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Sample records for acquired human diseases

  1. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  2. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Petrini, P

    1999-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a syndrome that has clinical and laboratory features similar to hereditary vWD. In contrast to the latter it occurs in patients without a family history of previous bleeding tendency. PMID:23401904

  3. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Nichols, William L

    2002-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a relatively rare acquired bleeding disorder that usually occurs in elderly patients, in whom its recognition may be delayed. Patients usually present predominantly with mucocutaneous bleeding, with no previous history of bleeding abnormalities and no clinically meaningful family history. Various underlying diseases have been associated with AvWD, most commonly hematoproliferative disorders, including monoclonal gammopathies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and myeloproliferative disorders. The pathogenesis of AvWD remains incompletely understood but includes autoantibodies directed against the von Willebrand factor (vWF), leading to a more rapid clearance from the circulation or interference with its function, adsorption of vWF by tumor cells, and nonimmunologic mechanisms of destruction. Laboratory evaluation usually reveals a pattern of prolonged bleeding time and decreased levels of vWF antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity, and factor VIII coagulant activity consistent with a diagnosis of vWD. Acquired vWD is distinguished from the congenital form by age at presentation, absence of a personal and family history of bleeding disorders, and, often, presence of a hematoproliferative or autoimmune disorder. The severity of the bleeding varies considerably among patients. Therapeutic options include desmopressin and certain factor VIII concentrates that also contain vWF. Successful treatment of the associated illness can reverse the clinical and laboratory manifestations. Intravenous immunoglobulins have also shown some efficacy in the management of AvWD, especially cases associated with monoclonal gammopathies. Awareness of AvWD is essential for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:11838652

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  5. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a “nucleoplasmic reticulum,” into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  6. Human temporal bone findings in acquired hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hald, J; Milroy, C M; Jensen, K D; Parving, A

    1991-11-01

    Histological studies of the auditory organ in patients with acquired hypothyroidism are scarce. Thus the aim of the present study was to examine the temporal bones and the brain in subjects with hypothyroidism. Four temporal bones and two brains from clinically and biochemically hypothyroid subjects were removed and evaluated by light microscopy determine to the morphological changes and deposition of neutral and acid glycosaminoglycans. An audiogram from one of the patients showed a sensorineural hearing loss, which could be ascribed to occupational noise exposure. The study revealed histological changes compatible with age and infectious disease. No accumulation of neutral or acid glycosaminoglycans could be demonstrated in the temporal bones, or in the brains. PMID:1761939

  7. [Inborn and acquired von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, R; Budde, U

    2008-12-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is known for its marked heterogeneity which was already recognized by von Willebrand in 1926. The basis of phenotypic differentiation are quantitative and qualitative or functional differences between the different types and subtypes of VWD. Clinical relevant facts for the practioner on diagnosis and therapy of von Willebrand disease and von Willebrand syndrome are presented. PMID:19132162

  8. [Inborn and acquired von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Schneppenheim, R; Barthels, M; Budde, U

    2005-11-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is known for its marked heterogeneity which was already recognized by von Willebrand in 1926. The basis of phenotypic differentiation are quantitative and qualitative or functional differences between the different types and subtypes of VWD. Clinical relevant facts for the practitioner on diagnosis and therapy of von Willebrand disease and von Willebrand syndrome are presented. PMID:16395486

  9. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  10. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  11. Imaging of acquired coronary diseases: From children to adults.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, A; Jacquier, A; Falque, C; Gorincour, G; Gaubert, J Y

    2016-05-01

    Acquired coronary diseases include aneurysms, fistulae, dissections, and stenosis. Aneurysms may occur secondarily to Kawasaki disease, a childhood vasculitis, the prognosis of which depends on the coronary involvement, or they may be degenerative, infectious, inflammatory, or traumatic in origin. Fistulae develop between the coronary arterial system and a pulmonary or bronchial artery, or cardiac cavity. Dissections may occur spontaneously or may be post-traumatic. These coronary abnormalities may be found incidentally or may present as complications, infarction or rupture. The goals of this article are to understand acquired childhood and adult coronary diseases and their usual means of presentation, the ways of investigating them, and the principles of their treatment. PMID:27130480

  12. Low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury accelerates disease and mortality in acquired murine lupus.

    PubMed Central

    Via, Charles S; Nguyen, Phuong; Niculescu, Florin; Papadimitriou, John; Hoover, Dennis; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2003-01-01

    Inorganic mercury (iHg) is known to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible rodent strains. Additionally, in inbred strains of mice prone to autoimmune disease, iHg can accelerate and exacerbate disease manifestations. Despite these well-known links between iHg and autoimmunity in animal models, no association between iHg alone and autoimmune disease in humans has been documented. However, it is possible that low-level iHg exposure can interact with disease triggers to enhance disease expression or susceptibility. To address whether exposure to iHg can alter the course of subsequent acquired autoimmune disease, we used a murine model of acquired autoimmunity, lupus-like chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which autoimmunity is induced using normal, nonautoimmune prone donor and F1 recipient mice resistant to Hg-induced autoimmunity. Our results indicate that a 2-week exposure to low-dose iHg (20 or 200 micro g/kg every other day) to donor and host mice ending 1 week before GVHD induction can significantly worsen parameters of disease severity, resulting in premature mortality. iHg pretreatment clearly worsened chronic lupus-like disease, rather than GVHD worsening iHg immunotoxicity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that low-level, nontoxic iHg preexposure may interact with other risk factors, genetic or acquired, to promote subsequent autoimmune disease development. PMID:12896845

  13. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis. PMID:26676359

  14. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  15. Massive postoperative intramuscular bleeding in acquired von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M; Meyer, B; Quehenberger, P; Turecek, P L; Hejna, M; Sperr, W R; Lechner, K; Pabinger, I

    2002-07-01

    We describe a case of acquired von Willebrand's disease (vWD) associated with monoclonal gammopathy with undetermined significance (MGUS) in a 54-year-old man who was admitted with hemarthrosis and extensive thigh muscle hematoma following arthroscopic surgery and postoperative prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin. Coagulation tests were compatible with acquired vWD: prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (56.1 s), decreased levels of factor VIII coagulant activity (23%), low concentrations of von Willebrand's factor (vWF) antigen (13%), and undetectable ristocetin cofactor activity (<10%). Infusion of a vWF-containing factor VIII concentrate failed to normalize the plasma levels of vWF-related parameters. Only additional intravenous administration of immunoglobulins led to a transient normalization of ristocetin cofactor activity, vWF antigen, and factor VIII coagulant activity. While the spontaneous bleeding tendency in this case was mild, surgery and administration of prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin led to life-threatening bleeding. PMID:12185511

  16. Pathophysiology of acquired von Willebrand disease: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shrimati; Kasatkar, Priyanka; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-08-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AVWD) is a rare, underdiagnosed hemorrhagic disorder, which is similar to congenital VWD with regard to the clinical and laboratory parameters; however, it is found in individuals with no positive family history and has no genetic basis. The etiology is varied, the commonest being hematoproliferative disorders and cardiovascular disorders. Other disorders associated with AVWD are autoimmune disorders such as systematic lupus erythematosus, hypothyroidism, and neoplasia, or it may also be drug induced. In quite a few cases, the etiology is unknown. The pathogenic mechanisms are different in different underlying disorders or they may be overlapping among these disorders. Some of the proposed mechanisms include the development of autoantibodies, selective absorption of high molecular weight von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers, non-selective absorption of VWF, mechanical destruction of VWF under high shear stress, and increased proteolysis. This report presents a concise review of the pathophysiological mechanisms of AVWD in these various underlying conditions. PMID:21535159

  17. Acquired immune heterogeneity and its sources in human helminth infection

    PubMed Central

    BOURKE, C. D.; MAIZELS, R. M.; MUTAPI, F.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Similarities in the immunobiology of different parasitic worm infections indicate that co-evolution of humans and helminths has shaped a common anti-helminth immune response. However, recent in vitro and immuno-epidemiological studies highlight fundamental differences and plasticity within host-helminth interactions. The ‘trade-off’ between immunity and immunopathology inherent in host immune responses occurs on a background of genetic polymorphism, variable exposure patterns and infection history. For the parasite, variation in life-cycle and antigen expression can influence the effector responses directed against them. This is particularly apparent when comparing gastrointestinal and tissue-dwelling helminths. Furthermore, insights into the impact of anti-helminthic treatment and co-infection on acquired immunity suggest that immune heterogeneity arises not from hosts and parasites in isolation, but also from the environment in which immune responses develop. Large-scale differences observed in the epidemiology of human helminthiases are a product of complex host-parasite-environment interactions which, given potential for exposure to parasite antigens in utero, can arise even before a parasite interacts with its human host. This review summarizes key differences identified in human acquired immune responses to nematode and trematode infections of public health importance and explores the factors contributing to these variations. PMID:20946693

  18. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  19. ACQUIRED PES CAVUS IN CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Maranho, Daniel Augusto; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of the forefoot, hindfoot or it may be a combination of both locations. Related deformities, mainly the varus and toe clawing require appropriate evaluation; clinical characteristics such as severity of the deformity, impairment of the muscular power, flexibility and patient's age are important characteristics in the treatment decision. Conservative treatment of the cavusvarus foot with physiotherapy, insoles and shoe modifications are reserved to young patients and mild deformities. However, there is a tendency of the deformity to become more severe over time because of the progressive feature of the underlying neurological condition. So, the surgical treatment by using classical techniques is performed in early stages. Most importantly is the identification of the primary and main components of each deformity to properly correct them, if possible. Muscular transfers are used to treat the dynamic unbalance, retracted structures should be either divided or lengthened and localized osteotomies should be preferred over arthrodeses, which are reserved for stiff and severely deformed feet in adults. PMID:27077056

  20. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  1. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; Georgiev, Alexander V; Kuzawa, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities. PMID:27394024

  3. Acquired mitochondrial impairment as a cause of optic nerve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blindness from an optic neuropathy recently occurred as an epidemic affecting 50,000 patients in Cuba (CEON) and had clinical features reminiscent of both tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA) and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Leber's; LHON). Selective damage to the papillomacular bundle was characteristic, and many patients also developed a peripheral neuropathy. Identified risk factors included vitamin deficiencies as well as exposure to methanol and cyanide. In all 3 syndromes, there is evidence that singular or combined insults to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are associated with a clinically characteristic optic neuropathy. PURPOSE: First, to test the hypothesis that a common pathophysiologic mechanism involving impairment of mitochondria function and, consequently, axonal transport underlies both genetic optic nerve diseases such as Leber's and acquired toxic and nutritional deficiency optic neuropathies. According to this hypothesis, ATP depletion below a certain threshold leads to a blockage of orthograde axonal transport of mitochondria, which, in turn, leads to total ATP depletion and subsequent cell death. Second, to address several related questions, including (1) How does impaired energy production lead to optic neuropathy, particularly since it seems to relatively spare other metabolically active tissues, such as liver and heart? (2) Within the nervous system, why is the optic nerve, and most particularly the papillomacular bundle, so highly sensitive? Although there have been previous publications on the clinical features of the Cuban epidemic of blindness, the present hypothesis and the subsequent questions have not been previously addressed. METHODS: Patients in Cuba with epidemic optic neuropathy were personally evaluated through a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic examination. In addition, serum, lymphocytes for DNA analysis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), sural nerves, and eyes with attached optic nerves were obtained from

  4. Oxfendazole Treatment of Sheep with Naturally Acquired Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dueger, Erica L.; Moro, Pedro L.; Gilman, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    A blinded, randomized placebo-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of oxfendazole for the treatment of ovine hydatid disease. Cyst fertility and parasite viability were measured following daily, weekly, and monthly treatment schedules with 30 mg of oxfendazole per kg of body weight. The 12-week trial was conducted in 215 adult sheep in the central Peruvian Andes and was masked for both treatment group and scheduling. In this trial oxfendazole significantly reduced protoscolex viability relative to controls in all treatment groups. In the daily, weekly, and monthly groups, 100, 97, and 78% of sheep, respectively, were either cured or improved following treatment, compared to 35% cured or improved animals in the control group. However, daily dosing at 30 mg of oxfendazole per kg proved highly toxic to sheep, resulting in a 24% death rate in the daily group as compared to a 4 to 6% mortality rate in all other groups. If found safe in humans, oxfendazole may prove to be a useful and inexpensive treatment for cestode infections in humans. This study suggests that a staggered dosing regimen of oxfendazole, and possibly other benzimidazoles, may be as efficacious as daily treatment regimens for hydatidosis while decreasing both the cost and adverse effects associated with daily dosing. PMID:10471576

  5. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. PMID:26669818

  6. Hendra and Nipah viruses: new zoonotically-acquired human pathogens.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Joseph G

    2005-03-01

    Some of the key features of Hendra and Nipah viruses are summarized in Table 1. The appearance of these new viruses over the last 10 years emphasizes a number of issues. (1) Epidemics of human infectious diseases can occur unexpectedly and with high impact in terms of morbidity and mortality. (2) We do not know what epidemiologic factors conspire to allow these viruses to stray out of their bat reservoirs into the two different intermediate hosts (horses and pigs) and then into humans. (3) We do not know how long these viruses have been present in the bat population, where they originated from, or if they are present in other parts of the world. (4)There may be other viruses waiting for similar opportunities to cross species.(5) It is unlikely that we have seen the last of these and related viruses. PMID:15763222

  7. Autophagy and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peidu; Mizushima, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a major intracellular degradative process that delivers cytoplasmic materials to the lysosome for degradation. Since the discovery of autophagy-related (Atg) genes in the 1990s, there has been a proliferation of studies on the physiological and pathological roles of autophagy in a variety of autophagy knockout models. However, direct evidence of the connections between ATG gene dysfunction and human diseases has emerged only recently. There are an increasing number of reports showing that mutations in the ATG genes were identified in various human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases, infectious diseases, and cancers. Here, we review the major advances in identification of mutations or polymorphisms of the ATG genes in human diseases. Current autophagy-modulating compounds in clinical trials are also summarized. PMID:24323045

  8. Autophagosomes and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Beau, Isabelle; Mehrpour, Maryam; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    The autophagosome is a double-membrane bound compartment that initiates macroautophagy, a degradative pathway for cytoplasmic material terminating in the lysosomal compartment. The discovery of ATG genes involved in the formation of autophagosomes has greatly increased our understanding of the molecular basis of macroautophagy, and its role in cell function. Macroautophagy plays a pivotal role in cell fitness by removing obsolete organelles and protein aggregates. Its stimulation is an adaptive response to stressful situations, such as nutrient deprivation, intended to maintain a level of ATP compatible with cell survival. Macroautophagy is central for organ homeostasis, embryonic development, and longevity. Malfunctioning autophagy is observed in many human diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac and muscular diseases, infectious and inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Discovering potential drug therapies that can be used to modulate macroautophagy is a major challenge, and likely to enhance the therapeutic arsenal against many human diseases. PMID:21256243

  9. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk

  10. Turner syndrome associated with acquired von Willebrand disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Lubomir; Stueben, Eugen T; Jaikishen, Jay P; Lamarche, Maximo B

    2002-07-01

    We report a unique case of Turner syndrome associated with acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). During 7 years of close follow-up, the patient presented with multiple major episodes of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by different pathogenic mechanisms, such as IBD, AvWD, gastric varices, and thrombocytopenia. AvWD mimicking familial vWD type III on laboratory testing was most probably triggered by autoimmune mechanism associated with PBC. Therapy of PBC with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) resulted in significant decrease of liver enzymes followed by normalization of vWF and FVIII levels. Portosystemic shunt placement with ligation of gastric varices improved hypersplenism and severe thrombocytopenia and led to clinical stability for more than 24 months. The clinicopathological features of these disorders and of the recurrent bleeding episodes are discussed in the text along with a review of the literature. PMID:12116986

  11. Morbilliviruses and human disease.

    PubMed

    Rima, Bertus K; Duprex, W Paul

    2006-01-01

    Morbilliviruses are a group of viruses that belong to the family Paramyxoviridae. The most instantly recognizable member is measles virus (MV) and individuals acutely infected with the virus exhibit a wide range of clinical symptoms ranging from a characteristic mild self-limiting infection to death. Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rinderpest virus (RPV) cause a similar but distinctive pathology in dogs and cattle, respectively, and these, alongside experimental MV infection of primates, have been useful models for MV pathogenesis. Traditionally, viruses were identified because a distinctive disease was observed in man or animals; an infectious agent was subsequently isolated, cultured, and this could be used to recapitulate the disease in an experimentally infected host. Thus, satisfying Koch's postulates has been the norm. More recently, particularly due to the advent of exceedingly sensitive molecular biological assays, many researchers have looked for infectious agents in disease conditions for which a viral aetiology has not been previously established. For these cases, the modified Koch's postulates of Bradford Hill have been developed as criteria to link a virus to a specific disease. Only in a few cases have these conditions been fulfilled. Therefore, many viruses have over the years been definitely and tentatively linked to human diseases and in this respect the morbilliviruses are no different. In this review, human diseases associated with morbillivirus infection have been grouped into three broad categories: (1) those which are definitely caused by the infection; (2) those which may be exacerbated or facilitated by an infection; and (3) those which currently have limited, weak, unsubstantiated or no credible scientific evidence to support any link to a morbillivirus. Thus, an attempt has been made to clarify the published data and separate human diseases actually linked to morbilliviruses from those that are merely anecdotally associated. PMID:16362981

  12. Nongenital human papillomavirus disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Khan, Michelle J

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral cause of cancer, and is responsible for 5% of cancers worldwide. Following demonstration of the causative link between HPV and cervical cancer, HPV has been shown to be associated with several anogenital malignancies and with oral pharyngeal cancers. HPV-related anal and oral pharyngeal disease is rising in incidence and includes anal warts and neoplasia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and oral pharyngeal neoplasia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongenital HPV-related disease. PMID:23732034

  13. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis and Other Diseases of Mucus Clearance.

    PubMed

    Raju, S Vamsee; Solomon, George M; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. No therapies alter the natural history of the disease. Chronic bronchitis is perhaps the most clinically troublesome phenotype. Emerging data strongly suggest that cigarette smoke and its components can lead to acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction. Findings in vitro, in animal models, and in smokers with and without COPD also show acquired CFTR dysfunction, which is associated with chronic bronchitis. This abnormality is also present in extrapulmonary organs, suggesting that CFTR dysfunction may contribute to smoking-related systemic diseases. PMID:26857776

  14. Towards an Age-Dependent Transmission Model of Acquired and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Calero, Miguel; Rábano, Alberto; Cruz, Mabel; Siden, Åke; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Laursen, Henning; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Mølbak, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) might be transmitted by surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential susceptibility to sCJD from surgery at juvenile age and in early adulthood. Methods From Danish and Swedish national registries we identified 167 definite and probable sCJD cases with onset from 1987 through 2003, and 835 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls along with their surgical histories. Main, anatomically or etiologically classified surgical procedures followed by a ≥20-year lag were analyzed using logistic regression, and stratified by age at first-registered surgical discharge. Results The risk of having a diagnosis of CJD depended strongly on age at first surgery with odds ratio (OR) of 12.80 (95% CI 2.56–64.0) in patients <30 years, 3.04 (95% 1.26–7.33) in 30–39 years, and 1.75 (95% CI 0.89–3.45) in ≥40 years, for anatomically classified surgical procedures. Similar figures were obtained for etiologically classified surgical procedures. Conclusions Risk of surgical-acquired sCJD depends on age at exposure; this pattern is similar to age-specific profiles reported for CJD accidentally transmitted by human pituitary-derived growth hormone and susceptibility curves for variant CJD estimated after adjustment for dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. There might be an age-at-exposure-related susceptibility to acquire all CJD forms, including sCJD from routine surgery. PMID:25279832

  15. First case of a naturally acquired human infection with Plasmodium cynomolgi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since 1960, a total of seven species of monkey malaria have been reported as transmissible to man by mosquito bite: Plasmodium cynomolgi, Plasmodium brasilianum, Plasmodium eylesi, Plasmodium knowlesi, Plasmodium inui, Plasmodium schwetzi and Plasmodium simium. With the exception of P. knowlesi, none of the other species has been found to infect humans in nature. In this report, it is described the first known case of a naturally acquired P. cynomolgi malaria in humans. The patient was a 39-year-old woman from a malaria-free area with no previous history of malaria or travel to endemic areas. Initially, malaria was diagnosed and identified as Plasmodium malariae/P. knowlesi by microscopy in the Terengganu State Health Department. Thick and thin blood films stained with 10% Giemsa were performed for microscopy examination. Molecular species identification was performed at the Institute for Medical Research (IMR, Malaysia) and in the Malaria & Emerging Parasitic Diseases Laboratory (MAPELAB, Spain) using different nested PCR methods. Microscopic re-examination in the IMR showed characteristics of Plasmodium vivax and was confirmed by a nested PCR assay developed by Snounou et al. Instead, a different PCR assay plus sequencing performed at the MAPELAB confirmed that the patient was infected with P. cynomolgi and not with P. vivax. This is the first report of human P. cynomolgi infection acquired in a natural way, but there might be more undiagnosed or misdiagnosed cases, since P. cynomolgi is morphologically indistinguishable from P. vivax, and one of the most used PCR methods for malaria infection detection may identify a P. cynomolgi infection as P. vivax. Simian Plasmodium species may routinely infect humans in Southeast Asia. New diagnostic methods are necessary to distinguish between the human and monkey malaria species. Further epidemiological studies, incriminating also the mosquito vector(s), must be performed to know the relevance of cynomolgi malaria and its

  16. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  17. Epidemiological characteristics of human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of transmissible, progressive, and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which include Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia. Human prion diseases affect approximately 1-2 persons per million worldwide annually, occurring in sporadic, inherited, and acquired forms. These diseases have attracted both scientific and public attention not only because of their mysterious pathogen, but also due to their considerable threat to public health since the emergence of the variant CJD.There are still no specific therapeutic and prophylactic interventions available for prion diseases, thus active surveillance of human prion diseases is critical for disease control and prevention. Since 1993, CJD surveillance systems have been established in many countries and regions, and several long-term multinational cooperative projects have been conducted.In this paper, the epidemiological characteristics of various human prion diseases and the active surveillance systems pertaining to them in different countries and regions are summarized and reviewed. PMID:27251305

  18. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J.; Lander, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead. PMID:18988837

  19. Acquired von Willebrand disease in a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wu; Saidi, Parvin

    2004-02-01

    We describe a patient with acquired von Willebrand disease (vWD), who had typical presentation and clinical manifestations of acquired vWD, but correct diagnosis was delayed because of lack of awareness and early recognition. The patient was initially seen at a community hospital with persistent nasal mucosal bleeding and was transfused with an excessive amount of cryoprecipitates before appropriate hemostatic evaluation. Hemostasis work-up revealed that he had classic features of acquired vWD. Further extensive evaluation revealed the patient to have monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). He was refractory to a high dose of corticosteroids and had a very transient response to desmopressin acetate (less than 4 hours) but responded well to a high dose of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), which lasted at least 3 weeks with each treatment. He remained very responsive to IVIG 2 years later. His underlying MGUS has not progressed during the past 4 years. PMID:14770028

  20. S1 nuclease analysis of alpha-globin gene expression in preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease after transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Helder, J; Deisseroth, A

    1987-04-01

    The loss of alpha-globin gene transcriptional activity rarely occurs as an acquired abnormality during the evolution of myeloproliferative disease or preleukemia. To test whether the mutation responsible for the loss of alpha-globin gene expression (hemoglobin H disease) in these patients is linked with the alpha-globin genes on chromosome 16, we transferred chromosome 16 from preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease to mouse erythroleukemia cells and measured the transcriptional activity of the human alpha-globin genes. After transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells, the expression of human alpha-globin genes from the peripheral blood or marrow cells of preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease was similar to that of human alpha-globin genes transferred to mouse erythroleukemia cells from normal donors. These data showed that factor(s) in the mouse erythroleukemia cell can genetically complement the alpha-globin gene defect in these preleukemia patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease and suggest that altered expression of a gene in trans to the alpha-globin gene may be responsible for the acquisition of hemoglobin H disease in these patients. PMID:3031681

  1. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells from blood cells of healthy donors and patients with acquired blood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaohui; Zhan, Huichun; Mali, Prashant; Dowey, Sarah; Williams, Donna M.; Jang, Yoon-Young; Dang, Chi V.; Spivak, Jerry L.; Moliterno, Alison R.

    2009-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from somatic cells hold promise to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. We and others previously reprogrammed human adherent cells, such as postnatal fibroblasts to iPS cells, which resemble adherent embryonic stem cells. Here we report derivation of iPS cells from postnatal human blood cells and the potential of these pluripotent cells for disease modeling. Multiple human iPS cell lines were generated from previously frozen cord blood or adult CD34+ cells of healthy donors, and could be redirected to hematopoietic differentiation. Multiple iPS cell lines were also generated from peripheral blood CD34+ cells of 2 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) who acquired the JAK2-V617F somatic mutation in their blood cells. The MPD-derived iPS cells containing the mutation appeared normal in phenotypes, karyotype, and pluripotency. After directed hematopoietic differentiation, the MPD-iPS cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor (CD34+CD45+) cells showed the increased erythropoiesis and gene expression of specific genes, recapitulating features of the primary CD34+ cells of the corresponding patient from whom the iPS cells were derived. These iPS cells provide a renewable cell source and a prospective hematopoiesis model for investigating MPD pathogenesis. PMID:19797525

  2. Acquired von Willebrand disease and multiple myeloma: a case report of a breast cancer survivor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ning; Salahuddin, Farah F; Nesbitt, John A

    2014-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (aVWD) is rare disease and is associated with a variety of underlying diseases. We report a case of aVWD in the setting of multiple myeloma. The patient was a 63-year-old female with breast cancer in remission who was admitted for symptomatic anemia. She was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. She also had subcutaneous bleeding before admission. Laboratory studies revealed isolated prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time, which corrected in a mixing study. Her factor VIII activity, von Willebrand factor (VWF) Ag, and VWF activity were low. VWF multimer study confirmed the patient had aVWD. The treatment of aVWD is discussed in this article, including the treatment of underlying diseases, and acute management in emergent situations. An intriguing question in this case is whether the patient's multiple myeloma is a chemotherapy-induced hematological malignancy or a second primary malignancy. PMID:24911454

  3. First Experimental In Vivo Model of Enhanced Dengue Disease Severity through Maternally Acquired Heterotypic Dengue Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Zhang, Summer Lixin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Yan, Benedict; Maria Martinez Gomez, Julia; Tan, Wei Yu; Lam, Jian Hang; Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) represents the most serious arthropod-borne viral disease. DEN clinical manifestations range from mild febrile illness to life-threatening hemorrhage and vascular leakage. Early epidemiological observations reported that infants born to DEN-immune mothers were at greater risk to develop the severe forms of the disease upon infection with any serotype of dengue virus (DENV). From these observations emerged the hypothesis of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease severity, whereby maternally acquired anti-DENV antibodies cross-react but fail to neutralize DENV particles, resulting in higher viremia that correlates with increased disease severity. Although in vitro and in vivo experimental set ups have indirectly supported the ADE hypothesis, direct experimental evidence has been missing. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study has challenged the influence of maternal antibodies in disease outcome. Here we have developed a mouse model of ADE where DENV2 infection of young mice born to DENV1-immune mothers led to earlier death which correlated with higher viremia and increased vascular leakage compared to DENV2-infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers. In this ADE model we demonstrated the role of TNF-α in DEN-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, upon infection with an attenuated DENV2 mutant strain, mice born to DENV1-immune mothers developed lethal disease accompanied by vascular leakage whereas infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers did no display any clinical manifestation. In vitro ELISA and ADE assays confirmed the cross-reactive and enhancing properties towards DENV2 of the serum from mice born to DENV1-immune mothers. Lastly, age-dependent susceptibility to disease enhancement was observed in mice born to DENV1-immune mothers, thus reproducing epidemiological observations. Overall, this work provides direct in vivo demonstration of the role of maternally acquired heterotypic dengue antibodies in the enhancement of dengue

  4. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys.

  5. Dynamic Linear Model Analysis of Optical Imaging Data Acquired from the Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Michael; Haglund, Michael M.; Hochman, Daryl W.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of light absorbed and scattered by neocortical tissue is altered by neuronal activity. Imaging of intrinsic optical signals (ImIOS), a technique for mapping these activity-evoked optical changes with an imaging detector, has the potential to be useful for both clinical and experimental investigations of the human neocortex. However, its usefulness for human studies is currently limited because intraoperatively acquired ImIOS data is noisy. To improve the reliability and usefulness of ImIOS for human studies, it is desirable to find appropriate methods for the removal of noise artifacts and its statistical analysis. Here we develop a Bayesian, dynamic linear modeling approach that appears to address these problems. A dynamic linear model (DLM) was constructed that included cyclic components to model the heartbeat and respiration artifacts, and a local linear component to model the activity-evoked response. The robustness of the model was tested on a set of ImIOS data acquired from the exposed cortices of six human subjects illuminated with either 535 nm or 660 nm light. The DLM adequately reduced noise artifacts in these data while reliably preserving their activity-evoked optical responses. To demonstrate how these methods might be used for intraoperative neurosurgical mapping, optical data acquired from a single human subject during direct electrical stimulation of the cortex were quantitatively analyzed. This example showed that the DLM can be used to provide quantitative information about human ImIOS data that is not available through qualitative analysis alone. PMID:21640137

  6. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  7. Use of recombinant factor VIIa in inherited and acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Sucker, Christoph; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Zotz, Rainer B

    2009-02-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is increasingly used outside the labeled indications for the treatment of life-threatening bleeding episodes after failure of respective standard therapy. In this article, the authors focus on the use of the agent in patients with inherited or acquired von Willebrand disease (vWD). Although the current experience is sparse, published cases indicate the high efficacy of rFVIIa for the treatment of patients refractory to conventional treatment. The agent may be used in patients with congenital vWD complicated by alloantibodies directed against substituted von Willebrand factor or in the presence of concomitant hemostatic defects as well as acquired vWD with hitherto limited therapeutic options. Controlled clinical studies are necessary to define the use of rFVIIa in this clinical setting. PMID:18263636

  8. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  9. [Human prion diseases in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Rohan, Z; Rusina, R; Marešová, M; Matěj, R

    2015-09-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of very rare diseases with a unique pathogenesis and, due to an inauspicious prognosis and unavailability of therapy, with fatal consequences. The etiopathogenetic background is the presence of pathologically misfolded prion protein, highly resistant to denaturation, the aggregation and presence of which in the brain tissue causes irreversible neuronal damage. The most frequent prion disease in humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which occurs in sporadic, hereditary/familial, or acquired/infectious/iatrogenic forms. A new form of CJD, variant CJD, is considered to be linked to dietary exposure to beef products from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and to infection via blood transfusion. The clinical picture of these diseases is characterized by a rapidly progressing dementia, cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms, and rather specific MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Clinically, the diagnosis is described as possible or probable prion disease and needs to be confirmed by neuropathological or immunological investigation of the brain tissue. Epidemiological data from the Czech Republic spanning the last decade are presented. PMID:26448298

  10. Acquired von Willebrand's disease associated with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Kannan, M; Chatterjee, T; Dixit, A; Mahapatra, M; Choudhry, V P; Saxena, R

    2006-07-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare and probably underestimated bleeding disorder which mimics most of the clinical symptoms and laboratory features of hereditary von Willebrand disease (VWD) in patients devoid of both personal and family history of bleeding diathesis. In this study, we present a case of 55 yrs male patient, presented with gastrointestinal bleeds since three years, diagnosed to have AVWS with inhibitors. From this study it is concluded that AVWS is rare and it is important to diagnose this bleeding disorder so that appropriate treatment with plasmapheresis and IV:Ig can effectively correct the haemostatic defect and manage severe bleeding in these patients. PMID:16834752

  11. Review of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with focus on pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Ohe, Chisato; Mikami, Shuji; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-09-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently established entity. In this article, we introduce the general view of this new entity. Macroscopically, the disease exclusively occurs in ACD and may arise as a dominant mass or non-dominant masses. Histologically, the tumor is characterized by a microcystic pattern, neoplastic cells with an eosinophilic or oncocytic cytoplasm and frequent intratumoral oxalate crystal deposition. Prominent nucleoli of tumor cells are often observed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells are generally positive for AMACR but negative for cytokeratin 7. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells contain abundant mitochondria in the cytoplasm. Genetically, the gain of chromosomes 3, 7, 17 and abnormality of the sex chromosome were frequently observed in several studies. In conclusion, ACD-associated RCC may be widely recognized as a distinct entity in the near future because this tumor is morphologically and genetically different from other renal tumor entities that have been previously established. PMID:21751153

  12. Inclusion body disease of cranes: comparison of pathologic findings in cranes with acquired vs. experimentally induced disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuh, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Siegfried, L.M.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes was the cause of death in 17 immature and mature cranes of 5 different species in Wisconsin. A herpesvirus of unknown origin was the apparent cause. An isolate of this herpesvirus was used to experimentally infect 3 species of cranes. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions associated with naturally acquired and experimentally induced disease were essentially identical. Multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis was found in all cranes evaluated. Necrosis of the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius also was seen in some of the cranes. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies often were commonly associated with hepatic lesions, sometimes with the splenic lesions, and rarely with the thymic or gastrointestinal tract lesions. The lesions of this inclusion body disease were similar to those reported for cranes in Austria from which a crane herpesvirus was isolated.

  13. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  14. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  15. Cohesin and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominant multisystem disorder caused by a disruption of cohesin function. The cohesin ring complex is composed of four protein subunits and more than 25 additional proteins involved in its regulation. The discovery that this complex also has a fundamental role in long-range regulation of transcription in Drosophila has shed light on the mechanism likely responsible for its role in development. In addition to the three cohesin proteins involved in CdLS, a second multisystem, recessively inherited, developmental disorder, Roberts-SC phocomelia, is caused by mutations in another regulator of the cohesin complex, ESCO2. Here we review the phenotypes of these disorders, collectively termed cohesinopathies, as well as the mechanism by which cohesin disruption likely causes these diseases. PMID:18767966

  16. Meteorological factors and risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease in Switzerland: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Conza, Lisa; Casati, Simona; Limoni, Costanzo; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify meteorological factors that could be associated with an increased risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease (LD) in two Swiss regions. Design Retrospective epidemiological study using discriminant analysis and multivariable Poisson regression. Setting We analysed legionellosis cases notified between January 2003 and December 2007 and we looked for a possible relationship between incidence rate and meteorological factors. Participants Community-acquired LD cases in two Swiss regions, the Canton Ticino and the Basle region, with climatically different conditions were investigated. Primary outcome measures Vapour pressure, temperature, relative humidity, wind, precipitation and radiation recorded in weather stations of the two Swiss regions during the period January 2003 and December 2007. Results Discriminant analysis showed that the two regions are characterised by different meteorological conditions. A multiple Poisson regression analysis identified region, temperature and vapour pressure during the month of infection as significant risk factors for legionellosis. The risk of developing LD was 129.5% (or 136.4% when considering vapour pressure instead of temperature in the model) higher in the Canton Ticino as compared to the Basle region. There was an increased relative risk of LD by 11.4% (95% CI 7.70% to 15.30%) for each 1 hPa rise of vapour pressure or by 6.7% (95% CI 4.22% to 9.22%) for 1°C increase of temperature. Conclusions In this study, higher water vapour pressure and heat were associated with a higher risk of community-acquired LD in two regions of Switzerland. PMID:23468470

  17. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Yamashita, Motoki; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently identified. However, there are only a few genetic studies to date. In this article, we performed an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study for six cases including one case with sarcomatoid change. As a result, we observed frequent immunohistochemical expression of AMACR. FISH of chromosome 3 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and disomy for one case. Additionally, FISH of chromosome 16 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and both trisomy and monosomy for one case. Furthermore, both the carcinomatous area and the sarcomatoid area of one ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change revealed monosomy of chromosomes 3, 9, and 16 but showed disomy of chromosome 14. In conclusion, the numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 16, irrespective of gain or loss, may be characteristic of ACD-associated RCC. PMID:22179186

  18. Clinical efficacy of pimobendan versus benazepril for the treatment of acquired atrioventricular valvular disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Christophe W; Jöns, Olaf; Bussadori, Claudio M

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-six dogs with clinical acquired atrioventricular valvular disease were evaluated to determine the efficacy of pimobendan (n=41) versus benazepril hydrochloride (n=35) in a randomized, positive-controlled, multicenter study. The study was divided into 56-day and long-term evaluation periods. In a subgroup of dogs with concurrent furosemide treatment (pimobendan [n=31], benazepril [n=25]), the Heart Insufficiency Score improved in favor of pimobendan (P=0.0011), equating to a superior overall efficacy rating (P<0.0001) at day 56. Long-term median survival (i.e., death or treatment failure) for dogs receiving pimobendan was 415 days versus 128 days for dogs not on pimobendan (P=0.0022). PMID:16822763

  19. An unusually long-lasting outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease, 2005-2008, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, M; Fontana, S; Crippa, S; Caporali, M G; Seyler, T; Veschetti, E; Villa, G; Rota, M C; Ricci, M L

    2015-08-01

    An unusually long-lasting community-acquired outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred in the inhabitants of a town in northern Italy from 2005 to 2008. Overall, 43 cases were diagnosed including five deaths. Hundreds of water samples were collected for Legionella isolation but only two clinical samples were obtained. Clinical strains were ST23 as were environmental isolates detected in most Legionella-positive patients' homes and those from a public fountain. Although no Legionella was found in the municipal water mains, a continuous chlorination was applied in 2008. This action resulted in a halving of cases, although incidence remained tenfold higher than the Italian average incidence until the end of 2013, when it dropped to the expected rate. Retrospective analyses of prevalent wind direction suggested that a hidden cooling tower could have been the main cause of this uncommon outbreak, highlighting the importance of implementation of cooling tower registers in supporting LD investigations. PMID:25427871

  20. Animal models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rust, J H

    1982-01-01

    The use of animal models for the study of human disease is, for the most part, a recent development. This discussion of the use of animal models for human diseases directs attention to the sterile period, early advances, some personal experiences, the human as the model, biological oddities among common laboratory animals, malignancies in laboratory animals, problems created by federal regulations, cancer tests with animals, and what the future holds in terms of the use of animal models as an aid to understanding human disease. In terms of early use of animal models, there was a school of rabbis, some of whom were also physicians, in Babylon who studied and wrote extensively on ritual slaughter and the suitability of birds and beasts for food. Considerable detailed information on animal pathology, physiology, anatomy, and medicine in general can be found in the Soncino Babylonian Talmudic Translations. The 1906 edition of the "Jewish Encyclopedia," has been a rich resource. Although it has not been possible to establish what diseases of animals were studied and their relationship to the diseases of humans, there are fascinating clues to pursue, despite the fact that these were sterile years for research in medicine. The quotation from the Talmud is of interest: "The medical knowledge of the Talmudist was based upon tradition, the dissection of human bodies, observation of disease and experiments upon animals." A bright light in the lackluster years of medical research was provided by Galen, considered the originator of research in physiology and anatomy. His dissection of animals and work on apes and other lower animals were models for human anatomy and physiology and the bases for many treatises. Yet, Galen never seemed to suggest that animals could serve as models for human diseases. Most early physicians who can be considered to have been students of disease developed their medical knowledge by observing the sick under their care. 1 early medical investigator

  1. Bilateral spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage in an acquired cystic kidney disease hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Hirohama, Daigoro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is a well-known late stage complication of chronic kidney disease. Cysts tend to grow with time on dialysis and could lead to malignant transformation, and intra- or perirenal hemorrhage is a rare complication of ACKD. Here we describe one case of bilateral spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage of ACKD in a 44-year-old man, on hemodialysis for 15 years. One was due to cyst rupture, and the other was due to aneurism rupture, both were controlled with transcatheter arterial embolization. In renal arteriography at the second rupture, we demonstrated extravasation from an aneurysm being present at the periphery of right renal artery. Several spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage cases were reported but its clinical information is limited, moreover, bilateral cases were extremely rare. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage caused by intraparenchymal renal artery aneurysm rupture in ACKD patients. We report this case because of its rarity and significance with respect to the complication of dialysis patients, review reported bilateral cases, and discuss some clinical characteristics. PMID:24533199

  2. Chronic beryllium disease: an updated model interaction between innate and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Richard T; Maier, Lisa A

    2011-02-01

    During the last decade, there have been concerted efforts to reduce beryllium (Be) exposure in the workplace and thereby reduce potential cases of this occupational lung disorder. Despite these efforts, it is estimated that there are at least one million Be-exposed individuals in the U.S. who are potentially at risk for developing chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Previously, we reviewed the current CBD literature and proposed that CBD represents a model interaction between innate and acquired immunity (Sawyer et al., Int Immunopharmacol 2:249-261, 2002). We closed this review with a section on "future directions" that identified key gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of CBD. In the intervening period, progress has been made to fill in some of these gaps, and the current review will provide an update on that progress. Based on recent findings, we provide a new hypothesis to explain how Be drives sustained chronic inflammation and granuloma formation in CBD leading to progressive compromised lung function in CBD patients. This paradigm has direct implications for our understanding of the development of an immune response to Be, but is also likely applicable to other immune-mediated lung diseases of known and unknown etiology. PMID:20981472

  3. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: further characterization of the morphologic and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soomin; Kwon, Ghee Young; Cho, Yong Mee; Jun, Sun-Young; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yong Wook; Park, Weon Seo; Shim, Jung Won

