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Sample records for acquired heterosubtypic antibodies

  1. Prevalence and predictors for homo- and heterosubtypic antibodies against influenza a virus.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Ines; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Bianchi, Matteo; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Steck, Marco; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F; Hangartner, Lars

    2014-11-15

    The effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccination has been confirmed in several studies. To date, it is not known whether repeated exposure and vaccination to influenza promote production of cross-reactive antibodies. Furthermore, how strains encountered earlier in life imprint the immune response is currently poorly understood. To determine the prevalence for human homo- and heterosubtypic antibody responses, we scrutinized serum samples from 305 healthy volunteers for hemagglutinin-binding and -neutralizing antibodies against several strains and subtypes of influenza A. Statistical analyses were then performed to establish the association of measured values with potential predictors. It was found that vaccination not only promoted higher binding and neutralizing antibody titers to homosubtypic influenza isolates but also increased heterosubtypic human immune responses. Both binding and neutralizing antibody titers in relation with age of the donors mirrored the course of the different influenza strain circulation during the last century. Advanced age appeared to be of advantage for both binding and neutralizing titers to most subtypes. In contrast, the first virus subtype encountered was found to imprint to some degree subsequent antibody responses. Antibodies to recent strains, however, primarily seemed to be promoted by vaccination. We provide evidence that vaccinations stimulate both homo- and heterosubtypic immune responses in young and middle-aged as well as more senior individuals. Our analyses suggest that influenza vaccinations not only prevent infection against currently circulating strains but can also stimulate broader humoral immune responses that potentially attenuate infections with zoonotic or antigenically shifted strains. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Alternative Recognition of the Conserved Stem Epitope in Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin by a VH3-30-Encoded Heterosubtypic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A human monoclonal heterosubtypic antibody, MAb 3.1, with its heavy chain encoded by VH3-30, was isolated using phage display with immobilized hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus A/Japan/305/1957(H2N2) as the target. Antibody 3.1 potently neutralizes influenza viruses from the H1a clade (i.e., H1, H2, H5, H6) but has little neutralizing activity against the H1b clade. Its crystal structure in complex with HA from a pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1), revealed that like other heterosubtypic anti-influenza virus antibodies, MAb 3.1 contacts a hydrophobic groove in the HA stem, primarily using its heavy chain. However, in contrast to the closely related monoclonal antibody (Mab) FI6 that relies heavily on HCDR3 for binding, MAb 3.1 utilizes residues from HCDR1, HCDR3, and framework region 3 (FR3). Interestingly, HCDR1 of MAb 3.1 adopts an α-helical conformation and engages in hydrophobic interactions with the HA very similar to those of the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic protein HB36.3. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular requirements for binding to the conserved epitope in the stem of the HA protein and, therefore, aid the development of more universal influenza vaccines targeting these epitopes. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses rapidly evade preexisting immunity by constantly altering the immunodominant neutralizing antibody epitopes (antigenic drift) or by acquiring new envelope serotypes (antigenic shift). As a consequence, the majority of antibodies elicited by immunization or infection protect only against the immunizing or closely related strains. Here, we describe a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes the conserved heterosubtypic epitope in the stem of influenza A virus hemagglutinin. This antibody, referred to as MAb 3.1, recognizes its epitope in a manner that resembles recognition of a similar epitope by the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic

  3. Multi-Dimensional Measurement of Antibody-Mediated Heterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiong; Hilchey, Shannon P.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Huertas, Nelson; Perry, Sheldon; Ramanunninair, Manojkumar; Bucher, Doris; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    The human immune response to influenza vaccination depends in part on preexisting cross-reactive (heterosubtypic) immunity from previous infection by, and/or vaccination with, influenza strains that share antigenic determinants with the vaccine strains. However, current methods for assessing heterosubtypic antibody responses against influenza, including the hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) assay and ELISA, are time and labor intensive, and require moderate amounts of serum and reagents. To address these issues we have developed a fluorescent multiplex assay, mPlex-Flu, that rapidly and simultaneously measures strain specific IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from multiple viral strains. We cloned, expressed and purified HA proteins from 12 influenza strains, and coupled them to multiplex beads. Assay validation showed that minimal sample volumes (<5 μl of serum) were needed, and the assay had a linear response over a four Log10 range. The assay detected nanogram levels of anti-influenza specific antibodies, had high accuracy and reproducibility, with an average percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) of 9.06 for intra-assay and 12.94 for inter-assay variability. Pre- and post-intramuscular trivalent influenza vaccination levels of virus specific Ig were consistent with HAI titer and ELISA measurements. A significant advantage of the mPLEX-Flu assay over the HAI assay is the ability to perform antigenic cartography, determining the antigenic distances between influenza HA’s, without mathematical correction for HAI data issues. For validation we performed antigenic cartography on 14 different post-influenza infection ferret sera assayed against 12 different influenza HA’s. Results were in good agreement with a phylogenetic tree generated from hierarchical clustering of the genomic HA sequences. This is the first report of the use of a multiplex method for antigenic cartography using ferret sera. Overall, the mPlex-Flu assay

  4. Molecular signatures of hemagglutinin stem-directed heterosubtypic human neutralizing antibodies against influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Avnir, Yuval; Tallarico, Aimee S; Zhu, Quan; Bennett, Andrew S; Connelly, Gene; Sheehan, Jared; Sui, Jianhua; Fahmy, Amr; Huang, Chiung-yu; Cadwell, Greg; Bankston, Laurie A; McGuire, Andrew T; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Wagner, Gerhard; Liddington, Robert C; Marasco, Wayne A

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown high usage of the IGHV1-69 germline immunoglobulin gene for influenza hemagglutinin stem-directed broadly-neutralizing antibodies (HV1-69-sBnAbs). Here we show that a major structural solution for these HV1-69-sBnAbs is achieved through a critical triad comprising two CDR-H2 loop anchor residues (a hydrophobic residue at position 53 (Ile or Met) and Phe54), and CDR-H3-Tyr at positions 98±1; together with distinctive V-segment CDR amino acid substitutions that occur in positions sparse in AID/polymerase-η recognition motifs. A semi-synthetic IGHV1-69 phage-display library screen designed to investigate AID/polη restrictions resulted in the isolation of HV1-69-sBnAbs that featured a distinctive Ile52Ser mutation in the CDR-H2 loop, a universal CDR-H3 Tyr at position 98 or 99, and required as little as two additional substitutions for heterosubtypic neutralizing activity. The functional importance of the Ile52Ser mutation was confirmed by mutagenesis and by BCR studies. Structural modeling suggests that substitution of a small amino acid at position 52 (or 52a) facilitates the insertion of CDR-H2 Phe54 and CDR-H3-Tyr into adjacent pockets on the stem. These results support the concept that activation and expansion of a defined subset of IGHV1-69-encoded B cells to produce potent HV1-69-sBnAbs does not necessarily require a heavily diversified V-segment acquired through recycling/reentry into the germinal center; rather, the incorporation of distinctive amino acid substitutions by Phase 2 long-patch error-prone repair of AID-induced mutations or by random non-AID SHM events may be sufficient. We propose that these routes of B cell maturation should be further investigated and exploited as a pathway for HV1-69-sBnAb elicitation by vaccination.

  5. Heterosubtypic antiviral activity of hemagglutinin-specific antibodies induced by intranasal immunization with inactivated influenza viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Mieko; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kajihara, Masahiro; Maruyama, Junki; Kimura, Takashi; Manzoor, Rashid; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1-H17) and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1-H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses.

  6. Heterosubtypic Antiviral Activity of Hemagglutinin-Specific Antibodies Induced by Intranasal Immunization with Inactivated Influenza Viruses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Mieko; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kajihara, Masahiro; Maruyama, Junki; Kimura, Takashi; Manzoor, Rashid; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1–H17) and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1–H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses. PMID:23977065

  7. Cooperativity Between CD8+ T Cells, Non-Neutralizing Antibodies, and Alveolar Macrophages Is Important for Heterosubtypic Influenza Virus Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J.; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Abt, Michael C.; Wolf, Amaya I.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential “universal” vaccine. PMID:23516357

  8. Heterosubtypic Antibodies to Influenza A Virus Have Limited Activity against Cell-Bound Virus but Are Not Impaired by Strain-Specific Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Bianchi, Matteo; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of influenza virus-specific antibodies elicited by vaccination or natural infection are effective only against the eliciting or closely related viruses. Rare stem-specific heterosubtypic monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) can neutralize multiple strains and subtypes by preventing hemagglutinin (HA)-mediated fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane. The epitopes recognized by these hMAbs are therefore considered promising targets for the development of pan-influenza virus vaccines. Here, we report the isolation of a novel human HA stem-reactive monoclonal antibody, hMAb 1.12, with exceptionally broad neutralizing activity encompassing viruses from 15 distinct HA subtypes. Using MAb 1.12 and two other monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that neutralization by hMAbs is virtually irreversible but becomes severely impaired following virus attachment to cells. In contrast, no interference by human anti-influenza virus serum antibodies was found, indicating that apically binding antibodies do not impair access to the membrane-proximal heterosubtypic epitopes. Our findings therefore encourage development of new vaccine concepts aiming at the induction of stem-specific heterosubtypic antibodies, as we provide support for their effectiveness in individuals previously exposed to influenza virus. IMPORTANCE The influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) can easily accommodate changes in its antigenic structures to escape preexisting immunity. This variability restricts the breadth and long-term efficacy of influenza vaccines. Only a few heterosubtypic antibodies (hMAbs), i.e., antibodies that can neutralize more than one subtype of influenza A virus, have been identified. The molecular interactions between these heterosubtypic antibodies and hemagglutinin are well characterized, yet little is known about the functional properties of these antibodies. Using a new, extraordinarily broad hMAb, we show that virus neutralization by hMAbs is virtually

  9. Heterosubtypic anti-avian H5N1 influenza antibodies in intravenous immunoglobulins from globally separate populations protect against H5N1 infection in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, John S; Selleck, Paul W; Downton, Teena; Boehm, Ingrid; Axell, Anna-Maree; Ayob, Yasmin; Kapitza, Natalie M; Dyer, Wayne; Fitzgerald, Anna; Walsh, Bradley; Lynch, Garry W

    2009-01-01

    With antigenically novel epidemic and pandemic influenza strains persistently on the horizon it is of fundamental importance that we understand whether heterosubtypic antibodies gained from exposures to circulating human influenzas exist and can protect against emerging novel strains. Our studies of IVIG obtained from an infection-naive population (Australian) enabled us to reveal heterosubtypic influenza antibodies that cross react with H5N1. We now expand those findings for an Australian donor population to include IVIG formulations from a variety of northern hemisphere populations. Examination of IVIGs from European and South East-Asian (Malaysian) blood donor populations further reveal heterosubtypic antibodies to H5N1 in humans from different global regions. Importantly these protect against highly pathogenic avian H5N1 infection in vitro, albeit at low titres of inhibition. Although there were qualitative and quantitative differences in binding and protection between globally different formulations, the heterosubtypic antibody activities for the respective IVIGs were in general quite similar. Of particular note because of the relative geographic proximity to the epicentre of H5N1 and the majority of human infections, was the similarity in the antibody binding responses between IVIGs from the Malayan peninsula, Europe and Australia. These findings highlight the value of employing IVIGs for the study of herd immunity, and particularly heterosubtypic antibody responses to viral antigens such as those conserved between circulating human influenzas and emerging influenza strains such as H5N1. They also open a window into a somewhat ill defined arena of antibody immunity, namely heterosubtypic immunity. PMID:20076794

  10. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  11. Competition between influenza A virus subtypes through heterosubtypic immunity modulates re-infection and antibody dynamics in the mallard duck.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Brown, Justin D; Fojtik, Alinde; Poulson, Rebecca L; Carter, Deborah; Franca, Monique; Stallknecht, David E

    2017-06-01

    Our overall hypothesis is that host population immunity directed at multiple antigens will influence the prevalence, diversity and evolution of influenza A virus (IAV) in avian populations where the vast subtype diversity is maintained. To investigate how initial infection influences the outcome of later infections with homologous or heterologous IAV subtypes and how viruses interact through host immune responses, we carried out experimental infections in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards were pre-challenged with an H3N8 low-pathogenic IAV and were divided into six groups. At five weeks post H3N8 inoculation, each group was challenged with a different IAV subtype (H4N5, H10N7, H6N2, H12N5) or the same H3N8. Two additional pre-challenged groups were inoculated with the homologous H3N8 virus at weeks 11 and 15 after pre-challenge to evaluate the duration of protection. The results showed that mallards were still resistant to re-infection after 15 weeks. There was a significant reduction in shedding for all pre-challenged groups compared to controls and the outcome of the heterologous challenges varied according to hemagglutinin (HA) phylogenetic relatedness between the viruses used. There was a boost in the H3 antibody titer after re-infection with H4N5, which is consistent with original antigenic sin or antigenic seniority and suggest a putative strategy of virus evasion. These results imply competition between related subtypes that could regulate IAV subtype population dynamics in nature. Collectively, we provide new insights into within-host IAV complex interactions as drivers of IAV antigenic diversity that could allow the circulation of multiple subtypes in wild ducks.

  12. The role of MyD88 signaling in heterosubtypic influenza A virus infections.

    PubMed

    Madera, Rachel F; Libraty, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of heterosubtypic influenza A virus infections was used to determine the role of MyD88 signaling in CD4+ T-cell, CD8+ T-cell, and IgG immune responses. We found that MyD88 signaling played an important role in anti-influenza A virus heterosubtypic lung and spleen CD4+ T-cell, and spleen CD8+ T-cell, immune responses. MyD88 dependent signaling was important for T-helper 1 cytokine production in anti-influenza A virus lung and spleen heterosubtypic CD4+ T-cells, but not for their frequencies. Toll-like receptor 7 dependent signaling played a partial role in anti-influenza A virus lung heterosubtypic CD4+ T-helper 1 responses and anti-influenza A virus heterosubtypic IgG2c antibody levels. Our results have important implications for the generation of effective universal influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of MyD88 Signaling in Heterosubtypic Influenza A Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Rachel F.; Libraty, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of heterosubtypic influenza A virus infections was used to determine the role of MyD88 signaling in CD4+ T-cell, CD8+ T-cell, and IgG immune responses. We found that MyD88 signaling played an important role in anti-influenza A virus heterosubtypic lung and spleen CD4+ T-cell, and spleen CD8+ T-cell, immune responses. MyD88 dependent signaling was important for T-helper 1 cytokine production in anti-influenza A virus lung and spleen heterosubtypic CD4+ T-cells, but not for their frequencies. Toll-like receptor 7 dependent signaling played a partial role in anti-influenza A virus lung heterosubtypic CD4+ T-helper 1 responses and anti-influenza A virus heterosubtypic IgG2c antibody levels. Our results have important implications for the generation of effective universal influenza vaccines. PMID:23238076

  14. Naturally acquired antibodies against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin in goats.

    PubMed

    Veschi, Josir Laine A; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Losada-Eaton, Daniela M; Dutra, Iveraldo S; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2008-09-15

    Clostridium perfringens type D-producing epsilon toxin is a common cause of death in sheep and goats worldwide. Although anti-epsilon toxin serum antibodies have been detected in healthy non-vaccinated sheep, the information regarding naturally acquired antibodies in ruminants is scanty. The objective of the present report was to characterize the development of naturally acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin in goats. The levels of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies in blood serum of goat kids from two different herds were examined continuously for 14 months. Goats were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease and received heterologous colostrums from cows that were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease. During the survey one of these flocks suffered an unexpectedly severe C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia outbreak. The results showed that natural acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin can appear as early as 6 weeks in young goats and increase with the age without evidence of clinical disease. The enterotoxemia outbreak was coincident with a significant increase in the level of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies.

  15. A Non-VH1-69 Heterosubtypic Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Mice against H1N1 and H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Moreno, Guisella J.; Sun, Xiangjie; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Mishin, Vasiliy; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are among the most important human pathogens and are responsible for annual epidemics and sporadic, potentially devastating pandemics. The humoral immune response plays an important role in the defense against these viruses, providing protection mainly by producing antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. However, their high genetic variability allows the virus to evade the host immune response and the potential protection offered by seasonal vaccines. The emergence of resistance to antiviral drugs in recent years further limits the options available for the control of influenza. The development of alternative strategies for influenza prophylaxis and therapy is therefore urgently needed. In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (PN-SIA49) that recognizes a highly conserved epitope located on the stem region of the HA and able to neutralize a broad spectrum of influenza viruses belonging to different subtypes (H1, H2 and H5). Furthermore, we describe its protective activity in mice after lethal challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses suggesting a potential application in the treatment of influenza virus infections. PMID:22496802

  16. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  17. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-07

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood.

  18. Immunogenicity of bioactive magnetic nanoparticles: natural and acquired antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Ofra; Avtalion, Ramy R; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-06-15

    Uniform magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were prepared by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films onto porcine gelatin nuclei. The formed gelatin containing MNP (Gel-MNP) were then coated with dextran (Gel-MNP-Dex) followed by human serum albumin (Gel-MNP-Dex-HSA). Since these MNP are designated for clinical applications, studies concerning the immunogenicity of their antigenic components (porcine gelatin, dextran, and HSA) have been performed in BALB-C mice. These studies demonstrated that plasma of nonimmunized mice already contains basal levels of natural antibodies against all of these antigenic components. This work also demonstrated that the conjugated gelatin is a weak immunogen: Intraperitoneal injection of the various MNP (Gel-MNP, Gel-MNP-Dex dispersed in PBS emulsified with Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA) mineral oil and Gel-MNP-Dex-HSA dispersed in PBS) did not increase significantly the acquired anti-gelatin antibody titers. Exceptional behavior was observed following immunization with Gel-MNP-Dex-HSA dispersed in PBS emulsified with IFA, which exhibited an adjuvant effect and turned gelatin into a stronger immunogen. In contrast to gelatin, the conjugated HSA and dextran were found to be strong immunogens. The possibility that the various MNP will not induce an autoimmune response as a result of their clinical use is discussed in the contest of the protective role of the natural antibodies.

  19. Homosubtypic and heterosubtypic antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 recombinant proteins in H5N1 survivors and non-H5N1 subjects.

    PubMed

    Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Pooruk, Phisanu; Prasertsopon, Jarunee; Assanasen, Susan; Kitphati, Rungrueng; Auewarakul, Prasert; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2014-04-01

    Six recombinant vaccinia viruses containing HA, NA, NP, M or NS gene insert derived from a highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus, and the recombinant vaccinia virus harboring plasmid backbone as the virus control were constructed. The recombinant proteins were characterized for their expression and subcellular locations in TK(-) cells. Antibodies to the five recombinant proteins were detected in all 13 sequential serum samples collected from four H5N1 survivors during four years of follow-up; and those directed to rVac-H5 HA and rVac-NA proteins were found in higher titers than those directed to the internal proteins as revealed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Although all 28 non-H5N1 subjects had no neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 virus, they did have cross-reactive antibodies to those five recombinant proteins. A significant increase in cross-reactive antibody titer to rVac-H5 HA and rVac-NA was found in paired blood samples from patients infected with the 2009 pandemic virus.

  20. Heterosubtypic immunity to influenza mediated by liposome adjuvanted H5N1 recombinant protein vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Maneewatch, Santi; Srimanote, Potjanee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Tapchaisri, Pramuan; Sookrung, Nitat; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Channarong, Sunee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2010-09-24

    A non-egg, non-culture based influenza vaccine that intervenes large influenza outbreaks and protects against heterosubtypic infections is needed. Candidates of such vaccine are likely to be conserved influenza virus proteins or their coding DNA. The vaccine must be conveniently produced at reasonable cost, safe, highly immunogenic and should be able to recall rapidly the immunological memory upon the antigenic re-exposure. In this study vaccines made of full length recombinant NP and M2 of the H5N1 influenza A virus were entrapped either alone or together into liposome (L) made of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. The vaccines (L-NP, L-M2 or L-NP+M2) and mocks (L or PBS) were safe without causing any adverse reaction in the intramuscularly injected mice. They were readily immunogenic at a single dose and a recalled response could be detected within one day post booster. Cytokine and antibody data indicated that the vaccines induced a Th1 bias immune response. NP containing vaccines stimulated a marked increase of cytotoxic lymphocytes, i.e., CD8(+), intracellular IFNγ(+) cells, while M2 containing vaccines elicited good antibody response which neutralized infectivity of heterologous influenza viruses. Although the three vaccines elicited different immunological defense factors; nevertheless, they similarly and readily abrogated lung histopathology mediated by viruses belonging to different H5N1 clade/subclade and heterosubtypes including swine H1N1 and human H1N1/2009 viruses. They protected the vaccinated mice against lethal challenges with mouse adapted avian H5N1 virus. The liposome adjuvanted vaccines which demonstrated high protective efficacy in mice warrant testing further in a non-rodent model as well as in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel vaccination strategy mediating the induction of lung-resident memory CD8 T cells confers heterosubtypic immunity against future pandemic influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Min-Chul; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    The currently used vaccine strategy to combat influenza A virus (IAV) aims to provide highly specific immunity to circulating seasonal IAV strains. However, the outbreak of 2009 influenza pandemic highlights the danger in this strategy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that universal vaccination that offers broader but weaker protection would result in cross protective T-cell responses after primary IAV infection, which would subsequently provide protective immunity against future pandemic strains. Specifically, we used tandem repeat M2e epitopes on virus-like particles (M2e5x VLP) that induced heterosubtypic immunity by eliciting antibodies to a conserved M2e epitope. M2e5x VLP was found to be superior to strain-specific current split vaccine in conferring heterosubtypic cross protection and in equipping the host with cross-protective lung-resident nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8+ T cell responses to a subsequent secondary infection with a new pandemic potential strain. Immune correlates for subsequent heterosubtypic immunity by M2e5x VLP vaccination were found to be virus-specific CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and expressing lung-resident memory phenotypic markers CD69+ and CD103+ as well as M2e antibodies. Hence, vaccination with M2e5x VLP may be developable as a new strategy to combat future pandemic outbreaks. PMID:26864033

  2. Naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Good, Kyle M; Houser, Annmarie; Arntzen, Lorraine; Turnbull, Peter C B

    2008-07-01

    An outbreak of anthrax in the Jwana Game Reserve in Jwaneng, Botswana, was first observed when three cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) died of the disease in November 2004. In the aftermath of this event, banked serum samples collected from 23 wild-caught cheetahs were examined, by the inhibition enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), for antibodies to the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis. Of the 23 cheetahs, 16 regularly accessed the reserve. Antibodies to PA were detected in one cheetah collected in May 2004, indicating the disease was occurring well before it was first noticed. This appears to be the first demonstration of naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in cheetahs. The finding of one antibody-positive animal amongst at least 16 potentially exposed individuals is consistent with existing reports that it is uncommon for cheetahs to develop natural immunity to anthrax.

  3. [Prevalence of antitoxoplasma antibodies in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako].

    PubMed

    Maïga, I; Kiemtoré, P; Tounkara, A

    2001-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a cosmopolitan disease. Our aim was to evaluate the epidemiological importance of toxoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and blood donors in Bamako (Mali, West Africa). A one year study of toxoplasmosis prevalence was carried out among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako. The toxoplasmosis prevalence was 60% from AIDS patients, 22.6% from the HIV-seropositive blood donors and 21% from the HIV-seronegative blood donors. The specific antibodies were IgG and IgA. The specific IgM were not detected.

  4. Antibody Maturation in Women Who Acquire HIV Infection While Using Antiretroviral Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Redd, Andrew D; Nason, Martha; Longosz, Andrew F; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Naranbhai, Vivek; Garrett, Nigel; Eshleman, Susan H; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Quinn, Thomas C

    2015-09-01

    The CAPRISA 004 preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) randomized trial demonstrated that women who used a vaginal gel containing the antiretroviral drug tenofovir (TFV) had a 39% lower risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not known whether topical TFV alters the antibody response to breakthrough HIV infection. In this study, antibody maturation was evaluated using 3 serologic assays: the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (CEIA), the Bio-Plex (Luminex) assay, and the Bio-Rad avidity assay. Tests were performed using serum samples collected 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, and >48 months after seroconversion from 95 women in the CAPRISA 004 trial (35 in the TFV gel arm and 60 in the placebo arm). For the BED CEIA and Luminex assay, linear mixed effects models were used to examine test results by study arm. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to examine time to avidity cutoff. Anti-HIV antibody titers did not differ between study arms. Women assigned to TFV gel demonstrated slower antibody avidity maturation, as determined by the Bio-Rad (P = .04) and gp120 Bio-Plex (P = .028) assays. Women who were assigned to receive topical TFV but became infected had slower antibody avidity maturation, with potential implications for diagnosis and antibody-based incidence assays as access to antiretroviral therapy-based PrEP is increased.

  5. Naturally Acquired Human Immunity to Pneumococcus Is Dependent on Antibody to Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Jose, Ricardo J.; Marshall, Helina; de Vogel, Corné; Gordon, Stephen; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Baxendale, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is thought to be dependent on anti-capsular antibody. However nasopharyngeal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae also induces antibody to protein antigens that could be protective. We have used human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation (IVIG), representing natural IgG responses to S. pneumoniae, to identify the classes of antigens that are functionally relevant for immunity to IPD. IgG in IVIG recognised capsular antigen and multiple S. pneumoniae protein antigens, with highly conserved patterns between different geographical sources of pooled human IgG. Incubation of S. pneumoniae in IVIG resulted in IgG binding to the bacteria, formation of bacterial aggregates, and enhanced phagocytosis even for unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, demonstrating the capsule was unlikely to be the dominant protective antigen. IgG binding to S. pneumoniae incubated in IVIG was reduced after partial chemical or genetic removal of bacterial surface proteins, and increased against a Streptococcus mitis strain expressing the S. pneumoniae protein PspC. In contrast, depletion of type-specific capsular antibody from IVIG did not affect IgG binding, opsonophagocytosis, or protection by passive vaccination against IPD in murine models. These results demonstrate that naturally acquired protection against IPD largely depends on antibody to protein antigens rather than the capsule. PMID:28135322

  6. Prevalance of antibodies to 15 antigens of Legionellaceae in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, M.; Kurtz, J. B.; Selkon, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Sera from 252 patients with community-acquired pneumonia were examined for the presence of antibodies to 15 antigens of 7 Legionella spp. by indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing. The sera had been collected as part of the British Thoracic Society/Public Health Laboratory Service study of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. We also examined sera from 20 patients with gram-negative sepsis. Using a limited range of antigens of L. pneumophila, nine cases of legionellosis were diagnosed in the original study. However, using antigens to other Legionella spp., we identified two further cases, caused by L. micdadei and L. gormanii respectively. Twenty-six other patients had titres of 16 or 32 to one or more antigens, most commonly L. bozemanii serogroup 1, L. micdadei and L. dumoffi. None of the patients with non-legionella pneumonia, however, had significant changes in legionella antibody titres. All of the patients with Gram-negative sepsis had titres of less than 16. PMID:2407543

  7. First Experimental In Vivo Model of Enhanced Dengue Disease Severity through Maternally Acquired Heterotypic Dengue Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Zhang, Summer Lixin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Yan, Benedict; Maria Martinez Gomez, Julia; Tan, Wei Yu; Lam, Jian Hang; Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) represents the most serious arthropod-borne viral disease. DEN clinical manifestations range from mild febrile illness to life-threatening hemorrhage and vascular leakage. Early epidemiological observations reported that infants born to DEN-immune mothers were at greater risk to develop the severe forms of the disease upon infection with any serotype of dengue virus (DENV). From these observations emerged the hypothesis of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease severity, whereby maternally acquired anti-DENV antibodies cross-react but fail to neutralize DENV particles, resulting in higher viremia that correlates with increased disease severity. Although in vitro and in vivo experimental set ups have indirectly supported the ADE hypothesis, direct experimental evidence has been missing. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study has challenged the influence of maternal antibodies in disease outcome. Here we have developed a mouse model of ADE where DENV2 infection of young mice born to DENV1-immune mothers led to earlier death which correlated with higher viremia and increased vascular leakage compared to DENV2-infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers. In this ADE model we demonstrated the role of TNF-α in DEN-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, upon infection with an attenuated DENV2 mutant strain, mice born to DENV1-immune mothers developed lethal disease accompanied by vascular leakage whereas infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers did no display any clinical manifestation. In vitro ELISA and ADE assays confirmed the cross-reactive and enhancing properties towards DENV2 of the serum from mice born to DENV1-immune mothers. Lastly, age-dependent susceptibility to disease enhancement was observed in mice born to DENV1-immune mothers, thus reproducing epidemiological observations. Overall, this work provides direct in vivo demonstration of the role of maternally acquired heterotypic dengue antibodies in the enhancement of dengue

  8. Annual influenza vaccination affects the development of heterosubtypic immunity.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, Rogier; Fraaij, Pieter L A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2012-12-07

    Annual vaccination of healthy children >6 months of age against seasonal influenza has been recommended by public health authorities of some countries. However, currently used seasonal vaccines provide only limited protection against (potentially) pandemic influenza viruses. Furthermore, we recently hypothesized that annual vaccination may hamper the development of cross-reactive immunity against influenza A viruses of novel subtypes, that would otherwise be induced by natural infection. Here we summarize our findings in animal models in which we demonstrated that vaccination against influenza A/H3N2 virus reduced the induction of heterosubtypic immunity against highly pathogenic avian influenza A/H5N1 virus, otherwise induced by a prior infection with influenza A/H3N2 virus. The reduction of heterosubtypic immunity correlated with reduced virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. An additional study was performed in humans, in which we collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from annually vaccinated children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age-matched unvaccinated healthy control children to study the virus-specific T cell response. An age-related increase of the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response was observed in unvaccinated children that was absent in vaccinated children with CF. These findings highlight the importance of the development of vaccines that provide protection against influenza A viruses of all subtypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Combating acquired resistance to trastuzumab by an anti-ErbB2 fully human antibody

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yanchun; Wang, Huajing; Yang, Yang; Gao, Jie; Wei, Huafeng; Zhao, Jian; Lu, Cuihua; Chen, Han; Sun, Yanping; Li, Bohua

    2017-01-01

    Trastuzumab resistance is a common problem that impedes the effectiveness of trastuzumab in ErbB2-amplified cancers. About 70% of ErbB2-amplified breast cancers do not respond to trastuzumab (de novo resistance), and the majority of the trastuzumab-responsive cancers progress within 1 year (acquired resistance). Different mechanisms exist between de novo and acquired resistance. Innate resistance mechanisms are mainly independent of ErbB2 receptor activity, and acquired resistance involves with alterations depending on ErbB2 activity. We previously reported H2-18, an ErbB2 domain I-specific antibody, which could circumvent de novo resistance to trastuzumab. Here, we modeled the development of acquired resistance by treating human gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87 with trastuzumab to obtain the trastuzumab-resistant subline, NCI-N87-TraRT. Next, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of H2-18 in NCI-N87-TraRT cell line. H2-18 exhibited a significantly greater antitumor activity in NCI-N87-TraRT tumor-bearing nude mice than pertuzumab and trastuzumab, either alone or in combination. The unique ability of H2-18 to overcome acquired resistance may be attributable to its potent programmed cell death-inducing activity, which was probably mediated by RIP1-ROS-JNK-c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, H2-18 may have the potential as an effective agent to circumvent acquired resistance to trastuzumab in ErbB2-overexpressing cancers. PMID:28514745

  10. A blocking ELISA with improved sensitivity for the detection of passively acquired maternal antibodies to BHV-1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Ju; Entz, Susan C.; Green, G. Tom; Jordan, Lorne T.

    2002-01-01

    Four serological tests were evaluated for their ability to detect passively acquired maternal antibodies to Bovine herpesvirus 1. A blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated superior sensitivity in the detection of such antibodies in calves up to 9–11 months old, versus calves up to 7 months old for other tests. PMID:11802669

  11. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  12. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Afsar, Md. Nure Alam; Huda, M. Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7–9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  13. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-02

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy.

  14. Antibody Responses and Avidity of Naturally Acquired Anti-Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) Antibodies in Individuals from an Area with Unstable Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Sedigheh; Babaeekhou, Laleh; Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Abbasi, Maryam; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax remains an important cause of morbidity outside Africa, and no effective vaccine is available against this parasite. The P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) is essential during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes, and it is a target for protective immunity against malaria. This investigation was designed to evaluate naturally acquired antibodies to two variant forms of PvDBP-II antigen (DBP-I and -VI) in malaria individuals (N = 85; median = 22 years) who were living in hypoendemic areas in Iran. The two PvDBP-II variants were expressed in Escherichia coli, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype composition and avidity of naturally acquired antibodies to these antigens were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that almost 32% of the studied individuals had positive antibody responses to the two PvDBP-II variants, and the prevalence of responders did not differ significantly (P > 0.05; χ2 test). The IgG-positive samples exhibited 37.03% and 40.8% high-avidity antibodies for PvDBP-I and PvDBP-VI variants, respectively. Furthermore, high-avidity IgG1 antibody was found in 39.1% of positive sera for each examined variant antigen. The avidity of antibodies for both PvDBP variant antigens and the prevalence of responders with high- and intermediate-avidity IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 antibodies were similar in patients (P > 0.05; χ2 test). Moreover, the prevalence of IgG antibody responses to the two variants significantly increased with exposure and host age. To sum up, the results provided additional data in our understanding of blood-stage immunity to PvDBP, supporting the rational development of an effective blood-stage vaccine based on this antigen. PMID:21633032

  15. Adaptive heterosubtypic immunity to low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in experimentally infected mallards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mallards are widely recognized as reservoirs for Influenza A viruses (IAV), however host factors that might prompt seasonality and trends in subtype diversity of IAV such as adaptive heterosubtypic immunity (HSI) are not well understood. We inoculated mallards with a prevailing H3N8 low pathogenic a...

