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Sample records for acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome

  1. Recapitulation of acquired immuno deficiency syndrome associated Kaposi's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is one of the clinical forms of KS. KS is caused by human herpes viruses 8 or KS associated herpes virus (KSHV). In India, till now, only 16 cases of AIDS associated KS was reported. Of all the clinical forms of KS, AIDS associated KS is distinct in many ways viz.; cutaneous manifestations commonly affects face and trunk rather than lower limbs, more mucosal lesions, rapidly progressive, and early systemic involvement. When human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is co-infected with KSHV, in addition to the other pathogenic factors for the development of KS, HIV Tat protein promotes the proliferation of cytokine-activated endothelial cells and stimulates KS. Moreover, actions of HIV Tat lead to the aggressive course of KS in patients with AIDS, compared with the more confined behavior of KS in HIV-negative persons. Similarly, latency-associated nuclear antigen of KSHV would enhance HIV replication by activating the long terminal repeats of HIV-1 through its association with Tat. Effective antiretroviral treatment in AIDS associated KS results in reduction of the incidence of AIDS-related KS and regression of the existing lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment of AIDS associated KS would definitely increase the life span and quality of the patients. PMID:27890943

  2. Knowledge and attitude toward human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome among dental and medical undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Patil, Kavitha; Munoli, Karishma

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a major public health challenge. Unjustified calls for the isolation of patients with HIV infection might further constrain the potential for expansion of clinical services to deal with a greater number of such patients. This infectious illness can evoke irrational emotions and fears in health care providers. Keeping this in view, a study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitudes related to HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) among dental and medical students. Methodology: Descriptive cross-sectional survey of the entire dental and medical undergraduate students from two colleges was carried out using a pretested, self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as percentage was used to present the data. Results: Ninety-eight percentage medical and dental undergraduate graduate students knew about HIV transmission in the hospital. Journals and internet were the leading source of information among both medical and dental undergraduates. The majority of respondents discussed HIV-related issues with their classmates. Surprisingly, 38% medical and 52% dental undergraduates think that HIV patient should be quarantined (isolation) to prevent the spread of infection. 68% medical and 60% dental undergraduates are willing to rendering dental/medical care to HIV-infected patients. Relatively large proportion (98%) of participants was willing to participate for HIV prevention program. Conclusion: The knowledge of medical and dental students is adequate, but the attitude needs improvement. Dental and medical students constitute a useful public health education resource. Comprehensive training, continuing education, and motivation will improve their knowledge and attitude, which enable them to provide better care to HIV patients. PMID:26538940

  3. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of disease among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome: A study from a tertiary care center in North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Chauahn, Pushpinder S.; Mehta, Karainder S.; Rawat, Ritu; Shiny, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although modification of behavioral practices among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-affected patients is important in decreasing HIV disease transmission, the knowledge, attitude, and perception studies about HIV infection rarely include persons living with HIV/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Aims: To assess knowledge, attitude, and perceptions of persons living with HIV/AIDS for the disease and other epidemiological aspects. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and fifty consecutive persons living with HIV/AIDS were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: These 150 patients comprised 93 men and 57 women, aged between 14 and 78 (mean 37.13) years. The majority, 112 (74.67%) patients were between 20 and 50 years of age and 116 (77.3%) patients were either illiterate or high-school dropouts. Drivers, laborers, and self-employed comprised 69 (74.2%) patients among affected males. Only 129 (86%) respondents had heard about HIV/AIDS and knew about its heterosexual transmission. Ninety-eight (65.3%) respondents were aware of disease transmission from infected blood or needle pricks. Interestingly, 106 (70.7%) respondents were aware of the importance of using condom in preventing disease transmission. Television/radio was the most common sources of information for 135 (90%) patients. Nearly, 69% respondents disfavored disclosing their disease to friends/colleagues fearing stigmatization. Conclusions: Information, education, and communication activities are imperative to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS about life-long nature of the disease, modes of its transmission, and significance of preventive measures to bridge the gaps in their knowledge. While improvement in individual economic status, education, and health services remains highly desirable, mass media can play a pivotal role in creating awareness among masses. PMID:27890953

  4. Immune reconstitution syndromes in human immuno-deficiency virus infection following effective antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Behrens, G M; Meyer, D; Stoll, M; Schmidt, R E

    2000-08-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy leads to rapid decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA, frequently followed by an increase in CD4 T-helper cell counts. The improvement of immune function during highly active antiretroviral therapy has important impact on natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic disorders. Here we describe cases of unusual clinical inflammatory syndromes in CMV retinitis, hepatitis C, and atypical mycobacteriosis in HIV-1 infected patients associated with the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Pathogenetic implications and therapeutic management of these new immunopathologic syndromes are discussed.

  5. Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    effectiveness of the therapy as prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carini pneumonia . San Francisco investigators presented a formal abstract describing...who had a history of cytologically confirmed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) or an absolute CD4 lymphocyte count of less than 200 per cubic...Jacobson, P. A. Voiberding, D. Abrams, and the San Francisco County Community Consortium, "Aerosolized pentamidine for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis

  6. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  7. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on oral manifestations of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome in South India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. V. S. Eswara; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Kattappagari, Kiran Kumar; Kantheti, Lalith Prakash Chandra; Poosarla, Chandrasekhar; Baddam, Venkat Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a global health problem, although the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease into a manageable disease with improved quality-of-life mainly in the developed countries. Very few studies are available regarding effect of HAART on oral lesions in developing countries like India. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to document and compare oral lesions in HIV-seropositive patients before and after HAART. Materials and Methods: Oral manifestations were recorded in 320 HIV seropositive patients attending to the Voluntary Counseling and Confidential Testing Centre at the Government General Hospital, Guntur, before and after treating with HAART and the results were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Oral Candidiasis was significantly reduced in patients under HAART after 3 months. Furthermore, there was decreased incidence of periodontal diseases, but increased hyperpigmentation in patients undergoing HAART. Conclusion: The oral manifestations of HIV infection have changed due to the advent of HAART. Many opportunistic infections have resolved as a result of an improved immune system. Though the risk of hyperpigmentation in those with HAART has increased the prevalence of oral candidiasis and periodontal diseases were less in patients who had access to HAART. PMID:26392652

  8. Central nervous system toxoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: An emerging disease in India.

    PubMed

    Mathew, M J; Chandy, M J

    1999-09-01

    With the incidence of patients infected with human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) increasing in India, the central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of the disease will be seen more frequently. The CNS may be primarily afflicted by the virus or by opportunistic infections and neoplasms secondary to the immune suppression caused by the virus. In India, although mycobacterium tuberculosis has been reported to be the most common opportunistic infection, toxoplasmosis may become as common owing to the ubiquitous nature of the protozoan. Since an empirical trial of medical therapy without histopathological diagnosis is recommended, the true incidence of this condition may remain under estimated. The role of ancillary tests such as radiology and serology in the initial diagnosis of this condition remain crucial. This report highlights two patients who were diagnosed to have acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) only after the biopsy of the intracranial lesion was reported as toxoplasmosis. Presently all patients for elective neurosurgery are tested for HIV antigen. The management protocol to be followed in a known patient with AIDS presenting with CNS symptoms is discussed in detail. The value of ancillary tests is also reviewed.

  9. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  10. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  11. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  12. Conference Summary on Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Held in Washington, DC on 11-12 September 1989: Surrogate Endpoints in Evaluating the Effectiveness of Drugs against HIV Infection and AIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    overall well-being in evaluations of interventions for patients with cystic fibrosis . Any discussion of treatment for pediatric AIDS would be incomplete...because they also proceed rapidly, changes can be detected early. Loss of appetite , wasting, and neuropsychological impairment (detectable in 40 to 95

  13. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  14. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  15. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Quagliarello, V.

    1982-01-01

    A recently recognized syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-AIDS) has arisen since June 1981. It has received international attention. The clinical spectrum consists of repeated opportunistic infections, rare malignancies, and autoimmune phenomena, occurring in previously healthy adults with no history of an immunologic disorder. The population subset at risk for this syndrome appears to be predominantly homosexual American males and intravenous drug abusers with rare cases being reported in heterosexuals, hemophiliacs, and foreign patients, especially Haitians. The immunologic aberrancy in all patients described appears limited to T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and imbalance of T-helper and suppressor cells. This disordered immunoregulation is a consistent finding in all reported cases and appears to predispose to the opportunistic infections and malignancies which have been associated with a 40 percent mortality. The underlying factor responsible for the immunoregulatory defect is unknown but possible etiologies include a transmissible infectious agent, drug use, chronic antigen stimulation, and spermatozoa exposure. Treatment of the associated infections and malignancies has been a frustrating endeavor as many patients respond incompletely or relapse soon after successful treatment course. Preventive measures, including patient education, physician awareness, and immunomodulating agents, are discussed. PMID:6134399

  16. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, J. L.; Palacios-Araus, L.; Echevarría, S.; Herrán, A.; Campo, J. F.; Riancho, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus are predisposed to many infectious and noninfectious complications and often receive a variety of drugs. Furthermore, they seem to have a particular susceptibility to idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. It is therefore surprising that only a few cases of the neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been described in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose the neuroleptic malignant syndrome in these patients, as its usual manifestations, including fever and altered consciousness, are frequently attributed to an underlying infection. PMID:9497946

  17. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in a human immuno-deficiency virus patient treated with laser surgery

    PubMed Central

    Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Vecchio, Alessandro Del; Romeo, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck’s disease, is a rare disease of the oral mucosa; it is mostly found in children or young adults who are immunosuppressed and who live in regions with low socioeconomic status. It is characterized by asymptomatic papules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Healing can be spontaneous, and treatment is indicated if there are aesthetic or functional complications. Human papillomavirus, especially genotypes 13 and 32, has been associated with FEH and is detected in the majority of lesions. Histopathologically, FEH is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, and fusion and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges. A 37-year-old male patient was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences at the Sapienza University of Rome, complaining of numerous exophytic lesions in his mouth. He stated that the lesions were not painful but he had experienced occasional bleeding after incidental masticatory trauma. He had received no previous treatment for the oral lesions. His medical history revealed that he was human immuno-deficiency virus positive and was a smoker with numerous, asymptomatic oral papules clinically and histologically corresponding to FEH. The labial and buccal mucosa were especially affected by lesions. Surgical treatment was performed using a 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate laser (SmartLite, Deka, Florence, Italy) in continuous mode with a 300 μm fiber and power of 1.4 W (power density 1980.22 W/cm2). After anesthesia without vasoconstrictors, the lesions were tractioned with sutures or an Allis clamp and then completely excised. The lesions were preserved in 10% formalin for histological examination, which confirmed the clinical diagnosis of FEH. In this case, the laser allowed excellent control of bleeding, without postoperative sutures, and optimal wound healing. PMID:25032206

  18. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in a human immuno-deficiency virus patient treated with laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Vecchio, Alessandro Del; Romeo, Umberto

    2014-07-16

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a rare disease of the oral mucosa; it is mostly found in children or young adults who are immunosuppressed and who live in regions with low socioeconomic status. It is characterized by asymptomatic papules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Healing can be spontaneous, and treatment is indicated if there are aesthetic or functional complications. Human papillomavirus, especially genotypes 13 and 32, has been associated with FEH and is detected in the majority of lesions. Histopathologically, FEH is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, and fusion and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges. A 37-year-old male patient was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences at the Sapienza University of Rome, complaining of numerous exophytic lesions in his mouth. He stated that the lesions were not painful but he had experienced occasional bleeding after incidental masticatory trauma. He had received no previous treatment for the oral lesions. His medical history revealed that he was human immuno-deficiency virus positive and was a smoker with numerous, asymptomatic oral papules clinically and histologically corresponding to FEH. The labial and buccal mucosa were especially affected by lesions. Surgical treatment was performed using a 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate laser (SmartLite, Deka, Florence, Italy) in continuous mode with a 300 μm fiber and power of 1.4 W (power density 1980.22 W/cm(2)). After anesthesia without vasoconstrictors, the lesions were tractioned with sutures or an Allis clamp and then completely excised. The lesions were preserved in 10% formalin for histological examination, which confirmed the clinical diagnosis of FEH. In this case, the laser allowed excellent control of bleeding, without postoperative sutures, and optimal wound healing.

  19. [Iris heterochromia in acquired Horner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beynat, J; Soichot, P; Bidot, S; Dugas, B; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2007-09-01

    Horner's syndrome (HS) is related to an interruption of the oculosympathetic nerve pathway. The classic clinical findings associated with this condition are ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos. Heterochromia is typically described in congenital HS, but it is an uncommon finding in acquired HS. We report a case of post-traumatic HS associated with heterochromia. A literature review indicates that this type of heterochromia may be related to a reduction in the number of iris melanocytes. This mechanism may be the same in the physiological iris color modifications in adulthood.

  20. Treatment of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budde, Ulrich; Scheppenheim, Sonja; Dittmer, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) accounts for 22% of patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor. Most patients with known pathophysiological mechanisms suffer from cardiovascular, myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. Less frequent associations are of autoimmune origin, due to hyperfibrinolysis, adsorption to tumor cells, reduced synthesis and prolonged circulation. The mechanisms leading to aVWS is hitherto not known in patients with liver and kidney diseases, drug use, glycogen storage disease, virus infections and at least 18 other disease entities. Diagnosis is complicated by the battery of tests needed, and their inherent rather low sensitivity and specificity for aVWS. Thus, even in acute bleeding situations it may take days until a firm diagnosis is settled and specific therapies can be initiated. The main aim is to shed more light onto this, compared with inherited von Willebrand disease, rare disease which affects at least 2-3% of the older population.

  1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  2. [HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, J

    1997-05-01

    On June 4, 1981, MMWR published a report about Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homosexual men in Los Angeles. This was the first published report. A years later, this disease was named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the following year, Montangier et al in France discovered the causative agent, which they called lymphadenopathy virus (LAV), now known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1985, solid-phase enzymeimmunoassay for the detection of the antibody to HIV was developed. Since then, other new techniques for the identification of HIV infection have been become available. These include more sensitive methods (for example; polymerase chain reaction techniques). Although these techniques facilitate early and definite diagnosis of infection, these tests may fail to detect the antibody in sera during window period of infection or overdiagnose infection in sera contaminated with genes not related to HIV. Although preventing blood exposure is the primary means of preventing occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, appropriate post-exposure management is an important element of workplace safety. Information suggesting that zidovudine (ZDV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) may reduce the risk for HIV transmission after occupational exposure to HIV infected blood prompted a Public Health Service (PHS) interagency working group, with expert consultation, and recommendations on PEP and management of occupational exposure to HIV in relation to these findings were discussed.

  3. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  4. [Thoracic manifestations of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, A; Zompatori, M; Chiodo, F; Costigliola, P; Ricchi, E; Colangeli, V; Canini, R; Gavelli, G

    1989-11-01

    AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) seems to be related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is characterized by severe T-helpers lymphocyte dysfunction. Many of the AIDS patients (47-70%) develop pulmonary manifestations, both infectious and neoplastic, in the course of their disease. In the Department of Infectious Diseases of our Hospital are studied many patients HIV+. Every year 246 seropositive new patients have been discovered. Among them we have studied 25 subjects with respiratory disease, by chest radiographs; successively, according to clinical picture, we have performed thoracic computed tomography, Gallium scintigraphy, fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy (TBB), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); the majority of these patients (68%) had AIDS, only 28% had ARC and 4% had PGL. In our experience, the diagnosed diseases were mainly infections (92%), and most frequently (52%) due to Pneumocystis carinii, alone or in association with other etiologic agents. We have not found pathognomonic radiographic abnormalities, but chest X-ray evaluated with clinical and laboratory data, may often be useful to obtain diagnostic indications and in order to determine a more specific and aggressive diagnostic approach.

  5. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Funnyé, Allen S; Akhtar, Abbasi J; Biamby, Gisele

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if older African Americans are disproportionately affected by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and to review the clinical impact of AIDS and the importance of prevention and treatment efforts. A review of the literature and statistics was obtained using Medline and the AIDS Public Information Data Set offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Twenty-seven percent of the U.S. population is above the age of 50, and the number of AIDS cases in this group is growing, with African Americans accounting for the highest proportion of cases and deaths. Testing for HIV may be delayed and symptoms attributed to other illnesses. Though 5% of new cases occur in those over 50, prevention programs, testing, and the perception of risk by providers may be insufficient. There are few research studies on HIV treatment in older patients and no specific guidelines for antiretroviral treatments available. Although death rates for AIDS has been declining, adults over 50 still have the highest mortality rate. Co-morbid conditions, such as heart disease and hypertension, may require taking multiple drugs, which may complicate treatment. Increasing heterosexual transmission rates and a lack of information on HIV reinforces the need for specific prevention programs targeted toward older African Americans.

  7. Organic Brain Syndromes: Conditions of Acquired Intellectual Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Roy, John R.

    1979-01-01

    The term 'organic brain syndrome' covers a multitude of ills, many of which are treatable conditions. Diagnosis must concentrate on defining which syndrome is involved; this article presents a diagnostic schema with illustrative case histories. Clinical aspects of acquired mental deficit are also outlined. The approach to organic brain syndromes is the classic medical observation of signs and symptoms. PMID:21297811

  8. Acquired Bartter syndrome following gentamicin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, J.; Patel, M. L.; Gupta, K. K.; Pandey, S.; Dinkar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity may manifest as nonoliguric renal failure or tubular dysfunction, such as Fanconi-like syndrome, Bartter-like syndrome (BS), or distal renal tubular acidosis. We report a case who developed severe renal tubular dysfunction on the the 7th day of gentamicin therapy, resulting in metabolic alkalosis, refractory hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and polyuria. The patient was diagnosed as a case of transient BS associated with gentamicin exposure. The patient recovered with conservative management. PMID:27942182

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Menon, V; Bharucha, K

    1994-01-01

    As health care professionals, we face a grave risk of acquiring HIV infection in the course of our work. But how many of us really know the precautions to be applied in the hospital set up in dealing with HIV infected patients? A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) study was conducted in Pune hospitals to assess the current status. Among the results 65% servants had not heard of AIDS, 85% nursing staff did not apply the Universal Safety Precautions (USP) approach, 13.5% resident thought that the HIV was not transmitted by blood, 30% consultants would avoid contact with an HIV positive patient. This study has shown that definite lacunae exist in knowledge specific to the particular population in question. A proposal for an education programme which is target specific and one of constant renewal is sought.

  10. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity.

  11. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  12. Teaching AIDS: A Resource Guide on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Sargent, Pamela

    This document is a resource guide designed for teachers, youth leaders, and health educators as a practical and relevant approach to integrating information on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) into their existing courses. The curriculum is written in language appropriate for teenagers, junior college students, and the young adult…

  13. Dumping syndrome, a cause of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Jeffrey M; Zador, Ivan; Fish, Daryl L

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy, having undergone fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease and fed by gastrostomy, presented with recurrent emesis, syncope with hypoglycemia, and persistently elevated serum liver transaminase levels. Liver biopsy revealed hepatocellular glycogenosis by light and electron microscopy. Further evaluation showed no evidence of diabetes mellitus, glycogen storage disease, or corticosteroid use. Since the hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic state of dumping syndrome would provide a mechanism for hepatocellular glycogenosis, the biopsy findings prompted consideration of dumping syndrome. Metabolic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of dumping syndrome, and appropriate dietary management led to sustained resolution of symptomatology and hypertransaminasemia. Dumping syndrome is proposed to be a cause of hepatocellular glycogenosis, the latter representing a form of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

  14. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  15. [Reflection on treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Ni

    2012-02-01

    The current situation of Chinese medicine and Western medicine treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has made the integrative medicine treatment of AIDS an important treatment strategy. Integrative medicine treatment of AIDS has made certain achievements in clinical research, basic research, and other aspects. It has good mass foundation and curative efficacy, as well as insufficiency. I hope integrative medicine can be brought into full play in the treatment of AIDS and make breakthrough progress.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  17. Searching for the cause of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, R D

    1984-02-01

    An outbreak of unexplained immune deficiency associated with opportunistic infection and Kaposi's sarcoma is occurring in the USA and other parts of the world. Affected individuals with what had come to be known as the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a high mortality. Epidemiological features suggest the presence of a transmissable agent, but no responsible agent has yet been identified. Homosexual and bisexual men make up 75% of these affected individuals. Cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr and herpes simplex viruses, organisms that commonly affect male homosexuals, may produce some features of AIDS. Individually or collectively, however, they can not account for the emergence of a previously unrecognized clinical syndrome. Hepatitis B is prevalent in patients with AIDS and may play a role as a co-factor in the disease. The properties of a number of other known viruses may provide a model for the pathogenesis of some features of the AIDS immunodeficiency. Newly described simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) is the best available animal model. In man, the retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) may play a role in AIDS. However, HTLV or any other known virus cannot yet be assumed to cause AIDS. It is likely that an as yet unrecognized agent is the key causative agent of AIDS.