    2013-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma (ACD-RCC) is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with unique morphologic features found exclusively in the background of end-stage renal disease. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features and immumoreactive profiles of 12 cases of ACD-RCC to further characterize this recently recognized entity. Review of histologic slides was performed in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining directed to the contemporary diagnostic antibodies and the putative target therapy-related markers. Histologically, the tumors showed characteristic inter-or intracellular microlumens and eosinophilic tumor cells. Intratumoral hemosiderin deposition and degenerating foamy tumor cells were consistent findings which were not previously described. Immunohistochemically, all the tumors were positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, CD10, pan-cytokeratin, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and c-met, while negative for carbonic anhydrase-9, CD57, CD68, c-kit, pax-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. Heterogenous staining was found for CK7 and kidney-specific cadherin. Positive reaction to c-met suggests its utility as a plausible therapeutic target in ACD-RCC. Thus, we present the unique morphologic and immunopathologic features of ACD-RCC, which may be helpful in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:23471757

  4. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  5. Oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization of renal cell tumors that developed in patients with acquired cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Eva; Yusenko, Maria V; Nagy, Anetta; Kovacs, Gyula

    2010-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma occurs at higher frequency in acquired cystic renal disease than in the general population. We have analyzed 4 tumors obtained from the kidneys of 2 patients with acquired cystic renal disease, including 2 conventional renal cell carcinomas and 2 acquired cystic renal disease-associated tumors, for genetic alterations. DNA changes were established by applying the 44K Agilent Oligonucleotide Array-Based CGH (Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany), and mutation of VHL gene was detected by direct sequencing of the tumor genome. DNA losses and mutation of the VHL gene, which are characteristic for conventional renal cell carcinomas, were seen in 2 of the tumors. The acquired cystic renal disease-associated eosinophilic-vacuolated cell tumor showed gain of chromosomes 3 and 16. No DNA alterations occurred in the papillary clear cell tumor. We suggest that not only the morphology but also the genetics of renal cell tumors associated with acquired cystic renal disease may differ from those occurring in the general population. PMID:20646738

  6. The Unspecific Side of Acquired Immunity Against Infectious Disease: Causes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunity against infectious disease (AIID) has long been considered as strictly dependent on the B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. Consequently, AIID has been viewed as highly specific to the antigens expressed by pathogens. However, a growing body of data motivates revision of this central paradigm of immunology. Unrelated past infection, vaccination, and chronic infection have been found to induce cross-protection against numerous pathogens. These observations can be partially explained by the poly-specificity of antigenic T and B receptors, the Mackaness effect and trained immunity. In addition, numerous studies highlight the importance of microbiota composition on resistance to infectious disease via direct competition or modulation of the immune response. All of these data support the idea that a non-negligible part of AIID in nature can be nonspecific to the pathogens encountered and even of the antigens expressed by pathogens. As this protection may be dependent on the private T and B repertoires produced by the random rearrangement of genes, past immune history, chronic infection, and microbiota composition, it is largely unpredictable at the individual level. However, we can reasonably expect that a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will allow us to statistically predict cross-protection at the population level. From an evolutionary perspective, selection of immune mechanisms allowing for partially nonspecific AIID would appear to be advantageous against highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving pathogens. This new emerging paradigm may have several important consequences on our understanding of individual infectious disease susceptibility and our conception of tolerance, vaccination and therapeutic strategies against infection and cancer. It also underscores the importance of viewing the microbiota and persisting infectious agents as integral parts of the immune system. PMID:26793171

  7. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P.; Ye, Shui Qing

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) was first reported as a pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor in 1994 with little notice, but it has received increasing attention in recent years due to accumulating evidence indicating that NAMPT is a pleiotropic protein such as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and a visfatin. Now, NAMPT has been accepted as an official name of this protein. Because of NAMPT’s multiple functions in a variety of physiological processes, their dysregulations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases or conditions such as acute lung injury, aging, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and sepsis. This review will cover the current understanding of NAMPT’s structure and functions with an emphasis on recent progress of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase’s pathological roles in various human diseases and conditions. Future directions on exploring its Terra incognita will be offered in the end. PMID:22140607

  9. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tamura, Masato; Hamaguchi, Nobumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Pan, Chin-Chen; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently described entity. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid changes. In this article, we present the first case of such a tumor. A 56-year-old Japanese man has received long-term hemodialysis and had a history of right renal cancer. Following the discovery of metastatic cancer in the thoracic wall, detailed imaging studies revealed a mass in the left kidney. The histologic examination of the left renal tumor showed ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically, intracytoplasmic globular inclusions in rhabdoid cells were positive for vimentin and cytokeratin CAM5.2. The G-band karyotype showed the following changes: 46, X, +X. -Y[1]/43, idem, add(2)(q31), -6, -9, -14, -15, +16, -22, +mar1[6]/46, XY[2]/abnormal cell[11]. In conclusion, pathologists and urologists should be aware that rhabdoid features may occur in ACD-associated RCC and that the loss of chromosomes 9 and 14 may occur during the process of sarcomatoid change in ACD-associated RCC. PMID:21036640

  10. Domestically Acquired Legionnaires’ Disease: Two Case Reports and a Review of the Pertinent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2016-01-01

    Background: Legionella species may colonize in home water systems and cause Legionnaires’ disease (LD). We herein report two cases of sporadic LD associated with the solar energy-heated hot water systems of the patients’ houses. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with chronic bronchitis and diabetes mellitus presented with a high fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Physical examination revealed rales, and her chest radiograph showed a homogeneous density in the left lung. The Legionella urinary antigen test was positive, and an indirect fluorescent antibody test revealed a serum antibody titer of 1/520 for L. pneumophila serogroup 1. In the second case, a 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was treated for pneumonia at another hospital. After the patient’s general condition worsened and he required mechanical ventilation, he was referred to our hospital. The Legionella urinary antigen test was positive. Neither of the patients had been hospitalized or travelled within the previous month. Both patients used hot water storage tanks heated by solar energy; both also used an electrical device in the bathroom to heat the water when solar energy alone was insufficient. The hot water samples from the residences of both patients were positive for L. pneumophila sero-group 1. Conclusion: These cases show that domestic hot water systems heated by solar energy must be considered a possible source of community-acquired LD. PMID:27308081

  11. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  12. Liver biopsies in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: influence of endemic disease and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Comer, G M; Mukherjee, S; Scholes, J V; Holness, L G; Clain, D J

    1989-12-01

    A retrospective review of 48 liver biopsies in 34 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 10 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) was performed at Harlem Hospital Center to assess the diagnostic yield of liver biopsies in this distinct patient population. Among the patients, 93.2% were black and 32 were males, with a mean age of 36.7 yr. Intravenous drug abuse was a risk factor for AIDS in 81.8% of patients. Liver biopsies were particularly useful in patients with fever of unclear origin, which was positively correlated with the presence of granulomas (p = 0.01). Granulomas due to mycobacteria were present in 16 (33.3%) of the biopsies. Liver biopsy proved to be clinically significant in 14 of 17 patients (82.3%) with mycobacterial disease, or 29.3% of the liver biopsies. Chronic active hepatitis was present in 12 (29.2%) of the biopsies, and in all but one was due to non-A non-B hepatitis viruses. All patients with chronic active hepatitis were intravenous drug abusers or the sexual partners of intravenous drug abusers. Liver biopsy can provide important diagnostic information in AIDS patients. The pathological findings in this series reflect the high risk of exposure to tuberculosis and hepatitis in the intravenous drug abusers in Harlem. PMID:2596454

  13. Acquired von Willebrand's disease associated with epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, Geoffrey Spencer; Porter, Graham

    2014-01-01

    This is the first case report of a patient with acquired von Willebrand's disease (AvWD) secondary to epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) of the parotid salivary gland. This patient presented to haematology following an abnormal bleeding episode with von Willebrand factor Ristocetin cofactor (VWF:RCo) <5% and VWF:Ag 13%. He was diagnosed with AvWD. At the same time he was found to have a left parotid lump which was excised following a multidisciplinary team meeting. This was histologically reported as an EMC. Following excision, unusually this patient's AvWD did not resolve. Extensive investigation looking for other causes of the AvWD did not reveal any other potential cause; therefore, due to the similar timing of onset of both pathologies it is felt that the AvWD in this case is secondary to the EMC. This case report highlights the presentation, investigation and management of AvWD and parotid lumps as well as discussing proposed pathophysiological mechanisms for AvWD. PMID:25096657

  14. Long-term natural history of acquired cystic disease of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao; Hayama, Satoshi; Morita, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Honda, Ryumon; Satoh, Kyoko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki

    2010-08-01

    Patients with acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) were followed longitudinally over an average of 21.7 +/- 5.4 years to determine the natural history of the disease; that is, how big the kidneys become, when the kidney size reaches a plateau, and when the size regresses. Twenty-seven male and 20 female patients with chronic glomerulonephritis treated at our hospital were investigated. CT scans were performed once a year and kidney volume was measured. Two different quadratic curves with a node of 5.2 years for males and 2.5 years for females after the start of hemodialysis were fitted to log-transformed kidney volume to the duration of hemodialysis using a linear mixed model. The maximum kidney volume in male patients was obtained 21.1 years after the start of hemodialysis using this model. Peak values of kidney volume were demonstrated in 19 of 26 cases during the observation period. The median peak value (interquartile range) of bilateral kidney volumes was 274 (165-849) mL/1.73 m(2) occurring 19.1 +/- 4.5 years after the start of dialysis. In one male patient who had undergone nephrectomy due to renal cell carcinoma and in two of the remaining 26 male patients, the maximum kidney volume of 782 (residual kidney), 1151, and 1129 mL regressed to 428, 616, and 847 mL (reduction rate: 45.3, 46.5, and 25.0%) at 20.6, 25.4, and 23.1 years after the start of hemodialysis, respectively. Kidney enlargement due to ACDK reached a plateau after 21.1 years of hemodialysis in the male patients. Partial regression of severe ACDK may occur naturally after long-term hemodialysis without renal transplantation. PMID:20649762

  15. The Plasmodium falciparum blood stages acquire factor H family proteins to evade destruction by human complement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Thiago F A; Flammersfeld, Ansgar; Ngwa, Che J; Kiesow, Meike; Fischer, Rainer; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Pradel, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition of regulatory proteins is a means of blood-borne pathogens to avoid destruction by the human complement. We recently showed that the gametes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind factor H (FH) from the blood meal of the mosquito vector to assure successful sexual reproduction, which takes places in the mosquito midgut. While these findings provided a first glimpse of a complex mechanism used by Plasmodium to control the host immune attack, it is hitherto not known, how the pathogenic blood stages of the malaria parasite evade destruction by the human complement. We now show that the human complement system represents a severe threat for the replicating blood stages, particularly for the reinvading merozoites, with complement factor C3b accumulating on the surfaces of the intraerythrocytic schizonts as well as of free merozoites. C3b accumulation initiates terminal complement complex formation, in consequence resulting in blood stage lysis. To inactivate C3b, the parasites bind FH as well as related proteins FHL-1 and CFHR-1 to their surface, and FH binding is trypsin-resistant. Schizonts acquire FH via two contact sites, which involve CCP modules 5 and 20. Blockage of FH-mediated protection via anti-FH antibodies results in significantly impaired blood stage replication, pointing to the plasmodial complement evasion machinery as a promising malaria vaccine target. PMID:26457721

  16. Pigeons acquire multiple categories in parallel via associative learning: A parallel to human word learning?

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Brooks, Daniel I.; McMurray, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Might there be parallels between category learning in animals and word learning in children? To examine this possibility, we devised a new associative learning technique for teaching pigeons to sort 128 photographs of objects into 16 human language categories. We found that pigeons learned all 16 categories in parallel, they perceived the perceptual coherence of the different object categories, and they generalized their categorization behavior to novel photographs from the training categories. More detailed analyses of the factors that predict trial-by-trial learning implicated a number of factors that may shape learning. First, we found considerable trial-by-trial dependency of pigeons’ categorization responses, consistent with several recent studies that invoke this dependency to claim that humans acquire words via symbolic or inferential mechanisms; this finding suggests that such dependencies may also arise in associative systems. Second, our trial-by-trial analyses divulged seemingly irrelevant aspects of the categorization task, like the spatial location of the report responses, which influenced learning. Third, those trial-by-trial analyses also supported the possibility that learning may be determined both by strengthening correct stimulus-response associations and by weakening incorrect stimulus-response associations. The parallel between all these findings and important aspects of human word learning suggests that associative learning mechanisms may play a much stronger part in complex human behavior than is commonly believed. PMID:25497520

  17. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  18. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  19. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  20. Transfer RNA and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jamie A.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Robey-Bond, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are “hotspots” for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  1. Characterization of a human colorectal carcinoma cell line with acquired resistance to flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Raynaud, F; Workman, P; Kelland, L R

    2001-11-01

    Flavopiridol is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) and represents the first in this anticancer class to enter clinical trials. In anticipation of the likelihood that, as with other cancer drugs, acquired resistance may limit the drug's efficacy, an acquired resistance model has been established by in vitro drug exposure of the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116. This stably resistant line, possessing 8-fold resistance to flavopiridol, showed a lack of cross-resistance to the anticancer agents etoposide, doxorubicin, paclitaxel, topotecan, and cisplatin, and notably to other chemical classes of cdk inhibitors: the aminopurines roscovitine and purvalanol A, 9-nitropaullone, and hymenialdisine. Resistance did not seem to be related to differences in the levels of multidrug resistance drug efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein, and MRP1. Moreover, there were no changes in overall drug accumulation between the resistant and sensitive cell lines. Flavopiridol induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and inhibition of retinoblastoma gene product phosphorylation on serine 780 in both parental and resistant lines, but the latter required 8-fold higher concentrations to achieve these effects. Cyclin E protein levels and cyclin E-associated kinase activity were increased in the resistant line, suggesting that overexpression of cyclin E may be the mechanism of resistance to flavopiridol. However, transfection of cyclin E to increase expression of this protein did not result in an increase in resistance to flavopiridol. Thus, up-regulation of cyclin E alone does not seem to cause resistance to this cdk inhibitor. PMID:11641415

  2. A novel ELISA-based diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand disease with increased VWF proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Antoine; Caron, Claudine; Vincent, Flavien; Jeanpierre, Emmanuelle; Ternisien, Catherine; Boisseau, Pierre; Zawadzki, Christophe; Fressinaud, Edith; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Hermoire, Sylvie; Paris, Camille; Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Veyradier, Agnès; Ung, Alexandre; Vincentelli, André; van Belle, Eric; Lenting, Peter J; Goudemand, Jenny; Susen, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Von Willebrand disease-type 2A (VWD-2A) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) due to aortic stenosis (AS) or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are associated with an increased proteolysis of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Analysis of VWF multimeric profile is the most sensitive way to assess such increased VWF-proteolysis. However, several technical aspects hamper a large diffusion among routine diagnosis laboratories. This makes early diagnosis and early appropriate care of increased proteolysis challenging. In this context of unmet medical need, we developed a new ELISA aiming a quick, easy and reliable assessment of VWF-proteolysis. This ELISA was assessed successively in a LVAD-model, healthy subjects (n=39), acquired TTP-patients (n=4), VWD-patients (including VWD-2A(IIA), n=22; VWD-2B, n=26; VWD-2A(IIE), n=21; and VWD-1C, n=8) and in AVWS-patients (AS, n=9; LVAD, n=9; and MGUS, n=8). A standard of VWF-proteolysis was specifically developed. Extent of VWF-proteolysis was expressed as relative percentage and as VWF proteolysis/VWF:Ag ratio. A speed-dependent increase in VWF-proteolysis was assessed in the LVAD model whereas no proteolysis was observed in TTP-patients. In VWD-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in VWD-2A(IIA) and VWD-2B and significantly decreased in VWD-2A(IIE) versus controls (p< 0.0001). In AVWS-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in AS- and LVAD-patients compared to controls (p< 0.0001) and not detectable in MGUS-patients. A significant increase in VWF-proteolysis was detected as soon as three hours after LVAD implantation (p< 0.01). In conclusion, we describe a new ELISA allowing a rapid and accurate diagnosis of VWF-proteolysis validated in three different clinical situations. This assay represents a helpful alternative to electrophoresis-based assay in the diagnosis and management of AVWS with increased VWF-proteolysis. PMID:26791163

  3. Recent multistate outbreaks of human salmonella infections acquired from turtles: a continuing public health challenge.

    PubMed

    Harris, Julie R; Neil, Karen P; Behravesh, Casey Barton; Sotir, Mark J; Angulo, Frederick J

    2010-02-15

    The federal ban in the United States on the sale of turtles with shell lengths <4 inches that was established in 1975 has reduced the number of turtle-associated human Salmonella infections during subsequent years, especially among children. Although numerous sporadic turtle-associated Salmonella infections in humans have been reported since the ban went into effect, outbreaks were not reported until recently. Since 2006, 3 multistate outbreaks of turtle-associated Salmonella infections have been documented in the United States. This review examines the history of turtle-associated human Salmonella infections in the United States and discusses reasons why an increase in turtle-associated salmonellosis may be occurring and how challenges in enforcement of the ban affect disease control. Additional steps should be considered by the public health community, state governments, and enforcement agencies to prevent turtle-associated Salmonella infections in humans. PMID:20085463

  4. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; MacFabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels—a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of

  5. Purinergic signaling and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: From viral entry to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Daniela F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela BR

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a serious condition associated to severe immune dysfunction and immunodeficiency. Mechanisms involved in HIV-associated immune activation, inflammation and loss of CD4+ T cells have been extensively studied, including those concerning purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic signaling components are involved in viral entry and replication and disease progression. Research involving the participation of purinergic signaling in HIV infection has been not only important to elucidate disease mechanisms but also to introduce new approaches to therapy. The involvement of purinergic signaling in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and its implications in the control of the HIV infection are reviewed in this paper. PMID:26279989

  6. Molybdenum cofactor and human disease.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Four molybdenum-dependent enzymes are known in humans, each harboring a pterin-based molybdenum cofactor (Moco) in the active site. They catalyze redox reactions using water as oxygen acceptor or donator. Moco is synthesized by a conserved biosynthetic pathway. Moco deficiency results in a severe inborn error of metabolism causing often early childhood death. Disease-causing symptoms mainly go back to the lack of sulfite oxidase (SO) activity, an enzyme in cysteine catabolism. Besides their name-giving functions, Mo-enzymes have been recognized to catalyze novel reactions, including the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. In this review we cover the biosynthesis of Moco, key features of Moco-enzymes and focus on their deficiency. Underlying disease mechanisms as well as treatment options will be discussed. PMID:27055119

  7. Coevolution, modularity and human disease.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Hunter B

    2006-12-01

    The concepts of coevolution and modularity have been studied separately for decades. Recent advances in genomics have led to the first systematic studies in each of these fields at the molecular level, resulting in several important discoveries. Both coevolution and modularity appear to be pervasive features of genomic data from all species studied to date, and their presence can be detected in many types of datasets, including genome sequences, gene expression data, and protein-protein interaction data. Moreover, the combination of these two ideas might have implications for our understanding of many aspects of biology, ranging from the general architecture of living systems to the causes of various human diseases. PMID:17005391

  8. CNVs, Aneuploidies and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christa L.; Kirkpatrick, Brianne E.; Ledbetter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In the perinatal setting, chromosome imbalances cause a wide range of clinically significant disorders and increase risk for other particular phenotypes. As technologies have improved to detect increasingly smaller deletions and duplications, collectively referred to as copy number variants (CNVs), we are learning the significant role that these types of genomic variants play in human disease and their relatively high frequency in ~1% of all pregnancies. In this overview, we will highlight key aspects of CNV detection and interpretation used during the course of clinical care in the prenatal and neonatal periods. Since CNVs are one of the most frequent causes of a broad spectrum of human disorders, early diagnosis and accurate interpretation is important to implement timely interventions and targeted clinical management. PMID:26042902

  9. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. PMID:22099158

  10. Evolutionary Mutant Models for Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, R. Craig; Cresko, William; Detrich, H. William; Postlethwait, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although induced mutations in traditional laboratory animals have been valuable as models for human diseases, they have some important limitations. Here we propose a complementary approach to discover genes and mechanisms that might contribute to human disorders: the analysis of evolutionary mutant models whose adaptive phenotypes mimic maladaptive human diseases. If the type and mode of action of mutations favored by natural selection in wild populations are similar to those that contribute to human diseases, then studies in evolutionary mutant models have the potential to identify novel genetic factors and gene-by-environment interactions that affect human health and underlie human disease. PMID:19108930

  11. Therapies for human prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K; Armari, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The pathological foundation of human prion diseases is a result of the conversion of the physiological form of prion protein (PrPc) to the pathological protease resistance form PrPres. Most patients with prion disease have unknown reasons for this conversion and the subsequent development of a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. The conversion of PrPc to PrPres, with resultant propagation and accumulation results in neuronal death and amyloidogenesis. However, with increasing understanding of neurodegenerative processes it appears that protein-misfolding and subsequent propagation of these rouge proteins, is a generic phenomenon shared with diseases caused by tau, α-synucleins and β-amyloid proteins. Consequently, effective anti-prion agents may have wider implications. A number of therapeutic approaches include polyanionic, polycyclic drugs such as pentosan polysulfate (PPS), which prevent the conversion of PrPc to PrPres and might also sequester and down-regulate PrPres. Polyanionic compounds might also help to clear PrPres. Treatments aimed at the laminin receptor, which is an important accessory molecule in the conversion of PrPc to PrPres – neuroprotection, immunotherapy, siRNA and antisense approaches have provided some experimental promise. PMID:24093082

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4+ receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4+ T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives. PMID:26568917

  13. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  14. The spatial distribution pattern of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Yongli; Shi, Xuezhong; Mao, Saicai; Shi, Nian; Hui, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) exhibit variable patterns among the provinces of China. Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is needed for the prevention and control of AIDS. Thus, the cumulative number of reported cases of HIV/AIDS from the period 1985-2013, and the incidence rate of AIDS in 2013 were determined. Spatial autocorrelation analysis and hotspot analysis were conducted using ArcGIS10.2 to explore the spatial distribution of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Both the thematic map and the global spatial autocorrelation Moran's I statistics revealed a clustered distribution of the spatial pattern. A local spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated hotspots of AIDS incidence rate that were confined to the provinces of Guangxi, Yunnan and Sichuan. The hotspots encompassed Guangxi and Yunnan, while Henan Province displayed a negative autocorrelation with more variable numbers that included neighbouring regions. The Getis-Ord Gi* statistics identified 6 hotspots and 8 coldspots for the incidence of AIDS, and 7 hotspots and 1 coldspot for the cumulative number of reported cases of HIV/AIDS. The spatial distribution pattern of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in China is clustered, demonstrating hotspots located in the Southwest. Specific interventions targeting provinces with severe HIV/AIDS epidemic are urgently needed. PMID:27245799

  15. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war. PMID:10330595

  16. South Asian Consensus Guidelines for the rational management of diabetes in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Baruah, Manash P.; Latt, Tint Swe; Shrestha, Dina; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Somasundaram, Noel; Sahay, Rakesh; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-01-01

    As newer methods of management are made available, and accessible, survival rates with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are increasing. This means that chronic, metabolic complications of HIV are becoming more frequent in clinical practice, as acute morbidity is controlled. Management of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is gradually expanding to include these chronic and metabolic complications of the disease, and the adverse effects associated with its treatments, including diabetes. Unfortunately, no guidelines are available to help the medical practitioners choose appropriate therapy for patients with these conditions. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with HIV. The development of these guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. These guidelines and associated review of literature represent a compilation of available knowledge regarding rational management of diabetes in HIV. Patients of diabetes with concomitant HIV infection are managed optimally with insulin therapy and judicious use of highly active antiretroviral therapy with suitable alternatives is also recommended. These guidelines should prove helpful to physicians, not only in South Asia, but also across the globe, while managing patients with coexistent HIV and diabetes. PMID:22028994

  17. [The deterministic concept of human diseases].

    PubMed

    Petlenko, V P; Strukov, A I; Khmel'nitskiĭ, O K

    1984-01-01

    Human disease is a complex systemic event, the theoretical analysis of which requires application of the methodological appratus of investigation. As such, the authors used the concept of Marxist-Leninist determinism. The latter is a system of universal interconnections and causative dependence of natural events, society, and human diseases in particular. Analysis of human diseases from the position of the Marxist-Leninist theory of determinism is one of the basic problems of the theory of pathology. A logical analysis of evolutionary, systemic, morphological and causative determinism is given which characterizes on the whole human diseases. PMID:6391430

  18. The Best Time to Acquire New Skills: Age-Related Differences in Implicit Sequence Learning across the Human Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janacsek, Karolina; Fiser, Jozsef; Nemeth, Dezso

    2012-01-01

    Implicit skill learning underlies obtaining not only motor, but also cognitive and social skills through the life of an individual. Yet, the ontogenetic changes in humans' implicit learning abilities have not yet been characterized, and, thus, their role in acquiring new knowledge efficiently during development is unknown. We investigated such…

  19. The Effects of a Kansas Education Class on Students' Knowledge and Attitudes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, R. Warren, Jr.

    This study was undertaken to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade Kansas students pertaining to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Attitudes and knowledge of 9th and 10th grade students who had participated in a Sex Respect Class offered in the 9th grade were compared…

  20. What High School Students Who Are Mildly Mentally Retarded Know about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Hazel B.; Horn, Charles J., Jr.

    Alabama high school students (N=309) with mild mental retardation completed a questionnaire concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Students demonstrated some basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and expressed some concern about getting AIDS. They…

  1. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  2. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  3. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  4. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  5. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  6. Human natural chimerism: an acquired character or a vestige of evolution?

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, B

    2001-06-01

    Analysis on five common classes of human natural chimeras (cytomictical, whole body, fetal-maternal, germ cell, and tumor chimeras) reveals that (1) they initiate only during pregnancy, (2) the most common class are chimeras which contain maternal cells, and (3) the primary mechanisms that are involved in their formation and establishment are still elusive. These classes of natural chimerism, are involved only with maladaptive phenomena such as malignancy and autoimmune diseases and without any documented benefit. A recent review has challenged the accepted dogma that the evolution of immunity is pathogen-directed and asserted that preserving individuality from littering the soma and the germline by conspecific alien cells might have been the original function of the innate immunity. Following this tenet, I propose here that human natural chimerism is a by-product of the new role evolved from primitive components of immunity to "educate" the developing embryo with the armamentarium of effector mechanisms, dedicated to purge the individual from pervasive somatic and germline variants, and is not a vestige of evolution. PMID:11390041

  7. miR-146b antagomir-treated human Tregs acquire increased GVHD inhibitory potency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjie; Hippen, Keli L; Lemire, Amanda L; Gu, Jian; Wang, Weizhi; Ni, Xuhao; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Levine, Bruce L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Turka, Laurence A; Munn, David H; Garzon, Ramiro; Lu, Ling; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) thymic-derived regulatory T cells (tTregs) are indispensable for maintaining immune system equilibrium. Adoptive transfer of tTregs is an effective means of suppressing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in murine models and in early human clinical trials. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that mediates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, plays an essential role in modulating regulatory T cell survival and function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs, which mediate RNA silencing and posttranscriptional gene repression. By performing comprehensive TaqMan Low Density Array miRNA assays, we identified 10 miRNAs differentially regulated in human tTreg compared with control T cells. One candidate, miR-146b, is preferentially and highly expressed in human naive tTregs compared with naive CD4 T cells. miRNA prediction software revealed that TRAF6 was the one of the top 10 scored mRNAs involved tTreg function with the highest probability as a potential miR-146b target. Antagomir-mediated knockdown of miRNA-146b, but not another miRNA-146 family member (miRNA-146a), enhanced TRAF6 expression. TRAF6, in turn, increases NF-κB activation, which is essential for tTreg function as well as Foxp3 protein and antiapoptotic gene expression, and downregulates proapoptotic gene expression. miR-146b knockdown increased the nuclear localization and expression of genes regulated by NF-κB, which was associated with enhanced tTreg survival, proliferation, and suppressive function measured in vitro and in vivo. TRAF6 inhibition had the opposite effects. We conclude that an miR-146b-TRAF6-NF-κB-FoxP3 signaling pathway restrains regulatory T cell survival, proliferation, and suppressor function. In vitro exposure of human tTregs to miR-146b antagomirs can be exploited to improve the clinical efficacy of human adoptive tTreg transfer in a GVHD setting. PMID:27485827

  8. Scrapie in France: some possible predisposing factors in the naturally-acquired disease of sheep.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, J; Delasnerie-Laupretre, N; Cathala, F; Brown, P

    1983-10-01

    A nationwide survey of the occurrence of scrapie in France during the 12-year period 1968-1979 has shown the disease to be more widespread than previously thought. The data suggest that certain sheep raising practices, such as transhumance (nomadic grazing), pen and pasture alternations, and use of animals for milk production, may play a possible role in disease prevalence. PMID:6685940

  9. Correlation of disease activity and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen in acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Honma, Masaru; Iinuma, Shin; Kanno, Kyoko; Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Minami-Hori, Masako; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2015-09-01

    Hypohidrosis and anhidrosis are congenital or acquired conditions which are characterized by inadequate sweating. Acquired idiopathic generalized hypohidrosis/anhidrosis (AIGA) includes idiopathic pure sudomotor failure (IPSF), which has the following distinct features: sudden onset in youth, increased serum immunoglobulin E and responds favorably to systemic corticosteroid. No clinical markers reflecting the disease severity or activity have been established. Here, we report a case of AIGA in a Japanese patient successfully treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. In this case, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels increased up to 19.8 ng/mL along with aberrant CEA immunoreactivity of eccrine sweat glands. Interestingly, the serum CEA level normalized as sweating improved with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Therefore, serum CEA level may serve as a useful clinical marker of hypohidrosis or anhidrosis. PMID:25958966

  10. IgG4-related disease and its pathogenesis—cross-talk between innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Akio; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawanami, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masao; Dong, Lingli; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a novel clinical entity proposed in Japan in the 21th century and is attracting strong attention over the world. The characteristic manifestations of IgG4-RD are increased serum IgG4 concentration and tumefaction by IgG4+ plasma cells. Although the clinical manifestations in various organs have been established, the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still unknown. Recently, many reports of aberrant acquired immunity such as Th2-diminated immune responses have been published. However, many questions still remain, including questions about the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and the roles of IgG4. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD by focusing on the cross-talk between innate and acquired immunity. PMID:25024397

  11. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  12. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Yao, Dongqi; Walline, Joseph; Xu, Jun; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55) in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Methods We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15) detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI), respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively). The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant. Conclusions HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of

  13. The Human Phenotypic Disease Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Cesar; Blumm, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Christakis, Nicholas

    2008-03-01

    We study the evolution of patient illness using a network summarizing the disease associations extracted from 32 million Medicare claims recorded from 13 million elders using the ICD9-CM format. We find that the evolution of patients' illness is accurately described by a process in which once a patient develops a particular disease, subsequent disease are seen to occur among diseases lying close by in the network. In addition, we find that patients affected with diseases with high network connectivity are more likely to die during a follow-up period of eight years.

  14. Hooked! Modeling human disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Santoriello, Cristina; Zon, Leonard I

    2012-07-01

    Zebrafish have been widely used as a model system for studying developmental processes, but in the last decade, they have also emerged as a valuable system for modeling human disease. The development and function of zebrafish organs are strikingly similar to those of humans, and the ease of creating mutant or transgenic fish has facilitated the generation of disease models. Here, we highlight the use of zebrafish for defining disease pathways and for discovering new therapies. PMID:22751109

  15. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Masahiro; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair. PMID:25407530

  16. Sporadic community-acquired Legionnaires' disease in France: a 2-year national matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Che, D; Campese, C; Santa-Olalla, P; Jacquier, G; Bitar, D; Bernillon, P; Desenclos, J-C

    2008-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is an aetiology of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults, with a high case-fatality ratio (CFR). We conducted a matched case-control study to identify risk factors for sporadic, community-acquired LD. Cases of sporadic, community-acquired and biologically confirmed LD, in metropolitan France from 1 September 2002 to 31 September 2004, were matched with a control subject according to age, sex, underlying illness and location of residence within 5 km. We performed a conditional logistic regression on various host-related factors and exposures. Analysis was done on 546 matched pairs. The CFR was 3.5%. Age ranged from 18-93 years (mean 57 years), with a 3.6 male:female sex ratio. Cases were more likely to have smoked with the documentation of a dose-effect relation, to have travelled with a stay in a hotel (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.6-14.2), or to have used a wash-hand basin for personal hygiene (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.7) than controls. Tobacco and travel have been previously described as risk factors for LD, but this is the first time that such a dose-effect for tobacco has been documented among sporadic cases. These findings will provide helpful knowledge about LD and help practitioners in identifying patients at high risk. PMID:18211725

  17. Novel human astroviruses: Novel human diseases?

    PubMed

    Vu, Diem-Lan; Cordey, Samuel; Brito, Francisco; Kaiser, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Astroviruses are small, non-enveloped, single-stranded positive RNA viruses that belong to the Astroviridae family. While classical human astroviruses (HAstV) are a well-recognized cause of acute non-bacterial diarrhea among young children worldwide, novel astroviruses, named HAstV-MLB and HAstV-VA/HMO, have been identified recently in humans by molecular assays. They are phylogenetically more related to animal astroviruses than to classical human astroviruses, thus suggesting cross-species transmission. Serological studies demonstrated a surprisingly high seroprevalence in certain populations and highlighted a high infection rate in the early years of life. Although their pathogenic role has not yet been clearly determined, novel astrovirus RNA sequences have been identified in different biological specimens of symptomatic patients, including the feces, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain biopsies. Thus, there is evidence that they could contribute not only to digestive tract infection, but also to unexpected clinical syndromes, notably encephalitis and meningitis. Severe infections affect mainly immunocompromised patients. These findings indicate that novel astroviruses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with meningitis or encephalitis of unknown origin. PMID:27434149

  18. Multiple acquired extrahepatic portosystemic shunts secondary to veno-occlusive disease in a young German shepherd

    PubMed Central

    Fredholm, Dan

    2009-01-01

    An 11-month-old German shepherd presented with behavioral abnormalities. Histopathologic analysis of liver biopsies taken during exploratory laparotomy revealed veno-occlusive disease caused by fibrosis of the hepatic central veins leading to secondary portal hypertension, development of shunting vessels, and hepatic encephalopathy. The fibrosis was likely congenital in origin. PMID:19794875

  19. Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Randall S.; Lorson, Monique; Ross, Jason W.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are used widely as models of human disease, their utility as models has been enhanced by genetic engineering. Initially, transgenes were added randomly to the genome, but with the application of homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies, now most any genetic change that can be envisioned can be completed. To date these genetic modifications have resulted in animals that have the potential to provide new insights into human diseases for which a good animal model did not exist previously. These new animal models should provide the preclinical data for treatments that are developed for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, spinal muscular atrophy, diabetes, and organ failure. These new models will help to uncover aspects and treatments of these diseases that were otherwise unattainable. The focus of this review is to describe genetically engineered pigs that have resulted in models of human diseases. PMID:25387017

  20. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  1. [Acquired von Willebrand's disease in the course of severe primary hypothyroidism in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3].

    PubMed

    Lubińska, Monika; Swiatkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Kazimierska, Ewa; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 20-year old female, who had been followed because of von Willebrand disease (vWD) was presented in this paper . She had a past history of menorrhagia and bleeding after dental procedures and the activity of von Willebrand factor (vWF) was decreased. Because of suggestive clinical features, the workup for hypothyroidism was performed and the patient was found to have severe hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto thyroiditis. After the institution of replacement therapy with levothyroxine, von Willebrand factor activity returned to normal range and symptoms of von Willebrand disease disappeared. Based on these findings, the diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AvWS) due to hypothyroidism was made. The development of myasthenia led to the final diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 (APS) with myasthenia gravis and vitiligo. PMID:18335399

  2. Chemopreventative effects of tetrahydrocurcumin on human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ching; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Lai, Ching-Shu; Wang, Ying-Jan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Chemoprevention is a relatively new and promising strategy to prevent human degenerative diseases, including cancer, and is defined as the use of natural dietary compounds and/or synthetic substances to block, inhibit, reverse, or retard the progress of human diseases. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is a major metabolite of curcumin (extracted from the roots of the Curcuma longa Linn). THC has been demonstrated to prevent oxidative stress and inflammation, to act against neurodegeneration, and to possess anti-cancer activity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and underlying molecular mechanisms of the chemopreventative activities of THC and its potential effects on the development of various human diseases. PMID:24220621

  3. Helping patients to reduce their risk of acquiring sexually transmitted disease.

    PubMed

    Braun, J F

    1992-05-01

    This monthly series was developed from the AOA Task Force on AIDS Writers' Workshop, held August 16 to 18, 1991, in New York. The workshop was sponsored by an education grant from Burroughs Wellcome. It will provide brief clinical updates and perspectives on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Readers may request tear sheets from the AOA editorial offices. PMID:1601700

  4. CLINICAL APPROACH TO THE DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION OF HERDITARY AND ACQUIRED NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the context of a neuromuscular disease diagnostic evaluation, the clinician still must be able to obtain a relevant patient and family history and perform focused general, musculoskeletal, neurologic and functional physical examinations to direct further diagnostic evaluations. Laboratory studies for hereditary neuromuscular diseases include relevant molecular genetic studies. The EMG and nerve conduction studies remain an extension of the physical examination and help to guide further diagnostic studies such as molecular genetic studies, and muscle and nerve biopsies. All diagnostic information needs to be interpreted not in isolation, but within the context of relevant historical information, family history, physical examination findings, and laboratory data, electrophysiologic findings, pathologic findings, and molecular genetic findings if obtained. PMID:22938875

  5. [Fetal programming: prevention of perinatal acquired predispositions of diseases in later life].

    PubMed

    Kainer, F

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the metabolic and hormonal environment of the fetus may cause predispositions to the development of disorders and diseases in later life. The timing, duration, severity, and type of insult during development determines the specific physiological outcome. Intrauterine programming of physiological systems occurs at the gene, cell, tissue, organ, and system levels and causes permanent structural and functional changes. Elevated insulin concentrations during critical periods of perinatal life may induce a lasting 'malprogramming' of neuroendocrine systems regulating body weight, food intake, and metabolism. Similar characteristics may occur due to perinatal hyperleptinism, hypercortisolism. Diagnosis and therapy of gestational diabetes in time may prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in later life. This concept has new important implications for chances and challenges of perinatal preventive medicine in the future. PMID:17327986

  6. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases. PMID:19220349

  7. Global change and human susceptibility to disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, G.C.; Ehrlich, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    Although the loss of good health is inherently unpredictable, human behavior at the individual and societal levels profoundly influences the incidence and evolution of disease. In this review, the authors define the human epidemiological environment and describe key biophysical, economic, sociocultural, and political factors that shape it. The potential impact upon the epidemiological environment of biophysical aspects of global change--changes in the size; mobility, and geographic distribution of the human population; land conversion; agricultural intensification; and climate change--is then examined. Human vulnerability to disease is strongly and deleteriously influenced by many of these ongoing, intensifying alterations. The authors then examine threats to human defenses against disease, including immune suppression, loss of biodiversity and indigenous knowledge, and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Effective responses will require greatly enhanced attention by and collaboration among experts in diverse academic disciplines, in the private sector, and in government worldwide. 157 refs.

  8. Atypical prion diseases in humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Tranulis, Michael A; Benestad, Sylvie L; Baron, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Although prion diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep, have long been recognized, our understanding of their epidemiology and pathogenesis is still in its early stages. Progress is hampered by the lengthy incubation periods and the lack of effective ways of monitoring and characterizing these agents. Protease-resistant conformers of the prion protein (PrP), known as the "scrapie form" (PrP(Sc)), are used as disease markers, and for taxonomic purposes, in correlation with clinical, pathological, and genetic data. In humans, prion diseases can arise sporadically (sCJD) or genetically (gCJD and others), caused by mutations in the PrP-gene (PRNP), or as a foodborne infection, with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) causing variant CJD (vCJD). Person-to-person spread of human prion disease has only been known to occur following cannibalism (kuru disease in Papua New Guinea) or through medical or surgical treatment (iatrogenic CJD, iCJD). In contrast, scrapie in small ruminants and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids behave as infectious diseases within these species. Recently, however, so-called atypical forms of prion diseases have been discovered in sheep (atypical/Nor98 scrapie) and in cattle, BSE-H and BSE-L. These maladies resemble sporadic or genetic human prion diseases and might be their animal equivalents. This hypothesis also raises the significant public health question of possible epidemiological links between these diseases and their counterparts in humans. PMID:21598097

  9. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers. PMID:27486355

  10. Evolutionary Response to Human Infectious Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armelagos, George J.; Dewey, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Gives an overview of human history, relating cultural changes with resulting changes in population density and in ecological balance to patterns of infectious diseases in man. Discusses mechanisms of evolution of resistance. Suggests that in populations where infectious diseases can be controlled, attention should shift to degenerative diseases…

  11. Melanized Fungi in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections. PMID:20930077

  12. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kris A.; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Daszak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non–vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and “Wallacean” zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set. PMID:26417098

  13. [Primary human demodicosis. A disease sui generis].