  16. Immunity to malaria and naturally acquired antibodies to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S L; Wistar, R; Ballou, W R; Hollingdale, M R; Wirtz, R A; Schneider, I; Marwoto, H A; Hockmeyer, W T

    1986-09-04

    A candidate Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite vaccine, R32tet32, which includes 32 tetrapeptide repeats derived from the circumsporozoite protein of P. falciparum, has been developed on the basis of the hypothesis that antibodies to the repeat region of this protein will protect against sporozoite infection. The results of two in vitro assays, the circumsporozoite precipitation reaction and the inhibition of sporozoite invasion into hepatoma cells, are thought to indicate protective immunity. We therefore tested serum samples from persons living in a hyperendemic malarious area of Indonesia for antibodies against R32tet32 and for their ability to produce circumsporozoite precipitation and to inhibit sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells. The prevalence and mean titer of antibody against R32tet32 increased with the age of the subjects, whereas the prevalence of P. falciparum infection in the community decreased. Only serum samples with IgG or IgM R32tet32 antibody titers greater than or equal to 1/800 had precipitation activity and invasion-inhibiting activity of more than 75 percent. When the serum samples were fractionated by affinity chromatography, only the fractions containing purified human antibody to R32tet32 were found to contain this activity. These data support the hypotheses that antibodies to the circumsporozoite protein are important in reducing the prevalence of malaria with increasing age among persons in areas in which malaria is endemic and that vaccine-elicited antibody to the circumsporozoite repeat region will protect against infection with P. falciparum sporozoites.

  17. A Tat-grafted anti-nucleic acid antibody acquires nuclear-localization property and a preference for TAR RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jong-Geun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} We generate '{sub H3}Tat-3D8' by grafting Tat{sub 48-60} peptide to VH CDR of 3D8 scFv antibody. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 antibody retains nucleic acid binding and hydrolyzing activities. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 acquires a preference for TAR RNA structure. {yields} Properties of Tat{sub 48-60} is transferred to an antibody via Tat-grafting into a CDR. -- Abstract: The 3D8 single chain variable fragment (3D8 scFv) is an anti-nucleic acid antibody that can hydrolyze nucleic acids and enter the cytosol of cells without reaching the nucleus. The Tat peptide, derived from the basic region of the HIV-1 Tat protein, translocates to cell nuclei and has TAR RNA binding activity. In this study, we generated a Tat-grafted antibody ({sub H3}Tat-3D8) by replacing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) within the VH domain of the 3D8 scFv with a Tat{sub 48-60} peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ). {sub H3}Tat-3D8 retained the DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity of the scFv, and translocated to the nuclei of HeLa cells and preferentially recognized TAR RNA. Thus, the properties associated with the Tat peptide were transferred to the antibody via Tat-grafting without loss of the intrinsic DNA-binding and hydrolyzing activities of the 3D8 scFv antibody.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy study of a factor VIII ELISA for detection of factor VIII antibodies in congenital and acquired haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Batty, Paul; Moore, Gary W; Platton, Sean; Maloney, James C; Palmer, Ben; Bowles, Louise; Pasi, K John; Rangarajan, Savita; Hart, Daniel P

    2015-10-01

    Antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) remains the greatest clinical and diagnostic challenge to the haemophilia-treating physician. Current guidance for testing for inhibitory FVIII antibodies (inhibitors) recommends the functional Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA). A FVIII ELISA offers a complementary, immunological approach for FVIII antibody testing. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively evaluate the performance of a FVIII ELISA (index) for detection of FVIII antibodies, compared with the NBA (reference). All samples sent for routine FVIII antibody testing at two haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, were tested in parallel using the NBA and a solid-phase, indirect FVIII ELISA kit (Immucor). A total of 497 samples from 239 patients (severe haemophilia A=140, non-severe haemophilia A=85, acquired haemophilia A=14) were available for analysis. Sixty-three samples tested positive by the NBA (prevalence 12.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.9-15.9 %), with a median inhibitor titre of 1.2 BU/ml (range 0.7-978.0). The FVIII ELISA demonstrated a specificity of 94.0% (95%CI, 91.3-96.0), sensitivity of 77.8% (95%CI, 65.5-87.3), negative predictive value of 96.7% (95%CI, 94.5-98.2), positive predictive value 65.3% (95%CI, 53.5-76.0), negative likelihood ratio 0.2 (95%CI, 0.1-0.4), positive likelihood ratio 13.0 (95%CI, 8.7-19.3) and a diagnostic odds ratio of 54.9 (95%CI, 27.0-112.0). Strong positive correlation (r=0.77, p<0.001) was seen between the results of the NBA (log adjusted) and FVIII ELISA optical density. In conclusion, FVIII ELISA offers a simple, specific, surveillance method enabling batch testing of non-urgent samples for the presence of FVIII antibodies.

  19. Role of B Cells and Antibodies in Acquired Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Chan, John; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has documented a role for B cells and antibodies (Abs) in the immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Passive transfer studies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mycobacterial antigens have shown protection against the tubercle bacillus. B cells and Abs are believed to contribute to an enhanced immune response against Mtb by modulating various immunological components in the infected host including the T-cell compartment. Nevertheless, the extent and contribution of B cells and Abs to protection against Mtb remains uncertain. In this article we summarize the most relevant findings supporting the role of B cells and Abs in the defense against Mtb and discuss the potential mechanisms of protection. PMID:25301934

  20. Antibody response of HIV-infected patients to latent, cerebral and recently acquired toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Malý, M; Hrdá, S; Rozsypal, H; Stanková, M; Kodym, P

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study with 626 HIV-infected patients was to evaluate the capability of serological tests in diagnosing the presence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV-infected patients, as well as the potential impact of various treatment regimes on serological results. Low IgG antibody levels and stable or declining titres predominated. IgM positivity occurred in ten patients (one seroconversion, seven latent, two cerebral toxoplasmosis). Complement fixation test (CFT) titres >or=1:32 imply that the relative risk of cerebral toxoplasmosis is 6.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-32.5) but with a predictive value of only 14.0% (95% CI 5.3-27.9). Values of specific antibodies are not biassed by antiretroviral treatment and/or prophylaxis for toxoplasmosis, and the detection of specific antibodies is very useful in the identification of T. gondii infection in the HIV-infected population, but the role of serology in predicting the clinical manifestation of T. gondii infection is limited.

  1. Naturally acquired antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum describes heterogeneity in transmission on islands in Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zulkarnain Md; Chan, Chim W; Kongere, James; Hall, Tom; Logedi, John; Gitaka, Jesse; Drakeley, Chris; Kaneko, Akira

    2017-08-22

    As markers of exposure anti-malaria antibody responses can help characterise heterogeneity in malaria transmission. In the present study antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1, MSP-119 and CSP were measured with the aim to describe transmission patterns in meso-endemic settings in Lake Victoria. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in Lake Victoria in January and August 2012. The study area comprised of three settings: mainland (Ungoye), large island (Mfangano) and small islands (Takawiri, Kibuogi, Ngodhe). Individuals provided a finger-blood sample to assess malaria infection by microscopy and PCR. Antibody response to P. falciparum was determined in 4,112 individuals by ELISA using eluted dried blood from filter paper. The overall seroprevalence was 64.0% for AMA-1, 39.5% for MSP-119, and 12.9% for CSP. Between settings, seroprevalences for merozoite antigens were similar between Ungoye and Mfangano, but higher when compared to the small islands. For AMA-1, the seroconversion rates (SCRs) ranged from 0.121 (Ngodhe) to 0.202 (Ungoye), and were strongly correlated to parasite prevalence. We observed heterogeneity in serological indices across study sites in Lake Victoria. These data suggest that AMA-1 and MSP-119 sero-epidemiological analysis may provide further evidence in assessing variation in malaria exposure and evaluating malaria control efforts in high endemic area.

  2. Predominance of heterosubtypic IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells in pandemic H1N1 naive adults

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya; Begom, Shaima; Bermingham, Alison; Ziegler, Thedi; Roberts, Kim L.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Openshaw, Peter; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    The 2009/10 pandemic (pH1N1) highlighted the need for vaccines conferring heterosubtypic immunity against antigenically shifted influenza strains. Although cross-reactive T cells are strong candidates for mediating heterosubtypic immunity, little is known about the population-level prevalence, frequency, and cytokine-secretion profile of heterosubtypic T cells to pH1N1. To assess this, pH1N1 sero-negative adults were recruited. Single-cell IFN-γ and IL-2 cytokine-secretion profiles to internal proteins of pH1N1 or live virus were enumerated and characterised. Heterosubtypic T cells recognising pH1N1 core proteins were widely prevalent, being detected in 90% (30 of 33) of pH1N1-näive individuals. Although the last exposure to influenza was greater than 6 months ago, the frequency and proportion of the IFN-γ-only-secreting T-cell subset was significantly higher than the IL-2-only-secreting subset. CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting heterosubtypic T cells were predominantly CCR7−CD45RA− effector-memory phenotype, expressing the tissue-homing receptor CXCR3 and degranulation marker CD107. Receipt of the 2008–09 influenza vaccine did not alter the frequency of these heterosubtypic T cells, highlighting the inability of current vaccines to maintain this heterosubtypic T-cell pool. The surprisingly high prevalence of pre-existing circulating pH1N1-specific CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells with cytotoxic and lung-homing potential in pH1N1-seronegative adults may partly explain the low case fatality rate despite high rates of infection of the pandemic in young adults. PMID:22777887

  3. Adaptive Heterosubtypic Immunity to Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Experimentally Infected Mallards

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Karen M.; Stallknecht, David E.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Stabler, Lisa; Berghaus, Roy D.; Fotjik, Alinde; Latorre-Margalef, Neus; França, Monique S.

    2017-01-01

    Mallards are widely recognized as reservoirs for Influenza A viruses (IAV); however, host factors that might prompt seasonality and trends in subtype diversity of IAV such as adaptive heterosubtypic immunity (HSI) are not well understood. To investigate this, we inoculated mallards with a prevailing H3N8 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) subtype in waterfowl to determine if prior infection with this virus would be protective against heterosubtypic infections with the H4N6, H10N7 and H14N5 LPAIV subtypes after one, two and three months, respectively. Also, we investigated the effect of cumulative immunity after sequential inoculation of mallards with these viruses in one-month intervals. Humoral immunity was assessed by microneutralization assays using a subset of representative LPAIV subtypes as antigens. Our results indicate that prior inoculation with the H3N8 virus confers partial protective immunity against subsequent heterosubtypic infections with the robustness of HSI related to the phylogenetic similarity of the HA protein of the strains used. Furthermore, induced HSI was boosted and followed by repeated exposure to more than one LPAIV subtype. Our findings provide further information on the contributions of HSI and its role in the dynamics of IAV subtype diversity in mallards. PMID:28107403

  4. Otitis-prone Children Have Immunologic Deficiencies in Naturally Acquired Nasopharyngeal Mucosal Antibody Response after Streptococcus pneumoniae Colonization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R; Newman, Emily; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common pediatric bacterial infection, and stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children have immunologic deficiencies. We recently found that nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) elicits a NP mucosal antibody response to vaccine candidate pneumococcal proteins that correlate with protection from AOM in non-sOP (NOP) children. Here, we sought to determine if sOP children experience significantly higher colonization rates with Spn than NOP children, develop lower naturally acquired NP mucosal antibody responses to those same pneumococcal proteins after colonization by Spn, and suffer greater frequency of AOM as a consequence. NP samples were collected from 130 NOP and 45 sOP children during 270 healthy visits and 201 AOM visits between 6 and 24 months of age. Spn were identified by standard culture. NP mucosal IgG and IgA levels to vaccine candidate proteins pneumococcal histidine triad protein D, pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA) and pneumolysin D1 were measured by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. sOP children had significantly higher colonization frequency by Spn (P < 0.0001) and significantly lower IgG and IgA levels to all 3 vaccine candidate proteins studied compared with NOP children (all P values <0.05) except IgG to Ply D1 (P = 0.31). Spn colonization in NOP children led to 2-fold to 5-fold increase in mucosal IgG and IgA levels to all 3 proteins (all P values <0.01), whereas Spn colonization in sOP children generally failed to elicit antibody responses (all P values >0.05). PcpA was unique in inducing significant increases in mucosal IgA (P = 0.02). When high mucosal IgG levels to all 3 proteins and IgA to PcpA were measured, they correlated with reduced AOM in sOP children. sOP children experience significantly higher colonization rates with Spn, develop lower naturally acquired NP mucosal antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccine candidate proteins pneumococcal

  5. Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines Expressing Multiple Conserved Influenza Antigens Confer Protection against Homologous and Heterosubtypic Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Magini, Diletta; Giovani, Cinzia; Mangiavacchi, Simona; Maccari, Silvia; Cecchi, Raffaella; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; De Gregorio, Ennio; Geall, Andrew J.; Brazzoli, Michela; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Current hemagglutinin (HA)-based seasonal influenza vaccines induce vaccine strain-specific neutralizing antibodies that usually fail to provide protection against mismatched circulating viruses. Inclusion in the vaccine of highly conserved internal proteins such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and the matrix protein 1 (M1) was shown previously to increase vaccine efficacy by eliciting cross-reactive T-cells. However, appropriate delivery systems are required for efficient priming of T-cell responses. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of novel self-amplifying mRNA (SAM®) vectors expressing influenza NP (SAM(NP)), M1 (SAM(M1)), and NP and M1 (SAM(M1-NP)) delivered with lipid nanoparticles (LNP) induced robust polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cells, while NP-containing SAM also induced cytotoxic CD8 T cells. Robust expansions of central memory (TCM) and effector memory (TEM) CD4 and CD8 T cells were also measured. An enhanced recruitment of NP-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells was observed in the lungs of SAM(NP)-immunized mice after influenza infection that paralleled with reduced lung viral titers and pathology, and increased survival after homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the co-administration of RNA (SAM(M1-NP)) and protein (monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIIV)) was feasible, induced simultaneously NP-, M1- and HA-specific T cells and HA-specific neutralizing antibodies, and enhanced MIIV efficacy against a heterologous challenge. In conclusion, systemic administration of SAM vectors expressing conserved internal influenza antigens induced protective immune responses in mice, supporting the SAM® platform as another promising strategy for the development of broad-spectrum universal influenza vaccines. PMID:27525409

  6. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura as an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus with acquired ADAMTS 13 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Changcharoen, Bhisit; Bolger, Dennis Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient presenting with headache, fatigue, ecchymoses and recent, excessive vaginal bleeding. Prompt review of the peripheral blood smear showed evidence of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange and corticosteroids were started urgently. The patient responded favourably to the treatment. Subsequently, positive serological markers returned and were compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs, member 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity was remarkably low with a positive inhibitory ADAMTS 13 antibody. Mycophenolate and hydroxychloroquine were started along with a prolonged course and taper of corticosteroids. These medications have been maintained with an excellent response in 14 months of follow-up. PMID:25701834

  7. Induction of antibody to asialo GM1 by spermatozoa and its occurrence in the sera of homosexual men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Sonnabend, J; Richards, J M; Purtilo, D T

    1983-01-01

    Compared to healthy homosexual and heterosexual men, homosexual men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) possessed significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to the neutral glycolipid asialo GM1 (ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide) (P less than 0.01). Of 31 homosexuals with AIDS, 36% possessed levels of this antibody that were at least two standard deviations above the mean of the healthy men. Furthermore, asialo GM1 antibody could be removed from serum by adsorption with spermatozoa. Weekly rectal insemination of male rabbits with rabbit semen also led to the appearance of antibody to asialo GM1 by 15 weeks. These results suggest that asialo GM1 is a component of ejaculated spermatozoa and demonstrate that rectal insemination by itself can lead to the production of antibodies to this glycolipid in the rabbit. In addition, asialo GM1 antibodies may be of value as a serological marker for the early detection of individuals with AIDS. PMID:6652964

  8. Naturally acquired antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in vultures of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, P C B; Diekmann, M; Kilian, J W; Versfeld, W; De Vos, V; Arntzen, L; Wolter, K; Bartels, P; Kotze, A

    2008-06-01

    Sera from 19 wild caught vultures in northern Namibia and 15 (12 wild caught and three captive bred but with minimal histories) in North West Province, South Africa, were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to the Bacillus anthracis toxin protective antigen (PA). As assessed from the baseline established with a control group of ten captive reared vultures with well-documented histories, elevated titres were found in 12 of the 19 (63%) wild caught Namibian birds as compared with none of the 15 South African ones. There was a highly significant difference between the Namibian group as a whole and the other groups (P < 0.001) and no significant difference between the South African and control groups (P > 0.05). Numbers in the Namibian group were too small to determine any significances in species-, sex- or age-related differences within the raw data showing elevated titres in four out of six Cape Vultures, Gyps coprotheres, six out of ten White-backed Vultures, Gyps africanus, and one out of three Lappet-faced Vultures, Aegypius tracheliotus, or in five of six males versus three of seven females, and ten of 15 adults versus one of four juveniles. The results are in line with the available data on the incidence of anthrax in northern Namibia and South Africa and the likely contact of the vultures tested with anthrax carcasses. It is not known whether elevated titre indicates infection per se in vultures or absorption of incompletely digested epitopes of the toxin or both. The results are discussed in relation to distances travelled by vultures as determined by new tracking techniques, how serology can reveal anthrax activity in an area and the issue of the role of vultures in transmission of anthrax.

  9. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68-90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease.

  10. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68–90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  11. Heterosubtypic T-Cell Immunity to Influenza in Humans: Challenges for Universal T-Cell Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza, although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the twenty-first century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protecting against a broad range of influenza strains. Such “universal” influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity, wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognizing conserved antigens are a key contributor in reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell-inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed. PMID:27242800

  12. Spontaneous reversal of acquired autoimmune dysfibrinogenemia probably due to an antiidiotypic antibody directed to an interspecies cross-reactive idiotype expressed on antifibrinogen antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    1988-01-01

    A young man with a long history of abnormal bleeding was seen in January 1985. Coagulation tests showed dysfibrinogenemia and an antifibrinogen autoantibody was demonstrable in his serum. This antibody, when purified, was capable of inhibiting the polymerization of normal fibrin monomers, apparently through binding to the alpha fibrinogen chain. 6 mo later the patient was asymptomatic, coagulation tests were normal, and the antifibrinogen autoantibody was barely detectable. At this time, affinity-purified autologous and rabbit antifibrinogen antibodies were capable of absorbing an IgG kappa antibody from the patient's serum, which reacted indistinctly with both autologous and xenogeneic antifibrinogen antibodies in enzyme immunoassays. It has been concluded that the patient's dysfibrinogenemia was the result of an antifibrinogen autoantibody, and that later on an anti-idiotype antibody, which binds an interspecies cross-reactive idiotype expressed on anti-human fibrinogen antibodies, inhibited the production of the antifibrinogen autoantibody which led to the remission of the disorder. Images PMID:3262127

  13. Antibody Contributes to Heterosubtypic Immunity In the Cotton Rat Model of Influenza

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-29

    of pathologic ndings were assessed for each sample as described above: eribronchiolitis, alveolitis , interstitial pneumonia, epithelial amage, and...airway debris/obstruction. Primary infection ith either A/PR8 (H1N1) or A/Wuhan (H3N2) virus led to ignificant alveolitis , interstitial pneumonia, and

  14. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  15. Effect of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on the Natural Antibodies and Antibody Responses Against Protein Antigens From Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in Children With Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dafne C; Borges, Igor C; Adrian, Peter V; Meinke, Andreas; Barral, Aldina; Ruuskanen, Olli; Käyhty, Helena; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are common causative agents of respiratory infections. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been introduced recently, but their effect on the natural immunity against protein antigens from these pathogens has not been elucidated. This was an age-matched observational controlled study that evaluated the influence of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on the levels of antibodies and frequencies of antibody responses against proteins from S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis in serum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia. Eight pneumococcal proteins (pneumolysin, choline-binding protein A, pneumococcal surface protein A families 1 and 2, pneumococcal choline-binding protein A, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D, serine/threonine protein kinase, protein required for cell wall separation of group B streptococcus), 3 proteins from H. influenzae (including protein D) and 5 M. catarrhalis proteins were investigated. The study group comprised 38 vaccinated children and 114 age-matched controls (median age: 14.5 vs. 14.6 months, respectively; P = 0.997), all with community-acquired pneumonia. There was no difference on clinical baseline characteristics between vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Vaccinated children had significantly lower levels of antibodies against 4 of the studied pneumococcal antigens (P = 0.048 for Ply, P = 0.018 for pneumococcal surface protein A, P = 0.001 for StkP and P = 0.028 for PcsB) and higher levels of antibodies against M. catarrhalis (P = 0.015). Nevertheless, the vaccination status did not significantly affect the rates of antibody responses against S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. In spite of the differences that have been found on the level of natural antibodies, no effect from pneumococcal vaccination was observed on the rate of immune responses associated with community-acquired pneumonia against protein

  16. Analysis of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus antibody responses in treated hemophiliacs. Implications for the study of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, S H; Sullivan, J L; Brettler, D B; Levine, P H

    1984-07-06

    One hundred hemophiliacs were studied for serological evidence of infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis B virus. Ninety-eight percent had markers of hepatitis B infection, while 69% had antibody to EBV and only 42% had antibody to CMV, suggesting that factor VIII preparations do not transmit EBV and CMV efficiently. Seventy-one percent of those seropositive to EBV had an antibody pattern suggestive of active infection, as compared with 23% of healthy young adult blood donors. These findings make the patients with hemophilia an unusually favorable population for the study of the role of persistent viral infection in the immunodeficiency now found to be widespread in groups at high risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and for the contribution of CMV and EBV to AIDS itself.

  17. Thrombocytopenia in homosexual patients. Prognosis, response to therapy, and prevalence of antibody to the retrovirus associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C; Krigel, R; Lennette, E; Karpatkin, S

    1985-10-01

    Thirty-three homosexual patients with thrombocytopenia (mean [+/- SE] platelet count, 50 000 +/- 7000/mm3; range, 7 to 135 000/mm3) have been followed for a mean period of 20 +/- 2 months. Six patients have developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome 1 to 37 months after the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia. Six patients spontaneously reverted to normal platelet counts 5 to 27 months (median, 10 months) after the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia, in the absence of splenectomy and while not receiving corticosteroids. Sixteen of seventeen patients had a moderate to excellent response while on corticosteroid treatment. Ten of ten patients had an excellent response to splenectomy which has persisted. Fifteen patients did not require treatment for their thrombocytopenia. Thirteen of fourteen patients had antibody against the retrovirus associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, as did 4 of 12 homosexual controls without thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia in homosexuals is part of the complex related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  18. Comparison of inhibitory and binding characteristics of an antibody causing acquired von Willebrand syndrome: an assay for von Willebrand factor binding by antibody.

    PubMed

    Fricke, W A; Brinkhous, K M; Garris, J B; Roberts, H R

    1985-09-01

    An acquired inhibitor of von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity occurring in a patient with benign gammopathy and von Willebrand syndrome (vWS) has been partially characterized. The inhibitor-induced syndrome resulted in low to undetectable plasma levels of vWF/ristocetin, vWF/botrocetin, FVIIIR:Ag, and FVIII:C with a normal to slightly prolonged bleeding time. Platelet vWF was normal. Intensive and continuous infusion of a heat-treated factor VIII concentrate (Hemofil-T, Hyland, Glendale, Calif) elevated the FVIII:C plasma levels to about 100%, with an increase in FVIIIR:Ag levels to about 340% and vWF/ristocetin levels to about 40%, much lower than expected based on the dose of Hemofil-T and its content of vWF and FVIII:C activities. The inhibitor bound to staphylococcal protein A (SpA) with high affinity, indicating an IgG antibody (Ab). An assay for the vWF-binding capacity was developed on the basis of absorption of the Ab from serially diluted plasma by SpA and removal of vWF and FVIII:C activities from normal plasma by the SpA-Ab complex. The Ab-binding site was on the vWF component of the factor VIII complex. The Ab was unable to bind isolated FVIII:C. The combined use of the new vWF-binding assay and a battery of tests for inhibition of vWF-dependent platelet aggregation with ristocetin (which detects high molecular weight vWF), with botrocetin (which detects high and low molecular weight vWF), and with platelet-aggregating factor (which detects high molecular weight vWF) provided a means of analysis of Ab effect on in vitro vWF function. Using these tests, a comparison was made of the effects of the vWS Ab with those of an Ab inhibitor occurring in homozygous von Willebrand's disease. The Ab of the vWS patient had weak inhibitory action on vWF/ristocetin without having an effect on vWF/botrocetin and platelet-aggregating factor, a high titer vWF-binding capacity, and no anamnestic response following concentrate therapy. These findings contrasted with those

  19. Male sex predominance in Chlamydia trachomatis sexually acquired reactive arthritis: are women more protected by anti-chlamydia antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Bas, S; Scieux, C; Vischer, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether the humoral anti-chlamydia antibody response might be related to the ineffective bacterial elimination seen in patients with Chlamydia trachomatis reactive arthritis, particularly in men, who have a higher prevalence of the disease than women.
METHODS—The number and specificity of the antibody responses to 27 different C trachomatis antigens were determined by western blots in serum samples from patients with C trachomatis urogenital infection, with and without reactive arthritis, with a special regard to the sex of the patients.
RESULTS—Patients with reactive arthritis had antibodies to significantly fewer chlamydia antigens than those with urethritis only. Antibodies from men recognised significantly fewer antigens than antibodies from women. The IgA class antibodies were slightly more relevant than those of the IgG class for differentiation of patients with reactive arthritis from those with uncomplicated genitourinary infection.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with acute C trachomatis infection the development of reactive arthritis may be related, particularly in men, to a deficient humoral response, to antigens which perhaps play a part in the clearance of the bacteria. Men who cannot generate antibodies to a large number of antigens may be less able to contain the local infection, allowing a wide systemic dissemination of the organisms to the joints.

 PMID:11350850

  20. Naturally Acquired Antibodies Target the Glutamate-Rich Protein on Intact Merozoites and Predict Protection Against Febrile Malaria.

    PubMed

    Kana, Ikhlaq Hussain; Adu, Bright; Tiendrebeogo, Régis Wendpayangde; Singh, Susheel Kumar; Dodoo, Daniel; Theisen, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Plasmodium species antigens accessible at the time of merozoite release are likely targets of biologically functional antibodies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against intact merozoites were quantified in the plasma of Ghanaian children from a longitudinal cohort using a novel flow cytometry-based immunofluorescence assay. Functionality of these antibodies, as well as glutamate-rich protein (GLURP)-specific affinity-purified IgG from malaria hyperimmune Liberian adults, was assessed by the opsonic phagocytosis (OP) assay. Opsonic phagocytosis activity was strongly associated (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] = .30-.73; P = .0008) with protection against febrile malaria. Of the antimerozoite-specific antibodies, only IgG3 was significantly associated with both OP and protection (HR = 0.53; 95% CI = .34-.84; Pcorrected = .03) against febrile malaria. Similarly, GLURP-specific antibodies previously shown to be protective against febrile malaria in this same cohort were significantly associated with OP activity in this study. GLURP-specific antibodies recognized merozoites and also mediated OP activity. These findings support previous studies that found OP of merozoites to be associated with protection against malaria and further shows IgG3 and GLURP antibodies are key in the OP mechanism, thus giving further impetus for the development of malaria vaccines targeting GLURP.

  1. Influenza bivalent vaccine comprising recombinant H3 hemagglutinin (HA) and H1 HA containing replaced H3 hemagglutinin transmembrane domain exhibited improved heterosubtypic protection immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiliang; Xue, Chunyi; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Kang; Wang, Yang; Wei, Ying; Liu, George Dacai; Cao, Yongchang

    2015-07-31

    Influenza caused by infection of influenza viruses is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human. Vaccination is the main defense against influenza virus, but current influenza trivalent or quatrivalent vaccines (TIV/QIV) would lose their effectiveness when vaccine strains are mismatched with circulating strains. Our early study showed that recombinant influenza Hx-TM HA proteins containing H3 HA transmembrane domain(TM) had improved immunogenicity and heterosubtypic protection over corresponding wild-type Hx-WT HA proteins. In present study, bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT+Hx-TM were investigated for their immune responses and heterosubtypic protection immunities. The data showed that the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-TM or H1-TM had improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection over the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-WT or H1-WT respectively. These results demonstrated that the improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of Hx-TM HA proteins could be translated into bivalent vaccines, suggesting a feasible strategy of improving the immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of influenza multivalent vaccines such as TIV and QIV.

  2. Acquired Gitelman Syndrome in an Anti-SSA Antibody-positive Patient with a SLC12A3 Heterozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kusuda, Takeshi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Mori, Takayasu; Ihara, Katsuhito; Nishida, Hidenori; Chiga, Motoko; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Koike, Ryuji; Uchida, Shinichi; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman developed hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis after anti SS-A antibody was found to be positive. Diuretic loading test results were compatible with Gitelman syndrome (GS). The patient had a heterozygous mutation in SLC12A3, which encodes for thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCCT). While the mutation may be responsible for a latent hypofunction of NCCTs, the underlying anti-SSA antibody-associated autoimmunity induced the manifestation of its hypofunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that anti SS-A antibody-associated autoimmunity may induce GS in a patient with a SLC12A3 heterozygous mutation. PMID:27803420

  3. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to antibody-mediated ADAMTS13 deficiency precipitated by a localized Castleman's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Thais Celi Lopes; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Colella, Marina Pereira; Percout, Priscila de Oliveira; Moura, Muriel Silva; Dias, Maria Almeida; Lins, Betina Diniz; Paula, Erich Vinicius de; Vassallo, Jose; Annichino-Bizzachi, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor causing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) may be precipitated by some infections, inflammatory diseases or neoplasia. We reported a case of refractory TTP precipitated by a newly diagnosed localized Castleman's disease (CD). TTP was initially treated with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids; however the treatment failed to promote sustained response. During hospitalization, an abdominal tumor was diagnosed and resected; the histological analysis revealed a CD of hyaline-vascular variant rich stroma. After tumor removal, the patient achieved a long-lasting clinical remission and normalized ADAMTS13 activity. This clinical case describes a novel association of acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor and CD. The antibody to ADAMTS13 developed along with the systemic manifestation of CD and promptly disappeared after the resection of the tumor. There are reports of neoplasia-associated thrombotic microangiopathy however direct evidence of CD-dependent ADAMTS13 inhibitor had not yet been reported.

  4. Successful treatment of a noninhibitory antibody-mediated acquired factor X deficiency in a patient with marginal-zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Meenhuis, Annemarie; van Vliet, Rianne; Hudig, Francisca; Ypma, Paula F; Schipperus, Martin R; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Prolonged clotting times were observed in a patient with spontaneous hemorrhage. Analysis showed severe factor X deficiency due to clearance by a noninhibitory antibody. Lymphadenopathy identified on imaging led to diagnosis of marginal B-cell lymphoma. Treatment of lymphoma with rituximab and chlorambucil resulted in complete disappearance of the bleeding disorder. PMID:26273448

  5. Naturally Acquired Binding-Inhibitory Antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein in Pregnant Women Are Associated with Higher Birth Weight in a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Pilar; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Menegon, Michela; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E.; Padilla, Norma; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Hans, Dhiraj; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Robinson, Leanne; Samol, Paula; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Desai, Meghna; Sanz, Sergi; Quintó, Llorenç; Mayor, Alfredo; Rogerson, Stephen; Mueller, Ivo; Severini, Carlo; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Bardají, Azucena; Chitnis, Chetan C.; Menéndez, Clara; Dobaño, Carlota

    2017-01-01

    A vaccine to eliminate malaria would need a multi-stage and multi-species composition to achieve robust protection, but the lack of knowledge about antigen targets and mechanisms of protection precludes the development of fully efficacious malaria vaccines, especially for Plasmodium vivax (Pv). Pregnant women constitute a risk population who would greatly benefit from a vaccine preventing the adverse events of Plasmodium infection during gestation. We hypothesized that functional immune responses against putative targets of naturally acquired immunity to malaria and vaccine candidates will be associated with protection against malaria infection and/or poor outcomes during pregnancy. We measured (i) IgG responses to a large panel of Pv and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) antigens, (ii) the capacity of anti-Pv ligand Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) antibodies to inhibit binding to Duffy antigen, and (iii) cellular immune responses to two Pv antigens, in a subset of 1,056 pregnant women from Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India, and Papua New Guinea (PNG). There were significant intraspecies and interspecies correlations for most antibody responses (e.g., PfMSP119 versus PfAMA1, Spearman’s rho = 0.81). Women from PNG and Colombia had the highest levels of IgG overall. Submicroscopic infections seemed sufficient to boost antibody responses in Guatemala but not antigen-specific cellular responses in PNG. Brazil had the highest percentage of Duffy binding inhibition (p-values versus Colombia: 0.040; Guatemala: 0.047; India: 0.003, and PNG: 0.153) despite having low anti-PvDBP IgG levels. Almost all antibodies had a positive association with present infection, and coinfection with the other species increased this association. Anti-PvDBP, anti-PfMSP1, and anti-PfAMA1 IgG levels at recruitment were positively associated with infection at delivery (p-values: 0.010, 0.003, and 0.023, respectively), suggesting that they are markers of malaria exposure. Peripheral blood

  6. Naturally Acquired Binding-Inhibitory Antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein in Pregnant Women Are Associated with Higher Birth Weight in a Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Requena, Pilar; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Menegon, Michela; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E; Padilla, Norma; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Hans, Dhiraj; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Robinson, Leanne; Samol, Paula; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Desai, Meghna; Sanz, Sergi; Quintó, Llorenç; Mayor, Alfredo; Rogerson, Stephen; Mueller, Ivo; Severini, Carlo; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Bardají, Azucena; Chitnis, Chetan C; Menéndez, Clara; Dobaño, Carlota

    2017-01-01

    A vaccine to eliminate malaria would need a multi-stage and multi-species composition to achieve robust protection, but the lack of knowledge about antigen targets and mechanisms of protection precludes the development of fully efficacious malaria vaccines, especially for Plasmodium vivax (Pv). Pregnant women constitute a risk population who would greatly benefit from a vaccine preventing the adverse events of Plasmodium infection during gestation. We hypothesized that functional immune responses against putative targets of naturally acquired immunity to malaria and vaccine candidates will be associated with protection against malaria infection and/or poor outcomes during pregnancy. We measured (i) IgG responses to a large panel of Pv and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) antigens, (ii) the capacity of anti-Pv ligand Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) antibodies to inhibit binding to Duffy antigen, and (iii) cellular immune responses to two Pv antigens, in a subset of 1,056 pregnant women from Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India, and Papua New Guinea (PNG). There were significant intraspecies and interspecies correlations for most antibody responses (e.g., PfMSP119 versus PfAMA1, Spearman's rho = 0.81). Women from PNG and Colombia had the highest levels of IgG overall. Submicroscopic infections seemed sufficient to boost antibody responses in Guatemala but not antigen-specific cellular responses in PNG. Brazil had the highest percentage of Duffy binding inhibition (p-values versus Colombia: 0.040; Guatemala: 0.047; India: 0.003, and PNG: 0.153) despite having low anti-PvDBP IgG levels. Almost all antibodies had a positive association with present infection, and coinfection with the other species increased this association. Anti-PvDBP, anti-PfMSP1, and anti-PfAMA1 IgG levels at recruitment were positively associated with infection at delivery (p-values: 0.010, 0.003, and 0.023, respectively), suggesting that they are markers of malaria exposure. Peripheral blood mononuclear

  7. Successful treatment of an elderly frail patient with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura under close monitoring of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Sano, Keigo; Yagi, Hideo; Hanamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Mariko; Iizuka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Keiko; Tsubaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted to the regional hospital because of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neurological abnormalities including unconsciousness. One week before admission, she suffered from diarrhea and subsequently passed out and hit her face on the ground. She was suspected of having TTP and was transferred to our hospital. We performed the assays of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers, and confirmed the diagnosis of acquired idiopathic TTP with total deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity with its inhibitor. She was initially treated with plasma exchange combined with corticosteroids, however, we were forced to substitute plasma exchange with fresh frozen plasma infusion due to procedure-associated complications. The infusion of fresh frozen plasma was known as less effective and more likely to boost inhibitor titers compared to plasma exchange. In this circumstance, we could successfully switch the plasma therapy under close monitoring of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers which precisely revealed the disease status of TTP in our patient, and eventually she achieved complete remission with normal level of ADAMTS13 activity and no inhibitor. Our experience suggested that the measurement of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor titer might be valuable not only for making the diagnosis but also for guiding treatment decisions by precise evaluating of disease status in patients with the acquired form of TTP.