  18. Inhibition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome virus by oligodeoxynucleoside methylphosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, P S; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Goodchild, J; Ikeuchi, T; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides containing internucleoside methylphosphonate linkages were examined for their ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced syncytium formation and virus expression. HIV inhibitory activity was found to be dependent on both chain length and the number of phosphonate residues. Introduction of 18 phosphonate groups in an oligomer of chain length 20 significantly increased HIV inhibitory activity relative to the parent oligonucleotide, whereas 5 such groups showed little or no increase in the HIV inhibition capacity. Methylphosphonate-linked oligomers are more stable to nuclease degradation and hence could be potentially useful in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3174646

  19. Pathology of Toxoplasma myocarditis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Neil S; Jadhav, M V; Deshmukh, S D; Holla, V V

    2003-10-01

    Involvement of the myocardium by Toxoplasma gondii is seen in patients of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), mostly in association with toxoplasma encephalitis. Only few patients die as a direct result of cardiac dysfunction. Clinico-pathological findings of three cases of toxoplasma myocarditis are reported, one of which presented and died due to massive pericardial effusion. All cases showed diffuse myocarditis with parasites on histopathological examination. Incidence of toxoplasma myocarditis in patients dying with AIDS was 8.3% (3 out of 36 cases).

  20. Toxoplasma peritonitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Israelski, D M; Skowron, G; Leventhal, J P; Long, I; Blankenship, C F; Barrio, G W; Prince, J B; Araujo, F G; Remington, J S

    1988-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was identified in a stained slide preparation of, and isolated from, peritoneal fluid specimens obtained from a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). At the time of admission to the hospital, the patient's serologic tests were positive for Toxoplasma. Toxoplasma was isolated from samples of the patient's blood by mouse inoculation. Findings of newly developed methods for diagnosis of the presence of T gondii in body fluids by assay for Toxoplasma-specific antigen and by use of a DNA probe were positive.

  1. Polymorphous hemangioendothelioma in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephan R; Hurford, Matthew T; Miettinen, Markku M; Aronoff, Stephen C; Delvecchio, Michael; Grewal, Harsh; Tuluc, Madalina

    2008-03-01

    Polymorphous hemangioendotheliomas (PH) are rare and borderline malignant tumors that are among the wide range of vascular tumors. We report here a 13-year-old male presenting with a history of weight loss, opportunistic infections, and lymphadenopathy. He was determined to be HIV positive and to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A biopsy of a femoral node was diagnostic of PH. His systemic lymphadenopathy appeared to resolve with anti-retroviral therapy. This tumor should be considered within the differential diagnoses of pediatric and immunocompromised patients.

  2. Three Cases of Acquired Simulated Brown Syndrome after Blowout Fracture Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ji, So Young; Yoo, Jae Hong; Ha, Won; Lee, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Brown syndrome is known as limited elevation of the affected eye during adduction. It is caused by a disorder of the superior oblique tendon, which makes it difficult for the eyeball to look upward, especially during adduction. It is classified into congenital true sheath Brown syndrome and acquired simulated Brown syndrome. Acquired simulated Brown syndrome can be caused by trauma, infection, or inflammatory conditions. The surgical restoration of blowout fractures can also lead to limitations of ocular motility, including Brown syndrome. We report on three patients with acquired simulated Brown syndrome, who complained of diplopia and limitation of ocular motility after operations to treat blowout fractures. PMID:26015892

  3. Gastric toxoplasmosis as the presentation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merzianu, Mihai; Gorelick, Steven M; Paje, Voltaire; Kotler, Donald P; Sian, Corazon

    2005-04-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old West African man with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status diagnosed with gastric toxoplasmosis as the presenting manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Toxoplasma gondii is common in severely immunosuppressed patients and most frequently involves the central nervous system, followed by the eye, myocardium and skeletal muscle, lungs, bone marrow, and peripheral blood. For unclear reasons, gastrointestinal involvement is exceedingly rare and occurs in the context of severe immunosuppression and disseminated disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of a patient with isolated, manifest gastric toxoplasmosis without evidence of concomitant cerebral or extracerebral involvement. It is important for both the clinician and the pathologist to maintain a high index of suspicion for toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms of gastritis and radiologic and endoscopic presence of thickened gastric folds with or without ulceration.

  4. Infectious colitides in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mosenkis, B N; Simon, D

    1995-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and infections of the colon constitute a significant etiology. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common opportunistic infection of the colon in patients with AIDS, and it can involve any portion of the colon and the gastrointestinal tract. Because CMV is potentially treatable with either ganciclovir or foscarnet, it is important to evaluate endoscopically the entire colon of patients with AIDS with protracted diarrhea and no cause identifiable with routine stool and laboratory tests. In addition to CMV, there are a variety of other viral, bacterial, protozoal, and fungal infections seen in patients with AIDS. A thorough evaluation will help identify these pathogens, and those that are treatable can be given appropriate therapy.

  5. Endocrine disorders in Brazilian patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Rosita; Vangeloti, Andréa; Pires, Maria Lucia; Lima, Mário B C; Dimetz, Trude; Faulhaber, Marcelo; Faria, Raul; Meirelles, Ricardo M

    2003-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was first reported in Brazil in 1980. In 1997, its incidence was 147 per million and then declined to 90 per million in 2000. Abnormalities of endocrine organ systems occur frequently in patients with AIDS. We evaluated mineralcorticoid, glucocorticoid, and thyroid hormone axes and glucose and insulin responses to a standardized oral glucose dose in healthy individuals; human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive, asymptomatic individuals; HIV-infected patients with general lymphadenopathy, diarrhea, fever, fatigue, nocturnal sweating, and weight loss; and HIV-infected patients diagnosed with secondary infectious diseases or neoplasms. Baseline cortisol levels in the patients with AIDS were significantly higher than those in healthy control subjects. However, after adrenocorticotrophic hormone stimulation, cortisol levels were significantly lower in HIV-infected patients. Insulin concentrations were significantly higher after the glucose load in HIV-infected asymptomatic than in patients with AIDS. There were no significant differences in mineralocorticoid or thyroid function among groups.

  6. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  7. Serological diagnosis of human immuno-deficiency virus in Burkina Faso: reliable, practical strategies using less expensive commercial test kits.

    PubMed Central

    Meda, N.; Gautier-Charpentier, L.; Soudré, R. B.; Dahourou, H.; Ouedraogo-Traoré, R.; Ouangré, A.; Bambara, A.; Kpozehouen, A.; Sanou, H.; Valéa, D.; Ky, F.; Cartoux, M.; Barin, F.; Van de Perre, P.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of a cross-sectional survey in Burkina Faso to identify reliable, practical strategies for the serological diagnosis of HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections, using less-expensive commercial test kits in various combinations, as an alternative to the conventional Western blot (WB) test, which costs US$ 60. Serum samples, collected from blood donors, patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and pregnant women, were tested between December 1995 and January 1997. Twelve commercial test kits were available: five Mixt enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), three Mixt rapid tests, and four additional tests including monospecific HIV-1 and HIV-2 ELISA. The reference strategy utilized a combination of one ELISA or one rapid test with WB, and was conducted following WHO criteria. A total of 768 serum samples were tested; 35 were indeterminate and excluded from the analysis. Seroprevalence of HIV in the remaining 733 sera was found to be 37.5% (95% confidence interval: 34.0-41.1). All the ELISA tests showed 100% sensitivity, but their specificities ranged from 81.4% to 100%. GLA (Genelavia Mixt) had the highest positive delta value, while ICE HIV-1.0.2 (ICE) produced the most distinct negative results. Among the rapid tests, COM (CombAIDS-RS) achieved 100% sensitivity and SPO (HIV Spot) 100% specificity. Various combinations of commercial tests, according to recommended WHO strategies I, II, III, gave excellent results when ICE was included in the sequence. The best combination of tests for strategy II, which achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity, was to use ICE and COM, the cost of which was US$ 2.10, compared with US$ 55.60 for the corresponding conventional strategy. For strategy III, the best combination, which achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity, was to use ICE, ZYG (Enzygnost Anti HIV-1/HIV-2 Plus) and COM, the cost of which was US$ 2.90 (19.2 times lower than the corresponding strategy requiring WB). No rapid test

  8. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: manifestations in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Urízar, José Manuel; Echebarría-Goicouría, María Angeles; Eguía-del-Valle, Asier

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a pandemic disease characterised by impairment of the immune system; the main parameter is a progressive decline in the number of CD4 lymphocytes. This circumstance paves the way for opportunistic infections and the development of neoplastic processes that can lead the patient to a state known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ultimately, results in death. The incorporation of treatment based on a cocktail of different active drugs (highly active antiretroviral therapy) has made it possible to drastically change the panorama of the disease in developed nations; improving quality of life for the patient and delaying the progression of the disease. The oral manifestations of HIV infection have been and continue to be an important component of the disease from the very first descriptions and are indicative of progression. At some point in the course of the disease, nine out of every ten patients will present oral manifestations and, on occasion, these symptoms will be the first sign of the syndrome. It is essential that oral healthcare professionals recognize the hallmarks of the illness. In developed countries, the emergence of new therapies has made it possible to significantly reduce immune deficiency-related oral manifestations, both in terms of frequency, as well as severity. This review analyses the most important oral lesions associated with HIV infection and the current state of affairs in this regard.

  9. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  10. Hepatic disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Lodenyo, Hudson; Segal, Issy

    2004-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is now the leading cause of death in the world. Liver involvement in opportunistic infections and neoplasms affecting patients with human immunodeficiency disease syndrome are common. Many of these patients also take many medicines and toxins that are potentially harmful to the liver. This is an overview on the aetiology and possible diagnostic guide to determine liver involvement in patients with HIV infection. A literature review was performed on major published series on the liver and HIV infection between 1985 and 1999, both years inclusive. Data and opinions from 5 general reviews and 31 original articles from MEDLINE on liver disease in patients with HIV infection regarding aetiology, pathology, presentation and patient evaluation are summarised. The liver is frequently affected in patients with AIDS. The majority of the patients have hepatomegaly and abnormal liver enzymes secondary to involvement with opportunities infections, AIDS associated neoplasms and drug therapy. Most of the infections reach the liver by lymphohaematogeneous spread from other sites in the body. Methodical approach in patient evaluation is therefore essential for prompt diagnosis and treatment to minimise morbidity and early mortality.

  11. Case report, aetiology, and treatment of an acquired long-QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Asbroeck, P J; Huybrechts, W; De Soir, R

    2014-04-01

    Acquired long-QT syndrome is an iatrogenic disorder, usually induced by drugs, which can cause life-threatening arrhythmias. We present a case report on an acquired long-QT syndrome with an interesting confluence of circumstances, and comment on aetiology and treatment.

  12. Microsporum gypseum dermatophytosis in a patient of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Bhagra, S; Ganju, S A; Sood, A; Guleria, R C; Kanga, A K

    2013-01-01

    Microsporum gypseum, a geophillic dermatophyte is rarely isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report tinea corporis due to Microsporum gypseum, an uncommon aetiological agent, in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from our region. The clinical presentation resembled psoriasis characterised by atypical, scaly and hyperkeratotic lesions.

  13. Focal neurological disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skiest, Daniel J

    2002-01-01

    Focal neurological disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome may be caused by various opportunistic pathogens and malignancies, including Toxoplasma gondii, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Diagnosis may be difficult, because the findings of lumbar puncture, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging are relatively nonspecific. Newer techniques have led to improved diagnostic accuracy of these conditions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cerebrospinal fluid specimens is useful for diagnosis of PML, CNS lymphoma, and CMV encephalitis. Recent studies have indicated the diagnostic utility of new neuroimaging techniques, such as single-photon emission CT and positron emission tomography. The combination of PCR and neuroimaging techniques may obviate the need for brain biopsy in selected cases. However, stereotactic brain biopsy, which is associated with relatively low morbidity rates, remains the reference standard for diagnosis. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the prognosis of several focal CNS processes, most notably toxoplasmosis, PML, and CMV encephalitis.

  14. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Brazil. Necropsy findings.

    PubMed

    Michalany, J; Mattos, A L; Michalany, N S; Filie, A C; Montezzo, L C

    1987-01-01

    According to the 15 autopsies performed at the Department of Pathological Anatomy, Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil, it was confirmed that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurs preferably in young homosexual males, who die in a short period of time of the disease, which leads to a consumptive state verified by cachexia of the cadavers. The most affected organs of this series were the lungs and encephalum, exactly the ones responsible for the immediate cause of death. In this series of autopsies there were 9 types of microorganisms represented by virus, bacteria, fungi, protozoans and two types of tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma of the central nervous system. From the microorganisms, the most frequent was the Cytomegalovirus and, from the tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma. The various types of microorganisms were frequently associated, principally in the central nervous and digestive systems. There was also association of microorganisms with tumors. Besides the lesions produced by microorganisms there were other associated alterations as brown atrophy of neuronia, which was related to the infiltration of cerebral lymphoma, and the lymphocytic depletion of lymphoid organs due to immunological exhaustion. Cellular reaction to microorganisms was practically none, principally with Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptococcus neoformans, the first one behaving as an inert mould in the pulmonary alveoli and the second proliferating freely in tissues. In two cases there was no granulomatous reaction to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The primary lymphoma of the central nervous system should be interpreted as a microglioma, i.e., a reticulosarcoma of this system according to Hortega's school.

  15. A nationwide survey of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kira, R.; Ishizaki, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sanefuji, M.; Ichiyama, T.; Oka, A.; Kishi, T.; Kimura, S.; Kubota, M.; Takanashi, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamai, H.; Natsume, J.; Hamano, S.; Hirabayashi, S.; Maegaki, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Minagawa, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kira, J.; Kusunoki, S.; Hara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the CNS in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide survey and collected clinical data on children with ADS aged 15 years or younger, who visited hospitals between 2005 and 2007. Results: Among 977 hospitals enrolled, 723 (74.0%) responded to our inquiries and reported a total of 439 patients as follows: 244 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 117 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 14 with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 64 with other ADS. We collected and analyzed detailed data from 204 cases, including those with ADEM (66), MS (58), and NMO (10). We observed the following: (1) the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric ADEM in Japan was 0.40 per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34–0.46), with the lowest prevalence in the north; (2) the estimated prevalence rate of MS was 0.69 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.58–0.80), with the lowest prevalence in the south; (3) NMO in Japan was rare, with an estimated prevalence of 0.06 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.04–0.08); and (4) the sex ratio and mean age at onset varied by ADS type, and (5) male/female ratios correlated with ages at onset in each ADS group. Conclusions: Our results clarify the characteristic clinical features of pediatric ADS in the Japanese population. PMID:27742816

  16. Gastrointestinal surgery and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Nsagha, Dickson; Chichom, Alain; Enoworock, George

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is becoming an increasing problem to the surgeon. The impact of HIV/AIDS on surgical practice include the undoubted risk to which the surgeon will expose him or herself, the atypical conditions that may be encountered and the outcome and long term benefit of the surgical treatment in view of disease progression. The two factors most associated with surgical outcome and poor wound healing were AIDS and poor performance status (ASA score). This article questions whether gastrointestinal surgical procedures can be safe and effective therapeutic measures in HIV/AIDS patients and if surgical outcome is worthy of the surgeon's ethical responsibility to treat. As HIV/AIDS patients are not a homogeneous group, with careful patient selection, emergency laparotomy for peritonitis confers worthwhile palliation. However, aggressive surgical intervention must be undertaken with caution and adequate peri-operative care is required. Symptomatic improvement of anorectal pathology may make delayed wound healing an acceptable complication. Alternatives to surgery can be contemplated for diagnosis, prophylaxis or palliation. PMID:25685343

  17. Uveitis as an initial manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Chui-Lien; Chen, Shih-Chou; Chen, Yao-Shen; Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a multisystem disease that can involve the human eyes. Using ophthalmic examination records from January 2006 to November 2015, we retrospectively reviewed all patients who were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in our hospital. The study was performed at a tertiary referral center in southern Taiwan. Data included age, gender, ophthalmic examinations, systemic conditions, CD4 cell counts, course, and treatment. Eleven patients were identified as having AIDS with uveitis as their presenting manifestation. All were men, with a mean age of 39.5 ± 11.4 years (range 24-56). The mean CD4(+) T-cell counts were 91.7 ± 50.3 cells/μl (range 27-169). Ocular diagnoses included cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in five patients, ocular syphilis in four patients, and ocular toxoplasmosis in two patients. Uveitis resolved in all patients after medical treatment. However, a retinal detachment developed in two eyes in CMV retinitis and one eye in ocular syphilis. Ocular manifestations are among the most common clinical features in patients with HIV/AIDS who have varying clinical presentations that affect almost all ocular structures. This study demonstrated that ocular findings could be an initial manifestation of an underlying disease. Awareness of ocular lesions in HIV/AIDS is important for early recognition and management.

  18. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  19. Skin aging in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Favarato, Grace Kelly Naves; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the histomorphometric skin changes over aging patients with autopsied acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 29 skin fragments of autopsied elderly (older than 50 years) and nonelderly patients with AIDS, epidermal thickness, the number of layers, the diameter of cells, the percentage of collagen and elastic fibers in the dermis, and the number and morphology of Langerhans cells were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed by SigmaStat 2.03 program. The thickness of the epidermis (92.55 × 158.94 μm), the number of layers (7 × 9 layers), and the diameter of the cells (13.27 × 17.6 μm) were statistically lower among the elderly. The quantity of collagen fibers (9.68 × 14.11%) and elastic fibers (11.89 × 15.31%) was also significantly lower in the elderly. There was a decrease in total (10.61 × 12.38 cel/mm(2)) and an increase in immature Langerhans cells (6.31 × 4.98 cel/mm(2)) in elderly patients with AIDS. The aging of the skin of patients with AIDS is amended in different histomorphometric aspects, the epidermis constituents suffer less pronounced changes in normal aging, and the dermis has more intense changes in elastic fibers and collagen.

  20. Renal syndromes in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): lessons learned from analysis over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Rao, T K; Friedman, E A

    1988-06-01

    Renal syndromes associated with the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome include: potentially reversible acute renal failure, AIDS associated nephropathy which leads to end stage renal disease, and AIDS developing in patients who are being treated by maintenance hemodialysis. The longitudinal study of 95 patients with AIDS and various forms of renal syndrome at two urban institutions indicates that both acute and chronic renal failure is increasing yearly. While some patients with acute renal failure recover renal function and survive for prolonged period, the mortality of dialyzed patients with irreversible renal failure continues to be unsatisfactory. There is a great need for collecting data from high risk areas to analyze the results of maintenance dialysis therapy in patients with AIDS, to assess the economic impact of uremia therapy, and for long-term planning of available resources.

  1. Introduction and immunopathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sudharshan, S; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2008-01-01

    India has a large number of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the third largest population of this group in the world. This disease was first described in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia in 1981. Ocular lesions can occur at any stage of the disease but are more commonly seen at the late stages. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS is a retrovirus with RNA genome and a unique 'Reverse transcriptase enzyme' and is of two types, HIV-1 and 2. Most human diseases are caused by HIV-1. The HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in India are A, B and C. They act predominantly by reducing the CD4+ cells and thus the patient becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. High viral titers in the peripheral blood during primary infection lead to decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Onset of HIV-1-specific cellular immune response with synthesis of HIV-1 specific antibodies leads to the decline of plasma viral load and chronification of HIV-1 infection. However, the asymptomatic stage of infection may lead to persistent viral replication and a rapid turnover of plasma virions which is the clinical latency. During this period, there is further decrease in the CD4+ counts which makes the patient's immune system incapable of controlling opportunistic pathogens and thus life-threatening AIDS-defining diseases emerge. Advent of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has revolutionized the management of AIDS though there is associated increased development of immune recovery uveitis in a few of these patients.