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-K; Zink, A; Wei, K-J; Dzika, E; Plewig, G; Chen, W

    2015-03-01

    Human Demodex mites (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis) are unique in that they are an obligate human ectoparasite that can inhabit the pilosebaceous unit lifelong without causing obvious host immune response in most cases. The mode of symbiosis between humans and human Demodex mites is unclear, while the pathogenicity of human Demodex mites in many inflammatory skin diseases is now better understood. Primary human demodicosis is a skin disease sui generis not associated with local or systemic immunosuppression. Diagnosis is often underestimated and differentiation from folliculitis, papulopustular rosacea and perioral dermatitis is not always straightforward. Dependent on the morphology and degree of inflammation, the clinical manifestations can be classified into spinulate, papulopustular, nodulocystic, crustic and fulminant demodicosis. Therapy success can be achieved only with acaricides/arachidicides. The effective doses, optimal regimen and antimicrobial resistance remain to be determined. PMID:25744530

  14. Comparison of local and systemic induction of acquired disease resistance in cucumber plants treated with benzothiadiazoles or salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Y; Narusaka, M; Horio, T; Ishii, H

    1999-04-01

    The accumulation of chitinase and its involvement in systemic acquired disease resistance was analyzed using acibenzolar-S-methyl and salicylic acid (SA). Resistance against scab (pathogen: Cladosporium cucumerinum) and the accumulation of chitinase were rapidly induced in cucumber plants after treatment with acibenzolar-S-methyl. In contrast, SA protected the plants from C. cucumerinum and the accumulation of chitinase was induced only on the treated leaves. The accumulation of chitinase in response to inoculation with the pathogen was induced more rapidly in cucumber plants previously treated with acibenzolar-S-methyl than in plants pretreated with SA or water. Thus, it appears that a prospective signal(s), that induces systemic resistance, can be transferred from leaves treated with acibenzolar-S-methyl to the untreated upper and lower leaves where systemic resistance is elicited. In contrast, exogenously applied SA is not likely to function as a mobile, systemic resistance-inducing signal, because SA only induces localized acquired resistance. PMID:10394634

  15. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  16. Robust spectral analysis of videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant frequency (DF) analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images is a new method to detect small intestinal periodicities that may result from mechanical rhythms such as peristalsis. Longer periodicity is related to greater image texture at areas of villous atrophy in celiac disease. However, extraneous features and spatiotemporal phase shift may mask DF rhythms. Method The robustness of Fourier and ensemble averaging spectral analysis to compute DF was tested. Videocapsule images from the distal duodenum of 11 celiac patients (frame rate 2/s and pixel resolution 576 × 576) were analyzed. For patients 1, 2, ... 11, respectively, a total of 10, 11, ..., 20 sequential images were extracted from a randomly selected time epoch. Each image sequence was artificially repeated to 200 frames, simulating periodicities of 0.2, 0.18, ..., 0.1Hz, respectively. Random white noise at four different levels, spatiotemporal phase shift, and frames with air bubbles were added. Power spectra were constructed pixel-wise over 200 frames, and an average spectrum was computed from the 576 × 576 individual spectra. The largest spectral peak in the average spectrum was the estimated DF. Error was defined as the absolute difference between actual DF and estimated DF. Results For Fourier analysis, the mean absolute error between estimated and actual DF was 0.032 ± 0.052Hz. Error increased with greater degree of random noise imposed. In contrast, all ensemble average estimates precisely predicted the simulated DF. Conclusions The ensemble average DF estimate of videocapsule images with simulated periodicity is robust to noise and spatiotemporal phase shift as compared with Fourier analysis. Accurate estimation of DF eliminates the need to impose complex masking, extraction, and/or corrective preprocessing measures. PMID:21906318

  17. Vertically acquired hepatitis C virus infection: Correlates of transmission and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Calitri, Carmelina; Scolfaro, Carlo; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children is 0.05%-0.4% in developed countries and 2%-5% in resource-limited settings, where inadequately tested blood products or un-sterile medical injections still remain important routes of infection. After the screening of blood donors, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HCV has become the leading cause of pediatric infection, at a rate of 5%. Maternal HIV co-infection is a significant risk factor for MTCT and anti-HIV therapy during pregnancy seemingly can reduce the transmission rate of both viruses. Conversely, a high maternal viral load is an important, but not preventable risk factor, because at present no anti-HCV treatment can be administered to pregnant women to block viral replication. Caution is needed in adopting obstetric procedures, such as amniocentesis or internal fetal monitoring, that can favor fetal exposure to HCV contaminated maternal blood, though evidence is lacking on the real risk of single obstetric practices. Mode of delivery and type of feeding do not represent significant risk factors for MTCT. Therefore, there is no reason to offer elective caesarean section or discourage breast-feeding to HCV infected parturients. Information on the natural history of vertical HCV infection is limited. The primary infection is asymptomatic in infants. At least one quarter of infected children shows a spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) that usually occurs within 6 years of life. IL-28B polymorphims and genotype 3 infection have been associated with greater chances of SVC. In general, HCV progression is mild or moderate in children with chronic infection who grow regularly, though cases with marked liver fibrosis or hepatic failure have been described. Non-organ specific autoantibodies and cryoglobulins are frequently found in children with chronic infection, but autoimmune diseases or HCV associated extrahepatic manifestations are rare. PMID:26819507

  18. Vertically acquired hepatitis C virus infection: Correlates of transmission and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Calitri, Carmelina; Scolfaro, Carlo; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia

    2016-01-28

    The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children is 0.05%-0.4% in developed countries and 2%-5% in resource-limited settings, where inadequately tested blood products or un-sterile medical injections still remain important routes of infection. After the screening of blood donors, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HCV has become the leading cause of pediatric infection, at a rate of 5%. Maternal HIV co-infection is a significant risk factor for MTCT and anti-HIV therapy during pregnancy seemingly can reduce the transmission rate of both viruses. Conversely, a high maternal viral load is an important, but not preventable risk factor, because at present no anti-HCV treatment can be administered to pregnant women to block viral replication. Caution is needed in adopting obstetric procedures, such as amniocentesis or internal fetal monitoring, that can favor fetal exposure to HCV contaminated maternal blood, though evidence is lacking on the real risk of single obstetric practices. Mode of delivery and type of feeding do not represent significant risk factors for MTCT. Therefore, there is no reason to offer elective caesarean section or discourage breast-feeding to HCV infected parturients. Information on the natural history of vertical HCV infection is limited. The primary infection is asymptomatic in infants. At least one quarter of infected children shows a spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) that usually occurs within 6 years of life. IL-28B polymorphims and genotype 3 infection have been associated with greater chances of SVC. In general, HCV progression is mild or moderate in children with chronic infection who grow regularly, though cases with marked liver fibrosis or hepatic failure have been described. Non-organ specific autoantibodies and cryoglobulins are frequently found in children with chronic infection, but autoimmune diseases or HCV associated extrahepatic manifestations are rare. PMID:26819507

  19. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G; Kaplan, Mariana J; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Barrett, A John; O'Shea, John; Young, Neal S

    2016-02-15

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8(+) TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8(+) TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8(+) and CD4(+) TSCMs. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4(+) and CD8(+) TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8(+) TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA. PMID:26764034

  20. Human Polyomaviruses in Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Ludvigsen, Maria; Van Ghelue, Marijke

    2011-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small, nonenveloped viruses with a circular double-stranded DNA genome of ∼5,000 base pairs protected by an icosahedral protein structure. So far, members of this family have been identified in birds and mammals. Until 2006, BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and simian virus 40 (SV40) were the only polyomaviruses known to circulate in the human population. Their occurrence in individuals was mainly confirmed by PCR and the presence of virus-specific antibodies. Using the same methods, lymphotropic polyomavirus, originally isolated in monkeys, was recently shown to be present in healthy individuals although with much lower incidence than BKV, JCV, and SV40. The use of advanced high-throughput sequencing and improved rolling circle amplification techniques have identified the novel human polyomaviruses KI, WU, Merkel cell polyomavirus, HPyV6, HPyV7, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus, and HPyV9. The skin tropism of human polyomaviruses and their dermatopathologic potentials are the focus of this paper. PMID:21941687

  1. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  2. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr T. M.; Al-Naqeb, Dhekra

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases. PMID:27313952

  3. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach.

    PubMed

    Saeb, Amr T M; Al-Naqeb, Dhekra

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases. PMID:27313952

  4. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  5. Evolution of the human hand: approaches to acquiring, analysing and interpreting the anatomical evidence

    PubMed Central

    MARZKE, MARY W.; MARZKE, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of fossil hand bones from an early human ancestor at Olduvai Gorge in 1960, at the same level as primitive stone tools, generated a debate about the role of tools in the evolution of the human hand that has raged to the present day. Could the Olduvai hand have made the tools? Did the human hand evolve as an adaptation to tool making and tool use? The debate has been fueled by anatomical studies comparing living and fossil human and nonhuman primate hands, and by experimental observations. These have assessed the relative abilities of apes and humans to manufacture the Oldowan tools, but consensus has been hampered by disagreements about how to translate experimental data from living species into quantitative models for predicting the performance of fossil hands. Such models are now beginning to take shape as new techniques are applied to the capture, management and analysis of data on kinetic and kinematic variables ranging from hand joint structure, muscle mechanics, and the distribution and density of bone to joint movements and muscle recruitment during manipulative behaviour. The systematic comparative studies are highlighting a functional complex of features in the human hand facilitating a distinctive repertoire of grips that are apparently more effective for stone tool making than grips characterising various nonhuman primate species. The new techniques are identifying skeletal variables whose form may provide clues to the potential of fossil hominid hands for one-handed firm precision grips and fine precision manoeuvering movements, both of which are essential for habitual and effective tool making and tool use. PMID:10999274

  6. Overview of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Role of Inflammatory Mechanisms in the Immunopathogenesis of Severe Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Helen C.; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the infectious diseases. Despite the implementation of national pneumococcal polyvalent vaccine-based immunisation strategies targeted at high-risk groups, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) remains the most common cause of CAP. Notwithstanding the HIV pandemic, major challenges confronting the control of CAP include the range of bacterial and viral pathogens causing this condition, the ever-increasing problem of antibiotic resistance worldwide, and increased vulnerability associated with steadily aging populations in developed countries. These and other risk factors, as well as diagnostic strategies, are covered in the first section of this review. Thereafter, the review is focused on the pneumococcus, specifically the major virulence factors of this microbial pathogen and their role in triggering overexuberant inflammatory responses which contribute to the immunopathogenesis of invasive disease. The final section of the review is devoted to a consideration of pharmacological, anti-inflammatory strategies with adjunctive potential in the antimicrobial chemotherapy of CAP. This is focused on macrolides, corticosteroids, and statins with respect to their modes of anti-inflammatory action, current status, and limitations. PMID:24453422

  7. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area. PMID:24684125

  8. Oxidants and human disease: some new concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, B.

    1987-11-01

    Oxidant species such as superoxide radical (O/sub 2//sup -/), hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and lipid peroxides (LOOH) are becoming increasingly implicated in human disease. However, the question of whether such oxidants are a major cause of tissue injury in human disease or are merely produced during such injury has been difficult to answer because of inadequate experimental techniques, and possibly because of an overemphasis on lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of oxidant injury. Recent developments in methodology, in the authors understanding of the primary mechanism of oxidant toxicity to cells, and in concepts of antioxidant protection are reviewed. Good evidence now exists for some role of oxidant damage to tissues in the pathology of several human diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, reperfusion injury, immune injury to lung and kidney, and cerebral trauma or ischemia. These have led to promising suggestions for new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Engraftment of Human Glioblastoma Cells in Immunocompetent Rats through Acquired Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Huszthy, Peter C.; Sakariassen, Per Ø.; Espedal, Heidi; Brokstad, Karl A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Miletic, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of glioblastoma patient biopsy spheroids to the brain of T cell-compromised Rowett (nude) rats has been established as a representative animal model for human GBMs, with a tumor take rate close to 100%. In immunocompetent littermates however, primary human GBM tissue is invariably rejected. Here we show that after repeated passaging cycles in nude rats, human GBM spheroids are enabled to grow in the brain of immunocompetent rats. In case of engraftment, xenografts in immunocompetent rats grow progressively and host leukocytes fail to enter the tumor bed, similar to what is seen in nude animals. In contrast, rejection is associated with massive infiltration of the tumor bed by leukocytes, predominantly ED1+ microglia/macrophages, CD4+ T helper cells and CD8+ effector cells, and correlates with elevated serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-18 and TNF-α. We observed that in nude rat brains, an adaptation to the host occurs after several in vivo passaging cycles, characterized by striking attenuation of microglial infiltration. Furthermore, tumor-derived chemokines that promote leukocyte migration and their entry into the CNS such as CXCL-10 and CXCL-12 are down-regulated, and the levels of TGF-β2 increase. We propose that through serial in vivo passaging in nude rats, human GBM cells learn to avoid and or/ suppress host immunity. Such adapted GBM cells are in turn able to engraft in immunocompetent rats without signs of an inflammatory response. PMID:26291724

  10. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26414877

  11. Detection of acquired hemoglobinopathy in children with hematological malignancies at disease onset: results form a national referral centre.

    PubMed

    Maritsi, Despoina N; Kosmidis, Helen V; Douna, Varvara; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne; Tsolia, Maria N; Kossiva, Lydia

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal hemoglobin synthesis is usually inherited but may also arise as a secondary manifestation of a hematological neoplasia. The objective of this study is to identify the presence of acquired hemoglobinopathy in children diagnosed with hematological malignancies and compare these against healthy controls. Prospective matched case-control study held from 2010 to 2012. For each patient with hematological malignancy two healthy controls matched on gender, age and race were recruited. Patients with other co-morbidities were excluded. All samples underwent supravital staining and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) electrophoresis. Following identification of abnormal results, molecular genetic testing for all α- and β-thalassemia mutations prevalent in the Greek population was performed. Other causes of anemia were ruled out based on specific testing. A total of 44 (32 males) patients with a mean age of 7.1 years were enrolled in the study. Hematological disorders included acute lymphocytic leukemia (24), acute myeloid leukemia (8), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (8), Hodgkin disease (3), and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (1). Following exclusion of congenital hemoglobinopathies, atypical HPLC electrophoretic findings persisted in 18.1 % of the patient group, compared to 0 % in the control group (p < 0.001). The patient group showed marked microcytic anemia (p < 0.01) and detection of small inclusions (p = 0.034) on supravital staining. Comparison of the HPLC findings between the groups demonstrated significantly lower percentages of HbA (p = 0.02), normal HbA2 and higher percentage of fast moving Hb bands (p = 0.04) in the patient group. Interestingly, the majority of these patients belonged to the high-risk group. Acquired hemoglobinopathy is recognized in adult patients. This is a novel study describing evidence of abnormal erythropoiesis in children with hematological malignancies and in particular those classified as high-risk cancer patients according to

  12. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-10-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  13. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  14. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catherine Kelleher, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver. About the Kidney Failure Series The NIDDK Kidney Failure Series includes booklets and fact sheets that can help you learn more about treatment methods for kidney failure, complications of dialysis, financial help ...

  15. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  16. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  17. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  18. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  19. IMMUNOACTIVATION AT THE CROSSROADS OF HUMAN DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that immunoactivation, which evolved as a system of host defense against pathogens, can become dysregulated and promote the pathogenesis of diverse diseases with both known and unknown etiologies (e.g., AIDS, age-related macular degeneration, cancer) as well as aging. Immunoactivation seems to be a “common denominator” or general mechanism of pathogenesis, and may explain the association and similarities in pathology among otherwise unrelated human diseases. Identification of general mechanisms of immunoactivation may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies applicable to many diseases even before detailed knowledge of specific etiology and pathogenesis may be available. PMID:25637756

  20. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  1. Normal human mammary epithelial cells spontaneously escape senescence and acquire genomic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanov, S. R.; Kozakiewicz, B. K.; Holst, C. R.; Stampfer, M. R.; Haupt, L. M.; Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    Senescence and genomic integrity are thought to be important barriers in the development of malignant lesions. Human fibroblasts undergo a limited number of cell divisions before entering an irreversible arrest, called senescence. Here we show that human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) do not conform to this paradigm of senescence. In contrast to fibroblasts, HMECs exhibit an initial growth phase that is followed by a transient growth plateau (termed selection or M0; refs 3-5), from which proliferative cells emerge to undergo further population doublings (approximately 20-70), before entering a second growth plateau (previously termed senescence or M1; refs 4-6). We find that the first growth plateau exhibits characteristics of senescence but is not an insurmountable barrier to further growth. HMECs emerge from senescence, exhibit eroding telomeric sequences and ultimately enter telomere-based crisis to generate the types of chromosomal abnormalities seen in the earliest lesions of breast cancer. Growth past senescent barriers may be a pivotal event in the earliest steps of carcinogenesis, providing many genetic changes that predicate oncogenic evolution. The differences between epithelial cells and fibroblasts provide new insights into the mechanistic basis of neoplastic transformation.

  2. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors alters the metabolism of human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells and xenograft tumours

    PubMed Central

    Beloueche-Babari, M; Box, C; Arunan, V; Parkes, H G; Valenti, M; De Haven Brandon, A; Jackson, L E; Eccles, S A; Leach, M O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to molecularly targeted therapeutics is a key challenge in personalised cancer medicine, highlighting the need for identifying the underlying mechanisms and early biomarkers of relapse, in order to guide subsequent patient management. Methods: Here we use human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) models and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess the metabolic changes that follow acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and which could serve as potential metabolic biomarkers of drug resistance. Results: Comparison of NMR metabolite profiles obtained from control (CALS) and EGFR TKI-resistant (CALR) cells grown as 2D monolayers, 3D spheroids or xenograft tumours in athymic mice revealed a number of differences between the sensitive and drug-resistant models. In particular, we observed elevated levels of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) in CALR relative to CALS monolayers, spheroids and tumours, independent of the growth rate or environment. In addition, there was an increase in alanine, aspartate and creatine+phosphocreatine in resistant spheroids and xenografts, and increased levels of lactate, branched-chain amino acids and a fall in phosphoethanolamine only in xenografts. The xenograft lactate build-up was associated with an increased expression of the glucose transporter GLUT-1, whereas the rise in GPC was attributed to inhibition of GPC phosphodiesterase. Reduced glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and phosphocholine were observed in a second HNSCC model probably indicative of a different drug resistance mechanism. Conclusions: Our studies reveal metabolic signatures associated not only with acquired EGFR TKI resistance but also growth pattern, microenvironment and contributing mechanisms in HNSCC models. These findings warrant further investigation as metabolic biomarkers of disease relapse in the clinic. PMID:25742484

  3. Acquired fears reflected in cortical sensory processing: A review of electrophysiological studies of human classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Vladimir; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to associate neutral stimuli with affective value is an important survival strategy that can be accomplished by cell assemblies obeying Hebbian learning principles. In the neuroscience laboratory, classical fear conditioning has been extensively used as a model to study learning related changes in neural structure and function. Here, we review the effects of classical fear conditioning on electromagnetic brain activity in humans, focusing on how sensory systems adapt to changing fear-related contingencies. By considering spatio-temporal patterns of mass neuronal activity we illustrate a range of cortical changes related to a retuning of neuronal sensitivity to amplify signals consistent with fear-associated stimuli at the cost of other sensory information. Putative mechanisms that may underlie fear-associated plasticity at the level of the sensory cortices are briefly considered and several avenues for future work are outlined. PMID:22891639

  4. Wombats acquired scabies from humans and/or dogs from outside Australia.

    PubMed

    Andriantsoanirina, V; Ariey, F; Izri, A; Bernigaud, C; Fang, F; Guillot, J; Chosidow, O; Durand, R

    2015-06-01

    According to previous studies, Sarcoptes mites of wombats were relatively recently introduced into Australia by colonizers and/or their dogs. However, that affirmation has been called into question due to apparent flaws in the design of the phylogenetic studies. With the aim of providing a definitive answer to this question, a part of the mitochondrial gene coding for 12S rRNA of S. scabiei mites from 23 humans and one dog collected in France was sequenced and a phylogenetic analysis including the sequences previously deposited in Genbank was performed. Phylogenetic analysis did not show host segregation or geographical isolation of the mites. Conversely, the present work suggested that mange in wombats is indeed due to the introduction of S. scabiei into Australia by immigrating individuals and/or their companion animals. PMID:25813454

  5. Commentary: is Alzheimer's disease uniquely human?

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    That Alzheimer's disease (AD) might be a human-specific disease was hypothesized by Rapoport in 1989. Apes and humans share an identical amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide amino acid sequence and accumulate considerable Aβ deposits after age 40 years, an age when amyloid plaques are uncommon in humans. Despite their early Aβ buildup, ape brains have not shown evidence dystrophic neurites near plaques. Aging great ape brains also have few neurofibrillary tangles, with one exception of 1 obese chimpanzee euthanized after a stroke who displayed abundant neurofibrillary tangles, but without the typical AD distribution. We discuss the need for more exacting evaluation of neuron density with age, and note husbandry issues that may allow great apes to live to greater ages. We remain reserved about expectations for fully developed AD-like pathology in the great apes of advanced ages and cautiously support Rapoport's hypothesis. PMID:25533426

  6. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of complex cystic lesions in renal transplant recipients with acquired cystic kidney disease: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Paudice, N; Zanazzi, M; Agostini, S; Bertelli, E; Caroti, L; Carta, P; Moscarelli, L; Tsalouchos, A; Salvadori, M; Bertoni, E

    2012-09-01

    We prospectively studied the potential value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to characterize complex acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) or suspected solid renal masses, avoiding the risk of inducing acute kidney injury in 138 renal transplant recipients by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Forty-three cases (31%) had ACKD; 15 ACKD patients (35%) showed suspicious or nondiagnostic ultrasound. The latter subgroup underwent CEUS and, if the suspicion was confirmed, a contrast-enhanced CT. Thirty five lesions were identified in the 15 patients studied by CEUS. According to the Bosniak classification, 27 cysts were type I (BI), four type II (BII), two type III (BIII) with enhancement at the level of thickened septa; we also identified two solid enhancing lesions (BIV). We followed the BI and BII lesions with serial CEUS, while the remaining four cases underwent contrast-enhanced CT showing two solid lesions and two complex cysts with contrast enhancement in the septea. The four patients underwent surgical resection yielding three renal cell carcinomas one papillary carcinoma as the pathological findings. This preliminary study characterized solid nodules and BIII lesions for further evaluation by CT. CEUS seems to correctly characterize BI and BII cysts that are not clearly defined by standard ultrasound. PMID:22974874

  7. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  8. The First World War years of Sydney Domville Rowland: an early case of possible laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Wever, Peter C; Hodges, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sydney Domville Rowland was a bacteriologist and staff member at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine when the First World War broke out in 1914. Following a request to the Director of the Lister Institute to staff and equip a mobile field laboratory as quickly as possible, Rowland was appointed to take charge of No. 1 Mobile Laboratory and took up a temporary commission at the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. On 9 October 1914, Rowland set out for the European mainland and was subsequently attached to General Headquarters in Saint-Omer, France (October 1914-June 1915), No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station in Lijssenthoek, Belgium (June 1915-February 1916, during which period he was promoted Major), and No. 26 General Hospital in Étaples, France (February 1916-March 1917). His research focused on gas gangrene, typhoid fever, trench fever, wound infection and cerebrospinal fever. In February of 1917, while engaged in identifying meningococcal carriers, Rowland contracted cerebrospinal meningitis to which he succumbed at age 44 on 6 March 1917. His untimely death might have been caused by laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease, especially since Rowland's work with Neisseria meningitidis isolates had extended beyond routine laboratory techniques and included risk procedures like immunisation of rabbits with pathogenic strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, microbiology laboratory workers who are routinely exposed to N. meningitidis isolates are recognised as a population at increased risk for meningococcal disease, for which reason recommended preventive measures include vaccination and handling of isolates within a class II biosafety cabinet. PMID:27084843

  9. Relationship between the Use of Inhaled Steroids for Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Early Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. Methods Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality). Results Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%). In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002) in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787). This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542), with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194), but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027). Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. Conclusions Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis. PMID:24039899

  10. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E.; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  11. Shigellosis in Subjects with Traveler's Diarrhea Versus Domestically Acquired Diarrhea: Implications for Antimicrobial Therapy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos; Arroyo, Ana; Sarria, Ana; Iglesias, Nuria; Enríquez, Ana; Baquero, Margarita; de Guevara, Concepción Ladrón

    2015-09-01

    An increase of sexually transmitted shigellosis is currently being reported in developed countries. In addition, travel-related shigellosis can introduce resistant strains that could be disseminated within this new scenario. Epidemiological features and antimicrobial susceptibility of shigellosis depending on where infection was acquired were investigated. From 2008 to 2013, subjects with shigellosis were studied. Patients were classified according to acquisition of Shigella as traveler's diarrhea (TD) or domestically acquired diarrhea (DAD). Ninety cases of shigellosis were identified: 76 corresponding to the TD group and 14 to the DAD group. In the DAD group, most of patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), being shigellosis associated to male sex (P = 0.007) and HIV infection (P < 0.0001). S. sonnei (47.8%) and S. flexneri (42.2%) were the predominant species. The highest resistance was detected for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (81.8%), followed by ampicillin (AMP) (37.8%) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (23.3%). Resistant Shigella strains were more frequent in subjects with TD than those with DAD, although only for CIP the difference was significant (P = 0.034). Continuous monitoring of patients with shigellosis is necessary to control the spread of resistant Shigella strains and for effective therapy. Men with shigellosis who have not traveled to an endemic area should be screened for HIV infection. PMID:26195465

  12. Shigellosis in Subjects with Traveler's Diarrhea versus Domestically Acquired Diarrhea: Implications for Antimicrobial Therapy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Carlos; Sarria, Ana Arroyo, Ana; Iglesias, Nuria; Enríquez, Ana; Baquero, Margarita; de Guevara, Concepción Ladrón

    2015-01-01

    An increase of sexually transmitted shigellosis is currently being reported in developed countries. In addition, travel-related shigellosis can introduce resistant strains that could be disseminated within this new scenario. Epidemiological features and antimicrobial susceptibility of shigellosis depending on where infection was acquired were investigated. From 2008 to 2013, subjects with shigellosis were studied. Patients were classified according to acquisition of Shigella as traveler's diarrhea (TD) or domestically acquired diarrhea (DAD). Ninety cases of shigellosis were identified: 76 corresponding to the TD group and 14 to the DAD group. In the DAD group, most of patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), being shigellosis associated to male sex (P = 0.007) and HIV infection (P < 0.0001). S. sonnei (47.8%) and S. flexneri (42.2%) were the predominant species. The highest resistance was detected for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (81.8%), followed by ampicillin (AMP) (37.8%) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (23.3%). Resistant Shigella strains were more frequent in subjects with TD than those with DAD, although only for CIP the difference was significant (P = 0.034). Continuous monitoring of patients with shigellosis is necessary to control the spread of resistant Shigella strains and for effective therapy. Men with shigellosis who have not traveled to an endemic area should be screened for HIV infection. PMID:26195465

  13. Comparative Genomics Suggests That the Human Pathogenic Fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii Acquired Obligate Biotrophy through Gene Loss

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Ousmane H.; Pagni, Marco; Hauser, Philippe M.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungal parasite that colonizes specifically humans and turns into an opportunistic pathogen in immunodeficient individuals. The fungus is able to reproduce extracellularly in host lungs without eliciting massive cellular death. The molecular mechanisms that govern this process are poorly understood, in part because of the lack of an in vitro culture system for Pneumocystis spp. In this study, we explored the origin and evolution of the putative biotrophy of P. jirovecii through comparative genomics and reconstruction of ancestral gene repertoires. We used the maximum parsimony method and genomes of related fungi of the Taphrinomycotina subphylum. Our results suggest that the last common ancestor of Pneumocystis spp. lost 2,324 genes in relation to the acquisition of obligate biotrophy. These losses may result from neutral drift and affect the biosyntheses of amino acids and thiamine, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur, and the catabolism of purines. In addition, P. jirovecii shows a reduced panel of lytic proteases and has lost the RNA interference machinery, which might contribute to its genome plasticity. Together with other characteristics, that is, a sex life cycle within the host, the absence of massive destruction of host cells, difficult culturing, and the lack of virulence factors, these gene losses constitute a unique combination of characteristics which are hallmarks of both obligate biotrophs and animal parasites. These findings suggest that Pneumocystis spp. should be considered as the first described obligate biotrophs of animals, whose evolution has been marked by gene losses. PMID:25062922

  14. 'Laminopathies': A wide spectrum of human diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Worman, Howard J. . E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu; Bonne, Gisele

    2007-06-10

    Mutations in genes encoding the intermediate filament nuclear lamins and associated proteins cause a wide spectrum of diseases sometimes called 'laminopathies.' Diseases caused by mutations in LMNA encoding A-type lamins include autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and related myopathies, Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1 and developmental and accelerated aging disorders. Duplication in LMNB1 encoding lamin B1 causes autosomal dominant leukodystrophy and mutations in LMNB2 encoding lamin B2 are associated with acquired partial lipodystrophy. Disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding lamin-associated integral inner nuclear membrane proteins include X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, sclerosing bone dysplasias, HEM/Greenberg skeletal dysplasia and Pelger-Huet anomaly. While mutations and clinical phenotypes of 'laminopathies' have been carefully described, data explaining pathogenic mechanisms are only emerging. Future investigations will likely identify new 'laminopathies' and a combination of basic and clinical research will lead to a better understanding of pathophysiology and the development of therapies.

  15. Drug repurposing and human parasitic protozoan diseases

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Katherine T.; Fisher, Gillian; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases have an enormous health, social and economic impact and are a particular problem in tropical regions of the world. Diseases caused by protozoa and helminths, such as malaria and schistosomiasis, are the cause of most parasite related morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 1.1 million combined deaths annually. The global burden of these diseases is exacerbated by the lack of licensed vaccines, making safe and effective drugs vital to their prevention and treatment. Unfortunately, where drugs are available, their usefulness is being increasingly threatened by parasite drug resistance. The need for new drugs drives antiparasitic drug discovery research globally and requires a range of innovative strategies to ensure a sustainable pipeline of lead compounds. In this review we discuss one of these approaches, drug repurposing or repositioning, with a focus on major human parasitic protozoan diseases such as malaria, trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis and leishmaniasis. PMID:25057459

  16. Roles for retrotransposon insertions in human disease.

    PubMed

    Hancks, Dustin C; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-01-01

    Over evolutionary time, the dynamic nature of a genome is driven, in part, by the activity of transposable elements (TE) such as retrotransposons. On a shorter time scale it has been established that new TE insertions can result in single-gene disease in an individual. In humans, the non-LTR retrotransposon Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous TE. In addition to mobilizing its own RNA to new genomic locations via a "copy-and-paste" mechanism, LINE-1 is able to retrotranspose other RNAs including Alu, SVA, and occasionally cellular RNAs. To date in humans, 124 LINE-1-mediated insertions which result in genetic diseases have been reported. Disease causing LINE-1 insertions have provided a wealth of insight and the foundation for valuable tools to study these genomic parasites. In this review, we provide an overview of LINE-1 biology followed by highlights from new reports of LINE-1-mediated genetic disease in humans. PMID:27158268

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genomics and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trowsdale, John; Knight, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Over several decades, various forms of genomic analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been extremely successful in picking up many disease associations. This is to be expected, as the MHC region is one of the most gene-dense and polymorphic stretches of human DNA. It also encodes proteins critical to immunity, including several controlling antigen processing and presentation. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) imputation now permit the screening of large sample sets, a technique further facilitated by high-throughput sequencing. These methods promise to yield more precise contributions of MHC variants to disease. However, interpretation of MHC-disease associations in terms of the functions of variants has been problematic. Most studies confirm the paramount importance of class I and class II molecules, which are key to resistance to infection. Infection is likely driving the extreme variation of these genes across the human population, but this has been difficult to demonstrate. In contrast, many associations with autoimmune conditions have been shown to be specific to certain class I and class II alleles. Interestingly, conditions other than infections and autoimmunity are also associated with the MHC, including some cancers and neuropathies. These associations could be indirect, owing, for example, to the infectious history of a particular individual and selective pressures operating at the population level. PMID:23875801

  18. Long-Term Outcome After Ablation of Right Atrial Tachyarrhythmias After the Surgical Repair of Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Anguera, Ignasi; Dallaglio, Paolo; Macías, Rosa; Jiménez-Candil, Javier; Peinado, Rafael; García-Seara, Javier; Arcocha, Mari Fe; Herreros, Benito; Quesada, Aurelio; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Alvarez, Miguel; Filgueiras, David; Matía, Roberto; Cequier, Angel; Sabaté, Xavier

    2015-06-15

    Atrial myopathy, atriotomies, and fibrotic scars are the pathophysiological substrate of lines of conduction block, promoting atrial macroreentry. The aim of this study was to determine the acute and long-term outcome of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for right atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in adults after cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) and acquired heart disease (AHD) and predictors of these outcomes. Clinical records of adults after surgery for heart disease undergoing RFCA of right-sided AT were analyzed retrospectively. Multivariate analyses identified clinical and procedural factors predicting acute and long-term outcomes. A total of 372 patients (69% men; age 61 ± 15 years) after surgical repair of CHD (n = 111) or AHD (n = 261) were studied. Cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) was observed in 300 patients and non-CTI-AFL in 72 patients. Ablation was successful in 349 cases (94%). During a mean follow-up of 51 ± 30 months, recurrences were observed in 24.5% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed that non-CTI-AFL (hazard ratio [HR] 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 2.9) and CHD (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.9) were independent predictors of long-term recurrences. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.3), surgery for AHD (HR 95% 2.31, 95% CI 1.5 to 3.7), and left atrial dilatation (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.2) were independent predictors of long-term atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, RFCA of right-sided AT after cardiac surgery is associated with high acute success rates and significant long-term recurrences. Non-CTI-dependent AFL and surgery for CHD are at higher risk of recurrence. Atrial fibrillation is common during follow-up, particularly in patients with AHD and enlarged left atrium. PMID:25896151

  19. The origin recognition complex in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    ORC (origin recognition complex) serves as the initiator for the assembly of the pre-RC (pre-replication complex) and the subsequent DNA replication. Together with many of its non-replication functions, ORC is a pivotal regulator of various cellular processes. Notably, a number of reports connect ORC to numerous human diseases, including MGS (Meier–Gorlin syndrome), EBV (Epstein–Barr virus)-infected diseases, American trypanosomiasis and African trypanosomiasis. However, much of the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In those genetic diseases, mutations in ORC alter its function and lead to the dysregulated phenotypes; whereas in some pathogen-induced symptoms, host ORC and archaeal-like ORC are exploited by these organisms to maintain their own genomes. In this review, I provide detailed examples of ORC-related human diseases, and summarize the current findings on how ORC is involved and/or dysregulated. I further discuss how these discoveries can be generalized as model systems, which can then be applied to elucidating other related diseases and revealing potential targets for developing effective therapies. PMID:23662735

  20. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  1. Automated data processing of { 1H-decoupled} 13C MR spectra acquired from human brain in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shic, Frederick; Ross, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In clinical 13C infusion studies, broadband excitation of 200 ppm of the human brain yields 13C MR spectra with a time resolution of 2-5 min and generates up to 2000 metabolite peaks over 2 h. We describe a fast, automated, observer-independent technique for processing { 1H-decoupled} 13C spectra. Quantified 13C spectroscopic signals, before and after the administration of [1- 13C]glucose and/or [1- 13C]acetate in human subjects are determined. Stepwise improvements of data processing are illustrated by examples of normal and pathological results. Variation in analysis of individual 13C resonances ranged between 2 and 14%. Using this method it is possible to reliably identify subtle metabolic effects of brain disease including Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.