  8. Homo- and Heterosubtypic Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Exposure on H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Taiana P.; Brown, Justin D.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Swayne, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Wild birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are the natural reservoirs for avian influenza (AI) viruses. Although they are often infected with multiple AI viruses, the significance and extent of acquired immunity in these populations is not understood. Pre-existing immunity to AI virus has been shown to modulate the outcome of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection in multiple domestic avian species, but few studies have addressed this effect in wild birds. In this study, the effect of pre-exposure to homosubtypic (homologous hemagglutinin) and heterosubtypic (heterologous hemagglutinin) low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses on the outcome of a H5N1 HPAI virus infection in wood ducks (Aix sponsa) was evaluated. Pre-exposure of wood ducks to different LPAI viruses did not prevent infection with H5N1 HPAI virus, but did increase survival associated with H5N1 HPAI virus infection. The magnitude of this effect on the outcome of the H5N1 HPAI virus infection varied between different LPAI viruses, and was associated both with efficiency of LPAI viral replication in wood ducks and the development of a detectable humoral immune response. These observations suggest that in naturally occurring outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI, birds with pre-existing immunity to homologous hemagglutinin or neuraminidase subtypes of AI virus may either survive H5N1 HPAI virus infection or live longer than naïve birds and, consequently, could pose a greater risk for contributing to viral transmission and dissemination. The mechanisms responsible for this protection and/or the duration of this immunity remain unknown. The results of this study are important for surveillance efforts and help clarify epidemiological data from outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI virus in wild bird populations. PMID:21253608

  9. Homo- and heterosubtypic low pathogenic avian influenza exposure on H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in wood ducks (Aix sponsa).

    PubMed

    Costa, Taiana P; Brown, Justin D; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Stallknecht, David E; Swayne, David E

    2011-01-06

    Wild birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are the natural reservoirs for avian influenza (AI) viruses. Although they are often infected with multiple AI viruses, the significance and extent of acquired immunity in these populations is not understood. Pre-existing immunity to AI virus has been shown to modulate the outcome of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection in multiple domestic avian species, but few studies have addressed this effect in wild birds. In this study, the effect of pre-exposure to homosubtypic (homologous hemagglutinin) and heterosubtypic (heterologous hemagglutinin) low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses on the outcome of a H5N1 HPAI virus infection in wood ducks (Aix sponsa) was evaluated. Pre-exposure of wood ducks to different LPAI viruses did not prevent infection with H5N1 HPAI virus, but did increase survival associated with H5N1 HPAI virus infection. The magnitude of this effect on the outcome of the H5N1 HPAI virus infection varied between different LPAI viruses, and was associated both with efficiency of LPAI viral replication in wood ducks and the development of a detectable humoral immune response. These observations suggest that in naturally occurring outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI, birds with pre-existing immunity to homologous hemagglutinin or neuraminidase subtypes of AI virus may either survive H5N1 HPAI virus infection or live longer than naïve birds and, consequently, could pose a greater risk for contributing to viral transmission and dissemination. The mechanisms responsible for this protection and/or the duration of this immunity remain unknown. The results of this study are important for surveillance efforts and help clarify epidemiological data from outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI virus in wild bird populations.

  10. Lipid accumulation, lipid oxidation, and low plasma levels of acquired antibodies against oxidized lipids associate with degeneration and rupture of the intracranial aneurysm wall.

    PubMed

    Frösen, Juhana; Tulamo, Riikka; Heikura, Tommi; Sammalkorpi, Sini; Niemelä, Mika; Hernesniemi, Juha; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-10-28

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (sIA) causes an often fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Why some sIAs rupture remains unknown. Since sIA walls bear some histological similarities with early atherosclerotic lesions, we hypothesized that accumulation and oxidation of lipids might occur in the sIA wall and might associate with sIA wall degeneration. Tissue samples from sIA fundi (n = 54) were studied with histochemistry and a panel of previously characterized antibodies for epitopes of oxidized LDL (OxLDL). Plasma samples from sIA carriers (n = 125) were studied with ELISA and EIA for IgG and IgM -antibodies against a panel of OxLDL epitopes. Lipid accumulation, foam cells, and oxidized lipids were found both in unruptured and ruptured sIA walls. Lipid accumulation associated with wall degeneration (P < 0.001), as did the expression of adipophilin, a marker of lipid ingestion by cells. Lipid accumulation associated also with loss of mural cells (P < 0.001), as did the accumulation of OxLDL (P < 0.001). Plasma IgG antibody titers against OxLDL or malondialdehyde modified LDL were higher in patients with unruptured sIAs than in patients with aneurysmal SAH (P ≤ 0.001). A trend but not statistically significant differences were found in plasma IgM antibodies against oxidized lipids. Accumulation of lipids and their oxidation in the sIA wall associates with the degeneration of the sIA wall. Acquired immunity against oxidized lipid epitopes may be protective of lipid associated sIA wall degeneration, but warrants further studies.

  11. Longitudinal analysis of pneumococcal antibodies during community-acquired pneumonia reveals a much higher involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae than estimated by conventional methods alone.

    PubMed

    van Mens, Suzan P; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Endeman, Henrik; van Velzen-Blad, Heleen; Biesma, Douwe H; Grutters, Jan C; Vlaminckx, Bart J M; Rijkers, Ger T

    2011-05-01

    In up to half of all cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), no pathogen can be identified with conventional diagnostic methods. The most common identified causative agent is Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, pneumococcal antibody responses during CAP were analyzed to estimate the contribution of the pneumococcus to all cases of CAP for epidemiological purposes. Pneumococcal antibodies against 14 different serotypes were measured in serum of hospitalized CAP patients. Patients participated in one of two consecutive clinical trials in a general 600-bed teaching hospital in the Netherlands (between October 2004 and June 2009). A significant pneumococcal immune response was defined as at least a 2-fold increase in antibody concentrations against a single serotype between an early (day 1) and a late (day 30) serum sample of each patient with an end concentration above 0.35 μg/ml. A total of 349 adult CAP patients participated in two consecutive clinical trials. For 200 patients, sufficient serum samples were available to determine antibody responses: 62 pneumococcal pneumonia patients, 57 nonpneumococcal pneumonia patients, and 81 patients with an unidentified causative agent. A significant immune response was detected in 45% (28/62 patients) of pneumococcal pneumonia patients, in 5% (3/57) of nonpneumococcal pneumonia patients, and in 28% (23/81) of patients with an unidentified causative agent. The estimated contribution of pneumococci in patients with an unidentified causative agent was calculated to be 57% (95% confidence interval, 36 to 86%). A substantial fraction of pneumococcal pneumonia patients do not elicit a serotype-specific immune response.

  12. Discovery of Influenza A Virus Sequence Pairs and Their Combinations for Simultaneous Heterosubtypic Targeting that Hedge against Antiviral Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Pramono, Zacharias Aloysius Dwi; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The multiple circulating human influenza A virus subtypes coupled with the perpetual genomic mutations and segment reassortment events challenge the development of effective therapeutics. The capacity to drug most RNAs motivates the investigation on viral RNA targets. 123,060 segment sequences from 35,938 strains of the most prevalent subtypes also infecting humans–H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9, were used to identify 1,183 conserved RNA target sequences (≥15-mer) in the internal segments. 100% theoretical coverage in simultaneous heterosubtypic targeting is achieved by pairing specific sequences from the same segment (“Duals”) or from two segments (“Doubles”); 1,662 Duals and 28,463 Doubles identified. By combining specific Duals and/or Doubles to form a target graph wherein an edge connecting two vertices (target sequences) represents a Dual or Double, it is possible to hedge against antiviral resistance besides maintaining 100% heterosubtypic coverage. To evaluate the hedging potential, we define the hedge-factor as the minimum number of resistant target sequences that will render the graph to become resistant i.e. eliminate all the edges therein; a target sequence or a graph is considered resistant when it cannot achieve 100% heterosubtypic coverage. In an n-vertices graph (n ≥ 3), the hedge-factor is maximal (= n– 1) when it is a complete graph i.e. every distinct pair in a graph is either a Dual or Double. Computational analyses uncover an extensive number of complete graphs of different sizes. Monte Carlo simulations show that the mutation counts and time elapsed for a target graph to become resistant increase with the hedge-factor. Incidentally, target sequences which were reported to reduce virus titre in experiments are included in our target graphs. The identity of target sequence pairs for heterosubtypic targeting and their combinations for hedging antiviral resistance are useful toolkits to construct target graphs for

  13. Naturally Acquired Antibodies Specific for Plasmodium falciparum Reticulocyte-Binding Protein Homologue 5 Inhibit Parasite Growth and Predict Protection From Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan M.; Ongoiba, Aissata; Coursen, Jill; Crosnier, Cecile; Diouf, Ababacar; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Li, Shanping; Doumbo, Safiatou; Doumtabe, Didier; Kone, Younoussou; Bathily, Aboudramane; Dia, Seydou; Niangaly, Moussa; Dara, Charles; Sangala, Jules; Miller, Louis H.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Kayentao, Kassoum; Long, Carole A.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Wright, Gavin J.; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homologue 5 (PfRH5) is a blood-stage parasite protein essential for host erythrocyte invasion. PfRH5-specific antibodies raised in animals inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but the relevance of naturally acquired PfRH5-specific antibodies in humans is unclear. Methods. We assessed pre–malaria season PfRH5-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in 357 Malian children and adults who were uninfected with Plasmodium. Subsequent P. falciparum infections were detected by polymerase chain reaction every 2 weeks and malaria episodes by weekly physical examination and self-referral for 7 months. The primary outcome was time between the first P. falciparum infection and the first febrile malaria episode. PfRH5-specific IgG was assayed for parasite growth-inhibitory activity. Results. The presence of PfRH5-specific IgG at enrollment was associated with a longer time between the first blood-stage infection and the first malaria episode (PfRH5-seropositive median: 71 days, PfRH5-seronegative median: 18 days; P = .001). This association remained significant after adjustment for age and other factors associated with malaria risk/exposure (hazard ratio, .62; P = .02). Concentrated PfRH5-specific IgG purified from Malians inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro. Conclusions. Naturally acquired PfRH5-specific IgG inhibits parasite growth in vitro and predicts protection from malaria. These findings strongly support efforts to develop PfRH5 as an urgently needed blood-stage malaria vaccine. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01322581. PMID:24133188

  14. Anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody ACE910 prevents joint bleeds in a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihashi, Kazutaka; Takeda, Minako; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Sampei, Zenjiro; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Haraya, Kenta; Adachi, Kenji; Kawabe, Yoshiki; Nogami, Keiji; Shima, Midori; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    ACE910 is a humanized anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII (FVIII). We previously demonstrated in nonhuman primates that a single IV dose of ACE910 exerted hemostatic activity against hemophilic bleeds artificially induced in muscles and subcutis, and that a subcutaneous (SC) dose of ACE910 showed a 3-week half-life and nearly 100% bioavailability, offering support for effective prophylaxis for hemophilia A by user-friendly SC dosing. However, there was no direct evidence that such SC dosing of ACE910 would prevent spontaneous bleeds occurring in daily life. In this study, we newly established a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A by multiple IV injections of an anti-primate FVIII neutralizing antibody engineered in mouse-monkey chimeric form to reduce its antigenicity. The monkeys in the control group exhibited various spontaneous bleeding symptoms as well as continuous prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time; notably, all exhibited joint bleeds, which are a hallmark of hemophilia. Weekly SC doses of ACE910 (initial 3.97 mg/kg followed by 1 mg/kg) significantly prevented these bleeding symptoms; notably, no joint bleeding symptoms were observed. ACE910 is expected to prevent spontaneous bleeds and joint damage in hemophilia A patients even with weekly SC dosing, although appropriate clinical investigation is required. PMID:25274508

  15. Anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody ACE910 prevents joint bleeds in a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Muto, Atsushi; Yoshihashi, Kazutaka; Takeda, Minako; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Sampei, Zenjiro; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Haraya, Kenta; Adachi, Kenji; Kawabe, Yoshiki; Nogami, Keiji; Shima, Midori; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2014-11-13

    ACE910 is a humanized anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII (FVIII). We previously demonstrated in nonhuman primates that a single IV dose of ACE910 exerted hemostatic activity against hemophilic bleeds artificially induced in muscles and subcutis, and that a subcutaneous (SC) dose of ACE910 showed a 3-week half-life and nearly 100% bioavailability, offering support for effective prophylaxis for hemophilia A by user-friendly SC dosing. However, there was no direct evidence that such SC dosing of ACE910 would prevent spontaneous bleeds occurring in daily life. In this study, we newly established a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A by multiple IV injections of an anti-primate FVIII neutralizing antibody engineered in mouse-monkey chimeric form to reduce its antigenicity. The monkeys in the control group exhibited various spontaneous bleeding symptoms as well as continuous prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time; notably, all exhibited joint bleeds, which are a hallmark of hemophilia. Weekly SC doses of ACE910 (initial 3.97 mg/kg followed by 1 mg/kg) significantly prevented these bleeding symptoms; notably, no joint bleeding symptoms were observed. ACE910 is expected to prevent spontaneous bleeds and joint damage in hemophilia A patients even with weekly SC dosing, although appropriate clinical investigation is required.

  16. Application of monoclonal antibodies generated against Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL-S) toxin for specific identification of community acquired methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Niveditha Sundar; Ramlal, Shylaja; Urs, Radhika Madan; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-12-01

    Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) produced by community acquired methicillin Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) involved in skin and soft-tissue infections and necrotizing pneumonia comprised of two fractions, namely PVL S and PVL F. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies designated as MAb1, MAb9 and MAb10 were generated against recombinant PVL-S (35kDa) protein of S. aureus. All the three MAbs specifically reacted to confirm PVL-S positive strains of S. aureus recovered from clinical samples in Western blot analysis. Similarly all the three MAbs did not show any binding to other tested 14 different pathogenic bacteria belonging to other genera and species in Western blot analysis. Furthermore, a simple dot-ELISA method was standardized for the identification of PVL-S toxin containing S. aureus strains. Initially in dot-ELISA, Protein A (Spa) of S. aureus posed background noise problems due to the non-specific binding of antibodies resulting in false positive reactions. With the addition of 10mM diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) along with 5% milk in PBS in the blocking step prevented this non-specific binding of Spa to mouse anti-PVL monoclonal antibodies in dot-ELISA. Once standardized, this simple dot-ELISA was evaluated with nine PVL positive strains recovered from food, environmental and clinical samples and the results were compared with PCR assay for the presence of PVL toxin genes and also with Western blot analysis. A 100% correlation was found between dot-ELISA, PCR assay and Western blot analysis. Collectively our results suggest the newly developed simple dot-ELISA system can be of immense help in providing, rapid detection of the PVL toxin containing S. aureus strains at a relatively low cost and will be a valuable tool for the reliable identification of CA-MRSA.

  17. Epitope specificity of anti-factor VIII antibodies from inhibitor positive acquired and congenital haemophilia A patients using synthetic peptides spanning A and C domains.

    PubMed

    Gharagozlou, Soheila; Sharifian, Ramazan A; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Karimi, Katayoon; Milani, Monica; Okita, David K; Shokri, Fazel; Conti-Fine, Bianca M

    2009-05-01

    Development of antibodies (Ab) that either block the function of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) (inhibitors) or clear it from circulation, seriously complicate the treatment of haemophilia A patients with FVIII products. Autoantibodies which develop in subjects without congenital FVIII defects, cause acquired haemophilia, a rare but life-threatening coagulopathy. Identification of the FVIII epitopes to which inhibitor Abs bind will help understanding the mechanisms of inhibitor activity, and perhaps development of new therapies. Here, we examined the FVIII peptide sequence regions recognised by anti-FVIII Ab in the plasma of six congenital and one acquired haemophilia patients with high inhibitor titers (24.4-2000 BU/ml). We used indirect ELISA and overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, spanning the sequence of the A and C FVIII domains. None of the plasma samples reacted with A1, A3 or C1 domain peptides. Six plasmas reacted with A2 and/or C2 peptides. Peptides spanning residues A2-521-690 and C2-2251-2332 were recognised most frequently and strongly. They include residues that contribute to the binding sites for activated factor IX and phosphatidyl serine/von Willebrand factor. These results suggest that anti-FVIII Abs share a pattern of antigen specificity in our panel of patients, and that exposed regions of the FVIII molecule that form functionally important binding sites elicit an intense Ab response.

  18. The kinase mTOR modulates the antibody response to provide cross-protective immunity to lethal infection with influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Keating, Rachael; Hertz, Tomer; Wehenkel, Marie; Harris, Tarsha L; Edwards, Benjamin A; McClaren, Jennifer L; Brown, Scott A; Surman, Sherri; Wilson, Zachary S; Bradley, Philip; Hurwitz, Julia; Chi, Hongbo; Doherty, Peter C; Thomas, Paul G; McGargill, Maureen A

    2013-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses pose a continuing global threat. Current vaccines will not protect against newly evolved pandemic viruses. The creation of 'universal' vaccines has been unsuccessful because the immunological mechanisms that promote heterosubtypic immunity are incompletely defined. We found here that rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug that inhibits the kinase mTOR, promoted cross-strain protection against lethal infection with influenza virus of various subtypes when administered during immunization with influenza virus subtype H3N2. Rapamycin reduced the formation of germinal centers and inhibited class switching in B cells, which yielded a unique repertoire of antibodies that mediated heterosubtypic protection. Our data established a requirement for the mTORC1 complex in B cell class switching and demonstrated that rapamycin skewed the antibody response away from high-affinity variant epitopes and targeted more conserved elements of hemagglutinin. Our findings have implications for the design of a vaccine against influenza virus.

  19. Detection of antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis proteins in children with community-acquired pneumonia: effects of combining pneumococcal antigens, pre-existing antibody levels, sampling interval, age, and duration of illness.

    PubMed

    Borges, I C; Andrade, D C; Vilas-Boas, A-L; Fontoura, M-S H; Laitinen, H; Ekström, N; Adrian, P V; Meinke, A; Cardoso, M-R A; Barral, A; Ruuskanen, O; Käyhty, H; Nascimento-Carvalho, C M

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of combining different numbers of pneumococcal antigens, pre-existing antibody levels, sampling interval, age, and duration of illness on the detection of IgG responses against eight Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, three Haemophilus influenzae proteins, and five Moraxella catarrhalis proteins in 690 children aged <5 years with pneumonia. Serological tests were performed on acute and convalescent serum samples with a multiplexed bead-based immunoassay. The median sampling interval was 19 days, the median age was 26.7 months, and the median duration of illness was 5 days. The rate of antibody responses was 15.4 % for at least one pneumococcal antigen, 5.8 % for H. influenzae, and 2.3 % for M. catarrhalis. The rate of antibody responses against each pneumococcal antigen varied from 3.5 to 7.1 %. By multivariate analysis, pre-existing antibody levels showed a negative association with the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae antigens; the sampling interval was positively associated with the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae antigens. A sampling interval of 3 weeks was the optimal cut-off for the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae proteins. Duration of illness was negatively associated with antibody responses against PspA. Age did not influence antibody responses against the investigated antigens. In conclusion, serological assays using combinations of different pneumococcal proteins detect a higher rate of antibody responses against S. pneumoniae compared to assays using a single pneumococcal protein. Pre-existing antibody levels and sampling interval influence the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae proteins. These factors should be considered when determining pneumonia etiology by serological methods in children.

  20. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Uddback, Ida E. M.; Pedersen, Line M. I.; Pedersen, Sara R.; Steffensen, Maria A.; Holst, Peter J.; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  1. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  2. Naturally Acquired Antibody Responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP1) C-Terminal 19 kDa Domains in an Area of Unstable Malaria Transmission in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghui; Zhao, Zhenjun; Zhang, Xuexing; Li, Xuelian; Zhu, Min; Li, Peipei; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Ying; Yan, Guiyun; Shang, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Fan, Qi; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding naturally acquired immunity to infections caused by Plasmodia in different malaria endemicity settings is needed for better vaccine designs and for exploring antibody responses as a proxy marker of malaria transmission intensity. This study investigated the sero-epidemiology of malaria along the international border between China and Myanmar, where malaria elimination action plans are in place. This study recruited 233 P. vivax and 156 P. falciparum infected subjects with acute malaria at the malaria clinics and hospitals. In addition, 93 and 67 healthy individuals from the same endemic region or from non-endemic region, respectively, were used as controls. Acute malaria infections were identified by microscopy. Anti-recombinant PfMSP119 and PvMSP119 antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Antibody responses to respective MSP119 were detected in 50.9% and 78.2% patients with acute P. vivax and P. falciparum infections, respectively. There were cross-reacting antibodies in Plasmodium patients against these two recombinant proteins, though we could not exclude the possibility of submicroscopic mixed-species infections. IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 were the major subclasses. Interestingly, 43.2% of the healthy endemic population also had antibodies against PfMSP119, whereas only 3.9% of this population had antibodies against PvMSP119. Higher antibody levels were correlated with age and parasite density, but not with season, gender or malaria history. Both total IgG and individual IgG subclasses underwent substantial declines during the convalescent period in three months. This study demonstrated that individuals in a hypoendemic area with coexistence of P. vivax and P. falciparum can mount rapid antibody responses against both PfMSP119 and PvMSP119. The significantly higher proportion of responders to PfMSP119 in the healthy endemic population indicates higher prevalence of P. falciparum in the recent past. Specific antibodies against PvMSP119 could serve as a

  3. Naturally Acquired Antibody Responses to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP1) C-Terminal 19 kDa Domains in an Area of Unstable Malaria Transmission in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinghui; Zhao, Zhenjun; Zhang, Xuexing; Li, Xuelian; Zhu, Min; Li, Peipei; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Ying; Yan, Guiyun; Shang, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Fan, Qi; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding naturally acquired immunity to infections caused by Plasmodia in different malaria endemicity settings is needed for better vaccine designs and for exploring antibody responses as a proxy marker of malaria transmission intensity. This study investigated the sero-epidemiology of malaria along the international border between China and Myanmar, where malaria elimination action plans are in place. This study recruited 233 P. vivax and 156 P. falciparum infected subjects with acute malaria at the malaria clinics and hospitals. In addition, 93 and 67 healthy individuals from the same endemic region or from non-endemic region, respectively, were used as controls. Acute malaria infections were identified by microscopy. Anti-recombinant PfMSP119 and PvMSP119 antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Antibody responses to respective MSP119 were detected in 50.9% and 78.2% patients with acute P. vivax and P. falciparum infections, respectively. There were cross-reacting antibodies in Plasmodium patients against these two recombinant proteins, though we could not exclude the possibility of submicroscopic mixed-species infections. IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 were the major subclasses. Interestingly, 43.2% of the healthy endemic population also had antibodies against PfMSP119, whereas only 3.9% of this population had antibodies against PvMSP119. Higher antibody levels were correlated with age and parasite density, but not with season, gender or malaria history. Both total IgG and individual IgG subclasses underwent substantial declines during the convalescent period in three months. This study demonstrated that individuals in a hypoendemic area with coexistence of P. vivax and P. falciparum can mount rapid antibody responses against both PfMSP119 and PvMSP119. The significantly higher proportion of responders to PfMSP119 in the healthy endemic population indicates higher prevalence of P. falciparum in the recent past. Specific antibodies against PvMSP119 could serve as a

  4. A constant threat for HIV: Fc-engineering to enhance broadly neutralizing antibody activity for immunotherapy of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-08-01

    Passive immunotherapy with polyclonal or hyperimmune serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an efficient means of protecting immunocompromised patients from microbial infections. More recently, the use of passive immunotherapy to prevent or to treat established infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has gained much attention, due to promising preclinical data obtained in monkey and humanized mouse in vivo model systems, demonstrating that the transfer of HIV-specific antibodies can not only prevent HIV infection, but also diminish virus load during chronic infection. Furthermore, an array of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies has become available and the importance of the IgG constant region as a critical modulator of broadly neutralizing activity has been demonstrated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings with regard to the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for antibody-mediated clearance of HIV infection, and to discuss how this may help to improve HIV therapy via optimizing Fcγ-receptor-dependent activities of HIV-specific antibodies.

  5. Vaccination with Adjuvanted Recombinant Neuraminidase Induces Broad Heterologous, but Not Heterosubtypic, Cross-Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Xu, Haoming; Tan, Gene S.; Hirsh, Ariana; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to assess the cross-protective potential of the influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) as a vaccine antigen, different subtypes of recombinant NA were expressed in a baculovirus system and used to vaccinate mice prior to lethal challenge with homologous, heterologous, or heterosubtypic viruses. Mice immunized with NA of subtype N2 were completely protected from morbidity and mortality in a homologous challenge and displayed significantly reduced viral lung titers. Heterologous challenge with a drifted strain resulted in morbidity but no mortality. Similar results were obtained for challenge experiments with N1 NA. Mice immunized with influenza B virus NA (from B/Yamagata/16/88) displayed no morbidity when sublethally infected with the homologous strain and, importantly, were completely protected from morbidity and mortality when lethally challenged with the prototype Victoria lineage strain or a more recent Victoria lineage isolate. Upon analyzing the NA content in 4 different inactivated-virus vaccine formulations from the 2013-2014 season via Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantification, we found that the amount of NA does indeed vary across vaccine brands. We also measured hemagglutinin (HA) and NA endpoint titers in pre- and postvaccination human serum samples from individuals who received a trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine from the 2004-2005 season; the induction of NA titers was statistically less pronounced than the induction of HA titers. The demonstrated homologous and heterologous protective capacity of recombinant NA suggests that supplementing vaccine formulations with a standard amount of NA may offer increased protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:25759506

  6. Naturally Acquired HMW1- and HMW2-Specific Serum Antibodies in Adults and Children Mediate Opsonophagocytic Killing of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Linda E.

    2015-01-01

    The HMW1 and HMW2 proteins are highly immunogenic adhesins expressed by approximately 75% of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains, and HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies can mediate opsonophagocytic killing of NTHi. In this study, we assessed the ability of HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies in sera from healthy adults and convalescent-phase sera from children with NTHi otitis media to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous NTHi. The serum samples were examined pre- and postadsorption on HMW1 and HMW2 affinity columns, and affinity-purified antibodies were assessed for ability to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous strains. Adult serum samples mediated the killing of six prototype NTHi strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:1,280. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed sera demonstrated unchanged to 8-fold decreased opsonophagocytic titers against the homologous strains. Each affinity-purified antibody preparation mediated the killing of the respective homologous strain at titers of <1:10 to 1:320 and of the five heterologous strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:320, with most preparations killing most heterologous strains to some degree. None of the acute-phase serum samples from children mediated killing, but each convalescent-phase serum sample mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:40 to 1:640. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed convalescent-phase serum samples demonstrated ≥4-fold decreases in titer. Three of four affinity-purified antibody preparations mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:20 to 1:320, but no killing of representative heterologous strains was observed. HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies capable of mediating opsonophagocytic killing are present in the serum from normal adults and develop in convalescent-phase sera of children with NTHi otitis media. Continued investigation of the HMW1 and HMW2 proteins as potential vaccine candidates for the prevention of NTHi disease is warranted. PMID:26512048

  7. Poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan nanogel greatly enhances the efficacy and heterosubtypic cross-reactivity of H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jihyun; Shim, Sang-Mu; Nguyen, Thi Quyen; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon-Hee; Webby, Richard; Poo, Haryoung

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the global outbreak of an influenza pandemic emphasized the need for an effective vaccine adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan (PC) nanogel as an adjuvant for the influenza vaccine. PC nanogel significantly enhanced antigen-specific cross-presentation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Compared with alum, the protective efficacy of the pandemic H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) vaccine was substantially increased by PC nanogel, with increased hemagglutination-inhibition titers, CTL activity, and earlier virus clearance after homologous and heterosubtypic [A/Philippines/2/82 (H3N2)] virus challenges. However, CD8+ T cell-depleted mice displayed no protection against the heterosubtypic virus challenge after immunization with PC nanogel-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine. We also observed that using PC nanogel as a vaccine adjuvant had a dose-sparing effect and significantly enhanced the long-lasting protection of the pH1N1 vaccine. Together, these results suggest that PC nanogel is a promising vaccine adjuvant that could broadly prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:28322289

  8. Plasmodium vivax VIR Proteins Are Targets of Naturally-Acquired Antibody and T Cell Immune Responses to Malaria in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Pilar; Rui, Edmilson; Padilla, Norma; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E.; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hans, Dhiraj; Menegon, Michela; Mateo, Francesca; Sanz, Sergi; Desai, Meghna; Mayor, Alfredo; Chitnis, Chetan C.; Bardají, Azucena; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen; Severini, Carlo; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-01-01

    P. vivax infection during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes such as anemia, low birth weight and congenital malaria, thus representing an important global health problem. However, no vaccine is currently available for its prevention. Vir genes were the first putative virulent factors associated with P. vivax infections, yet very few studies have examined their potential role as targets of immunity. We investigated the immunogenic properties of five VIR proteins and two long synthetic peptides containing conserved VIR sequences (PvLP1 and PvLP2) in the context of the PregVax cohort study including women from five malaria endemic countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea (PNG) at different timepoints during and after pregnancy. Antibody responses against all antigens were detected in all populations, with PNG women presenting the highest levels overall. P. vivax infection at sample collection time was positively associated with antibody levels against PvLP1 (fold-increase: 1.60 at recruitment -first antenatal visit-) and PvLP2 (fold-increase: 1.63 at delivery), and P. falciparum co-infection was found to increase those responses (for PvLP1 at recruitment, fold-increase: 2.25). Levels of IgG against two VIR proteins at delivery were associated with higher birth weight (27 g increase per duplicating antibody levels, p<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PNG uninfected pregnant women had significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ TH1 responses (p=0.006) and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 after PvLP2 stimulation than P. vivax-infected women (p<0.05). These data demonstrate that VIR antigens induce the natural acquisition of antibody and T cell memory responses that might be important in immunity to P. vivax during pregnancy in very diverse geographical settings. PMID:27711158

  9. Plasmodium vivax VIR Proteins Are Targets of Naturally-Acquired Antibody and T Cell Immune Responses to Malaria in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Requena, Pilar; Rui, Edmilson; Padilla, Norma; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Umbers, Alexandra J; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hans, Dhiraj; Menegon, Michela; Mateo, Francesca; Sanz, Sergi; Desai, Meghna; Mayor, Alfredo; Chitnis, Chetan C; Bardají, Azucena; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen; Severini, Carlo; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Menéndez, Clara; Del Portillo, Hernando; Dobaño, Carlota

    2016-10-01

    P. vivax infection during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes such as anemia, low birth weight and congenital malaria, thus representing an important global health problem. However, no vaccine is currently available for its prevention. Vir genes were the first putative virulent factors associated with P. vivax infections, yet very few studies have examined their potential role as targets of immunity. We investigated the immunogenic properties of five VIR proteins and two long synthetic peptides containing conserved VIR sequences (PvLP1 and PvLP2) in the context of the PregVax cohort study including women from five malaria endemic countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea (PNG) at different timepoints during and after pregnancy. Antibody responses against all antigens were detected in all populations, with PNG women presenting the highest levels overall. P. vivax infection at sample collection time was positively associated with antibody levels against PvLP1 (fold-increase: 1.60 at recruitment -first antenatal visit-) and PvLP2 (fold-increase: 1.63 at delivery), and P. falciparum co-infection was found to increase those responses (for PvLP1 at recruitment, fold-increase: 2.25). Levels of IgG against two VIR proteins at delivery were associated with higher birth weight (27 g increase per duplicating antibody levels, p<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PNG uninfected pregnant women had significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ TH1 responses (p=0.006) and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 after PvLP2 stimulation than P. vivax-infected women (p<0.05). These data demonstrate that VIR antigens induce the natural acquisition of antibody and T cell memory responses that might be important in immunity to P. vivax during pregnancy in very diverse geographical settings.