  2. Hepatobiliary manifestations of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    1991-01-01

    Patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) frequently develop hepatic dysfunction. Although hepatic injury may indirectly result from malnutrition, hypotension, administered medications, sepsis, or other conditions, the hepatic injury is frequently due to opportunistic hepatic infection, directly related to AIDS. Infection with Mycobacterium avium intracellulare typically occurs in patients with advanced immunocompromise and with systemic symptoms due to widely disseminated infection. In contrast, hepatic tuberculosis often occurs with less advanced immunocompromise. Cytomegaloviral infection may produce a hepatitis. Cytomegaloviral and cryptosporidial infections have been implicated as causes of acalculous cholecystitis and of a secondary sclerosing cholangitis. About 10-20% of patients with AIDS have chronic hepatitis B infection. These patients tend to develop minimal hepatic inflammation and necrosis. The clinical findings in patients with hepatic cryptococcal infection are usually due to concomitant extrahepatic infection. Hepatic histoplasmosis usually develops as part of a widely disseminated infection with systemic symptoms. Hepatic involvement by Kaposi's sarcoma is rarely documented ante mortem because an unguided liver biopsy is an insensitive diagnostic procedure. Patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the liver typically have lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, and systemic symptoms. As a pragmatic approach, patients with liver dysfunction and HIV-related disease should have a sonographic or computerized tomographic examination of the liver. Patients with dilated bile ducts should undergo endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography because opportunistic infection may produce biliary obstruction. Patients with a focal hepatic lesion should be considered for a guided liver biopsy. Patients with a significantly elevated serum alkaline phosphatase level should be considered for a percutaneous liver biopsy. When performed for these

  3. Treatment of infectious complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furio, M M; Wordell, C J

    1985-01-01

    The infectious complications of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are discussed, and the conventional and nonconventional therapies used for these infections are reviewed. The infections most commonly encountered in patients with AIDS are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (58%), Candida esophagitis (31%), toxoplasmosis (21%), cytomegalovirus infections (15%), and herpes-simplex virus infections (12%). Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the most common life-threatening process in these patients. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is considered the drug of choice for its treatment. Oral candidiasis often indicates the progression to AIDS in the high-risk populations of homosexual or bisexual men, intravenous drug abusers, and individuals with hemophilia. Nystatin suspension is commonly used to treat oral candidiasis, while Candida esophagitis demands systemic therapy with ketoconazole. Toxoplasmosis most commonly manifests itself in patients with AIDS as a cerebral mass lesion. The recommended therapy includes sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. AIDS patients frequently experience protozoal invasion of the intestinal tract with Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli, and Cryptosporidium muris. Various drugs have been tried for these infections, including quinacrine hydrochloride, metronidazole, TMP-SMZ, and spiramycin. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections commonly involve the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, eyes, brain, and nervous system. Attempts to treat these disseminated CMV infections with antiviral agents, including acyclovir, have not been successful. However, acyclovir has been found beneficial in the treatment of herpes-simplex virus infections. Multiple infectious complications may occur in patients with AIDS as a result of the cellular-immune deficiency associated with this disease. Until more research is done with AIDS patients, therapy must be based on the data available from the treatment of these infections in immunosuppressed patients without AIDS.

  4. Monocyte function in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Defective chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P D; Ohura, K; Masur, H; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S; Wahl, S M

    1984-01-01

    The ineffective immune response in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) contributes to severe and widespread infections and unrestricted growth by certain tumors. To determine whether monocyte dysfunction contributes to this immunosuppressed condition, we investigated monocyte chemotaxis in patients with AIDS. Using three different chemotactic stimuli, N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine, lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor, and C5a des Arg, we studied the chemotactic responses of monocytes from seven homosexual men with AIDS, three homosexuals with lymphadenopathy and an abnormal immunological profile, seven healthy homosexual men, and 23 heterosexual control individuals. Monocytes from each of the AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and/or opportunistic infection exhibited a marked reduction in chemotaxis to all stimuli compared with the healthy control subjects. The reduced chemotactic responses were observed over a wide range of concentrations for each stimulus. Monocytes from AIDS patients who had clinically apparent opportunistic infection(s) exhibited a greater reduction in monocyte migration to all three stimuli than monocytes from the AIDS patient with only Kaposi's sarcoma. Monocytes from each of three homosexuals with lymphadenopathy and an abnormal immunological profile exhibited decreased chemotactic responses that were intermediate between those of the AIDS patients and the healthy heterosexual control subjects. In contrast to these findings, monocytes from each of seven healthy homosexuals exhibited normal chemotactic responses to the same stimuli. In addition, monocytes from AIDS patients exhibited reduced chemotaxis to soluble products of Giardia lamblia, one of several protozoan parasites prevalent in AIDS patients. Thus the immune abnormality in AIDS, previously thought to involve only the T-, B-, and natural killer lymphocytes, extends to the monocyte-macrophage. Defective monocyte migratory function may contribute to

  5. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in children with aorticand pulmonary stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Filiz, Şayegan Güven; Zengin, Emine; Sarper, Nazan; Altun, Gürkan; Kılıç, Suar Çakı

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: This prospective study was planned to investigate the frequency and relationship of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) with aortic and pulmonary stenosis in patients. Methods: A total of 84 children, ranging from two to 18 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Of these, 28 had isolated aortic stenosis, 32 had isolated pulmonary stenosis and 24 were healthy. Children with aortic and pulmonary stenosis associated with other congenital heart diseases were excluded. Children with hypothyroidism, renal or liver disease, malignancy or autoimmune disease were also excluded. Wholeblood count, blood group, factor VIII level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag), ristocetin co-factor (VWF:RCo), and bleeding time using a platelet-function analyser (PFA-100) were performed in all patients. All of the children in the study underwent a detailed physical examination and echocardiographic evaluation. Results: A history of bleeding was positive in 18% of the aortic stenosis group, 9% of the pulmonary stenosis group, and 4% of the control group. Seven of 60 (12%) patients had laboratory findings that implied a diagnosis of AVWS, and two of these (28%) had a history of bleeding. The frequency of AVWS was 14% in patients with aortic stenosis and 9% in those with pulmonary stenosis. Conclusion: AVWS is not rare in stenotic obstructive cardiac diseases. A detailed history of bleeding should be taken from patients with valvular disease. Even if the history is negative, whole blood count, PT and aPTT should be performed. If necessary, PFA-100 closure time and further tests should be planned for the diagnosis of AVWS. PMID:27841910

  6. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) manifesting Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Sakai, H; Fujihara, K; Fujihara, K; Itoyama, Y

    1998-11-01

    We reported a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) via multiple blood transfusions, who manifested progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) about 18 months after the development of AIDS. PML initiated with right hemiparesis, dysphasia, and Gerstmann's syndrome and resulted in death within 2 months after the onset. Neuroimaging examinations revealed white matter lesions mainly in the left posterior parietal lobe. The cortical gray matter also showed abnormal signal intensity. Peripheral CD4+ lymphocyte count was 81/microl. Routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations were negative. CSF antibodies against herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus as well as serum antibody against toxoplasma gondii were negative. Though autopsy or biopsy of the brain was not performed, JC virus genomes were detected in the CSF sample by a polymerase chain reaction, and their sequencing showed unique alterations of the regulatory regions, characteristic to PML-type JC virus.

  7. The urological management of the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heyns, Chris F; Fisher, Megan

    2005-04-01

    In people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) both the CD4 T-cell count and the viral load are used to monitor disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CD4 counts of <500/mm(3) are associated with opportunistic infections and certain malignancies, so-called 'AIDS-defining' conditions. Highly active antiretroviral therapy, using combinations of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and/or protease inhibitors, can improve considerably the prognosis of people who are HIV-positive, but such therapy is not yet widely available in many developing countries. People with AIDS are predisposed to urinary tract infection (UTI) by uncommon bacteria and pathogens, e.g. fungi, parasites and viruses, which may affect any urogenital organ; treatment should be culture-specific and long-term, because there is a tendency to recurrence, infection with multiple organisms and resistant isolates. Voiding dysfunction in patients with AIDS is usually a result of neurological complications caused by opportunistic infections, and has a poor prognosis. Of patients with AIDS, 30-50% develop a cancer, especially Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). KS may involve any urogenital organ, but is usually part of systemic disease. Small lesions on the external genitalia can be treated with laser, cryotherapy or surgical excision, larger lesions with radiotherapy, and disseminated or visceral KS with multidrug chemotherapy. NHL may involve the kidneys, testes and retroperitoneal lymph nodes, thus obstructing the ureters, which may require ureteric stenting or percutaneous nephrostomy. NHL can be treated with radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy. Urolithiasis in patients with AIDS may be caused by indinavir, a protease inhibitor, but the more common types of stones may also occur. Fluid-electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are common in patients with advanced AIDS, secondary to vomiting, diarrhoea, malnutrition or septicaemia. HIV

  8. Hepatitis in children with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Histopathologic and immunocytologic features.

    PubMed

    Duffy, L F; Daum, F; Kahn, E; Teichberg, S; Pahwa, R; Fagin, J; Kenigsberg, K; Kaplan, M; Fisher, S E; Pahwa, S

    1986-01-01

    Hepatic morphology and immunocytology were evaluated in 4 children with clinical and immunologic characteristics of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immune deficiency syndrome related complex. All 4 children had hepatomegaly and increased serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activity. Both lobular and portal changes were noted. Lymphocytic infiltration, piecemeal necrosis, hepatocellular and bile duct damage, sinusoidal cell hyperplasia, and endothelialitis were prominent. Vesicular rosettes in sinusoidal lymphocytes and tubuloreticular structures in sinusoidal endothelial cells were demonstrated by electron microscopy. The lymphocytic infiltrate in both the lobular and portal spaces was characterized by a relative increase of cytotoxic/suppressor (T8) cells. Hepatitis may be a common feature of pediatric acquired immune deficiency syndrome and acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related complex. Although the histopathologic changes are consistent with chronic active hepatitis, the specific pathogenesis remains to be determined.

  9. [Epilepsy-acquired aphasia syndrome with psychosis. Report of a case ].

    PubMed

    Zivi, A; Broussaud, G; Daymas, S; Hazard, J; Sicard, C

    1990-06-01

    We report the case of a boy whose development was normal until the age of three when regression with loss of speech occurred. Other anomalies included eating and sleep disorders, sterotyped behavior disorders, suggesting infantile psychosis. The electroencephalogram evidenced paroxysmal anomalies, particularly during sleep, with no clinical seizures. The diagnosis of epilepsia-acquired aphasia syndrome (Landau-Kleffner syndrome) was made. The psychotic disorders were not considered as a differential diagnosis but rather as intertwined with the elements of the syndrome. The relationship between acquired aphasia and psychosis are discussed.

  10. Acquired hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with synovial sarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Ferrara, Roberto; Fantinel, Emanuela; Zecchetto, Camilla; Simionato, Francesca; Grego, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Silvia; Caccese, Mario; Bimbatti, Davide; Cingarlini, Sara; Brunelli, Matteo; Andreini, Angelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a syndrome characterized by severe hyperinflammation due to an overwhelming ineffective immune response to different triggers. Most important symptoms are fever, hepatosplenomegaly and cytopenias. Biochemical signs include elevated ferritin, hypertriglyceridemia and low fibrinogen. Hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow is a hallmark of this syndrome. Based on the pathogenetic mechanism, it can be classified into primary (inherited) or secondary (acquired) HLH. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of acquired hemophagocytic syndrome that arose in a 20-year-old man affected by synovial sarcoma as a complication during chemotherapy. PMID:28031902

  11. Serum immunoglobulin G subclass dysbalances in the lymphadenopathy syndrome and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Aucouturier, P; Couderc, L J; Gouet, D; Danon, F; Gombert, J; Matheron, S; Saimot, A G; Clauvel, J P; Preud'homme, J L

    1986-01-01

    Serum IgG subclass levels were measured by an indirect competitive immunoenzymatic assay with monoclonal antibodies in 61 adult patients of different geographic origins affected either with the lymphoadenopathy syndrome (LAS, 46 cases) or with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, 15 cases). In spite of considerable variations from patient to patient, IgG-1 and IgG-3 levels were higher than in normal Caucasians, with IgG-1 levels much more elevated in LAS than in AIDS patients. In Caucasians with AIDS or LAS, IgG-4 levels were low. IgG-2 levels tended to be low and correlated negatively with IgG-1 levels. IgG subclass imbalances were especially striking in patients with lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis. The results suggest that the IgG increase predominantly affects the less T-dependent subclasses. The low levels of the more T-dependent isotypes do not appear to play a clear role in the occurrence of pyogenic infections in certain patients. PMID:3955884

  12. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm3. The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  13. Cutaneous colesional acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated Kaposi sarcoma and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Subrayan, Sumeshini; Calonje, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 4 AIDS patients with cutaneous colesional Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and cryptococcosis, a rare phenomenon, are described. Biopsies from 3 patients who were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naive demonstrated predominant KS with a conspicuous spindle cell component and small aggregates of cryptococcal yeasts in 2 biopsies and predominant gelatinous cryptococcosis with attenuated KS spindle cells in 1 biopsy. One patient was HAART exposed. He had childhood pulmonary tuberculosis, was treated for disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis 18 months earlier and presented with cutaneous lesions, odynophagia and massive cervical lymphadenopathy in the eighth week of HAART, after achieving viral suppression and a CD4 cell increase from 28 to 184 cells/μL. His skin biopsy demonstrated a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, neutrophils, and granulomas with admixed aggregates and single Cryptococcus neoformans and focal aggregation of human herpes virus 8-immunopositive spindle cells. Acid fast bacilli were not identified and mycobacterial molecular studies were negative. The features were compatible with cutaneous cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. His nodal and oropharyngeal biopsies demonstrated dense mixed, including granulomatous, inflammation with few cryptococcal yeasts and acid fast bacilli, confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction testing, without KS. These features were also compatible with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, but the exact role of each infection in the extracutaneous sites was unconfirmed. Colesional KS and cryptococcosis served as the sentinel lesion of AIDS in 3 patients and of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in 1 patient.

  14. [Hemophagocytic syndrome associated with tuberculosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    González, Norma E; Álvarez Ponte, Silvia; López, Mariela; Fronti, Pablo; Smith, Silvina; Pawluk, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The secondary hemophagocytic syndrome is rare in children and even rarer associated with tuberculosis. e report the case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, disseminated tuberculosis and hemophagocytic syndrome. An 8-year-old girl, diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, was admitted due to fever, vomiting and abdominal pain. She presented abdominal distension, dehydration, tachypnea, crackles and wheezing in both lungs, anemia, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. She received broad-spectrum antibiotics and exploratory laparotomy was performed with appendectomy and lymph node biopsy. After 72 hours the patient presented tonic clonic seizure, impaired sensory, fever, hypoxemia, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites and peripheral edema. She developed bicytopenia, hyperferritinemia and bone marrow microscopic examination with hemophagocytosis. She received intravenous gammaglobulin, steroids and blood transfusions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured in gastric aspirate, bone marrow and abdominal lymph node biopsy. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol, showing marked improvement.

  15. [Prevalence of antitoxoplasma antibodies in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako].

    PubMed

    Maïga, I; Kiemtoré, P; Tounkara, A

    2001-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a cosmopolitan disease. Our aim was to evaluate the epidemiological importance of toxoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and blood donors in Bamako (Mali, West Africa). A one year study of toxoplasmosis prevalence was carried out among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako. The toxoplasmosis prevalence was 60% from AIDS patients, 22.6% from the HIV-seropositive blood donors and 21% from the HIV-seronegative blood donors. The specific antibodies were IgG and IgA. The specific IgM were not detected.

  16. Adult Nephrotic Syndrome and Acquired Coagulopathies: Hageman Factor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Branson, Herman E.; Vaziri, N. Dabir; Slater, Lewis M.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of tests of coagulation and fibrinolysis from 20 adult nephrotics prior to the onset of therapy disclosed that 40 percent had low factor XII levels. The mean factor XI was normal. The platelet count and fibrinogen concentration were elevated. The findings of this study on adults are similar to those of Honig and Lindley21 in the nephrotic syndrome of childhood. Subjects with minimal change disease constituted a small (15 percent) but readily segregated subpopulation without evidence of fibrinolysis in association with low factor XII activity. Prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time corresponded in every instance with factor XII activities of ≤30 percent. Lengthening of the one stage prothrombin time was not directly attributable to factor deficiencies. PMID:7120469

  17. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival.

  18. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Mirjana; Elezovic, Ivo; Miljic, Predrag; Suvajdzic, Nada

    2014-04-01

    Although various coagulation abnormalities occur in patients with Gaucher disease (GD), von Willebrand factor (vWF) deficiency has rarely been reported. A retrospective review of six treatment naïve cases with GD and concomitant vWF deficiency over a 12-year-period in a single center is presented. All patients had a personal history of prior hemorrhages. Based on both reduced level of vWF antigen (vWF:Ag, range 14-56%) and ristocetin cofactor activity (vWF:RCo, range 12-53%), with a vWF:RCo/Ag ratio >0.7, the diagnosis of type 1 von Willebrand disease was made in all six cases. During enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of a 2-year duration all patients normalized their vWF:Ag levels. Based on the positive ERT effect on vWF:Ag levels, vWF deficiency was assumed to be acquired. It should be noted that beside vWF deficiency four patients with GD exhibited mild thrombocytopenia (range 81-131×10(9)/L) and three had additional hemostatic defects (reduced collagen platelet aggregation, FV, FXI and FXII deficiencies).

  19. Acquired Constriction Ring: A Case of Rubber Band Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rahel; Haug, Luzian; Surke, Carsten; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2017-03-13

    Rubber band syndrome is a rare entity seen in younger children mainly in communities where rubber bands are worn around the wrist for decorative purposes. When the band is worn for a long duration, it burrows through the skin and soft tissues resulting in distal edema, loss of function, and even damage to the neurovascular structures. These symptoms are difficult to relate to this rare but typical condition. We report a case of a 2¾-year-old girl with the history of a linear circumferential scar at the right wrist combined with the limited use of a swollen hand for several weeks. The child was taken to surgery with the purpose to release the red, indurated scar and eliminate the lymphatic congestion. A rubber band was found lying in a plane superficial to the flexor tendons but had cut through the superficial branch of the radial nerve and partially through the abductor pollicis longus tendon. The band was removed and the lacerated structures were repaired. The child had excellent recovery postoperatively. The cardinal features of a linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a swollen hand should always alert the clinician to the possibility of a forgotten band around the wrist, which might have burrowed into the soft tissues for a period. Early recognition may be important to prevent further damage of essential structures.

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of major protozoal infections among acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yin-Zhong; Lu, Hong-Zhou

    2008-04-01

    Protozoal infection is one of the most important opportunistic infections among patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In order to enhance the knowledge of protozoal infections in AIDS, the current status of diagnosis and treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis, cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis and isosporiasis was reviewed in this paper.

  1. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS: A Selected Bibliography of Federal Government Publications. Research Guide 90 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Margaret

    This research guide presents a selected bibliography of federal government publications about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These documents are listed in five categories: (1) Bibliographies (7); (2) Congressional Publications (69 hearings and reports); (3) Executive Branch Publications (43 reports); (4) Federal Government…

  2. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Puronen, Camille E; Josephson, Neil C; Broudy, Virginia C

    2013-06-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder that typically presents as mucocutaneous bleeding in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding disorder. Here we present a case in which a patient presented with profound epistaxis and was found to have AVWS in the setting of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

  3. AIDS. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Curriculum Planning Guidelines: Elementary, Junior High, High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    The support materials in this guide provide background and content materials for school personnel and others to modify and use in their education programming on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) for K-12 students. The following support materials are included: (1) the U.S. Surgeon General's report on AIDS; (2) digest and reference guide to…

  4. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  5. AIDS Instruction about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Wisconsin Schools. Bulletin No. 8248.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taff, Laura

    This document provides a comprehensive framework for school districts to follow in developing instruction about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) within kindergarten through 12th grade health education programs. A curriculum progression matrix about AIDS is included. It lists student outcome objectives by grade level in the areas of…

  6. Central nervous system infection due to Mycobacterium haemophilum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buppajarntham, Aubonphan; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rutjanawech, Sasinuj; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is an environmental organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who had central nervous system infection due to M. haemophilum. The diagnosis required brain tissue procurement and molecular identification method while the treatment outcome was unfavourable.

  7. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea. PMID:27433384

  8. Small intestinal lymphoma in three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Bridges, N; Feiner, H D; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of small bowel lymphoma in young homosexual men are presented. All three had acquired immune deficiency syndrome as demonstrated by demography, sexual history, cachexia, opportunistic infections by Cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis carinii, atypical Mycobacterium, Candida, and/or evidence of immune deficiency, such as skin test anergy, lymphopenia, inversion of T-helper/T-suppressor ratio, and diminished lymphocyte response to either phytohemmaglutinin or pokeweed mitogen. All had peripheral and/or abdominal lymphadenopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms, e.g., diarrhea, spasms, constipation, and oral candidiasis. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made at laparotomy in all cases. All three had complete removal of localized tumor (stage Ie or IIe), yet died within 6 months of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Thus gastrointestinal complaints may not always be related to "gay bowel" syndrome, or other infectious diseases in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Small intestinal lymphoma should be added to the list of neoplasms to which this group is susceptible.