  2. Human-Dromedary Camel Interactions and the Risk of Acquiring Zoonotic Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C; Danielson, N; Gervelmeyer, A; Berthe, F; Faye, B; Kaasik Aaslav, K; Adlhoch, C; Zeller, H; Penttinen, P; Coulombier, D

    2016-02-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases without documented contact with another human MERS-CoV case make up 61% (517/853) of all reported cases. These primary cases are of particular interest for understanding the source(s) and route(s) of transmission and for designing long-term disease control measures. Dromedary camels are the only animal species for which there is convincing evidence that it is a host species for MERS-CoV and hence a potential source of human infections. However, only a small proportion of the primary cases have reported contact with camels. Other possible sources and vehicles of infection include food-borne transmission through consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and raw meat, medicinal use of camel urine and zoonotic transmission from other species. There are critical knowledge gaps around this new disease which can only be closed through traditional field epidemiological investigations and studies designed to test hypothesis regarding sources of infection and risk factors for disease. Since the 1960s, there has been a radical change in dromedary camel farming practices in the Arabian Peninsula with an intensification of the production and a concentration of the production around cities. It is possible that the recent intensification of camel herding in the Arabian Peninsula has increased the virus' reproductive number and attack rate in camel herds while the 'urbanization' of camel herding increased the frequency of zoonotic 'spillover' infections from camels to humans. It is reasonable to assume, although difficult to measure, that the sensitivity of public health surveillance to detect previously unknown diseases is lower in East Africa than in Saudi Arabia and that sporadic human cases may have gone undetected there. PMID:25545147

  3. The Mitochondrial Proteome and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly three decades, the sequence of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) has provided a molecular framework for understanding maternally inherited diseases. However, the vast majority of human mitochondrial disorders are caused by nuclear defects, which is not surprising since the mtDNA encodes only 13 proteins. Advances in genomics, mass spectrometry, and computation have only recently made it possible to systematically identify the complement of over 1,000 proteins that comprise the mammalian mitochondrial proteome. Here, we review recent progress in characterizing the mitochondrial proteome and highlight insights into its complexity, tissue heterogeneity, evolutionary origins, and biochemical versatility. We then discuss how this proteome is being used to discover the genetic basis of respiratory chain disorders as well as to expand our definition of mitochondrial disease. Finally, we explore future prospects and challenges for using the mitochondrial proteome as a foundation for systems analysis of the organelle. PMID:20690818

  4. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    PubMed

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-10-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future. PMID:26795222

  5. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  6. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part II. Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonic examination of the kidney was performed on 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was detected in 107 of 529 kidneys (20.2%). This paper presents an analysis of ultrasonotomograms of ACDK. Ultrasonic measurement of the size of ACDK was 72.5 +/- 15.2 mm in length and 41.7 +/- 9.8 mm in thickness. The size of ACDK was significantly greater than that of contracted kidneys by ultrasonographic diagnosis. With regard to sex distinction the length and thickness of ACDK were significantly greater in males than in females. As for laboratory data, patients with ACDK showed significantly higher values of red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum creatinine concentration compared with contracted kidneys. Prolongation of the dialysis peirod increased the incidence of ACDK. The size of ACDK showed a tendency to increase with duration of dialysis. However, no correlation was noted statistically between the incidence of ACDK and duration of dialysis and between the size of ACDK and duration of dialysis. There was a significantly lower incidence of ACDK in patients with diabetic nephropathy than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. A sonographic feature of ACDK is irregularity of the renal contour because of cystic transformation. Renal imaging, identification of the corticomedullary border, identification of the central echoes and increased parenchymal echogenicity were similar to other dialyzed kidneys. The main complications of ACDK are hemorrhage and tumor formation. We observed two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. The incidence of complications of ACDK was 5.1 per cent. We believe that patients with ACDK should be watched carefully by regular ultrasonic examination for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232409

  7. Evaluation of Acquired Valvular Heart Disease by the Pediatrician: When to Follow, When to Refer for Intervention? Part II.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2015-11-01

    Lesions of the heart valves are the commonest acquired cardiac abnormalities seen in pediatric age group. Aortic regurgitation (AR) results from abnormality of the valve leaflets or of the aortic root. Mitral valve lesion may be associated in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Left ventricle dilates and may develop dysfunction in advanced states. Coronary perfusion also tends to suffer in severe AR. The symptoms develop later and include dyspnea and palpitations. An early diastolic, high pitched murmur, best heard at base of the heart is the hallmark of AR. All symptomatic patients with severe AR and those with left ventricular dysfunction should undergo surgical intervention. Aortic stenosis (AS) is often due to congenitally bicuspid or unicuspid valve. RHD rarely results in AS; associated AR is common in such cases. The most common cause of tricuspid valve involvement is secondary to dilatation of right ventricle and tricuspid annulus resulting in tricuspid regurgitation (TR). Rarely RHD affects the tricuspid valve directly; resulting in stenosis with TR. Involvement of both mitral and aortic valves is almost pathognomonic of RHD etiology. Severity of individual lesions may be difficult to ascertain as proximal valve lesion tends to modify the assessment of the distal valve lesion. It is important to understand that all valvular lesions do not require surgery. Regular secondary prophylaxis with long acting penicillin (for patients with RHD) may retard further progression of valve lesion and must be emphasized to the family. For mild and asymptomatic moderate valvular lesions, periodic monitoring with clinical examination and echocardiography is sufficient. No guidelines are available for timing of intervention in such children; data may have to be extrapolated from published guidelines for adult patients. Various types of surgical options are available for regurgitant valves, but none is ideal. The pediatricians are required to have knowledge of

  8. The genetics of human skin disease.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Gina M; Christiano, Angela M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is composed of a variety of cell types expressing specific molecules and possessing different properties that facilitate the complex interactions and intercellular communication essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the skin. Importantly, a single mutation in one of these molecules can disrupt the entire organization and function of these essential networks, leading to cell separation, blistering, and other striking phenotypes observed in inherited skin diseases. Over the past several decades, the genetic basis of many monogenic skin diseases has been elucidated using classical genetic techniques. Importantly, the findings from these studies has shed light onto the many classes of molecules and essential genetic as well as molecular interactions that lend the skin its rigid, yet flexible properties. With the advent of the human genome project, next-generation sequencing techniques, as well as several other recently developed methods, tremendous progress has been made in dissecting the genetic architecture of complex, non-Mendelian skin diseases. PMID:25274756

  9. A Genomic Approach to Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in the use of DNA-based microarrays. These techniques permit to assess RNA abundance on a genome-wide scale. Medical applications emerged in the field of cancer, with studies of both solid tumors and hematological malignancies leading to the development of tests that are now used to personalize therapeutic options. Microarrays have also been used to analyze the blood transcriptome in a wide range of diseases. In human autoimmune diseases, these studies are showing potential for identifying therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers for diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and response to treatment. More quantitative and sensitive high throughput RNA profiling methods are starting to be available and will be necessary for transcriptome analyses to become routine tests in the clinical setting. We expect this to crystallize within the coming decade, as they become part of the personalized medicine armamentarium. PMID:20192809

  10. HECT E3s and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Scheffner, Martin; Staub, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    In a simplified view, members of the HECT E3 family have a modular structure consisting of the C-terminal HECT domain, which is catalytically involved in the attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins, and N-terminal extensions of variable length and sequence that mediate the substrate specificity of the respective HECT E3. Although the physiologically relevant substrates of most HECT E3s have remained elusive, it is becoming increasingly clear that HECT E3s play an important role in sporadic and hereditary human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular (Liddle's syndrome) and neurological (Angelman syndrome) disorders, and/or in disease-relevant processes including bone homeostasis, immune response and retroviral budding. Thus, molecular approaches to target the activity of distinct HECT E3s, regulators thereof, and/or of HECT E3 substrates could prove valuable in the treatment of the respective diseases. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; ). PMID:18047743

  11. Mechanisms of resistance to etoposide and teniposide in acquired resistant human colon and lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Long, B H; Wang, L; Lorico, A; Wang, R C; Brattain, M G; Casazza, A M

    1991-10-01

    Stable acquired resistance to etoposide (VP-16) or teniposide (VM-26) in HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, was previously obtained by weekly 1-h exposures to either drug (B. H. Long, Natl. Cancer Inst. Monogr., 4: 123-127, 1987). The purpose of this study was to identify possible mechanisms of resistance present in these cells by using human mdr1 and topoisomerase II DNA probes, antibodies to these gene products, and P4 phage unknotting assay for topoisomerase II activities. HCT116(VP)35 cells were 9-, 7-, and 6-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin, respectively, and showed no cross-resistance to colchicine and actinomycin D. These cells had no differences in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels but displayed decreased levels of topoisomerase II mRNA and enzyme activity without any alteration of drug sensitivity displayed by the enzyme. HCT116(VM)34 cells were 5-, 7-, and 21-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin; were cross-resistant to colchicine (7-fold) and actinomycin D (18-fold); and possessed a 9-fold increase in mdr1 mRNA and increased P-glycoprotein without evidence of mdr1 gene amplification. No alterations in topoisomerase II gene or mRNA levels, enzyme activity, or drug sensitivity were observed. A549(VP)28 and A549(VM)28 cells were 8-fold resistant to VP-16 and VM-26 and 3-fold resistant to Adriamycin. Both lines were not cross-resistant to colchicine or actinomycin D but were hypersensitive to cis-platinum. No alterations in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels, but lower topoisomerase II mRNA levels and decreased enzyme activities, were observed. Of the four acquired resistant cell lines, resistance is likely related to elevated mdr1 expression in one line and to decreased topoisomerase II expression in the other three lines. PMID:1717144

  12. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  13. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S.; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approach leverages high-throughput data from tissue homogenates in a novel iterative statistical framework. We applied this method to chronic kidney disease and identified transcripts specific to podocytes, key cells in the glomerular filter responsible for hereditary and most acquired glomerular kidney disease. In a systematic evaluation of our predictions by immunohistochemistry, our in silico approach was significantly more accurate (65% accuracy in human) than predictions based on direct measurement of in vivo fluorescence-tagged murine podocytes (23%). Our method identified genes implicated as causal in hereditary glomerular disease and involved in molecular pathways of acquired and chronic renal diseases. Furthermore, based on expression analysis of human kidney disease biopsies, we demonstrated that expression of the podocyte genes identified by our approach is significantly related to the degree of renal impairment in patients. Our approach is broadly applicable to define lineage specificity in both cell physiology and human disease contexts. We provide a user-friendly website that enables researchers to apply this method to any cell-lineage or tissue of interest. Identified cell-lineage–specific transcripts are expected to play essential tissue-specific roles in organogenesis and disease and can provide starting points for the development of organ-specific diagnostics and therapies. PMID:23950145

  14. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  15. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  16. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  17. The Human Microbiome and Surgical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morowitz, Michael J.; Babrowski, Trissa; Carlisle, Erica M.; Olivas, Andrea; Romanowski, Kathleen S.; Seal, John B.; Liu, Donald C.; Alverdy, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review article is to summarize what is currently known about microbes associated with the human body and to provide examples of how this knowledge impacts the care of surgical patients. Background Pioneering research over the past decade has demonstrated that human beings live in close, constant contact with dynamic communities of microbial organisms. This new reality has wide-ranging implications for the care of surgical patients. Methods and Results Recent advances in the culture-independent study of the human microbiome are reviewed. To illustrate the translational relevance of these studies to surgical disease, we discuss in detail what is known about the role of microbes in the pathogenesis of obesity, gastrointestinal malignancies, Crohn disease, and perioperative complications including surgical site infections and sepsis. The topics of mechanical bowel preparation and perioperative antibiotics are also discussed. Conclusions Heightened understanding of the microbiome in coming years will likely offer opportunities to refine the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of surgical conditions. PMID:21422915

  18. Acquired von Willebrand disease during CentriMag support is associated with high prevalence of bleeding during support and after transition to heart replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kerry A; Jorde, Ulrich P; Garan, Arthur R; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    The Levitronix CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pump that can be implanted rapidly in the operating room for both right and left ventricular support. Recently, continuous-flow pumps have been associated with excessive bleeding, which can be at least partially explained by acquired von Willebrand disease (vWD). We investigated whether acquired vWD occurs during CentriMag support and determined the frequency of bleeding complications during device support as well as after transition to long-term support. We found that acquired vWD is common early post CentriMag implantation and is associated with frequent bleeding events and high requirement of blood products. PMID:24577372

  19. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  20. The Microbiota, Chemical Symbiosis, and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of mammalian-microbial mutualism has expanded by combing microbial sequencing with evolving molecular and cellular methods, and unique model systems. Here, the recent literature linking the microbiota to diseases of three of the key mammalian mucosal epithelial compartments – nasal, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) tract – is reviewed with a focus on new knowledge about the taxa, species, proteins and chemistry that promote health and impact progression toward disease. The information presented is further organized by specific diseases now associated with the microbiota:, Staphylococcus aureus infection and rhinosinusitis in the nasal-sinus mucosa; cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and asthma in the pulmonary tissues. For the vast and microbially dynamic GI compartment, several disorders are considered, including obesity, atherosclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, drug toxicity, and even autism. Our appreciation of the chemical symbiosis ongoing between human systems and the microbiota continues to grow, and suggest new opportunities for modulating this symbiosis using designed interventions. PMID:25305474

  1. The human immunodeficiency virus preventive vaccine research at the French National Agency for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome research.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth; Rieux, Véronique; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Kazatchkine, Michel

    2005-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic is of unprecedented gravity and is spreading rapidly, notably in the most disadvantaged regions of the world. The search for a preventive vaccine is thus an absolute priority. For over 10 years the French National Agency for AIDS research (ANRS) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research. The HIV preventive vaccine research program run by the ANRS covers upstream research for the definition of immunogens, animal models, and clinical research to evaluate candidate vaccines. Most researchers in 2004 believe that it should be possible to obtain partial vaccine protection through the induction of a strong and multiepitopic cellular response. Since 1992, the ANRS has set up 15 phases I and II clinical trials in order to evaluate the safety and the capacity of the candidate vaccines for inducing cellular immune responses. The tested candidate vaccines were increasingly complex recombinant canarypox viruses (Alvac) containing sequences coding for certain viral proteins, utilized alone or combined with other immunogens (whole or truncated envelope proteins). ANRS has also been developing an original strategy based on the utilization of lipopeptides. These comprise synthetic fragments of viral proteins associated with lipids that facilitate the induction of a cellular immune response. These approaches promptly allowed the assessment of a prime-boost strategy combining a viral vector and lipopeptides. PMID:15867969

  2. Proteomics in human disease: cancer, heart and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, P R; Zimny-Arndt, U; Zeindl-Eberhart, E; Stulik, J; Koupilova, K; Pleissner, K P; Otto, A; Müller, E C; Sokolowska-Köhler, W; Grabher, G; Stöffler, G

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, genomics has increased the understanding of many diseases. Proteomics is a rapidly growing research area that encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. The protein composition represents the functional status of a biological compartment. The five approaches presented here resulted in the detection of disease-associated proteins. Calgranulin B was upregulated in colorectal cancer, and hepatoma-derived aldose reductase-like protein was reexpressed in a rat model during hepatocarcinogenesis. In these two investigations, attention was focused on one protein, obviously differing in amount, directly after two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Additional methods, such as enzyme activity measurements and immunohistochemistry, confirmed the disease association of the two candidates resulting from 2-DE subtractive analysis. The following three investigations take advantage of the holistic potential of the 2-DE approach. The comparison of 2-DE patterns from dilated cardiomyopathy patients with those of controls revealed 25 statistically significant intensity differences, from which 12 were identified by amino acid analysis, Edman degradation or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A human myocardial 2-DE database was constructed, containing 3300 protein spots and 150 identified protein species. The number of identified proteins was limited by the capacity of our group, rather than by the principle of feasibility. Another field where proteomics proves to be a valuable tool in identifying proteins of importance for diagnosis is proteome analysis of pathogenic microorganisms such as Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis). Sera from patients with early or late symptoms of Lyme borreliosis contained antibodies of various classes against about 80 antigens each, containing the already described antigens OspA, B and C, flagellin, p83/100, and p39. Similarly, antibody reactivity to

  3. Copy number variants, aneuploidies, and human disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christa Lese; Kirkpatrick, Brianne E; Ledbetter, David H

    2015-06-01

    In the perinatal setting, chromosome imbalances cause a range of clinically significant disorders and increase the risk for other particular phenotypes. As technologies have improved to detect increasingly smaller deletions and duplications, collectively referred to as copy number variants (CNVs), clinicians are learning the significant role that these types of genomic variants play in human disease and their high frequency in ∼ 1% of all pregnancies. This article highlights key aspects of CNV detection and interpretation used during the course of clinical care in the prenatal and neonatal periods. Early diagnosis and accurate interpretation are important for targeted clinical management. PMID:26042902

  4. Gene Conversion in Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Gene conversion is a specific type of homologous recombination that involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a ‘donor’ sequence to a highly homologous ‘acceptor’. We have recently reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying gene conversion, explored the key part that this process has played in fashioning extant human genes, and performed a meta-analysis of gene-conversion events known to have caused human genetic disease. Here we shall briefly summarize some of the latest developments in the study of pathogenic gene conversion events, including (i) the emerging idea of minimal efficient sequence homology (MESH) for homologous recombination, (ii) the local DNA sequence features that appear to predispose to gene conversion, (iii) a mechanistic comparison of gene conversion and transient hypermutability, and (iv) recently reported examples of pathogenic gene conversion events. PMID:24710102

  5. Evasion of human innate and acquired immunity by a bacterial homolog of CD11b that inhibits opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lei, B; DeLeo, F R; Hoe, N P; Graham, M R; Mackie, S M; Cole, R L; Liu, M; Hill, H R; Low, D E; Federle, M J; Scott, J R; Musser, J M

    2001-12-01

    Microbial pathogens must evade the human immune system to survive, disseminate and cause disease. By proteome analysis of the bacterium Group A Streptococcus (GAS), we identified a secreted protein with homology to the alpha-subunit of Mac-1, a leukocyte beta2 integrin required for innate immunity to invading microbes. The GAS Mac-1-like protein (Mac) was secreted by most pathogenic strains, produced in log-phase and controlled by the covR-covS two-component gene regulatory system, which also regulates transcription of other GAS virulence factors. Patients with GAS infection had titers of antibody specific to Mac that correlated with the course of disease, demonstrating that Mac was produced in vivo. Mac bound to CD16 (FcgammaRIIIB) on the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and inhibited opsonophagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen species, which resulted in significantly decreased pathogen killing. Thus, by mimicking a host-cell receptor required for an innate immune response, the GAS Mac protein inhibits professional phagocyte function by a novel strategy that enhances pathogen survival, establishment of infection and dissemination. PMID:11726969

  6. Imaging of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao; Morita, Kyoko; Hayama, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Araki, Ichiro; Higashi, Kotaro; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji; Nojima, Takayuki

    2011-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) complicated with acquired renal cystic disease in a 63-year-old male patient on long-term hemodialysis (30 years and 8 months) that was difficult because of no or poor contrast enhancement by dynamic CT scan is reported. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) in addition to dynamic CT were effective and useful for preoperative assessment of this patient. The pathological subtype of RCC in this patient was acquired cystic disease-associated RCC (ACD-associated RCC), which has been newly defined by Tickoo et al. (Am J Surg Pathol 30:141-153, 2006). PMID:20824295

  7. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to antibody-mediated ADAMTS13 deficiency precipitated by a localized Castleman's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Thais Celi Lopes; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Colella, Marina Pereira; Percout, Priscila de Oliveira; Moura, Muriel Silva; Dias, Maria Almeida; Lins, Betina Diniz; Paula, Erich Vinicius de; Vassallo, Jose; Annichino-Bizzachi, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor causing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) may be precipitated by some infections, inflammatory diseases or neoplasia. We reported a case of refractory TTP precipitated by a newly diagnosed localized Castleman's disease (CD). TTP was initially treated with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids; however the treatment failed to promote sustained response. During hospitalization, an abdominal tumor was diagnosed and resected; the histological analysis revealed a CD of hyaline-vascular variant rich stroma. After tumor removal, the patient achieved a long-lasting clinical remission and normalized ADAMTS13 activity. This clinical case describes a novel association of acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor and CD. The antibody to ADAMTS13 developed along with the systemic manifestation of CD and promptly disappeared after the resection of the tumor. There are reports of neoplasia-associated thrombotic microangiopathy however direct evidence of CD-dependent ADAMTS13 inhibitor had not yet been reported. PMID:24853254

  8. Epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirus infection and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Helen; Burchell, Ann N

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of mucosal human papillomavirs (HPV) in adults and children, its mode of transmission and its associated diseases. Over 40 genotypes of HPV infect the epithelial lining of the anogenital tract and other mucosal areas of the body. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection globally, with high prevalences found in both females and males. The predominant route of transmission is via sexual contact, although mother-to-child transmission is also possible. HPV infection may exist asymptomatically or may induce the formation of benign or malignant tumours in the genital, oral or conjunctival mucosa. Although most infections clear spontaneously, those that persist result in substantial morbidity and invoke high costs associated with the treatment of clinically relevant lesions. Some 13-18 mucosal HPV types are considered to have high oncogenic potential. HPV is recognized unequivocally as the main causal factor for cervical cancer, and is further responsible for a substantial proportion of many other anogenital neoplasms and head and neck cancers. Infections with HPV types that have low oncogenic risk, such as HPV-6 and 11, are associated with benign lesions of the anogenital areas known as condylomata acuminata (genital warts), oral papillomas, conjunctival papillomas, as well as low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions of the cervix. Perinatally acquired HPV can also cause recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in infants and young children. The implementation of HPV vaccination therefore has the potential to prevent a substantial proportion of HPV-related disease in the future. PMID:19684442

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... acquired CJD. CJD belongs to a family of human and animal diseases known as the transmissible spongiform ... CJD is the most common of the known human TSEs. Other human TSEs include kuru, fatal familial ...

  10. Antimicrobial peptides in human skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Kenshi, Yamasaki; Richard, L. Gallo

    2009-01-01

    The skin continuously encounters microbial pathogens. To defend against this, cells of the epidermis and dermis have evolved several innate strategies to prevent infection. Antimicrobial peptides are one of the primary mechanisms used by the skin in the early stages of immune defense. In general, antimicrobial peptides have broad antibacterial activity against gram-positive and negative bacteria and also show antifungal and antiviral activity. The antimicrobial activity of most peptides occurs as a result of unique structural characteristics that enable them to disrupt the microbial membrane while leaving human cell membranes intact. However, antimicrobial peptides also act on host cells to stimulate cytokine production, cell migration, proliferation, maturation, and extracellular matrix synthesis. The production by human skin of antimicrobial peptides such as defensins and cathelicidins occurs constitutively but also greatly increases after infection, inflammation or injury. Some skin diseases show altered expression of antimicrobial peptides, partially explaining the pathophysiology of these diseases. Thus, current research suggests that understanding how antimicrobial peptides modify susceptibility to microbes, influence skin inflammation, and modify wound healing, provides greater insight into the pathophysiology of skin disorders and offers new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18086583

  11. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  12. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  13. HIV and the spectrum of human disease.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sebastian; Nelson, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes systemic T cell destruction and reduced cell-mediated immunity that leads to a wide range of opportunistic infections and cancers. Second, it directly damages many tissues - gut, brain, lung - through mononuclear cell infection and activation. Third, through immune activation and effects on endothelia, it can cause more subtle systemic organ damage, such as chronic cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary and central nervous system disease. Antiretroviral treatment has enabled HIV-infected persons to live with chronic infection, although with some side-effects and mortality, including reactions due to the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). As cohorts of infected people get older, age-related diseases will combine with chronic HIV infection to produce disabilities whose scale is not yet understood. HIV is detectable in tissues by immunohistochemistry when infection loads are high, such as at first presentation. Pathologists should proactively consider HIV disease in routine diagnostic work, so as to identify more HIV-infected patients and enable their optimal management. PMID:25251832

  14. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  15. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  16. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  17. Differences in miRNA expression profiles between GIST and leiomyoma in human samples acquired by submucosal tunneling biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Fujihara, Shintaro; Chiyo, Taiga; Matsunaga, Tae; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Morishita, Asahiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Small gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rarely have malignant potential with poor prognosis. Using conventional imaging to differentiate between small GISTs and leiomyoma, which often have similar characteristics, is difficult but essential in daily practice. Although some studies have reported on the utility of serum c-kit as a biomarker for non-small GIST and specific miRNA, clinical aspects of such testing are controversial. The aim of this study was to identify differences between small GIST and leiomyoma through the investigation of miRNA expression patterns in human cases. Patients and methods: MiRNA expression was examined in nine GIST (less than low risk, mean 18 mm in size) samples and seven leiomyoma samples acquired by a novel sampling method, submucosal tunneling biopsy (STB), which produces tumor specimens of submucosal tumor (SMT) without contamination of sufficient size to be examined under direct vision. Total RNA was extracted from these tissues and analyzed for miRNA expression patterns by microarray. Subsequently, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used to confirm specific miRNA overexpression, comparing GISTs with leiomyomas. Results: Microarray analysis revealed upregulation of the miR-140 family up to 20 times higher in GISTs than in leiomyomas. Real-time qPCR revealed that the expression level of miR-140-5 p in GISTs was 27.86 times higher than in leiomyomas; miR-140-3 p was 12.24 times higher as well. Conclusions: The STB method provided suitable SMT samples for miRNA analysis. MiR-140 family members may serve as specific biomarkers to distinguish GIST from leiomyoma. PMID:26716134

  18. Telomere length in human liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Y; Nouso, K; Higashi, T; Nakatsukasa, H; Hino, N; Ashida, K; Kinugasa, N; Yoshida, K; Uematsu, S; Tsuji, T

    1996-10-01

    To determine the role of telomere-mediated gene stability in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined the telomere length of human liver with or without chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). The mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length of normal liver (n = 13), chronic hepatitis (n = 11), liver cirrhosis (n = 24) and HCC (n = 24) was 7.8 +/- 0.2, 7.1 +/- 0.3, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.2 kb, respectively (mean +/- standard error). TRF length decreased with a progression of chronic liver diseases and that in HCC was significantly shorter than that in other chronic liver diseases (p < 0.05). The ratios of TRF length of HCC to that of corresponding surrounding liver of well differentiated (n = 7), moderately differentiated (n = 10) and poorly differentiated (n = 4) HCCs were 0.83 +/- 0.06, 0.75 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.09, respectively. The ratio of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly higher than that of moderately differentiated HCC (p < 0.05). A comparison between the size and telomere length ratio of moderately differentiated HCCs revealed a decrease of the ratio with size until it reached 50 mm in diameter. In contrast, the ratio increased as the size enlarged over 50 mm. These findings suggest that the gene stability of the liver cells mediated by the telomere is reduced as chronic liver disease progresses and that telomerase is activated in poorly differentiated HCC and moderately differentiated HCC over 50 mm in diameter. PMID:8938628

  19. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress. PMID:22194706

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woroniecka, Karolina I.; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Mohtat, Davoud; Thomas, David B.; Pullman, James M.; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the single leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., for which a cure has not yet been found. The aim of our study was to provide an unbiased catalog of gene-expression changes in human diabetic kidney biopsy samples. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Affymetrix expression arrays were used to identify differentially regulated transcripts in 44 microdissected human kidney samples. DKD samples were significant for their racial diversity and decreased glomerular filtration rate (~25–35 mL/min). Stringent statistical analysis, using the Benjamini-Hochberg corrected two-tailed t test, was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in control and diseased glomeruli and tubuli. Two different web-based algorithms were used to define differentially regulated pathways. RESULTS We identified 1,700 differentially expressed probesets in DKD glomeruli and 1,831 in diabetic tubuli, and 330 probesets were commonly differentially expressed in both compartments. Pathway analysis highlighted the regulation of Ras homolog gene family member A, Cdc42, integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in DKD glomeruli. The tubulointerstitial compartment showed strong enrichment for inflammation-related pathways. The canonical complement signaling pathway was determined to be statistically differentially regulated in both DKD glomeruli and tubuli and was associated with increased glomerulosclerosis even in a different set of DKD samples. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have cataloged gene-expression regulation and identified multiple novel genes and pathways that may play a role in the pathogenesis of DKD or could serve as biomarkers. PMID:21752957

  1. Acquired chondronecrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloff, L

    1990-01-01

    Zonal necrosis of chondrocytes is a characteristic feature of Kashin-Beck disease. Inferences about chondronecrosis in several spontaneous and experimental arthropathies of other species may be relevant to the cause of Kashin-Beck disease and conceivably, too, banal osteoarthritis in man. PMID:2187418

  2. Wolbachia endosymbionts and human disease control.

    PubMed

    Slatko, Barton E; Luck, Ashley N; Dobson, Stephen L; Foster, Jeremy M

    2014-07-01

    Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filaria, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility and survival, whereas in arthropods, they are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as Dengue, Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Furthermore, Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases. PMID:25046729

  3. Surveillance for Travel and Domestically Acquired Multidrug-Resistant Human Shigella Infections-Pennsylvania, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Lung; Tewari, Deepanker; Yealy, Courtney C; Fardig, David; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis is a leading cause of enteric infections in the United States. We compared antimicrobial resistance in Shigella infections related to overseas travel (travel-associated) and in those acquired domestically by analyzing antimicrobial resistance patterns, geographic distributions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. We tested samples (n = 204) from a collection of isolates recovered from patients in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2014. Isolates were grouped into travel- and non-travel-associated categories. Eighty-one (79.4%) of the Shigella isolates acquired during international travel were resistant to multiple antibiotics compared to 53 (52.1%) of the infections transmitted in domestic settings. A majority (79.4%) of isolates associated with international travel demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines, whereas 47 (46.1%) of the infections acquired domestically were resistant to tetracycline. Almost all isolates (92.2%) transmitted in domestic settings were resistant to aminoglycosides, and 5 isolates from adult male patients were resistant to azithromycin, a drug often used for empiric treatment of severe shigellosis. Twenty (19.6%) isolates associated with illnesses acquired during overseas travel in 4 countries were resistant to quinolones. One S. sonnei PFGE pattern was traced to a multidrug-resistant isolate acquired overseas that had caused a multistate outbreak of shigellosis, suggesting global dissemination of a drug-resistant species. Resistance to certain drugs-for example, tetracycline-increased in both overseas- and domestic-acquired infections during the study period. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides (azithromycin) and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone) was less than 1%; however, efforts to better monitor changes in drug resistance over time combined with increased antimicrobial stewardship are essential at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:27314654

  4. Disease emergence and resurgence: the wildlife-human connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) was organized as a global disease watchdog group to coordinate disease outbreak information and health crisis response. The World Health Organization (WHO) is the headquarters for this network.2 Understandably, the primary focus for WHO is human health. However, diseases such as the H5N1 avian influenza epizootic in Asian bird populations demonstrate the need for integrating knowledge about disease emergence in animals and in humans.

  5. Rome consensus conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. Methods The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. Results The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3–72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16–26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2–98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6–93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6–99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males

  6. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  7. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  8. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases. PMID:23829105

  9. Human Herpesviruses as Copathogens of HIV Infection, Their Role in HIV Transmission, and Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Munawwar, Arshi; Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Of eight human herpesviruses (HHVs), often, only herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) find mention in medical literature as both of these viruses are commonly associated with genital lesions and oral ulcers, commonly known as cold sores. However, role of human herpesviruses as copathogens and in aggravation and in the transmission of other human diseases, especially the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has only very recently been recognized. Therefore, screening and treating subclinical HHV infections may offer slowing of HIV infection, disease progression, and its transmission. Beside HSV-1 and HSV-2, HHV-3 a causative agent of herpes zoster remained one of the first manifestations of HIV disease before the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HHV-5 also known as human Cytomegalovirus infection remains a significant risk factor for HIV-associated mortality and morbidity even in HAART era. It is proposed that Cytomegalovirus viremia could be a better predictor of HIV disease progression than CD4+ T-lymphocyte count. The role of HHV-4 or Epstein-Burr virus and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 is still being investigated in HIV disease progression. This review provides insight into the current understanding about these 8 HHVs, their co-pathogenesis, and role in HIV/AIDS disease progression. The review also covers recent literature in favor and against administering anti-HHV treatment along with HAART for slower AIDS progression and interrupted sexual transmission. PMID:27013807

  10. Human Herpesviruses as Copathogens of HIV Infection, Their Role in HIV Transmission, and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Munawwar, Arshi; Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Of eight human herpesviruses (HHVs), often, only herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) find mention in medical literature as both of these viruses are commonly associated with genital lesions and oral ulcers, commonly known as cold sores. However, role of human herpesviruses as copathogens and in aggravation and in the transmission of other human diseases, especially the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has only very recently been recognized. Therefore, screening and treating subclinical HHV infections may offer slowing of HIV infection, disease progression, and its transmission. Beside HSV-1 and HSV-2, HHV-3 a causative agent of herpes zoster remained one of the first manifestations of HIV disease before the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HHV-5 also known as human Cytomegalovirus infection remains a significant risk factor for HIV-associated mortality and morbidity even in HAART era. It is proposed that Cytomegalovirus viremia could be a better predictor of HIV disease progression than CD4+ T-lymphocyte count. The role of HHV-4 or Epstein–Burr virus and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 is still being investigated in HIV disease progression. This review provides insight into the current understanding about these 8 HHVs, their co-pathogenesis, and role in HIV/AIDS disease progression. The review also covers recent literature in favor and against administering anti-HHV treatment along with HAART for slower AIDS progression and interrupted sexual transmission. PMID:27013807

  11. Attitudes of Baccalaureate Nursing Students toward Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome According to Mode of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrea M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Nursing students (n=236) completed the AIDS Knowledge Scale and AIDS Attitude Scale. Results showed most stigma attached to AIDS acquired through drug use or sexual contact, the least through maternal transmission or blood transfusion. Demographic characteristics did not influence attitudes. (SK)

  12. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, MasamichI; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  13. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  14. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease. PMID:26694631

  15. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173). Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%), followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. Conclusions: The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area. PMID:27499166

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  17. A Case Series of Acquired Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: An Emerging Public Health Concern in Rural Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gamell, Anna; Muri, Lukas; Ntamatungiro, Alex; Nyogea, Daniel; Luwanda, Lameck B.; Hatz, Christoph; Battegay, Manuel; Felger, Ingrid; Tanner, Marcel; Klimkait, Thomas; Letang, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistance mutations among African children living with in human immunodeficiency virus on antiretroviral treatment has been scarcely reported. This threatens the overall success of antiretroviral programs and the clinical outcomes of children in care. We present a well characterized series of children from rural Tanzania with acquired drug-resistance mutations to contribute to the better understanding of this emerging public health concern. PMID:26807427

  18. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  19. Screening algorithm for aortoiliac occlusive disease using duplex ultrasonography-acquired velocity spectra from the distal external iliac artery.

    PubMed

    Fontcuberta, Juan; Flores, Angel; Langsfeld, Mark; Orgaz, Antonio; Cuena, Rafael; Criado, Enrique; Doblas, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Aortoiliac duplex scanning can be difficult to perform owing to the deep location of these vessels. We propose a new method to indirectly screen for aortoiliac disease by performing duplex examination of the distal external iliac artery (DEIA). After performing a preliminary study on 21 patients, the parameters of the Doppler waveform that best distinguish normal from diseased arteries were the presence or absence of reverse flow, peak systolic velocity, and resistance index. These values were used in a derived equation, with the value Y > or = 0.78 predicting normal proximal inflow. We then studied 118 aortoiliac segments in 81 consecutive patients with arteriography and DEIA duplex ultrasonography. To predict moderate to severe stenosis, duplex ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 95.7%, a specificity of 84.1%, a positive predictive value of 80%, and a negative predictive value of 96.8%. Our formula thus predicted significant disease in 55 of the 118 aortoiliac segments (47%), with these segments needing further arteriographic evaluation. The other 63 limbs can be safely considered as having normal aortoiliac inflow. Our method accurately screens for aortoiliac disease and is excellent for predicting normal inflow. This information can be used to better plan the intraoperative diagnostic study and intervention. PMID:15996374

  20. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Metersky, Mark L; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A; Palmer, Lucy B; Napolitano, Lena M; O'Grady, Naomi P; Bartlett, John G; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D; File, Thomas M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Roberts, Jason A; Waterer, Grant W; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L; Brozek, Jan L

    2016-09-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. PMID:27418577

  1. Severe Q fever community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) mimicking Legionnaires' disease: Clinical significance of cold agglutinins, anti-smooth muscle antibodies and thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Nausheen, Sara; Busch, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be caused by zoonotic or nonpulmonary pathogens. However, atypical pathogens are systemic infectious disease accompanied by pneumonia in contrast with typical bacterial pathogens with infection limited to the lungs and absent extrapulmonary findings. Clinically and radiologically, the atypical CAP pathogens that most closely resemble each other are psittacosis, Q fever, and Legionnaires' disease. Psittacosis can usually be readily suspected or eliminated on the basis of a recent psittacine bird contact history. The 2 atypical pneumonias that most closely resemble each other clinically are Q fever and Legionnaires' disease. The epidemiology of Q fever is related to livestock, and sporadic cases are related to contact to parturient cats. In nonendemic areas, Q fever CAP mimics Legionnaires' disease most closely. Both Q fever and Legionella CAP have several clinical and laboratory features in common. However, there are subtle but important differences that allow the astute clinician to differentiate between these 2 disorders on the basis of clinical and nonspecific laboratory findings before definitive diagnostic tests results are reported. We report a case of severe Q fever CAP mimicking Legionnaires' disease in a young adult normal host. Her initial zoonotic contact history was negative, and her clinical presentation suggested Legionnaires' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Against the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease was the patient's age and occurrence of the disease in spring time. In contrast, Legionnaires' disease is usually an infection of older individuals and occurs in late summer/fall. Although the patient did not have splenomegaly, a common finding in Q fever CAP, she did have mild hepatomegaly. Hepatomegaly is a uncommon in Q fever CAP but is not a feature of Legionnaires' disease. In the absence of a positive zoonotic contact history, the cardinal findings pointing to the diagnosis of Q fever in this

  2. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  3. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  4. A new look at acquired heart diseases in a contemporary sub-Saharan African pediatric population: the case of Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Menanga, Alain; Boombhi, Jerome; Chelo, David; Kingue, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Acquired heart diseases (AHD) in children cause significant morbidity and mortality especially in low resource settings. There is limited description of acquired childhood heart diseases in Cameroon, making it difficult to estimate its current contribution to childhood morbidity and mortality. Echocardiography is the main diagnostic modality in low resource settings and has a key role in the characterization and management of these disorders. We aimed to determine the prevalence and spectrum of AHD in children in Yaoundé-Cameroon, in an era of echocardiography. These data are needed for health service and policy formulation. Methods Echocardiography records from August 2003 to December 2013 were reviewed. Echocardiography records of children ≤18 years with an echocardiographic diagnosis of a definite AHD were identified and relevant data extracted from their records. Results One hundred and fifty eight children (13.4%) ≤18 years had an AHD. The mean [± standard deviations (SD)] age was 11.9 (±4.4) years .The most common affected age group was 15-18 years (36.1%). Heart failure (20.3%), suspicion of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) (12.0%) and the presence of a heart murmur (8.9%) were the most common indications for echocardiography. RHD (41.1%), pericardial disease (25.3%), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (15.8%) and endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) (13.9%) were the most common AHD. Cor pulmonale was rare (1.3%). Fifty-seven (87.7%) children with RHD had mitral regurgitation alone or in combination with other heart valve lesions and 63.3% of the lesions were severe. Conclusions RHD remains the most common AHD in children in this setting and is frequently severe. Multicenter collaborative studies will help to better describe the pattern of AHD and there should be a renewed focus on the prevention of RHD. PMID:26672632

  5. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Applications and Challenges in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Feki, Anis

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) holds great promise for the understanding and the treatment of human neurological diseases in modern medicine. The hPSCs are considered for their in vitro use as research tools to provide relevant cellular model for human diseases, drug discovery, and toxicity assays and for their in vivo use in regenerative medicine applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress, promises, and challenges of hPSC applications in human neurological disease modeling and therapies. PMID:22934023

  6. Vitamin E in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael W; Burnett, John R; Croft, Kevin D

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin E in nature is comprised of a family of tocopherols and tocotrienols. The most studied of these is alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH), because this form is retained within the body, and vitamin E deficiency is corrected with this supplement. alpha-TOH is a lipid-soluble antioxidant required for the preservation of cell membranes, and it potentially acts as a defense against oxidative stress. Many studies have investigated the metabolism, transport, and efficacy alpha-TOH in the prevention of sequelae associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Supplementation with vitamin E is considered to provide health benefits against CVD through its antioxidant activity, the prevention of lipoprotein oxidation, and the inhibition of platelet aggregation. However, the results from large prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials with alpha-TOH have been largely negative. A recent meta-analysis suggests that alpha-TOH supplements may actually increase all-cause mortality; however, the mechanism for this increased risk is unknown. In vitro studies performed in human cell cultures and animal models suggest that vitamin E might increase the hepatic production of cytochrome P450s and MDR1. Induction of CYP3A4 or MDR1 by vitamin E could potentially lower the efficacy of any drug metabolized by CYP3A4 or MDR1. Other possibilities include an adverse effect of alpha-TOH on blood pressure in high-risk populations. Because of the wide popularity and use of vitamin E supplements, further research into potential adverse effects is clearly warranted. PMID:18712629

  7. Geographic Distribution and Expansion of Human Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease occurs in specific geographic regions of the United States. We present a method for defining high-risk counties based on observed versus expected number of reported human Lyme disease cases. Applying this method to successive periods shows substantial geographic expansion of counties at high risk for Lyme disease. PMID:26196670

  8. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Joseph F.; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E.; Laurent, Louise C.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred; Keuren-Jensen, Kendall Van; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P. David; Weiner, Howard L.; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  9. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Joseph F; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E; Laurent, Louise C; Carter, Bob S; Hochberg, Fred; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M Yashar S; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P David; Weiner, Howard L; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  10. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammations are a common element of many gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, and diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett's esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. PMID:24781339

  11. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Kira G.; Bortner, James D.; Falk, Gary W.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Lynch, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammation are a common element of many GI diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett’s esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. PMID:24781339

  12. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rgnull) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of “next generation” humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  13. Targeting xenobiotic receptors PXR and CAR in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Robbins, Delira; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors such as the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are xenobiotic receptors regulating not only drug metabolism and disposition but also various human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, metabolic disease and liver diseases, suggesting that PXR and CAR are promising targets for drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need to discover and develop small molecules that target these PXR- and/or CAR-mediated human-disease-related pathways for relevant therapeutic applications. This review proposes approaches to target PXR and CAR, either individually or simultaneously, in the context of various human diseases, taking into consideration the structural differences between PXR and CAR. PMID:25463033

  14. [Acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare, but probably underestimated, bleeding disorder that mimics the congenital form of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. AVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The main pathogenic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:16913181

  15. Exploring the evolutionary rate differences between human disease and non-disease genes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandip; Panda, Arup; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    Comparisons of evolutionary features between human disease and non-disease genes have a wide implication to understand the genetic basis of human disease genes. However, it has not yet been resolved whether disease genes evolve at slower or faster rate than the non-disease genes. To resolve this controversy, here we integrated human disease genes from several databases and compared their protein evolutionary rates with non-disease genes in both housekeeping and tissue-specific group. We noticed that in tissue specific group, disease genes evolve significantly at a slower rate than non-disease genes. However, we found no significant difference in evolutionary rates between disease and non-disease genes in housekeeping group. Tissue specific disease genes have a higher protein complex number, elevated gene expression level and are also associated with conserve biological processes. Finally, our regression analysis suggested that protein complex number followed by protein multifunctionality independently modulates the evolutionary rate of human disease genes. PMID:26562439

  16. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  17. Circulating long noncoding RNAs as novel biomarkers of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoying; Lei, Ronghui; Ning, Qilan

    2016-07-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a kind of noncoding RNAs which are longer than ˜200 nucleotides, lacking of protein-encoding capacity and are implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recently, it was demonstrated that lncRNAs could be released into the circulation and be stable in blood. Circulating lncRNAs have been reported to have potential in distinguishing patients from healthy individuals. Therefore, the detection of circulating lncRNAs may be valuable for improving the diagnosis and prognosis of various diseases. This review summarized the current understanding of circulating lncRNAs as novel biomarkers of various human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, nervous system diseases and other diseases, which highlighted the significance of circulating lncRNAs as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of human diseases. PMID:27347748

  18. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus knowledge, attitudes, and practices, and use of healthcare services among rural migrants: a cross-sectional study in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Today’s rapid growth of migrant populations has been a major contributor to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, relatively few studies have focused on HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related knowledge, attitudes, and practice among rural-to-urban migrants in China. This cross-sectional study was to assess HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and perceptions, including knowledge about reducing high-risk sex. Methods Two-phase stratified cluster sampling was applied and 2,753 rural migrants participated in this study. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was conducted in Guangdong and Sichuan provinces in 2007. Descriptive analysis was used to present the essential characteristics of the respondents. Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression models were performed to examine the associations between identified demographic factors and high-risk sex, sexually transmitted disease (STD) symptoms, and access to HIV screening services among the seven types of workers. Results 58.6% of participants were knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS transmission, but approximately 90% had a negative attitude towards the AIDS patients, and that 6.2% had engaged in high-risk sex in the past 12 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed sex, marital status, income, migration and work experience to be associated with high-risk sex. Among the 13.9% of workers who reported having STD symptoms, risk factors that were identified included female gender, high monthly income, being married, daily laborer or entertainment worker, frequent migration, and length of work experience. Only 3% of migrant workers received voluntary free HIV screening, which was positively associated with monthly income and workplace. Conclusions HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and practices among rural migrants in China remain a thorny health issue, and use of healthcare services needs to be improved. Low levels of education and knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS among

  19. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format. PMID:27415403

  20. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage presenting as hemoperitoneum secondary to renal cyst rupture in a peritoneal dialysis patient with acquired cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Biyik, Z; Solak, Y; Gaipov, A; Ozbek, O; Esen, H; Turk, S

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage (SRH) is a rare and potentially fatal condition. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) may cause SRH in hemodialysis patients. However, presentation of retroperitoneal hematoma as hemoperitoneum in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is exceedingly rare. We report a 44-year-old male PD patient who presented with hemoperitoneum secondary to retroperitoneal hematoma. The reason of SRH was rupture of the cysts of ACKD. The patient underwent unilateral nephrectomy with subsequent disappearance of hemoperitoneum. The importance of this case lies in the fact that the patients who have been receiving dialysis for a long time should be under surveillance in terms of ACKD development and potential associated complications such as cyst hemorrhage and malignancy. PMID:26199480

  1. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  2. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  3. Improved human disease candidate gene prioritization using mouse phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Huan; Aronow, Bruce J; Jegga, Anil G