  10. Factors Associated with Immunoglobulin G Subclass Polarization in Naturally Acquired Antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Proteins: a Cross-Sectional Survey in Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Kézia K. G.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Braga, Érika M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and MSP-2 in 112 malaria-exposed subjects in Brazil. IgG3 polarization was primarily epitope driven, being little affected by cumulative or current exposure to malaria and not affected by a subject's age and Fcγ receptor IIA genotype. PMID:16829621

  11. Cytotoxicity acquired by conjugation of an anti-Thy1.1 monoclonal antibody and the ribosome-inactivating protein, gelonin.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, P E; Brown, A N; Ross, W C; Cumber, A J; Detre, S I; Edwards, D C; Davies, A J; Stirpe, F

    1981-06-01

    Gelonin, a plant protein which can powerfully reduce the protein-synthetic capacity of ribosome preparations, was covalently coupled to anti-Thy1.2 antibody. The conjugate was prepared using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate which generates a disulphide linkage between the component molecules. Two conjugate fractions were obtained with Mr of 180 000 and greater than 200 000. After its linkage of the antibody, gelonin suppressed those Thy1.1-bearing T lymphocytes from AKR mice which will respond to phytohaemagglutinin and concanavalin A in tissue culture. The [3H]leucine incorporation with the T-cell mitogens was inhibited by 50% with the 180 000-Mr fraction at a concentration of 0.4 nM and with the greater than 200 000-Mr fraction of pM. Unconjugated gelonin induced comparable reductions in T-cell responsiveness but at concentrations of 30 nM. The conjugates exerted little or no effect upon B lymphocytes or T lymphocytes from CBA mice (Thy1.2 + ve). Thy1.1-expressing AKR lymphoma cell lines, AKR-A and BW5147, were found to be sensitive to the conjugates, albeit much less so than the normal T lymphocytes. The conjugates injected in vivo significantly prolonged the life of CBA mice bearing in an AKR-A lymphoma allograft. It is concluded that gelonin can, by its linkage to an antibody, be rendered cytotoxic with a potency to match or exceed those of the toxins abrin and ricin.

  12. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  13. Induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection against influenza by a whole inactivated virus vaccine: the role of viral membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Natalija; Huckriede, Anke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Boon, Louis; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2012-01-01

    The inability of seasonal influenza vaccines to effectively protect against infection with antigenically drifted viruses or newly emerging pandemic viruses underlines the need for development of cross-reactive influenza vaccines that induce immunity against a variety of virus subtypes. Therefore, potential cross-protective vaccines, e.g., whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine, that can target conserved internal antigens such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and/or matrix protein (M1) need to be explored. In the current study we show that a WIV vaccine, through induction of cross-protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), protects mice from heterosubtypic infection. This protection was abrogated after depletion of CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice, indicating that CTLs were the primary mediators of protection. Previously, we have shown that different procedures used for virus inactivation influence optimal activation of CTLs by WIV, most likely by affecting the membrane fusion properties of the virus. Specifically, inactivation with formalin (FA) severely compromises fusion activity of the virus, while inactivation with β-propiolactone (BPL) preserves fusion activity. Here, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with BPL-inactivated H5N1 WIV vaccine induces solid protection from lethal heterosubtypic H1N1 challenge. By contrast, vaccination with FA-inactivated WIV, while preventing death after lethal challenge, failed to protect against development of disease and severe body weight loss. Vaccination with BPL-inactivated WIV, compared to FA-inactivated WIV, induced higher levels of specific CD8+ T cells in blood, spleen and lungs, and a higher production of granzyme B in the lungs upon H1N1 virus challenge. The results underline the potential use of WIV as a cross-protective influenza vaccine candidate. However, careful choice of the virus inactivation procedure is important to retain membrane fusion activity and full immunogenicity of the vaccine.

  14. Natural acquired inhibitory antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) equally block erythrocyte binding of homologous and heterologous expressed PvDBP-II on the surface of COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Vahideh; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Mehrizi, Akram A; Mirkazemi, Sedigheh; Djadid, Navid D

    2016-02-01

    The binding domain of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) is a promising blood-stage vaccine candidate for vivax malaria. For the development of a successful vivax malaria vaccine based on DBP-II, the antigenic diversity and also naturally occurring functional antibodies to different PvDBP-II variant types in the various populations must be determined. However, similar to other blood-stage antigens, allelic variation within the PvDBP-II is a fundamental challenge for the development of a broadly efficient vaccine. The present study was performed to define whether the polymorphisms in PvDBP-II influence the nature of functional inhibitory activity of naturally acquired or induced anti-DBP-II antibodies in mice. In this investigation, five genetically distinct variants of PvDBP-II were transiently expressed on the COS-7 cell surface. Erythrocyte-binding inhibition assay (EBIA) was performed using human sera infected with corresponding and non-corresponding P. vivax variants as well as by the use of mice sera immunized with different expressed recombinant PvDBP-IIs. EBIA results showed that the inhibitory percentage varied between 50 and 63 % by using sera from infected individuals, and in case of mouse antisera, inhibition was in the range of 76-86 %. Interestingly, no significant difference was detected in red blood cell binding inhibition when different PvDBP-II variants on the COS-7 cell surfaces were incubated with heterologous and homologous sera infected with PvDBP-II variants. This suggests that the detected polymorphisms in all five forms of PvDBP-II may not affect functional activity of anti-DBP-II antibodies. In conclusion, our results revealed that there are functional cross-reactive antibody responses to heterologous PvDBP-II variants that might provide a broader inhibitory response against all, or at least the majority of strains compared to single allele of this protein that should be considered in development of PvDBP-II-based vaccine.

  15. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  16. Cross-reactivity between avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and divergent H7 subtypic- and heterosubtypic influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Gao, Xin; Xiao, Yan; Ren, Lili; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Shu, Yuelong; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    The number of human avian H7N9 influenza infections has been increasing in China. Understanding their antigenic and serologic relationships is crucial for developing diagnostic tools and vaccines. Here, we evaluated the cross-reactivities and neutralizing activities among H7 subtype influenza viruses and between H7N9 and heterosubtype influenza A viruses. We found strong cross-reactivities between H7N9 and divergent H7 subtypic viruses, including H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7. Antisera against H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7 could also effectively neutralize two distinct H7N9 strains. Two-way cross-reactivities exist within group 2, including H3 and H4, whereas one-way cross-reactivities were found across other groups, including H1, H10, H9, and H13. Our data indicate that the hemaglutinins from divergent H7 subtypes may facilitate the development of vaccines for distinct H7N9 infections. Moreover, serologic diagnoses for H7N9 infections need to consider possible interference from the cross-reactivity of H7N9 with other subtype influenza viruses. PMID:26907865

  17. The Effects of Acute Neutrophil Depletion on Resolution of Acute Influenza Infection, Establishment of Tissue Resident Memory (TRM), and Heterosubtypic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Emma C.; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Topham, David J.

    2016-01-01

    After disease resolution, a small subset of influenza specific CD8+ T cells can remain in the airways of the lung as a tissue resident memory population (TRM). These cells are critical for protection from subsequent infections with heterosubtypic influenza viruses. Although it is well established that expression of the collagen IV binding integrin alpha 1 is necessary for the retention and maintenance of TRM cells, other requirements allowing them to localize to the airways and persist are less well understood. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of neutrophils or neutrophil derived chemokine CXCL12 during acute influenza virus infection reduces the effector T cell response and affects the ability of these cells to localize to the airways. We therefore sought to determine whether the defects that occur in the absence of neutrophils would persist throughout resolution of the disease and impact the development of the TRM population. Interestingly, the early alterations in the CD8+ T cell response recover by two weeks post-infection, and mice form a protective population of TRM cells. Overall, these observations show that acute neutrophil depletion results in a delay in the effector CD8+ T cell response, but does not adversely impact the development of TRM. PMID:27741316

  18. Cross-reactivity between avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and divergent H7 subtypic- and heterosubtypic influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Gao, Xin; Xiao, Yan; Ren, Lili; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Shu, Yuelong; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-02-24

    The number of human avian H7N9 influenza infections has been increasing in China. Understanding their antigenic and serologic relationships is crucial for developing diagnostic tools and vaccines. Here, we evaluated the cross-reactivities and neutralizing activities among H7 subtype influenza viruses and between H7N9 and heterosubtype influenza A viruses. We found strong cross-reactivities between H7N9 and divergent H7 subtypic viruses, including H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7. Antisera against H7N2, H7N3, and H7N7 could also effectively neutralize two distinct H7N9 strains. Two-way cross-reactivities exist within group 2, including H3 and H4, whereas one-way cross-reactivities were found across other groups, including H1, H10, H9, and H13. Our data indicate that the hemaglutinins from divergent H7 subtypes may facilitate the development of vaccines for distinct H7N9 infections. Moreover, serologic diagnoses for H7N9 infections need to consider possible interference from the cross-reactivity of H7N9 with other subtype influenza viruses.

  19. Antibodies to Kv1 potassium channel-complex proteins leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein-2 in limbic encephalitis, Morvan’s syndrome and acquired neuromyotonia

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Sarosh R.; Alexander, Sian; Waters, Patrick; Kleopa, Kleopas A.; Pettingill, Philippa; Zuliani, Luigi; Peles, Elior; Buckley, Camilla; Lang, Bethan

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies that immunoprecipitate 125I-α-dendrotoxin-labelled voltage-gated potassium channels extracted from mammalian brain tissue have been identified in patients with neuromyotonia, Morvan’s syndrome, limbic encephalitis and a few cases of adult-onset epilepsy. These conditions often improve following immunomodulatory therapies. However, the proportions of the different syndromes, the numbers with associated tumours and the relationships with potassium channel subunit antibody specificities have been unclear. We documented the clinical phenotype and tumour associations in 96 potassium channel antibody positive patients (titres >400 pM). Five had thymomas and one had an endometrial adenocarcinoma. To define the antibody specificities, we looked for binding of serum antibodies and their effects on potassium channel currents using human embryonic kidney cells expressing the potassium channel subunits. Surprisingly, only three of the patients had antibodies directed against the potassium channel subunits. By contrast, we found antibodies to three proteins that are complexed with 125I-α-dendrotoxin-labelled potassium channels in brain extracts: (i) contactin-associated protein-2 that is localized at the juxtaparanodes in myelinated axons; (ii) leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein that is most strongly expressed in the hippocampus; and (iii) Tag-1/contactin-2 that associates with contactin-associated protein-2. Antibodies to Kv1 subunits were found in three sera, to contactin-associated protein-2 in 19 sera, to leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein in 55 sera and to contactin-2 in five sera, four of which were also positive for the other antibodies. The remaining 18 sera were negative for potassium channel subunits and associated proteins by the methods employed. Of the 19 patients with contactin-associated protein-antibody-2, 10 had neuromyotonia or Morvan’s syndrome, compared with only 3 of the 55 leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein-antibody

  20. Heterosubtypic Protection against Pathogenic Human and Avian Influenza Viruses via In Vivo Electroporation of Synthetic Consensus DNA Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Laddy, Dominick J.; Yan, Jian; Kutzler, Michele; Kobasa, Darwyn; Kobinger, Gary P.; Khan, Amir S.; Greenhouse, Jack; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Weiner, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Background The persistent evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) highlights the need for novel vaccination techniques that can quickly and effectively respond to emerging viral threats. We evaluated the use of optimized consensus influenza antigens to provide broad protection against divergent strains of H5N1 influenza in three animal models of mice, ferrets, and non-human primates. We also evaluated the use of in vivo electroporation to deliver these vaccines to overcome the immunogenicity barrier encountered in larger animal models of vaccination. Methods and Findings Mice, ferrets and non-human primates were immunized with consensus plasmids expressing H5 hemagglutinin (pH5HA), N1 neuraminidase (pN1NA), and nucleoprotein antigen (pNP). Dramatic IFN-γ-based cellular immune responses to both H5 and NP, largely dependent upon CD8+ T cells were seen in mice. Hemaggutination inhibition titers classically associated with protection (>1:40) were seen in all species. Responses in both ferrets and macaques demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus antigens to induce antibodies capable of inhibiting divergent strains of the H5N1 subtype, and studies in the mouse and ferret demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus vaccines to induce protection even in the absence of such neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, protection from morbidity and mortality was seen in mice and ferrets, with significant reductions in viral shedding and disease progression seen in vaccinated animals. Conclusions By combining several consensus influenza antigens with in vivo electroporation, we demonstrate that these antigens induce both protective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice, ferrets and non-human primates. We also demonstrate the ability of these antigens to protect from both morbidity and mortality in a ferret model of HPAI, in both the presence and absence of neutralizing antibody, which will be critical in responding to the antigenic drift that

  1. Cross-Protective Potential of a Novel Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Antigenic Site B of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Kishida, Noriko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2009-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1–H16) to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2), A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2), and A/WSN/33 (H1N1) strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering). A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the potential

  2. Cross-protective potential of a novel monoclonal antibody directed against antigenic site B of the hemagglutinin of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Reiko; Igarashi, Manabu; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Kishida, Noriko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2009-03-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1-H16) to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2), A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2), and A/WSN/33 (H1N1) strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering). A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the potential

  3. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  4. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  5. Evaluation of the Naturally Acquired Antibody Immune Response to the Pv200L N-terminal Fragment of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1 in Four Areas of the Amazon Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Storti-Melo, Luciane M.; Souza-Neiras, Wanessa C.; Cassiano, Gustavo C.; Taveira, Leonardo C.; Cordeiro, Antônio J.; Couto, Vanja S. C. A.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Cunha, Maristela G.; Echeverry, Diana M.; Rossit, Andréa R. B.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Machado, Ricardo L. D.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and levels of IgG antibodies to an N-terminal fragment of the Plasmodium vivax MSP-1 (Pv200L) protein, in individuals naturally exposed to malaria in four endemic areas of Brazil, were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma samples of 261 P. vivax-infected individuals from communities of Macapá, Novo Repartimento, Porto Velho, and Plácido de Castro in the Amazonian region with different malaria transmission intensities. A high mean number of studied individuals (89.3%) presented with antibodies to the Pv200L that correlated with the number of previous malaria infections; there were significant differences in the frequency of the responders (71.9–98.7) and in the antibody levels (1:200–1:51,200) among the four study areas. Results of this study provide evidence that Pv200L is a naturally immunogenic fragment of the PvMSP-1 and is associated with the degree of exposure to parasites. The fine specificity of antibodies to Pv200L is currently being assessed. PMID:21292879

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  7. B cell epitope mapping and characterization of naturally acquired antibodies to the Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-3α (PvMSP-3α) in malaria exposed individuals from Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Junior, JC; Jiang, J; Rodrigues-da-Silva, RN; Banic, DM; Tran, TM; Ribeiro, RY; Meyer, VSE; De-Simone, SG; Santos, F; Moreno, A; Barnwell, JW; Galinski, MR; Oliveira-Ferreira, J

    2011-01-01

    The Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-3α (PvMSP-3α) is considered as a potential vaccine candidates. However, the detailed investigations of the type of immune responses induced in naturally exposed populations are necessary. Therefore, we aim to characterize the naturally induced antibody to PvMSP-3α in 282 individuals with different levels of exposure to malaria infections residents in Brazilian Amazon. PvMSP3 specific antibodies (IgA, IgG and IgG subclass) to five recombinant proteins and the epitope mapping by Spot-synthesis technique to full-protein sequence of amino acids (15aa sequence with overlapping sequence of 9aa) were performed. Our results indicates that PvMSP3 is highly immunogenic in naturally exposed populations, where 78% of studied individuals present IgG immune response against the full-length recombinant protein (PVMSP3-FL) and IgG subclass profile was similar to all five recombinant proteins studied with a high predominance of IgG1 and IgG3. We also observe that IgG and subclass levels against PvMSP3 are associated with malaria exposure. The PvMSP3 epitope mapping by spot-synthesis shows a natural recognition of at least 15 antigenic determinants, located mainly in the two blocks of repeats, confirming the high immunogenicity of this region. In conclusion, PvMSP-3α is immunogenic in naturally exposed individuals to malaria infections and that antibodies to PvMSP3 are induced to several B cell epitopes. The presence of PvMSP3 cytophilic antibodies (IgG1 and IgG3), suggest that this mechanisms could also occur in P. vivax. PMID:21215342

  8. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  9. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  10. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  11. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-08-01

    The 13q33-34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy.

  12. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-01-01

    The 13q33–34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy. PMID:19604268

  13. Common acquired causes of thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Jaszianne; Carpenter, Shannon L

    2013-08-01

    Compared to adults, venous thromboembolism in the pediatric population is a rare event. Cancer, cardiac disease, antiphospholipid antibodies, and indwelling catheters are established risk factors for thromboembolism in children. We examined the literature related to thrombophilia in children, childhood cancer and thrombosis, cardiac disease and thrombosis, and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in children. Citations in identified articles yielded additional articles for review. We found that studies of acquired thrombophilia in children are limited. Current treatment for thromboembolism in children is based on adult data therefore optimal treatment in this population remains unclear.

  14. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED MYCOSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    laboratory- acquired mycoses . Insofar as possible, the etiological fungus, type of laboratory, classification of personnel, type of work conducted, and other...pertinent data have been listed in this study. More than 288 laboratory- acquired mycoses are described here, including 108 cases of

  15. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  18. Brucella abortus Infection Acquired in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Pier Luigi; Mastrandrea, Scilla; Rappelli, Paola; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2000-01-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated. PMID:10790142

  19. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  20. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  1. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels in the blood Sputum culture or sputum gram stain , to check what germs are causing the pneumonia ... Aspiration Immunodeficiency disorders Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 2/2/ ...

  2. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  4. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... CL, Bradley JS. Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinback WJ, and Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Acquired Immunity to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Doolan, Denise L.; Dobaño, Carlota; Baird, J. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to falciparum malaria protects millions of people routinely exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection from severe disease and death. There is no clear concept about how this protection works. There is no general agreement about the rate of onset of acquired immunity or what constitutes the key determinants of protection; much less is there a consensus regarding the mechanism(s) of protection. This review summarizes what is understood about naturally acquired and experimentally induced immunity against malaria with the help of evolving insights provided by biotechnology and places these insights in the context of historical, clinical, and epidemiological observations. We advocate that naturally acquired immunity should be appreciated as being virtually 100% effective against severe disease and death among heavily exposed adults. Even the immunity that occurs in exposed infants may exceed 90% effectiveness. The induction of an adult-like immune status among high-risk infants in sub-Saharan Africa would greatly diminish disease and death caused by P. falciparum. The mechanism of naturally acquired immunity that occurs among adults living in areas of hyper- to holoendemicity should be understood with a view toward duplicating such protection in infants and young children in areas of endemicity. PMID:19136431

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  7. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  8. Effect of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic low pathogenic avian influenza exposure on H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in wood ducks (Aix sponsa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are the natural reservoirs for avian influenza (AI) viruses. Although they are often infected with multiple AI viruses, the significance and extent of acquired immunity in these populations is not understood. Pre-existing immunity to AI virus...

  9. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  10. Laboratory-acquired Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Richard; Kelly, Molly; Limberger, Ronald J.; DeAngelis, Karen; Cain, Louise; Wallace, Barbara; Dumas, Nellie

    2004-01-01

    We report two laboratory-acquired Brucella melitensis infections that were shown to be epidemiologically related. Blood culture isolates were initially misidentified because of variable Gram stain results, which led to misdiagnoses and subsequent laboratory exposures. Notifying laboratory personnel who unknowingly processed cultures from brucellosis patients is an important preventive measure. PMID:15504276

  11. Protection Patterns in Duck and Chicken after Homo- or Hetero-Subtypic Reinfections with H5 and H7 Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Viruses: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Hélène; Soubies, Sébastien Mathieu; Croville, Guillaume; Loupias, Josyane; Marc, Daniel; Quéré, Pascale; Guérin, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses are circulating continuously in ducks, inducing a mostly asymptomatic infection, while chickens are accidental hosts highly susceptible to respiratory disease. This discrepancy might be due to a different host response to the virus between these two bird species and in particular to a different susceptibility to reinfection. In an attempt to address this question, we analyzed, in ducks and in chickens, the viral load in infected tissues and the humoral immune response after experimental primary and secondary challenge infections with either homologous or heterologous low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). Following homologous reinfection, ducks were only partially protected against viral shedding in the lower intestine in conjunction with a moderate antibody response, whereas chickens were totally protected against viral shedding in the upper respiratory airways and developed a stronger antibody response. On the contrary, heterologous reinfection was not followed by a reduced viral excretion in the upper airways of chickens, while ducks were still partially protected from intestinal excretion of the virus, with no correlation to the antibody response. Our comparative study provides a comprehensive demonstration of the variation of viral tropism and control of the host humoral response to LPAIV between two different bird species with different degrees of susceptibility to avian influenza. PMID:25153201

  12. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  13. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  14. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  16. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yang; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Du, Anariwa; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  17. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  18. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  19. [HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, J

    1997-05-01

    On June 4, 1981, MMWR published a report about Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homosexual men in Los Angeles. This was the first published report. A years later, this disease was named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the following year, Montangier et al in France discovered the causative agent, which they called lymphadenopathy virus (LAV), now known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1985, solid-phase enzymeimmunoassay for the detection of the antibody to HIV was developed. Since then, other new techniques for the identification of HIV infection have been become available. These include more sensitive methods (for example; polymerase chain reaction techniques). Although these techniques facilitate early and definite diagnosis of infection, these tests may fail to detect the antibody in sera during window period of infection or overdiagnose infection in sera contaminated with genes not related to HIV. Although preventing blood exposure is the primary means of preventing occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, appropriate post-exposure management is an important element of workplace safety. Information suggesting that zidovudine (ZDV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) may reduce the risk for HIV transmission after occupational exposure to HIV infected blood prompted a Public Health Service (PHS) interagency working group, with expert consultation, and recommendations on PEP and management of occupational exposure to HIV in relation to these findings were discussed.

  20. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  1. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  2. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  3. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heather D; Macgregor, Jennifer L; Nord, Kristin M; Tyring, Stephen; Rady, Peter; Engler, Danielle E; Grossman, Marc E

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

  4. Surgical treatment of acquired tracheocele.

    PubMed

    Porubsky, Edward A; Gourin, Christine G

    2006-06-01

    Acquired tracheoceles are rare clinical entities that can cause a variety of chronic and recurrent aerodigestive tract symptoms. The management of acquired tracheoceles is primarily conservative, but surgical intervention may be indicated for patients with refractory symptoms. We present a case of acquired tracheocele and describe a method of successful surgical management.

  5. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  6. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  7. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  9. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti-gastric ...

  10. Dengue Antibody and Zika: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus related to dengue that is rapidly spreading through the Americas. This outbreak is occurring in dengue-endemic areas where the population has acquired antibodies to dengue. Recent studies reveal that preexisting dengue antibodies may have opposite effects on Zika infection, transmission, and clinical outcome. Discerning these effects is critical to a better understanding of Zika pathogenesis and the prevention of future outbreaks.

  11. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  12. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  13. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  14. Recurrent stroke as a presenting feature of acquired partial lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Namburi R.; Reddy, Ponnala A.; Menon, Bindu; Karthik, T. S.; Ahmed, Faizal; Chakravarthy, Mithun

    2012-01-01

    Acquired partial lipodystrophy (PL) (Barraquer–Simons syndrome) is a rare condition with onset in childhood, and it is characterized by progressive loss of subcutaneous fat in a cephalocaudal fashion. This report describes a case of acquired PL in a 16-year-old girl, who had progressive loss of facial fat since 3 years. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anticardiolipin antibody, primary hypothyroidism, diabetes, and dyslipidemia may antedate the development of complications such as cerebrovascular stroke and cardiovascular disease. The girl had developed recurrent left hemiparesis, and withdrawn from school due to poor performance. PMID:23565465

  15. Antibodies in the treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David; Jaime-Pérez, Jose Carlos; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies have been the cornerstone of treatment of acquired aplastic anemia for more than 25 years. Treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is considered pivotal and the addition of cyclosporine improves the overall response rate. This antibody is heterogeneous and horse ATG is apparently more effective than rabbit ATG. Several issues remain unsolved in relation to the combination of ATG and cyclosporine: cost, toxicity and late clonal disorders. In recent years, alternative immunosuppressive therapy has been proposed and new antibodies have emerged: porcine ATG, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and rituximab. Experience with these antibodies is limited to a few studies with alemtuzumab being the most promising, but the results are interesting and provocative. More studies are needed to find the perfect antibody.

  16. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  17. Acquired myasthenia gravis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Evoli, Amelia

    2010-10-01

    This review discusses recent studies on myasthenia gravis with onset in childhood (juvenile myasthenia gravis) and neonatal myasthenia gravis. The occurrence of myasthenia gravis in childhood is strongly influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Juvenile myasthenia gravis is associated with antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in most patients. Thymoma is rare, but often malignant in children. The frequency of juvenile myasthenia gravis with antibodies to the muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) varies markedly in different countries; some distinct features have been described. Management of juvenile myasthenia gravis does not differ, on the whole, from that of adult myasthenia gravis. Timing of thymectomy in young children is still controversial. Maternal antifetal type AChR antibodies can cause persistent focal weakness in the offspring, while neonatal myasthenia gravis associated with MuSK antibodies is often a severe and protracted albeit transient disease. Juvenile myasthenia gravis, like its adult-onset counterpart, is a heterogeneous disease. Clinical presentation is influenced by antibody status, ethnicity and age of onset. Treatment is very effective, but guidelines and controlled trials are needed.The risk for neonatal myasthenia gravis appears to be markedly influenced by maternal antibody subclass and antigen specificity. Adequate treatment in mothers can reduce both frequency and severity of neonatal disease.

  18. [Clinical cases of acquired coagulation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Hino, M; Ota, K; Akahori, M; Hirai, M; Inoue, T; Mugitani, A; Tatsumi, N

    2000-12-01

    The acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are classified into alloantibodies, which appear in association with supplementary treatment for congenital coagulation factor deficiency, and autoantibodies, which are spontaneously produced. We report here 2 cases of acquired factor VIII inhibitor and 1 case of factor V inhibitor. Case 1: A 52-year-old woman noted swelling of the right parotid region in March 1988. Though contrast examination was scheduled, she was admitted for detailed examination due to a markedly prolonged coagulation time. An APTT correction test suggested that decreased factor VIII activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. Since antinuclear antibody and SS-A antibody were positive and infiltration by lymphocytes in the salivary gland acini in a lip biopsy specimen was detected, Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed. Case 2: A 33-year-old woman had normal delivery of her second child in February 1998. In June 1998, she suffered slight contusion in the left lower limb. The affected site became swollen and painful, making walking difficult. Since both upper limbs became markedly swollen after 1 week, she visited our hospital. Prolonged APTT and a marked decrease in factor VIII activity were observed. Factor VIII inhibitor titer was high at 19 Bethesda units. Case 3: A 64-year-old man had had asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria since the beginning of August 1998 but was placed under observation since no abnormal findings were observed on various imaging tests. However, he was admitted to Osaka City General Medical Center because of vesicular tamponade. Factor V activity was markedly decreased to 1.0%. PT correction test suggested that decreased factor V activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. The underlying disease could not be determined in this case. In patients with acquired coagulation inhibitors, bleeding symptoms are reported to be mild in many cases, and severe bleeding is rare. However, cases of death without severe bleeding or

  19. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  20. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  1. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  2. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  3. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  4. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  5. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of liabilities...

  6. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  7. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  8. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct.

  9. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  10. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenping; Yan, Li

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective alternatives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-based regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:21527062

  11. Azathioprine therapy for acquired myasthenia gravis in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Dewey, C W; Coates, J R; Ducoté, J M; Meeks, J C; Fradkin, J M

    1999-01-01

    Five dogs with acquired myasthenia gravis (MG), verified via positive serum acetylcholine (ACh) receptor antibody concentrations, were treated with a drug protocol including azathioprine (AZA). Four of the five dogs were concurrently treated with pyridostigmine. Azathioprine was used as the sole immunosuppressive agent in four dogs. One dog was temporarily treated with a combination of an immunosuppressive dose of prednisone and AZA, then maintained on AZA as the sole immunosuppressive drug. Three patients experienced complete remission of clinical signs within three months of therapy. In the four dogs for which follow-up serum ACh receptor antibody concentrations were available, initial versus final concentrations decreased substantially (81%), coincident with clinical improvement. One dog died suddenly due to a suspected myasthenic crisis before attaining the target dose of AZA. Two of the four surviving dogs were euthanized approximately one and seven years after diagnosis. One of these two dogs was euthanized because of a rib osteosarcoma, and the other dog was euthanized because of paraparesis of undetermined cause. The remaining two dogs were alive and doing well at the time of final follow-up evaluation, approximately six months and one year after diagnosis. The use of AZA as a therapeutic agent for acquired canine MG has not been investigated. The cases presented in this report suggest a potentially important role for AZA in the treatment of acquired MG in dogs.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy.

  13. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  14. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  15. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    PubMed

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  16. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-11-03

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma (nosocomial bacterial meningitis). Despite advances in treatment and vaccinations, community-acquired bacterial meningitis remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common causative bacteria and are associated with high mortality and morbidity; vaccines targeting these organisms, which have designs similar to the successful vaccine that targets Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis, are now being used in many routine vaccination programmes. Experimental and genetic association studies have increased our knowledge about the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. Early antibiotic treatment improves the outcome, but the growing emergence of drug resistance as well as shifts in the distribution of serotypes and groups are fuelling further development of new vaccines and treatment strategies. Corticosteroids were found to be beneficial in high-income countries depending on the bacterial species. Further improvements in the outcome are likely to come from dampening the host inflammatory response and implementing preventive measures, especially the development of new vaccines.

  17. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neutralizing Antibody Response in Bovine Serum and Nasal and Salivary Secretions After Immunization with Live or Inactivated Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Felipe; Ohlbaum, Adela; Contreras, Guillermo

    1973-01-01

    Calves develop nasal and salivary neutralizing antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus after nasal inoculation with live virus. Nasal and salivary antibody was not detected after exposure to inactive virus. Serum antibodies were induced by live and inactive virus given subcutaneously. Passively acquired antibodies were detected as long as 7 months after birth. PMID:4353542

  19. Inherited and acquired thrombophilia: pregnancy outcome and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; Cavaliere, A F; Straface, G; Di Gianantonio, E; Caruso, A

    2006-08-01

    Maternal thrombophilias increases the risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome. An extensive literature review highlights the role of inherited and acquired thrombophilic disorders in spontaneous abortion, both early and late, recurrent or isolate, in intrauterine growth retardation, in placenta abruption, in pre-eclampsia and in venous thromboembolism. We have particularly focused attention on the following factors: antithrombin III (ATIII), proteins C (PC) and S (PS) deficiencies, genetic mutations particularly factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin gene G20210A (PTM) and the thermolabile variant of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR) gene, lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and anticardiolipin antibodies, VIIIc factor, hyperhomocysteinemia and acquired activated protein C resistance. Appropriate treatment can improve pregnancy outcome without teratogenic effects.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, tyrosine kinases (TKs) have been recognized as central players and regulators of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, and are therefore considered suitable potential targets for anti-cancer therapies. Several strategies for targeting TKs have been developed, the most successful being monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, increasing evidence of acquired resistance to these drugs has been documented, and extensive preclinical studies are ongoing to try to understand the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells are able to bypass their inhibitory activity. This review intends to present the most recently identified molecular mechanisms that mediate acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, identified through the use of in vitro models or the analysis of patient samples. The knowledge obtained from these studies will help to design better therapies that prevent and overcome resistance to treatment in cancer patients. PMID:20385023

  1. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  2. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for ...

  3. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003552.htm Platelet-associated antibodies blood test To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a ...

  4. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e95-e103.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  6. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Antibody Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content on Lab Tests Online has been reviewed and approved by our Editorial Review Board . At a ... screen is used to screen an individual's blood for antibodies directed against red blood cell (RBC) ...

  7. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  8. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  9. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  10. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  12. Anesthetic management in a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkiliineni, Venkata Rama Rao; Panidapu, Nagarjuna; Parasa, Mrunalini; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA) syndrome is one of the most common thrombocytophilias but, unfortunately, goes unrecognized most often. It is an auto-immune disorder in which thrombotic events and a recurrent fetal loss occur in the presence of antibodies to phospholipids. It is the most common acquired hyper-coagulable state. There is a limited literature on peroperative management of patients with this syndrome. We report a case of APLA syndrome in a parturient due to its rarity and complexity.