  9. Mechanisms underlying acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with an IgM paraprotein.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, M; Haushofer, A; Kyrle, P A; Chott, A; Müllner, C; Quehenberger, P; Worel, N; Traby, L; Eichinger, S

    2009-09-01

    Acquired von Willebrand (vW) syndrome is a rare bleeding disorder which is frequently associated with immunological, malignant or cardiovascular disorders. The underlying pathomechanisms, particularly in patients with IgM monoclonal gammopathies, often remain unknown. We report a patient with indolent small B-cell lymphoma (immunocytoma) and plasmacytic differentiation with an IgM kappa paraprotein who was admitted with retroperitoneal haematoma. Medical history and coagulation testing were consistent with acquired vW syndrome. vW immunohistochemistry showed normal cytoplasmic labelling of endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, whereas the lymphomatous infiltrate was negative. Acquired vW syndrome due to adsorption of vW factor on malignant cells was thus excluded. In the multimeric analysis, all multimers were present similar to that in type 1 vW syndrome, but the triplet structures were blurred. The bands on serum immunofixation electrophoresis were also atypically broadened, which suggested complex formation between the IgM and vW factor. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that the 176-kDa proteolytic fragment of vW factor co-precipitated with the IgM paraprotein in the patient but not in the controls, suggesting a specific interaction between vW factor and the paraprotein in the patient. The patient required surgery and was successfully managed by chemotherapy consisting of rituximab and fludarabin as well as plasma exchange.

  10. Altered excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borek, E; Sharma, O K; Buschman, F L; Cohn, D L; Penley, K A; Judson, F N; Dobozin, B S; Horsburgh, C R; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1986-05-01

    Urinary excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid, subsequently referred to as markers, was determined in populations of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or at risk for development of AIDS. Our results show that asymptomatic adult male homosexuals excreted elevated amounts of markers as compared to male heterosexuals. This aberrant excretion was more pronounced in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III. Significantly greater excretion of 1-methylinosine, N4-acetylcytidine, and N2-methylguanosine was observed in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III than in asymptomatic male homosexuals without antibodies to HTLV-III. Increased amounts of markers were also excreted by subjects with the generalized or chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome, AIDS related complex (ARC), or AIDS. In these subjects, the most pronounced differences between groups were between subjects with chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome and those with ARC; subjects with ARC excreted greater amounts of seven of the ten urinary markers. There were few differences between subjects with ARC and those with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma, or AIDS with opportunistic infections. This observation may be useful for identifying subjects who are at risk of developing AIDS. A prospective study to test this hypothesis is under way.

  11. Glioblastoma multiforme of the brain stem in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Zimmermann, M; Marquardt, Gerhard; Lanfermann, H; Nafe, R; Seifert, V

    2002-09-01

    Glioblastoma of the brain stem is rare and there is no description of such a lesion in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The majority of intracerebral mass lesions are due either to toxoplasmosis or primary central nervous system lymphomas so that it is usually not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system in these patients. A 31-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected man presented with a four months history of slowly progressive deterioration of brainstem associated symptoms despite antitoxoplasmic therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large ring enhancing lesion in the brainstem. Clinical and neuroradiological data could not establish a proper diagnosis and a stereotactic serial biopsy was undertaken. Histological examination of the specimen showed a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as the first reported case of GBM located in the brainstem in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. Patient management and effectiveness of stereotactic serial biopsy are discussed.

  12. Microbe-Induced Inflammatory Signals Triggering Acquired Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J. Luis; Kotecha, Ritesh; Nakao, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Acquired bone marrow failure syndromes encompass a unique set of disorders characterized by a reduction in the effective production of mature cells by the bone marrow (BM). In the majority of cases, these syndromes are the result of the immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem cells or their progenitors at various stages of differentiation. Microbial infection has also been associated with hematopoietic stem cell injury and may lead to associated transient or persistent BM failure, and recent evidence has highlighted the potential impact of commensal microbes and their metabolites on hematopoiesis. We summarize the interactions between microorganisms and the host immune system and emphasize how they may impact the development of acquired BM failure. PMID:28286502

  13. Kaposi's sarcoma of the head and neck in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patow, C A; Steis, R; Longo, D L; Reichert, C M; Findlay, P A; Potter, D; Masur, H; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S; Macher, A M

    1984-06-01

    Since 1981 a new syndrome of acquired immune deficiency (AIDS) has been recognized. Male homosexuals, male and female intravenous drug abusers, and recipients of blood products (i.e., hemophiliacs) appear to be the populations at risk. The syndrome has been manifested by community-acquired opportunistic infections and/or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Otolaryngologic manifestations of AIDS are not infrequent. Thirteen AIDS patients at the National Institutes of Health with KS of the head and neck region are presented. All 13 patients were homosexual or bisexual males. Nine initially presented with KS, five with KS of the head or neck. As a group the patients demonstrated lesions involving the oropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and gastrointestinal regions. Their clinical course and complications are presented in detail. The mortality rate in this subgroup of AIDS patients is extraordinarily high (62%), with an average longevity of 11 months following initial diagnosis.

  14. Thalidomide for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated refractory oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Diz Dios, P; Sopeña, B; Cameselle, J; Butrón, M; Crespo, M; Ocampo, A

    2000-01-01

    A case of severe, oral, not otherwise specified ulcers in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient is described. The lesions did not respond to acyclovir, prednisone, pentoxifylline, or foscarnet sodium therapy. Dramatic clinical improvement and progressive ulcer healing were observed after starting oral thalidomide therapy. Clinicians should be aware of the usefulness of thalidomide for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated not otherwise specified ulcerations.

  15. Inital observations of the effect of radiotherapy on epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. [Acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.; Laubenstein, L.J.

    1984-08-17

    Fifteen patients who had Kaposi's sarcoma in conjunction with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) received radiotherapy to a total of 17 selected lesions. All tumors exhibited at least partial regression, and the majority responded completely. The radiosensitivity of these lesions is similar to that observed in the classic form of the disease. The authors conclude that in appropriately selected cases radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice.

  16. Nontropical pyomyositis as a cause of subacute, multifocal myalgia in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, R.F.; Sprenger, H.G.; Mooyaart, E.L.; Tamsma, J.T.; Kengen, R.A.; Weits, J. )

    1990-11-01

    We report a case of nontropical pyomyositis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection, in which severe myalgia was the presenting symptom over several weeks. Multifocal muscle lesions were identified by gallium scanning and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The epidemiology, possible pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic imaging, and therapy are reviewed. Early suspicion of nontropical pyomyositis in severely immunocompromised patients with cryptic myalgia is recommended.

  17. Psychological support and counselling for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D; Green, J

    1985-01-01

    The growing numbers of patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in England had led to the development of a counselling service for patients, their sexual partners, contacts, and others. The nature of the counselling is described with reference to the primary qualitative issues arising from diagnosis. The necessity for preventative education for patients and those at risk is stressed, and guidelines for low risk sexual activities are outlined. PMID:2991121

  18. Heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Detection by gallium scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E; Tipler, B M

    1987-06-01

    A case of heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans) secondary to the central nervous system complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Because of the overwhelming suspicion of infection in this patient, this diagnosis was not considered until a gallium scan revealed the typical findings of heterotopic ossification. Because of the increasing utilization of gallium imaging in the AIDS population, every imaging specialist should be aware of this potential disorder.

  19. Lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thakur, B K; Verma, S; Mishra, J

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at increased risk of drug reactions because of immune dysregulation and multiple drug intake. Lichenoid drug reactions to isoniazid have been reported previously in the literature. However, for lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid to be so extensive to present as exfoliative dermatitis is rare. We report here a rare case of lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  20. Development of a Sensitive DNA Assay for the AIDS Virus, HTLV-III/LAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-19

    lylphadenopathy syndrome, acquired immuno- deficiency disease syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC) (including night sweats, fever, diarrhea, weight loss, oral ... candidiasis ), or AIDS (including neurological disease, opportunistic infections, or malignancies) (1). A signifi- cant number of infected individuals

  1. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  2. Human Immune Responses to HTLV-III Virus Infections in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-10

    in western blots in the antibodies to HIV-1 structural antigens between this serum and the other sera which neutralize HIV at low dilutions but enhance...n3est AvailabCe AD N T== HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSE TO HTLV -III VIRUS INFECTION IN ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME N ANNUAL REPORT FRANCIS A. ENNIS D...Stimulation of HIV-1 specific T cells. We have stimulated the PBL of 20 HIV antibody-positive donors with live HIV-1 ( HTLV -IIIB) virus, and only 30% respond

  3. Cryptosporidiosis among medical patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Tikur Anbessa Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mengesha, B

    1994-06-01

    Fresh stool specimens, collected at random from 63 medical in-patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), were studied prospectively for Cryptosporidium oocyst. The diagnosis of AIDS was made according to the clinical case definition of the Bangui criteria. These patients presented with profuse watery diarrhoea, significant weight loss and other associated symptoms and signs of clinical manifestations of symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Using the modified Kinyoun acid fast staining technique, 25(39.7%) of the stool specimens were positive for Cryptosporidium oocyst. This study showed that the protozoan, Cryptosporidium parvum, may be responsible for a significant proportion of cases of chronic diarrhoea among AIDS patients in Ethiopia.

  4. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)--complications in dental treatment. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hurlen, B; Gerner, N W

    1984-04-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a new disease which has recently alerted the medical world. AIDS may also concern dental practitioners and oral surgeons who may be the first to suspect impairment of immunity in patients presenting opportunistic oral infections. Extraordinary resistance to treatment of dental infections, such as encountered in a 27-year-old man developing AIDS, could also be a sign of immunodepression. Epidemiological features of AIDS indicate transmissibility, and interim recommendations for prevention of spread correspond to the measures appropriate for hepatitis B.

  5. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: recommendations of a working party of the Hospital Infection Society.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    Unified procedures to control those infections that are transmitted by inoculation of blood are recommended. These should be applied to patients with overt acquired immune deficiency syndrome, persistent generalized lymphadenopathy or hepatitis B, those with serological evidence of infection by HTLV III or hepatitis B virus, and those in medical and social categories with a higher than average prevalence of such infections. Rational infection control measures, based on the known modes of spread, permit efficient management of infected patients, with satisfactory protection of staff and other patients.

  6. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  7. Atopic manifestations in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: response to recombinant interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, J M; Eales, L J; Galazka, A R; Pinching, A J

    1987-01-01

    Six patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had exacerbations or recurrences of previously quiescent atopic disease when they developed immunodeficiency. Four developed a different atopic illness from that suffered previously. Atopic symptoms developed within three months after the patients developed AIDS or during prodromal illness. Two of the patients were treated with recombinant interferon gamma: both showed a striking improvement in symptoms and cellular immunity. These results indicate that cellular immunity, through interferon gamma, may have a role in regulating atopic disease. PMID:3109572

  8. Disseminated varicella zoster virus in an immunized child as the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining illness.

    PubMed

    Chilek, Katherine; Routhouska, Shannon; Tamburro, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunization aids in the prevention of future VZV infections in immunocompetent patients; however, severely immunocompromised patients remain at increased risk of VZV infection. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy previously immunized to Varicella who presented with herpes zoster with hematogenous dissemination as the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-defining illness. Disseminated VZV is more commonly seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals with more advanced disease, as was the case with our patient. Disseminated VZV infection in a previously immunized child should raise suspicion for underlying immunosuppression.

  9. Detection of thoracic infections by nuclear medicine techniques in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The challenge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for nuclear medicine has been the early detection of related intrathoracic opportunistic infections, inflammatory conditions, and neoplasms. Gallium-67 citrate scanning has proved a sensitive test not only for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but for many of the other opportunistic infections and malignancies, including mycobacterial infections and lymphoma. Patterns and intensity of gallium uptake may suggest more specific diagnoses. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells may also be a valuable diagnostic tool in the AIDS patient.41 references.

  10. Dermoscopy of Norwegian scabies in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Towersey, Loan; Cunha, Marina X da; Feldman, Cecilia A; Castro, Carlos Gustavo C de; Berger, Timothy G

    2010-01-01

    The authors report here on the case of a female patient with Norwegian (crusted) scabies and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome whose compliance with antiretroviral therapy was poor. Definitive diagnosis was confirmed by direct microscopic examination, which revealed numerous Sarcoptes scabei. Dermoscopy showed pathognomonic scabetic burrows and brownish structures in the shape of a hand-glider with a millipede-like appearance. The latter constitutes a diagnostic feature in the pathology of Norwegian scabies that has not yet been described. The patient responded well to oral ivermectin and topical vaseline with sulphur at a proportion of 10%. There was a simultaneous improvement in dermoscopic parameters.

  11. Speculations on the viral etiology of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Conant, M A

    1984-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) appeared in the United States in late 1978 and has spread at an epidemic rate through the four major coastal cities of this country. The disease appears to show the same epidemiologic distribution as hepatitis B virus infection, and for this reason, most investigators feel that this new disease is caused by a blood-borne sexually transmitted virus. A number of viral agents have been suggested as the cause of AIDS, but to date, no virus has been consistently isolated. The most likely candidate is a retrovirus that has recently been introduced into the human population and has found its way into two extremely high-risk groups, namely, promiscuous male homosexuals and intravenous drug abusers. The relationship between Kaposi's sarcoma and cytomegalovirus is still unclear, but evidence is mounting that cytomegalovirus may be the agent that initiates this multifocal malignancy. Multiple factors must be involved in this process. It is known that some immunosuppressed individuals develop Kaposi's sarcoma, which completely resolves when the immunosuppression is reversed; however, in individuals with classical Kaposi's sarcoma, the profound degree of helper T-cell depression that characterizes the acquired immune deficiency syndrome is not seen.

  12. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  13. Acute Chagas' disease (Trypanosomiasis americana) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oddó, D; Casanova, M; Acuña, G; Ballesteros, J; Morales, B

    1992-01-01

    Two heterosexual men, aged 31 and 40 years, with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and presenting with the acute form of Chagas' disease are reported. The first patient, a carrier of hemophilia A, was treated for 20 years with Chilean and Brazilian cryoprecipitates. This patient acquired both diseases through this medium. The second patient, an inhabitant of northern Chile (fourth region), was allegedly bitten by Triatoma infestans and was an intravenous drug addict. The hemophilic patient presented with a neurologic syndrome; a brain biopsy showed a necrotizing encephalitis with an obliterative angiitis and abundant macrophages. The second patient developed intractable congestive heart failure; necropsy showed a dilated myocarditis with rupture of myofibers and an inflammatory infiltrate rich in plasma cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Using light and electron microscopy, abundant amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were seen in brain tissue, especially in the cytoplasm of macrophages, as well as in some myocardial fibers. In both cases, determination of anti-T cruzi antibodies (indirect hemagglutination technique) and xenodiagnosis were positive.

  14. Utility of the National Death Index in ascertaining mortality in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome surveillance.

    PubMed

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Maddox, Lorene M; Lieb, Spencer; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2011-07-01

    To assess the utility of the National Death Index (NDI) in improving the ascertainment of deaths among people diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the authors determined the number and characteristics of additional deaths identified through NDI linkage not ascertained by using standard electronic linkage with Florida Vital Records and the Social Security Administration's Death Master File. Records of people diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome between 1993 and 2007 in Florida were linked to the NDI. The demographic characteristics and reported human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission modes of people whose deaths were identified by using the NDI were compared with those whose deaths were ascertained by standard linkage methods. Of the 15,094 submitted records, 719 had confirmed matches, comprising 2.1% of known deaths (n = 34,504) within the cohort. Hispanics, males, people 40 years of age or older, and injection drug users were overrepresented among deaths ascertained only by the NDI. In-state deaths comprised 59.0% of newly identified deaths, and human immunodeficiency virus was less likely to be a cause of death among newly identified compared with previously identified deaths. The newly identified deaths were not previously ascertained principally because of slight differences in personal identifying information and could have been identified through improved linkages with Florida Vital Records.

  15. The relationship between acquired premature ejaculation and metabolic syndrome: a prospective, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bolat, D; Kocabas, G U; Gunlusoy, B; Aydogdu, O; Aydin, M E

    2017-02-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and acquired premature ejaculation (PE). A total of 100 patients with acquired PE and 100 control cases were enrolled in the study. After obtaining a detailed medical history, anthropometric (weight, height and waist circumference) and blood pressure measurements were performed. Ejaculation and erection functions were evaluated by Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5), respectively. Self-estimated intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) of the participants was recorded. Fasting blood samples were taken for biochemical and hormonal work-up. The median PEDT scores were 16 (9-22) and 4.5 (2-8) in acquired PE and control groups, respectively (P<0.001). The mean estimated IELT values in PE patients and controls were 36.1±46.5  versus 488.2±313.8 s (P<0.001). MetS was diagnosed in 51 patients (51%) in the PE group and 24 (24%) participants in the control group (P<0.001). A significant negative correlation was observed between the components of MetS and estimated IELT, except for diastolic blood pressure. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between the all components of MetS and total PEDT score, except for fasting blood glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels. Logistic regression analysis revealed that, except blood pressure and HDL levels, MetS components were significant risk factors for PE after adjusting for age and total testosterone. In conclusion, MetS is associated with acquired PE.International Journal of Impotence Research advance online publication, 9 February 2017; doi:10.1038/ijir.2017.3.

  16. Toxoplasmosis of spinal cord in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient presenting as paraparesis: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sachin R; Singh, Vinita; Ingale, Sheetal; Jain, Ajeet Prasad

    2014-10-01

    Although brain has been the most common site for toxoplasma infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients, involvement of spinal cord by toxoplasma has been rarely found. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis can present as acute onset weakness in both lower limbs associated with sensory and bladder dysfunction. A presumptive diagnosis can be made in patients with CD4 count <100/mm(3) based on a positive serum Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies, no recent prophylaxis against toxoplasmosis, intramedullary ring enhancing lesion in spinal cord supported by similar lesions in brain parenchyma. Institutions of antitoxoplasma treatment in such patients result in prompt clinical response and therefore avoiding the need of unnecessary invasive diagnostic tests. Here, we report a case of toxoplasmic myelitis in immunocompromised patient presenting as myelopathy who showed significant clinical improvement after starting antitoxoplasma treatment. Hence toxoplasmic myelitis should be considered in toxoplasma seropositive immunocompromised patients presenting as myelopathy and imaging studies showing ring enhancing intramedullary lesion.

  17. Isolated toxoplasmosis of the thoracic spinal cord in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Resnick, D K; Comey, C H; Welch, W C; Martinez, A J; Hoover, W W; Jacobs, G B

    1995-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis and lymphoma are the two most common causes of intraparenchymal cerebral mass lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The clinical and radiographic features of the intracranial lesions have been well described. Because of the high frequency of toxoplasmosis in the AIDS population, common therapy for patients presenting with intracranial mass lesions consists of an empirical trial of anti-Toxoplasma chemotherapy, with biopsy reserved for cases demonstrating features considered to be more consistent with lymphoma, or for lesions that do not improve despite adequate anti-Toxoplasma treatment. A similar treatment algorithm does not exist for intramedullary lesions of the spinal cord. The authors describe a patient who presented with paraparesis resulting from an isolated thoracic intramedullary lesion. An open biopsy of the lesion revealed characteristic structures containing Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The clinical and radiographic presentation of the lesion is discussed, the available literature is reviewed, and a treatment strategy for spinal cord lesions in AIDS patients is proposed.

  18. Structural characterization of reverse transcriptase and endonuclease polypeptides of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoote, M M; Coligan, J E; Folks, T M; Fauci, A S; Martin, M A; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    Automated N-terminal microsequencing of immune affinity-purified acquired immunodeficiency syndrome retrovirus polypeptides from infected cells was used to locate the N termini of 64-, 51-, and 34-kilodalton (kDa) polypeptides within the pol open reading frame (ORF) of the proviral DNA. The 64- and 51-kDa proteins had identical N termini (Pro-Ile-Ser-Pro-IIe-Glu-Thr-Val-) positioned 156 residues from the beginning of the pol ORF. The N terminus of the 34-kDa pol gene product, Phe-Leu-Asp-Gly-Ile-Asp-Lys-, mapped 716 residues into the pol ORF. These polypeptides were absent in an RT-negative, CD4-negative, persistently infected cell line (8E5) carrying a single defective copy of a constitutively expressed, integrated proviral DNA. Images PMID:2430111

  19. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Chang, P; Moreno, K; Fernández-Fernández, V; Montes de Oca, G; Araiza, J; Ponce, R M

    2009-06-01

    Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a series of 23 cases (21 men, two women; median age 29 years) with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis seen at two hospital centres. Most of the patients (21/23) were classified as stage C3. The most common dermatological findings were papules, crusting plaques, nodules and ulcers, mainly located on the face and chest. Of the 23 cases, 15 (65%) had pulmonary involvement. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the main drugs used for treatment. Treatment response was variable: four of the patients were cured, six improved and remain stable, nine patients died, and four patients were lost to follow-up.