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of common diseases are multi-factorial and modified by genetically and mechanistically complex polygenic interactions and environmental factors. High-throughput genome-wide studies like linkage analysis and gene expression profiling, tend to be most useful for classification and characterization but do not provide sufficient information to identify or prioritize specific disease causal genes. Results Extending on an earlier hypothesis that the majority of genes that impact or cause disease share membership in any of several functional relationships we, for the first time, show the utility of mouse phenotype data in human disease gene prioritization. We study the effect of different data integration methods, and based on the validation studies, we show that our approach, ToppGene , outperforms two of the existing candidate gene prioritization methods, SUSPECTS and ENDEAVOUR. Conclusion The incorporation of phenotype information for mouse orthologs of human genes greatly improves the human disease candidate gene analysis and prioritization. PMID:17939863

  4. Engineering Large Animal Species to Model Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Animal models are an important resource for studying human diseases. Genetically engineered mice are the most commonly used species and have made significant contributions to our understanding of basic biology, disease mechanisms, and drug development. However, they often fail to recreate important aspects of human diseases and thus can have limited utility as translational research tools. Developing disease models in species more similar to humans may provide a better setting in which to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. This unit provides an overview of the history of genetically engineered large animals and the techniques that have made their development possible. Factors to consider when planning a large animal model, including choice of species, type of modification and methodology, characterization, production methods, and regulatory compliance, are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367161

  5. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression. PMID:27493014

  6. Global Burden of Human Brucellosis: A Systematic Review of Disease Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Anna S.; Crump, Lisa; Greter, Helena; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Background This report presents a systematic review of scientific literature published between 1990–2010 relating to the frequency of human brucellosis, commissioned by WHO. The objectives were to identify high quality disease incidence data to complement existing knowledge of the global disease burden and, ultimately, to contribute towards the calculation of a Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALY) estimate for brucellosis. Methods/Principal Findings Thirty three databases were searched, identifying 2,385 articles relating to human brucellosis. Based on strict screening criteria, 60 studies were selected for quality assessment, of which only 29 were of sufficient quality for data analysis. Data were only available from 15 countries in the regions of Northern Africa and Middle East, Western Europe, Central and South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Central Asia. Half of the studies presented incidence data, six of which were longitudinal prospective studies, and half presented seroprevalence data which were converted to incidence rates. Brucellosis incidence varied widely between, and within, countries. Although study biases cannot be ruled out, demographic, occupational, and socioeconomic factors likely play a role. Aggregated data at national or regional levels do not capture these complexities of disease dynamics and, consequently, at-risk populations or areas may be overlooked. In many brucellosis-endemic countries, health systems are weak and passively-acquired official data underestimate the true disease burden. Conclusions High quality research is essential for an accurate assessment of disease burden, particularly in Eastern Europe, the Asia-Pacific, Central and South America and Africa where data are lacking. Providing formal epidemiological and statistical training to researchers is essential for improving study quality. An integrated approach to disease surveillance involving both human health and veterinary services would allow a better understanding

  7. Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin

    1996-09-01

    The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

  8. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  9. The WOMED model of benign thyroid disease: Acquired magnesium deficiency due to physical and psychological stressors relates to dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to discern whether a relation between biochemical parameters, sonography and musculoskeletal data exists in cases of hyperthyroidism and whether they are modifiable through supplementation with selenomethionine and magnesium citrate as well as by acupuncture and manual medicine methods. Results A direct correlation between whole blood selenium and serum magnesium was found in subjects without thyroid disease and in menopausal women while it was reversed in cases of thyroid diseases as well as in patients with depression, infection, and in infertile women. Vascularization indices were elevated in cases of newly diagnosed benign thyroid diseases. Musculoskeletal changes i.e. lateral tension and idiopathic moving toes, as well as situations of physical and psychological stress and minor trauma and infection led to an increase of vascularization. Magnesium levels correlated negatively with these two conditions. The supplementation brought a reduction of the vascularization indices and reduced the incidence of idiopathic moving toes. Treatment of lateral tension required manual medicine methods and acupuncture (gastrocnemius). A small subgroup of patients showed a further reduction of hyper-vascularization after receiving coenzyme Q10. Conclusions We interpret the elevated thyroid vascularization and low magnesium levels as signs of an inflammatory process related to the musculoskeletal changes. Improvement of thyroid function and morphology can be achieved after correcting the influence of stressors together with the supplementation regime. We hypothesize that the central biochemical event in thyroid disease is that of an acquired, altered mitochondrial function due to deficiency of magnesium, selenium, and coenzyme Q10. PMID:26675817

  10. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of human gait diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Chatterjee, Sucharita

    2013-01-01

    In this paper multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) is used to study the human gait time series for normal and diseased sets. It is observed that long range correlation is primarily responsible for the origin of multifractality. The study reveals that the degree of multifractality is more for normal set compared to diseased set. However, the method fails to distinguish between the two diseased sets. PMID:24109454

  11. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field. PMID:27318646

  12. Membrane Traffic and Muscle: Lessons from Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, James J.; Gibbs, Elizabeth M.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2010-01-01

    Like all mammalian tissues, skeletal muscle is dependent on membrane traffic for proper development and homeostasis. This fact is underscored by the observation that several human diseases of the skeletal muscle are caused by mutations in gene products of the membrane trafficking machinery. An examination of these diseases and the proteins that underlie them is instructive both in terms of determining disease pathogenesis and of understanding the normal aspects of muscle biology regulated by membrane traffic. This review highlights our current understanding of the trafficking genes responsible for human myopathies. PMID:18266915

  13. Profiling of Human Acquired Immunity Against the Salivary Proteins of Phlebotomus papatasi Reveals Clusters of Differential Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Nicholas S.; Mukbel, Rami M.; Kemp, Michael T.; Wadsworth, Mariha N.; Lesho, Emil; Stayback, Gwen M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Bernard, Megan A.; Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo; Hanafi, Hanafi A.; Fawaz, Emadeldin Y.; El-Hossary, Shabaan S.; Wortmann, Glenn; Hoel, David F.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies are among the primary vectors of Leishmania major parasites from Morocco to the Indian subcontinent and from southern Europe to central and eastern Africa. Antibody-based immunity to sand fly salivary gland proteins in human populations remains a complex contextual problem that is not yet fully understood. We profiled the immunoreactivities of plasma antibodies to sand fly salivary gland sonicates (SGSs) from 229 human blood donors residing in different regions of sand fly endemicity throughout Jordan and Egypt as well as 69 US military personnel, who were differentially exposed to P. papatasi bites and L. major infections in Iraq. Compared with plasma from control region donors, antibodies were significantly immunoreactive to five salivary proteins (12, 26, 30, 38, and 44 kDa) among Jordanian and Egyptian donors, with immunoglobulin G4 being the dominant anti-SGS isotype. US personnel were significantly immunoreactive to only two salivary proteins (38 and 14 kDa). Using k-means clustering, donors were segregated into four clusters distinguished by unique immunoreactivity profiles to varying combinations of the significantly immunogenic salivary proteins. SGS-induced cellular proliferation was diminished among donors residing in sand fly-endemic regions. These data provide a clearer picture of human immune responses to sand fly vector salivary constituents. PMID:24615125

  14. Polymicrobial Interactions: Impact on Pathogenesis and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; O'May, Graeme A.; Costerton, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Microorganisms coexist in a complex milieu of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses on or within the human body, often as multifaceted polymicrobial biofilm communities at mucosal sites and on abiotic surfaces. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the complicated biofilm phenotype during infection; moreover, even less is known about the interactions that occur between microorganisms during polymicrobial growth and their implications in human disease. Therefore, this review focuses on polymicrobial biofilm-mediated infections and examines the contribution of bacterial-bacterial, bacterial-fungal, and bacterial-viral interactions during human infection and potential strategies for protection against such diseases. PMID:22232376

  15. Characteristics and Clinical Management of a Cluster of 3 Patients With Ebola Virus Disease, Including the First Domestically Acquired Cases in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, Allison M.; Davey, Richard T.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Varkey, Jay B.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Tseggay, Gebre K.; Badidi, Oghenetega; Faust, Andrew C.; Brown, Katia V.; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Barrett, Kevin; Wolcott, Mark J.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Lyon, G. Marshall; Weinstein, Gary L.; Weinmeister, Kenney; Sutton, Shelby; Hazbun, Munir; Albariño, César G.; Reed, Zachary; Cannon, Debi; Ströher, Ute; Feldman, Mark; Ribner, Bruce S.; Lane, H. Clifford; Fauci, Anthony S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 26 000 cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) have been reported in western Africa, with high mortality. Several patients have been medically evacuated to hospitals in the United States and Europe. Detailed clinical data are limited on the clinical course and management of patients with EVD outside western Africa. Objective To describe the clinical characteristics and management of a cluster of patients with EVD, including the first cases of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection acquired in the United States. Design Retrospective clinical case series. Setting Three U.S. hospitals in September and October 2014. Patients First imported EVD case identified in the United States and 2 secondary EVD cases acquired in the United States in critical care nurses who cared for the index case patient. Measurements Clinical recovery, EBOV RNA level, resolution of Ebola viremia, survival with discharge from hospital, or death. Results The index patient had high EBOV RNA levels, developed respiratory and renal failure requiring critical care support, and died. Both patients with secondary EBOV infection had nonspecific signs and symptoms and developed moderate illness; EBOV RNA levels were moderate, and both patients recovered. Limitation Both surviving patients received uncontrolled treatment with multiple investigational agents, including convalescent plasma, which limits generalizability of the results. Conclusion Early diagnosis, prompt initiation of supportive medical care, and moderate clinical illness likely contributed to successful outcomes in both survivors. The inability to determine the potential benefit of investigational therapies and the effect of patient-specific factors that may have contributed to less severe illness highlight the need for controlled clinical studies of these interventions, especially in the setting of a high level of supportive medical care. Primary Funding Source None. PMID:25961438

  16. Impacts of gut bacteria on human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  17. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  18. Human Microbiome and its Association With Health and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Althani, Asmaa A; Marei, Hany E; Hamdi, Wedad S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Khodor, Souhaila; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Abdel-Aziz, Hassan; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Human microbiota are distinct communities of microorganisms that resides at different body niches. Exploration of the human microbiome has become a reality due to the availability of powerful metagenomics and metatranscriptomic analysis technologies. Recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatics over the past decade help provide a deep insight into the nature of the host-microbial interactions and identification of potential deriver genes and pathways associated with human health, well-being, and predisposition to different diseases. In the present review, we outline recent studies devoted to elucidate the possible link between the microbiota and various type of diseases. The present review also highlights the potential utilization of microbiota as a potential therapeutic option to treat a wide array of human diseases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1688-1694, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660761

  19. Golgi glycosylation and human inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Freeze, Hudson H; Ng, Bobby G

    2011-09-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  20. Golgi Glycosylation and Human Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Ng, Bobby G.

    2011-01-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  1. Animal Models of Human Granulocyte Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Klein, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to understand basic biological pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This manuscript addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  2. Role of Cellular Magnesium in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Samantha; Romani, Andrea MP

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is required for many of the major organs to function and plays a crucial role in human and mammalian physiology. Magnesium is essential for the structure of bones and teeth, acts as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes in the body, including binding to ATP for kinase reactions, and affects permeability of excitable membranes and neuromuscular transmission. Despite these essential roles, much is still unknown about magnesium physiology and homeostasis. Currently, nutritionists believe that the general population intakes insufficient magnesium daily through the diet. The effects of magnesium deficiency are, for the most part undetected, and simple, widespread assessments of magnesium intake remain unavailable for humans. Many of the patients admitted to hospitals or medical care facilities are unaware of their low magnesium levels. Moreover, because magnesium is predominantly an intracellular cation (>99%), serum magnesium levels remain a poor predictor of tissue magnesium content and availability. This review will discuss the effects of magnesium deficiency in various pathologies affecting the human population. The underlying causes for magnesium depletion in major physiological systems will be examined along with the involved signaling pathways and the main roles of magnesium homeostasis. Where possible (e.g. alcoholism), the implications of administering supplemental magnesium will be discussed. Ultimately, this review will advocate for the necessity of identifying easy and reproducible methods to assess serum and cellular magnesium levels and to identify magnesium deficiency in order to alleviate related pathological conditions. PMID:25839058

  3. Current and Emerging Biomarkers of Cell Death in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kongning; Wu, Deng; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Lu; Yi, Ying; Miao, Zhengqiang; Jin, Nana; Bi, Xiaoman; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a critical biological process, serving many important functions within multicellular organisms. Aberrations in cell death can contribute to the pathology of human diseases. Significant progress made in the research area enormously speeds up our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of cell death. According to the distinct morphological and biochemical characteristics, cell death can be triggered by extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death, and mitotic catastrophe. Nevertheless, the realization that all of these efforts seek to pursue an effective treatment and cure for the disease has spurred a significant interest in the development of promising biomarkers of cell death to early diagnose disease and accurately predict disease progression and outcome. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about cell death, survey current and emerging biomarkers of cell death, and discuss the relationship with human diseases. PMID:24949464

  4. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26616239

  5. Executive Summary: The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Byington, Carrie L.; Shah, Samir S.; Alverson, Brian; Carter, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Mace, Sharon E.; McCracken, George H.; Moore, Matthew R.; St Peter, Shawn D.; Stockwell, Jana A.; Swanson, Jack T.

    2011-01-01

    Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and surgery. These guidelines are intended for use by primary care and subspecialty providers responsible for the management of otherwise healthy infants and children with CAP in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Site-of-care management, diagnosis, antimicrobial and adjunctive surgical therapy, and prevention are discussed. Areas that warrant future investigations are also highlighted. PMID:21890766

  6. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  7. Animal models of human granulocyte diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to the understanding of basic biologic pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This article addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish, and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  8. Mouse models of human disease: An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  9. Effects of Environmental Pollutants on Cellular Iron Homeostasis and Ultimate Links to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schreinemachers, Dina M.; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease has increased in the past several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases may indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanisms underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to complex iron through electronegative functional groups containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur. Cellular exposure to the chemical or its metabolite may cause a loss of requisite functional iron from intracellular sites. The cell is compelled to acquire further iron critical to its survival by activation of iron-responsive proteins and increasing iron import. Iron homeostasis in the exposed cells is altered due to a new equilibrium being established between iron-requiring cells and the inappropriate chelator (the pollutant or its catabolite). Following exposure to environmental pollutants, the perturbation of functional iron homeostasis may be the mechanism leading to adverse biological effects. Understanding the mechanism may lead to intervention methods for this major public health concern. PMID:26966372

  10. Genetic regulation of human brain development: lessons from Mendelian diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Salazar, Tracy J.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental goals in human genetics is to link gene function to phenotype, yet the function of the majority of the genes in the human body is still poorly understood. This is especially true for the developing human brain. The study of human phenotypes that result from inherited, mutated alleles is the most direct evidence for the requirement of a gene in human physiology. Thus, the study of Mendelian central nervous system(CNS) diseases can be an extremely powerful approach to elucidate such phenotypic/genotypic links and to increase our understanding of the key components required for development of the human brain. In this review, we highlight examples of how the study of inherited neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our knowledge of both the “normal” and diseased human brain, as well as elaborate on the future of this type of research. Mendelian disease research has been, and will continue to be, key to understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie human brain function, and will ultimately form a basis for the design of intelligent, mechanism-specific treatments for nervous system disorders. PMID:21062301

  11. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html. PMID:23484340

  12. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  13. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  14. Fifth (human parvovirus) and sixth (herpesvirus 6) diseases.

    PubMed

    Koch, W C

    2001-06-01

    Fifth (erythema infectiosum) and sixth (roseola infantum) diseases are common rash illnesses of childhood that have long been recognized in clinical medicine. The discovery of the viruses that cause these illnesses has revealed relationships with other syndromes. Primary infection with the agent of erythema infectiosum, human parvovirus B19, is associated with transient aplastic crisis in hemolytic anemia, arthropathy in adults, chronic anemia in immunocompromised patients, and nonimmune fetal hydrops in pregnant women. The only documented illness associated with primary infection with human herpesvirus 6 is roseola or exanthema subitum in young children. However, reactivated infections in adults and immunocompromised patients may be associated with serious illness such as encephalitis/encephalopathy, and bone marrow suppression leading to transplant failure or graft-versus-host disease. Diagnostic studies for both viruses have been limited, although reliable serologic tests for human parvovirus B19 have recently become available. Diagnosis of human herpesvirus 6 remains problematic, because current tests cannot differentiate primary from reactivated disease. This is more of an issue for the putative relationship of these viruses to more chronic conditions, such as rheumatologic disease for human parvovirus B19 and multiple sclerosis for human herpesvirus 6. The relationship between the viruses and these conditions remains controversial, and better diagnostic tests and further information on viral pathogenesis for both viruses are required in order to make a reliable judgment in this regard. PMID:11964854

  15. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-03-01

    Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  16. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  17. Human Disease Insight: An integrated knowledge-based platform for disease-gene-drug information.

    PubMed

    Tasleem, Munazzah; Ishrat, Romana; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-01-01

    The scope of the Human Disease Insight (HDI) database is not limited to researchers or physicians as it also provides basic information to non-professionals and creates disease awareness, thereby reducing the chances of patient suffering due to ignorance. HDI is a knowledge-based resource providing information on human diseases to both scientists and the general public. Here, our mission is to provide a comprehensive human disease database containing most of the available useful information, with extensive cross-referencing. HDI is a knowledge management system that acts as a central hub to access information about human diseases and associated drugs and genes. In addition, HDI contains well-classified bioinformatics tools with helpful descriptions. These integrated bioinformatics tools enable researchers to annotate disease-specific genes and perform protein analysis, search for biomarkers and identify potential vaccine candidates. Eventually, these tools will facilitate the analysis of disease-associated data. The HDI provides two types of search capabilities and includes provisions for downloading, uploading and searching disease/gene/drug-related information. The logistical design of the HDI allows for regular updating. The database is designed to work best with Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome and is freely accessible at http://humandiseaseinsight.com. PMID:26631432

  18. Using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model cerebellar disease: Hope and hype

    PubMed Central

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Arber, Charles; Li, Abi; Wray, Selina; Houlden, Henry; Patani, Rickie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum forms a highly ordered and indispensible component of motor function within the adult neuraxis, consisting of several distinct cellular subtypes. Cerebellar disease, through a variety of genetic and acquired causes, results in the loss of function of defined subclasses of neurons, and remains a significant and untreatable health care burden. The scarcity of therapies in this arena can partially be explained by unresolved disease mechanisms due to inaccessibility of human cerebellar neurons in a relevant experimental context where initiating disease mechanisms could be functionally elucidated, or drug screens conducted. In this review we discuss the potential promise of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for regenerative neurology, with a particular emphasis on in vitro modelling of cerebellar degeneration. We discuss progress made thus far using hiPSC-based models of neurodegeneration, noting the relatively slower pace of discovery made in modelling cerebellar dysfunction. We conclude by speculating how strategies attempting cerebellar differentiation from hiPSCs can be refined to allow the generation of accurate disease models. This in turn will permit a greater understanding of cerebellar pathophysiology to inform mechanistically rationalised therapies, which are desperately needed in this field. PMID:25985846

  19. Spectroscopy techniques for human disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Moreno, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Modern medicine would benefit from the pursuit of new, more specific and easier to implement diagnosis tools. In recent years, Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy have proven to be successful diagnostic techniques for a wide range of diseases including atherosclerosis, kidney stones, bone diseases, diabetes, and a wide collection of neoplasms. Optical spectroscopy has several advantages over more traditional diagnostic methods (i.e., histopathology, quantitative PCR, etc.) such as faster data analysis, nonspecific sample preparation, nonspecific labels/reagents/antibodies usage requirements, and immediate on-site implementation. In the present work, label-free in vitro fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been used to differentiate between blood cells of patients affected with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and those of healthy subjects. The SERS technique has also been applied to hemoglobin variants as well as to serum obtained from patients affected with chronic heart failure who positively or negatively responded to the seasonal influenza vaccine. We found that spectral ratios of the background fluorescence intensity that accompanies the SERS spectra of granulocytes serve as excellent markers for the presence of MPNs. In addition, we also found expression dysregulation of two hypoxia induced factor regulated genes, which correlates with our results obtained by SERS spectroscopy assay in MPN patients and supports the presence of the Warburg effect in MPNs. We hypothesize that SERS measures metabolic change in granulocytes through two possible mechanisms: (i) Changes in dielectric properties of the environment surrounding the silver-cell interface; and (ii) changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide concentrations, which in turn changes the relative contribution of the autofluorescence to the emission spectrum. These hypotheses are supported by SERS measurement of 2-deoxy

  20. Molecular and genetic inflammation networks in major human diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Forst, Christian V; Sayegh, Camil E; Wang, I-Ming; Yang, Xia; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-19

    It has been well-recognized that inflammation alongside tissue repair and damage maintaining tissue homeostasis determines the initiation and progression of complex diseases. Albeit with the accomplishment of having captured the most critical inflammation-involved molecules, genetic susceptibilities, epigenetic factors, and environmental factors, our schemata on the role of inflammation in complex diseases remain largely patchy, in part due to the success of reductionism in terms of research methodology per se. Omics data alongside the advances in data integration technologies have enabled reconstruction of molecular and genetic inflammation networks which shed light on the underlying pathophysiology of complex diseases or clinical conditions. Given the proven beneficial role of anti-inflammation in coronary heart disease as well as other complex diseases and immunotherapy as a revolutionary transition in oncology, it becomes timely to review our current understanding of the molecular and genetic inflammation networks underlying major human diseases. In this review, we first briefly discuss the complexity of infectious diseases and then highlight recently uncovered molecular and genetic inflammation networks in other major human diseases including obesity, type II diabetes, coronary heart disease, late onset Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and sporadic cancer. The commonality and specificity of these molecular networks are addressed in the context of genetics based on genome-wide association study (GWAS). The double-sword role of inflammation, such as how the aberrant type 1 and/or type 2 immunity leads to chronic and severe clinical conditions, remains open in terms of the inflammasome and the core inflammatome network features. Increasingly available large Omics and clinical data in tandem with systems biology approaches have offered an exciting yet challenging opportunity toward reconstruction of more comprehensive and dynamic molecular and genetic

  1. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  2. Pilot study of non-contrast-enhanced MRI vs. ultrasound in renal transplant recipients with acquired cystic kidney disease: a prospective intra-individual comparison.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Anja S; Lange, Christian; Kroll, Gisela; Floege, Jürgen; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane; Eitner, Frank; Schrading, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after kidney transplantation is 15-fold increased. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is one of the known risk factors. We performed a small pilot study to assess the role of non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for intensified screening in renal transplant recipients with ACKD. Renal ultrasound was used to assess the native kidneys of 215 renal transplant recipients. Thirty patients with 54 kidneys, fulfilling the criteria of ACKD, underwent non-enhanced MRI at 1.5T using T2- and T1-weighed as well as diffusion-weighted sequences with a high spatial resolution. Among the 54 kidneys assessed by both methods, three RCCs were identified (6%). Of those, one RCC was detected by both imaging methods (33%), while two RCCs were diagnosed by MRI alone (67%). MRI identified an additional four proteinaceous or hemorrhagic cysts that did not fulfill the criteria for RCC but were classified as suspicious. All of these lesions were stable in size and appearance in follow-up studies. In conclusion, non-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than ultrasound in identifying RCCs and lesions suspicious for RCC and thus appears to be a useful secondary screening tool in patients with ACKD after renal transplantation. PMID:24118352

  3. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with gain of chromosomes 3, 7, and 16, gain of chromosome X, and loss of chromosome Y.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently described. To date, there are no reports on genetic findings of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. In this article, we report the first report of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. A 66-year-old Japanese man was found to have a left renal tumor during the follow-up of hemodialysis consequent to chronic renal failure. Left nephrectomy was performed. Histological examination of three tumors in the left kidney showed the cribriform or microcystic growth pattern of neoplastic cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, and many oxalate crystals were observed. The G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC showed 49, X, +X, -Y, +3, +7, +16. These chromosomal abnormalities resemble those of sporadic papillary RCC that has been previously reported. Finally, we suggest that this tumor may show a close relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC, but a large-scale study will be needed to clarify the relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC. PMID:21267700

  4. Systematic discovery of nonobvious human disease models through orthologous phenotypes.

    PubMed

    McGary, Kriston L; Park, Tae Joo; Woods, John O; Cha, Hye Ji; Wallingford, John B; Marcotte, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    Biologists have long used model organisms to study human diseases, particularly when the model bears a close resemblance to the disease. We present a method that quantitatively and systematically identifies nonobvious equivalences between mutant phenotypes in different species, based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes from human, mouse, yeast, worm, and plant (212,542 gene-phenotype associations). These orthologous phenotypes, or phenologs, predict unique genes associated with diseases. Our method suggests a yeast model for angiogenesis defects, a worm model for breast cancer, mouse models of autism, and a plant model for the neural crest defects associated with Waardenburg syndrome, among others. Using these models, we show that SOX13 regulates angiogenesis, and that SEC23IP is a likely Waardenburg gene. Phenologs reveal functionally coherent, evolutionarily conserved gene networks-many predating the plant-animal divergence-capable of identifying candidate disease genes. PMID:20308572

  5. Gene-Environment Interactions in Human Disease: Nuisance or Opportunity?

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Carole; Vercelli, Donata

    2010-01-01

    Many environmental risk factors for common, complex human diseases have been revealed by epidemiologic studies, but how genotypes at specific loci modulate individual responses to environmental risk factors is largely unknown. Gene-environment interactions will be missed in genome-wide association studies and may account for some of the ‘missing heritability’ for these diseases. In this review, we focus on asthma as a model disease for studying gene-environment interactions because of relatively large numbers of candidate gene-environment interactions with asthma risk in the literature. Identifying these interactions using genome-wide approaches poses formidable methodological problems and elucidating molecular mechanisms for these interactions has been challenging. We suggest that studying gene-environment interactions in animal models, while more tractable, is not likely to shed light on the genetic architecture of human diseases. Lastly, we propose avenues for future studies to find gene-environment interactions. PMID:21216485

  6. Myiasis as a risk factor for prion diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Lupi, O

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of humans and animals. The oral route is clearly associated with some prion diseases, according to the dissemination of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle and kuru in humans. However, other prion diseases such as scrapie (in sheep) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) (in cervids) cannot be explained in this way and are probably more associated with a pattern of horizontal transmission in both domestic and wild animals. The skin and mucous membranes are a potential target for prion infections because keratinocytes and lymphocytes are susceptible to the abnormal infective isoform of the prion protein. Iatrogenic transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was also recognized after corneal transplants in humans and scrapie was successfully transmitted to mice after ocular instillation of infected brain tissue, confirming that these new routes could also be important in prion infections. Some ectoparasites have been proven to harbour prion rods in laboratory experiments. Prion rods were identified in both fly larvae and pupae; adult flies are also able to express prion proteins. The most common causes of myiasis in cattle and sheep, closely related animals with previous prion infections, are Hypoderma bovis and Oestrus ovis, respectively. Both species of flies present a life cycle very different from human myiasis, as they have a long contact with neurological structures, such as spinal canal and epidural fat, which are potentially rich in prion rods. Ophthalmomyiases in humans is commonly caused by both species of fly larvae worldwide, providing almost direct contact with the central nervous system (CNS). The high expression of the prion protein on the skin and mucosa and the severity of the inflammatory response to the larvae could readily increase the efficiency of transmission of prions in both animals and humans. PMID:16987255

  7. Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 (TLR-2, TLR-3 and TLR-4) are expressed in the microenvironment of human acquired cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Szczepański, Mirosław; Szyfter, Witold; Jenek, Renata; Wróbel, Maciej; Lisewska, Iwona Mozer; Zeromski, Jan

    2006-07-01

    Human toll-like receptors (TLR 1-10) are crucial in the induction and activation of innate immunity in the course of an infection. They are expressed mainly on the cells of the immune system, and also on some epithelia and endothelia. Their ligands so called pathogen associated molecular patterns are abundant on invading microbes. TLR-ligand binding results in cell signal transduction and subsequent production of various proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Acquired cholesteatoma is formed during chronic otitis media in the proportion of cases. It has adverse effects on ear structures, resulting in osteolysis and bone resorption. Its formation and pathogenesis are not fully understood. The current study attempted to search the possible role of TLRs in this somewhat awkward pathological condition. Surgical specimens of human acquired cholesteatoma (n=15) and normal external auditory canal skin (n=5, control tissues) were tested by immunohistochemistry for the presence of TLRs. Three TLRs were examined: TLR-2, TLR-3 and TLR-4. All TLRs tested were demonstrated in matrix (layer of keratinizing epithelium) and perimatrix (granulation tissue) of this inflammatory tumour. Expression of particular TLRs within the keratinizing epithelium was distinct and uneven. In the perimatrix, numerous T (CD3+) cells were seen and relatively few macrophages (CD11c+, HLA-DR+). There was a weak expression of all TLRs on normal (non-inflammatory) skin. Expression of TLR-3 both on the epithelium and some cells within the perimatrix and the presence of T cells may suggest that apart from innate immune responses, mechanisms of adaptive immunity also operate in cholesteatoma. Weak expression of these receptors on normal skin may also suggest the important role of TLRs in the etiopathogenesis of cholesteatoma. PMID:16538507

  8. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases: A Systems Biology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2015-12-01

    The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction. PMID:26555600

  9. Natural selection and infectious disease in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    The ancient biological 'arms race' between microbial pathogens and humans has shaped genetic variation in modern populations, and this has important implications for the growing field of medical genomics. As humans migrated throughout the world, populations encountered distinct pathogens, and natural selection increased the prevalence of alleles that are advantageous in the new ecosystems in both host and pathogens. This ancient history now influences human infectious disease susceptibility and microbiome homeostasis, and contributes to common diseases that show geographical disparities, such as autoimmune and metabolic disorders. Using new high-throughput technologies, analytical methods and expanding public data resources, the investigation of natural selection is leading to new insights into the function and dysfunction of human biology. PMID:24776769

  10. Human prion diseases: surgical lessons learned from iatrogenic prion transmission.

    PubMed

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Khan, Fahd; Miller, Benjamin R; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Puoti, Gianfranco; Cohen, Mark L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Cali, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    The human prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, have captivated our imaginations since their discovery in the Fore linguistic group in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s. The mysterious and poorly understood "infectious protein" has become somewhat of a household name in many regions across the globe. From bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly identified as mad cow disease, to endocannibalism, media outlets have capitalized on these devastatingly fatal neurological conditions. Interestingly, since their discovery, there have been more than 492 incidents of iatrogenic transmission of prion diseases, largely resulting from prion-contaminated growth hormone and dura mater grafts. Although fewer than 9 cases of probable iatrogenic neurosurgical cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have been reported worldwide, the likelihood of some missed cases and the potential for prion transmission by neurosurgery create considerable concern. Laboratory studies indicate that standard decontamination and sterilization procedures may be insufficient to completely remove infectivity from prion-contaminated instruments. In this unfortunate event, the instruments may transmit the prion disease to others. Much caution therefore should be taken in the absence of strong evidence against the presence of a prion disease in a neurosurgical patient. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have devised risk assessment and decontamination protocols for the prevention of iatrogenic transmission of the prion diseases, incidents of possible exposure to prions have unfortunately occurred in the United States. In this article, the authors outline the historical discoveries that led from kuru to the identification and isolation of the pathological prion proteins in addition to providing a brief description of human prion diseases and iatrogenic forms of CJD, a brief history of prion disease nosocomial transmission

  11. Gold compounds as therapeutic agents for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Berners-Price, Susan J; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2011-09-01

    The application of gold in medicine is traceable for several thousand years and Au(i) compounds have been used clinically to treat rheumatoid arthritis since the last century. Recently research into gold-based drugs for a range of human diseases has seen a renaissance. Old as well as new Au(i) and Au(iii) compounds have been used and designed with an aim of targeting cellular components that are implicated in the onset or progression of cancers, rheumatoid arthiritis, viral and parasitic diseases. In addition, new disease targets have been found for gold compounds that have given insight into the mechanism of action of these compounds, as well as in the molecular pathophysiology of human diseases. Here we discuss the rationale for the design and use of gold compounds that have specific and selective targets in cells to alleviate the symptoms of a range of human diseases. We summarise the most recent findings in this research and our own discoveries to show that gold compounds can be developed to become versatile and powerful drugs for diseases caused by dysfunction of selenol and thiol containing proteins. PMID:21755088

  12. [The Biological Function of SHP2 in Human Disease].

    PubMed

    Li, S M

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl phosphorylation participates in various pathological and physiological processes, which are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). The Src homology-2 domain containing phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) is an important phosphatase, which was found to be implicated in the regulation of genetic disease, development, metabolic, neurological, muscle, skeletal disease and cancer. Germline mutations in PTPN11 cause the Noonan Syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome and metachondromatosis. Somatic PTPN11 mutations occur in hematologic malignancies and in solid tumors. SHP2 is also an important component in oncogenic signaling pathways. It may play different roles in different stages and positions of human cancers. Whether SHP2 is an oncogene or cancer suppressor gene remains to be elucidated. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of SHP2 in human disease will provide new insights into disease and new targets for therapy. Here, we summarized the structural basis and recent research progression on SHP2 in various human disease, including genetic and cancer diseases. PMID:27028808

  13. Human prion disease and relative risk associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Samantha; Pape, W John; Forster, Jeri E; Anderson, C Alan; Bosque, Patrick; Miller, Michael W

    2006-10-01

    The transmission of the prion disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans raises concern about chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease of deer and elk. In 7 Colorado counties with high CWD prevalence, 75% of state hunting licenses are issued locally, which suggests that residents consume most regionally harvested game. We used Colorado death certificate data from 1979 through 2001 to evaluate rates of death from the human prion disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The relative risk (RR) of CJD for CWD-endemic county residents was not significantly increased (RR 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-1.63), and the rate of CJD did not increase over time (5-year RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.73-1.16). In Colorado, human prion disease resulting from CWD exposure is rare or nonexistent. However, given uncertainties about the incubation period, exposure, and clinical presentation, the possibility that the CWD agent might cause human disease cannot be eliminated. PMID:17176567

  14. The zebrafish as a model system for human disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Lieschke, Graham J

    2002-04-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been widely utilised for the study of developmental biology, which has lead to the evolution of sophisticated cellular and molecular approaches. More recently, the rapid progress of various zebrafish genomic infrastructure initiatives is facilitating the development of zebrafish models of human disease. This review aims to describe several representative examples of how the zebrafish can be successfully used to identify novel genes and assign gene function, providing invaluable clues to human pathophysiology. PMID:11897571

  15. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  16. Of fish and men: using zebrafish to fight human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Zon, Leonard I

    2013-12-01

    Long restricted to the field of developmental biology, the use of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has extended to the study of human pathogenesis. Fostered by the rapid adaptation of new technologies, the design and analysis of fish models of human diseases have contributed important findings that are now making their way from aquariums to clinics. Here we outline the clinical relevance of the zebrafish as a model organism. PMID:24275383

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression in the central nervous system correlates directly with extent of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, B.; La Neve, D.; Eilbott, D.J.; Burger, H.; Seidman, R. ); Peress, N. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY )

    1990-05-01

    To investigate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in infected individuals and examine the correlation of HIV-1 expression with extent of clinical and pathologic disease, the authors studied spinal cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a wide range of spinal cord pathology. By performing in situ hybridization with HIV-1-specific riboprobes, they detected HIV-1 RNA in all 10 cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a common, characteristic pathologic entity called vacuolar myelopathy but not in 10 control cords from HIV-1-infected and uninfected patients. In the cords from individuals with vacuolar myelopathy, the level of HIV-1 RNA expression correlated directly with extent of spinal cord pathology and clinical findings. These data support a role for HIV-1 int he pathogenesis of tissue damage and related clinical disease in infected individuals.

  18. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications. PMID:24034072

  19. Molecular approaches to human polygenic disease - Symposium 130

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume deals with the application of recombinant DNA techniques to the identification of diseases that have more than one inherited component. Focus is on the polygenic factors responsible for coronary atherosclerosis. Several other disorders having a polygenic orgin are also discussed, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, psychiatric diseases, and autoimmune (HLA-related) disorders. Problems raised by the study of different families or different populations are covered, as well as the possibility of applying molecular techniques to disease prevention-for example, through gene therapy. Also explored are some of the ethical issues that relate to human gene mapping.

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  1. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what׳s wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to

  2. Characteristic CSF prion seeding efficiency in humans with prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Maria; Schmitz, Matthias; Karch, André; Zafar, Saima; Varges, Daniela; Mitrova, Eva; Schroeder, Bjoern; Raeber, Alex; Kuhn, Franziska; Zerr, Inga

    2015-02-01

    The development of in vitro amplification systems allows detecting femtomolar amounts of prion protein scrapie (PrP(Sc)) in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We performed a CSF study to determine the effects of prion disease type, codon 129 genotype, PrP(Sc) type, and other disease-related factors on the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) response. We analyzed times to 10,000 relative fluorescence units, areas under the curve and the signal maximum of RT-QuIC response as seeding parameters of interest. Interestingly, type of prion disease (sporadic vs. genetic) and the PRNP mutation (E200K vs. V210I and FFI), codon 129 genotype, and PrP(Sc) type affected RT-QuIC response. In genetic forms, type of mutation showed the strongest effect on the observed outcome variables. In sporadic CJD, MM1 patients displayed a higher RT-QuIC signal maximum compared to MV1 and VV1. Age and gender were not associated with RT-QuIC signal, but patients with a short disease course showed a higher seeding efficiency of the RT-QuIC response. This study demonstrated that PrP(Sc) characteristics in the CSF of human prion disease patients are associated with disease subtypes and rate of decline as defined by disease duration. PMID:24809690

  3. Uncovering the role of genomic "dark matter" in human disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lance; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-05-01

    The human genome encodes thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Although most remain functionally uncharacterized biological "dark matter," lncRNAs have garnered considerable attention for their diverse roles in human biology, including developmental programs and tumor suppressor gene networks. As the number of lncRNAs associated with human disease grows, ongoing research efforts are focusing on their regulatory mechanisms. New technologies that enable enumeration of lncRNA interaction partners and determination of lncRNA structure are well positioned to drive deeper understanding of their functions and involvement in pathogenesis. In turn, lncRNAs may become targets for therapeutic intervention or new tools for biotechnology. PMID:22546862

  4. Glutathione dysregulation and the etiology and progression of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ballatori, Nazzareno; Krance, Suzanne M.; Notenboom, Sylvia; Shi, Shujie; Tieu, Kim; Hammond, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and as a result, disturbances in GSH homeostasis are implicated in the etiology and/or progression of a number of human diseases, including cancer, diseases of aging, cystic fibrosis, and cardiovascular, inflammatory, immune, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Because of GSH’s pleiotropic effects on cell functions, it has been quite difficult to define the role of GSH in the onset and/or the expression of human diseases, although significant progress is being made. GSH levels, turnover rates and/or oxidation state can be compromised by inherited or aquired defects in the enzymes, transporters, signaling molecules, or transcription factors that are involved in its homeostasis, or from exposure to reactive chemicals or metabolic intermediates. GSH deficiency or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio manifests itself largely through an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and the resulting damage is thought to be involved in diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, imbalances in GSH levels affect immune system function, and are thought to play a role in the aging process. Just as low intracellular GSH levels decrease cellular antioxidant capacity, elevated GSH levels generally increase antioxidant capacity and resistance to oxidative stress, and this is observed in many cancer cells. The higher GSH levels in some tumor cells are also typically associated with higher levels of GSH-related enzymes and transporters. Although neither the mechanism nor the implications of these changes are well defined, the high GSH content makes cancer cells chemoresistant, which is a major factor that limits drug treatment. The present report highlights and integrates the growing connections between imbalances in GSH homeostasis and a multitude of human diseases

  5. Clan genomics and the complex architecture of human disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human diseases (diabetes, etc.) are caused by alleles that encompass the full range of variant types, from single-nucleotide changes to copy-number variants, and these variations span a broad frequency spectrum, from the very rare to the common. The picture emerging from analysis of whole-genome seq...