  13. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    PubMed

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  14. Kinetics of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Neutralizing and Virus-Specific Antibodies after Primary Infection with EBV.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wei; Hayes, Gregory M; Liu, Hui; Gemmell, Lorraine; Schmeling, David O; Radecki, Pierce; Aguilar, Fiona; Burbelo, Peter D; Woo, Jennifer; Balfour, Henry H; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Prospective studies of antibodies to multiple Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins and EBV neutralizing antibodies in the same individuals before, during, and after primary EBV infection have not been reported. We studied antibody responses to EBV in college students who acquired primary EBV infection during prospective surveillance and correlated the kinetics of antibody response with the severity of disease. Neutralizing antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibodies to gp350, the major target of neutralizing antibody, reached peak levels at medians of 179 and 333 days after the onset of symptoms of infectious mononucleosis, respectively. No clear correlation was found between the severity of the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis and the peak levels of antibody to individual viral proteins or to neutralizing antibody. In summary, we found that titers of neutralizing antibody and antibodies to multiple EBV proteins increase over many months after primary infection with EBV. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Shambhu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report. A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests' results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion. While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization. PMID:28473932

  16. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood.

  17. Acquired haemophilia in recipients of depot thioxanthenes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A J; Manson, L M; Dasani, H; Beddall, A; Collins, P; Shima, M; Ludlam, C A

    2000-11-01

    We present two cases in which the occurrence of acquired haemophilia is associated with the use of depot preparations of the thioxanthenes zuclopenthixol and flupenthixol. These drugs have not previously been implicated in the aetiology of acquired haemophilia.

  18. 7 CFR 929.12 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.12 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling such cranberries. ...

  19. 7 CFR 929.12 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.12 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling such cranberries. ...

  20. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  1. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  2. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  3. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  4. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  5. Acquiring Evolving Technologies: Web Services Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards Harry L. Levinson Software Engineering Institute Carnegie...Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards © 2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring

  6. Reaginic antibodies in dogs infected with Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. F.; Esandi, Miguela V. Pérez

    1971-01-01

    Serum samples from twenty dogs infected with Echinococcus granulosus were tested for the presence of homocytotropic skin-sensitizing antibodies. Five of the twenty sera were positive in this test, while none of the sera from twenty normal dogs was positive. The antibody was thermolabile and susceptible to 2-mercaptoethanol reduction. Reaginic antibodies to cestode antigens have not been described previously in dogs, though they are frequently associated with helminth infection in other animals and may play a role in acquired resistance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4994864

  7. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  8. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy.

  9. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  10. Sero diagnosis of Legionella infection in community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Javed, Sabah; Chaudhry, Rama; Passi, Kapil; Sharma, Sutikshan; K, Padmaja; Dhawan, Benu; Dey, A B

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as an emerging pathogen responsible for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. In India, the actual burden is not known. The present study was thus undertaken to see the presence of Legionella infection in patients with community acquired pneumonia admitted in a tertiary care centre in north India. Both children and adults (n=113) with symptoms of pneumonia were included in the study. Clinical samples (blood, urine, nasopharyngeal aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum, etc.) were collected and subjected to culture and other tests. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was done by commercial kits for all the three classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM & IgA). Urinary antigen was also detected using commercial kits. Culture was performed on 51 respiratory tract fluid samples. Serum samples of 44 healthy controls were also screened for the presence of anti-legionella antibodies (IgG, IgM & IgA). Thirty one of the 113 cases (27.43%) were serologically positive. Anti-legionella IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were positive in 7.96, 15.92 and 11.50 per cent patients respectively. In controls, seropositivity was 9.09 (4/44). IgA was positive in 3 and IgM, IgG combined in one. Antigenuria detection by Microwell ELISA kit showed 17.69 per cent positivity. Four antigenuria positive patients were also serologically positive; of these two patients were positive for IgM, hence considered as confirmed cases of Legionella infection. None of the sample was culture positive. Combination of serology and antigenuria detection may be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of Legionella infection in absence of culture positivity. In order to evaluate the actual burden of Legionella in community acquired pneumonia, further studies with larger samples need to be done.

  11. Corticomotoneuronal function and hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Yiannikas, Con; Vincent, Angela; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    Acquired neuromyotonia encompasses a group of inflammatory disorders characterized by symptoms reflecting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, which may be clinically confused in the early stages with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite a clear peripheral nerve focus, it remains unclear whether the ectopic activity in acquired neuromyotonia receives a central contribution. To clarify whether cortical hyperexcitability contributes to development of clinical features of acquired neuromyotonia, the present study investigated whether threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation could detect cortical hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia, and whether this technique could differentiate acquired neuromyotonia from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken in 18 patients with acquired neuromyotonia and 104 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with results compared to 62 normal controls. Short-interval intracortical inhibition in patients with acquired neuromyotonia was significantly different when compared to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (averaged short interval intracortical inhibition acquired neuromyotonia 11.3 +/- 1.9%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2.6 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.001). In addition, the motor evoked potential amplitudes (acquired neuromyotonia 21.0 +/- 3.1%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 38.1 +/- 2.2%, P < 0.0001), intracortical facilitation (acquired neuromyotonia -0.9 +/- 1.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -2.3 +/- 0.6%, P < 0.0001), resting motor thresholds (acquired neuromyotonia 62.2 +/- 1.6%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 57.2 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05) and cortical silent period durations (acquired neuromyotonia 212.8 +/- 6.9 ms; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 181.1 +/- 4.3 ms, P < 0.0001) were significantly different between patients with acquired neuromyotonia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation established corticomotoneuronal integrity

  12. An extra X does not prevent acquired hemophilia - Pregnancy-associated acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Barg, Assaf A; Livnat, Tami; Kenet, Gili

    2017-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a severe bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII (FVIII). With an estimated annual incidence of 1.3 to 1.5 per million, AHA is a rare disease. An extremely rare form of AHA has been described among women in the peripartum period, and may present with peripartum hemorrhage. Notably, although hemorrhagic symptoms commonly present 1-4 months around delivery, they may occur up to 1 year after parturition. When caring for a mother with AHA it is important to note that Factor VIII inhibitor may be transferred via the placenta from the mother to the fetus. Hence the newborn may also be affected. It is important to increase the awareness of Gynecologists for clinical symptoms and laboratory signs of AHA in order to avoid delayed diagnosis. Treatment may involve use of bypass agents to control hemorrhage, despite the risk of thrombosis, while immunomodulation (with increasing role for Rituximab) may be required to eradicate the inhibiting antibodies. Our review will evaluate the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of peripartum AHA, focusing upon mother and infant care. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  14. Demystified...recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Nelson, P N; Warren, P; Astley, S J; Murray, P G; Greenman, J

    2004-09-01

    Recombinant antibodies are important tools for biomedical research and are increasingly being used as clinical diagnostic/therapeutic reagents. In this article, a background to humanized antibodies is given, together with details of the generation of antibody fragments--for example, single chain Fv fragments. Phage antibody fragments are fast becoming popular and can be generated by simple established methods of affinity enrichment from libraries derived from immune cells. Phage display methodology can also be used for the affinity enrichment of existing antibody fragments to provide a reagent with a higher affinity. Here, phage antibodies are demystified to provide a greater understanding of the potential of these reagents and to engage clinicians and biomedical scientists alike to think about potential applications in pathology and clinical settings.

  15. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  16. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  17. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction.

  18. Seagull to acquire arkla exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-23

    Seagull Energy Corp., Houston, has agreed to acquire Arkla Exploration Inc. from Arkla Inc., Shreveport, La., for about $402 million. The transaction-expected to net Seagull reserves totaling about 578 bcf of gas and 7.3 million bbl of oil and condensate-would more than double Seagull's proved reserves and nearly double its total assets. According to Seagull's 1991 annual report, the company's reserves at yearend 1991 were estimated at 401.2 bcf of gas equivalent (bcfe), including 335.1 bcf of gas and 11 million bbl of oil. Independent engineers at yearend 1991 estimated Arkla's proved reserves at 635 bcf of gas and 9 million bbl of liquids. Seagull Chairman Barry J. Galt said the company plans to keep many of Arkla Exploration's employees and to establish a meaningful presence in Shreveport. Arkla's already got good people in Shreveport and an operating base, a Seagull official said. We want to move in, put our name on the door, and continue the good operations Arkla already has. Seagull has lined up financing for the acquisition from a group of major U.S. banks. A new credit facility-consisting of a $475 million line of revolving credit and a $150 million 3 year term loan-will replace an exiting $225 million line of revolving credit. Boards of both companies have approved the deal, which Seagull and Arkla hope to close before yearend, subject to regulatory approvals and purchase price adjustments.

  19. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis.

  20. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  1. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  2. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  3. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  4. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  5. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  6. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated.

  7. Antibody responses of raccoons naturally exposed to influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Root, J Jeffrey; Bentler, Kevin T; Sullivan, Heather J; Blitvich, Bradley J; McLean, Robert G; Franklin, Alan B

    2010-10-01

    An investigation was performed to describe the responses of naturally acquired antibodies to influenza A virus in raccoons (Procyon lotor) over time. Seven wild raccoons, some of which had been exposed to multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, were held in captivity for 279 days, and serum samples were collected on 10 occasions during this interval. Serum samples from 9 of 10 bleeding occasions were tested using an epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the presence of antibodies to influenza A virus. Although titer declines were noted in most animals over time, all animals maintained detectable antibodies for the duration of the study. These data indicate that naturally acquired antibodies to influenza A virus can remain detectable in raccoons for many months, with the actual duration presumably being much longer because all animals had been exposed to influenza A virus before this study commenced. This information is important to surveillance programs because the duration of naturally acquired antibodies to influenza A virus in wildlife populations is largely unknown.

  8. Case of linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis associated with acquired hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Osao; Yamamoto, Yu-ichi; Awazawa, Ryoko; Nonaka, Kimiko; Taira, Kiyohito; Asato, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Keisuke; Oyama, Bungo; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Uezato, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis caused by circulating IgA autoantibodies directed against the antigens at the basement membrane zone. Most linear IgA bullous dermatosis cases are idiopathic, but some are associated with the use of certain drugs, infections, lymphoproliferative disorders, internal malignancies, autoimmune disorders, collagen diseases or, very rarely, other skin diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases. Acquired hemophilia is also rare; it is a coagulation disease caused by anti-factor VIII IgG antibodies. Acquired hemophilia has been reported to be associated with malignant tumors, pregnancy or postpartum, drug reactions, collagen diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders, and skin diseases such as psoriasis and pemphigus. We report a case of hemophilia acquired during the course of linear IgA bullous dermatosis and review reported cases of autoimmune bullous dermatoses associated with acquired hemophilia.

  9. Insights into the naturally acquired immune response to Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Longley, Rhea J; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread of the malaria parasites causing human disease, yet it is comparatively understudied compared with Plasmodium falciparum. In this article we review what is known about naturally acquired immunity to P. vivax, and importantly, how this differs to that acquired against P. falciparum. Immunity to clinical P. vivax infection is acquired more quickly than to P. falciparum, and evidence suggests humans in endemic areas also have a greater capacity to mount a successful immunological memory response to this pathogen. Both of these factors give promise to the idea of a successful P. vivax vaccine. We review what is known about both the cellular and humoral immune response, including the role of cytokines, antibodies, immunoregulation, immune memory and immune dysfunction. Furthermore, we discuss where the future lies in terms of advancing our understanding of naturally acquired immunity to P. vivax, through the use of well-designed longitudinal epidemiological studies and modern tools available to immunologists.

  10. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  11. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  12. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  15. Affinity purification of antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  16. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  17. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  18. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  19. Antibodies for biodefense

    PubMed Central

    Froude, Jeffrey W; Stiles, Bradley; Pelat, Thibaut

    2011-01-01

    Potential bioweapons are biological agents (bacteria, viruses and toxins) at risk of intentional dissemination. Biodefense, defined as development of therapeutics and vaccines against these agents, has seen an increase, particularly in the US, following the 2001 anthrax attack. This review focuses on recombinant antibodies and polyclonal antibodies for biodefense that have been accepted for clinical use. These antibodies aim to protect against primary potential bioweapons or category A agents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, botulinum neurotoxins, smallpox virus and certain others causing viral hemorrhagic fevers) and certain category B agents. Potential for prophylactic use is presented, as well as frequent use of oligoclonal antibodies or synergistic effect with other molecules. Capacities and limitations of antibodies for use in biodefense are discussed, and are generally applicable to the field of infectious diseases. PMID:22123065

  20. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  1. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  2. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies.

  3. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC Antibody Screen ; Blood Typing ; Type ... a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) . It is used to identify ...

  4. Human Immune Responses to HTLV-III Virus Infections in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-10

    in western blots in the antibodies to HIV-1 structural antigens between this serum and the other sera which neutralize HIV at low dilutions but enhance...n3est AvailabCe AD N T== HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSE TO HTLV -III VIRUS INFECTION IN ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME N ANNUAL REPORT FRANCIS A. ENNIS D...Stimulation of HIV-1 specific T cells. We have stimulated the PBL of 20 HIV antibody-positive donors with live HIV-1 ( HTLV -IIIB) virus, and only 30% respond

  5. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R; Buckley, Camilla; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2014-06-01

    To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody-positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. THREE DISTINCT CLINICORADIOLOGIC PHENOTYPES WERE RECOGNIZED: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease.

  6. Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Kenji; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Ugajin, Tsukasa; Ohnuma, Naotsugu; Obata, Kazushige; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Mukai, Kaori; Kawano, Yohei; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Watanabe, Naohiro; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are ectoparasitic arthropods that can transmit a variety of microorganisms to humans and animals during blood feeding, causing serious infectious disorders, including Lyme disease. Acaricides are pharmacologic agents that kill ticks. The emergence of acaricide-resistant ticks calls for alternative control strategies for ticks and tick-borne diseases. Many animals develop resistance to ticks after repeated infestations, but the nature of this acquired anti-tick immunity remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks in mice and found that antibodies were required, as was IgFc receptor expression on basophils but not on mast cells. The infiltration of basophils at tick-feeding sites occurred during the second, but not the first, tick infestation. To assess the requirement for basophil infiltration to acquired tick resistance, mice expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor under the control of the mast cell protease 8 (Mcpt8) promoter were generated. Diphtheria toxin administration to these mice selectively ablated basophils. Diphtheria toxin–mediated basophil depletion before the second tick infestation resulted in loss of acquired tick resistance. These data provide the first clear evidence, to our knowledge, that basophils play an essential and nonredundant role in antibody-mediated acquired immunity against ticks, which may suggest new strategies for controlling tick-borne diseases. PMID:20664169

  7. Stereospecific antibodies to propranolol.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chorev, M; Feingers, J; Levitzki, A; Inbar, M

    1986-04-21

    The beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol was activated through its side chain, coupled to bovine serum albumin, and injected into BALB/c mice. After fusion of the splenocytes from these immunized mice with the NS-1 myeloma cell line, two hybridomas, producing monoclonal anti-propranolol antibodies, were isolated. Clone P-49 was monospecific for propranolol, with a significant preference for the 1-stereoisomer, as compared to the d form. On the other hand, clone P-28 cross-reacted with alprenolol as well as some other beta-antagonists. Both classes of antibodies competed with A431 epidermoid carcinoma beta 2-adrenoceptors for the binding of [3H]propranolol. When ascites cells from clone P-28 were fixed with glutaraldehyde, the anti-propranolol monoclonal antibody became cell bound. These cell-bound P-28 antibodies bind propranolol and other beta-adrenergic ligands with a similar ranking order to the soluble monoclonal antibody. The cell-bound antibody displayed a 5-fold higher affinity towards 1-propranolol than the soluble monoclonal antibody. The practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. STUDIES ON ANTIBODY PRODUCTION

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert G.; Coons, Albert H.; Connolly, Jeanne M.

    1955-01-01

    After subcutaneous injection of hen's ovalbumin or diphtheria toxoid precipitated with aluminum phosphate, the production of antibody, as judged by the presence in the tissues of antibody-containing cells, proceeds partly within the regional lymphatic glands and partly in the granulation tissue surrounding the nodule which develops at the site of injection. The first production of antibody takes place in the regional lymphatic gland and antibody production in the local granuloma becomes apparent only from 14 days onwards (rabbit). Antibody-containing plasma cells were demonstrated in the local granuloma up to 7 weeks. Antibody-containing cells in the regional lymphatic glands reach maximum numbers at 2 weeks following injection and decrease thereafter to few cells at 5 weeks. The adjuvant effect of the aluminum phosphate is interpreted as due partly to the delay in absorption of antigen from the local site of its injection which results in prolongation of stimulation of cells within the regional lymphatic glands, and partly to the production of a local granuloma which contains antibody-producing plasma cells. PMID:14392242

  9. Therapeutic antibody technology 97.

    PubMed

    Larrick, J W; Gavilondo, J

    1998-01-01

    Almost 200 antibody aficionados attended the Therapeutic Antibody Technology 97 meeting, held September 21-24, 1997 at the Holiday Inn, Union Square in the heart of San Francisco, CA. The meeting was sponsored by the Palo Alto Institute of Molecular Medicine and organized by James W. Larrick (PAIMM) and Dennis R. Burton (Scripps Research Institute). The meeting featured excellent discussions on many interesting talks and a number of poster presentations. It is likely that another meeting will be organized in 2 years, however in the meantime, an effort is underway to organize a 'Virtual Antibody Society' to be set up on the web server at Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA (Questions and comments on this project can be sent to: Jwlarrick@aol.com or Burton@scripps.edu). Richard Lerner (Scripps) gave the keynote address on 'Catalytic Antibodies', describing recent work with Carlos Barbas on so-called reactive immunization to generate a high activity aldolase catalytic antibody. This antibody, soon to be described in an article in Science, is the first commercially available catalytic antibody.

  10. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  11. Rituximab in the treatment of acquired factor VIII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiestner, Adrian; Cho, Hearn J; Asch, Adam S; Michelis, Mary Ann; Zeller, Jack A; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Weksler, Babette B; Schechter, Geraldine P

    2002-11-01

    Autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) are rare but can cause life-threatening bleeding requiring costly factor replacement and prolonged immunosuppression. We report 4 consecutively treated patients whose acquired FVIII inhibitors responded rapidly to immunosuppressive regimens that included rituximab, a monoclonal antibody against CD20(+) B cells. Three patients had spontaneously occurring inhibitors. The fourth, a patient with mild hemophilia A, developed both an autoantibody and an alloantibody following recombinant FVIII treatment. Pretreatment FVIII activities ranged from less than 1% to 4% and inhibitor titers from 5 to 60 Bethesda units (BU). One patient with polymyalgia rheumatica who developed the inhibitor while receiving prednisone responded to single agent rituximab. The hemophilia patient had rapid resolution of the autoantibody, whereas the alloantibody persisted for months. Responses continue off treatment from more than 7 to more than 12 months. This report adds to the growing evidence that rituximab has efficacy in immune disorders resulting from autoantibody formation.

  12. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A: Updated review of evidence and treatment guidance.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Kempton, Christine L; Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter W; Knoebl, Paul; Leissinger, Cindy A; Tiede, Andreas; Kessler, Craig M

    2017-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disease resulting from autoantibodies (inhibitors) against endogenous factor VIII (FVIII) that leads to bleeding, which is often spontaneous and severe. AHA tends to occur in elderly patients with comorbidities and is associated with high mortality risk from underlying comorbidities, bleeding, or treatment complications. Treatment, which consists of hemostatic management and eradication of the inhibitors, can be challenging to manage. Few data are available to guide the management of AHA-related bleeding and eradication of the disease-causing antibodies. Endorsed by the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society of North America, an international panel of experts in AHA analyzed key questions, reviewed the literature, weighed the evidence and formed a consensus to update existing guidelines. AHA is likely underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed in real-world clinical practice. Recommendations for the management of AHA are summarized here based on the available data, integrated with the clinical experience of panel participants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described.

  15. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  16. Acquired Surface Dyslexia: The Evidence from Hebrew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnboim, Smadar

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the symptoms of acquired surface dyslexia in Hebrew. Four acquired surface dyslexic adults were compared with eight normal second graders in terms of reading strategy. Homophones and homographs were a major source of difficulty for native Hebrew surface dyslexic readers; the normal second graders used a non-lexical strategy. (45…

  17. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Elise I; Mutasim, Diya F; Heaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) in a 56-year-old white woman. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is an exceedingly rare group of heterogeneous disorders that has been almost exclusively reported in young Japanese males. Our case is unique in that AlGA may be underrecognized in this patient population.

  18. Acquiring and Managing Electronic Journals. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Donnelyn; Yue, Paoshan

    Electronic journals are both a blessing and a curse for libraries. To be meaningful in the current information environment--to meet users' ever-increasing demands--libraries must acquire as many appropriate full text resources as possible, as quickly as possible, and make them easy to use. This Digest provides tips for acquiring and providing…

  19. Assays of thyroid-stimulating antibody

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.M.; Zakarija, M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the two major assay methods of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease. The basic procedures involve: (1) some index of thyroid stimulation, usually in vitro, using TSAb to indicate its activity; and (2) indirect recognition by assessment of the inhibition of binding of radioiodinated thyrotropin (TSH) to a preparation of its receptor, i.e., TSH-binding inhibition or TBI. There is potential for misinterpretation of data acquired by testing patients' sera by one or the other basic procedure.

  20. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  1. Association of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Podder, Sidhertha; Cervates, Jose; Dey, Bimalangshu R

    2015-10-13

    Pernicious anaemia is an autoimmune disease caused by intrinsic factor antibody; it leads to vitamin B12 deficiency and is marked by ineffective erythropoiesis. Haematological features reveal macrocytosis, hyperchromasia and hypersegmented neutrophils. Schistocytes are typically seen in microangiopathy, such as in thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP)/haemolytic uraemic syndrome or disseminated intravascular haemolysis (DIC). We report a case of a patient with severe anaemia who presented to the emergency room. Peripheral smear revealed macrocytosis, hypersegmented neutrophils and marked schistocytosis. The patient also had high reticulocyte count with high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated D-dimer, low fibrinogen and low haptoglobin. Vitamin B12 level came back low and the presence of intrinsic factor antibody confirmed pernicious anaemia. ADAMTS13 level was noted to be mildly reduced, which raised the suspicion of the association of acquired TTP with pernicious anaemia. Acquired TTP is another autoimmune disorder and its association with pernicious anaemia needs further evaluation.

  2. Legionnaires' Disease acquired within the homes of two patients: link to the home water supply

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.; Muraca, P.

    1987-03-06

    Two patients with sporadic community-acquired legionnaires' disease are described. Legionella pneumophila was isolated from sputum specimens, and seroconversion of antibody titers was demonstrated for both patients. Legionella pneumophila was also recovered from the residential water supply of both patients. In each case, the serogroup of the environmental organism matched that of the infecting organism. In one patient, serogroup 3 was isolated - a rare cause of legionnaires' disease, and in the second case, monoclonal antibody testing confirmed that the serogroup 1 organisms isolated from sputum and residential water supply samples were identical. The incubation period of legionnaires' disease is presumed to be up to two weeks. Because of medical problems, both patients had been confined to their homes for the entire two weeks before the onset of symptoms. This is the first report that links acquisition of community-acquired legionnaires' disease to contaminated water supplies within the homes of susceptible patients.

  3. Acquired Hemophilia A: A Frequently Overlooked Autoimmune Hemorrhagic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare hemorrhagic disease in which autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII- (FVIII-) neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) impair the intrinsic coagulation system. As the inhibitors developed in AHA are autoantibodies, the disease may have an autoimmune cause and is often associated with autoimmune disease. Although acute hemorrhage associated with AHA may be fatal and is costly to treat, AHA is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed. AHA should thus be considered in the differential diagnosis particularly in postpartum women and the elderly with bleeding tendency or prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Cross-mixing tests and measurement of FVIII-binding antibodies are useful to confirm AHA diagnosis. For treatment of acute hemorrhage, hemostatic therapy with bypassing agents should be provided. Unlike in congenital hemophilia A with inhibitors, in which immune tolerance induction therapy using repetitive infusions of high-dose FVIII concentrates is effective for inhibitor eradication, immune tolerance induction therapy has shown poor efficacy in treating AHA. Immunosuppressive treatment should thus be initiated to eradicate inhibitors as soon as the diagnosis of AHA is confirmed. PMID:24741588

  4. Acquired hemophilia A: a frequently overlooked autoimmune hemorrhagic disorder.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare hemorrhagic disease in which autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII- (FVIII-) neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) impair the intrinsic coagulation system. As the inhibitors developed in AHA are autoantibodies, the disease may have an autoimmune cause and is often associated with autoimmune disease. Although acute hemorrhage associated with AHA may be fatal and is costly to treat, AHA is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed. AHA should thus be considered in the differential diagnosis particularly in postpartum women and the elderly with bleeding tendency or prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Cross-mixing tests and measurement of FVIII-binding antibodies are useful to confirm AHA diagnosis. For treatment of acute hemorrhage, hemostatic therapy with bypassing agents should be provided. Unlike in congenital hemophilia A with inhibitors, in which immune tolerance induction therapy using repetitive infusions of high-dose FVIII concentrates is effective for inhibitor eradication, immune tolerance induction therapy has shown poor efficacy in treating AHA. Immunosuppressive treatment should thus be initiated to eradicate inhibitors as soon as the diagnosis of AHA is confirmed.

  5. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-01-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change. Images Fig. 1 PMID:389957

  6. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  7. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  8. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  9. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  10. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  11. Localization of Haemophilus ducreyi in naturally acquired chancroidal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Margaret E; Townsend, Carisa A; Ronald, Allan R; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid. In human inoculation experiments, bacteria colocalize with neutrophils and macrophages but remain extracellular. The organism also colocalizes with collagen and fibrin but not with keratinocytes, fibroblasts, laminin, or fibronectin. These relationships are established by 48 h postinoculation and persist through the pustular stage of disease. To extend these observations to the ulcerative stage of disease, and to compare results in the human model with those of natural disease, we obtained biopsies from patients with naturally acquired chancroid. All ulcers were culture positive for H. ducreyi and histologically very similar to pustules from the human model. Staining with H. ducreyi-specific monoclonal antibodies demonstrated H. ducreyi within 5 biopsies. The organism was chiefly found within the granulocytic infiltrate of the ulcer. Dual staining for H. ducreyi and eukaryotic tissue components showed that H. ducreyi colocalized with neutrophils and fibrin at the ulcerative stage of disease. No bacteria were associated with keratinocytes, fibroblasts, or collagen. Overall, these findings are consistent with results from the human model. This is the first reported study to localize bacteria specifically identified as H. ducreyi within naturally acquired chancroid.

  12. Role of autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system in children.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Reindl, Markus

    2013-12-01

    The recent detection of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica, or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and multiple sclerosis, in children strongly indicates that B-cell-dependent mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis. This review aims to give an overview of the role of autoantibodies in inflammatory demyelinating pediatric diseases, with a focus on antibodies to AQP4 and MOG.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  14. Potential Suppressive Effects of Two C60 Fullerene Derivatives on Acquired Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Udaka, Asako; Uemura, Eiichiro; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Aoshima, Hisae; Gao, Jian-Qing; Kokubo, Ken; Oshima, Takumi; Nagano, Kazuya; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mashino, Tadahiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-10-01

    The therapeutic effects of fullerene derivatives on many models of inflammatory disease have been demonstrated. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of these nanoparticles remain to be elucidated, though their beneficial roles in allergy and autoimmune diseases suggest their suppressive potential in acquired immunity. Here, we evaluated the effects of C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid (C60-P) and polyhydroxylated fullerene (C60(OH)36) on the acquired immune response in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, both C60 derivatives had dose-dependent suppressive effects on T cell receptor-mediated activation of T cells and antibody production by B cells under anti-CD40/IL-4 stimulation, similar to the actions of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In addition, C60-P suppressed ovalbumin-specific antibody production and ovalbumin-specific T cell responses in vivo, although T cell-independent antibodies responses were not affected by C60-P. Together, our data suggest that fullerene derivatives can suppress acquired immune responses that require T cells.

  15. Amended Final Report - Antibodies to Radionuclides. Engineering by Surface Display for Immunosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2013-06-14

    The relatively new techniques of antibody display, which permit molecular engineering of antibody structure and function, have the potential to revolutionize the way scientists generate binding proteins for specific applications. However, the skills required to efficiently use antibody display techniques have proven difficult for other laboratories to acquire without hands-on training and exchange of laboratory personnel. This research project is designed bring important expertise in antibody display to the State of Louisiana while pursuing a project with direct relevance to the DOE’s EM program.

  16. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  17. Bispecific Antibodies as a Development Platform for New Concepts and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fa; Wen, Weihong; Qin, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    With the development of molecular cloning technology and the deep understanding of antibody engineering, there are diverse bispecific antibody formats from which to choose to pursue the optimal biological activity and clinical purpose. The single-chain-based bispecific antibodies usually bridge tumor cells with immune cells and form an immunological synapse because of their relatively small size. Bispecific antibodies in the IgG format include asymmetric bispecific antibodies and homodimerized bispecific antibodies, all of which have an extended blood half-life and their own crystalline fragment (Fc)-mediated functions. Besides retargeting effector cells to the site of cancer, new applications were established for bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies that can simultaneously bind to cell surface antigens and payloads are a very ideal delivery system for therapeutic use. Bispecific antibodies that can inhibit two correlated signaling molecules at the same time can be developed to overcome inherent or acquired resistance and to be more efficient angiogenesis inhibitors. Bispecific antibodies can also be used to treat hemophilia A by mimicking the function of factor VIII. Bispecific antibodies also have broad application prospects in bone disorders and infections and diseases of the central nervous system. The latest developments of the formats and application of bispecific antibodies will be reviewed. Furthermore, the challenges and perspectives are summarized in this review. PMID:28036020

  18. Acquired RAS or EGFR mutations and duration of response to EGFR blockade in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Emburgh, Beth O.; Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Lazzari, Luca; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Corti, Giorgio; Mussolin, Benedetta; Baldi, Federica; Buscarino, Michela; Bartolini, Alice; Valtorta, Emanuele; Vidal, Joana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Germano, Giovanni; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Ponzetti, Agostino; Albanell, Joan; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Montagut, Clara; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab is effective in a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the emergence of resistance limits the efficacy of these therapeutic agents. At relapse, the majority of patients develop RAS mutations, while a subset acquires EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) mutations. Here we find that patients who experience greater and longer responses to EGFR blockade preferentially develop EGFR ECD mutations, while RAS mutations emerge more frequently in patients with smaller tumour shrinkage and shorter progression-free survival. In circulating cell-free tumour DNA of patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies, RAS mutations emerge earlier than EGFR ECD variants. Subclonal RAS but not EGFR ECD mutations are present in CRC samples obtained before exposure to EGFR blockade. These data indicate that clonal evolution of drug-resistant cells is associated with the clinical outcome of CRC patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies. PMID:27929064

  19. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment. PMID:27869733

  20. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  1. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  2. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  3. Diffuse hyperpigmentation associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, S. A.; Brignol, Y. F.; Razavi, M. H.; Greeley, N.

    1992-01-01

    This article reports a case of diffuse hyperpigmentation in a 56-year-old Latino male after he was diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The possible causes of this hyperpigmentation are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1334155

  4. Acquired Brown's syndrome: an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Booth-Mason, S; Kyle, G M; Rossor, M; Bradbury, P

    1985-10-01

    A 62-year-old man with acquired Brown's syndrome is presented. This was due to an orbital metastatic deposit, a cause not previously reported. Other causes of this disorder and its treatment are discussed.

  5. Lash ptosis in congenital and acquired blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Khurram J; Lee, Michael S; Park, D J John; Harrison, Andrew R

    2007-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of lash ptosis (LP) in eyes with congenital and acquired blepharoptosis. We retrospectively graded photographs of 228 eyes from 174 patients with congenital or acquired blepharoptosis for LP. We used a 4-point rating scale for LP, in which 0 indicates no LP; 1, minimal; 2, moderate; and 3, severe. A prospective evaluation of LP in 30 eyes from 15 patients without blepharoptosis (control eyes) was also performed. A total of 107 eyes (in 87 patients) demonstrated congenital blepharoptosis and 121 eyes (in 87 patients) had acquired blepharoptosis. A moderate to severe rating of LP (rating, >/= 2) occurred in 60.7% of eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 28.9% of eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 6.7% of control eyes. Lash ptosis (rating, >/= 1) was present in 91.6% of eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 83.5% of eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 33.3% of control eyes. The mean LP rating was 2.1 for eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 1.3 for eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 0.6 for control eyes. Lash ptosis was common in the patients with blepharoptosis. Moderate to severe LP occurred more commonly in all forms of blepharoptosis compared with normal eyes, with more frequent and more severe LP demonstrated in eyes with congenital blepharoptosis.