  20. Optic neuritis heralding varicella zoster virus retinitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meenken, C; van den Horn, G J; de Smet, M D; van der Meer, J T

    1998-04-01

    We report on a 29-year-old severely compromised acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis 5 weeks after an episode of cutaneous herpes zoster infection. During the optic neuritis, varicella zoster virus could be demonstrated in the cerebrospinal fluid. The neuritis responded well to treatment with foscarnet, but, 3 weeks into therapy, varicella zoster retinitis developed. Additional treatment with intravenous acyclovir stopped progression of the retinitis and resulted in healing of the retinal lesions. This case suggests that retrobulbar optic neuritis can be regarded as a prodrome of imminent acute retinal necrosis. Early recognition and prompt therapy with combined antivirals may prevent the development of this devastating ocular complication of varicella zoster infection.

  1. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  2. Immunologic studies in asymptomatic hemophilia patients. Relationship to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Poon, M C; Abo, T; Stagno, S; Lurie, A; Cooper, M D

    1983-05-01

    Asymptomatic hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate were found to have normal natural killer (NK) cells and B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to an increase in cells of T suppressor phenotype. In contrast, a hemophilia patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) exhibited nonfunctional NK cells, low B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to very low numbers of T helper cells. Hemophilia patients on cryoprecipitate therapy exhibited normal immune parameters. A high percentage of hemophilia patients on both treatments had antibody to hepatitis B virus. The isolated finding of elevated levels of T suppressor cells in hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate has not been recognized as an early indicator of impending AIDS, and longitudinal studies will be required to determine its clinical significance.

  3. Active viral B hepatitis in parenteral drug abusers with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Leevy, C B; Nurse, H; Kapila, R

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-percent of 47 parenteral drug abusers with hepatomegaly and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome had HBV DNA in serum, although only 27% were HBsAg or "e" antigen-positive by polyclonal radioimmunoassay. Liver biopsies from each of 37 HBV DNA seropositive patients showed HBV DNA and were HBcAg-positive. The absence of positive HBsAg and "e" antigen in HBV DNA-positive patients was attributable to the presence of immune complexes; after in vitro dissociation of these complexes there was an increase in HBsAg from 24% to 86%, and of "e" antigen from 19% to 62%. These data indicate that actively replicating hepatitis B virus is common in patients with AIDS, and that precautions should be taken to prevent its dissemination. Therapy in these patients should address both human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B virus infections.

  4. Pathologic features of the liver in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Y; Liew, C T; Peters, R L; Govindarajan, S

    1986-06-01

    The livers of 26 adult males with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were reviewed. The occurrence of portal tracts with diminished lymphocytes, probably reflecting generalized exhaustion of the lymphoid system, was a characteristic morphologic change, and was found in all cases. Kupffer cell hyperplasia was also a frequent finding and probably reflected generalized infection(s). Punched-out clusters of foamy histiocytes filled with acid-fast bacilli, typical for infection with Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAC), were found in three patients. In addition, MAC was cultured from two livers without the foamy histiocytic changes. Chronic viral hepatitis (three cases) and deposition of polarizable materials (one case) in the liver might be related to unusual habits of patients with AIDS. In conclusion, livers from patients with AIDS disclosed several kinds of lesions reflecting underlying or associated conditions in AIDS, but these did not contribute to the cause of death in our patients.

  5. Histopathologic features of the liver in pediatric acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jonas, M M; Roldan, E O; Lyons, H J; Fojaco, R M; Reddy, R K

    1989-07-01

    Autopsy and liver biopsy specimens from 30 pediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex (ARC) were retrospectively reviewed. Of 28 cases with histologic abnormalities, the following findings were noted singly or in combination: giant-cell transformation, cytomegalovirus inclusions, Kaposi's sarcoma, diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate, granulomatous hepatitis, mild portal inflammation, necrosis around central veins, steatosis, and cholestasis. For the most part, abnormalities in the liver were not predictive of those in other organs, but the two children with the diffuse parenchymal lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate also had lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Liver histopathology in pediatric patients with AIDS shares some features with that in adults, but appreciable differences are noted. In particular, these differences include the higher frequency of giant-cell transformation and the lower frequency of granulomas in children and the observation of diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate associated with LIP.

  6. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in leucocytes in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Lie-Injo, L E; Volberding, P; Golden, J A; Herrera, A R

    1985-01-01

    Earlier reported findings of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in white blood cells of patients with hepatoma, and in a patient with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, led to the examination of HBV DNA in a series of twenty three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), including nine with opportunistic infections and fourteen with Kaposi's sarcoma, by Southern blot hybridization method, using 32P labelled HBV DNA specific probe obtained by nick translation of HBV DNA cloned into plasmid pBR325. Four of the patients were found to be positive for HBV DNA or HBV related DNA in their leucocytes. The HBV DNA was found free or integrated in the leucocytes of the patients.

  7. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: recommendations of a Working Party of the Hospital Infection Society.

    PubMed

    Speller, D C; Shanson, D C; Ayliffe, G A; Cooke, E M

    1990-01-01

    Unified procedures to control those infections that are transmitted by inoculation of blood are recommended. These should be applied to patients with acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), AIDS-related complex, persistent generalized lymphadenopathy or hepatitis B, those with serological evidence of infection by human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus, and those in medical and social categories with a higher than average prevalence of such infections. When the identification of these categories of patient would be particularly difficult, the precautions should be applied to all patients, in situations of high risk for inoculation incidents. Rational infection-control measures, based on the known mode of spread, permit efficient management of infected patients, with satisfactory protection of staff and other patients.

  8. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  9. [The laryngeal involvement in Kaposi's sarcoma in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olmo, A; Vilaseca, I; Moragas, M; Pérez, J; Blanch, J L; Avellaneda, R; Traserra, J

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a malignant vascular neoplasm characterized, in its classical form, by a slow evolutive course, beginning in the lower extremities. Lately have been reported more and more cases of this entity associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), running much more aggressively. In ENT-pathology are not uncommon this kind of neoplasm in the oral cavity and oropharynx. However at larynx's level such descriptions till now had been sporadic. The AA. present a KS case sitting in the epiglottis of an AIDS patient. They emphasize the importance of a throughout ENT-examination of these patients and also remark the necessity of performing various and deep biopsies in order to gain a diagnosis that can be relied on. Finally, they review the updated management alternatives for this sort of pathology.

  10. Acquired deficiency and urinary excretion of antithrombin III in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Paule, P; Toohey, J; Hung, E; Alikhani, S; Darwish, R; Pahl, M V

    1984-09-01

    The published data concerning changes of antithrombin III (ATIII) in nephrotic syndrome (NS) are contradictory. While increased ATIII activity has been reported by some investigators, decreased concentration has been shown by others and normal values by yet another group of authors. We determined plasma and urine concentrations of ATIII in a group of 20 patients with NS using an immunologic assay. In addition, plasma ATIII activity was determined. The results were compared with those obtained in a group of normal volunteers. Plasma concentration and activity of ATIII were both greatly reduced in the patients with NS. In addition, substantial quantities of ATIII were recovered in the urine of all tested patients. The present study, therefore, substantiates the low plasma concentrations of ATIII and its urinary losses in NS. In addition, a parallel reduction in plasma ATIII activity is demonstrated providing functional evidence of acquired ATIII deficiency in this condition.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome knowledge and risk factors in Ethiopian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N; Abebe, Yegeremu; Brodine, Stephanie K; Kraft, Heidi S; Shaffer, Richard A; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2004-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related knowledge and behaviors were assessed in face-to-face structured interviews with 314 Ethiopian military personnel. A significant finding of this research was the association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and risky sexual behavior. That is, military personnel who had inaccurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention were 3.4 times as likely to engage in combined sexual risk behaviors compared with personnel with accurate knowledge, after controlling for age, military rank, and marital status (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.22). This finding highlights the potential value of educational programs in slowing the spread of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, S K; Nedjat, S; Jabbari, H; Saiepour, N; Heris, M J

    2015-12-13

    This study investigated the social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the associated factors. In a cross-sectional study the Integrated Social Capital Questionnaire was filled by a sequential sample of 300 patients visiting a referral counselling centre in Tehran. The patients' social capital scores were around 50% in the trust, social cohesion, collective action and cooperation and political empowerment domains. The groups and networks membership domain scored the lowest (27.1%). In regression analysis, employment status was significantly associated with groups and networks membership; age, marital status and financial status were associated with collective action and cooperation; period of disease awareness and marital status affected social cohesion and inclusion; and having risky behaviour affected empowerment and political action. Efforts are needed to enhance the social capital of those patients living with AIDS who are younger, unemployed, divorced/widowed, with risky behaviours and shorter disease awareness.

  13. Pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Asia: mother-to-child transmission.

    PubMed

    Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2002-05-01

    At least 6 million people in the Asia-Pacific region have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The numbers of HIV-infected women and children are increasing at an alarming rate. Important components of infection control that need to be addressed if mother-to-child transmission of HIV is to be prevented successfully include voluntary and confidential counseling and testing, family planning, obstetric care, use of antiretroviral agents, and availability of alternatives to breast-feeding. Many services can aid in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and the care of HIV-infected mothers and their children. Each country needs to take into account the features of HIV and AIDS epidemiology that are peculiar to it, its infrastructure, and the resources that are available. Providing services in a stepwise manner can help prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  14. Findings in psychiatric consultations with patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dilley, J W; Ochitill, H N; Perl, M; Volberding, P A

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen of 40 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) admitted to the wards of a large city hospital were seen by the staff of a psychiatric consultation service. Eleven were gay men and two were bisexual men. "Depression" was the stated reason for referral of 10 patients; of these, two met DSM-III criteria for major depression, one had dysthymic disorder, and seven had adjustment disorder with depressed mood. Recurrent psychological themes of the 13 patients were: dealing with a life-threatening illness, uncertainty about the implications of an AIDS diagnosis, social isolation, and guilt over their previous life style. The role of the primary physician and of the mental health professional in the psychological care of AIDS patients is discussed.

  15. Treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in China: opportunity, advancement and challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Hui-Juan; Jin, Yan-Tao; Guo, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Zhen; Xu, Li-Ran

    2013-08-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has been used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for 30 years and the demonstrated therapeutic effects of CM, such as reducing plasma HIV viral load, increasing CD4(+)T cell counts, promoting immunity reconstitution, ameliorating symptoms and signs, improving the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and counteracting against the effects of anti-retroviral drugs, were summarized and reviewed in this article. The authors point out that it had been a good opportunity to use CM for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS in the past and also there are huge challenges ahead for CM research and clinicians to discover more effective CM and its underlying mechanisms for treatment of AIDS.

  16. Investigation of potent lead for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chan, Yueh-Chiu; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has become, because of the rapid spread of the disease, a serious global problem and cannot be treated. Recent studies indicate that VIF is a protein of HIV to prevent all of human immunity to attack HIV. Molecular compounds of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database filtered through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations to inhibit VIF can protect against HIV. Glutamic acid, plantagoguanidinic acid, and Aurantiamide acetate based docking score higher with other TCM compounds selected. Molecular dynamics are useful for analysis and detection ligand interactions. According to the docking position, hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding changes, and structure variation, the study try to select the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine compound Aurantiamide acetate is better than the other for protein-ligand interactions to maintain the protein composition, based on changes in the structure.

  17. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  18. Pancreatic tuberculosis with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meesiri, Somchai

    2012-02-21

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a relatively rare disease that can mimic carcinoma, lymphoma, cystic neoplasia, retroperitoneal tumors, pancreatitis or pseudocysts. Here, I report the case of a 31-year-old immigrant Burmese woman who exhibited epigastralgia, fever, weight loss and an epigastric mass. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic TB and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and was treated with antituberculous drugs and percutaneous catheter drainage without a laparotomy. The clinical presentation, radiographic investigation and management of pancreatic TB are summarized in this paper to emphasize the importance of considering this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses concomitant with human immunodeficiency virus infection. I also emphasize the need for both histopathological and microbiological diagnosis via fine-needle aspiration.

  19. Phonological awareness abilities of a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome before and after speech therapy.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Suzana Aparecida; Fukuda, Marisa Tomoe Hebihara; Granzotti, Raphaela Barroso Guedes

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the phonological awareness abilities of a child with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) before and after speech-language therapy. The participant was a 6-year-old girl, first-grade Elementary School student, with AIDS acquired by vertical transmission. The child's phonological awareness abilities were evaluated using the Instrument of Sequential Evaluation of Phonological Awareness (CONFIAS). After this first evaluation, a closed therapeutic program (15 sessions) for phonological awareness was developed, consisting of activities for syllabic and phonemic levels. The CONFIAS was reapplied in the last session in order to investigate therapy effectiveness. In the pre-therapy assessment, the child scored 18 points in syllable tasks and 1 point in phoneme tasks, with a total score of 19 points. In the post-therapy assessment, the child scored 26 points in syllable tasks and 11 points in phoneme tasks, with a total score of 37 points. This study allowed us to characterize the performance of a child with AIDS in tasks of phonological awareness and the effectiveness of the therapeutic program. The score obtained before therapy was much lower than expected for the child's age, and presented significant improvement after speech-language therapy. Thus, professionals working with this population must be aware of therapeutic programs that approach phonological processing abilities in addition to other aspects.

  20. Oral candidiasis in high-risk patients as the initial manifestation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klein, R S; Harris, C A; Small, C B; Moll, B; Lesser, M; Friedland, G H

    1984-08-09

    We studied the frequency with which unexplained oral candidiasis led to unequivocal acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in patients at risk. Twenty-two previously healthy adults with unexplained oral candidiasis, of whom the 19 tested had a reversed T4/T8 ratio and 20 had generalized lymphadenopathy, were compared with 20 similar patients with a reversed T4/T8 ratio and generalized lymphadenopathy who did not have oral candidiasis. All were intravenous-drug abusers, homosexual or bisexual men, or both. Thirteen of the 22 patients with oral candidiasis (59 per cent) acquired a major opportunistic infection or Kaposi's sarcoma at a median of three months (range, 1 to 23) as compared with none of 20 patients with generalized lymphadenopathy and immunodeficiency but without candidiasis who were followed for a median of 12 months (range, 5 to 21) (P less than 0.001). AIDS developed in 12 of 15 patients with candidiasis and T4/T8 ratios less than or equal to 0.51, as compared with none of four with ratios equal to or greater than 0.60 (P less than 0.01). We conclude that in patients at high risk for AIDS, the presence of unexplained oral candidiasis predicts the development of serious opportunistic infections more than 50 per cent of the time. Whether the remainder will have AIDS is not yet known.

  1. Herpetic (non-cytomegalovirus) retinal infections in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    Human herpes viruses cause significant morbidity in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Even after the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), herpes viruses remain the leading causes of blindness in AIDS patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and the closely-related immune reconstitution uveitis syndrome are the most common causes of blindness, but progressive outer retinal necrosis and acute retinal necrosis due to varicella zoster and herpes simplex are also important causes of vision loss. Successful treatment of these conditions requires an aggressive approach with multi-drug intravenous therapy or repeated intravitreal antiviral injections. Since the rate of retinal detachment is alarmingly high despite successful antiviral therapy, internists and ophthalmologists must work closely together to recognize and treat complications as they arise. Fortunately, Epstein-Barr virus is a rare cause of retinal infection and human herpes virus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 do not appear to be primary pathogens. However, increasing evidence suggests that HHV-6 and HHV-7 play important roles in modulating the immune system and potentiating infection by CMV.

  2. [The use of growth hormone to treat endocrine-metabolic disturbances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients].

    PubMed

    Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana A; da Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2008-07-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids) was initially related to HIV-associated wasting syndrome, and its metabolic disturbances to altered body composition. After Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) was started, malnutrition has declined and HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome has emerged as an important metabolic disorder. Aids is also characterized by hormonal disturbances, principally in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. The use of recombinant human GH (hrGH) was formerly indicated to treat wasting syndrome, in order to increase lean body mass. Even though the use of hrGH in lipodystrophy syndrome has been considered, the decrease in insulin sensitivity is a limitation for its use, which has not been officially approved yet. Diversity in therapeutic regimen is another limitation to its use in Aids patients. The present study has reviewed the main HIV-related endocrine-metabolic disorders as well as the use of hrGH in such conditions.

  3. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HTLV-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena.

    This manual presents information about the disease, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and guidelines for service delivery to Montana residents who have been diagnosed with AIDS or related disorders. The first section describes the disease's causes, symptoms, and transmission; risk factors; high-risk populations; prevention suggestions;…

  4. AIDS: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; Information and Procedural Guidelines for Providing Services to Persons with AIDS/HIV. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Helena. Health Education Bureau.

    This volume consists of updated information to be inserted into a Montana AIDS Project manual on providing services to persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS/HIV), originally published in December 1985. The updates are mainly statistics and terminology, along with the addition of several new sections.…

  5. The Basic Nature of Ethical Problems Experienced by Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Implications for Nursing Ethics Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Miriam E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) described and validated 100 ethical problems that are experienced by people with AIDS from 3 levels of ethical inquiry: descriptive ethics, normative ethics, and metaethics. Findings suggest strategies for improving nursing ethics education. (JOW)

  6. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  7. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  8. Select Personality Characteristic Differences between Caregivers for Persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and Caregivers for Other Types of Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Daniel Scott; Heritage, Jeannette

    The purpose of this study was to analyze select personality characteristics of individuals working within the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) population in comparison to non-AIDS caregivers by using two personality assessment instruments. Subjects were from two health care provider populations. Two hundred research packets were…

  9. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  10. Effects of a Syndrome-Specific Antibiotic Stewardship Intervention for Inpatient Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Michelle K.; Dalton, Kristen; Knepper, Bryan C.; Stella, Sarah A.; Cervantes, Lilia; Price, Connie S.; Burman, William J.; Mehler, Philip S.; Jenkins, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Syndrome-specific interventions are a recommended approach to antibiotic stewardship, but additional data are needed to understand their potential impact. We implemented an intervention to improve the management of inpatient community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and evaluated its effects on antibiotic and resource utilization. Methods. A stakeholder group developed and implemented a clinical practice guideline and order set for inpatient, non-intensive care unit CAP recommending a short course (5 days) of a fluoroquinolone-sparing antibiotic regimen in uncomplicated cases. Unless there was suspicion for complications or resistant pathogens, chest computed tomography (CT) and sputum cultures were discouraged. This was a retrospective preintervention postintervention study of patients hospitalized for CAP before (April 15, 2008–May 31, 2009) and after (July 1, 2011–July 31, 2012) implementation of the guideline. The primary comparison was the difference in duration of therapy during the baseline and intervention periods. Secondary outcomes included changes in use of levofloxacin, CT scans, and sputum culture. Results. One hundred sixty-six and 84 cases during the baseline and intervention periods, respectively, were included. From the baseline to intervention period, the median duration of therapy decreased from 10 to 7 days (P < .0001). Prescription of levofloxacin at discharge decreased from 60% to 27% of cases (P < .0001). Use of chest CT and sputum culture decreased from 47% to 32% of cases (P = .02) and 51% to 31% of cases (P = .03), respectively. The frequency of clinical failure between the 2 periods was similar. Conclusions. A syndrome-specific intervention for inpatient CAP was associated with shorter treatment durations and reductions in use of fluoroquinolones and low-yield diagnostic tests. PMID:27747254

  11. Gastric toxoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: antemortem diagnosis with histopathologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Alpert, L; Miller, M; Alpert, E; Satin, R; Lamoureux, E; Trudel, L

    1996-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms attributable to Toxoplasma gondii infection are distinctly unusual, and antemortem diagnosis of gastrointestinal involvement is rarely documented, particularly in the absence of cerebral manifestations or disseminated disease. This case report describes a rare example of T. gondii infection of the stomach diagnosed antemortem in a 22-year-old Haitian woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who presented with fever and abdominal pain. An abdominal computerized tomographic scan showed thickened gastric walls. Endoscopy showed diffusely thickened gastric folds and a fundic ulcer along the greater curvature. Light and electron-microscopic examination of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens showed active Toxoplasma infection with necrosis and intracellular trophozoites within the gastric epithelium, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Both true cysts and pseudocysts were seen. Disseminated disease was documented by the growth of T. gondii in a tissue culture from a venous blood sample. It is concluded that some patients with AIDS, particularly those from areas endemic for Toxoplasma infection, can manifest disseminated disease in unusual locations such as the gastrointestinal tract. Documentation of active T. gondii infection based on tissue cultures of venous blood or on biopsy specimens of symptomatic extracerebral sites can lead to a rapid diagnosis of toxoplasmosis, a treatable disease.