  6. Part 1: The Human Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Plummer, Nigel T.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial cells harbored within the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) outnumber the host’s cells by a factor of 10 and the genes encoded by the bacteria resident within the GIT outnumber their host’s genes by more than 100 times. These human digestive-tract associated microbes are referred to as the gut microbiome. The human gut microbiome and its role in both health and disease has been the subject of extensive research, establishing its involvement in human metabolism, nutrition, physiology, and immune function. Imbalance of the normal gut microbiota have been linked with gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and wider systemic manifestations of disease such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atopy. In the first part of this review, we evaluate our evolving knowledge of the development, complexity, and functionality of the healthy gut microbiota, and the ways in which the microbial community is perturbed in dysbiotic disease states; the second part of this review covers the role of interventions that have been shown to modulate and stabilize the gut microbiota and also to restore it to its healthy composition from the dysbiotic states seen in IBS, IBD, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atopy. PMID:26770121

  7. Molecular Genetic Approaches to Human Diseases Involving Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latt, Samuel A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques provide new approaches to the diagnosis and analysis of inherited human diseases associated with mental retardation, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, phenylketonauria, the Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, and those associated with deletions or duplications of subchromosomal regions. (Author/CL)

  8. PXR- and CAR-mediated herbal effect on human diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenshu; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are two members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that regulate a broad range of genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. A variety of naturally occurring compounds present in herbal medicines were identified as ligands of PXR and CAR. Recently, accumulative evidences have revealed the PXR- and CAR-mediated herbal effect against multiple human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), cholestatic liver disease, and jaundice. The current review summarized the recent progress in identifying the expanding libraries of herbal medicine as ligands for PXR and CAR. Moreover, the potential for herbal medicines as promising therapeutic agents which were mainly regulated through PXR/CAR signaling pathways was also discussed. The discovery of herbal medicines as modulators of PXR and CAR, and their PXR- and CAR-mediated effect on human diseases will provide a basis for rational drug design, and eventually be explored as a novel therapeutic approach against human diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26906544

  9. Molecular identification of the causative agent of human strongyloidiasis acquired in Tanzania: dispersal and diversity of Strongyloides spp. and their hosts.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Nobusue, Kenichi; Miyagi, Kei; Kooriyama, Takanori; Takenoshita, Yuji; Noda, Shohei; Sato, Akiko; Morimoto, Azusa; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Nishida, Toshisada

    2010-09-01

    In order to identify the causative agent of imported strongyloidiasis found in a Japanese mammalogist, who participated in a field survey in Tanzania, the hyper-variable region IV (HVR-IV) of 18S ribosomal DNA and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) were analyzed and compared with Strongyloides fuelleborni collected from apes and monkeys of Africa and Japan, and S. stercoralis from humans, apes and dogs. The HVR-IV and cox1 of the patient's worms were identical to or only slightly differed from those of worms parasitic in Tanzanian chimpanzees and yellow baboons, demonstrating that the patient acquired the infection during her field survey in Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis with the maximum-likelihood method largely divided isolates of S. fuelleborni into three groups, which corresponded to geographical localities but not to host species. Meanwhile, isolates of S. stercoralis were grouped by the phylogenetic analysis into dog-parasitic and primate-parasitic clades, and not to geographical regions. It is surmised that subspeciation has occurred in S. fuelleborni during the dispersal of primates in Africa and Asia, while worldwide dispersal of S. stercoralis seems to have occurred more recently by migration and the activities of modern humans. PMID:20621633

  10. Genomic profiling of acquired resistance to apoptosis in cells derived from human atherosclerotic lesions: potential role of STATs, cyclinD1, BAD, and Bcl-XL.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Dmitry; Yang, Zhaoqing; Butler, Jason; Wimmer, Monika; Du, Baoheng; Cahan, Patrick; McCaffrey, Timothy A

    2005-09-01

    Current theories suggest that atherosclerosis, plaque rupture, stroke, and restenosis after angioplasty may involve defective apoptotic mechanisms in vascular cells. Prior work has demonstrated that cells from human atherosclerotic lesions, and cells from the aorta of aged rats, exhibit functional resistance to apoptosis induced by TGF-beta and glucocorticoids. The present studies demonstrate that human lesion-derived cells (LDC) are also resistant to apoptosis induced by fas ligation compared to cells derived from the adjacent media, and that in vitro expansion of LDC causes acquired resistance to apoptosis. Microarray profiling of fas-resistant versus sensitive cells identified a set of genes including STATs, caspase 1, cyclin D1, Bcl-xL, VDAC2, and BAD. The STAT proteins have been implicated in resistance to apoptosis, potentially via their ability to modulate caspase 1 (ICE), Bcl-xL, and cyclin D1 expression. Western blot analysis of sensitive and resistant LDC clonal lines confirmed increases in cyclin D1, STAT6, Bcl-xL, and BAD, with decreased expression of caspase 1. Thus, transcript profiling has identified a potential pathway of apoptotic regulation in subsets of lesion cells. The resistant phenotype may contribute to plaque stability and excessive vascular repair, while sensitive cells may be involved in plaque rupture and infarction. The data suggests both genetic interventions and novel small-molecule inhibitors that may be effective modulators of apoptosis in atherosclerosis, angina, and in-stent restenosis. PMID:16005468

  11. A chemo-centric view of human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Rossell, David; Aloy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to compile the phenotypic effects of drugs and environmental chemicals offer the opportunity to adopt a chemo-centric view of human health that does not require detailed mechanistic information. Here, we consider thousands of chemicals and analyze the relationship of their structures with adverse and therapeutic responses. Our study includes molecules related to the etiology of 934 health threatening conditions and used to treat 835 diseases. We first identify chemical moieties that could be independently associated with each phenotypic effect. Using these fragments, we build accurate predictors for approximately 400 clinical phenotypes, finding many privileged and liable structures. Finally, we connect two diseases if they relate to similar chemical structures. The resulting networks of human conditions are able to predict disease comorbidities, as well as identifying potential drug side effects and opportunities for drug repositioning, and show a remarkable coincidence with clinical observations. PMID:25435099

  12. Resolving the variable genome and epigenome in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    The individual human genome and epigenome are being defined at unprecedented resolution by current advances in sequencing technologies with important implications for human disease. This review uses examples relevant to clinical practice to illustrate the functional consequences of genetic and epigenetic variation. The insights gained from genome-wide association studies are described together with current efforts to understand the role of rare variants in common disease, set in the context of recent successes in Mendelian traits through the application of whole exome sequencing. The application of functional genomics to interrogate the genome and epigenome, build up an integrated picture of the regulatory genomic landscape and inform disease association studies is discussed, together with the role of expression quantitative trait mapping and analysis of allele-specific gene expression. PMID:22443201

  13. Human genetics of infectious diseases: a unified theory.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2007-02-21

    Since the early 1950s, the dominant paradigm in the human genetics of infectious diseases postulates that rare monogenic immunodeficiencies confer vulnerability to multiple infectious diseases (one gene, multiple infections), whereas common infections are associated with the polygenic inheritance of multiple susceptibility genes (one infection, multiple genes). Recent studies, since 1996 in particular, have challenged this view. A newly recognised group of primary immunodeficiencies predisposing the individual to a principal or single type of infection is emerging. In parallel, several common infections have been shown to reflect the inheritance of one major susceptibility gene, at least in some populations. This novel causal relationship (one gene, one infection) blurs the distinction between patient-based Mendelian genetics and population-based complex genetics, and provides a unified conceptual frame for exploring the molecular genetic basis of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:17255931

  14. Receptor Coactivators: Master Regulators of Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Lonard, David M.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators (coactivators and corepressors) have emerged as the principal modulators of the functions of nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. During the decade since the discovery of steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), the first authentic coregulator, more than 400 coregulators have been identified and characterized, and deciphering their function has contributed significantly to our understanding of their role in human physiology. Deregulated expression of coregulators has been implicated in diverse disease states and related pathologies. The advancement of molecular technologies has enabled us to better characterize the molecular associations of the SRC family of coactivators with other protein complexes in the context of gene regulation. These continuing discoveries not only expand our knowledge of the roles of coactivators in various human diseases but allow us to discover novel coactivator-targeting strategies for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. PMID:24111892

  15. Quantification of phosphorus metabolites in human calf muscle and soft-tissue tumours from localized MR spectra acquired using surface coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, V. L.; Payne, G. S.; Collins, D. J.; Verrill, M. W.; Leach, M. O.

    1997-04-01

    Metabolite concentrations determined from MR spectra provide more specific information than peak area ratios. This paper presents a method of quantification that allows metabolite concentrations to be determined from in vivo MR spectra acquired using a surface coil and ISIS localization. Corrections for the effects of field inhomogeneity produced by surface coils are based on a measured and calibrated spatial sensitivity field map for the coil. Account is taken of imperfections in pulse performance, coil loading effects and relaxation effects, the latter making use of published metabolite relaxation times. The technique is demonstrated on model solutions. The concentrations of the main metabolites in normal human calf muscle measured using this method are [PCr] = ; [Pi] = ; [NTP] = . Quantification of spectra acquired from soft-tissue tumours in patients both pre- and post-treatment showed that changes in metabolite concentrations are more sensitive to metabolic changes than changes in peak area ratios.

  16. Use of model organism and disease databases to support matchmaking for human disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Mungall, Christopher J; Washington, Nicole L; Nguyen-Xuan, Jeremy; Condit, Christopher; Smedley, Damian; Köhler, Sebastian; Groza, Tudor; Shefchek, Kent; Hochheiser, Harry; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A

    2015-10-01

    The Matchmaker Exchange application programming interface (API) allows searching a patient's genotypic or phenotypic profiles across clinical sites, for the purposes of cohort discovery and variant disease causal validation. This API can be used not only to search for matching patients, but also to match against public disease and model organism data. This public disease data enable matching known diseases and variant-phenotype associations using phenotype semantic similarity algorithms developed by the Monarch Initiative. The model data can provide additional evidence to aid diagnosis, suggest relevant models for disease mechanism and treatment exploration, and identify collaborators across the translational divide. The Monarch Initiative provides an implementation of this API for searching multiple integrated sources of data that contextualize the knowledge about any given patient or patient family into the greater biomedical knowledge landscape. While this corpus of data can aid diagnosis, it is also the beginning of research to improve understanding of rare human diseases. PMID:26269093

  17. Integrative analysis of human protein, function and disease networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Aiping; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks serve as a powerful tool for unraveling protein functions, disease-gene and disease-disease associations. However, a direct strategy for integrating protein interaction, protein function and diseases is still absent. Moreover, the interrelated relationships among these three levels are poorly understood. Here we present a novel systematic method to integrate protein interaction, function, and disease networks. We first identified topological modules in human protein interaction data using the network topological algorithm (NeTA) we previously developed. The resulting modules were then associated with functional terms using Gene Ontology to obtain functional modules. Finally, disease modules were constructed by associating the modules with OMIM and GWAS. We found that most topological modules have cohesive structure, significant pathway annotations and good modularity. Most functional modules (70.6%) fully cover corresponding topological modules, and most disease modules (88.5%) are fully covered by the corresponding functional modules. Furthermore, we identified several protein modules of interest that we describe in detail, which demonstrate the power of our integrative approach. This approach allows us to link genes, and pathways with their corresponding disorders, which may ultimately help us to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. PMID:26399914

  18. Human urotensin II promotes hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arita, Shigeko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Suguro, Toshiaki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Hongo, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Human urotensin II (U-II), the most potent vasoconstrictor undecapeptide identified to date, and its receptor (UT) are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of U-II with particular reference to its role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of U-II gene (S89N) are associated with onset of essential hypertension, type II diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in the Asian population. Plasma U-II levels are elevated in patients with vascular endothelial dysfunction-related diseases such as essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Chronic infusion of U-II enhances atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. In human atherosclerotic plaques from the aorta and coronary and carotid arteries, U-II is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs) and lymphocytes, whereas UT is expressed at high levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. U-II stimulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human ECs as chemoattractant for monocytes, and accelerates foam cell formation by up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages. U-II produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation in human VSMCs, and stimulates VSMC proliferation with synergistic effects when combined with ROS, oxidized LDL, and serotonin. Clinical studies demonstrated increased plasma U-II levels in accordance with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension and that of coronary artery lesions in patients with ischemic heart disease. Here, we summarize the key roles of U-II in progression of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

  19. Humane killing of animals for disease control purposes.

    PubMed

    Thornber, P M; Rubira, R J; Styles, D K

    2014-04-01

    Killing for disease control purposes is an emotional issue for everyone concerned. Large-scale euthanasia or depopulation of animals may be necessary for the emergency control or eradication of animal diseases, to remove animals from a compromised situation (e.g. following flood, storm, fire, drought or a feed contamination event), to effect welfare depopulation when there is an oversupply due to a dysfunctional or closed marketing channel, or to depopulate and dispose of animals with minimal handling to decrease the risk of a zoonotic disease infecting humans. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) developed international standards to provide advice on humane killing for various species and situations. Some fundamental issues are defined, such as competency of animal handling and implementation of humane killing techniques. Some of these methods have been used for many years, but novel approaches for the mass killing of particular species are being explored. Novel vaccines and new diagnostic techniques that differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals will save many animals from being killed as part of biosecurity response measures. Unfortunately, the destruction of affected livestock will still be required to control diseases whilst vaccination programmes are activated or where effective vaccines are not available. This paper reviews the principles of humane destruction and depopulation and explores available techniques with their associated advantages and disadvantages. It also identifies some current issues that merit consideration, such as legislative conflicts (emergency disease legislation versus animal welfare legislation, occupational health and safety), media issues, opinions on the future approaches to killing for disease control, and animal welfare. PMID:25000803

  20. AFRICAN GENETIC DIVERSITY: Implications for Human Demographic History, Modern Human Origins, and Complex Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies of ethnically diverse human populations, particularly in Africa, are important for reconstructing human evolutionary history and for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic adaptation and complex disease. African populations are characterized by greater levels of genetic diversity, extensive population substructure, and less linkage disequilibrium (LD) among loci compared to non-African populations. Africans also possess a number of genetic adaptations that have evolved in response to diverse climates and diets, as well as exposure to infectious disease. This review summarizes patterns and the evolutionary origins of genetic diversity present in African populations, as well as their implications for the mapping of complex traits, including disease susceptibility. PMID:18593304

  1. Proteomics as a tool to explore human milk in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Roncada, Paola; Stipetic, Laurence H; Bonizzi, Luigi; Burchmore, Richard J S; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2013-08-01

    Proteins in milk have wide range of functions, they are carriers of minerals or chemically vulnerable and insoluble vitamins and other compounds, stabilisers of large aggregates or micelles of lipids, and components of both innate and acquired immune defence systems. Together with other components of milk, proteins may also contribute to the selection and establishment of appropriate microbiome in the gut of the infant. The proteome of mammalian milk is now known to be dynamic and changes radically with time after birth from colostrum to mature lactation. Significantly, immune and innate defence proteins appear in milk during infection of the mammary gland and possibly also during systemic infections. The understanding of the human milk proteome and how it changes with time during lactation and in disease is developing rapidly, and is to a large extent informed by proteomics of the milks of non-human mammals, domestic animals in particular. We review general methods now being applied for proteomic analysis of human milk. Moreover we place emphasis on how the milk proteome may change in different ways in response to disease, mastitis in particular, how such changes may be specific to pathogen types, and we give some insights about evolution. PMID:23590890

  2. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change. PMID:26479830

  3. Animal Models of Pulmonary Hypertension: Matching Disease Mechanisms to Etiology of the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Kelley L.; Yeager, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Recently a great deal of progress has been made in our understanding of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Research from the past 30 years has resulted in newer treatments that provide symptomatic improvements and delayed disease progression. Unfortunately, the cure for patients with this lethal syndrome remains stubbornly elusive. With the relative explosion of scientific literature regarding PH, confusion has arisen regarding animal models of the disease and their correlation to the human condition. This short review uniquely focuses on the clear and present need to better correlate mechanistic insights from existing and emerging animal models of PH to specific etiologies and histopathologies of human PH. A better understanding of the pathologic processes in various animal models and how they relate to the human disease should accelerate the development of newer and more efficacious therapies. PMID:25705569

  4. “Laminopathies:” a wide spectrum of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Worman, Howard J.; Bonne, Gisèle

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the intermediate filament nuclear lamins and associated proteins cause a wide spectrum of diseases sometimes called “laminopathies.” Diseases caused by mutations in LMNA encoding A-type lamins include autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and related myopathies, Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1 and developmental and accelerated aging disorders. Duplication in LMNB1 encoding lamin B1 causes autosomal dominant leukodystrophy and mutations in LMNB2 encoding lamin B2 are associated with acquired partial lipodystrophy. Disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding lamin-associated integral inner nuclear membrane proteins include X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, sclerosing bone dysplasias, HEM/Greenberg skeletal dysplasia and Pelger-Huet anomaly. While mutations and clinical phenotypes of “laminopathies” have been carefully described, data explaining pathogenic mechanisms are only emerging. Future investigations will likely identify new “laminopathies” and a combination of basic and clinical research will lead to a better understanding of pathophysiology and the development of therapies. PMID:17467691

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Acrolein Toxicity: Relevance to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moghe, Akshata; Ghare, Smita; Lamoreau, Bryan; Mohammad, Mohammad; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and its potential as a serious environmental health threat is beginning to be recognized. Humans are exposed to acrolein per oral (food and water), respiratory (cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and biocide use) and dermal routes, in addition to endogenous generation (metabolism and lipid peroxidation). Acrolein has been suggested to play a role in several disease states including spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-, hepato-, and nephro-toxicity. On the cellular level, acrolein exposure has diverse toxic effects, including DNA and protein adduction, oxidative stress, mitochondrial disruption, membrane damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and immune dysfunction. This review addresses our current understanding of each pathogenic mechanism of acrolein toxicity, with emphasis on the known and anticipated contribution to clinical disease, and potential therapies. PMID:25628402

  6. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjian; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2014-10-16

    Cardiovascular cells derived from patient specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) harbor gene mutations associated with the pathogenesis of inherited cardiac diseases and congenital heart diseases (CHD). Numerous reports have demonstrated the utilization of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) to model cardiac diseases as a means of investigating their underlying mechanisms. So far, they have been shown to investigate the molecular mechanisms of many cardiac disorders, such as long-QT syndrome (LQT), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), LEOPARD syndrome (LS), arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), Barth syndrome (BTHS), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), Marfan syndrome (MFS) and other CHD. This article summarizes the growing body of research related to modeling various cardiac diseases using hiPSCs. Moreover, by reviewing the methods used in previous studies, we propose multiple novel applications of hiPSCs to investigate comprehensive cardiovascular disorders and facilitate drug discovery. PMID:25322695

  7. Human bulbar conjunctival hemodynamics in hemoglobin SS and SC disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanek, Justin; Gaynes, Bruce; Lim, Jennifer I.; Molokie, Robert; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    The known biophysical variations of hemoglobin (Hb) S and Hb C may result in hemodynamic differences between subjects with SS and SC disease. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare conjunctival hemodynamics between subjects with Hb SS and SC hemoglobinopathies. Image sequences of the conjunctival microcirculation were acquired in 9 healthy control subjects (Hb AA), 24 subjects with SC disease, and 18 subjects with SS disease, using a prototype imaging system. Diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) measurements were obtained in multiple venules of each subject. Data were categorized according to venule caliber by averaging V and D for venules with diameters less than (vessel size 1) or greater than (vessel size 2) 15 µm. V in vessel size 2 was significantly greater than V in vessel size 1 in the AA and SS groups (P ≥ 0.009), but not in the SC group (P = 0.1). V was significantly lower in the SC group as compared to the SS group (P = 0.03). In AA and SS groups, V correlated with D (P ≥ 0.005), but the correlation was not statistically significant in the SC group (P = 0.08). V was inversely correlated with hematocrit in the SS group for large vessels (P = 0.03); however, no significant correlation was found in the SC group (P ≥ 0.2). Quantitative assessment of conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics in SS and SC disease may advance understanding of sickle cell disease pathophysiology and thereby improve therapeutic interventions. PMID:23657867

  8. Mobile technologies for disease surveillance in humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Mwabukusi, Mpoki; Karimuribo, Esron D; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Beda, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A paper-based disease reporting system has been associated with a number of challenges. These include difficulties to submit hard copies of the disease surveillance forms because of poor road infrastructure, weather conditions or challenging terrain, particularly in the developing countries. The system demands re-entry of the data at data processing and analysis points, thus making it prone to introduction of errors during this process. All these challenges contribute to delayed acquisition, processing and response to disease events occurring in remote hard to reach areas. Our study piloted the use of mobile phones in order to transmit near to real-time data from remote districts in Tanzania (Ngorongoro and Ngara), Burundi (Muyinga) and Zambia (Kazungula and Sesheke). Two technologies namely, digital and short messaging services were used to capture and transmit disease event data in the animal and human health sectors in the study areas based on a server-client model. Smart phones running the Android operating system (minimum required version: Android 1.6), and which supported open source application, Epicollect, as well as the Open Data Kit application, were used in the study. These phones allowed collection of geo-tagged data, with the opportunity of including static and moving images related to disease events. The project supported routine disease surveillance systems in the ministries responsible for animal and human health in Burundi, Tanzania and Zambia, as well as data collection for researchers at the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania. During the project implementation period between 2011 and 2013, a total number of 1651 diseases event-related forms were submitted, which allowed reporters to include GPS coordinates and photographs related to the events captured. It was concluded that the new technology-based surveillance system is useful in providing near to real-time data, with potential for enhancing timely response in rural remote areas of

  9. Human RNA “Rumor” Viruses: the Search for Novel Human Retroviruses in Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Voisset, Cécile; Weiss, Robin A.; Griffiths, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Retroviruses are an important group of pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans and animals. Four human retroviruses are currently known, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which causes AIDS, and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which causes cancer and inflammatory disease. For many years, there have been sporadic reports of additional human retroviral infections, particularly in cancer and other chronic diseases. Unfortunately, many of these putative viruses remain unproven and controversial, and some retrovirologists have dismissed them as merely “human rumor viruses.” Work in this field was last reviewed in depth in 1984, and since then, the molecular techniques available for identifying and characterizing retroviruses have improved enormously in sensitivity. The advent of PCR in particular has dramatically enhanced our ability to detect novel viral sequences in human tissues. However, DNA amplification techniques have also increased the potential for false-positive detection due to contamination. In addition, the presence of many families of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) within our DNA can obstruct attempts to identify and validate novel human retroviruses. Here, we aim to bring together the data on “novel” retroviral infections in humans by critically examining the evidence for those putative viruses that have been linked with disease and the likelihood that they represent genuine human infections. We provide a background to the field and a discussion of potential confounding factors along with some technical guidelines. In addition, some of the difficulties associated with obtaining formal proof of causation for common or ubiquitous agents such as HERVs are discussed. PMID:18322038

  10. Human anthrax as a re-emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Mehmet; Demiraslan, Hayati

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is primarily a disease of herbivores and the etiological agent is B. anthracis which is a gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming, and rod shaped bacterium. Bacillus anthracis spores are highly resistant to heat, pressure, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, chemical agents and disinfectants. For these reasons, B. anthracis spores are an attractive choice as biological agents for the use of bioweapon and/or bioterrorism. Soil is the main reservoir for the infectious agent. The disease most commonly affects wild and domestic mammals. Human are secondarily infected by contact with infected animals and contaminated animal products or directly expose to B. anthracis spores. Anthrax occurs worldwide. This infection is still endemic or hyperendemic in both animals and humans in some part of areas of the world; particularly in Middle East, West Africa, Central Asia, some part of India, South America. However, some countries are claiming free of anthrax, and anthrax has become a re-emerging disease in western countries with the intentional outbreak. Currently, anthrax is classified according to its setting as (1) naturally occurring anthrax, (2) bioterrorism-related anthrax. Vast majority of human anthrax are occurring as naturally occurring anthrax in the world. It is also a threaten disease for western countries. The aim of this paper is to review the relevant patents, short historical perspective, microbiological and epidemiological features, clinical presentations and treatment. PMID:25851429

  11. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  12. Downregulation of Sulfotransferase Expression and Activity in Diseased Human Livers

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Emine B.; More, Vijay; Neira, Karissa L.; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Slitt, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) function has been well studied in healthy human subjects by quantifying mRNA and protein expression and determining enzyme activity with probe substrates. However, it is not well known if sulfotransferase activity changes in metabolic and liver disease, such as diabetes, steatosis, or cirrhosis. Sulfotransferases have significant roles in the regulation of hormones and excretion of xenobiotics. In the present study of normal subjects with nonfatty livers and patients with steatosis, diabetic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, we sought to determine SULT1A1, SULT2A1, SULT1E1, and SULT1A3 activity and mRNA and protein expression in human liver tissue. In general, sulfotransferase activity decreased significantly with severity of liver disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Specifically, SULT1A1 and SULT1A3 activities were lower in disease states relative to nonfatty tissues. Alcoholic cirrhotic tissues further contained lower SULT1A1 and 1A3 activities than those affected by either of the two other disease states. SULT2A1, on the other hand, was only reduced in alcoholic cirrhotic tissues. SULT1E1 was reduced both in diabetic cirrhosis and in alcoholic cirrhosis tissues, relative to nonfatty liver tissues. In conclusion, the reduced levels of sulfotransferase expression and activity in diseased versus nondiseased liver tissue may alter the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics and affect homeostasis of endobiotic sulfotransferase substrates. PMID:23775849

  13. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  14. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  15. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  16. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing and human disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional modification that converts adenosines to inosines in both coding and noncoding RNA transcripts. It is catalyzed by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which exist throughout the body but are most prevalent in the central nervous system. Inosines exhibit properties that are most similar to those of guanosines. As a result, ADAR-mediated editing can post-transcriptionally alter codons, introduce or remove splice sites, or affect the base pairing of the RNA molecule with itself or with other RNAs. A-to-I editing is a mechanism that regulates and diversifies the transcriptome, but the full biological significance of ADARs is not understood. ADARs are highly conserved across vertebrates and are essential for normal development in mammals. Aberrant ADAR activity has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, metabolic diseases, viral infections and autoimmune disorders. ADARs have been shown to contribute to disease pathologies by editing of glutamate receptors, editing of serotonin receptors, mutations in ADAR genes, and by other mechanisms, including recently identified regulatory roles in microRNA processing. Advances in research into many of these diseases may depend on an improved understanding of the biological functions of ADARs. Here, we review recent studies investigating connections between ADAR-mediated RNA editing and human diseases. PMID:24289319

  17. Noncommunicable Diseases and Human Rights: A Promising Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Beaglehole, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have finally emerged onto the global health and development agenda. Despite the increasingly important role human rights play in other areas of global health, their contribution to NCD prevention and control remains nascent. The recently adopted Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013–2020 is an important step forward, but the lack of concrete attention to human rights is a missed opportunity. With practical implications for policy development, priority setting, and strategic design, human rights offer a logical, robust set of norms and standards; define the legal obligations of governments; and provide accountability mechanisms that can be used to enhance current approaches to NCD prevention and control. Harnessing the power of human rights can strengthen action for NCDs at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:24625165

  18. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. PMID:26456009

  19. Autoantibodies with Enzymatic Properties in Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wootla, Bharath; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. In addition to this plethora of functions, some antibodies express enzymatic activity. Antibodies endowed with enzymatic properties have been described in human autoimmune manifestations for more than a decade in a variety of disorders such as autoimmune thyroiditis, systemic erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS) and acquired hemophilia (AH). Antibodies isolated from these conditions were able to specifically hydrolyze thyroglobulin, DNA, RNA, myelin basic protein (MBP), and factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. The therapeutic relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:21624820

  20. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on oral manifestations of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome in South India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. V. S. Eswara; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Kattappagari, Kiran Kumar; Kantheti, Lalith Prakash Chandra; Poosarla, Chandrasekhar; Baddam, Venkat Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a global health problem, although the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease into a manageable disease with improved quality-of-life mainly in the developed countries. Very few studies are available regarding effect of HAART on oral lesions in developing countries like India. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to document and compare oral lesions in HIV-seropositive patients before and after HAART. Materials and Methods: Oral manifestations were recorded in 320 HIV seropositive patients attending to the Voluntary Counseling and Confidential Testing Centre at the Government General Hospital, Guntur, before and after treating with HAART and the results were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Oral Candidiasis was significantly reduced in patients under HAART after 3 months. Furthermore, there was decreased incidence of periodontal diseases, but increased hyperpigmentation in patients undergoing HAART. Conclusion: The oral manifestations of HIV infection have changed due to the advent of HAART. Many opportunistic infections have resolved as a result of an improved immune system. Though the risk of hyperpigmentation in those with HAART has increased the prevalence of oral candidiasis and periodontal diseases were less in patients who had access to HAART. PMID:26392652

  1. The Burden of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    De Vuyst, Hugo; Alemany, Laia; Lacey, Charles; Chibwesha, Carla J.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant; Banura, Cecily; Denny, Lynette; Parham, Groesbeck P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the scarcity of high quality cancer registries and lack of reliable mortality data, it is clear that human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases, particularly cervical cancer, are major causes of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Cervical cancer incidence rates in SSA are the highest in the world and the disease is the most common cause of cancer death among women in the region. The high incidence of cervical cancer is a consequence of the inability of most countries to either initiate or sustain cervical cancer prevention services. In addition, it appears that the prevalence of HPV in women with normal cytology is higher than in more developed areas of the world, at an average of 24%. There is, however, significant regional variation in SSA, with the highest incidence of HPV infection and cervical cancer found in Eastern and Western Africa. It is expected that, due to aging and growth of the population, but also to lack of access to appropriate prevention services and the concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in SSA will rise over the next 20 years. HPV16 and 18 are the most common genotypes in cervical cancer in SSA, although other carcinogenic HPV types, such as HPV45 and 35, are also relatively more frequent compared with other world regions. Data on other HPV-related anogenital cancers including those of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis, are limited. Genital warts are common and associated with HPV types 6 and 11. HIV infection increases incidence and prevalence of all HPV-associated diseases. Sociocultural determinants of HPV-related disease, as well as the impact of forces that result in social destabilization, demand further study. Strategies to reduce the excessive burden of HPV-related diseases in SSA include age-appropriate prophylactic HPV vaccination, cervical cancer prevention services for women of the reproductive

  2. Disease Ontology 2015 update: An expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    SciTech Connect

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M.

    2014-10-27

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. In conclusion, this will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning.

  3. Disease Ontology 2015 update: An expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; et al

    2014-10-27

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years.more » These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. In conclusion, this will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning.« less

  4. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Warren A; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J; Binder, Janos X; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. PMID:25348409

  5. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data

    PubMed Central

    Kibbe, Warren A.; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J.; Binder, Janos X.; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. PMID:25348409

  6. Plant polyphenols as dietary antioxidants in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan

    2009-01-01

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites of plants and are generally involved in defense against ultraviolet radiation or aggression by pathogens. In the last decade, there has been much interest in the potential health benefits of dietary plant polyphenols as antioxidant. Epidemiological studies and associated meta-analyses strongly suggest that long term consumption of diets rich in plant polyphenols offer protection against development of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, osteoporosis and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we present knowledge about the biological effects of plant polyphenols in the context of relevance to human health. PMID:20716914

  7. Progress in Mining the Human Proteome for Disease Applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Currently available technologies allow in-depth analysis of multiple facets of the proteome that have clinical relevance and that complement current genomics-based approaches. Although some progress has been made in our knowledge of the human proteome in health and in disease, there is an urgent need to chart a coherent road map with clearly defined milestones to guide proteomics efforts. Areas of emphasis include: (1) building resources, (2) filling gaps in our understanding of biological variation, and (3) systematically characterizing proteome alterations that occur in well-defined disease states, all of which require an organized and collaborative effort. PMID:21375461

  8. Therapeutic modulators of STAT signalling for human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Gabriella; Hilliard, Tyvette S.; Turkson, James

    2014-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have important roles in biological processes. The abnormal activation of STAT signalling pathways is also implicated in many human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and diabetes. Over a decade has passed since the first inhibitor of a STAT protein was reported and efforts to discover modulators of STAT signalling as therapeutics continue. This Review discusses the outcomes of the ongoing drug discovery research endeavours against STAT proteins, provides perspectives on new directions for accelerating the discovery of drug candidates, and highlights the noteworthy candidate therapeutics that have progressed to clinical trials. PMID:23903221

  9. Therapeutic modulators of STAT signalling for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Gabriella; Hilliard, Tyvette S; Turkson, James

    2013-08-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have important roles in biological processes. The abnormal activation of STAT signalling pathways is also implicated in many human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and diabetes. Over a decade has passed since the first inhibitor of a STAT protein was reported and efforts to discover modulators of STAT signalling as therapeutics continue. This Review discusses the outcomes of the ongoing drug discovery research endeavours against STAT proteins, provides perspectives on new directions for accelerating the discovery of drug candidates, and highlights the noteworthy candidate therapeutics that have progressed to clinical trials. PMID:23903221

  10. Clan Genomics and the Complex Architecture of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, John W.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Human diseases are caused by alleles that encompass the full range of variant types, from single-nucleotide changes to copy-number variants, and these variations span a broad frequency spectrum, from the very rare to the common. The picture emerging from analysis of whole-genome sequences, the 1000 Genomes Project pilot studies, and targeted genomic sequencing derived from very large sample sizes reveals an abundance of rare and private variants. One implication of this realization is that recent mutation may have a greater influence on disease susceptibility or protection than is conferred by variations that arose in distant ancestors. PMID:21962505

  11. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

    PubMed

    Kanherkar, Riya R; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called "cellular Rosetta stones" because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  12. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanherkar, Riya R.; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called “cellular Rosetta stones” because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  13. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  14. Human rabies: a reemerging disease in Costa Rica?

    PubMed

    Badilla, Xiomara; Pérez-Herra, Victor; Quirós, Ligia; Morice, Ana; Jiménez, Edwin; Sáenz, Elizabeth; Salazar, Fernando; Fernández, Rodrigo; Orciari, Lillian; Yager, Pamela; Whitfield, Sylvia; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2003-06-01

    Two human rabies cases caused by a bat-associated virus variant were identified in September 2001 in Costa Rica, after a 31-year absence of the disease in humans. Both patients lived in a rural area where cattle had a high risk for bat bites, but neither person had a definitive history of being bitten by a rabid animal. Characterization of the rabies viruses from the patients showed that the reservoir was the hematophagous Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus, and that a sick cat was the vector. PMID:12781014

  15. Psychopathology in 90 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients with mostly intravenous drug use history.

    PubMed

    Perretta, P; Nisita, C; Zaccagnini, E; Lorenzetti, C; Nuccorini, A; Cassano, G B; Akiskal, H S

    1996-01-01

    This report presents systematic clinical data regarding psychiatric diagnoses, personal and family psychiatric histories, and symptomatologic aspects of 90 consecutive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, of whom slightly less than two thirds were at risk due to intravenous drug abuse. In addition, a comparison was made between the distribution patterns of these variables at various stages of HIV illness and related at-risk behaviors. Eighty-four percent of the patients met criteria for a spectrum of DSM-III-R diagnoses (mostly affective) that were associated with high rates of affective and alcohol abuse disorders among first-degree relatives. Mood disorders did not differ significantly between the two main groups at risk (intravenous drug users [IVDUs] v others) by gender, age, or stage of illness. The overall data from the rating scales show high levels of psychic and somatic anxiety in the early stages of illness, whereas cognitive symptoms, retardation, and disorientation are dominant in later stages. A noteworthy finding in this study is that many depressed patients demonstrated current and/or past hypomanic, hyperthymic, or cyclothymic features with no evidence of brain damage detectable by computed axial tomography (CAT). These temperamental attributes, which preceded HIV infection, may have served as risk factors for both drug abuse and impulsive sexual behavior in all types of at-risk groups. PMID:8826691

  16. Decreased expression of human class II antigens on monocytes from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Increased expression with interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Kelley, V E; Strom, T B; Mayer, K; Shapiro, H M; Mandel, R; Finberg, R

    1984-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR (a class II histocompatibility antigen) on monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was investigated by the use of dual fluorescent staining and cytofluorometry. In animal models the absence of class II positive monocytes is linked to a failure of T cells to respond to antigens. We now report that patients with AIDS have a paucity of HLA-DR+ monocytes. The percentage of HLA-DR+ monocytes among eight normal individuals ranged from 49.3 to 95.0%+, and only one individual had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes. HLA-DR expression on monocytes from homosexual male patients with lymphadenopathy was similar to that of normal subjects (range, 58.0 to 97.4%+). In contrast, seven of nine patients with AIDS had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes (range, 13.4 to 78.8%+). The in vitro incubation of monocytes from AIDS patients with cloned human interferon-gamma resulted in an increase of the expression of HLA-DR to near normal levels. PMID:6439741

  17. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the “Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer”. Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Comorbidities and Treatment”, “Public Health Perspectives”, and “Best Practices”. This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:24227993

  18. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:26577109

  19. Behaviors Influencing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in the Context of Positive Prevention among People Living with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Seyed Ramin; Sedaghat, Abbas; Banihashemi, Arash Tehrani; Gouya, Mohammadmehdi; Rawson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identifying factors, which influence health behaviors is critical to designing appropriate and effective preventive programs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is highly related to people behaviors and understanding factors influencing healthy behaviors among Iranian people living with HIVs (PLHIVs)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is very important to tailor an effective response to HIV/AIDS epidemic. Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative study by methods of focus group discussion and in-depth interview in six provinces of Iran with 64 PLHIVs to determine factors influence engagement in positive prevention. Results: Knowledge and education, feelings of responsibility and positive prevention practices were identified as the primary domains of engagement. These domains were found to be influenced by feelings of ostracism and frustration, poverty, barriers to disclosure of HIV status, access to and utilization of drug abuse treatment services and antiretroviral therapy, adherence to treatment, age, religiousness, sex work, singleness, and incarceration. Conclusions: Designing new interventions and updating current interventions directed toward the aforementioned factors should be addressed by responsible Iranian authorities in order to have a national effective response on the HIV/AIDS epidemic. PMID:25489445

  20. l-carnosine dipeptide overcomes acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in HT29 human colon cancer cells via downregulation of HIF1-alpha and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Guardia, Francesca; Irace, Carlo; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) protein is over-expressed in many human cancers and is a major cause of resistance to drugs. HIF-1α up-regulation decreases the effectiveness of several anticancer agents, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), because it induces the expression of drug efflux transporters, alters DNA repair mechanisms and modifies the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic factors. These findings suggest that inhibition of HIF-1α activity may sensitize cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. We previously reported that l-carnosine reduces HIF-1α expression by inhibiting the proliferation of colon cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the effect of l-carnosine on HT29 colon cancer cells with acquired resistance to 5-FU. We found that l-carnosine reduces colon cancer cell viability, decreases HIF-1α and multi-drug resistant protein MDR1-pg expression, and induces apoptosis. Moreover, the l-carnosine/5-FU combination lowers the expression of some chemoresistance markers. The combination index evaluated in vitro on the HT29-5FU cell line by median drug effect analysis reveals a significant synergistic effect. PMID:27234614

  1. Acquired von Willebrand disease--hemostatic management of major orthopedic surgery with high-dose immunoglobulin, desmopressin, and continuous factor concentrate infusion.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rolf Dario; Kunz, Dagmar; Wirtz, Dieter Christian

    2002-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (aVWD) is a rare bleeding disorder that mimics congenital VWD in previously healthy individuals; it is most frequently associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Hemostatic therapy of aVWD is challenging due to the extremely shortened half-life of endogenous and exogenous VWF. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (ivIG) is recommended as the treatment of choice, usually rapidly normalizing coagulation; but in case of failure, alternative treatment options are not well explored. We report successful major orthopedic surgery in a 61-year-old woman with multiple myeloma IgG lambda and aVWD. IvIG alone failed to correct hemostasis. However, ivIG pretreatment improved the VWF ristocetin cofactor (VWF:RCo) half-life from only 1.5 hr to more than 4 hr, allowing desmopressin infusions twice daily to maintain sufficient VWF:RCo levels. Because of diminishing desmopressin effect, we attempted for the first time in aVWD a continuous VWF/FVIII infusion (Haemate HS), 2.1-2.7 FVIII U/kg/hr or 51-64 U/kg/day, respectively 4.6-6.0 VWF:RCo U/kg/hr or 110-145 U/kg/day) to reach constant factor levels. The steady-state clearance was 2.4 mL/kg/hr for FVIII:C and 13.5 mL/kg/hr for VWF:RCo. During surgery, VWF:RCo, FVIII:C, and PFA-100 closure time were normalized. Until day 5, VWF:RCo was kept above 50%, from day 6 to 10 at least 30% activity were attained. FVIII:C levels were always >70%. The clinical course was uneventful without bleeding. Two weeks after hip surgery the patient was discharged from the hospital without complaints. The therapy described can be recommended as safe and feasible for further evaluation in aVWD patients who are hyporesponsive to ivIG treatment alone. Continuous VWF/FVIII infusion can improve substitution therapy in aVWD. PMID:11994985

  2. Olfactory Cilia: Linking Sensory Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul M.; McEwen, Dyke P.

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory system gives us an awareness of our immediate environment by allowing us to detect airborne stimuli. The components necessary for detection of these odorants are compartmentalized in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. Cilia are microtubule-based organelles, which can be found projecting from the surface of almost any mammalian cell, and are critical for proper olfactory function. Mislocalization of ciliary proteins and/or the loss of cilia cause impaired olfactory function, which is now recognized as a clinical manifestation of a broad class of human diseases, termed ciliopathies. Future work investigating the mechanisms of olfactory cilia function will provide us important new information regarding the pathogenesis of human sensory perception diseases. PMID:19406873

  3. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    STEFANO, GEORGE B.; KREAM, RICHARD M.