  6. Antibody decoration of neurofilaments

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have decorated neurofilaments with antibodies against three polypeptides (designated here as H [mol wt = 195,000], 45[mol wt = 145,000], and 46[mol wt = 73,000]) in an effort to understand the arrangement of these polypeptides within neurofilaments. The three polypeptides were purified and antibodies were raised against each. The cross-reactivity of the antibodies suggested that each polypeptide contains both shared and unique antigenic determinants. The differential reactivities of each antibody preparation were enhanced by adsorption with the two heterologous polypeptides, and the resulting preparations were used to decorate purified neurofilaments, which were then negatively stained and examined in an electron microscope. The appearance of the antibody-decorated structures led to the following conclusions: All three polypeptides are physically associated with the same neurofilament. However, the disposition of H and 46 within a filament is different; 46 antigens appear to be associated with a "central core" of the filament, whereas H antigens compose a structure more loosely and peripherally attached to the central core and periodically arranged along its axis. The antibody-decorated H- containing structure assumes variable configurations; in some cases it appears asa bridge connecting two filaments; in other cases it appears as a helix wrapping the central core with a period of approximately 1,000 A and an apparent unit length of approximately 1.5 periods. These configurations suggest several functional implications, including the possibility that H is a component of the cross-bridges observed between filaments in situ. We also note that the central core-helix relationship could be used in the design of an intracellular transport motor. PMID:6788775

  7. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  8. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  9. Detection of cytomegalovirus antibody with latex agglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, S P; McVoy, M; Biro, V G; Britt, W J; Hider, P; Marshall, D

    1985-01-01

    Transfusion-acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections should be prevented in seronegative immunocompromised patients by providing blood products from donors who are also seronegative. Latex agglutination was investigated as a simple and rapid method for detecting antibody against CMV. Latex beads were coated with CMV antigen, incubated for 8 min at room temperature with 25 microliter of sera, and examined for agglutination. The sensitivity and specificity of latex agglutination was compared with that of indirect hemagglutination (IHA, Cetus Corp., Emeryville, Calif.) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with sera from 604 random blood donors or patients. Of 327 serum samples shown to be seronegative by EIA and IHA, 327 had a latex agglutination titer of less than 1:4 (specificity, 100%). Of 236 serum samples with detectable antibody by EIA and IHA, 228 had a latex agglutination titer of 1:4 or greater (sensitivity, 97%). Plasma collected with EDTA, heparin, or citrate was satisfactory for latex agglutination. Latex agglutination results correlated quantitatively with those of EIA, and the test also detected fourfold or greater rises in antibody with paired sera from six patients with posttransfusion CMV infections. Latex agglutination is a sensitive and specific assay that is rapid and simple to perform and should be effective in selecting seronegative blood donors to prevent posttransfusion CMV infections in seronegative recipients. PMID:2991330

  10. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  11. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable detection reagents for research and diagnostics and represent the biggest class of biological therapeutics on the market. In vitro antibody selection systems offer many advantages over animal-based technologies because the whole selection process is independent of the in vivo immune response. In the last two decades antibody phage display has evolved to the most robust and widely used method and has already yielded thousands of antibodies. The selection of binders by phage display is also referred to as "panning" and based on the specific molecular interaction of antibody phage with an immobilized antigen thus allowing the enrichment and isolation of antigen-specific monoclonal binders from very large antibody gene libraries. Here, we give detailed protocols for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody gene libraries in microtiter plates.

  12. [Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Cicinskaite, Ilona; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Macas, Andrius; Tamosiūnas, Ramūnas; Kinderyte, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are responsible for 40-60% of all hospital-acquired infections. Increased age of patients and comorbid diseases render hospitalized patients more susceptible to infection. Almost 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are associated with urinary catheters, and only 5-10% of urinary infections are caused by invasive manipulations in the urogenital tract. Pathogens of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are frequently multi-resistant, and antibiotic therapy can only be successful when the complicating factors are eliminated or urodynamic function is restored. For treatment of complicated hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, the antibiotics must exhibit adequate pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties: high renal clearance of unmetabolized form with good antimicrobial activity in both acidic and alkaline urine. For selection of empirical treatment of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, it is necessary to evaluate localization of infection, its severity, possible isolates, and the most frequent pathogens in the department where patient is treated. The best choice for the starting the antimicrobial therapy is the cheapest narrow-spectrum effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infection until microbiological evaluation of pathogens will be received. Adequate management of urinary tract infections lowers the rate of complications, requirements for antibacterial treatment, selection of multi-resistant isolates and is cost effective.

  13. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a β-strand “stalk” that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, “knob” domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  16. Recombinant monoclonal antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L

    2002-01-01

    With the development of murine hybridoma technology over a quarter century ago, the ability to produce large quantities of well-characterized monoclonal antibody preparations revolutionized diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. For many applications in transfusion medicine, however, the production of serological reagents in mice has certain biological limitations relating to the difficulty in obtaining murine monoclonal antibodies specific for many human blood group antigens. Furthermore, for therapeutic purposes, the efficacy of murine-derived immunoglobulin preparations is limited by the induction of anti-mouse immune responses. Technical difficulties inherent in human hybridoma formation have led to novel molecular approaches that facilitate the isolation and production of human antibodies without the need for B-cell transformation, tissue culture, or even immunized individuals. These technologies, referred to as 'repertoire cloning' or 'Fab/phage display', involve the rapid cloning of immunoglobulin gene segments to create immune libraries from which antibodies with desired specificities can be selected. The use of such recombinant methods in transfusion medicine is anticipated to play an important role in the development and production of renewable supplies of low-cost reagents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  17. Therapeutic antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    It is an important event in any knowledge area when an authority in the field decides that it is time to share all accumulated knowledge and learnings by writing a text book. This does not occur often in the biopharmaceutical industry, likely due to both the highly dynamic environment with tight timelines and policies and procedures at many pharmaceutical companies that hamper knowledge sharing. To take on a task like this successfully, a strong drive combined with a desire and talent to teach, but also an accommodating and stimulating environment is required. Luckily for those interested in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, Dr. William R. Strohl decided about two years ago that the time was right to write a book about the past, present and future of these fascinating molecules. Dr. Strohl’s great expertise and passion for biotechnology is evident from his life story and his strong academic and industry track record. Dr. Strohl pioneered natural product biotechnology, first in academia as a full professor of microbiology and biochemistry at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and later in industry while at Merck. Despite his notable advances in recombinant natural products, industry interest in this area waned and in 2001 Dr. Strohl sought new opportunities by entering the field of antibody therapeutics. He initiated antibody discovery through phage display at Merck, and then moved to Centocor Research and Development Inc. (now Janssen Biotech, Inc.) in 2008 to head Biologics Research, where he now directs the discovery of innovative therapeutic antibody candidates.

  18. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches.

  19. Acquired myasthenia gravis in a poodle.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    An 11-year-old, spayed female, teacup poodle was evaluated for a chronic cough, lethargy, hindlimb weakness, and reluctance to exercise. Thoracic radiographs revealed megaesophagus and aspiration pneumonia. Serum antibodies against acetylcholine receptors confirmed the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The unusual clinical history and case outcome are discussed.

  20. Ecoimmunity in Darwin's finches: invasive parasites trigger acquired immunity in the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis).

    PubMed

    Huber, Sarah K; Owen, Jeb P; Koop, Jennifer A H; King, Marisa O; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Clayton, Dale H

    2010-01-06

    Invasive parasites are a major threat to island populations of animals. Darwin's finches of the Galápagos Islands are under attack by introduced pox virus (Poxvirus avium) and nest flies (Philornis downsi). We developed assays for parasite-specific antibody responses in Darwin's finches (Geospiza fortis), to test for relationships between adaptive immune responses to novel parasites and spatial-temporal variation in the occurrence of parasite pressure among G. fortis populations. We developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the presence of antibodies in the serum of Darwin's finches specific to pox virus or Philornis proteins. We compared antibody levels between bird populations with and without evidence of pox infection (visible lesions), and among birds sampled before nesting (prior to nest-fly exposure) versus during nesting (with fly exposure). Birds from the Pox-positive population had higher levels of pox-binding antibodies. Philornis-binding antibody levels were higher in birds sampled during nesting. Female birds, which occupy the nest, had higher Philornis-binding antibody levels than males. The study was limited by an inability to confirm pox exposure independent of obvious lesions. However, the lasting effects of pox infection (e.g., scarring and lost digits) were expected to be reliable indicators of prior pox infection. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of parasite-specific antibody responses to multiple classes of parasites in a wild population of birds. Darwin's finches initiated acquired immune responses to novel parasites. Our study has vital implications for invasion biology and ecological immunology. The adaptive immune response of Darwin's finches may help combat the negative effects of parasitism. Alternatively, the physiological cost of mounting such a response could outweigh any benefits, accelerating population decline. Tests of the fitness implications of parasite-specific immune responses in Darwin

  1. Ecoimmunity in Darwin's Finches: Invasive Parasites Trigger Acquired Immunity in the Medium Ground Finch (Geospiza fortis)

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Sarah K.; Owen, Jeb P.; Koop, Jennifer A. H.; King, Marisa O.; Grant, Peter R.; Grant, B. Rosemary; Clayton, Dale H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasive parasites are a major threat to island populations of animals. Darwin's finches of the Galápagos Islands are under attack by introduced pox virus (Poxvirus avium) and nest flies (Philornis downsi). We developed assays for parasite-specific antibody responses in Darwin's finches (Geospiza fortis), to test for relationships between adaptive immune responses to novel parasites and spatial-temporal variation in the occurrence of parasite pressure among G. fortis populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the presence of antibodies in the serum of Darwin's finches specific to pox virus or Philornis proteins. We compared antibody levels between bird populations with and without evidence of pox infection (visible lesions), and among birds sampled before nesting (prior to nest-fly exposure) versus during nesting (with fly exposure). Birds from the Pox-positive population had higher levels of pox-binding antibodies. Philornis-binding antibody levels were higher in birds sampled during nesting. Female birds, which occupy the nest, had higher Philornis-binding antibody levels than males. The study was limited by an inability to confirm pox exposure independent of obvious lesions. However, the lasting effects of pox infection (e.g., scarring and lost digits) were expected to be reliable indicators of prior pox infection. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of parasite-specific antibody responses to multiple classes of parasites in a wild population of birds. Darwin's finches initiated acquired immune responses to novel parasites. Our study has vital implications for invasion biology and ecological immunology. The adaptive immune response of Darwin's finches may help combat the negative effects of parasitism. Alternatively, the physiological cost of mounting such a response could outweigh any benefits, accelerating population decline. Tests of the fitness

  2. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders occur if ... usually help defend the body against infections. In APS, however, the body makes antibodies that mistakenly attack ...

  3. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  4. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  5. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  6. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  7. Diagnostic algorithm for relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, W K; Barkhof, Frederik; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-07-18

    To establish whether children with relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes (RDS) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) show distinctive clinical and radiologic features and to generate a diagnostic algorithm for the main RDS for clinical use. A panel reviewed the clinical characteristics, MOG-Ab and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) Ab, intrathecal oligoclonal bands, and Epstein-Barr virus serology results of 110 children with RDS. A neuroradiologist blinded to the diagnosis scored the MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and serologic tests results were compared. The findings showed that 56.4% of children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), 25.4% with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 12.7% with multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and 5.5% with relapsing optic neuritis (RON). Blinded analysis defined baseline MRI as typical of MS in 93.5% of children with MS. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentation was seen only in the non-MS group. Of NMOSD cases, 30.7% were AQP4-Ab positive. MOG-Ab were found in 83.3% of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD, 100% of MDEM, and 33.3% of RON. Children with MOG-Ab were younger, were less likely to present with area postrema syndrome, and had lower disability, longer time to relapse, and more cerebellar peduncle lesions than children with AQP4-Ab NMOSD. A diagnostic algorithm applicable to any episode of CNS demyelination leads to 4 main phenotypes: MS, AQP4-Ab NMOSD, MOG-Ab-associated disease, and antibody-negative RDS. Children with MS and AQP4-Ab NMOSD showed features typical of adult cases. Because MOG-Ab-positive children showed notable and distinctive clinical and MRI features, they were grouped into a unified phenotype (MOG-Ab-associated disease), included in a new diagnostic algorithm. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. An Approach to Differential Diagnosis of Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Emmi, Giacomo; Silvestri, Elena; Squatrito, Danilo; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pengo, Vittorio; Prisco, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a systemic, acquired, immune-mediated disorder characterized by episodes of venous, arterial, or microcirculation thrombosis and/or pregnancy abnormalities, associated with the persistent presence of autoantibodies, confirmed at least in two occasions 12 weeks apart, directed to molecular complexes consisting of phospholipids and proteins. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should always be considered as a potential diagnosis especially for young patients presenting with a history of thrombotic events, in particular when they occur without any obvious external trigger or any inherited thrombophilic mutation (even if 2006 criteria do not exclude antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in patients with other inherited or acquired prothrombotic conditions), or for women with recurrent pregnancy losses or later fetal deaths. Many other disorders are able to mimic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, so a broad range of alternative diagnoses should be investigated and ruled out during clinical workup. PMID:25374937

  9. An approach to differential diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Emmi, Giacomo; Silvestri, Elena; Squatrito, Danilo; Ciucciarelli, Lucia; Cameli, Anna Maria; Denas, Gentian; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pengo, Vittorio; Emmi, Lorenzo; Prisco, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a systemic, acquired, immune-mediated disorder characterized by episodes of venous, arterial, or microcirculation thrombosis and/or pregnancy abnormalities, associated with the persistent presence of autoantibodies, confirmed at least in two occasions 12 weeks apart, directed to molecular complexes consisting of phospholipids and proteins. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome should always be considered as a potential diagnosis especially for young patients presenting with a history of thrombotic events, in particular when they occur without any obvious external trigger or any inherited thrombophilic mutation (even if 2006 criteria do not exclude antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in patients with other inherited or acquired prothrombotic conditions), or for women with recurrent pregnancy losses or later fetal deaths. Many other disorders are able to mimic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, so a broad range of alternative diagnoses should be investigated and ruled out during clinical workup.

  10. A Recombinant Secondary Antibody Mimic as a Target-specific Signal Amplifier and an Antibody Immobilizer in Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junseon; Song, Eun Kyung; Kim, Hansol; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Tae Joo; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-01-01

    We construct a novel recombinant secondary antibody mimic, GST-ABD, which can bind to the Fc regions of target-bound primary antibodies and acquire multiple HRPs simultaneously. We produce it in tenth of mg quantities with a bacterial overexpression system and simple purification procedures, significantly reducing the manufacturing cost and time without the use of animals. GST-ABD is effectively conjugated with 3 HRPs per molecule on an average and selectively bind to the Fc region of primary antibodies derived from three different species (mouse, rabbit, and rat). HRP-conjugated GST-ABD (HRP-GST-ABD) is successfully used as an alternative to secondary antibodies to amplify target-specific signals in both ELISA and immunohistochemistry regardless of the target molecules and origin of primary antibodies used. GST-ABD also successfully serves as an anchoring adaptor on the surface of GSH-coated plates for immobilizing antigen-capturing antibodies in an orientation-controlled manner for sandwich-type indirect ELISA through simple molecular recognition without any complicated chemical modification. PMID:27063487

  11. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  12. Antibody response to dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Cordero, Julio; Bustos-Arriaga, José; León-Juárez, Moisés; Gutiérrez-Castañeda, Benito

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the role of the antibody response against dengue virus and highlight novel insights into targets recognized by the human antibody response. We also discuss how the balance of pathological and protective antibody responses in the host critically influences clinical aspects of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  13. 17 CFR 210.3-05 - Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Financial statements of... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION FORM AND CONTENT OF AND REQUIREMENTS FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, SECURITIES... Statements § 210.3-05 Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired. (a) Financial statements...

  14. 17 CFR 210.3-05 - Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... individually insignificant businesses acquired since the date of the most recent audited balance sheet filed... businesses acquired shall be furnished. Such financial statements shall be for at least the most recent... most recent fiscal year and any interim periods specified in §§ 210.3-01 and 210.3-02. (iii) If any of...

  15. 17 CFR 210.8-04 - Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF 1940, AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Article 8 Financial Statements of Smaller... presented are determined by comparison of the most recent annual financial statements of the business acquired or to be acquired and the smaller reporting company's most recent annual financial statements...

  16. Natural polyreactive IgA antibodies coat the intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Jeffrey J; Erickson, Steven A; Flynn, Theodore M; Henry, Carole; Koval, Jason C; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A; Wilson, Patrick C; Bendelac, Albert

    2017-09-28

    Large quantities of immunoglobulin A (IgA) are constitutively secreted by intestinal plasma cells to coat and contain the commensal microbiota, yet the specificity of these antibodies remains elusive. Here, we profiled the reactivities of single murine IgA plasma cells by cloning and characterizing large numbers of monoclonal antibodies. IgAs were not specific to individual bacterial taxa but rather polyreactive, with broad reactivity to a diverse but defined subset of microbiota. These antibodies arose at low frequencies among naïve B cells, and were selected into the IgA repertoire upon recirculation in Peyer's patches. This selection process occurred independent of microbiota or dietary antigens. Furthermore, while some IgAs acquired somatic mutations, these did not substantially influence their reactivity. These findings reveal an endogenous mechanism driving homeostatic production of polyreactive IgAs with innate specificity to microbiota. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  18. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  19. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  20. Support Network Responses to Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chleboun, Steffany; Hux, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) affects social relationships; however, the ways social and support networks change and evolve as a result of brain injury is not well understood. This study explored ways in which survivors of ABI and members of their support networks perceive relationship changes as recovery extends into the long-term stage. Two…

  1. Acquiring Distance Knowledge in Virtual Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED 17-1 Acquiring Distance Knowledge in Virtual Environments Prof. Dr. Edgar Heineken ’ & Frank P. Schulte 2 Gerhard Mercator University LotharstraBe 65...by means of a head-tracked HMD SFor contact with Prof. Heineken : Heineken (a)uni-duisburg.de: tel. +49 203 379 2541, fax +49 203 379 1846 2 For contact

  2. Different etiologies of acquired torticollis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Per, Hüseyin; Canpolat, Mehmet; Tümtürk, Abdülfettah; Gumuş, Hakan; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Özmen, Sevgi; Kaçar Bayram, Ayşe; Poyrazoğlu, Hatice Gamze; Kumandas, Sefer; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Torticollis can be congenital or may be acquired in childhood. Acquired torticollis occurs because of another problem and usually presents in previously normal children. The causes of acquired torticollis include ligamentous, muscular, osseous, ocular, psychiatric, and neurologic disorders. We performed this study to evaluate the underlying causes of torticollis in childhood. Ten children presented with complaints of torticollis between April 2007 and April 2012 were enrolled in this study. The additional findings of physical examination included neck pain, twisted neck, walking disorder, imbalance, and vomiting The identified etiologies of the enrolled children was acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in a 2.5-year-old boy, posterior fossa tumor in a 10-month-old boy, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 5-year-old hemophiliac boy, cervical osteoblastoma in a 3-year-old boy, arachnoid cyst located at posterior fossa in a 16-month-old boy, aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery in a 6-year-old girl, pontine glioma in a 10-year-old girl, and a psychogenic torticollis in a 7-year-old boy were presented. There is a wide differential diagnosis for a patient with torticollis, not just neurological in etiology which should be considered in any patient with acquired torticollis. Moreover, early diagnosis of etiological disease will reduce mortality and morbidity. Therefore, clinicians managing children with torticollis must be vigilant about underlying neurological complications.

  3. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  4. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  5. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  6. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  7. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  8. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  9. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  10. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  11. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  12. Neural Correlates of Acquired Color Category Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alexandra; Franklin, Anna; Holmes, Amanda; Drivonikou, Vicky G.; Ozgen, Emre; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Category training can induce category effects, whereby color discrimination of stimuli spanning a newly learned category boundary is enhanced relative to equivalently spaced stimuli from within the newly learned category (e.g., categorical perception). However, the underlying mechanisms of these acquired category effects are not fully understood.…

  13. Cost of hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmud; Tuckman, Howard P; Patrick, Robert H; Kountz, David S; Kohn, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The authors assessed the costs of hospital-acquired infections using rigorous econometric methods on publicly available data, controlling for the interdependency of length of stay and the incidence of hospital acquired infection, and estimated the cost shares of different payers. They developed a system of equations involving length of stay, incidence of infection, and the total hospital care cost to be estimated using simultaneous equations system. The main data came from the State of New Jersey UB 92 for 2004, complimented with data from the Annual Survey of Hospitals by the American Hospital Association and the Medicare Cost Report of 2004. The authors estimated that an incidence of hospital acquired infection increases the hospital care cost of a patient by $10,375 and it increases the length of stay by 3.30 days, and that a disproportionately higher portion of the cost is attributable to Medicare. They conclude that reliable cost estimates of hospital-acquired infections can be made using publicly available data. Their estimate shows a much larger aggregate cost of $16.6 billion as opposed to $5 billion reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but much less than $29 billion as reported elsewhere in the literature.

  14. Acquiring a Second Language for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Virginia P.

    1995-01-01

    This report offers a conceptual model for use with language minority children who are entering a new school when they must acquire the language of the majority student population. The model has four development components or processes: sociocultural, linguistic, academic, and cognitive. These four components are described in detail. Research is…

  15. Acquired alexia with agraphia syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Paquier, Philippe F; De Smet, Hyo Jung; Mariën, Peter; Poznanski, Nathalie; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    The acquired alexia with agraphia syndrome is a conspicuous disorder of reading and writing in the absence of significant other language impairments that has mainly been recorded in adults. Pure cases are rare, with most patients displaying mild aphasic deficits. In children, acquired reading and writing disorders are generally reported as part of more encompassing aphasic syndromes affecting oral and written language equally, for example, Broca or Wernicke aphasia. Documented instances of predominant acquired reading and writing disorders in childhood are exceptional. We report an 11-year-old, right-handed boy who sustained a left temporoparieto-occipital hematoma following rupture of an arteriovenous malformation and who consecutively presented with the acquired alexia with agraphia syndrome associated with word-finding difficulties. Neuropsychologic and neurolinguistic data showed that there was no concomitant Gerstmann and/or angular gyrus syndrome. Th e recoveryfrom the anomia was quite favorable, but recovery of written language was more protracted and acted on the patient's further scholastic achievement. This case is reminiscent of a historical childhood case reported in 1939 and is consonant with adult cases in terms of lesion location and semiologic picture.

  16. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN...

  17. Acquiring Financial Management Software: A Prototyping Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John H.

    1990-01-01

    When the Smithsonian Institution recently acquired a new financial management system, the concept of prototyping was used throughout the process, but in a broader sense than in software development. It was used to refine requirements, establish software management techniques, test a logistical system, and implement and apply the package. (MSE)

  18. An Acquired Deficit of Audiovisual Speech Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Roy H.; Shenton, Jeffrey T.; Coslett, H. Branch

    2006-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient (AWF) who has an acquired deficit of audiovisual speech integration, characterized by a perceived temporal mismatch between speech sounds and the sight of moving lips. AWF was less accurate on an auditory digit span task with vision of a speaker's face as compared to a condition in which no visual information from…

  19. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    After the sequencing of the human genome is completed, the research focus shifts toward the analysis of gene products. The human genome encodes more than 30,000 genes. Owing to alternative mRNA splicing and posttranslational modifications, for example, glycosylation, phoshorylation, and so on, the number of different proteins of human proteome is supposed to easily exceed 90,000. Antibodies are key detection reagents for the "postgenomic" analysis of these proteins. Any systematic investigation of the human proteome requires high throughput methods for antibody generation. In vitro selection systems utilizing recombinant antibody repertoires offer this capability and capacity. The most commonly used contemporary in vitro selection system is antibody phage display, which has already yielded thousands of useful antibodies for therapy, research, and diagnostics. Herein, methods are described for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from naive antibody gene libraries.

  20. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  1. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  2. Naturally Acquired Immunity Against Rotavirus Infection and Gastroenteritis in Children: Paired Reanalyses of Birth Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Lewnard, Joseph A; Lopman, Benjamin A; Parashar, Umesh D; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Samuel, Prasanna; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Kang, Gagandeep; Pitzer, Virginia E

    2017-08-01

    Observational studies in socioeconomically distinct populations have yielded conflicting conclusions about the strength of naturally acquired immunity against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), mirroring vaccine underperformance in low-income countries. We revisited birth cohort studies to understand naturally acquired protection against rotavirus infection and RVGE. We reanalyzed data from 200 Mexican and 373 Indian children followed from birth to 2 and 3 years of age, respectively. We reassessed protection against RVGE, decomposing the incidence rate into the rate of rotavirus infection and the risk of RVGE given infection, and tested for serum antibody correlates of protection using regression models. Risk for primary, secondary, and subsequent infections to cause RVGE decreased per log-month of age by 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12%-41%), 69% (95% CI, 30%-86%), and 64% (95% CI, -186% to 95%), respectively, in Mexico City, and by 10% (95% CI, -1% to 19%), 51% (95% CI, 41%-59%) and 67% (95% CI, 57%-75%), respectively, in Vellore. Elevated serum immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G titers were associated with partial protection against rotavirus infection. Associations between older age and reduced risk for RVGE or moderate-to-severe RVGE given infection persisted after controlling for antibody levels. Dissimilar estimates of protection against RVGE may be due in part to age-related, antibody-independent risk for rotavirus infections to cause RVGE.

  3. Inheritance of acquired traits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since Lamarck proposed the idea of inheritance of acquired traits 200 years ago, much has been said for and against it, but the theory was finally declined after the 1930s. Despite of the negative opinions of the majority of geneticists, botanists and plant breeders have long recognized that altered properties during the growth were occasionally transmitted to the offspring. This was also the case with artificially altered properties such as dwarfism, flowering timing and plant stature, which were induced by a non-mutagenic chemical, 5-azacytidine and its derivatives. As these drugs are powerful inhibitors of DNA methylation in vivo, a close correlation between methylation and phenotypic expression was suggested. Subsequent studies showed that rice plants acquired disease resistance upon demethylation of the corresponding resistant gene, and that both resistant trait and hypomethylated status were inherited by the progeny up to nine generations. Whether or not the methylation pattern changes under natural condition was then questioned, and recent studies have indicated that it indeed naturally changes in response to environmental stresses. Whether or not the altered methylation pattern during the vegetative growth is heritable was also questioned, and studies on toadflax and rice affirmed the question, showing stable maintenance of hypermethylation in the former and hypomethylation in the latter for 250 and 10 years, respectively. The observation strongly suggested that acquired traits can be heritable as far as the acquired methylation pattern is stably transmitted. This concept is consistent with the Lamarck's theory of the inheritance of acquired traits, which therefore should be carefully reevaluated to reestablish his impaired reputation. PMID:20118668

  4. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  5. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  6. Construction of human naive antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Meyer, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Human antibodies are valuable tools for proteome research and diagnostics. Furthermore, antibodies are a rapidly growing class of therapeutic agents, mainly for inflammation and cancer therapy. The first therapeutic antibodies are of murine origin and were chimerized or humanized. The later-developed antibodies are fully human antibodies. Here, two technologies are competing the hybridoma technology using transgenic mice with human antibody gene loci and antibody phage display. The starting point for the selection of human antibodies against any target is the construction of an antibody phage display gene library.In this review we describe the construction of human naive and immune antibody gene libraries for antibody phage display.

  7. Prevalence and Gene Characteristics of Antibodies with Cofactor-induced HIV-1 Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Lecerf, Maxime; Scheel, Tobias; Pashov, Anastas D.; Jarossay, Annaelle; Ohayon, Delphine; Planchais, Cyril; Mesnage, Stephane; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    The healthy immune repertoire contains a fraction of antibodies that bind to various biologically relevant cofactors, including heme. Interaction of heme with some antibodies results in induction of new antigen binding specificities and acquisition of binding polyreactivity. In vivo, extracellular heme is released as a result of hemolysis or tissue damage; hence the post-translational acquisition of novel antigen specificities might play an important role in the diversification of the immunoglobulin repertoire and host defense. Here, we demonstrate that seronegative immune repertoires contain antibodies that gain reactivity to HIV-1 gp120 upon exposure to heme. Furthermore, a panel of human recombinant antibodies was cloned from different B cell subpopulations, and the prevalence of antibodies with cofactor-induced specificity for gp120 was determined. Our data reveal that upon exposure to heme, ∼24% of antibodies acquired binding specificity for divergent strains of HIV-1 gp120. Sequence analyses reveal that heme-sensitive antibodies do not differ in their repertoire of variable region genes and in most of the molecular features of their antigen-binding sites from antibodies that do not change their antigen binding specificity. However, antibodies with cofactor-induced gp120 specificity possess significantly lower numbers of somatic mutations in their variable region genes. This study contributes to the understanding of the significance of cofactor-binding antibodies in immunoglobulin repertoires and of the influence that the tissue microenvironment might have in shaping adaptive immune responses. PMID:25564611

  8. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    epithelial colonies. The single clones were grown under 4- OHT induction as well as blasticidine selection as mentioned above. The genomic DNA was...of the genes back into the lentiviral vector and sequencing single clones. Optimization of the isolation of the genomic DNA , optimization of primers...01/2015 – 06/30/2017 “Antibody Fingerprinting of Triple Negative Breast Cancer by High Throughput FACS” The goal of this research is to use a novel

  9. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    colonies. The single clones were grown under 4- OHT induction as well as blasticidine selection as mentioned above. The genomic DNA was extracted from...genes back into the lentiviral vector and sequencing single clones. Optimization of the isolation of the genomic DNA , optimization of primers, and...01/2015 – 06/30/2017 “Antibody Fingerprinting of Triple Negative Breast Cancer by High Throughput FACS” The goal of this research is to use a

  10. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  12. Inherited and acquired thrombophilia in Indian women experiencing unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rucha; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vora, Sonal; Shetty, Shrimati

    2015-10-01

    The most frequently hypothesized cause of unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) refers to a defective maternal haemostatic response leading to uteroplacental thrombosis. Approximately 20% women suffering from pregnancy loss (PL) are associated with autoimmune disorders and more than 50% remain idiopathic after common traditional investigations. The present study aims to investigate the prevalence of different genetic and acquired thrombophilia markers in a large series of Indian women with RPL. Such studies will help analyze the markers which pose maximum risk and help in the appropriate treatment in subsequent pregnancies. The study comprised of 587 women with no apparent etiological causes of RPL and 115 healthy women controls. p values were calculated with two tailed Fisher's exact test; statistical significance was assumed at p<0.05, 95% confidence interval. Relative risks were also calculated. Among genetic thrombophilia, the risk of PL was highest with protein S deficiency (16%, p=0.006) followed by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/4G (23%, p=0.007) polymorphism. Among acquired markers, the risk of PL was the highest in women with anti-cardiolipin antibodies (24%, p=0.0001), followed by anti-annexin V antibodies (23%, p=0.0009) and lupus anticoagulants (8%, p=0.02). Thrombophilia, inherited and acquired, is an important contributing factor in unexplained RPL and should be screened in the order of its prevalence.

  13. Antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J

    2000-01-01

    What is an immunoassay without an antibody? Clearly the name provides the answer to this question; without antibodies there would be no immunoassays. An immunoassay is an analytical technique, quantitative or qualitative, that relies absolutely on the specificity and affinity of the interaction between epitope and paratope for generation of a detectable response. The actual detection of this binding interaction can be via one of literally hundreds of different signal transduction mechanisms, e.g., fluorimetry, chemiluminescence, agglutination (turbidimetry or nephelometry) enzyme reactions, and so forth (1 -4), but these are simply transducing systems for the primary binding interaction. Antibodies thus provide us with an exquisitely sensitive and specific analytical technology for detecting and quantifying epitopic structures. These structures include amino-acid derivatives, e.g., thyroid hormones, peptides, e.g., vasopressin, proteins, e.g., cytokines, as well as carbohydrate structures, e.g., CA-125. Immunoassay technology has developed to such an extent that it is probably the most versatile analytical tool available able to identify and quantify epitopic structures across the milli- to zeptomolar concentration ranges (2).

  14. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Xavier; Guilabert, Antonio; Font, Josep

    2006-07-29

    Much like other autoantibodies (eg, anti-double stranded DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies in Goodpasture's syndrome), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have provided doctors with a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides, including Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and their localised forms (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. Present treatments for ANCA-associated vasculitis are not free from side-effects and as many as 50% of patients relapse within 5 years. Accurate understanding of the key pathogenic points of ANCA-associated vasculitis can undoubtedly provide a more rational therapeutic approach.

  15. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  16. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  17. Clinical laboratory data: acquire, analyze, communicate, liberate.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Elbehery, Ali H A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of portable healthcare devices, which can acquire and transmit medical data to remote experts would dramatically affect healthcare in areas with poor infrastructure. Smartphones, which feature touchscreen computer capabilities and sophisticated cameras, have become widely available with over billion units shipped in 2013. In the clinical laboratory, smartphones have recently brought the capabilities of key instruments such as spectrophotometers, fluorescence analyzers and microscopes into the palm of the hand. Several research groups have developed sensitive and low-cost smartphone-based diagnostic assay prototypes for testing cholesterol, albumin, vitamin D, tumor markers, and the detection of infectious agents. This review covers the use of smartphones to acquire, analyze, communicate, and liberate clinical laboratory data. Smartphones promise to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of healthcare offered in resource-limited areas.

  18. Subcortical infarction resulting in acquired stuttering.

    PubMed

    Ciabarra, A M; Elkind, M S; Roberts, J K; Marshall, R S

    2000-10-01

    Stuttering is an uncommon presentation of acute stroke. Reported cases have often been associated with left sided cortical lesions, aphasia, and difficulties with other non-linguistic tests of rhythmic motor control. Three patients with subcortical lesions resulting in stuttering are discussed. In one patient the ability to perform time estimations with a computerised repetitive time estimation task was characterised. One patient had a pontine infarct with clinical evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. A second patient had a left basal ganglionic infarct and a disruption of timing estimation. A third patient had a left subcortical infarct and a mild aphasia. These findings expand the reported distribution of infarction that can result in acquired stuttering. Subcortical mechanisms of speech control and timing may contribute to the pathophysiology of acquired stuttering.

  19. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota, Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations.