  12. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in acquired immune deficiency syndrome mimicking toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Utsuki, Satoshi; Oka, Hidehiro; Abe, Katsutoshi; Osawa, Shigeyuki; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Yasui, Yoshie; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2011-02-01

    A 37-year-old man, a hepatitis B virus carrier due to mother-to-child transmission, had a medical examination in September 2008 in nearby hospitals due to anorexia and weight loss. He was transported to our hospital because computed tomography (CT) detected intracranial lesions, and he had a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. Head computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple hemorrhagic lesions and enhancement effect, suggesting a thin wall. Also, an enhancement effect was present in the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space. No accumulation was found in the thallium-201 scintigraphy. The enhancement effect of the ventricle walls and the subarachnoid space disappeared after oral administration of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and calcium folinate, contributing to the diagnosis of an abscess and meningitis due to toxoplasma. However, mass lesions did not reduce. A biopsy was performed on 30 October, and the pathological diagnosis was malignant lymphoma. He died from respiratory function deterioration on 8 November. Lymphoma cells were found in ventricle wall tissue and the subarachnoid space at the autopsy. Toxoplasmosis will typically occur as a brain lesion most commonly in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), whereas malignant lymphoma commonly manifests as a brain neoplastic lesion. However, differentiating between images of these lesions is difficult, so diagnosis by early biopsy is recommended.

  13. The acquired immune deficiency syndrome: an international health problem of increasing importance.

    PubMed

    Wofsy, C B; Mills, J

    1984-06-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a new disease which first appeared in human populations about 1979. The disease is defined by the development of unusual types of cancer (e.g. Kaposi's sarcoma), or severe cellular immunodeficiency manifested by opportunistic infections (e.g. Pneumocystis carinii infection), or both. Although the etiology of AIDS is unknown, the epidemiologic evidence is consistent with an infectious agent transmitted by blood (e.g. transfusion, needle sharing) or sexual intercourse. Over three-quarters of the cases have been in homosexual or bisexual males and in intravenous drug abusers; about 5% of cases do not have recognized risk factors. A small number of cases have resulted from transfusion of blood or blood products. The early clinical manifestations are non-specific, and may include asymptomatic skin lesions, dyspnea and dry cough, weight loss, chronic diarrhea, and focal and non-focal central nervous system findings. Treatment for the associated cancers and opportunistic infections may be successful in individual instances, but the underlying immunosuppression of AIDS appears to progress inexorably and the fatality rate approaches 100% within a few years from diagnosis. Although nosocomial transmission has not been documented, infection control guidelines have been developed by analogy with hepatitis B infection.

  14. Pulmonary disease at autopsy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Hannah, J B

    1988-08-01

    To characterize the postmortem pulmonary disease and analyze the effectiveness of antemortem diagnosis, we examined the clinical records and autopsy material from 54 patients who died of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. At autopsy, all patients had pulmonary disease. One or more specific diagnoses were made in 53, including opportunistic infection, nonopportunistic infection, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Multiple postmortem pulmonary diagnoses were established in 37. Respiratory failure was the most common cause of death. Of the 97 pulmonary disorders discovered at autopsy, only 31 were diagnosed before death. The frequency with which infections were diagnosed during life varied according to the organism, and was significantly higher for Pneumocystis carinii than for cytomegalovirus or bacterial agents. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma was diagnosed in only 7% of patients with autopsy documentation. The yield of diagnostic procedures also varied according to the disease present. Sputum culture was relatively effective in detecting Cryptococcus neoformans and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, fiber-optic bronchoscopy was extremely useful for diagnosing P Carinii, and one or more diagnoses were provided in 4 of 7 patients who underwent thoracotomy, but significant disease including cytomegalovirus infection and pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma was frequently missed. Although the spectrum of lung disease found at autopsy is similar to that observed during life, the frequency of some pathologic processes including cytomegalovirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma may be underrepresented in antemortem series.

  15. From the wings of night: dream work with people who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muff, J

    1996-07-01

    Nurses who work with seriously ill and dying patients are engaged in helping them live fully until they die. Most theories of death and dying deal with conscious activities only. Yet many people find relief form the fear and loneliness of life-threatening illness if given the opportunity to express their totality, meaning their unconscious as well as conscious processes. Working with the mind may not be enough. Attending to the unconscious through dream work can allow inner healing to occur, which can support that person as he or she moves into the unknown. The article describes the AIDS Dreamwork Project, the goals of which are to understand patients better and to help them better understand themselves, to help them live and die more consciously, and to discern patterns in their dreams that may be unique to people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Six themes have been identified in the dreams collected so far: wake-up dreams; reassurance dreams; dreams of opposition, separation, or coming together; transition dreams; transformation dreams; and spiritual or archetypal dreams.

  16. Miliary tuberculosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome – ‘a cursed duet’

    PubMed Central

    Tatari, Atif; Ramanujam, Sahana; Mathai, Suja; Karabulut, Nigahus; Moser, Robert L.; Wallach, Sara L.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous osteomyelitis is rare and usually involves the vertebrae but is seldom found in the foot. The uncommon site and ability to mimic other disorders clinically and radiographically leads to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. We report a case of a 40-year-old man who initially presented to his podiatrist with intermittent pain and swelling of his right ankle and foot that lasted for a year. He also started to exhibit significant weight loss and unexplained fevers and was subsequently hospitalized for cellulitis of his right foot. On further workup, patient was found to have miliary tuberculosis (TB) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Patient was treated with anti-TB therapy for 9 months and highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Our patient presented with ongoing chronic right foot and ankle pain that was proven to be secondary to TB osteomyelitis of cuneiform bones of the right ankle in the setting of AIDS. The patient's clinical presentation was unusual due to symptom duration and lack of systemic characteristics. Like our case, reported incidence of osteomyelitis of bone/joint in extrapulmonary TB is estimated to be 10%, and out of all bones/joint TB cases, only 1% are found to be in the foot. PMID:27802849

  17. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  18. Anterior segment manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sudharshan, S

    2008-01-01

    Ocular complications are known to occur as a result of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. They can be severe leading to ocular morbidity and visual handicap. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the commonest ocular opportunistic infection seen in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Though posterior segment lesions can be more vision-threatening, there are varied anterior segment manifestations which can also lead to ocular morbidity and more so can affect the quality of life of a HIV-positive person. Effective antiretroviral therapy and improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections have led to an increase in the survival of an individual afflicted with AIDS. This in turn has led to an increase in the prevalence of anterior segment and adnexal disorders. Common lesions include relatively benign conditions such as blepharitis and dry eye, to infections such as herpes zoster ophthalmicus and molluscum contagiosum and malignancies such as squamous cell carcinoma and Kaposi′s sarcoma. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a new phenomenon known as immune recovery uveitis which presents with increased inflammation, has been noted to be on the rise. Several drugs used in the management of AIDS such as nevirapine or indinavir can themselves lead to severe inflammation in the anterior segment and adnexa of the eye. This article is a comprehensive update of the important anterior segment and adnexal manifestations in HIV-positive patients with special reference to their prevalence in the Indian population. PMID:18711264

  19. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Wendy B; Little, Richard F; Wilson, Wyndham H; Yarchoan, Robert

    2006-07-01

    Since the beginning of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, malignancies have been an important feature of this disease. Several cancers, including Kaposi sarcoma (KS), certain aggressive B-cell lymphomas, and cervical cancer, are considered AIDS-defining when they occur in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Most AIDS-defining tumors are associated with one of 3 DNA viruses: KS-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or human papillomavirus. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the incidence of KS and certain lymphomas has decreased, whereas that of other tumors, such as cervical cancer, has undergone little change. Several new drugs and therapies have been developed for KS and AIDS-related lymphomas, and these treatments, plus the development of HAART, have contributed to improvements in morbidity and mortality. At the same time, the improved overall survival of patients with HAART has contributed to an increase in the number of patients living with AIDS in developed countries such as the United States. With the development of HAART and improved prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections, an increasing percentage of the deaths in AIDS patients have been from malignancies. Strategies for prevention, screening, and therapy remain important areas of research in this developing field.

  20. Liver biopsies in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: influence of endemic disease and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Comer, G M; Mukherjee, S; Scholes, J V; Holness, L G; Clain, D J

    1989-12-01

    A retrospective review of 48 liver biopsies in 34 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 10 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) was performed at Harlem Hospital Center to assess the diagnostic yield of liver biopsies in this distinct patient population. Among the patients, 93.2% were black and 32 were males, with a mean age of 36.7 yr. Intravenous drug abuse was a risk factor for AIDS in 81.8% of patients. Liver biopsies were particularly useful in patients with fever of unclear origin, which was positively correlated with the presence of granulomas (p = 0.01). Granulomas due to mycobacteria were present in 16 (33.3%) of the biopsies. Liver biopsy proved to be clinically significant in 14 of 17 patients (82.3%) with mycobacterial disease, or 29.3% of the liver biopsies. Chronic active hepatitis was present in 12 (29.2%) of the biopsies, and in all but one was due to non-A non-B hepatitis viruses. All patients with chronic active hepatitis were intravenous drug abusers or the sexual partners of intravenous drug abusers. Liver biopsy can provide important diagnostic information in AIDS patients. The pathological findings in this series reflect the high risk of exposure to tuberculosis and hepatitis in the intravenous drug abusers in Harlem.

  1. Clinical and pathologic findings of the liver in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Glasgow, B J; Anders, K; Layfield, L J; Steinsapir, K D; Gitnick, G L; Lewin, K J

    1985-05-01

    Clinical data and histologic sections of the liver, including immunohistochemical studies for hepatitis B surface and core antigens, were reviewed in 42 autopsy cases of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hepatomegaly, elevation of serum transaminases, and mild elevation of alkaline phosphatase were commonly observed clinical and biochemical abnormalities. Mildly elevated alkaline phosphatase and normal bilirubin levels were present in patients with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Histologic sections demonstrated liver involvement by MAI in eight cases; KS in six cases; cryptococcus in three cases; and CMV in two cases. One case of MAI infection was associated with marked central vein sclerosis, a finding previously unreported. Thirty-two (76%) of 42 cases had serologic or pathologic evidence of hepatitis exposure. Two patients had histologic evidence of chronic active hepatitis. The pathologic processes involving the liver appeared to be secondary to the infections and neoplasms for which this population is susceptible and did not significantly contribute to morbidity or mortality. No findings specific or pathognomic for AIDS were identified in the liver.

  2. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  3. Effectiveness and safety of traditional Chinese medicine in treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Ji-Ping; Xu, Li-Ran

    2015-12-23

    Substantial progress has been made in China in using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Our objective was to review the latest developments in TCM treatment of AIDS in China between 2004 and 2014. We reviewed the content of original articles investigating the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS published in Chinese and English language journals. Relevant references from 2004 to 2014 were found using PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database. We found that TCM has been widely used for treating AIDS and its complications in China. The number of TCM studies has increased, which indicates efficacy and safety. Measures of efficacy in the reviewed articles included the alleviation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related signs and symptoms, improvements in quality of life, improvements in long-term survival, counteraction of the adverse side effects of antiviral drugs, promotion of immune reconstitution, and improvement of laboratory results. In sum, the literature indicates that TCM is safe. TCM plays an important role in the treatment of AIDS. Some studies have attempted to measure the efficacy and safety of TCM for treating AIDS, but more evidence is needed. Therefore, more research on this topic is required in the future.

  4. Immunologic markers of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are time-dependent and illness-specific.

    PubMed

    Krämer, A; Biggar, R J; Hampl, H; Friedman, R M; Fuchs, D; Wachter, H; Goedert, J J

    1992-07-01

    Since prevalent cohorts may be biased by the duration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (onset bias), it is useful to assess the potential predictive value of markers in incident cohorts of HIV-positive subjects for whom the date of seroconversion is known or can reliably be estimated. Of 131 homosexual men with HIV-1 seroconversion from New York City and Washington, DC, who were evaluated annually beginning in 1982, 60 developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by the end of 1989. The prognostic significance of immunologic markers (proportion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes, neopterin, beta 2-microglobulin, serum interferon, and anti-p24 antibody) and of a virologic marker (HIV p24 antigen) was determined using measurements made at defined time intervals after the known or estimated date of HIV seroconversion. When measurements made 3 years after seroconversion were used, all markers except anti-p24 antibody were found to be significant estimators of AIDS risk in univariate analyses. In multivariate Cox regression modeling, the maximum information was obtained by including neopterin, interferon, and the CD4+ T-lymphocyte proportion. The predictive value of markers after HIV seroconversion could change considerably from one interval to another. Elevated levels of beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin significantly predicted the development of Kaposi's sarcoma. These two markers were highly correlated (r = 0.74). The authors conclude that immunologic markers can be important for an HIV staging system for estimating prognosis and facilitating early therapeutic intervention in HIV-positive patients.

  5. Invasive fungal infections among inpatients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome at a Chinese university hospital.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Qi, Tang Kai; Ma, Jian Xin; Jiang, Xue Yan; Wang, Jiang Rong; Xu, Qing Nian; Huang, Qin; Liu, Xi Nian; Sun, Hong Qing; Lu, Hong Zhou

    2007-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality among people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), however, little is known about the clinical features and prognosis of IFI in AIDS in China. This study aimed to characterise the clinical features and prognosis of IFI in AIDS patients in China. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all HIV-infected patients at a Chinese university hospital between December 2004 and May 2006. We identified 35 patients with IFI. IFIs included thrush, oesophageal candidiasis, fungal pneumonia, cryptococcosis, penicilliosis and fungaemia, 44.4% of IFIs occurred in the digestive tract, 71.8% of IFIs occurred in patients with CD4(+)T-lymphocyte counts <100 cells mm(-3). Candida albicans accounted for 57.4% of fungal pathogens isolated. All the patients received both antiretroviral and antifungal therapy; 27 patients were cured and eight died. IFI is one of the most common opportunistic infections in AIDS patients in China. IFIs mainly occur in patients with low CD4(+)T-lymphocyte counts. The majority of IFIs occur in the digestive tract. The most common pathogen causing IFI is C. albicans. The mortality rate remains high although antiretroviral therapy and many newer antifungals are available in China.

  6. Defective in vitro growth of the hemopoietic progenitor cells in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Stella, C C; Ganser, A; Hoelzer, D

    1987-01-01

    In addition to immunologic derangement, hematological abnormalities have been reported in the majority of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study 15 patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex (ARC) were evaluated for the in vitro growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells. In all patients a significant reduction of growth (mean +/- SEM) of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage, (megakaryocyte) (CFU-GEM) (1.2 +/- 0.3), burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) (17 +/- 10), CFU-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk) (1.7 +/- 0.6), and CFU-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (35 +/- 10) was observed in comparison with normal controls. Depletion of T cells from the bone marrow before culture led to a significant increase in colony growth, which indicated an imbalance of the normally modulating T cell subsets. This increase was reversed by readdition of autologous T cells causing a decrease in colony growth to a degree, dependent on the T4 to T8 ratio. A decreased number of hemopoietic progenitor cells and/or a defective modulation of progenitor cell growth, normally carried out by T lymphocyte subsets, might be the cause of the hematological abnormalities in AIDS patients. PMID:3497175

  7. A rare case of acquired hemophilia A associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Mihir; Kallamadi, Rekha; Bande, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    84 year old male with past medical history of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented with progressive subcutaneous and muscle bleed in the right forearm and arm. Workup revealed elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) - 71.8 seconds (normal 23 - 32 seconds) which was persistently elevated after mixing study (37.1 seconds immediately and 51.1 seconds after 1 hour). Further laboratory work up revealed low factor VIII level (3%) and elevated factor VIII inhibitor by Bethesda assay (3 units/ml of blood). Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) diagnosis was established and patient was treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVlla) to control the bleeding and also prednisone for immunosuppression. Subsequent monitoring suggested reduction of factor VIII inhibitor - antibody levels to undetectable level in 3 days and increase of factor VIII level from 3% to 50% in 5 days. Despite of improvement in the laboratory values he continued to have progression of his bleeding which involved posterior chest wall and also left arm. Due to the progression of the condition and prior expressed wish family decided to stop the aggressive treatment and patient died nine days after the diagnosis. The case report describes a rare presentation of AHA in MDS (With bone marrow cytogenetics abnormality) patient with fatal outcome. PMID:22837802

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-11-12

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4(+) receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4(+) T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives.

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Cammarata, R

    1986-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infections are commonly seen in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, and laboratory culture is the best method for diagnosing these infections. In addition to conventional agar media, we used BACTEC 12A (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) broth medium for culture. More isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were recovered from 12A broth than from Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H11 agar. Also, the average detection time of these mycobacteria was the earliest with 12A broth. Stool examination has been helpful in diagnosing mycobacterial disease in AIDS patients, and in this study both acid-fast stain and culture of fecal material was necessary for efficient detection of mycobacteria. Another sensitive and practical method for detecting mycobacterial infections in patients with AIDS is the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) which offers the advantage of quantitating the degree of mycobacteremia. Laboratories should be alerted to the possibility of mixed mycobacterial infection in patients with AIDS, and positive cultures should be repeatedly examined to detect coinfection with a slower-growing mycobacterium such as M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium complex. PMID:3095369

  10. Monitoring of HAART regime antiretrovirals in serum of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Casas-Breva, I; Peris-Vicente, J; Rambla-Alegre, M; Carda-Broch, S; Esteve-Romero, J

    2012-09-21

    A methodology based on micellar liquid chromatography to monitor five antiretroviral drugs (lamivudine, stavudine, tenofovir, zidovudine and efavirenz) was proposed. Antiretrovirals were studied in sets of three, corresponding to each highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regime, prescribed to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-infected patients. Four aqueous micellar mobile phases buffered at pH 7 were optimized to separate these compounds, using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the tensioactive, and 1-propanol or 1-pentanol as the organic modifier. The composition of each mobile phase was optimized for each antiretroviral. The common separation conditions were: C18 apolar column (125 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size), UV detection set at 214 nm, and mobile phase running at 1 mL min(-1) without controlling the temperature. The finally suggested method was validated for five analysed antiretroviral drugs following the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines in terms of: linearity between 0.5 and 50 ppm (r(2) > 0.9995), sensitivity (LOD lower than 0.25 ppm), intra- and inter-day precision (<7.1 and <5.2%, respectively) and accuracy (recovery 88.5-105.3% and 93.5-101.3%, respectively), as well as robustness (<6.5%). The proposed method was used to monitor the level of antiretrovirals in the serum of AIDS patients. The suggested methodology was found to be useful in the routine analysis of antiretrovirals in serum samples.

  11. Progressive outer retinal necrosis associated with occlusive vasculitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Chi; Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chen, Huan-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    A 45-year-old man, a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, received a highly active antiretroviral therapy at the outpatient service for 4 years without regular follow-up. He experienced progressively blurred vision for 6 months and a cutaneous zoster on his back 3 months ago. He was diagnosed with progressive outer retinal necrosis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism using an aqueous humor sample, which revealed an existence of varicella zoster virus. He was given a combination of systemic, intravitreal antiviral and a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Occlusive vasculitis, an unusual finding for progressive outer retinal necrosis, developed in both eyes 1 week after the secondary intravitreal injection. Unfortunately, his vision deteriorated to no light perception in both eyes within 2 weeks. Progressive outer retinal necrosis is characterized clinically as showing minimal or no inflammation in the aqueous and vitreous humors, absence of retinal vasculitis, and patches of yellowish spots located deep in the retina. Physicians should pay attention to this rare case of progressive outer retinal necrosis associated occlusive vasculitis with very poor prognosis in spite of aggressive treatment.

  12. Outcomes of laparoscopic and open appendectomy for acute appendicitis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Mills, Steven D; Dolich, Matthew O; Dang, Phat; Carmichael, Joseph C; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare outcomes of appendectomy between acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and nonAIDS patients and laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) versus open appendectomy (OA) in AIDS patients. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, from 2006 to 2008, clinical data of patients with AIDS who underwent LA and OA were evaluated. A total of 800 patients with AIDS underwent appendectomy during these years. Patients with AIDS had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate (22.56% vs 10.36%), longer length of stay [(LOS) 4.9 vs 2.9 days], and higher mortality (0.61% vs 0.16%) compared with non-AIDS patients. In nonperforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA was associated with a significantly lower complication rate (11.25% vs 21.61%), lower mortality (0.0% vs 2.78%), and shorter mean LOS (3.22 days vs 4.82 days) compared with OA. In perforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA had a significantly lower complication rate (27.52% vs 57.50%), and shorter mean LOS (5.92 days vs 9.67 days) compared with OA. No mortality was reported in either group. In patients with AIDS, LA has a lower morbidity, lower mortality, and shorter LOS compared with OA. Laparoscopic appendectomy should be considered as a preferred operative option for acute appendicitis in patients with AIDS.