    2016-01-01

    The biomedical literature has extensively documented the functional roles of genetic polymorphisms in concert with well-characterized somatic mutations in the etiology and progression of major metastatic diseases afflicting human populations. Mitochondrial heteroplasmy exists as a dynamically determined co-expression of inherited polymorphisms and somatic mutations in varying ratios within individual mitochondrial DNA genomes with repetitive patterns of tissue specificity. Mechanistically, carcinogenic cellular processes include profound alterations of normative mitochondrial function, notably dependence on aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, and aberrant production and release of lactate, according to a classic theory. Within the translational context of human health and disease, the present review discusses the necessity of establishing critical foci designed to probe multiple biological roles of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in cancer biology. PMID:26998260

  4. Mitochondrial Protein Import and Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, James A.; Mark Payne, R.

    2009-01-01

    The targeting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins are essential processes because the energy supply of humans is dependent upon the proper functioning of mitochondria. Defective import of mitochondrial proteins can arise from mutations in the targeting signals within precursor proteins, from mutations that disrupt the proper functioning of the import machinery, or from deficiencies in the chaperones involved in the proper folding and assembly of proteins once they are imported. Defects in these steps of import have been shown to lead to oxidative stress, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. In addition, protein import into mitochondria has been found to be a dynamically regulated process that varies in response to conditions such as oxidative stress, aging, drug treatment, and exercise. This review focuses on how mitochondrial protein import affects human health and disease. PMID:17300922

  5. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  6. A Novel Human Body Area Network for Brain Diseases Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Xu, Tianlang

    2016-10-01

    Development of wireless sensor and mobile communication technology provide an unprecedented opportunity for realizing smart and interactive healthcare systems. Designing such systems aims to remotely monitor the health and diagnose the diseases for users. In this paper, we design a novel human body area network for brain diseases analysis, which is named BABDA. Considering the brain is one of the most complex organs in the human body, the BABDA system provides four function modules to ensure the high quality of the analysis result, which includes initial data collection, data correction, data transmission and comprehensive data analysis. The performance evaluation conducted in a realistic environment with several criteria shows the availability and practicability of the BABDA system. PMID:27526187

  7. Assessing the Human Gut Microbiota in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Tremaroli, Valentina; Nielsen, Jens; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that the gut microbiome complements our human genome with at least 100-fold more genes. In contrast to our Homo sapiens–derived genes, the microbiome is much more plastic, and its composition changes with age and diet, among other factors. An altered gut microbiota has been associated with several diseases, including obesity and diabetes, but the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we discuss factors that affect the gut microbiome, how the gut microbiome may contribute to metabolic diseases, and how to study the gut microbiome. Next-generation sequencing and development of software packages have led to the development of large-scale sequencing efforts to catalog the human microbiome. Furthermore, the use of genetically engineered gnotobiotic mouse models may increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the gut microbiome modulates host metabolism. A combination of classical microbiology, sequencing, and animal experiments may provide further insights into how the gut microbiota affect host metabolism and physiology. PMID:24065795

  8. Inositol lipid phosphatases in membrane trafficking and human disease.

    PubMed

    Billcliff, Peter G; Lowe, Martin

    2014-07-15

    The specific interaction of phosphoinositides with proteins is critical for a plethora of cellular processes, including cytoskeleton remodelling, mitogenic signalling, ion channel regulation and membrane traffic. The spatiotemporal restriction of different phosphoinositide species helps to define compartments within the cell, and this is particularly important for membrane trafficking within both the secretory and endocytic pathways. Phosphoinositide homoeostasis is tightly regulated by a large number of inositol kinases and phosphatases, which respectively phosphorylate and dephosphorylate distinct phosphoinositide species. Many of these enzymes have been implicated in regulating membrane trafficking and, accordingly, their dysregulation has been linked to a number of human diseases. In the present review, we focus on the inositol phosphatases, concentrating on their roles in membrane trafficking and the human diseases with which they have been associated. PMID:24966051

  9. Opposite effects of actively and passively acquired immunity to the carrier on responses of human infants to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Barington, T; Gyhrs, A; Kristensen, K; Heilmann, C

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to carrier proteins has proven protective against invasive Hib diseases in several trials. However, insufficient immunogenicity has been noted in certain populations. Therefore, studies analyzing factors influencing the antibody response to conjugate vaccines are needed. In this study, the response to HibCP coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) was examined in relation to (i) priming with or coadministration of the carrier protein and (ii) the levels of passively acquired maternal TT antibodies. One hundred forty-four infants were vaccinated with HibCP-TT at 5 and 6 months. They were randomized into three groups that received TT as part of a diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine at either 6 and 7 months (group A), 5 and 6 months (group B), or 4 and 5 months (group C). Maternally acquired TT antibodies inhibited the anti-HibCP response to the first HibCP-TT dose in groups A and B (r = -0.5 and -0.4, respectively; P < 0.005). In these groups, infants with prevaccination anti-TT levels above the median failed to reach the defined long-term protective level of HibCP antibodies (1 microgram/ml) more often than infants with low prevaccination levels after the first (P = 0.0001) and the second (P = 0.01) doses of HibCP-TT. In contrast, active priming with TT at 4 months resulted in a threefold-higher median level of anti-HibCP (group C; 1.34 micrograms/ml) than in the unprimed group (group A; 0.40 microgram/ml) after the first dose of HibCP-TT (P = 0.01). Coadministration of TT had no enhancing effect (group B; 0.58 microgram/ml). No significant differences between the median anti-HibCP levels were seen after the second HibCP-TT dose (6.72, 9.63, and 11.44 micrograms/ml in groups A, B, and C, respectively; P = 0.25). PMID:8262653

  10. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  11. Beyond the zebrafish: diverse fish species for modeling human disease

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, zebrafish, and to a lesser extent medaka, have become widely used small animal models for human diseases. These organisms have convincingly demonstrated the usefulness of fish for improving our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to pathological conditions, and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Despite the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka in the investigation of a wide spectrum of traits, there is evidence to suggest that other fish species could be better suited for more targeted questions. With the emergence of new, improved sequencing technologies that enable genomic resources to be generated with increasing efficiency and speed, the potential of non-mainstream fish species as disease models can now be explored. A key feature of these fish species is that the pathological condition that they model is often related to specific evolutionary adaptations. By exploring these adaptations, new disease-causing and disease-modifier genes might be identified; thus, diverse fish species could be exploited to better understand the complexity of disease processes. In addition, non-mainstream fish models could allow us to study the impact of environmental factors, as well as genetic variation, on complex disease phenotypes. This Review will discuss the opportunities that such fish models offer for current and future biomedical research. PMID:24271780

  12. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  13. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B.; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C.; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S.; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  14. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  15. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease? Reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S.; Hudson, Peter J.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2016-01-01

    The dilution effect is the sort of idea that everyone wants to be true. If nature protects humans against infectious disease, imagine the implications: nature's value could be tallied in terms of human suffering avoided. This makes a potent argument for conservation, convincing even to those who would otherwise be disinclined to support conservation initiatives. The appeal of the dilution effect has been recognized by others: “the desire to make the case for conservation has led to broad claims regarding the benefits of nature conservation for human health” (Bauch et al. 2015). Randolph and Dobson (2012) were among the first to critique these claims, making the case that promotion of conservation to reduce Lyme disease risk, although well intentioned, was flawed. Along with Randolph and Dobson's critique, there have been several calls for a more nuanced scientific assessment of the relationship between biodiversity and disease transmission (Dunn 2010, Salkeld et al. 2013, Wood and Lafferty 2013, Young et al. 2013). In response, supporters of the dilution effect have instead increased the scope of their generalizations with review papers, press releases, and, like Levi et al. (2015), letters. These responses have been successful; it is not uncommon to read papers that repeat the assertion that biodiversity generally interferes with disease transmission and that conservation will therefore generally benefit human health. Here, we explain how Levi et al. (2015) and other, similar commentaries use selective interpretation and shifting definitions to argue for the generality of the dilution effect hypothesis.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Human Radiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments. PMID:26406369

  17. Successful human epidermal growth receptor 2-targeted therapy beyond disease progression for extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satomi; Takeda, Masayuki; Takahama, Takayuki; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Tsurutani, Junji; Tanizaki, Junko; Shimizu, Toshio; Sakai, Kazuko; Wada, Yoshitaka; Isogai, Noritaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease is a malignant intraepithelial carcinoma, which constitutes less than 1 % of all vulvar malignancies. Surgical resection is the first treatment of choice and standard chemotherapy has not been established for advanced or recurrent disease. Experimental and clinical studies have identified human epidermal growth receptor 2 as a potential therapeutic target. A 63-year-old male was referred for recurrent extramammary Paget's disease after surgery. Human epidermal growth receptor 2 was shown to be overexpressed and amplified by immunohistochemical analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, respectively. After two cycles of trastuzumab monotherapy, all lymph node metastases decreased in size. However, he experienced recurrence in the lymph nodes during the seven courses of trastuzumab. As a subsequent treatment, trastuzumab was administered in combination with docetaxel and pertuzumab; clinical response was sustained for 12 months without significant adverse events. PMID:26856856

  18. G-quadruplex nucleic acids and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuliang; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate DNA structures that deviate from B-form double-stranded DNA such as G-quadruplex (G4) DNA can be formed by sequences that are widely distributed throughout the human genome. G-quadruplex secondary structures, formed by the stacking of planar quartets composed of four guanines that interact by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding, can affect cellular DNA replication and transcription, and influence genomic stability. The unique metabolism of G-rich chromosomal regions that potentially form quadruplexes may influence a number of biological processes including immunoglobulin gene rearrangements, promoter activation and telomere maintenance. A number of human diseases are characterized by telomere defects, and it is proposed that G-quadruplex structures which form at telomere ends play an important role in telomere stability. Evidence from cellular studies and model organisms suggests that diseases with known defects in G4 DNA helicases are likely to be perturbed in telomere maintenance and cellular DNA replication. In this minireview, we discuss the connections of G-quadruplex nucleic acids to human genetic diseases and cancer based on the recent literature. PMID:20670277

  19. The human gut microbiome impacts health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiome can now be characterized in unprecedented detail by an approach based on high-throughput sequencing of total stool DNA, that we name quantitative metagenomics. Central to the approach is a catalog that lists all the genes of intestinal microbes that are known - 9.9 millions, identified by the analysis of 1267 stool samples. Beyond the gene list, genetic units that carry them begun to be known; many of these correspond to bacterial species that were never isolated and cultured yet. Quantitative metagenomics allows developing powerful algorithms to diagnose a disease, monitor patients and identify individuals at risk to progress towards a disease. This lays ground for developing new approaches to better restore and even preserve the health by modulation of the altered microbiome, which contributes to promote or aggravate a disease. PMID:27236827

  20. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for novel therapies and preventative strategies. Present animal models include several target species for hRSV, including chimpanzees, cattle, sheep, cotton rats, and mice, as well as alternative animal pneumovirus models, such as bovine RSV and pneumonia virus of mice. These diverse animal models reproduce different features of hRSV disease, and their utilization should therefore be based on the scientific hypothesis under investigation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the strengths and limitations of each of these animal models. Our intent is to provide a resource for investigators and an impetus for future research. PMID:21571908

  1. Coronary Artery Disease in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Population.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Michael G; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient combined antiretroviral therapies has lengthened the mean life span of the population affected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transforming this terminal infection to a chronic yet manageable disease. Nonetheless, patients with HIV--treatment naive or not--exhibit larger risks for coronary artery disease than the noninfected population. Moreover, coronary atherosclerosis/arteriosclerosis may be the most prevalent condition in the HIV-infected population that is being accentuated by the effects of viral agents and the antiretroviral drugs, especially protease inhibitors. Nonetheless, generalized metabolic dysfunctions and premature senescence are often attributed to the viremia caused by the HIV infection directly and primarily. Therefore, a multifactorial approach is to be considered when attempting to explain the strong correlation between HIV and coronary artery disease, including co-opportunistic viremias and vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency. PMID:23797758

  2. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  3. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  4. Interconversion of the specificities of human lysosomal enzymes associated with Fabry and Schindler diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomasic, Ivan B; Metcalf, Matthew C; Guce, Abigail I; Clark, Nathaniel E; Garman, Scott C

    2010-07-01

    The human lysosomal enzymes alpha-galactosidase (alpha-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of alpha- GAL and alpha-NAGAL. The engineered alpha-GAL (which we call alpha-GAL(SA)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of alpha-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered alpha-NAGAL (which we call alpha-NAGAL(EL)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the alpha-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme alpha-GAL(SA) to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of alpha-GAL(SA) and alpha-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease. PMID:20444686

  5. Multiscale analysis of the murine intestine for modeling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jesse; Herring, Charles A.; Banerjee, Amrita; Simmons, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    When functioning properly, the intestine is one of the key interfaces between the human body and its environment. It is responsible for extracting nutrients from our food and excreting our waste products. It provides an environment for a host of healthful microbes and serves as a first defense against pathogenic ones. These processes require tight homeostatic controls, which are provided by the interactions of a complex mix of epithelial, stromal, neural and immune cells, as well as the resident microflora. This homeostasis can be disrupted by invasive microbes, genetic lesions, and carcinogens, resulting in diseases such Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer. Enormous strides have been made in understanding how this important organ functions in health and disease using everything from cell culture systems to animal models to human tissue samples. This has resulted in better therapies for all of these diseases, but there is still significant room for improvement. In the United States alone, 14000 people per year die of C. difficile, up to 1.6 million people suffer from IBD, and more than 50000 people die every year from colon cancer. Because these and other intestinal diseases arise from complex interactions between the different components of the gut ecosystem, we propose that systems approaches that address this complexity in an integrative manner may eventually lead to improved therapeutics that deliver lasting cures. This review will discuss the use of systems biology for studying intestinal diseases in vivo with particular emphasis on mouse models. Additionally, it will focus on established experimental techniques that have been used to drive this systems-level analysis, and emerging techniques that will push this field forward in the future. PMID:26040649

  6. Molecular clocks and the human condition: approaching their characterization in human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G A; Yang, G; Paschos, G K; Liang, X; Skarke, C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing, affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behaviour and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function. PMID:26332979

  7. The roles of Jumonji-type oxygenases in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catrine; Tumber, Anthony; Che, KaHing; Cain, Peter; Nowak, Radoslaw; Gileadi, Carina; Oppermann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases constitute a phylogenetically conserved class of enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation reactions in humans by acting on various types of substrates, including metabolic intermediates, amino acid residues in different proteins and various types of nucleic acids. The discovery of jumonji (Jmj), the founding member of a class of Jmj-type chromatin-modifying enzymes and transcriptional regulators, has culminated in the discovery of several branches of histone lysine demethylases, with essential functions in regulating the epigenetic landscape of the chromatin environment. This work has now been considerably expanded into other aspects of epigenetic biology and includes the discovery of enzymatic steps required for methyl-cytosine demethylation, as well as modification of RNA and ribosomal proteins. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge on the human Jmj-type enzymes and their involvement in human pathological processes, including development, cancer, inflammation and metabolic diseases. PMID:24579949

  8. mTOR, translational control and human disease.

    PubMed

    Tee, Andrew R; Blenis, John

    2005-02-01

    Many human diseases occur when the precise regulation of cell growth (cell mass/size) and proliferation (rates of cell division) is compromised. This review highlights those human disorders that occur as a result of inappropriate cellular signal transduction through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major pathway that coordinates proper cell growth and proliferation by regulating ribosomal biogenesis and protein translation. Recent studies reveal that the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-1/2, PTEN, and LKB1 tumor suppressor proteins tightly control mTOR. Loss of these tumor suppressors leads to an array of hamartoma syndromes as a result of heightened mTOR signaling. Since mTOR plays a pivotal role in maintaining proper cell size and growth, dysregulation of mTOR signaling results in these benign tumor syndromes and an array of other human disorders. PMID:15659337

  9. The versatile functions of Sox9 in development, stem cells, and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Alice; Denduluri, Sahitya; Zhang, Bosi; Wang, Zhongliang; Yin, Liangjun; Yan, Zhengjian; Kang, Richard; Shi, Lewis L.; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox9 was first discovered in patients with campomelic dysplasia, a haploinsufficiency disorder with skeletal deformities caused by dysregulation of Sox9 expression during chondrogenesis. Since then, its role as a cell fate determiner during embryonic development has been well characterized; Sox9 expression differentiates cells derived from all three germ layers into a large variety of specialized tissues and organs. However, recent data has shown that ectoderm- and endoderm-derived tissues continue to express Sox9 in mature organs and stem cell pools, suggesting its role in cell maintenance and specification during adult life. The versatility of Sox9 may be explained by a combination of post-transcriptional modifications, binding partners, and the tissue type in which it is expressed. Considering its importance during both development and adult life, it follows that dysregulation of Sox9 has been implicated in various congenital and acquired diseases, including fibrosis and cancer. This review provides a summary of the various roles of Sox9 in cell fate specification, stem cell biology, and related human diseases. Ultimately, understanding the mechanisms that regulate Sox9 will be crucial for developing effective therapies to treat disease caused by stem cell dysregulation or even reverse organ damage. PMID:25685828

  10. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation. PMID:26061765

  11. Functions of NOD-Like Receptors in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yifei; Kinio, Anna; Saleh, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are highly conserved cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that perform critical functions in surveying the intracellular environment for the presence of infection, noxious substances, and metabolic perturbations. Sensing of these danger signals by NLRs leads to their oligomerization into large macromolecular scaffolds and the rapid deployment of effector signaling cascades to restore homeostasis. While some NLRs operate by recruiting and activating inflammatory caspases into inflammasomes, others trigger inflammation via alternative routes including the nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and regulatory factor pathways. The critical role of NLRs in development and physiology is demonstrated by their clear implications in human diseases. Mutations in the genes encoding NLRP3 or NLRP12 lead to hereditary periodic fever syndromes, while mutations in CARD15 that encodes NOD2 are linked to Crohn’s disease or Blau’s syndrome. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a number of risk alleles encompassing NLR genes in a host of diseases including allergic rhinitis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multi-bacillary leprosy, vitiligo, early-onset menopause, and bone density loss in elderly women. Animal models have allowed the characterization of underlying effector mechanisms in a number of cases. In this review, we highlight the functions of NLRs in health and disease and discuss how the characterization of their molecular mechanisms provides new insights into therapeutic strategies for the management of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:24137163

  12. Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 uveitis after Graves' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, K; Mochizuki, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshimura, K; Shirao, M; Araki, S; Miyata, N; Mori, S; Kiyokawa, T; Takatsuki, K

    1994-01-01

    A distinct clinical entity of uveitis associated with human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been reported previously. During the period between January 1989 and April 1992, 93 patients were observed with HTLV-I uveitis and a significant correlation was found between Graves' disease and HTLV-I uveitis. Sixteen of the 93 patients with HTLV-I uveitis (17.2%) had a previous history of Graves' disease. Fifteen patients were female (15/60, 25.0%) and one was male (1/33, 3.0%). Interestingly, uveitis occurred after the onset of Graves' disease in all cases. On the other hand, none of 222 patients with idiopathic uveitis who were seronegative to HTLV-I had a history of Graves' disease. Although the mechanisms by which HTLV-I causes the correlation between uveitis and Graves' disease are unknown, the present data suggest that immune mediated or autoimmune mechanisms are involved in HTLV-I uveitis. Images PMID:8148330

  13. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. PMID:26615955

  14. Recommendations for assisting in the prevention of perinatal transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    The majority of cases of pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are transmitted perinatally. 165 (76%) of the cases of AIDS in children under 13 years of age reported as of December 1, 1985, in the US had as the only known risk factor a mother from a high-risk group. However, perinatal transmission from an infected mother to her infant is not automatic; studies have placed the rate of transmission from 0%-65%. A concern in addition to the risk posed to infants born to infected mothers is evidence of an increased likelihood of developing full-blown AIDS when infection with the AIDS virus occurs in association in pregnancy. Target groups for counseling and testing for antibodies to the AIDS virus should include pregnant women or those who may become pregnant who already have evidence of AIDS infection, are intravenous drug abusers, were born in countries where there is a high rate of heterosexual transmission of AIDS, are prostitutes, or are the sexual partners of men in high-risk groups. Such counseling and testing should be made available through the settings that women at increased risk frequent, including drug abuse treatment programs and sexually transmitted diseases clinics. Infected women should be advised to delay pregnancy until more is known about the perinatal transmission of AIDS. Pregnancy infected women should be closely monitored for the development of opportunistic infections as well as psychosocial difficulties. Although these recommendations pertain to women, men who are infected with the AIDS virus also should be counseled about risks of perinatal transmission. PMID:2999576

  15. Camel Streptococcus agalactiae populations are associated with specific disease complexes and acquired the tetracycline resistance gene tetM via a Tn916-like element

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Camels are the most valuable livestock species in the Horn of Africa and play a pivotal role in the nutritional sustainability for millions of people. Their health status is therefore of utmost importance for the people living in this region. Streptococcus agalactiae, a Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an important camel pathogen. Here we present the first epidemiological study based on genetic and phenotypic data from African camel derived GBS. Ninety-two GBS were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), capsular polysaccharide typing and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We analysed the GBS using Bayesian linkage, phylogenetic and minimum spanning tree analyses and compared them with human GBS from East Africa in order to investigate the level of genetic exchange between GBS populations in the region. Camel GBS sequence types (STs) were distinct from other STs reported so far. We mapped specific STs and capsular types to major disease complexes caused by GBS. Widespread resistance (34%) to tetracycline was associated with acquisition of the tetM gene that is carried on a Tn916-like element, and observed primarily among GBS isolated from mastitis. The presence of tetM within different MLST clades suggests acquisition on multiple occasions. Wound infections and mastitis in camels associated with GBS are widespread and should ideally be treated with antimicrobials other than tetracycline in East Africa. PMID:24083845

  16. 75 FR 52356 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: National Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: National Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Behavioral...

  17. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  18. Helicobacter pylori-infected MSCs acquire a pro-inflammatory phenotype and induce human gastric cancer migration by promoting EMT in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; DING, JUAN; LIU, JINJUN; WANG, WEI; ZHANG, FENG; WANG, JUNHE; LI, YUYUN

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence has suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated gastric cancer (GC) is associated with high rates of mortality and serious health effects. The majority of patients succumb to H. pylori infection-associated GC due to metastasis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have multipotent differentiation potential, may be recruited into the tumor-associated stroma. MSCs are crucial components of the H. pylori infection-associated GC microenvironment, and may be critical for GC cell migration. In this study, an MSCs/H. pylori co-culture model was designed, and the effect of H. pylori-infected MSCs on the migration of GC cells was evaluated using a Transwell migration assay. H. pylori-infected MSC cytokine expression was evaluated using Luminex/ELISA. The expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in the GC cells treated with supernatants from H. pylori-infected MSCs were detected by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the interaction between MSCs and H. pylori may induce GC cell migration, through secretion of a combination of cytokines that promote EMT in GC cells. The expression of phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was observed to be increased in MSCs by H. pylori. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate blocked the effects of H. pylori-infected MSCs on SGC-7901 human stomach adenocarcinoma cell migration. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that H. pylori-infected MSCs acquire a pro-inflammatory phenotype through secretion of a combination of multiple cytokines, a number of which are NF-κB-dependent. These cytokines enhance H. pylori infection-associated GC cell migration by promoting EMT in GC cells. The results of the present study provide novel evidence for the modulatory effect of MSCs in the tumor microenvironment and provide insight into the significance of stromal cell involvement in GC progression

  19. Essential veterinary education in emerging infections, modes of introduction of exotic animals, zoonotic diseases, bioterrorism, implications for human and animal health and disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B B; Marano, N

    2009-08-01

    A fundamental role of the veterinary profession is the protection of human health through wholesome food and control of diseases of animal origin, especially zoonoses. Therefore, training of veterinary students worldwide needs to face the new challenges posed by emerging infections, both from wildlife and domestic animals, as well as risks from bio/agroterrorism. New courses emphasising recognition, response, recovery and prevention must be developed to respond to natural or intentionally induced emerging diseases and zoonoses. Training programmes in applied epidemiology, zoonoses and foreign animal diseases are crucial for the development of a strong workforce to deal with microbial threats. Students should learn the reporting pathways for reportable diseases in their countries or states. Knowledge of the principles of ecology and ecosystems should be acquired during pre-veterinary studies. Elective classes on wildlife diseases, emphasising wildlife zoonotic diseases, should be offered during the veterinary curriculum, as well as a course on risk communication, since veterinarians are frequently in the position of having to convey complex information under adverse circumstances. PMID:20128464

  20. Global change and human vulnerability to vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Sutherst, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Global change includes climate change and climate variability, land use, water storage and irrigation, human population growth and urbanization, trade and travel, and chemical pollution. Impacts on vector-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, infections by other arboviruses, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and leishmaniasis are reviewed. While climate change is global in nature and poses unknown future risks to humans and natural ecosystems, other local changes are occurring more rapidly on a global scale and are having significant effects on vector-borne diseases. History is invaluable as a pointer to future risks, but direct extrapolation is no longer possible because the climate is changing. Researchers are therefore embracing computer simulation models and global change scenarios to explore the risks. Credible ranking of the extent to which different vector-borne diseases will be affected awaits a rigorous analysis. Adaptation to the changes is threatened by the ongoing loss of drugs and pesticides due to the selection of resistant strains of pathogens and vectors. The vulnerability of communities to the changes in impacts depends on their adaptive capacity, which requires both appropriate technology and responsive public health systems. The availability of resources in turn depends on social stability, economic wealth, and priority allocation of resources to public health. PMID:14726459

  1. Global Change and Human Vulnerability to Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sutherst, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Global change includes climate change and climate variability, land use, water storage and irrigation, human population growth and urbanization, trade and travel, and chemical pollution. Impacts on vector-borne diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, infections by other arboviruses, schistosomiasis, trypanosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and leishmaniasis are reviewed. While climate change is global in nature and poses unknown future risks to humans and natural ecosystems, other local changes are occurring more rapidly on a global scale and are having significant effects on vector-borne diseases. History is invaluable as a pointer to future risks, but direct extrapolation is no longer possible because the climate is changing. Researchers are therefore embracing computer simulation models and global change scenarios to explore the risks. Credible ranking of the extent to which different vector-borne diseases will be affected awaits a rigorous analysis. Adaptation to the changes is threatened by the ongoing loss of drugs and pesticides due to the selection of resistant strains of pathogens and vectors. The vulnerability of communities to the changes in impacts depends on their adaptive capacity, which requires both appropriate technology and responsive public health systems. The availability of resources in turn depends on social stability, economic wealth, and priority allocation of resources to public health. PMID:14726459

  2. Mimicking Retinal Development and Disease With Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Divya; Phillips, Jenny; Joseph Phillips, M; Gamm, David M

    2016-04-01

    As applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) continue to be refined and pursued, it is important to keep in mind that the strengths and weaknesses of this technology lie with its developmental origins. The remarkable capacity of differentiating hPSCs to recapitulate cell and tissue genesis has provided a model system to study stages of human development that were not previously amenable to investigation and experimentation. Furthermore, demonstration of developmentally appropriate, stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to specific cell types offers support for their authenticity and their suitability for use in disease modeling and cell replacement therapies. However, limitations to farming cells and tissues in an artificial culture environment, as well as the length of time required for most cells to mature, are some of the many issues to consider before using hPSCs to study or treat a particular disease. Given the overarching need to understand and modulate the dynamics of lineage-specific differentiation in stem cell cultures, this review will first examine the capacity of hPSCs to serve as models of retinal development. Thereafter, we will discuss efforts to model retinal disorders with hPSCs and present challenges that face investigators who aspire to use such systems to study disease pathophysiology and/or screen for therapeutics. We also refer readers to recent publications that provide additional insight and details on these rapidly evolving topics. PMID:27116663

  3. Functional modules, mutational load and human genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Norann A.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The ability to generate a massive amount of sequencing and genotyping data is transforming the study of human genetic disorders. Driven by such innovation, it is likely that whole exome and whole-genome resequencing will replace regionally focused approaches for gene discovery and clinical testing in the next few years. However, this opportunity brings a significant interpretative challenge to assigning function and phenotypic variance to common and rare alleles. Understanding the effect of individual mutations in the context of the remaining genomic variation represents a major challenge to our interpretation of disease. Here, we discuss the challenges of assigning mutation functionality and, drawing from the examples of ciliopathies as well as cohesinopathies and channelopathies, discuss possibilities for the functional modularization of the human genome. Functional modularization in addition to the development of physiologically-relevant assays to test allele functionality will accelerate our understanding of disease architecture and enable the use of genome-wide sequence data for disease diagnosis and phenotypic prediction in individuals. PMID:20226561

  4. TRAF molecules in cell signaling and in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R)-associated factor (TRAF) family of intracellular proteins were originally identified as signaling adaptors that bind directly to the cytoplasmic regions of receptors of the TNF-R superfamily. The past decade has witnessed rapid expansion of receptor families identified to employ TRAFs for signaling. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), T cell receptor, IL-1 receptor family, IL-17 receptors, IFN receptors and TGFβ receptors. In addition to their role as adaptor proteins, most TRAFs also act as E3 ubiquitin ligases to activate downstream signaling events. TRAF-dependent signaling pathways typically lead to the activation of nuclear factor-κBs (NF-κBs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), or interferon-regulatory factors (IRFs). Compelling evidence obtained from germ-line and cell-specific TRAF-deficient mice demonstrates that each TRAF plays indispensable and non-redundant physiological roles, regulating innate and adaptive immunity, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, stress response, and bone metabolism. Notably, mounting evidence implicates TRAFs in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as cancers and autoimmune diseases, which has sparked new appreciation and interest in TRAF research. This review presents an overview of the current knowledge of TRAFs, with an emphasis on recent findings concerning TRAF molecules in signaling and in human diseases. PMID:23758787

  5. Epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management of chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Minoru; Yanagisawa, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related deaths and opportunistic infectious diseases. This has resulted in prolonged survival of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, this improvement in survival has been accompanied by an increase in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease. CKD is now epidemic among HIV-infected populations in both Western and Eastern countries. Risk factors associated with CKD in HIV-infected populations include aging, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, co-infection with hepatitis C virus, a low CD4 cell count, and a high HIV viral load. Clinical experience has shown that HIV-infected individuals often have one or more concurrent risk factors for CKD. The cumulative effect of multiple risk factors on the development of CKD should be noted in this population. Glomerular disease directly related to HIV infection, so-called HIV-associated nephropathy, remains an important cause of CKD among a limited HIV population of African descent, but is less likely to be common among other urban HIV populations. The impact of exposure to nephrotoxic antiretroviral agents on the development of kidney disease is both an old and a new concern. In particular, the association of tenofovir with kidney tubular injury has been an area of great interest. The findings regarding tenofovir’s adverse effect on long-term kidney function vary among studies. The early identification and treatment of CKD is recommended for reducing the burden of patients requiring dialysis in HIV-infected populations. Periodic monitoring of urinary concentrations of albumin, protein, and tubular injury markers such as low-molecular-weight proteins may be useful for the early diagnosis of patients at risk for incident CKD. This review focuses on recent epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management of CKD in a contemporary HIV-infected population. PMID:26167463

  6. Primary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Head and Neck in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Clinicopathologic Study of 24 Patients in a Single Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  7. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  8. Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents an update on the clinical aspects of human prion disease, including the wide spectrum of their presentations. Recent Findings Prion diseases, a group of disorders caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions, occur in sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease), genetic (genetic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia), and acquired (kuru, variant Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, and iatrogenic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease) forms. This article presents updated information on the clinical features and diagnostic methods for human prion diseases. New antemortem potential diagnostic tests based on amplifying prions in order to detect them are showing very high specificity. Understanding of the diversity of possible presentations of human prion diseases continues to evolve, with some genetic forms progressing slowly over decades, beginning with dysautonomia and neuropathy and progressing to a frontal-executive dementia with pathology of combined prionopathy and tauopathy. Unfortunately, to date, all human prion disease clinical trials have failed to show survival benefit. A very rare polymorphism in the prion protein gene recently has been identified that appears to protect against prion disease; this finding, in addition to providing greater understanding of the prionlike mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, might lead to potential treatments. Summary Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease is the most common form of human prion disease. Genetic prion diseases, resulting from mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathologic features and can be difficult to diagnose because of their varied presentations. Perhaps most relevant to this Continuum issue on neuroinfectious diseases, acquired prion diseases are caused by accidental transmission to humans, but fortunately, they are the least common form and

  9. Type-2 innate lymphoid cells in human allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jillian L.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent decades have seen allergic diseases become endemic in a number of developed countries. Understanding the inflammatory processes that dictate these allergic responses is therefore important. Recent findings Critical to many allergic responses is the inappropriate release of the type-2 immune-regulatory cytokines: interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-9, and interleukin-13. The study of these inflammatory mediators has led directly to the development of two new asthma treatments: anti-interleukin-5 and anti-interleukin-13. Until recently, T helper 2 cells were considered to be the major cellular source of type-2 cytokines; however, a paradigm shift occurred with the discovery of a novel population, type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), that can produce huge levels of type-2 cytokines and are sufficient to induce allergy in mice. This discovery raises interesting questions about how innate and adaptive type-2 immunity might interact to induce relapsing and remitting episodes of allergy in patients. Summary It is essential that alongside the mechanistic investigation using model organisms, the roles of ILC2s in human disease be explored. Here, we discuss how ILC2 traits, discovered in mouse models, have informed research in humans and how newly identified human ILC2 pathways might provide potential therapeutic benefits in the future. PMID:25115682

  10. The burden of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases in sub-saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Hugo; Alemany, Laia; Lacey, Charles; Chibwesha, Carla J; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant; Banura, Cecily; Denny, Lynette; Parham, Groesbeck P

    2013-12-29

    Despite the scarcity of high quality cancer registries and lack of reliable mortality data, it is clear that human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases, particularly cervical cancer, are major causes of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Cervical cancer incidence rates in SSA are the highest in the world and the disease is the most common cause of cancer death among women in the region. The high incidence of cervical cancer is a consequence of the inability of most countries to either initiate or sustain cervical cancer prevention services. In addition, it appears that the prevalence of HPV in women with normal cytology is higher than in more developed areas of the world, at an average of 24%. There is, however, significant regional variation in SSA, with the highest incidence of HPV infection and cervical cancer found in Eastern and Western Africa. It is expected that, due to aging and growth of the population, but also to lack of access to appropriate prevention services and the concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in SSA will rise over the next 20 years. HPV16 and 18 are the most common genotypes in cervical cancer in SSA, although other carcinogenic HPV types, such as HPV45 and 35, are also relatively more frequent compared with other world regions. Data on other HPV-related anogenital cancers including those of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis, are limited. Genital warts are common and associated with HPV types 6 and 11. HIV infection increases incidence and prevalence of all HPV-associated diseases. Sociocultural determinants of HPV-related disease, as well as the impact of forces that result in social destabilization, demand further study. Strategies to reduce the excessive burden of HPV-related diseases in SSA include age-appropriate prophylactic HPV vaccination, cervical cancer prevention services for women of the reproductive

  11. Network Medicine: A Network-based Approach to Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiassian, Susan Dina

    With the availability of large-scale data, it is now possible to systematically study the underlying interaction maps of many complex systems in multiple disciplines. Statistical physics has a long and successful history in modeling and characterizing systems with a large number of interacting individuals. Indeed, numerous approaches that were first developed in the context of statistical physics, such as the notion of random walks and diffusion processes, have been applied successfully to study and characterize complex systems in the context of network science. Based on these tools, network science has made important contributions to our understanding of many real-world, self-organizing systems, for example in computer science, sociology and economics. Biological systems are no exception. Indeed, recent studies reflect the necessity of applying statistical and network-based approaches in order to understand complex biological systems, such as cells. In these approaches, a cell is viewed as a complex network consisting of interactions among cellular components, such as genes and proteins. Given the cellular network as a platform, machinery, functionality and failure of a cell can be studied with network-based approaches, a field known as systems biology. Here, we apply network-based approaches to explore human diseases and their associated genes within the cellular network. This dissertation is divided in three parts: (i) A systematic analysis of the connectivity patterns among disease proteins within the cellular network. The quantification of these patterns inspires the design of an algorithm which predicts a disease-specific subnetwork containing yet unknown disease associated proteins. (ii) We apply the introduced algorithm to explore the common underlying mechanism of many complex diseases. We detect a subnetwork from which inflammatory processes initiate and result in many autoimmune diseases. (iii) The last chapter of this dissertation describes the

  12. Post-translational modifications of nuclear receptors and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Huderson, Brandy; Murphy, Leigh; Rowan, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR) impact a myriad of physiological processes including homeostasis, reproduction, development, and metabolism. NRs are regulated by post-translational modifications (PTM) that markedly impact receptor function. Recent studies have identified NR PTMs that are involved in the onset and progression of human diseases, including cancer. The majority of evidence linking NR PTMs with disease has been demonstrated for phosphorylation, acetylation and sumoylation of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Phosphorylation of AR has been associated with hormone refractory prostate cancer and decreased disease-specific survival. AR acetylation and sumoylation increased growth of prostate cancer tumor models. AR phosphorylation reduced the toxicity of the expanded polyglutamine AR in Kennedy’s Disease as a consequence of reduced ligand binding. A comprehensive evaluation of ERα phosphorylation in breast cancer revealed several sites associated with better clinical outcome to tamoxifen therapy, whereas other phosphorylation sites were associated with poorer clinical outcome. ERα acetylation and sumoylation may also have predictive value for breast cancer. GR phosphorylation and acetylation impact GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids that are used as anti-inflammatory drugs. PPARγ phosphorylation can regulate the balance between growth and differentiation in adipose tissue that is linked to obesity and insulin resistance. Sumoylation of PPARγ is linked to repression of inflammatory genes important in patients with inflammatory diseases. NR PTMs provide an additional measure of NR function that can be used as both biomarkers of disease progression, and predictive markers for patient response to NR-directed treatments. PMID:22438791

  13. Borna disease virus infection in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Richt, J. A.; Pfeuffer, I.; Christ, M.; Frese, K.; Bechter, K.; Herzog, S.