  20. Acquired undescended testis: putting the pieces together.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W M; Goede, J; van der Voort-Doedens, L M; Meijer, R W

    2012-02-01

    Acquired undescended testis is now a well-recognized disorder. It is seen in 1.5% of pre-pubertal boys and accounts for the 1-2% orchidopexy rate in older boys. Its pathogenesis remains largely unclear, but it may be caused by a fibrous remnant of the processus vaginalis. There is much controversy over its management, and the proper management awaits a randomized-controlled trial. Until now, follow-up data are available only for cases of spontaneous descent or pubertal orchidopexy. It is speculated that acquired undescended testis is in fact congenital and because of a short funiculus at birth, allowing a low-scrotal position early in life. However, as the boy grows, the testis might evolve into an undescended state. When testosterone surges at puberty, spontaneous descent occurs in three of every four cases. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  1. [Acquired paraneoplastic hypertrichosis lanuginosa associated with scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Valda Rodriguez, L; Torrico Velasco, J; Zeballos Vasconcellos, R

    1990-01-01

    Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa is universally recognized as an individual disease and seldom reported as a genuine paraneoplastic manifestation. We report the case of a 30-year old woman with acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa. Due to the finding of a cervical lymph node metastasis, she was investigated for an internal neoplasm, but the original tumour could not be found by the usual methods. A bronchogenic carcinoma was discovered at autopsy. Beside hypertrichosis, this patient had other disorders not described in the literature as associated with that disease, viz.: progressive systemic scleroderma, fissured and hyperpigmented tongue, thrombocytopenia, galactorrhoea, axillary and pubic alopecia and overcurvature of toe nails. A review of similar cases in the literature provided clinical arguments in favour of the hormonal origin of this paraneoplastic hypertrichosis.

  2. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  3. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  4. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota Jr., Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27777479

  5. Acquired nasal deformities in fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Schreinemakers, Joyce R C; van Amerongen, Pieter; Kon, Moshe

    2010-07-01

    Fighter pilots may develop slowly progressive deformities of their noses during their flying careers. The spectrum of deformities that may be acquired ranges from soft tissue to osseous changes. The main cause is the varying pressure exerted by the oxygen mask on the skin and bony pyramid of the nose during flying. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rare presentation of spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Bali, Roseleen Kaur; Das, Kamanasish; Sisodia, Anula; Dewan, R K; Singla, Rupak

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia without any apparent history of trauma is a very rare condition and is very difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain for one month and four episodes of vomiting for one day. Clinical suspicion, chest radiography with nasogastric tube in situ and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the diagnosis. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired surgically. The patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery.

  7. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Brian L; Rice, Louis B

    2012-08-15

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options.

  8. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  9. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  10. Acquired ciliary circumscribed grey hair (ACCG).

    PubMed

    Romero, A G; Calatayud, J C

    2001-12-01

    Grey-haired areas usually occur due to aging or inheritance. A case is described of abrupt occurrence of a focal circumscribed grey-hair in the eyebrow region (a single hair) in a 27-year-old woman. The phenomenon was named acquired ciliary circumscribed grey-hair (ACCG). Qualitative and semiquantitative findings were obtained by microanalytical studies. In addition to morphological differences from control hair, the ACCG hair showed a high percentage of sulfur (99.8%) and absence of oligoelements.

  11. Acquiring Secure Systems Through Information Economics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Introduction “For all future weapons systems that DoD will acquire or procure, DoD will mandate specific cybersecurity standards for weapons...systems to meet. Acquisition and procurement policy and practice will be updated to promote effective cybersecurity throughout a system’s life cycle...physical damage or injury Motivating Contractor Efforts - Contractors have different priorities than the DOD when it comes to cybersecurity - Classic

  12. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  13. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:24183828

  15. The evolution of costly acquired immune memory.

    PubMed

    Best, Alex; Hoyle, Andy

    2013-07-01

    A key feature of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is acquired immune memory, whereby hosts launch a faster and heightened response when challenged by previously encountered pathogens, preventing full infection. Here, we use a mathematical model to explore the role of ecological and epidemiological processes in shaping selection for costly acquired immune memory. Applying the framework of adaptive dynamics to the classic SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Recovered) epidemiological model, we focus on the conditions that may lead hosts to evolve high levels of immunity. Linking our work to previous theory, we show how investment in immune memory may be greatest at long or intermediate host lifespans depending on whether immunity is long lasting. High initial costs to gain immunity are also found to be essential for a highly effective immune memory. We also find that high disease infectivity and sterility, but intermediate virulence and immune period, increase selection for immunity. Diversity in host populations through evolutionary branching is found to be possible but only for a limited range of parameter space. Our model suggests that specific ecological and epidemiological conditions have to be met for acquired immune memory to evolve.

  16. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Chris G; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Serefoglu, Ege C; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-08-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE.

  17. Laterality of acquired cholesteatoma and handedness.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela

    2012-08-01

    To investigate a possible contribution of handedness to the development of unilateral acquired cholesteatoma. All patients with unilateral acquired cholesteatoma attending otorhinolaryngology clinic between August 2009 and February 2012 were asked about their handedness. The study group consisted of 237 right-handed and 31 left-handed (11.8%) patients who included 158 male (59%) and 79 female subjects with an age range of 6 to 81 years (mean, 38.6 yr). There were no ambidexters in the present cohort. Overall, unilateral cholesteatoma involved 146 right (54.5%) and 122 left ears (45.5%). Ten of 31 patients (32.3%) with left hand predominance were female subjects. In the unilateral disease, the right ears were affected more frequently in patients with right-hand dominance (59.5%), and the left ears were more frequently affected in the left-handed patients (83.9%); this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). The sex differences in the distribution of cholesteatoma side and handedness were not statistically significant (p = 0.098). The strong relationship has been observed between the patient's handedness, and laterality of the unilateral acquired cholesteatoma may have contribution in the multifactorial process of cholesteatoma formation.

  18. Apoptosis in acquired and genetic hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    de Beeck, Ken Op; Schacht, Jochen; Van Camp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important physiological process. Normally, a healthy cell maintains a delicate balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, allowing it to live and proliferate. It is thus not surprising that disturbance of this delicate balance may result in disease. It is a well known fact that apoptosis also contributes to several acquired forms of hearing impairment. Noise-induced hearing loss is the result of prolonged exposure to excessive noise, triggering apoptosis in terminally differentiated sensory hair cells. Moreover, hearing loss caused by the use of therapeutic drugs such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and cisplatin potentially may result in the activation of apoptosis in sensory hair cells leading to hearing loss due to the “ototoxicity” of the drugs. Finally, apoptosis is a key contributor to the development of presbycusis, age-related hearing loss. Recently, several mutations in apoptosis genes were identified as the cause of monogenic hearing impairment. These genes are TJP2, DFNA5 and MSRB3. This implies that apoptosis not only contributes to the pathology of acquired forms of hearing impairment, but also to genetic hearing impairment as well. We believe that these genes constitute a new functional class within the hearing loss field. Here, the contribution of apoptosis in the pathology of both acquired and genetic hearing impairment is reviewed. PMID:21782914

  19. Acquired macrolide resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Christopher T; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of specific acquired macrolide resistance genes previously reported as present in clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. A collection of 172 clinical respiratory isolates of H. influenzae, including 59 isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and 27 from non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients with significant prior macrolide use, was established. This collection was tested for azithromycin susceptibility using Etest and screened for the presence of erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) and mef(E) using locked nucleic acid dual-labelled hydrolysis probes. The azithromycin MICs ranged from 0.09 to >256 mg/L, with 2 (1.2%) isolates susceptible, 163 (94.8%) intermediate and 7 (4%) resistant according to EUCAST breakpoints (susceptible, ≤0.12 mg/L; resistant, >4 mg/L). None of the acquired macrolide resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) or mef(E) was detected in any of the isolates. The specific acquired macrolide resistance genes are not widespread in H. influenzae and the high prevalence of these genes previously reported might be unique to the specific circumstances of that study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  1. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Jannini, Emmanuele A.; Serefoglu, Ege C.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE. PMID:27652216

  2. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  3. [Antiglycolipid antibody in inflammatory neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S

    1995-12-01

    Antiglycolipid antibody is frequently detected in the acute phase sera from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome, GBS). The titer is highest in the serum sample taken first after the neurological onset, and decreases with clinical improvement. Antiglycolipid antibody may play a role in the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS. GM1 and GD1b are the antigens most commonly recognized. Monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody specifically bound to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Serum anti-GD1b antibody may cause demyelinative neuropathy by binding to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody is specifically raised in almost all the sera from Fisher syndrome and GBS with ophthalmoplegia. Anti-GQ1b monoclonal antibody immunostained specifically the paranodal myelin of the extramedullary portion of oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves, but no such staining was observed in the other peripheral nerves. Anti-GQ1b antibody may cause conduction block in the cranial nerves innervating the muscles for extraocular movement by binding to the paranodal myelin of those nerves. Anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody is detected in the patients with GBS with very low or inexcitable compound muscle action potentials. The sera from patients with GBS subsequent to mycoplasma infection had antigalactocerebroside antibody. Further study on antiglycolipid antibody is needed for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS.

  4. Prevention of simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome with a formalin-inactivated type D retrovirus vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, P A; Pedersen, N C; Lerche, N W; Osborn, K G; Lowenstine, L J; Lackner, A A; Maul, D H; Kwang, H S; Kluge, J D; Zaiss, C P

    1986-01-01

    Experimental induction of simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) by inoculation of juvenile rhesus monkeys with a type D retrovirus was prevented by immunization with Formalin-killed whole SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 containing the adjuvant threonyl muramyl-dipeptide. All six immunized animals developed neutralizing antibody after three injections, while six age-matched cagemates receiving adjuvant alone were antibody free. All 12 monkeys were challenged intravenously with a potentially lethal dose of SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1. The six immunized animals failed to develop persistent viremia and remained clinically normal 8 months postchallenge. In contrast, five of six nonvaccinates developed persistent viremia, four of six developed clinical SAIDS, and two of six died with SAIDS at 10 weeks and 8 months postchallenge, respectively. These results show that prevention of a common spontaneous retrovirus-induced immunosuppressive disease in macaques is now possible by vaccination. PMID:3021978

  5. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) manifesting Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Sakai, H; Fujihara, K; Fujihara, K; Itoyama, Y

    1998-11-01

    We reported a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) via multiple blood transfusions, who manifested progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) about 18 months after the development of AIDS. PML initiated with right hemiparesis, dysphasia, and Gerstmann's syndrome and resulted in death within 2 months after the onset. Neuroimaging examinations revealed white matter lesions mainly in the left posterior parietal lobe. The cortical gray matter also showed abnormal signal intensity. Peripheral CD4+ lymphocyte count was 81/microl. Routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations were negative. CSF antibodies against herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus as well as serum antibody against toxoplasma gondii were negative. Though autopsy or biopsy of the brain was not performed, JC virus genomes were detected in the CSF sample by a polymerase chain reaction, and their sequencing showed unique alterations of the regulatory regions, characteristic to PML-type JC virus.

  6. Persistence of Immunity Acquired after a Single Dose of Rubella Vaccine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okafuji, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-20

    To date, Takahashi, Matsuura, and TO-336 strains of live-attenuated rubella vaccine have been used in Japan. Japan implemented a single-dose rubella vaccination program until 2006. However, few reports are available on the persistence of immunity after this vaccination program. We collected 276 serum samples from January 2009 to December 2011 at Okafuji Pediatric Clinic and assessed the immune status of these samples against rubella virus during 1-10 years after vaccination with a single dose of Takahashi rubella vaccine. Regional outbreak of rubella did not occur during 1999-2011. The collected serum samples were tested for antibodies against the rubella virus by performing a standard hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test. Our results showed that all the tested serum samples contained antibodies against the rubella virus 10 years after the vaccination. Geometric mean titer of HAI antibodies was 1:180 and decreased to 1:68 at 10 years after the vaccination. The levels of HAI antibodies decreased logarithmically with time after the vaccination. In conclusion, vaccine-acquired immunity after vaccination with a single dose of live-attenuated Takahashi rubella vaccine was retained for at least 10 years when rubella was under regional control.

  7. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  8. Natural Acquired Immunity Against Subsequent Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Jenkins, Gwendolyne; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kreimer, Aimée R; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Studies have been mixed on whether naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies may protect against subsequent HPV infection. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether naturally acquired HPV antibodies protect against subsequent genital HPV infection (ie, natural immunity). We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for studies examining natural HPV immunity against subsequent genital type-specific HPV infection in female and male subjects. We used random-effects models to derive pooled relative risk (RR) estimates for each HPV type. We identified 14 eligible studies that included >24,000 individuals from 18 countries that examined HPV natural immunity. We observed significant protection against subsequent infection in female subjects with HPV-16 (pooled RR, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, .50-.80) and HPV-18 (0.70; .43-.98) but not in male subjects (HPV-16: 1.22; .67-1.77 [P= .05 (test for heterogeneity)]; HPV-18: 1.50; .46-2.55; [P= .15]). We also observed type-specific protection against subsequent infection for a combined measure of HPV-6/11/31/33/35/45/52/58 in female subjects (pooled RR, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, .57-.92). Natural immunity was also evident in female subjects when analyses were restricted to studies that used neutralizing assays, used HPV persistence as an outcome, or reported adjusted analyses (each P< .05). HPV antibodies acquired through natural infection provide modest protection against subsequent cervical HPV infection in female subjects. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Altered excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borek, E; Sharma, O K; Buschman, F L; Cohn, D L; Penley, K A; Judson, F N; Dobozin, B S; Horsburgh, C R; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1986-05-01

    Urinary excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid, subsequently referred to as markers, was determined in populations of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or at risk for development of AIDS. Our results show that asymptomatic adult male homosexuals excreted elevated amounts of markers as compared to male heterosexuals. This aberrant excretion was more pronounced in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III. Significantly greater excretion of 1-methylinosine, N4-acetylcytidine, and N2-methylguanosine was observed in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III than in asymptomatic male homosexuals without antibodies to HTLV-III. Increased amounts of markers were also excreted by subjects with the generalized or chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome, AIDS related complex (ARC), or AIDS. In these subjects, the most pronounced differences between groups were between subjects with chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome and those with ARC; subjects with ARC excreted greater amounts of seven of the ten urinary markers. There were few differences between subjects with ARC and those with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma, or AIDS with opportunistic infections. This observation may be useful for identifying subjects who are at risk of developing AIDS. A prospective study to test this hypothesis is under way.

  10. Low-fat diets for acquired hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Smart, Neil A; Marshall, Belinda J; Daley, Maxine; Boulos, Elie; Windus, Janelle; Baker, Nadine; Kwok, Nigel

    2011-02-16

    Hypercholesterolaemia, characterised by raised blood cholesterol levels, is not a disease itself but a metabolic derangement that often contributes to many diseases, notably cardiovascular disease. In most cases, elevated cholesterol levels are associated with high-fat diet, especially saturated fat, coupled with an inactive lifestyle. Less commonly, raised cholesterol may be related to an inherited disorder, familial hypercholesterolaemia. This systematic review is only concerned with acquired hypercholesterolaemia. To assess the effects of low-fat diets for acquired hypercholesterolaemia and to investigate the incidence of adverse effects from low-fat dietary interventions. We planned to compare the relative effectiveness of low-fat diets with calorie-restricted diets for acquired hypercholesterolaemia. We also wanted to look into the relative effectiveness of low-fat diets and pharmacological interventions for acquired hypercholesterolaemia. Studies were obtained from computerised searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and databases of ongoing trials. Date of last search was February 2010. Otherwise healthy adults (equal to or greater than 18 years) with acquired (not familial) hypercholesterolaemia. We defined hypercholesterolaemia as either total cholesterol greater than 5.2 mmol/L, LDL-cholesterol greater than 3.0 mmol/L, HDL-cholesterol less than 1.0 mmol/L or a combination thereof, although investigators' definitions were also accepted. We wanted to include any low-fat dietary intervention, like low-fat and low-saturated fat diets, intended to lower serum total and LDL-cholesterol or to raise HDL-cholesterol. A low-fat diet was considered as a fat calorie intake less than 20% of the total calories. The minimum duration of the intervention had to be six months. We excluded studies in unhealthy people. Two authors were planned to independently assess risk of bias and extract data. No study met our inclusion criteria. Well designed, adequately

  11. Two novel anti-von Willebrand factor monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spadafora-Ferreira, M; Lopes, A A; Coelho, V; Guilherme, L; Kalil, J

    2000-01-15

    Von Willebrand Factor is a multimer produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, being stored in intracellular organelles, such as the Weibel-Palade bodies and alpha-granules in endothelial cells and platelets, respectively. This molecule acts as a carrier protein for factor VIIIc, involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation maintaining its stability in circulation. Von Willebrand Factor also plays an important role in platelet aggregation and adhesion to injured vessel wall. It interacts with platelets through two distinct glycoproteins, GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, ECA-3 and ECA-4, against human umbilical vascular endothelial cells that recognize and immunoprecipitate von Willebrand Factor. Interestingly, ECA-4 monoclonal antibody is able to completely inhibit platelet agglutination induced by ristocetin, suggesting that it binds to von Willebrand Factor close to platelet GPIb binding site. The use of monoclonal antibodies to identify von Willebrand Factor binding regions to factor VIII or platelets has been reported by others. In pulmonary hypertension, abnormalities have been detected on the multimeric structure of the molecule as well as on its proteolytic fragments, by using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies raised against specific regions of von Willebrand Factor molecule may allow studies of functional abnormalities of this protein in inherited and acquired disorders like subtypes of von Willebrand's disease.

  12. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  13. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pertusi, R M; Rubin, B R

    1991-06-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (formerly the American Rheumatism Association) diagnostic criteria for connective tissue disorders frequently include positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) assays. Proper interpretation of these tests requires an understanding of the principles governing ANA assays. Assay results are reported in two ways: as titers and as descriptions of fluorescent patterns. A titer is a quantitative measure of ANAs in serum. Different patterns of immunofluorescence are associated with different subsets of collagen vascular disease. Positive results can occur in the absence of connective tissue disease. Accurate diagnosis of connective tissue disorders requires judicious use of ANA assays as well as skillful interpretation of the results.

  15. Antibody Glossary —

    Cancer.gov

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  16. Antibody response in Heterodontus.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Erickson, B W; Lederman, L; Mäkelä, O

    1982-05-28

    Appropriately selected phylogenetic models are capable of providing insight into genetic mechanisms which may have become obscured during the passage of evolutionary time. In higher vertebrates a complex multigenic family encodes immunoglobulin-variable regions. The mechanisms involved in the expansion of the gene family and the stable maintenance of large numbers of individual genes presently are not understood. By defining the nature of antibody diversity in lower vertebrate species, it may be possible to approach such issues at a more fundamental level. Analyses of the immunoglobulins in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a representative phylogenetically primitive elasmobranch, indicate that this species may represent a useful developmental model.

  17. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin). Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. PMID:27536153

  18. Array tomography: immunostaining and antibody elution.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are prepared for imaging by tagging with primary antibodies against specific cellular targets, followed by labeling with fluorescent secondary antibodies. Alternatively, fluorescent proteins that have been introduced into the tissue before dissection can be used.

  19. Modulating antibody pharmacokinetics using hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Constantinou, Antony; Deonarain, Mahendra

    2011-09-01

    The use of hydrophilic polymers as a substitute for the Fc-domain in immuno- or non-immuno-based binding proteins is accelerating. Chemical PEGylation has led the way and is still the most advanced and clinically-approved approach. Hydrophilic polymers act by maintaining a flexible conformation and hydrogen bonding to a network of water molecules to acquire a larger hydrodynamic volume and apparent mass than their actual molecular mass suggest. The benefits are increased blood half-life and bioavailability, stability and reduced immunogenicity. In the case of PEG, there is also evidence of enhanced targeting and reduced side effects, but drawbacks include the fact that PEG is non-biodegradable. This report reviews the state of the art for antibody PEGylation in terms of approaches and effects. Additionally, non-biological (such as N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) and potentially superior biological alternatives (such as polysialylation) are described, ending with recombinant approaches (such as hydrophilic peptides and glyco-engineering), which promise to circumvent the need for chemical modification altogether. The emergence of many small, antibody fragment-like mimics will drive the need for such technologies, and PEGylation is still the choice polymer due to its established use and track record. However, there will be a place for many alternative technologies if they can match the pharmacokinetics of PEG-conjugates and bring addition beneficial features such as easier production.

  20. [The causes of necrobiosis and apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells during primary acquired keratoconus].

    PubMed

    Ziangirova, G G; Antonova, O V

    2002-01-01

    We studied 56 biopsy samples of conjunctiva and 50 corneal discs excised from 28 patients with acquired keratoconus cornea. The conjunctivas in all biopsy samples showed various stages of immune inflammation. Necrobiotic changes have been revealed in epithelium of the corneal discs going by the pathways of apoptosis--programmed cell death--and oncosis--initial edematic stage of necrobiosis. At the stage of acute inflammation they are due to cytotoxic effect of the lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. Antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by plasma and lymphoid cells predominates at this stage. At the reparative stage of inflammation ischemia, an inductor of apoptosis and oncosis, underlies necrobiotic changes in corneal epithelium.

  1. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, A.; West, T.E.; Gupta, M.; Loghmanee, F.

    1987-12-01

    A 34-year-old male prisoner with a history of intravenous drug abuse presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss, and recent onset of congestive heart failure. Serologic testing was positive for antibodies to human immune deficiency virus. There was intense myocardial uptake of gallium. Autopsy showed a primary immunoblastic lymphoma involving only the myocardium. While primary cardiac lymphoma is an extremely rare condition, the incidence may be higher in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and should be suspected in cases with atypical cardiomyopathy.

  2. [Ulcerative colitis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Naveau, S; Roulot, D; Cartier, I; Blanchard, A; Poynard, T; Drouhet, E; Chaput, J C

    1986-11-01

    The authors report a case of ulcerative colitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum in a previously healthy 35 year-old french geologist with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Gomori-Grocott and PAS stains and indirect immunofluorescence revealed Histoplasma capsulatum in colonic biopsies. The search for LAV antibody was positive. T-lymphocyte analysis revealed 10/mm3 OKT4 with OKT4/OKT8 ratio of 0.16. Histoplasmosis should be considered in subjects with ulcerative colitis according to the epidemiological context. In patients with AIDS relapses after discontinuation of treatment are to be expected and suppressive therapy with an imidazole derivative should probably be continued indefinitely.

  3. Acquired factor VIII deficiency after consuming the dried gallbladder of a cobra, Naja naja

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Young Jin; Jun, Hyun Soo; Seo, Su-Kil

    2010-01-01

    Acquired factor VIII deficiency is very rare, often fatal. It is associated with pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, malignancy, and drugs, although no underlying cause is found in 50%. A 49-year-old male was referred with right shoulder bruising. The coagulation test showed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. The factor VIII level was less than 1%, and the factor VIII inhibitor antibody titer was 246 Bethesda units/mL. The findings were compatible with acquired factor VIII deficiency. He had consumed the dried gallbladder of a cobra, Naja naja, for two weeks, it contained venom. After the initial treatment with factor VIII, he did not take supplemental coagulation factor VIII. The patient was readmitted with left forearm swelling. He lost consciousness suddenly and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed a subdural hematoma. Despite administering recombinant factor VII, his bleeding was not controlled and he died. PMID:21120211

  4. Schmallenberg virus antibody persistence in adult cattle after natural infection and decay of maternal antibodies in calves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Schmallenberg virus (SBV) has swept through the major part of Europe in the period 2011–2013. A vaccine against SBV has been developed and may be a possible preventive instrument against infection. Presently, there is no data available to refute the assumption that natural SBV infection results in long-term immunity. In that respect, it is of interest to know how long (protecting) virus-neutralizing antibodies are present in naturally infected animals. New-born calves acquire passive immunity from their dams by ingestion and absorption of antibodies present in colostrum, which can block the production of serum antibodies when vaccine is administered to calves with maternally derived antibodies. In that respect, it is useful to know how long it takes for maternal antibodies against SBV to disappear in young animals born from infected dams. Results Longitudinal whole-herd serological monitoring using virus neutralization test (VNT) indicated that 80% of adult dairy cows still had measurable antibodies against SBV at least 24 months after the estimated introduction of the virus into the herd. Median 2Log VNT titer of the adult dairy cows (≥1 year) dropped from 8.6 to 5.6 in a period of 17 months. Median 2Log VNT maternal antibodies titers of calves sampled within 30 days after birth was 8. Calves lost their maternally-derived antibodies after 5–6 months. There was a definite positive relationship between the VNT titer of the dam and the VNT titer of the corresponding calf (age ≤ 30 days) of dam-calf combinations sampled on the same day: the higher the VNT titer of the dam, the higher the VNT titer (maternal antibodies) of the calf. Conclusions Our field data support the assumption that natural SBV infection in adult cows results in persistence of specific antibodies for at least two years. Based on the observed decay of maternally-derived antibodies in calves, it is presumed safe to vaccinate calves against SBV at an age of approximately 6

  5. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  6. [Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel-Complex Antibodies Associated Encephalopathy and Related Diseases].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies are auto-antibodies, initially identified in acquired neuromyotonia (aNMT; Isaacs' syndrome), which cause muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. Subsequently, these antibodies were found in patients presenting with aNMT along with psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) patient with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Typical LE cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). The VGKC complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in the mild detergent digitonin. Recent studies indicated that the VGKC complex antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI1, Caspr2) that complex with VGKCs themselves. Patients with aNMT or MoS are most likely to have Caspr2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. We systematically identified and quantified autoantibodies in patient sera with VGKC-complex antibody associated encephalopathy and showed the relationship between individual antibodies and patient's symptoms. Furthermore, we revealed how autoantibodies disrupt the physiological functions of target proteins. LGI1 antibodies neutralize the interaction between LGI1 and ADAM22, reducing the synaptic AMPA receptors.

  7. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  8. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  10. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, G D

    2009-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase-ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener's granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  11. Serosurvey for polio antibodies.

    PubMed

    Biberi-Moroeanu, S; Munţiu, A; Stoiculescu, S

    1988-01-01

    From 1982 to 1988 a serological survey was performed on 573 subjects aged 3-80 years in order to evaluate the polio immunity level of the population. The presence of neutralizing antibodies was tested using the types 1, 2 and 3 Sabin vaccine strains as well as a wild strain of poliovirus type 1 isolated in France in 1978. According to their birth date, the subjects were assigned to 4 groups. The differences between the groups consisted in the different vaccination history of the subjects as well as in their different opportunities of having been in contact with the past epidemics of poliomyelitis. The results obtained indicate a satisfactory polio immunity level in all the 4 groups: seropositives, 96.7%-98.9% for type 2, 91.8%-98.2% for type 1 (Sabin vaccine strain), 89.3%-96.6% for type 3 and 84.2%-96.4% for type 1 wild strain. The highest immunity levels were found in group D (children with recorded history of complete polio vaccination) and in group A (unvaccinated people but contemporary with the past polio epidemics). A special comment is made with respect to 14 subjects showing satisfactory antibody titres for all the three types of Sabin-vaccine strains but who have proved to be seronegative (less than 4) for the wild type 1 poliovirus strain.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  13. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  14. Antibody therapies in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Freskgård, Per-Ola; Urich, Eduard

    2017-07-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have essentially been banned from the central nervous system, and are so far limited to use mainly in multiple sclerosis. This is primarily due to the fact that antibody penetration across the blood-brain barrier is very limited, with about only 0.1% of circulating antibodies estimated to reach the brain at steady-state concentration. Nonetheless, advances are being made with conventional antibodies, showing that minimal exposure can act centrally to mediate therapeutic effects. Immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease is a noteworthy example where antibodies against amyloid-β are able to reduce brain plaque pathology in preclinical models and humans. However, the advances in using antibodies directed at brain targets have also demonstrated impediments of low brain exposure in achieving clinical benefits, spurring increased attention in technologies designed to improve brain exposure of antibodies. Here we review antibodies in clinical trials for central nervous system disorders. Moreover, we describe some of the efforts to improve the therapeutic efficacy of antibodies by enhancing delivery across the blood-brain barrier. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled "Beyond small molecules for neurological disorders". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibodies as stratagems against cancer.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Louis; Cuong, Nguyen Tien; Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2016-06-21

    Antibodies have been in the frontline of anticancer research during the last few decades, since a number of different ways have been discovered to utilize them as parts or main components of anticancer drugs. Antibodies are used as the only component of some anticancer drugs, but they can also be conjugated with a variety of substances. Antibody engineering methods such as humanization, chimerization and Fc engineering are applied in order to modify their properties according to the requirements of anticancer drug application. Given the continuous advances in biology and informatics, the role of antibodies in anticancer treatment is expected to be prominent.

  16. Can we find a solution to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome controversy? Is acquired immune deficiency syndrome the consequence of continuous excessive stressing of the body?

    PubMed

    Hässig, A; Wen-Xi, L; Stampfli, K

    1996-04-01

    The time of re-evaluation of the role of human immunodeficiency viruses in the pathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome has now come, now that methods are available for the direct detection of human immunodeficiency viruses and for the detection of cellular anti-human immunodeficiency virus immune reactions. It has been shown that human immunodeficiency virus infections are common among anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody negative high-risk individuals. The disease is brought under control by cellular immune reactions and the anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody test remains negative. Apart from proof that infection with human immunodeficiency viruses has occurred, a positive result in an anti-human immunodeficiency virus-antibody test is also an indication of an independent immunosuppression state. According to the definition of the Centers of Disease Control classical acquired immune deficiency syndrome is the consequence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus in association with continuous excessive stress, such as observed in the known risk groups. At the center of the pathogenetic process is hypercortisolism-determined damage of T lymphocytes, in which insufficiency of thymus is prominent. For this reason, in our view, there are indications for shifting efforts from the prophylaxis of infection with human immunodeficiency viruses to the prophylaxis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by reducing stress factors.

  17. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  18. Functionality predictors in acquired brain damage.

    PubMed

    Huertas Hoyas, E; Pedrero Pérez, E J; Águila Maturana, A M; García López-Alberca, S; González Alted, C

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals who have survived an acquired brain injury present consequences affecting the sensorimotor, cognitive, affective or behavioural components. These deficits affect the proper performance of daily living activities. The aim of this study is to identify functional differences between individuals with unilateral acquired brain injury using functional independence, capacity, and performance of daily activities. Descriptive cross-sectional design with a sample of 58 people, with right-sided injury (n=14 TBI; n=15 stroke) or left-sided injury (n = 14 TBI, n = 15 stroke), right handed, and with a mean age of 47 years and time since onset of 4 ± 3.65 years. The functional assessment/functional independence measure (FIM/FAM) and the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) were used for the study. The data showed significant differences (P<.000), and a large size effect (dr=0.78) in the cross-sectional estimates, and point to fewer restrictions for patients with a lesion on their right side. The major differences were in the variables 'speaking' and 'receiving spoken messages' (ICF variables), and 'Expression', 'Writing' and 'intelligible speech' (FIM/FAM variables). In the linear regression analysis, the results showed that only 4 FIM/FAM variables, taken together, predict 44% of the ICF variance, which measures the ability of the individual, and up to 52% of the ICF, which measures the individual's performance. Gait alone predicts a 28% of the variance. It seems that individuals with acquired brain injury in the left hemisphere display important differences regarding functional and communication variables. The motor aspects are an important prognostic factor in functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  20. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  1. Psychological issues in acquired facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    The face is a vital component of one’s personality and body image. There are a vast number of variables that influence recovery and rehabilitation from acquired facial trauma many of which are psychological in nature. The present paper presents the various psychological issues one comes across in facial trauma patients. These may range from body image issues to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms accompanied by anxiety and depression. Issues related to facial and body image affecting social life and general quality of life are vital and the plastic surgeon should be aware of such issues and competent to deal with them in patients and families. PMID:21217982

  2. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  3. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  4. [Iris heterochromia in acquired Horner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beynat, J; Soichot, P; Bidot, S; Dugas, B; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2007-09-01

    Horner's syndrome (HS) is related to an interruption of the oculosympathetic nerve pathway. The classic clinical findings associated with this condition are ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos. Heterochromia is typically described in congenital HS, but it is an uncommon finding in acquired HS. We report a case of post-traumatic HS associated with heterochromia. A literature review indicates that this type of heterochromia may be related to a reduction in the number of iris melanocytes. This mechanism may be the same in the physiological iris color modifications in adulthood.

  5. Acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy.

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J C; Cuisset, J M; Nuyts, J P; Vallée, L

    1998-12-01

    Benign acquired and isolated asymmetrical palatal palsy is a rare condition in childhood. We report on three cases. Typical features include: sudden onset, abnormality of the palatal components of speech (rhinolalia), nasal escape of fluids from the ipsilateral nostril. It is supposed to be caused by viral infection, but attempts at viral isolation were unsuccessful. Complete spontaneous recovery is usual, taking a few weeks. Our paper seems to be the first report of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in this condition. It did not disclose any abnormalities in the 2 cases in which it was performed.

  6. Massive acquired cholesteatoma of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Wright, J L; Colman, B H; Connor, A F

    1976-03-01

    Nine patients with massive acquired cholesteatoma of the temporal bone were treated by radical mastoidectomy, facial nerve decompression, and excision of the inner ear. The commonest presenting symptoms were otorrhea and deafness, but otalgia, vertigo, external swelling and facial nerve palsies were also seen. Polytomography was helpful in assessing the degree of bone erosion preoperatively. The large cavity present following cholesteatoma excision was partially obliterated by a superiorly based temporalis muscle pedicle which helped to seal the internal auditory meatus and prevented the development of a cerebral hernia. Those patients with preoperative facial nerve palsies showed evidence of nerve degeneration and had incomplete recovery at a one year follow-up.