  13. First report of Cystoisospora belli parasitemia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; di Risio, Cecilia Alicia; Etchart, Cristina Beatriz; Chertcoff, Agustín Víctor; Nigro, Mónica Gabriela; Pantano, María Laura; Ledesma, Bibiana Alba; Vittar, Natalia; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Cystoisospora belli in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been described as cause of chronic diarrhea and disseminated cystoisosporosis. Diagnosis of intestinal cystoisosporosis can be achieved at the tissue level in the villus epithelium of the small bowel. Disseminated cystoisosporosis is diagnosed by microscopy identification of unizoite tissue cysts in the lamina propria of the intestine. We report a case of disseminated cystoisosporosis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with detection of parasitemia. We studied a 39-year old patient with AIDS and chronic diarrhea by analysis of stool and duodenal biopsy samples. Blood samples were also collected and examined by light microscopy and molecular techniques for C. belli DNA detection. The unizoite tissue cyst stages were present in the lamina propria, with unsporulated oocysts in feces. Zoites were present in blood smears and DNA of C. belli was detected in blood samples. Our study identified a new stage in the life cycle of C. belli. Detection of parasitemia is a novel and noninvasive tool for diagnosis of disseminated cystoisosporosis.

  14. Low T3 syndrome is a strong predictor of poor outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinliang; Wu, Xuejie; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Lifang; Shi, Lingxian; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Low T3 syndrome was previously reported to be linked to poor clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive power of low T3 syndrome for clinical outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data for 503 patients were analyzed retrospectively, and the primary end point was 30-day mortality. The intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate and 30-day mortality were 8.3% and 6.4% respectively. The prevalence of low T3 syndrome differed significantly between survivors and nonsurvivors (29.1% vs 71.9%, P < 0.001), and low T3 syndrome was associated with a remarkable increased risk of 30-day mortality and ICU admission in patients with severe CAP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis produced an odds ratio of 2.96 (95% CI 1.14–7.76, P = 0.025) for 30-day mortality in CAP patients with low T3 syndrome. Survival analysis revealed that the survival rate among CAP patients with low T3 syndrome was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01). Adding low T3 syndrome to the PSI and CURB-65 significantly increased the areas under the ROC curves for predicting ICU admission and 30-day mortality. In conclusion, low T3 syndrome is an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality in CAP patients. PMID:26928863

  15. Low T3 syndrome is a strong predictor of poor outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinliang; Wu, Xuejie; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Lifang; Shi, Lingxian; Xu, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Low T3 syndrome was previously reported to be linked to poor clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive power of low T3 syndrome for clinical outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data for 503 patients were analyzed retrospectively, and the primary end point was 30-day mortality. The intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate and 30-day mortality were 8.3% and 6.4% respectively. The prevalence of low T3 syndrome differed significantly between survivors and nonsurvivors (29.1% vs 71.9%, P < 0.001), and low T3 syndrome was associated with a remarkable increased risk of 30-day mortality and ICU admission in patients with severe CAP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis produced an odds ratio of 2.96 (95% CI 1.14-7.76, P = 0.025) for 30-day mortality in CAP patients with low T3 syndrome. Survival analysis revealed that the survival rate among CAP patients with low T3 syndrome was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01). Adding low T3 syndrome to the PSI and CURB-65 significantly increased the areas under the ROC curves for predicting ICU admission and 30-day mortality. In conclusion, low T3 syndrome is an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality in CAP patients.

  16. Chiari type 1 malformation in an infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome: further evidence of acquired pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Adrianna; Al-Hayek, Ali; Matic, Damir

    2010-03-01

    There seems to be an association between type 1 Chiari malformation (CM) and some congenital craniosynostosis syndromes. Type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome is a condition associated with premature fusion of multiple cranial sutures, cloverleaf skull (kleeblatschädel deformity), prominent ptosis, thumb and first toe abnormalities, variable syndactyly, and mutated genes for type 1 or 2 fibroblast growth factor receptor. These children generally do poorly because of significant often severe neurologic and cognitive defects, and many die very young. Roughly half of all patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and virtually all with type 2 disease, also have type 1 CM. Chiari malformation may not be congenital but acquired as a consequence of the skull deformities and other associated intracranial factors in patients with craniosynostosis. We report a term male infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome, who was not noted to have any CM on initial brain imaging done at 2 months but in whom repeated imaging demonstrated clear evidence of CM by 4 months, despite reconstructive craniotomies and unilateral ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion. Posterior fossa decompression yielded a good result. This patient provides further evidence to support the concept of acquired tonsillar herniation in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes. The etiology seems multifactorial and related to (1) the disproportionately slow growth of the skull relative to the brain, particularly in the posterior fossa, secondary to early fusion of skull sutures, in turn secondary to congenital deficiencies in fibroblast growth factor receptors; (2) impaired venous sinus drainage; (3) hydrocephalus; and (4) resultant elevations in intracranial pressure.

  17. Comparison of changing autopsy trends in the Bronx population with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, L; Markowitz, G S; Borczuk, A C; Factor, S M

    1996-10-01

    The opportunistic infections, malignancies, and causes of death related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are changing, perhaps as a result of improved treatment, prophylaxis, and education. With its high percentage of persons who acquired the human immunodeficiency virus from intravenous drug (IVD) use, the population of patients with AIDS in the Bronx is potentially unique. All of the 257 consecutive adult human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS cases from two Bronx teaching hospitals from 1982 through 1995 were collected. The reports were reviewed for patient demographics, opportunistic infections, malignancies, and causes of death. One hundred thirteen cases from 1982 through 1988 were compared with 144 cases from 1989 through 1995, separated by the institution of antiretroviral therapy and Pneumocystis carinii (PCP) prophylaxis in the latter period. Male homosexuality as a risk factor significantly decreased from 24.8% of the cases in our study from the 1982/88 period to 12.5% during the 1989/95 period (P = 0.014), but IVD use cases showed no change. Cases of AIDS in heterosexual patients increased from 23.9 to 36.1% (P = 0.041) but did not achieve statistical significance unless the unknown risk category (a population shown to be infected predominantly through heterosexual transmission) was included. The prevalence of PCP at autopsy as an opportunistic infection decreased from 37.2 to 25% (P = 0.04), and its prevalence as a cause of death decreased from 31.9 to 13.9% (P = 0.007). This decrease was seen in the homosexual and heterosexual populations but not in the population of IVD users. The homosexual population, as opposed to the population of IVD users, may have taken greater advantage of PCP treatment and prevention. As a result, bronchopneumonia, not PCP, is now the leading cause of death among the patients with AIDS in this study. These findings have important implications for therapy and prophylaxis to control the spread of AIDS and its

  18. Acquired immunity and asymptomatic reservoir impact on frontline and airport ebola outbreak syndromic surveillance and response.

    PubMed

    Tambo, Ernest; Xiao-Nong, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The number of surveillance networks for infectious disease diagnosis and response has been growing. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network, which has been endorsed by each of the 46 WHO African members since then. Yet, taming the dynamics and plague of the vicious Ebola virus disease (EVD) in African countries has been patchy and erratic due to inadequate surveillance and contact tracing, community defiance and resistance, a lack of detection and response systems, meager/weak knowledge and information on the disease, inadequacies in protective materials protocols, contact tracing nightmare and differing priorities at various levels of the public health system. Despite the widespread acceptance of syndromic surveillance (SS) systems, their ability to provide early warning alerts and notifications of outbreaks is still unverified. Information is often too limited for any outbreak, or emerging or otherwise unexpected disease, to be recognized at either the community or the national level. Indeed, little is known about the role and the interactions between the Ebola infection and exposure to other syndemics and the development of acquired immunity, asymptomatic reservoir, and Ebola seroconversion. Can lessons be learnt from smallpox, polio, and influenza immunity, and can immunization against these serve as a guide? In most endemic countries, community health centers and disease control and prevention at airports solely relies on passive routine immunization control and reactive syndromic response. The frontline and airport Ebola SS systems in West Africa have shown deficiencies in terms of responding with an alarming number of case fatalities, and suggest that more detailed insights into Ebola, and proactive actions, are needed. The quest for effective early indicators (EEE) in shifting the public and global health paradigm requires the development and implementation of a comprehensive and effective

  19. Can we find a solution to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome controversy? Is acquired immune deficiency syndrome the consequence of continuous excessive stressing of the body?

    PubMed

    Hässig, A; Wen-Xi, L; Stampfli, K

    1996-04-01

    The time of re-evaluation of the role of human immunodeficiency viruses in the pathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome has now come, now that methods are available for the direct detection of human immunodeficiency viruses and for the detection of cellular anti-human immunodeficiency virus immune reactions. It has been shown that human immunodeficiency virus infections are common among anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody negative high-risk individuals. The disease is brought under control by cellular immune reactions and the anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody test remains negative. Apart from proof that infection with human immunodeficiency viruses has occurred, a positive result in an anti-human immunodeficiency virus-antibody test is also an indication of an independent immunosuppression state. According to the definition of the Centers of Disease Control classical acquired immune deficiency syndrome is the consequence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus in association with continuous excessive stress, such as observed in the known risk groups. At the center of the pathogenetic process is hypercortisolism-determined damage of T lymphocytes, in which insufficiency of thymus is prominent. For this reason, in our view, there are indications for shifting efforts from the prophylaxis of infection with human immunodeficiency viruses to the prophylaxis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by reducing stress factors.

  20. Blood donors at high risk of transmitting the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Contreras, M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A; Mochnaty, P Z

    1985-03-09

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurs most commonly in homosexual men. This group carries the greatest risk of transmitting AIDS by blood transfusion. Both promiscuous and nonpromiscuous male homosexuals should refrain from giving blood. A leaflet stating this advice was prepared by the Department of Health and Social Security, United Kingdom. In July 1984 a questionnaire was given to all donors attending a blood donor clinic in the west end of London, England. 53% were male. Donors were given a leaflet on AIDS and a questionnaire to complete in private. Those who considered themselves to be in a high risk group were asked to designate their blood for research purposes only. Serum samples from donors who confirmed that they were in the high risk category were tested for antihepatitis B core antigen and anti-human T lymphotropic virus type III (anti-HTLV-III) in addition to the routine screening of donors for hepatitis B surface antigen and syphilis. All high risk donors were men. Homosexuality was the only high risk factor. Of 5000 questionnaires administered between July and October, 614 were not completed or had ambiguous answers. 38 donors who completed the questionnaire beonged to a high risk group. Of these, 7 were positive for antihepatitis B core antigen; none were positive for anti-HTLV-III, T pallidum hemagglatination, or hepatits B surface antigen. Although the homosexual donors had a much lower incidence of sexually transmitted disease than those attending special clinics, this should not encourage complacency. All possible measures must be taken to prevent homosexuals from donating blood.

  1. A pilot study of surrogate tests to prevent transmission of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by transfusion.

    PubMed

    Simon, T L; Bankhurst, A D

    1984-01-01

    Because of reports that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) might be transmissible by blood transfusion, we studied potential surrogate tests that could be used for screening donors. Male donors at one volunteer blood center and two plasma centers were screened for total lymphocyte count, OKT3, OKT4, OKT8, OKT11, LEU-7, LEU-M2, antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and herpes and circulating immune complexes. Total lymphocyte counts and the OKT11 were significantly lower in one plasma center. No significant differences were found for the other lymphocyte or monocyte tests. Low T4/T8 ratios, found in 20 percent of donors, did not correlate with other abnormalities. A small percentage (3.3%) of volunteer donors, 15.4 percent at one plasma center and 20.8 percent at a second plasma center, and 38.5 percent of the male homosexual donors were positive for anti-HBc (significant when comparing the male homosexuals to the volunteers at p = 0.032). Positive CMV and herpes titers were similar in the groups. Circulating immune complex levels greater than two standard deviations above the mean were found in 20 percent of the volunteer donors, 7.7 percent at one plasma center and 8.3 percent at the second plasma center, and none in the male homosexual population. Pearson product moment correlations showed reasonably good agreement among the lymphocyte tests. However, the anti-HBc, CMV, and herpes antibodies and circulating immune complex levels did not correlate with any of the other tests. Surrogate tests for AIDS are nonspecific and unlikely to be helpful in screening blood donor units.

  2. Sera from patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome inhibit production of interleukin-2 by normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, J P; Djeu, J Y; Stocks, N I; Masur, H; Gelmann, E P; Quinnan, G V

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effects of sera from patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) on interleukin-2 (IL-2) production to help elucidate the mechanism of immunodeficiency. Compared with sera from healthy controls, sera from AIDS patients suppressed phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced IL-2 production by normal blood mononuclear cells. Sera from homosexual contacts of AIDS patients and from adults with acute cytomegalovirus infection generally lacked this suppressive activity. The effect of the AIDS sera could not be attributed to absence of a stimulatory or nutritive factor, to inactivation of IL-2, to inhibition of the IL-2 assay, nor to increased turnover of IL-2. The suppressive effect of the sera was not mediated by radiosensitive or T8 antigen-bearing suppressor cells or by increased prostaglandin production or decreased interleukin-1 production. The sera acted directly on the groups of cells that produce IL-2, T cells and large granular lymphocytes; suppression occurred at an early, probably pretranslational, stage. When cells were incubated with AIDS sera and then washed, the suppressive effect persisted. The sera did not cause direct or complement-mediated cytotoxic effects on normal mononuclear cells nor did they suppress PHA-induced interferon production, nor proliferation of T lymphoblasts or lymphocyte lines. The suppressive effect was not mediated by interferon, cortisol, immunoglobulin G or M, or immune complexes. The activity was stable at pH 3, pH 10, and 60 degrees C; inactivated at 100 degrees C; and not ether extractable. Because IL-2 plays a central role in the development of many immune responses, the serum factor(s) that inhibits IL-2 production could contribute significantly to the immunodeficiency of AIDS. PMID:2989337

  3. Science and ethics of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome controversies in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brewster, David

    2011-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in Africa has raised important ethical issues for both researchers and clinicians. The most notorious controversy has been related to the zidovudine (AZT) trials in Africa in the late 1990s, in which the control groups were given a placebo rather than an effective drug to prevent vertical transmission. This raised concerns in the sponsoring country about exploitation of subjects, injustice and an ethical double standard between donor countries and resource-poor settings. However, the real double standard is between clinical practice standards in Western versus African countries, which must be addressed as part of the increasing global inequity of wealth both between countries and also within countries. There are important limitations to ethical declarations, principles and guidelines on their own without contextual ethical reasoning. The focus on research ethics with the HIV epidemic has led to a relative neglect of ethical issues in clinical practice. Although the scientific advances in HIV/AIDS have changed the ethical issues since the 1990s, there has also been progress in the bioethics of HIV/AIDS in terms of ethical review capability by local committees as well as in exposure to ethical issues by clinicians and researchers in Africa. However, serious concerns remain about the overregulation of research by bureaucratic agencies which could discourage African research on specifically African health issues. There is also a need for African academic institutions and researchers to progressively improve their research capacity with the assistance of research funders and donor agencies.

  4. Diketo acids derivatives as integrase inhibitors: the war against the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Góez, Yenny; Patiño, Pablo; Rugeles, Maria T

    2006-06-01

    Since the human immunodeficiency virus was identified as etiological agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, great advances have been accomplished in the therapeutic field leading to reduced morbidity and mortality among infected patients. However, the high mutation rate of the viral genome generates strains resistant to multiple drugs, pointing to the importance of finding new therapeutic targets. Among the HIV structural genes, the POL gene codes for three essential enzymes: reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase; nineteen of the twenty drugs currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat this viral infection, inhibit the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Although intense research has been carried out in this area during the last 10 years, HIV integrase inhibitors are not yet approved for clinical use; however the fact that presence of this enzyme is a sine qua non for a productive HIV life cycle joined to its unique properties makes it a promissory target for anti-HIV therapy. Many compounds have been claimed to inhibit integrase in vitro; however, few of them have proven to have antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity in cell systems. Diketoacid derivatives are the most promising integrase inhibitors so far reported. Initially discovered independently by Shionogi & Co. and the Merck Research Laboratories, these compounds are highly specific for the integrase with potent antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo, and low cytotoxicity in cell cultures. Some of these compounds have recently entered clinical trials. Due to the high relevance of integrase inhibitors, and specifically of diketoacid derivatives, we review the latest findings and patents in this important field of research.

  5. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  6. Fraction of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome prevented by the interactions of identified restriction gene variants.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, M J; Smith, M W; Chmiel, J S; Detels, R; Margolick, J B; Rinaldo, C R; O'Brien, S J; Muñoz, A

    2004-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated isolated effects of host genetic factors on the progression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. In this paper, the authors present a novel use of multivariable methods for estimating the prevented fraction of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases attributable to six restriction genes after accounting for their epidemiologic interactions. The methods presented will never yield a prevented fraction above 1. The study population consisted of a well-characterized cohort of 525 US men with HIV-1 seroconversion documented during follow-up (1984-1996). On the basis of a regression tree approach using a Cox proportional hazards model for times to clinical AIDS, the combinations of genes associated with the greatest protection, relative to the lack of a protective genotype, consisted of: 1) C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-Delta 32 and C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-64I (relative hazard = 0.44); 2) interleukin 10 (IL10)-+/+ in combination with CCR5-Delta 32 or CCR2-64I (relative hazard = 0.45); and 3) IL10-+/+ in combination with stromal-derived factor (SDF1)-3 'A and CCR5 promoter P1/approximately P1 (relative hazard = 0.37). Overall, 30% of potential AIDS cases were prevented by the observed combinations of restriction genes (95% confidence interval: 7, 47). However, the combined effect was confined to the first 4 years following HIV-1 seroconversion. Additional research is needed to identify AIDS restriction genes with stronger and long-lasting protection to better characterize the genetic epidemiology of HIV-1.

  7. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, L J

    2001-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) comprise a histologic spectrum, ranging from hyperplastic-appearing lesions to frank non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or multiple myeloma histology. Multiple clones may coexist, each representing a discrete lymphomagenic event, a situation that is unique to immunodeficiency states. The incidence varies from 1% in renal recipients to 5% in heart recipients, but can be markedly increased by the use of anti-T-cell therapies or by T-cell depletion in bone marrow transplantation. PTLD continues to arise, even many years after transplantation, and late T-cell lymphomas have recently been recognized. Pretransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegativity increases risk to as high as 30%-50%. PTLD has a highly variable clinical picture; certain patterns are, however, seen. Reversibility of PTLD with reduction in immunosuppressives has long been recognized. Predicting reversibility has been difficult. The presence or absence of bcl-6 mutations has recently been identified as being of predictive value. Surgical resection can be curative. Cytotoxics, although problematic, can also be curative. Long-term remission has been achieved with anti CD21 and CD24 antibodies; efficacy has been reported for interferon alfa and for rituximab. In vitro expanded EBV-specific T cells have been effective as treatment and as prophylaxis in the setting of bone marrow transplantation. EBV viral load measured in blood appears to associate with the emergence of PTLD and may facilitate prophylactic studies. PTLD is a model of immunodeficiency-related EBV lymphomagenesis. Pathogenetic, therapeutic, and prophylactic insights gained from the study of PTLD are likely to be applicable to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome setting.

  8. Otic and ophthalmic pneumocystosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, L; Haghighi, P

    1992-05-01

    A case of primary Pneumocystis carinii infection involving the left middle ear of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is described, and the literature on the otic and ophthalmic pneumocystosis is reviewed. Otic pneumocystosis typically presents as a unilateral polypoid mass, and it is clinically manifested as otalgia, hearing loss, or, sometimes, otorrhea without evidence of current respiratory disease or previous Pneumocystis pneumonia. In contrast, choroidal pneumocystosis usually occurs in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with at least one previous episode of Pneumocystis pneumonia and aerosolized pentamidine treatment, it is usually asymptomatic and bilateral, and it may be discovered only because of other concurrent human immunodeficiency virus-related ophthalmic disease. The diagnosis is made clinically, and intravenous antiparasite treatment is successful.