    1997-01-01

    The geographic distribution and host range of Borna disease (BD), a fatal neurologic disease of horses and sheep, are larger than previously thought. The etiologic agent, Borna disease virus (BDV), has been identified as an enveloped nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus with unique properties of replication. Data indicate a high degree of genetic stability of BDV in its natural host, the horse. Studies in the Lewis rat have shown that BDV replication does not directly influence vital functions; rather, the disease is caused by a virus-induced T-cell mediated immune reaction. Because antibodies reactive with BDV have been found in the sera of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, this review examines the possible link between BDV and such disorders. Seroepidemiologic and cerebrospinal fluid investigations of psychiatric patients suggest a causal role of BDV infection in human psychiatric disorders. In diagnostically unselected psychiatric patients, the distribution of psychiatric disorders was found to be similar in BDV seropositive and seronegative patients. In addition, BDV-seropositive neurologic patients became ill with lymphocytic meningoencephalitis. In contrast to others, we found no evidence is reported for BDV RNA, BDV antigens, or infectious B DV in peripheral blood cells of psychiatric patients. PMID:9284379

  14. Use of rodents as models of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Thierry F.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology have significantly increased the understanding of the biology of different diseases. However, these discoveries have not yet been fully translated into improved treatments for patients with diseases such as cancers. One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. In this brief review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases in the mouse and the preclinical studies that have already been undertaken. We will also discuss how recent improvements in imaging technologies may increase the information derived from using these GEMs during early assessments of potential therapeutic pathways. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that one of the values of using a mouse model is the very rapid turnover rate of the animal, going through the process of birth to death in a very short timeframe relative to that of larger mammalian species. PMID:24459397

  15. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771. PMID:27228454

  16. Thrombotic microangiopathies: from animal models to human disease and cure.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Jessica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies are a group of microvascular disorders, with reduced organ perfusion and hemolytic anemia. The two most relevant conditions characterized by thrombotic microangiopathic anemia (TMA) are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). In TTP, systemic microvascular aggregation of platelets causes ischemia in the brain and other organs. In HUS, platelet-fibrin thrombi predominantly occlude the renal circulation. TTP can be inherited due to deficiencies in the activity of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) or acquired due to the presence of autoantibodies directed against ADAMTS13. The majority of HUS cases are secondary to infections by strains of Escherichia coli that produce Shiga-like toxins (Stx-HUS), while about 5- 10% of all cases are classified as atypical HUS (aHUS). Genetically derived impaired regulation of the complement system is associated with aHUS. Infusion or the exchange of fresh frozen plasma have ameliorated the prognosis of TMA; however, no specific therapies aimed at preventing or limiting the microangiopathic process have been proven to affect the course of TMA. Large mammals, small animal models, knockout and transgenic mouse models of TTP and both Stx-HUS and aHUS have been developed and have provided outstanding contributions to nearly all areas of TMA research. A better understanding of the key clinical features of the diseases and of the importance of genetic and/or environmental factors involved in the pathogenesis of the diseases have been obtained. These animal models have also allowed the set up of protocols aimed at ameliorating the clinical approach to patients and for the development of new drugs and vaccines. PMID:21252531

  17. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to

  18. Key principles of miRNA involvement in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giza, Dana Elena; Vasilescu, Catalin; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Although rapid progress in our understanding of the functions of miRNA has been made by experimentation and computational approach, a considerable effort still has to be done in determining the general principles that govern the miRNA’s mode of action in human diseases. We will further discuss how these principles are being progressively approached by molecular studies, as well as the importance of miRNA in regulating different target genes and functions in specific biological contexts. There is a great demand to understand the principles of context - specific miRNA target recognition in order to design future experiments and models of normal developmental and disease states. PMID:26317116

  19. Human disease and drug pharmacology, complex as real life.

    PubMed

    Viayna, E; Sola, I; Di Pietro, O; Muñoz-Torrero, D

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades drug discovery practice has escaped from the complexity of the formerly used phenotypic screening in animals to focus on assessing drug effects on isolated protein targets in the search for drugs that exclusively and potently hit one selected target, thought to be critical for a given disease, while not affecting at all any other target to avoid the occurrence of side-effects. However, reality does not conform to these expectations, and, conversely, this approach has been concurrent with increased attrition figures in late-stage clinical trials, precisely due to lack of efficacy and safety. In this context, a network biology perspective of human disease and treatment has burst into the drug discovery scenario to bring it back to the consideration of the complexity of living organisms and particularly of the (patho)physiological environment where protein targets are (mal)functioning and where drugs have to exert their restoring action. Under this perspective, it has been found that usually there is not one but several disease-causing genes and, therefore, not one but several relevant protein targets to be hit, which do not work on isolation but in a highly interconnected manner, and that most known drugs are inherently promiscuous. In this light, the rationale behind the currently prevailing single-target-based drug discovery approach might even seem a Utopia, while, conversely, the notion that the complexity of human disease must be tackled with complex polypharmacological therapeutic interventions constitutes a difficult-to-refuse argument that is spurring the development of multitarget therapies. PMID:23410162

  20. Human Rabies: A Reemerging Disease in Costa Rica?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Herra, Victor; Quirós, Ligia; Morice, Ana; Jiménez, Edwin; Sáenz, Elizabeth; Salazar, Fernando; Fernández, Rodrigo; Orciari, Lillian; Yager, Pamela; Whitfield, Sylvia; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    Two human rabies cases caused by a bat-associated virus variant were identified in September 2001 in Costa Rica, after a 31-year absence of the disease in persons. Both patients lived in a rural area where cattle had a high risk for bat bites, but neither person had a definitive history of being bitten by a rabid animal. Characterization of the rabies viruses from the patients showed that the reservoir was the hematophagous Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus, and that a sick cat was the vector. PMID:12781014

  1. Higher-order Genome Organization in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Genomes are organized into complex higher-order structures by folding of the DNA into chromatin fibers, chromosome domains, and ultimately chromosomes. The higher-order organization of genomes is functionally important for gene regulation and control of gene expression programs. Defects in how chromatin is globally organized are relevant for physiological and pathological processes. Mutations and transcriptional misregulation of several global genome organizers are linked to human diseases and global alterations in chromatin structure are emerging as key players in maintenance of genome stability, aging, and the formation of cancer translocations. PMID:20591991

  2. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    PubMed Central

    Saritha, Mohanan; Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajesh, Nachiappa G

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn's disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient. PMID:23248371

  3. Control of human parasitic diseases: Context and overview.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H

    2006-01-01

    The control of parasitic diseases of humans has been undertaken since the aetiology and natural history of the infections was recognized and the deleterious effects on human health and well-being appreciated by policy makers, medical practitioners and public health specialists. However, while some parasitic infections such as malaria have proved difficult to control, as defined by a sustained reduction in incidence, others, particularly helminth infections can be effectively controlled. The different approaches to control from diagnosis, to treatment and cure of the clinically sick patient, to control the transmission within the community by preventative chemotherapy and vector control are outlined. The concepts of eradication, elimination and control are defined and examples of success summarized. Overviews of the health policy and financing environment in which programmes to control or eliminate parasitic diseases are positioned and the development of public-private partnerships as vehicles for product development or access to drugs for parasite disease control are discussed. Failure to sustain control of parasites may be due to development of drug resistance or the failure to implement proven strategies as a result of decreased resources within the health system, decentralization of health management through health-sector reform and the lack of financial and human resources in settings where per capita government expenditure on health may be less than $US 5 per year. However, success has been achieved in several large-scale programmes through sustained national government investment and/or committed donor support. It is also widely accepted that the level of investment in drug development for the parasitic diseases of poor populations is an unattractive option for pharmaceutical companies. The development of partnerships to specifically address this need provides some hope that the intractable problems of the treatment regimens for the trypanosomiases and

  4. Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzymes in Human Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Bradley J; McCarthy, Erin L; Booker, Squire J

    2016-06-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes catalyze an astonishing array of complex and chemically challenging reactions across all domains of life. Of approximately 114,000 of these enzymes, 8 are known to be present in humans: MOCS1, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis; LIAS, lipoic acid biosynthesis; CDK5RAP1, 2-methylthio-N(6)-isopentenyladenosine biosynthesis; CDKAL1, methylthio-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine biosynthesis; TYW1, wybutosine biosynthesis; ELP3, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl uridine; and RSAD1 and viperin, both of unknown function. Aberrations in the genes encoding these proteins result in a variety of diseases. In this review, we summarize the biochemical characterization of these 8 radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and, in the context of human health, describe the deleterious effects that result from such genetic mutations. PMID:27145839

  5. Consanguinity and susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Emily J.; Frodsham, Angela J.; Zhang, Lyna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Amos, William

    2009-01-01

    Studies of animal populations suggest that low genetic heterozygosity is an important risk factor for infection by a diverse range of pathogens, but relatively little research has looked to see whether similar patterns exist in humans. We have used microsatellite genome screen data for tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and leprosy to test the hypothesis that inbreeding depression increases risk of infection. Our results indicate that inbred individuals are more common among our infected cases for TB and hepatitis, but only in populations where consanguineous marriages are common. No effect was found either for leprosy, which is thought to be oligogenic, or for hepatitis in Italy where consanguineous marriages are rare. Our results suggest that consanguinity is an important risk factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans. PMID:19324620

  6. Human gut microbiota and its relationship to health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Taylor C; Guarner, Francisco; Madsen, Karen; Cabana, Michael D; Gibson, Glenn; Hentges, Eric; Sanders, Mary Ellen

    2011-07-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer a health benefit on the host when administered in appropriate amounts. Over 700 randomized, controlled, human studies have been conducted with probiotics thus far, with the results providing strong support for the use of probiotics in the clinical prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders and metabolic syndrome. The present review is based on webinar presentations that were developed by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) in partnership with the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and the North American branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI North America). The presentations provided gastroenterologists and researchers with fundamental and current scientific information on the influence of gut microbiota on human health and disease, as well as clinical intervention strategies and practical guidelines for the use of probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:21729093

  7. The role of nanotechnology in control of human diseases: perspectives in ocular surface diseases.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mahendra; Ingle, Avinash P; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Padovani, Felipe Hering; Alves, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Nanotechnology is the creation and use of materials and devices on the same scale as molecules and intracellular structures, typically less than 100 nm in size. It is an emerging science and has made its way into pharmaceuticals to significantly improve the delivery and efficacy of drugs in a number of therapeutic areas, due to development of various nanoparticle-based products. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence that nanotechnology can help to overcome many of the ocular diseases and hence researchers are keenly interested in this science. Nanomedicines offer promise as viable alternatives to conventional drops, gels or ointments to improve drug delivery to the eye. Because of their small size, they are well tolerated, thus preventing washout, increase bioavailability and also help in specific drug delivery. This review describes the application of nanotechnology in the control of human diseases with special emphasis on various eye and ocular surfaces diseases. PMID:26189355

  8. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease

    PubMed Central

    Asante, Emmanuel A.; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D.F.; Collinge, John

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP) 1. A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru, an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea, and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state2. We have now investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism; V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. Here we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical CJD prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to BSE prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Remarkably however, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion, but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild type prion propagation. PMID:26061765

  9. Lipid peroxidation products and antioxidants in human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F J; Bosch-Morell, F; Romero, M J; Jareño, E J; Romero, B; Marín, N; Romá, J

    1998-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is a free radical-related process that in biologic systems may occur under enzymatic control, e.g., for the generation of lipid-derived inflammatory mediators, or nonenzymatically. This latter form is associated mostly with cellular damage as a result of oxidative stress, which also involves cellular antioxidants in this process. This article focuses on the relevance of two LPO products, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), to the pathophysiology of human disease. The former has been studied in human serum samples of hepatitis C virus-infected adults and human immunodeficiency virus-infected children. In these two cases it is shown that the specific assay of serum MDA is useful for the clinical management of these patients. The presence of MDA in subretinal fluid of patients with retinal detachment suggests the involvement of oxidative stress in this process. Moreover, we were able to report the dependence of this involvement on the degree of myopia in these patients. The assay of MDA contents in the peripheral nerves of rats fed a chronic alcohol-containing diet or diabetic mice also confirms the pathophysiologic role of oxidative stress in these experimental models. In these two cases, associated with an increase in tissue LPO products content, we detected a decrease of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activity in peripheral nerve, among other modifications. We have demonstrated that in vitro HNE is able to inhibit GSHPx activity in an apparent competitive manner, and that glutathione may partially protect and/or prevent this inactivation. The accumulation of LPO products in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease has also been described, and it is on the basis of this observation that we have tried to elucidate the role of oxidative stress and cellular antioxidants in beta-amyloid-induced apoptotic cell death of rat embryo neurons. Finally, we discuss the possible role of the observed vascular effects of HNE on human

  10. Alzheimer disease models and human neuropathology: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    Potier, Marie-Claude; Delatour, Benoît

    2007-01-01

    Animal models aim to replicate the symptoms, the lesions or the cause(s) of Alzheimer disease. Numerous mouse transgenic lines have now succeeded in partially reproducing its lesions: the extracellular deposits of Aβ peptide and the intracellular accumulation of tau protein. Mutated human APP transgenes result in the deposition of Aβ peptide, similar but not identical to the Aβ peptide of human senile plaque. Amyloid angiopathy is common. Besides the deposition of Aβ, axon dystrophy and alteration of dendrites have been observed. All of the mutations cause an increase in Aβ 42 levels, except for the Arctic mutation, which alters the Aβ sequence itself. Overexpressing wild-type APP alone (as in the murine models of human trisomy 21) causes no Aβ deposition in most mouse lines. Doubly (APP × mutated PS1) transgenic mice develop the lesions earlier. Transgenic mice in which BACE1 has been knocked out or overexpressed have been produced, as well as lines with altered expression of neprilysin, the main degrading enzyme of Aβ. The APP transgenic mice have raised new questions concerning the mechanisms of neuronal loss, the accumulation of Aβ in the cell body of the neurons, inflammation and gliosis, and the dendritic alterations. They have allowed some insight to be gained into the kinetics of the changes. The connection between the symptoms, the lesions and the increase in Aβ oligomers has been found to be difficult to unravel. Neurofibrillary tangles are only found in mouse lines that overexpress mutated tau or human tau on a murine tau −/− background. A triply transgenic model (mutated APP, PS1 and tau) recapitulates the alterations seen in AD but its physiological relevance may be discussed. A number of modulators of Aβ or of tau accumulation have been tested. A transgenic model may be analyzed at three levels at least (symptoms, lesions, cause of the disease), and a reading key is proposed to summarize this analysis. PMID:18038275

  11. Regulatory Role of Small Nucleolar RNAs in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Grigory A.; Filippova, Julia A.; Komissarov, Andrey B.; Kuligina, Elena V.; Richter, Vladimir A.; Semenov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), namely, 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs. PMID:26060813

  12. Regulatory role of small nucleolar RNAs in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Grigory A; Filippova, Julia A; Komissarov, Andrey B; Kuligina, Elena V; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), namely, 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs. PMID:26060813

  13. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease.

    PubMed

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea; Artacho, Alejandro; Jensen, Ole N; Mira, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Tooth decay is considered the most prevalent human disease worldwide. We present the first metaproteomic study of the oral biofilm, using different mass spectrometry approaches that have allowed us to quantify individual peptides in healthy and caries-bearing individuals. A total of 7771 bacterial and 853 human proteins were identified in 17 individuals, which provide the first available protein repertoire of human dental plaque. Actinomyces and Coryneybacterium represent a large proportion of the protein activity followed by Rothia and Streptococcus. Those four genera account for 60-90% of total diversity. Healthy individuals appeared to have significantly higher amounts of L-lactate dehydrogenase and the arginine deiminase system, both implicated in pH buffering. Other proteins found to be at significantly higher levels in healthy individuals were involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis, iron metabolism and immune response. We applied multivariate analysis in order to find the minimum set of proteins that better allows discrimination of healthy and caries-affected dental plaque samples, detecting seven bacterial and five human protein functions that allow determining the health status of the studied individuals with an estimated specificity and sensitivity over 96%. We propose that future validation of these potential biomarkers in larger sample size studies may serve to develop diagnostic tests of caries risk that could be used in tooth decay prevention. PMID:26272225

  14. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    The number of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide was estimated to be 39.5 million in 2006, 2.6 million more than in 2004. The manifestations of HIV infection in the kidney are multiple and varied, highlighting the complexity of the disease process. There is a wide spectrum of renal disease that occurs in the course of HIV infection. Biopsy studies reveal varying frequencies of histological patterns. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is most common. A biopsy study at Chris Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa showed that HIVAN was present in 27% and immune complex disease in 21%. Han et al. studied HIV-positive patients in Durban, South Africa and screened for proteinuria, including microalbuminuria. They found persistent proteinuria in 6%; HIVAN in 21/30 (72.4%) and the prevalence of HIVAN in patients with persistent microalbuminuria was 85.7%. Studies in black patients have shown a higher prevalence of both severe glomerular lesions (focal glomerulosclerosis) and nephrotic range proteinuria with renal dysfunction in the presence of normo-hypotension. There have been no prospective randomised controlled studies with any form of therapy for HIVAN to date. Therapy of HIVAN has included corticosteroids, cyclosporine and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART appears to be a logical choice in the management of HIV-associated renal disease. Regimens containing protease inhibitors have been shown to be associated with significant slowing of the decline in creatinine clearance. Both peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis are appropriate treatment modalities for HIV-infected patients with end stage renal disease. The choice of dialysis modality between haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis is not a factor in predicting survival, if patients are stable on ART. Preliminary short-term data in case reports and small cohorts of liver, kidney, and heart transplant recipients suggest that patient survival rates may be similar to those in HIV

  15. Human B-cell interleukin-10: B-cell lines derived from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Burkitt's lymphoma constitutively secrete large quantities of interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, D; Knobloch, T J; Dayton, M A

    1992-09-01

    A recent addition to the lymphokine network is human IL-10 (hIL-10). This novel lymphokine has striking homology to BCRF1 protein, the product of a previously uncharacterized open-reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome. To date, IL-10 expression has been described in several T clones induced with anti-CD3 and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), in monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and in murine B-cell lymphomas. We sought to determine whether human B cells express hIL-10 and, if so, its relationship to EBV and to other B-cell lymphokines. We studied 21 EBV-positive B-cell lines derived from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and Burkitt's lymphoma (n = 6), American Burkitt's (n = 3), African Burkitt's (n = 5), and normal lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 7), in comparison with seven EBV-negative cell lines. All cell lines were activated with the tumor promoters PMA and teleocidin and were studied by Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA). We demonstrated that EBV-positive cell lines derived from patients with American Burkitt's lymphoma, and especially those from patients with AIDS, constitutively express large quantities of hIL-10 by Northern blot analysis and ELISA (range, 3,101 to 25,915 pg/mL), and that both teleocidin and PMA induce hIL-10 in these cell lines. In contrast, six of seven EBV-negative cell lines did not express hIL-10 even by RT-PCR, and hIL-10 was not triggered by PMA or teleocidin. To assure that the 350 bp amplified by PCR was hIL-10 and not BCRF1, we used PCR primers, which do not amplify a fragment from plasmid templates containing BCRF1. Cloning and sequencing of the 350 bp product also demonstrated that B-cell IL-10 is identical to hIL-10 from the T-cell clone B21. Correlation of hIL-10 with other B-cell lymphokines secreted by these B-cell lines demonstrated that hIL-10 secretor cell lines also

  16. Economic Burden of Human Papillomavirus-Related Diseases in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Gianluca; Capone, Alessandro; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Favato, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 impose a substantial burden of direct costs on the Italian National Health Service that has never been quantified fully. The main objective of the present study was to address this gap: (1) by estimating the total direct medical costs associated with nine major HPV-related diseases, namely invasive cervical cancer, cervical dysplasia, cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and head and neck, anogenital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and (2) by providing an aggregate measure of the total economic burden attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infection. Methods For each of the nine conditions, we used available Italian secondary data to estimate the lifetime cost per case, the number of incident cases of each disease, the total economic burden, and the relative prevalence of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, in order to estimate the aggregate fraction of the total economic burden attributable to HPV infection. Results The total direct costs (expressed in 2011 Euro) associated with the annual incident cases of the nine HPV-related conditions included in the analysis were estimated to be €528.6 million, with a plausible range of €480.1–686.2 million. The fraction attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 was €291.0 (range €274.5–315.7 million), accounting for approximately 55% of the total annual burden of HPV-related disease in Italy. Conclusions The results provided a plausible estimate of the significant economic burden imposed by the most prevalent HPV-related diseases on the Italian welfare system. The fraction of the total direct lifetime costs attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infections, and the economic burden of noncervical HPV-related diseases carried by men, were found to be cost drivers relevant to the making of informed decisions about future investments in programmes of HPV prevention. PMID:23185412

  17. Lecithin and choline in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Zeisel, S H

    1994-10-01

    Choline is involved in methyl group metabolism and lipid transport and is a component of a number of important biological compounds including the membrane phospholipids lecithin, sphingomyelin, and plasmalogen; the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; and platelet activating factor. Although a required nutrient for several animal species, choline is not currently designated as essential for humans. However, recent clinical studies show it to be essential for normal liver function. Additionally, a large body of evidence from the fields of molecular and cell biology shows that certain phospholipids play a critical role in generating second messengers for cell membrane signal transduction. This process involves a cascade of reactions that translate an external cell stimulus such as a hormone or growth factor into a change in cell transport, metabolism, growth, function, or gene expression. Disruptions in phospholipid metabolism can interfere with this process and may underlie certain disease states such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. These recent findings may be appropriate in the consideration of choline as an essential nutrient for humans. PMID:7816350

  18. Human endogenous retrovirus-K contributes to motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxue; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Henderson, Lisa; Tyagi, Richa; Bachani, Muzna; Steiner, Joseph; Campanac, Emilie; Hoffman, Dax A; von Geldern, Gloria; Johnson, Kory; Maric, Dragan; Morris, H Douglas; Lentz, Margaret; Pak, Katherine; Mammen, Andrew; Ostrow, Lyle; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2015-09-30

    The role of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in disease pathogenesis is unclear. We show that HERV-K is activated in a subpopulation of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and that its envelope (env) protein may contribute to neurodegeneration. The virus was expressed in cortical and spinal neurons of ALS patients, but not in neurons from control healthy individuals. Expression of HERV-K or its env protein in human neurons caused retraction and beading of neurites. Transgenic animals expressing the env gene developed progressive motor dysfunction accompanied by selective loss of volume of the motor cortex, decreased synaptic activity in pyramidal neurons, dendritic spine abnormalities, nucleolar dysfunction, and DNA damage. Injury to anterior horn cells in the spinal cord was manifested by muscle atrophy and pathological changes consistent with nerve fiber denervation and reinnervation. Expression of HERV-K was regulated by TAR (trans-activation responsive) DNA binding protein 43, which binds to the long terminal repeat region of the virus. Thus, HERV-K expression within neurons of patients with ALS may contribute to neurodegeneration and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26424568

  19. Modeling human diseases: an education in interactions and interdisciplinary approaches

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, most investigators in the biomedical arena exploit one model system in the course of their careers. Occasionally, an investigator will switch models. The selection of a suitable model system is a crucial step in research design. Factors to consider include the accuracy of the model as a reflection of the human disease under investigation, the numbers of animals needed and ease of husbandry, its physiology and developmental biology, and the ability to apply genetics and harness the model for drug discovery. In my lab, we have primarily used the zebrafish but combined it with other animal models and provided a framework for others to consider the application of developmental biology for therapeutic discovery. Our interdisciplinary approach has led to many insights into human diseases and to the advancement of candidate drugs to clinical trials. Here, I draw on my experiences to highlight the importance of combining multiple models, establishing infrastructure and genetic tools, forming collaborations, and interfacing with the medical community for successful translation of basic findings to the clinic. PMID:27483497

  20. Status quo of annotation of human disease variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever on-going technical developments in Next Generation Sequencing have led to an increase in detected disease related mutations. Many bioinformatics approaches exist to analyse these variants, and of those the methods that use 3D structure information generally outperform those that do not use this information. 3D structure information today is available for about twenty percent of the human exome, and homology modelling can double that fraction. This percentage is rapidly increasing so that we can expect to analyse the majority of all human exome variants in the near future using protein structure information. Results We collected a test dataset of well-described mutations in proteins for which 3D-structure information is available. This test dataset was used to analyse the possibilities and the limitations of methods based on sequence information alone, hybrid methods, machine learning based methods, and structure based methods. Conclusions Our analysis shows that the use of structural features improves the classification of mutations. This study suggests strategies for future analyses of disease causing mutations, and it suggests which bioinformatics approaches should be developed to make progress in this field. PMID:24305467

  1. Zebrafish as a disease model for studying human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Yang, Yi-Ju; Liao, Heng-An; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Liang-In; Ou, Da-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the world’s most common cancers and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a primary hepatic cancer, accounts for 90%-95% of liver cancer cases. The pathogenesis of HCC consists of a stepwise process of liver damage that extends over decades, due to hepatitis, fatty liver, fibrosis, and cirrhosis before developing fully into HCC. Multiple risk factors are highly correlated with HCC, including infection with the hepatitis B or C viruses, alcohol abuse, aflatoxin exposure, and metabolic diseases. Over the last decade, genetic alterations, which include the regulation of multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes and the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways, have also been identified as important factors in HCC. Recently, zebrafish have become an important living vertebrate model organism, especially for translational medical research. In studies focusing on the biology of cancer, carcinogen induced tumors in zebrafish were found to have many similarities to human tumors. Several zebrafish models have therefore been developed to provide insight into the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the related drug discovery and toxicology, and to enable the evaluation of novel small-molecule inhibitors. This review will focus on illustrative examples involving the application of zebrafish models to the study of human liver disease and HCC, through transgenesis, genome editing technology, xenografts, drug discovery, and drug-induced toxic liver injury. PMID:26576090

  2. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  3. Association between Human Body Composition and Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Salekzamani, Yagoub; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Rahbar, Mohammad; Shakouri, Seyed-Kazem; Nayebi, Farough

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans might increase the risk of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between body composition of males and their periodontal status. AS total of 150 males (aged 30-60) were selected: 31 were periodontally healthy, 45 had gingivitis, 39 had initial periodontitis, and 35 suffered from established periodontitis. BMI (body mass index), WC (waist circumference), and body composition parameters (consisting of body water, body fat, and skeletal muscle and bone mass) were measured. After adjusting for age, history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity status, and socioeconomic status, statistically significant correlations were found between periodontitis and BMI, WC, and body composition. There was only a statistically significant difference between the periodontal health and established periodontitis; that is, periodontal disease in mild forms (gingivitis) and initial periodontitis do not influence these variables (BMI, WC, and body composition parameters) and only the severe form of the disease influences the variables. These data suggest that there is a considerable association between severe forms of periodontal disease in males and their body composition, but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed in more extensive studies. PMID:22111011

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Interacts With Inflammation in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Stewart Siyan; Luo, Katherine L.; Shi, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a critical organelle for normal cell function and homeostasis. Disturbed protein folding process in the ER, termed ER stress, leads to the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) that encompasses a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. The UPR can either restore ER homeostasis or activate pro-apoptotic pathways depending on specific insults, intensity and duration of the stress, and cell types. ER stress and the UPR have recently been linked to inflammation in a variety of human pathologies including autoimmune diseases, infection, neurodegenerative disease, and metabolic disorders. In the cell, ER stress and inflammatory signaling share extensive regulators and effectors in a broad spectrum of biological processes. In spite of different etiologies, the two signaling pathways were shown to form a vicious cycle in exacerbating cellular dysfunction and causing apoptosis in many cells and tissues. However, the interaction between ER stress and inflammation in many of these diseases remains elusive. Further understanding of those issues may enable the development of novel therapies that spontaneously target these pathogenic pathways. PMID:26201832

  5. Derivation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Human Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Narsinh, Kamileh; Narsinh, Kazim H.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    The successful derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by de-differentiation of somatic cells offers significant potential to overcome obstacles in the field of cardiovascular disease. hiPSC derivatives offer incredible potential for new disease models and regenerative medicine therapies. However, many questions remain regarding the optimal starting materials and methods to enable safe, efficient derivation of hiPSCs suitable for clinical applications. Initial reprogramming experiments were carried out using lentiviral or retroviral gene delivery methods. More recently, various non-viral methods that avoid permanent and random transgene insertion have emerged as alternatives. These include transient DNA transfection approaches using transposons or minicircle plasmids, protein transduction approaches, and RNA transfection approaches. In addition, several small molecules have been found to significantly augment iPSC derivation efficiency, allowing the use of a fewer number of genes during pluripotency induction. Here, we review these various methods for the derivation of hiPSCs, focusing on their ultimate clinical applicability, with an emphasis on their potential for use as cardiovascular therapies and disease modeling platforms. PMID:21527744

  6. Caveolinopathies: from the biology of caveolin-3 to human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Sotgia, Federica; Bruno, Claudio; Lisanti, Michael P; Minetti, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    In muscle tissue the protein caveolin-3 forms caveolae – flask-shaped invaginations localized on the cytoplasmic surface of the sarcolemmal membrane. Caveolae have a key role in the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity and in the processes of vesicular trafficking and signal transduction. Mutations in the caveolin-3 gene lead to skeletal muscle pathology through multiple pathogenetic mechanisms. Indeed, caveolin-3 deficiency is associated to sarcolemmal membrane alterations, disorganization of skeletal muscle T-tubule network and disruption of distinct cell-signaling pathways. To date, there have been 30 caveolin-3 mutations identified in the human population. Caveolin-3 defects lead to four distinct skeletal muscle disease phenotypes: limb girdle muscular dystrophy, rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy, and hyperCKemia. In addition, one caveolin-3 mutant has been described in a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Many patients show an overlap of these symptoms and the same mutation can be linked to different clinical phenotypes. This variability can be related to additional genetic or environmental factors. This review will address caveolin-3 biological functions in muscle cells and will describe the muscle and heart disease phenotypes associated with caveolin-3 mutations. PMID:19584897

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S. more than 1.1 million individuals are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These patients exhibit a high frequency of coinfections with other hepatotropic viruses and ongoing fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. The etiologies of liver disease include viral hepatitis coinfections, drug-related hepatotoxicity, fatty liver disease, and direct and indirect effects from HIV infection including increased bacterial translocation, immune activation, and presence of soluble proteins that modulate the hepatic cytokine environment. New treatments for HCV using direct acting agents appear viable, though issues related to intrinsic toxicities and drug:drug interactions remain. Recent research suggests that acute HCV infection, unrecognized hepatitis D infection, and hepatitis E may all represent emergent areas of concern. Antiretroviral agents, including those used in past years may represent risk factors for hepatic injury and portal hypertension. Key issues in the future include systematic implementation of liver disease management and new treatment in HIV-infected populations with concomitant injection drug use, alcohol use, and low socioeconomic status. PMID:23904401

  8. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  9. Linkage of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to Human Chromosome 6p

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Jochen; Shaw, Sarah H.; Saiz, Robert; Leysens, Nancy; Lantermann, Annette; Mascheretti, Silvia; Lynch, Nicholas J.; MacPherson, Andrew J. S.; Bridger, Stephen; van Deventer, Sander; Stokkers, Pieter; Morin, Phil; Mirza, Mudassar M.; Forbes, Alastair; Lennard-Jones, John E.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Curran, Mark E.; Schreiber, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    Summary Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. IBD is subdivided into Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes. Given the immunologic dysregulation in IBD, the human-leukocyte-antigen region on chromosome 6p is of significant interest. Previous association and linkage analysis has provided conflicting evidence as to the existence of an IBD-susceptibility locus in this region. Here we report on a two-stage linkage and association analysis of both a basic population of 353 affected sibling pairs (ASPs) and an extension of this population to 428 white ASPs of northern European extraction. Twenty-eight microsatellite markers on chromosome 6 were genotyped. A peak multipoint LOD score of 4.2 was observed, at D6S461, for the IBD phenotype. A transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) result of P=.006 was detected for D6S426 in the basic population and was confirmed in the extended cohort (P=.004; 97 vs. 56 transmissions). The subphenotypes of Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, and mixed IBD contributed equally to this linkage, suggesting a general role for the chromosome 6 locus in IBD. Analysis of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the TNFA and LTA genes did not reveal evidence for association of these important candidate genes with IBD. In summary, we provide firm linkage evidence for an IBD-susceptibility locus on chromosome 6p and demonstrate that TNFA and LTA are unlikely to be susceptibility loci for IBD. PMID:10577918

  10. Severe peritonitis due to Balantidium coli acquired in France.

    PubMed

    Ferry, T; Bouhour, D; De Monbrison, F; Laurent, F; Dumouchel-Champagne, H; Picot, S; Piens, M A; Granier, P

    2004-05-01

    The case reported here concerns an alcoholic pork-butcher who presented with severe colitis with peritonitis, caused by the only ciliate protozoan capable of infecting humans, Balantidium coli. This parasite is common in a variety of domestic and wild mammals, mainly pigs; however, its prevalence rate in humans is very low--particularly in industrialised, northern countries, including France. The infection is most frequently acquired by ingesting food or water contaminated by pig faeces, and it may be asymptomatic or may cause acute diarrhoea. Specific antibiotic treatment is efficacious, and it is important to consider the risk of this parasitic disease in susceptible patients presenting with bloody diarrhoea. PMID:15112068

  11. Mutations within ICP4 acquired during in vitro attenuation do not alter virulence of recombinant Marek’s disease viruses in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV). MD is primarily controlled by live-attenuated vaccines generated by repeated in vitro serial passage. Previous efforts to characterize attenuated MDVs identified numerous mutations, particularl...

  12. Being human: The role of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine and humanizing Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Sproul, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the capacity to revolutionize medicine by allowing the generation of functional cell types such as neurons for cell replacement therapy. However, the more immediate impact of PSCs on treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will be through improved human AD model systems for mechanistic studies and therapeutic screening. This review will first briefly discuss different types of PSCs and genome-editing techniques that can be used to modify PSCs for disease modeling or for personalized medicine. This will be followed by a more in depth analysis of current AD iPSC models and a discussion of the need for more complex multicellular models, including cell types such as microglia. It will finish with a discussion on current clinical trials using PSC-derived cells and the long-term potential of such strategies for treating AD. PMID:26101165

  13. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: human disease and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Julie; Gonzalez, Julien; Miravete, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Chaaya, Rana; Decramer, Stéphane; Bandin, Flavio; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction is the most frequently observed cause of obstructive nephropathy in children. Neonatal and foetal animal models have been developed that mimic closely what is observed in human disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss how obstructive nephropathy alters kidney histology and function and describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of the lesions, including inflammation, proliferation/apoptosis, renin–angiotensin system activation and fibrosis, based on both human and animal data. Also we propose that during obstructive nephropathy, hydrodynamic modifications are early inducers of the tubular lesions, which are potentially at the origin of the pathology. Finally, an important observation in animal models is that relief of obstruction during kidney development has important effects on renal function later in adult life. A major short-coming is the absence of data on the impact of UPJ obstruction on long-term adult renal function to elucidate whether these animal data are also valid in humans. PMID:20681980

  14. Sympathetic regulation during thermal stress in human aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-04-01

    Humans control their core temperature within a narrow range via precise adjustments of the autonomic nervous system. In response to changing core and/or skin temperature, several critical thermoregulatory reflex effector responses are initiated and include shivering, sweating, and changes in cutaneous blood flow. Cutaneous vasomotor adjustments, mediated by modulations in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), aid in the maintenance of thermal homeostasis during cold and heat stress since (1) they serve as the first line of defense of body temperature and are initiated before other thermoregulatory effectors, and (2) they are on the efferent arm of non-thermoregulatory reflex systems, aiding in the maintenance of blood pressure and organ perfusion. This review article highlights the sympathetic responses of humans to thermal stress, with a specific focus on primary aging as well as impairments that occur in both heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Age- and pathology-related changes in efferent muscle and skin SNA during cold and heat stress, measured directly in humans using microneurography, are discussed. PMID:26627337

  15. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  16. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  17. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-11-22

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  18. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-31

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  19. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-30

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  20. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-29

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  1. How Many Have Died from Undiagnosed Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Associated Histoplasmosis, A Treatable Disease? Time to Act

    PubMed Central

    Nacher, Mathieu; Adenis, Antoine; Aznar, Christine; Blanchet, Denis; Vantilcke, Vincent; Demar, Magalie; Carme, Bernard; Couppié, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated disseminated Histoplasma capsulatum capsulatum infection often mimics tuberculosis. This disease is well know in the United States but is dramatically underdiagnosed in Central and South America. In the Amazon region, given the available incidence data and the regional HIV prevalence, it is expected that, every year, 1,500 cases of histoplasmosis affect HIV patients in that region alone. Given the mortality in undiagnosed patients, at least 600 patients would be expected to die from an undiagnosed but treatable disease. The lack of a simple diagnostic tool and the lack of awareness by clinicians spiral in a vicious cycle and made a major problem invisible for 30 years. The HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome community should tackle this problem now to prevent numerous avoidable deaths from HIV-associated histoplasmosis in the region and elsewhere. PMID:24277783

  2. How many have died from undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus-associated histoplasmosis, a treatable disease? Time to act.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu; Adenis, Antoine; Aznar, Christine; Blanchet, Denis; Vantilcke, Vincent; Demar, Magalie; Carme, Bernard; Couppié, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated disseminated Histoplasma capsulatum capsulatum infection often mimics tuberculosis. This disease is well know in the United States but is dramatically underdiagnosed in Central and South America. In the Amazon region, given the available incidence data and the regional HIV prevalence, it is expected that, every year, 1,500 cases of histoplasmosis affect HIV patients in that region alone. Given the mortality in undiagnosed patients, at least 600 patients would be expected to die from an undiagnosed but treatable disease. The lack of a simple diagnostic tool and the lack of awareness by clinicians spiral in a vicious cycle and made a major problem invisible for 30 years. The HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome community should tackle this problem now to prevent numerous avoidable deaths from HIV-associated histoplasmosis in the region and elsewhere. PMID:24277783

  3. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer's Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Ronald C; Lee, Anita Y H; Song, Qinghua; Liaw, Andy; Wiener, Matt; Paweletz, Cloud P; Seeburger, Jeffrey L; Li, Jenny; Meng, Fanyu; Deyanova, Ekaterina G; Mazur, Matthew T; Settlage, Robert E; Zhao, Xuemei; Southwick, Katie; Du, Yi; Holder, Dan; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Laterza, Omar F; Dallob, Aimee; Chappell, Derek L; Snyder, Karen; Modur, Vijay; King, Elizabeth; Joachim, Catharine; Bondarenko, Andrey Y; Shearman, Mark; Soper, Keith A; Smith, A David; Potter, William Z; Koblan, Ken S; Sachs, Alan B; Yates, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control) patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001) and SME-2 (p = 0.0004) for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR), in AD were 21% (p = 0.039) and 17% (p = 0.026) lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic. PMID:26270474

  4. Human ZMPSTE24 disease mutations: residual proteolytic activity correlates with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima; Wiley, Patricia A.; Hudon-Miller, Sarah E.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Michaelis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 plays a critical role in nuclear lamin biology by cleaving the prenylated and carboxylmethylated 15-amino acid tail from the C-terminus of prelamin A to yield mature lamin A. A defect in this proteolytic event, caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that eliminates the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, underlies the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Likewise, mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene that result in decreased enzyme function cause a spectrum of diseases that share certain features of premature aging. Twenty human ZMPSTE24 alleles have been identified that are associated with three disease categories of increasing severity: mandibuloacral dysplasia type B (MAD-B), severe progeria (atypical ‘HGPS’) and restrictive dermopathy (RD). To determine whether a correlation exists between decreasing ZMPSTE24 protease activity and increasing disease severity, we expressed mutant alleles of ZMPSTE24 in yeast and optimized in vivo yeast mating assays to directly compare the activity of alleles associated with each disease category. We also measured the activity of yeast crude membranes containing the ZMPSTE24 mutant proteins in vitro. We determined that, in general, the residual activity of ZMPSTE24 patient alleles correlates with disease severity. Complete loss-of-function alleles are associated with RD, whereas retention of partial, measureable activity results in MAD-B or severe progeria. Importantly, our assays can discriminate small differences in activity among the mutants, confirming that the methods presented here will be useful for characterizing any new ZMPSTE24 mutations that are discovered. PMID:22718200

  5. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  6. [Human diffusion of arthropod disease vectors throughout the world].

    PubMed

    Mouchet, J; Giacomini, T; Julvez, J

    1995-01-01

    The present distribution of animals and plants throughout the world is the result of an evolutionary process involving tectonic, climatic and biotic factors. Humans, since their appearance, have contributed to the spreading of many species including disease vectors and pests. When humans left their native African home, they brought with them ectoparasites such as lice and acarids. During the neolithic era, humans were leading domesticated animals which carried their own parasites into new areas. Dwelling commensals, flea, bugs, triatomids, flies, and cockroaches followed human migrations. In the second millennium, sailboats transported mosquito species which were resistant and reproduced on board, including Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Ae. albopictus. Steamers further shortened the length of trips and allowed the transport of anophelines. The opening of the Tamatave-Port-Louis line was immediately followed by the transport of An. gambiae from Madagascar to Mauritius and Reunion, and epidemics of malaria occurred on the two islands which had been free of the disease. Also, An. gambiae was transported from Senegal to Brazil. Old tires destined for recycling carried Ae. albopictus to the USA, Brazil, and then Italy. The pandemic of the plague at the end of the nineteenth century was propagated from harbour to harbour by steamers carrying both infected rats and their fleas Xenopsylla cheopsis. Aircrafts have reduced the travel time so much that in less than two days an insect could reach every point of the world. As soon as the airports had been built on the islands of French Polynesia, they were all colonized by Ae. aegypti. The same phenomenon occurred with midges (Fig. 2). Also, the construction of the airport on a Galapagos Island coincided with the importation of the blackfly Simulium bipunctatum from the continent. In addition, infected malaria mosquitos imported from tropical countries reached Europe and contaminated airport employees and local

  7. Vitamin D deficiency in community-acquired pneumonia: low levels of 1,25(OH)2 D are associated with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to explore the association between vitamin D levels and the severity, mortality and microbiological etiology of community-acquired pneumonia. Methods Vitamin D levels (both, the reservoir form 25-OH and the activated form 1,25-OH2) of 300 randomly selected patients with community-acquired pneumonia due to pre-specified pathogens included in the German competence network (CAPNETZ) study were measured. Prior to statistical analysis, values of 25-OH and 1,25-OH2 were power-transformed to achieve parametric distribution. All further analyses were performed with seasonally and age adjusted values. Results There was only a modest (Spearman Coefficient 0.38) positive correlation between 25-OH and 1,25-OH2. For 1,25-OH2 but not 25-OH, the general linear model revealed a significant inverse correlation between serum concentration and CURB score (p = 0.011). Liver and respiratory co-morbidity were associated with significantly lower 25-OH values and renal co-morbidity with significantly lower 1,25-OH2 values. No significant differences of 1,25-OH2 or 25-OH between different pathogens (influenza virus, Legionella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae) were detected. Conclusion For 1,25-OH2, we found a significant and independent (controlled for age, season and pathogen) negative correlation to pneumonia severity. Therefore, supplementation of non-activated vitamin D to protect from pneumonia may be non-sufficient in patients that have a decreased capacity to hydroxylate 25-OH to 1,25-OH2. PMID:24766747

  8. Quality control of cytoskeletal proteins and human disease.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Victor F; Leroux, Michel R; Stirling, Peter C

    2010-05-01

    Actins and tubulins are abundant cytoskeletal proteins that support diverse cellular processes. Owing to the unique properties of these filament-forming proteins, an intricate cellular machinery consisting minimally of the chaperonin CCT, prefoldin, phosducin-like proteins, and tubulin cofactors has evolved to facilitate their biogenesis. More recent evidence also suggests that regulated degradation pathways exist for actin (via TRIM32) and tubulin (via parkin or cofactor E-like). Collectively, these pathways maintain the quality control of cytoskeletal proteins ('proteostasis'), ensuring the appropriate function of microfilaments and microtubules. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of the quality control of actin and tubulin, and discuss emerging links between cytoskeletal proteostasis and human diseases. PMID:20116259

  9. CENPA a Genomic Marker for Centromere Activity and Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    M. Valdivia, Manuel; Hamdouch, Khaoula; Ortiz, Manuela; Astola, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Inheritance of genetic material requires that chromosomes segregate faithfully during cell division. Failure in this process can drive to aneuploidy phenomenon. Kinetochores are unique centromere macromolecular protein structures that attach chromosomes to the spindle for a proper movement and segregation. A unique type of nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin provides the base for kinetochore formation. A specific histone H3 variant, CENPA, replaces conventional histone H3 and together with centromere-specific-DNA-binding factors directs the assembly of active kinetochores. Recent studies on CENPA nucleosomal structure, epigenetic inheritance of centromeric chromatin and transcription of pericentric heterochromatin provide new clues to our understanding of centromere structure and function. This review highlights the role and dynamics of CENPA assembly into centromeres and the potential contribution of this kinetochore protein to autoimmune and cancer diseases in humans. PMID:20119530

  10. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists. In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and hypertrophy. PMID:21483452

  11. Hyaluronan as an Immune Regulator in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    NOBLE, PAUL W.; LIANG, JIURONG; JIANG, DIANHUA

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation and turnover of extracellular matrix components are the hallmarks of tissue injury. Fragmented hyaluronan stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes by a variety of immune cells at the injury site. Hyaluronan binds to a number of cell surface proteins on a variety of cell types. Hyaluronan fragments signal through both Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 as well as CD44 to stimulate inflammatory genes in inflammatory cells. Hyaluronan is also present on the cell surface of epithelial cells and provides protection against tissue damage by interacting with TLR2 and TLR4 on these parenchymal cells. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding proteins regulate inflammation, tissue injury and repair through regulating inflammatory cell recruitment, release of inflammatory cytokines, and stem cell migration. This review focuses on the role of hyaluronan as an immune regulator in human diseases. PMID:21248167

  12. Hepcidin modulation in human diseases: From research to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Piperno, Alberto; Mariani, Raffaella; Trombini, Paola; Girelli, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    By modulating hepcidi