  7. Triple arthrodesis for adult acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Alan R; Dix, Brian T; Richardson, Phillip E; Mendicino, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The primary goal of triple arthrodesis for stage III and IV adult acquired flatfoot is to obtain a well-aligned plantigrade foot that will support the ankle in optimal alignment. Ancillary procedures including posterior muscle group lengthening, medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy, medial column stabilization, peroneus brevis tenotomy, or transfer and harvest of regional bone graft are often necessary to achieve adequate realignment. Image intensification is helpful in confirming optimal realignment before fixation. Results of triple arthrodesis are enhanced with adequate preparation of joint surfaces, bone graft/orthobiologics, 2-point fixation of all 3 tritarsal joints, and a vertical heel position. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  9. Affective and Behavioral Responses of Gay and Bisexual Men to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 56 gay and bisexual men tested for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus. Subjects who tested positive experienced increased anxiety, depression and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome anxiety; subjects who tested negative experienced decrease in these feelings after learning results. Subjects who chose not to learn results experienced…

  10. Affective and Behavioral Responses of Gay and Bisexual Men to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 56 gay and bisexual men tested for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus. Subjects who tested positive experienced increased anxiety, depression and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome anxiety; subjects who tested negative experienced decrease in these feelings after learning results. Subjects who chose not to learn results experienced…

  11. Predictive Features of Severe Acquired ADAMTS13 Deficiency in Idiopathic Thrombotic Microangiopathies: The French TMA Reference Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Paul; Schwarzinger, Michael; Buffet, Marc; Wynckel, Alain; Clabault, Karine; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Malot, Sandrine; Vanhille, Philippe; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Lemiale, Virginie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Ridel, Christophe; Rondeau, Eric; Pourrat, Jacques; Girault, Stéphane; Bordessoule, Dominique; Saheb, Samir; Ramakers, Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Guidet, Bertrand; Wolf, Martine; Veyradier, Agnès

    2010-01-01

    Severe ADAMTS13 deficiency occurs in 13% to 75% of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA). In this context, the early identification of a severe, antibody-mediated, ADAMTS13 deficiency may allow to start targeted therapies such as B-lymphocytes-depleting monoclonal antibodies. To date, assays exploring ADAMTS13 activity require skill and are limited to only some specialized reference laboratories, given the very low incidence of the disease. To identify clinical features which may allow to predict rapidly an acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of our national registry from 2000 to 2007. The clinical presentation of 160 patients with TMA and acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency was compared with that of 54 patients with detectable ADAMTS13 activity. ADAMTS13 deficiency was associated with more relapses during treatment and with a good renal prognosis. Patients with acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency had platelet count <30×109/L (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.4–24.2, P<.001), serum creatinine level ≤200 µmol/L (OR 23.4, 95% CI 8.8–62.5, P<.001), and detectable antinuclear antibodies (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.0–8.0, P<.05). When at least 1 criteria was met, patients with a severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency were identified with positive predictive value of 85%, negative predictive value of 93.3%, sensitivity of 98.8%, and specificity of 48.1%. Our criteria should be useful to identify rapidly newly diagnosed patients with an acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency to better tailor treatment for different pathophysiological groups. PMID:20436664

  12. Predictive features of severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency in idiopathic thrombotic microangiopathies: the French TMA reference center experience.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Paul; Schwarzinger, Michael; Buffet, Marc; Wynckel, Alain; Clabault, Karine; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Malot, Sandrine; Vanhille, Philippe; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Lemiale, Virginie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Ridel, Christophe; Rondeau, Eric; Pourrat, Jacques; Girault, Stéphane; Bordessoule, Dominique; Saheb, Samir; Ramakers, Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Guidet, Bertrand; Wolf, Martine; Veyradier, Agnès

    2010-04-23

    Severe ADAMTS13 deficiency occurs in 13% to 75% of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA). In this context, the early identification of a severe, antibody-mediated, ADAMTS13 deficiency may allow to start targeted therapies such as B-lymphocytes-depleting monoclonal antibodies. To date, assays exploring ADAMTS13 activity require skill and are limited to only some specialized reference laboratories, given the very low incidence of the disease. To identify clinical features which may allow to predict rapidly an acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of our national registry from 2000 to 2007. The clinical presentation of 160 patients with TMA and acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency was compared with that of 54 patients with detectable ADAMTS13 activity. ADAMTS13 deficiency was associated with more relapses during treatment and with a good renal prognosis. Patients with acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency had platelet count < 30 x 10(9)/L (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.4-24.2, P<.001), serum creatinine level < or =200 micromol/L (OR 23.4, 95% CI 8.8-62.5, P<.001), and detectable antinuclear antibodies (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.0-8.0, P<.05). When at least 1 criteria was met, patients with a severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency were identified with positive predictive value of 85%, negative predictive value of 93.3%, sensitivity of 98.8%, and specificity of 48.1%. Our criteria should be useful to identify rapidly newly diagnosed patients with an acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency to better tailor treatment for different pathophysiological groups.

  13. Reactogenicity and immunogenicity of measles-rubella combined vaccine in school-entry-aged subjects with naturally acquired measles immunity.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Takuji; Ihara, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Nagata, Nobuo; Kamiya, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The reintroduction of measles-rubella combined (MR) vaccination to Japan raised concerns about adverse events as well as immunogenicity related to booster immunization in subjects with naturally acquired immunity to measles or rubella. The time course of reactogenicity and antibody responses in recipients with pre-existing immunity to measles through natural infection was observed. Eighteen children aged 80-104 months received MR booster vaccination; 16 of them had had previous rubella vaccination. There were virtually no clinical reactions related to booster vaccination, and a highly significant antibody response to rubella antigen, whereas the antibody rise to measles was statistically significant but poor. Vaccination of individuals already immune is not harmful. Booster immunization to rubella for Japanese children is vitally important. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Acquiring functional object knowledge through motor imagery?

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus; van Elk, Michiel; Bekkering, Harold

    2012-04-01

    A widely investigated question in the research on the acquisition of novel functional object representations is the role of the action system. Whereas most studies so far have investigated the role of active action training on the acquisition of object representation, we investigated whether people are able to acquire object representations by just imagining the use of novel objects, given that previous findings suggested that executed and imagined actions share a common representational format. To this end, participants trained the use of novel objects in a motor imagery condition. Training comprised the particular grip applied to the objects and the objects' typical end location. Subsequently, participants' object representations were assessed by means of an object detection task. The results show that participants responded slower when the novel objects were presented at functionally incorrect end locations, indicating that the participants had acquired functional knowledge about object use. Yet, there was no effect of correct versus incorrect grip. Altogether, the findings suggest that motor imagery can facilitate the acquisition of novel object representations, but point also to differences between first-hand action training and training by imagery.

  15. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Quagliarello, V.

    1982-01-01

    A recently recognized syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-AIDS) has arisen since June 1981. It has received international attention. The clinical spectrum consists of repeated opportunistic infections, rare malignancies, and autoimmune phenomena, occurring in previously healthy adults with no history of an immunologic disorder. The population subset at risk for this syndrome appears to be predominantly homosexual American males and intravenous drug abusers with rare cases being reported in heterosexuals, hemophiliacs, and foreign patients, especially Haitians. The immunologic aberrancy in all patients described appears limited to T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and imbalance of T-helper and suppressor cells. This disordered immunoregulation is a consistent finding in all reported cases and appears to predispose to the opportunistic infections and malignancies which have been associated with a 40 percent mortality. The underlying factor responsible for the immunoregulatory defect is unknown but possible etiologies include a transmissible infectious agent, drug use, chronic antigen stimulation, and spermatozoa exposure. Treatment of the associated infections and malignancies has been a frustrating endeavor as many patients respond incompletely or relapse soon after successful treatment course. Preventive measures, including patient education, physician awareness, and immunomodulating agents, are discussed. PMID:6134399

  16. Naturally Acquired Canine Herpesvirus-Associated Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jager, Mason C; Sloma, Erica A; Shelton, Morgan; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-09-01

    Canid alphaherpesvirus 1 (CHV) causes morbidity and mortality in susceptible puppies. While the neuropathology of experimentally infected puppies has been detailed, characterization of naturally acquired infections is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the histologic, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization features of CHV encephalitis in the dog. Six female and 11 male puppies ranging in age from stillborn to 57 days old were included. Histologically, lesions included multifocal glial nodules (16/17, 94%), meningeal infiltrates (15/17, 88%), and cerebellar cortical necrosis (6/9, 67%); however, robust inflammation was not a significant feature in any of the cases. Immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD20, MAC387, and Iba1 was performed. Although T cells predominated over B cells, the overall number of cells was small in all cases both within the glial nodules and the meninges. In 16 of 16 (100%) cases, glial nodules were diffusely immunoreactive for Iba1; however, limited or no immunoreactivity for MAC387 was present. In situ hybridization directed at the CHV thymidine kinase gene revealed CHV nucleic acid in the granule neurons of the cerebellar folia (8/9; 89%), endothelial cells in the meninges and parenchyma (12/17, 71%), and individual randomly distributed neurons (6/17, 35%). These results clarify the pathology of naturally acquired CHV infection and indicate that developing cerebellar granule neurons are an important site of viral replication.

  17. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hyperpigmentary disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired pigmentary disorders are group of heterogenous entities that share single, most significant, clinical feature, that is, dyspigmentation. Asians and Indians, in particular, are mostly affected. Although the classic morphologies and common treatment options of these conditions have been reviewed in the global dermatology literature, the value of histpathological evaluation has not been thoroughly explored. The importance of accurate diagnosis is emphasized here as the underlying diseases have varying etiologies that need to be addressed in order to effectively treat the dyspigmentation. In this review, we describe and discuss the utility of histology in the diagnostic work of hyperpigmentary disorders, and how, in many cases, it can lead to targeted and more effective therapy. We focus on the most common acquired pigmentary disorders seen in Indian patients as well as a few uncommon diseases with distinctive histological traits. Facial melanoses, including mimickers of melasma, are thoroughly explored. These diseases include lichen planus pigmentosus, discoid lupus erythematosus, drug-induced melanoses, hyperpigmentation due to exogenous substances, acanthosis nigricans, and macular amyloidosis.

  18. Acquired and congenital coronary artery abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Young, Ming-Lon; McLeary, Michael; Chan, Kak-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in approximately 20% of young athletes are due to acquired or congenital coronary artery abnormalities. Kawasaki disease is the leading cause for acquired coronary artery abnormalities, which can cause late coronary artery sequelae including aneurysms, stenosis, and thrombosis, leading to myocardial ischaemia and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery can develop adequate collateral circulation from the right coronary artery in the newborn period, which remains asymptomatic only to manifest in adulthood with myocardial ischaemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Anomalous origin of coronary artery from the opposite sinus occurs in 0.7% of the young general population aged between 11 and 15 years. If the anomalous coronary artery courses between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, sudden cardiac death may occur during or shortly after vigorous exercise, especially in patients where the anomalous left coronary artery originates from the right sinus of Valsalva. Symptomatic patients with evidence of ischaemia should have surgical correction. No treatment is needed for asymptomatic patients with an anomalous right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. At present, there is no consensus regarding how to manage asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva and interarterial course. Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in cardiac catheterisation and it rarely causes exercise-induced coronary syndrome or cardiac death. In symptomatic patients, refractory or β-blocker treatment and surgical un-bridging may be considered.

  19. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  20. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication.

  1. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  2. Active citizenship and acquired neurological communication difficulty.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Bennett, Amanda; Cairney, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    People with communication impairments may face barriers to civic participation, with resulting marginalisation of individuals who wish to be actively involved. The investigation aimed to explore the experience of civically engaged adults with acquired neurological communication difficulties. Six people with acquired neurological communication difficulties were interviewed. Discussion included the definition of active citizenship, their civic involvement, motivations, related barriers and facilitators. Qualitative analysis was undertaken, with data categorised, coded and examined for recurring themes. All participants were active in disability-related organisations and four undertook wider civic roles. Motivations included activity being out with the home and wanting to effect change for themselves and the populations they represented. Disability group meetings were more positive experiences than broader community activities, which were associated with fatigue and frustration, commonly resulting from communication difficulties and unmet support needs. All participants identified a need for professional and public educational about disability and communication and made recommendations on content, methods and priority groups. For these participants civic engagement had positive and negative dimensions. Speech and language therapists should promote reduction of the barriers that impede the active citizenship rights of people with communication support needs. Civic participation may be a relevant measure of outcome in communication impaired populations.

  3. Eye movement correlates of acquired central dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Schattka, Kerstin I; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-08-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has been no research attempting to analyze both word-based viewing time measures and local fixation patterns in dyslexic readers. The goal of the study was to find out whether specific eye movement parameters reflect pathologically preferred segmental reading in contrast to lexical reading. We compared oral reading of single words of normal controls (n=11) with six aphasic participants (two cases of deep, surface and residual dyslexia each). Participants were asked to read aloud lines of target words differing in length and frequency. Segmental reading was characterized by deviant spatial distribution of saccadic landing positions with initial fixations located mainly at the beginning of the word, while lexical readers showed the normative 'preferred landing positions' left to the center of the words. Contrary to expectation, word length did not distinguish between segmental and lexical readers, while word frequency showed the expected effect for lexical readers only. Their mean fixation duration was already prolonged during first pass reading reflecting their attempts of immediate access to lexical information. After first pass reading, re-reading time was significantly increased in all participants with acquired central dyslexia due to their exceedingly higher monitoring demands for oral reading. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  5. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  6. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  7. [The significance of antiphospholipid antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fojtík, Z

    2004-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) present very heterogeneous groups of antibodies which can significantly influence processes on different levels of coagulation cascade depending on effects of phospholipid surfaces on blood coagulation. This usually leads to a particular level of thrombophylia. Clinical syndrome accompanying positive APLA, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, was defined by clinical and laboratory symptoms. This clinical syndrome can be a primary syndrome, if other disorders with ability to induce generation of antibodies can be excluded, or a secondary syndrome. The most often in cases of systemic tissue disease. APLA can be divided according to the presence of lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. According to a definition lupus anticoagulants are antibodies able to inhibit and prolong in vitro one or more blood clotting processes dependent on phospholipid surfaces. Anticardiolipin antibodies are antibodies measured by ELISA method with cardiolipin used as an antibody. Findings show that some APLA are directed against proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces. Main cofactor proteins include beta 2-GPI and prothrombin. Because of their heterogeneous specificity, APLA are directed against negative phospholipids or proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces and have important pathophysiology role in development of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  8. Acquired enophthalmos with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Park, K R; Seo, M R; Ryu, H J; Chi, M J; Baek, H J; Choi, H J

    2016-01-01

    Ocular involvement sometimes occurs with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but enophthalmos with SLE is rare. We report a case of enophthalmos with SLE. A 25-year-old male was admitted for two weeks of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, chest pain and right arm weakness with pain. We diagnosed him with SLE with malar rash, arthritis, pleural effusion, proteinuria, leukopenia, positive antinuclear antibody, anti-dsDNA, and lupus anticoagulant. The patient was prescribed high-dose prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine 400 mg. One week after discharge, he complained about a sensation of a sunken right eye. CT showed right enophthalmos, a post-inflammatory change and chronic inflammation. Proteinuria increased to 3.8 g/day after the patient stopped taking prednisolone. Cyclophosphamide therapy was administered for three months without improvement. We decided to restart prednisolone and change cyclophosphamide to mycophenolate mofetil. Proteinuria decreased but enophthalmos remains as of this reporting.

  9. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  10. Introduction and immunopathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sudharshan, S; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2008-01-01

    India has a large number of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the third largest population of this group in the world. This disease was first described in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia in 1981. Ocular lesions can occur at any stage of the disease but are more commonly seen at the late stages. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS is a retrovirus with RNA genome and a unique 'Reverse transcriptase enzyme' and is of two types, HIV-1 and 2. Most human diseases are caused by HIV-1. The HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in India are A, B and C. They act predominantly by reducing the CD4+ cells and thus the patient becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. High viral titers in the peripheral blood during primary infection lead to decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Onset of HIV-1-specific cellular immune response with synthesis of HIV-1 specific antibodies leads to the decline of plasma viral load and chronification of HIV-1 infection. However, the asymptomatic stage of infection may lead to persistent viral replication and a rapid turnover of plasma virions which is the clinical latency. During this period, there is further decrease in the CD4+ counts which makes the patient's immune system incapable of controlling opportunistic pathogens and thus life-threatening AIDS-defining diseases emerge. Advent of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has revolutionized the management of AIDS though there is associated increased development of immune recovery uveitis in a few of these patients.

  11. Heterogeneous Antibody Responses in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Colangeli, Roberto; Houde, Michel; Al Jahdali, Hamdan; Menzies, Dick; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    1998-01-01

    Antibody responses during tuberculosis were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a panel of 10 protein antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It was shown that serum immunoglobulin G antibodies were produced against a variety of M. tuberculosis antigens and that the vast majority of sera from tuberculosis patients contained antibodies against one or more M. tuberculosis antigens. The number and the species of serologically reactive antigens varied greatly from individual to individual. In a given serum, the level of specific antibodies also varied with the antigen irrespective of the total number of antigens recognized by that particular serum. These findings indicate that person-to-person heterogeneity of antigen recognition, rather than recognition of particular antigens, is a key attribute of the antibody response in tuberculosis. PMID:9673283

  12. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  13. Antinuclear antibodies in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takehara, K; Moroi, Y; Nakabayashi, Y; Ishibashi, Y

    1983-05-01

    When HeLa cells were used as the substrate for detection by the indirect immunofluorescence method, antinuclear antibodies were demonstrated in 16 of 22 (72.7%) sera from patients with localized scleroderma. When mouse kidney sections were used, the positive rate for antinuclear antibodies was 50% (11 of 22). In the 3 subgroups of localized scleroderma, frequencies of antinuclear antibodies on HeLa cells were as follows: morphea, 50% (2 of 4), generalized morphea, 100% (6 of 6), linear scleroderma, 67% (8 of 12). Antibodies to centromere, Scl-70, nuclear RNP, Sm, and SS-B antigens were not detected in any patients with localized scleroderma. The high frequency of antinuclear antibodies in localized scleroderma sera suggests that localized scleroderma is a disease which, though different from diffuse scleroderma, also involves an immunologic abnormality.

  14. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  15. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  16. Acquiring case adaptation knowledge: A hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, D.B.; Kinley, A.; Wilson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The ability of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems to apply cases to novel situations depends on their case adaptation knowledge. However, endowing CBR systems with adequate adaptation knowledge has proven to be a very difficult task. This paper describes a hybrid method for performing case adaptation, using a combination of rule-based and case-based reasoning. It shows how this approach provides a framework for acquiring flexible adaptation knowledge from experiences with autonomous adaptation and suggests its potential as a basis for acquisition of adaptation knowledge from interactive user guidance. It also presents initial experimental results examining the benefits of the approach and comparing the relative contributions of case learning and adaptation learning to reasoning performance.

  17. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrian; Podlipnik, Sebastian; Burgos, Fernando; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Cogolludo, Eva; Gallego-Valdes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer's disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth. PMID:27073702

  18. Gemifloxacin for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lode, Hartmut M; Schmidt-Ionas, Malina; Stahlmann, Ralf

    2008-05-01

    Newer fluoroquinolones have become an important therapeutic choice in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Gemifloxacin is one of the newest members of this class of antibiotics and has performed favourably in this indication. To analyse the microbiological activity, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties and clinical activity of gemifloxacin in CAP, as well as the safety reported in controlled clinical studies. Literature research of English publications in the last 10 years addressing all aspects of gemifloxacin in CAP. Gemifloxacin is microbiologically the most active fluoroquinolone against Streptococcus pneumoniae--the leading pathogen of CAP. In several comparative studies gemifloxacin was highly effective and well tolerated in the treatment of mild-to-moderate severe CAP.

  19. ACECARD. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E.E.

    1996-09-01

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  20. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E. E.

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  1. Severe acquired anaemia in Africa: new concepts.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, Michael B; Jonker, Femkje; Bates, Imelda

    2011-09-01

    Severe anaemia is common in Africa. It has a high mortality and particularly affects young children and pregnant women. Recent research provides new insights into the mechanisms and causes of severe acquired anaemia and overturns accepted dogma. Deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin A, but not of iron or folic acid, are associated with severe anaemia. Bacterial infections and, in very young children, hookworm infections are also common in severe anaemia. Irrespective of the aetiology, the mechanism causing severe anaemia is often red cell production failure. Severe anaemia in Africa is therefore a complex multi-factorial syndrome, which, even in an individual patient, is unlikely to be amenable to a single intervention. Policies and practices concerning anaemia diagnosis, treatment and prevention need to be substantially revised if we are to make a significant impact on the huge burden of severe anaemia in Africa.

  2. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Horn, J; Hermans, G

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is most often seen in surviving critically ill patients with sepsis or extensive inflammatory response which results in increased duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. Patients with ICUAW often do not fully recover and the disability will seriously impact on their quality of life. In this chapter we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology and risk factors of ICUAW. Tools to diagnose ICUAW, how to separate ICUAW from other disorders, and which possible treatment strategies can be employed are also described. ICUAW is finally receiving the attention it deserves and the expectation is that it can be better understood and prevented.

  3. Treatment of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budde, Ulrich; Scheppenheim, Sonja; Dittmer, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) accounts for 22% of patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor. Most patients with known pathophysiological mechanisms suffer from cardiovascular, myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. Less frequent associations are of autoimmune origin, due to hyperfibrinolysis, adsorption to tumor cells, reduced synthesis and prolonged circulation. The mechanisms leading to aVWS is hitherto not known in patients with liver and kidney diseases, drug use, glycogen storage disease, virus infections and at least 18 other disease entities. Diagnosis is complicated by the battery of tests needed, and their inherent rather low sensitivity and specificity for aVWS. Thus, even in acute bleeding situations it may take days until a firm diagnosis is settled and specific therapies can be initiated. The main aim is to shed more light onto this, compared with inherited von Willebrand disease, rare disease which affects at least 2-3% of the older population.

  4. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Menon, V; Bharucha, K

    1994-01-01

    As health care professionals, we face a grave risk of acquiring HIV infection in the course of our work. But how many of us really know the precautions to be applied in the hospital set up in dealing with HIV infected patients? A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) study was conducted in Pune hospitals to assess the current status. Among the results 65% servants had not heard of AIDS, 85% nursing staff did not apply the Universal Safety Precautions (USP) approach, 13.5% resident thought that the HIV was not transmitted by blood, 30% consultants would avoid contact with an HIV positive patient. This study has shown that definite lacunae exist in knowledge specific to the particular population in question. A proposal for an education programme which is target specific and one of constant renewal is sought.

  5. Processed pseudogenes acquired somatically during cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Susanna L.; Shlien, Adam; Marshall, John; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P.; Martincorena, Inigo; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Li, Yilong; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Yates, Lucy; Davies, Helen; Bolli, Niccolo; Bignell, Graham R.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Teixeira, Vitor H.; Raine, Keiran; O’Meara, Sarah; Dodoran, Maryam S.; Teague, Jon W.; Butler, Adam P.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Santarius, Thomas; Grundy, Richard G.; Malkin, David; Greaves, Mel; Munshi, Nikhil; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Bowtell, David; Martin, Sancha; Larsimont, Denis; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Boussioutas, Alex; Taylor, Jack A.; Hayes, Neil D.; Janes, Sam M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J.; Provenzano, Elena; van de Vijver, Marc; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin; Pinder, Sarah; Mac Grogan, Gaetan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Larsimont, Denis; Grabau, Dorthe; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Ehinger, Anna; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; van Deurzen, C.H.M; Salgado, Roberto; Brock, Jane E.; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Giri, Dilip D.; Arnould, Laurent; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Treilleux, Isabelle; Caldas, Carlos; Chin, Suet-Feung; Fatima, Aquila; Thompson, Alastair M.; Stenhouse, Alasdair; Foekens, John; Martens, John; Sieuwerts, Anieta; Brinkman, Arjen; Stunnenberg, Henk; Span, Paul N.; Sweep, Fred; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Thomas, Gilles; Broeks, Annegein; Langerod, Anita; Aparicio, Samuel; Simpson, Peter T.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Erla Eyfjörd, Jórunn; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Jonasson, Jon G.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Wong, Bernice Huimin; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Hooijer, Gerrit K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5′ truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context. PMID:24714652

  6. [Merits of acquiring ISO15189 accreditation].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, an ISO15189 accreditation system was started in 2005. To date, 47 hospitals have been accredited. In this session, I will present the merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189 based on our experience. Our hospital has 263 beds. The Clinical Examination Section consists of 12 staff (including 5 part-time workers): 7 in change of sample examination and 5 in charge of physiological examination. The annual number of samples is approximately 150,000. Samples collected on health checkups account for 90%. To improve the quality and service, assessment by third persons has been positively utilized in our hospital. Accreditation regarding ISO9001, ISO14001, ISO27001, privacy mark, hospital function assessment, the functional assessment of "ningen-dock"/health checkup hospitals, labor/hygiene service function assessment, and ISO15189 has been acquired. Patients may not recognize ISO. So, it must be utilized, considering that the acquisition of accreditation is not a goal but a starting point. Furthermore, cost-performance should be improved to achieve utilization-related merits. It is important to not only acquire accreditation but also help clinical staff and patients become aware of some changes/merits. Patients may consult a hospital for the following reasons: confidence in the hospital, and the staffs kind/polite attitudes. Long-term management strategies should be established without pursuing only short-term profits. I will introduce several merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189. Initially, incidental conditions for bids and appeal points include accreditation regarding ISO15189. Our corporation has participated in some competitive bids regarding health checkup business. In some companies, the bid conditions included ISO acquisition. In our hospital, clinical trials have been positively carried out. For participation in trials, hospitals must pass an institutional examination. However, ISO acquisition facilitates the preparation of

  7. Innate and acquired bacteriophage-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    We recently described a novel, non-host-derived, phage-mediated immunity active at mucosal surfaces, the main site of pathogen entry in metazoans. In that work, we showed that phage T4 adheres to mucus glycoproteins via immunoglobulin-like domains displayed on its capsid. This adherence positions the phage in mucus surfaces where they are more likely to encounter and kill bacteria, thereby benefiting both the phage and its metazoan host. We presented this phage-metazoan symbiosis based on an exclusively lytic model of phage infection. Here we extend our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model to consider the undoubtedly more complex dynamics in vivo. We hypothesize how mucus-adherent phages, both lytic and temperate, might impact the commensal microbiota as well as protect the metazoan epithelium from bacterial invasion. We suggest that BAM may provide both an innate and an acquired antimicrobial immunity. PMID:24228227

  8. [Psychosocial aspects of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Moura, L; Jacquemin, A

    1991-04-01

    Psychosocial aspects which arise with regard to people directly or indirectly involved with AIDS: patients, relatives and professional staff, are studied. The results show that the population assisted in the Ribeirão Preto region is predominantly young, male and drug-addicted. The patients with "positive" results show reactions similar to those described by Kluber-Ross (1977) for terminal patients. The behavior observed in relatives forms a continuum which varies from the negation of the illness to the overprotection of the patient. For the professionals, perplexity is the most common reaction when they face a population which is different from that with which they are used to dealing. Finally, the data acquired indicate that the psychologist can help the professionals to deal with the reactions of the patients by integrating them into their organic and emotional aspects.

  9. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  10. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  12. Acquired alexia: lessons from successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Beeson, P M; Insalaco, D

    1998-11-01

    Two individuals with anomic aphasia and acquired alexia were each provided treatment for their reading impairment. Although reading of single words in isolation was fairly accurate, their text reading was slow and effortful, including functor substitutions and semantic errors. Prior to treatment, reading reaction times for single words showed grammatical class and word-length effects. Both patients responded positively to a treatment protocol that included two phases: (1) multiple oral rereading of text, and (2) reading phrase-formatted text that had increased spacing between phrasal clauses. Their reading rates for text improved while maintaining good comprehension. Following treatment, reading reaction times for single words showed the elimination of grammatical class and word-length effects, suggesting improved access to word forms, particularly functors.

  13. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  14. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  15. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP antibody) is present in the sera of patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type in Asian.

    PubMed

    Satoh, K; Kawakami, A; Shirabe, S; Tamai, M; Sato, A; Tsujihata, M; Nagasato, K; Eguchi, K

    2010-05-01

    In the hippocampi of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, aberrant expression of citrullinated proteins and peptidylarginase 2 (PADI2) has been identified. We explored the functional roles of these proteins by means of detection of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP antibody) in patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT). Sera were obtained from 42 patients with DAT, 30 patients with other neurological disorders and 42 healthy controls. Gender ratio and age were comparable among the three groups. The level of anti-CCP antibody in sera was examined by ELISA. Anti-CCP antibody was not found in the 30 patients with other neurological disorders, and only one of the 42 healthy controls (2.4%) was positive. However, surprisingly, anti-CCP antibody was clearly detected in eight of the 42 DAT patients. Anti-CCP antibody appears to be a simple and early serologic biomarker for DAT among dementia patients. Additionally, our data imply that citrullinated proteins accumulated in the astrocytes of AD patients acquire neo-antigenicity, inducing anti-CCP antibody production.

  16. Guidelines for prevention of hospital acquired infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Todi, Subhash; Myatra, SN; Samaddar, D. P.; Patil, Vijaya; Bhattacharya, Pradip Kumar; Ramasubban, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines, written for clinicians, contains evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of hospital acquired infections Hospital acquired infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity and provide challenge to clinicians. Measures of infection control include identifying patients at risk of nosocomial infections, observing hand hygiene, following standard precautions to reduce transmission and strategies to reduce VAP, CR-BSI, CAUTI. Environmental factors and architectural lay out also need to be emphasized upon. Infection prevention in special subsets of patients - burns patients, include identifying sources of organism, identification of organisms, isolation if required, antibiotic prophylaxis to be used selectively, early removal of necrotic tissue, prevention of tetanus, early nutrition and surveillance. Immunodeficient and Transplant recipients are at a higher risk of opportunistic infections. The post tranplant timetable is divided into three time periods for determining risk of infections. Room ventilation, cleaning and decontamination, protective clothing with care regarding food requires special consideration. Monitoring and Surveillance are prioritized depending upon the needs. Designated infection control teams should supervise the process and help in collection and compilation of data. Antibiotic Stewardship Recommendations include constituting a team, close coordination between teams, audit, formulary restriction, de-escalation, optimizing dosing, active use of information technology among other measure. The recommendations in these guidelines are intended to support, and not replace, good clinical judgment. The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of evidence supporting the recommendation, so that readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. PMID:24701065

  17. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  19. A LAIR1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joshua; Pieper, Kathrin; Piccoli, Luca; Abdi, Abdirahman; Foglierini, Mathilde; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Ndungu, Francis Maina; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica; Bull, Peter; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-07

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 98 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR1, an immunoglobulin superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B-cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine.

  20. A LAIR-1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Abdirahman; Perez, Mathilde Foglierini; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Maina Ndungu, Francis; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies1–4. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here, we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 100 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR-1, an Ig superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR-1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine. PMID:26700814

  1. Variation in use of erythrocyte invasion pathways by Plasmodium falciparum mediates evasion of human inhibitory antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Kristina E.M.; McCallum, Fiona J.; Reiling, Linda; Lister, Nicole A.; Stubbs, Janine; Cowman, Alan F.; Marsh, Kevin; Beeson, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that inhibit Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes are believed to be an important component of immunity against malaria. During blood-stage infection, P. falciparum can use different pathways for erythrocyte invasion by varying the expression and/or utilization of members of 2 invasion ligand families: the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) and reticulocyte-binding homologs (PfRhs). Invasion pathways can be broadly classified into 2 groups based on the use of sialic acid (SA) on the erythrocyte surface by parasite ligands. We found that inhibitory antibodies are acquired by malaria-exposed Kenyan children and adults against ligands of SA-dependent and SA-independent invasion pathways, and the ability of antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion depended on the pathway used by P. falciparum isolates. Differential inhibition of P. falciparum lines that varied in their use of specific EBA and PfRh proteins pointed to these ligand families as major targets of inhibitory antibodies. Antibodies against recombinant EBA and PfRh proteins were acquired in an age-associated manner, and inhibitory antibodies against EBA175 appeared prominent among some individuals. These findings suggest that variation in invasion phenotype might have evolved as a mechanism that facilitates immune evasion by P. falciparum and that a broad inhibitory response against multiple ligands may be required for effective immunity. PMID:18064303

  2. Research and development of next generation of antibody-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenping

    2010-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are emerging as one of the major class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of many human diseases, in particular in cancer and immunological disorders. To date, 28 mAb have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for clinical applications. In addition, several hundreds of mAb are being developed clinically by many biotech and pharmaceutical companies for various disease indications. Many challenges still remain, however, and the full potential of therapeutic antibodies has yet to be realized. With the advancement of antibody engineering technologies and our further understanding of disease biology as well as antibody mechanism of action, many classes of novel antibody formats or antibody derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. These new antibody formats or molecules are carefully designed and engineered to acquire special features, such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced efficacy. These new agents may have the potential to revolutionize both our thinking and practice in the efforts to research and develop next generation antibody-based therapeutics.

  3. Research and development of next generation of antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Zhenping

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are emerging as one of the major class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of many human diseases, in particular in cancer and immunological disorders. To date, 28 mAb have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for clinical applications. In addition, several hundreds of mAb are being developed clinically by many biotech and pharmaceutical companies for various disease indications. Many challenges still remain, however, and the full potential of therapeutic antibodies has yet to be realized. With the advancement of antibody engineering technologies and our further understanding of disease biology as well as antibody mechanism of action, many classes of novel antibody formats or antibody derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. These new antibody formats or molecules are carefully designed and engineered to acquire special features, such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced efficacy. These new agents may have the potential to revolutionize both our thinking and practice in the efforts to research and develop next generation antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:20694021

  4. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Article 8 Financial Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8... including earnings per unit) for the two most recent years, which shall exclude items not comparable to the... be presented for only the most recent fiscal year if: (1) The property is not acquired from a related...

  5. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Article 8 Financial Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8... including earnings per unit) for the two most recent years, which shall exclude items not comparable to the... be presented for only the most recent fiscal year if: (1) The property is not acquired from a related...

  6. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  7. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  8. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  9. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  10. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of Land...

  11. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that is...

  12. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of Land...

  13. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of Land...

  14. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a loan...

  15. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that is...

  16. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a loan...

  17. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that is...

  18. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that...

  19. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of Land...

  20. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a loan...