  9. The liver in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: emphasis on patients with intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, B M; Stahl, R E; Giardina, M A; Wormser, G P; Weiss, L; Jankowski, R; Rosenthal, W S

    1987-03-01

    To assess the spectrum of hepatic abnormalities in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), we reviewed clinical, biochemical, and pathological material in 32 patients with AIDS. Eight-four percent of AIDS cases had a history of intravenous drug abuse. Ninety percent of AIDS patients has some liver biochemical abnormality at the first presentation of illness. During the course of AIDS, significant (p less than 0.05, paired Student's t test) rises in alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin occurred, without rises in aminotransferases. Mean abnormalities were mild, reflecting approximately 2-fold increases over baseline. Liver failure was not believed to contribute to the death of any AIDS patient. Pathological findings in AIDS included specific infectious diagnosis in 26%, granulomas in 16%, hemosiderosis in 26%, nonspecific abnormalities in 39%, cirrhosis in 23%, and chronic active hepatitis in 3%. AIDS cases were also compared to 10 selected age, sex, and epidemiologically similar non-AIDS patients. Although granulomas or infections were not seen in our comparison group, only the incidence of chronic active hepatitis was significantly different between the groups. If only those with intravenous drug abuse were studied, then none of 24 AIDS patients versus four of eight non-AIDS cases (p less than 0.005) had chronic active hepatitis. AIDS patients with specific hepatic infections tended to have a higher alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase (p less than 0.05) than noninfected cases. However, substantial overlap existed, and no difference in hepatomegaly was noted. Ninety percent of AIDS patients were ingesting at least one potentially hepatotoxic drug. We conclude that AIDS patients have a high incidence of underlying hepatic abnormalities. However, clinical and biochemical abnormalities are similar in our selected liver biopsy patients with intravenous drug abuse with or without AIDS. As expected, AIDS patients have a higher incidence of hepatic

  10. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia: a comparison between patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and patients with other immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, J A; Hiemenz, J W; Macher, A M; Stover, D; Murray, H W; Shelhamer, J; Lane, H C; Urmacher, C; Honig, C; Longo, D L

    1984-05-01

    Clinical features of 49 episodes of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were compared with those of 39 episodes in patients with other immunosuppressive diseases. At presentation patients with the syndrome were found to have a longer median duration of symptoms (28 days versus 5 days, p = 0.0001), lower mean respiratory rate (23.4 versus 30, p = 0.005), and higher median room air arterial oxygen tension (69 mm Hg versus 52 mm Hg, p = 0.0002). The survival rate from 1979 to 1983 was similar for the two groups (57% and 50% respectively). Patients with the syndrome had a higher incidence of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (22 of 34 versus 2 of 17, p = 0.0007). Survivors with the syndrome at initial presentation had a significantly lower respiratory rate, and higher room air arterial oxygen tension, lymphocyte count, and serum albumin level compared to nonsurvivors. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia presents as a more insidious disease process in patients with the syndrome, and drug therapy in these patients is complicated by frequent adverse reactions.

  11. [Case report: Löffler's syndrome due to Ascaris lumbricoides mimicking acute bacterial community--acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Acar, Ali; Oncül, Oral; Cavuşlu, Saban; Okutan, Oğuzhan; Kartaloğlu, Zafer

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a patient with Loeffler's syndrome caused by Ascaris lumbricoides who presented with the clinical findings of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Our patient, who was twenty-five years old, and who had had symptoms such as coughing, expectorating, dyspnea and fever for approximately ten days, was hospitalized. We auscultated polyphonic rhonchuses at the both hemithoraxes. A chest X-ray revealed bilateral lower zone patch consolidation. Acute bacterial community acquired pneumonia (CAP) was diagnosed due to these findings and empirical antibiotic treatment was begun. Repeated sputum Gram stains were negative, and both sputum and blood cultures were sterile. A sputum smear was negative for acid-fast bacilli. The patient's fever and respiratory complaint did not respond to the empirical antibiotics therapy. During the course of advanced investigations, we measured peripheric eosinophilia, and high levels of total Eo and total IgE, and observed Ascaris lumbricoides eggs during stool examination. The patient was given a diagnosis of Loeffler's syndrome. Thereupon the patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazol 400 mg. In conclusion, we suggest that Loeffler's syndrome must be considered early in the differential diagnosis for CAP when peripheric eosinophilia is seen in patients if they live in an endemic area for parasitic disease.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging depiction of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ranjana; Joshi, Sandeep; Mittal, Amit; Luthra, Ishita; Mittal, Puneet; Verma, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome, also known as hemispheric atrophy, is characterized by loss of volume of one cerebral hemisphere from an insult in early life. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to dysfunction/atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere which is secondary to contralateral supratentorial insult. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases of acquired Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome with crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis.

  13. Monocyte/macrophage trafficking in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis: lessons from human and nonhuman primate studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Bell, Christie; Croul, Sidney; Lewis, Mark; Rappaport, Jay

    2008-08-01

    whose viral burden was predominantly at 1 x 10(6) copies/ml or greater developed encephalitis. To further investigate the relationship between CD163(+)/CD16(+) MPhis/microglia in the CNS and altered homeostasis in the periphery, the authors performed flow-cytometric analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The results demonstrate an increase in the percent frequency of CD163(+)/CD16(+) monocytes in animals with detectable virus that correlated significantly with increased viral burden and CD4(+) T-cell decline. These results suggest the importance of this monocyte subset in HIV/SIV CNS disease, and also in the immune pathogenesis of lentiviral infection. The authors further discuss the potential role of CD163(+)/CD16(+) monocyte/MPhi subset expansion, altered myeloid homeostasis, and potential consequences for immune polarization and suppression. The results and discussion here suggest new avenues for the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutics and vaccine design.

  14. Acquired factor VIII deficiency associated with a novel primary immunodeficiency suggestive of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Tuba Turul; Asal, Gulten Turkkan; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Tezcan, Ilhan; Ersoy, Fugen; Sanal, Ozden

    2007-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are associated with various autoimmune complications and several manifestations of autoimmunity can be seen in the disorders of T cells, B cells, phagocytes, and complement components. Acquired hemophilia is a rare entity in childhood. Although autoantibodies may develop in various forms of PID, Factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors have not been described before. Herein, we present a case of acquired hemophilia resulting from FVIII inhibitors who had underlying undefined PID features suggestive of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome. Our patient responded to corticosteroid treatment rather well and quickly, with an increased FVIII level and decreased FVIII inhibitors. However, FVIII inhibitor reappeared 7 months later, and disappeared spontaneously 4 months ago. Long-term and close follow-up is needed to observe the long-term prognosis in this child.

  15. Gastric toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Masoud; Tan, Ailyn; Maitar, Michael I; Weldon-Linne, C Michael; Weisenberg, Elliot; Rhone, Douglas P

    2003-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a common opportunistic pathogen in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It usually presents with ocular, central nervous system, or pulmonary disease. Gastric toxoplasmosis is uncommon in AIDS patients, especially in the absence of central nervous system manifestations. In the few reported cases, patients have presented with abdominal pain and other digestive complaints that usually are attributed to the more common gastrointestinal manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus infection. We describe a 49-year-old man with AIDS who presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea, dry cough, and systemic symptoms and was diagnosed with toxoplasmosis by a gastric biopsy.

  16. Perceived Life Changes in Adults with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and Kaposi’s Sarcoma Utilizing a Behavioral Systems Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    D-AIBE 152 PERCEIVED LIFE CHANGES IN ADULTS MITH ACQUIRED 1/3 XNNUNOEFICIENCY SYNDROME A .(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH URIGHT-PATTERSON AFD OH D A...belongs to the United States Air Force, which provided me with both the time and personal financial support to allow pursuit of this study as part of the...increase the metabolic rate further increasing the patient’s caloric requirements (Gong, 1985). Inability to got enough air and shortness of breath is

  17. [Fatal lactic acidosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Lasso, M; Pérez, J; Noriega, L M; Northland, R

    2000-10-01

    Type B lactic acidosis occurs without any evidence of cellular hypoxia and is associated with the use of drugs or toxins. We report a 36 years old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that was admitted to the hospital with a severe lactic acidosis. She had been treated with didanosine, stavudine and efavirenz for four months prior to admission. Despite the use of high bicarbonate doses and vasoactive drugs, the patient had a catastrophic evolution and died in shock and multiple organ failure, 68 hours after admission. (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 1139-43).

  18. The Role of Spatial Dispersion of Repolarization in Inherited and Acquired Sudden Cardiac Death Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This review examines the role of spatial electrical heterogeneity within ventricular myocardium on the function of the heart in health and disease. The cellular basis for transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) is reviewed and the hypothesis that amplification of spatial dispersion of repolarization underlies the development of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias associated with inherited ion channelopathies is evaluated. The role of TDR in the long QT, short QT and Brugada syndromes as well as catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) are critically examined. In the long QT Syndrome, amplification of TDR is often secondary to preferential prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) of M cells, whereas in the Brugada Syndrome, it is thought to be due to selective abbreviation of the APD of right ventricular (RV) epicardium. Preferential abbreviation of APD of either endocardium or epicardium appears to be responsible for amplification of TDR in the short QT syndrome. In catecholaminergic polymorphic VT, reversal of the direction of activation of the ventricular wall is responsible for the increase in TDR. In conclusion, the long QT, short QT, Brugada and catecholaminergic polymorphic VT syndromes are pathologies with very different phenotypes and etiologies, but which share a common final pathway in causing sudden cardiac death. PMID:17586620

  19. The Relationship between Acquired Impairments of Executive Function and Behaviour Change in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dawn; Oliver, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The latter stages of dementia in individuals with Down syndrome are well documented; however, earlier cognitive and behavioural changes have only recently been described. Holland et al. suggested such early signs of dementia in this population are behavioural and are similar to those seen in frontotemporal dementia, but there is, as…

  20. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  1. [Acquired and developmental Gerstmann syndrome. Illustration from a patient with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ehrlé, N; Maarouf, A; Chaunu, M-P; Sabbagh-Peignot, S; Bakchine, S

    2012-11-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome (GS) is defined by a clinical tetrad including acalculia, finger anomia, left-right disorientation and agraphia. In this article, we describe the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from an aggressive relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in which a systematic neuropsychological assessment revealed Gertsmann's syndrome amongst other cognitive disturbances. Brain MRI showed a high concentration of plaques within a left subcortical parietal region that has recently been considered as a crucial node for GS appearance. However, history, taking provided information suggesting that an important part of the GS, may have been present since childhood, evoking a possible neurodevelopmental origin in this patient. This article reviews the role of the GS concept in contemporary literature, with a special attention to pathophysiological hypotheses and to precautions necessary to study such cases.

  2. [Acquired long QT syndrome and cardiac arrest after general anesthesia. Case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, T; Parrel, S; Mierdl, S; Cottin, Y; Girard, C

    2014-06-01

    A 30-year-old woman, with no medical history, is operated on for breast implants. In recovery room, an episode of torsade de pointes occurs, progressing to ventricular fibrillation. The ECG after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and conversion to a normal sinus rhythm shows a corrected QT interval prolongation, whereas it is normalized after 48hours. We hypothesize that a ventricular fibrillation occurred after a torsade de pointes, due to drug-induced long QT syndrome during general anesthesia, with probably drug interaction.

  3. [The Landau-Kleffner syndrome: a special form of acquired childhood aphasia].

    PubMed

    Blouw-van Mourik, M; van Dongen, H R; Loonen, M C; Jannsen, A M

    1989-03-01

    The syndrome of "acuqired aphasia with convulsive disorder" occurs in children between 3 and 7 years of age and is characterized by a language disorder with heterogeneous epileptic manifestations. The pathogenesis is unknown. The course can show marked fluctuations. Our study of 6 children shows that the outcome can range from extremely unfavorable to complete recovery. The variables that possibly influence the course are discussed.

  4. An unusual presentation of acquired hypothyroidism: the Van Wyk-Grumbach syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, E; Högler, W

    2012-03-01

    The association in young females of long-standing primary hypothyroidism, isosexual precocious pseudopuberty and multicystic enlarged ovaries was first described in 1960 by Van Wyk and Grumbach. Since then, sporadic case reports have contributed to clarifying the key features of this syndrome. The unique elements that lead to this diagnosis are FSH-dominated sexual precocity combined with a delayed bone age in the presence of hypothyroidism. It is important to recognise this syndrome because initiating simple thyroid hormone replacement completely resolves symptoms and hormone abnormalities, avoiding unnecessary investigations for malignancies or surgical intervention. We describe an 8-year-old girl with autoimmune thyroiditis and severe long-standing hypothyroidism presenting with the clinical features of Van Wyk-Grumbach syndrome, a secondary TSH-secreting adenoma and hyperprolactinaemia. In addition, this girl presented with microcytic anaemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and two unusual features - a newly developed streaky hyperpigmented skin lesion and parathyroid hormone suppression despite vitamin D deficiency. Thyroxine replacement normalised all hormone abnormalities and shrunk the pituitary adenoma within 9 months, but the new skin lesion persisted. We review the literature and explore the pathophysiology of known and new features that give rise to speculation indicating stimulation of the FSH G protein-coupled receptor by excessive TSH, but LH suppression by hyperprolactinaemia.

  5. De Novo intracerebral aneurysm in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G.; Ahamed, Naushad A.; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated aneurysmal vasculopathy is a rare complication of HIV infection affecting the pediatric and adult population. We present a case of a 7-year-old male child known to have a congenitally acquired HIV infection presenting with a ruptured left distal internal carotid artery fusiform aneurysm that was diagnosed on MRI scans 6 months prior to his presentation. He underwent craniotomy and successful aneurysm reconstruction. He had uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. This case is among the few reported pediatric cases of HIV-associated cerebral arteriopathy to undergo surgery. We also reviewed the relevant literature of this rare condition. PMID:26166600

  6. Rhodoccocus Equi Pneumonia and Paradoxical Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Zijoo, Ritika; Dirweesh, Ahmed; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Rhodococcus equi pneumonia • paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Symptoms: Cough • fever • shorthness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Pulmonary infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and can progress rapidly to respiratory failure and death without appropriate therapy. Herein, we present a rare case of an advanced HIV infection and Rhodoccocus equi (R. equi) pneumonia in a young male who had severe paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Case Report: A 47-year-old nonsmoking Hispanic man with advanced HIV infection presented with severe acute necrotizing pneumonia secondary to R. equi. Although his initial response to antimicrobial therapy was optimal, he became symptomatic again in spite of continuation of antibiotics as he developed severe paradoxical IRIS 3 weeks after starting a new highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Conclusions: The diagnosis of IRIS remains challenging because of the wide variations in the clinical presentation and etiologies. In spite of its rarity as an opportunistic pathogen, we recommend that R. equi, an intracellular pathogen, be included in the differential list of pathogens associated with IRIS. PMID:28100903

  7. Thrombocytopenia in homosexual patients. Prognosis, response to therapy, and prevalence of antibody to the retrovirus associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C; Krigel, R; Lennette, E; Karpatkin, S

    1985-10-01

    Thirty-three homosexual patients with thrombocytopenia (mean [+/- SE] platelet count, 50 000 +/- 7000/mm3; range, 7 to 135 000/mm3) have been followed for a mean period of 20 +/- 2 months. Six patients have developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome 1 to 37 months after the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia. Six patients spontaneously reverted to normal platelet counts 5 to 27 months (median, 10 months) after the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia, in the absence of splenectomy and while not receiving corticosteroids. Sixteen of seventeen patients had a moderate to excellent response while on corticosteroid treatment. Ten of ten patients had an excellent response to splenectomy which has persisted. Fifteen patients did not require treatment for their thrombocytopenia. Thirteen of fourteen patients had antibody against the retrovirus associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, as did 4 of 12 homosexual controls without thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia in homosexuals is part of the complex related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  8. The evaluation of disphagic syndrome, in patients with previously acquired brain damages

    PubMed Central

    BARTULI, F. N.; LUCIANI, F.; MARINO, S.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; ARCURI, C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Recently clinical studies have proved without doubts that in patients affect by neurological diseases, like stroke, parkinsonism syndromes and others neurodegenerative pathologies, there is a very elevated incidence of swallowing disorders even severe. The disease can show up in a full blown way, with clinical evident signs like suffocation or frequent and sudden cough, at the moment in which the patient tries to feed or to drink; or it can appear in a less clear way, through an unable protection of the low airway and with possible pathologies ab ingestis. The first signals are represented by frequent resulting of cough reflex at nutrition or hydratation. Important is to assess the validity of this reflection, monitoring the amount of food reflux in the mouth after swallowing, which then could be perceived like foreign body and be aspired. The main diagnostic tests are the pHmetry in 24h, ultrasound, esophagography, videofluoroscopy, endoscopic examination and scintigraphy. Through the FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) we can then identify the time of swallowing deficit. Early diagnosis of Dysphagia Syndrome is important to improve living condition and survival of patients. PMID:23285383

  9. IgG kappa monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance presenting as acquired type III Von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christin R; Lin, Tara L; Cunningham, Mark T; Lipe, Brea C

    2014-09-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder associated with hematoproliferative disorders, autoimmune conditions, neoplasia and cardiovascular disorders that often present a diagnostic challenge. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is one of the most common causes of AVWS that typically presents later in life with mucocutaneous or postsurgical bleeding and multimers consistent with type I or II von Willebrand disease (VWD). Here, we present the case of a patient with a 32-year history of type III VWD that was ultimately found to be AVWS related to an IgG MGUS. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic challenges of AVWS to ensure proper identification and potentially lifesaving treatment of this rare disorder.

  10. Salvage therapy with high dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins in acquired Von Willebrand Syndrome and unresponsive severe intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 91-year-old woman affected with acquired Von Willebrand (VW) syndrome and intestinal angiodysplasias presented with severe gastrointestinal bleeding (hemoglobin 5 g/dl). Despite replacement therapy with VW factor/factor VIII concentrate qid, bleeding did not stop (eleven packed red blood cell units were transfused over three days). High circulating levels of anti-VW factor immunoglobulin M were documented immunoenzimatically. Heart ultrasound showed abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves with severe flow alterations. When intravenous immunoglobulins were added to therapy, prompt clinical and laboratory responses occurred: complete cessation of bleeding, raise in hemoglobin, VW factor antigen, VW ristocetin cofactor and factor VIII levels as well as progressive reduction of the anti-VWF autoantibody levels. PMID:24926417

  11. Lessons from the history of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among Spanish drug injectors.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, L; Bravo, M J; Barrio, G; Parras, F; Suárez, M; Rodés, A; Noguer, I

    2003-12-15

    In Spain, approximately 10 years passed between the time when human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) harm-reduction programs should have been developed with sufficient coverage to have an optimum impact on public health (before the HIV/AIDS epidemic's explosion in 1984) and the date of their actual implementation. This delay yielded an enormous cost for the country. The introduction of the virus in drug injector networks during a period of widespread diffusion of heroin injection and the lack of political awareness of the growing problem were 2 important factors that contributed to the important diffusion of the HIV infection among Spanish injection drug users. Lessons can be learned that may be of great interest in countries or territories facing similar challenges now and in the future.

  12. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B toxic shock syndrome induced by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Takeru; Kikuchi, Ken; Abe, Shinji; Kato, Hidehito; Hayashi, Hiroki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Kamio, Koichiro; Usuki, Jiro; Takeda, Shinhiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Imanishi, Ken'ichi; Yagi, Junji; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    We herein report a case of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) associated with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus and a community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection in a 16-year-old Vietnamese girl. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was detected in the patient's serum, and the level of anti-SEB antibodies was found to be elevated. A flow cytometric analysis showed evidence of activated SEB-reactive Vβ3+ and Vβ12+ T cells. These data suggest that the CA-MRSA-induced activation of SEB-reactive T cells may cause TSS in patients with pH1N1 virus infection. Moreover, this is the first report describing immunological confirmation of SEB contributing directly to TSS in a patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of TSS.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly associated with giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bei; Cheng, Xin; Gao, Jackson; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Liping; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shaoping; Fan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Yinzhong; Li, Lei; Liu, Baochi; Qi, Tangkai; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Jilin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exists in giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in the patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: 16 AIDS patients with a primary complaint of epigastric discomfort were examined by gastroscopy. Multiple and giant esophageal ulcers were biopsied and analyzed with pathology staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the potential pathogenic microorganisms, including HIV, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV). Results: HIV was detected in ulcer samples from 12 out of these 16 patients. Ulcers in 2 patients were infected with CMV and ulcers in another 2 patients were found HSV positive. No obvious cancerous pathological changes were found in these multiple giant esophageal ulcer specimens. Conclusion: HIV may be one of the major causative agents of multiple benign giant esophageal ulcers in AIDS patients. PMID:27830031

  14. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome successfully treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Cottler-Fox, Michele; Motwani, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening disease with a mortality of up to 90%, if not promptly recognized and treated. We report a 64-year-old woman with this condition who presented with left-sided weakness and seizure-like activity preceded by headache and easy bruising. She did not achieve optimal response to plasma exchange, corticosteroids, rituximab, and vincristine. We initiated treatment with eculizumab, following which she had durable remission that continued for 30 months after discontinuation of the drug. We later found that our patient has homozygous deletion in two closely related genes, complement factor H–related 1 and complement factor H–related 3.

  15. Insights into vaccine development for acquired immune deficiency syndrome from crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus-1 gp41 and equine infectious anemia virus gp45.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liangwei; Du, Jiansen; Liu, Xinqi

    2015-10-01

    An effective vaccine against acquired immune deficiency syndrome is still unavailable after dozens of years of striving. The glycoprotein gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus is a good candidate as potential immunogen because of its conservation and relatively low glycosylation. As a reference of human immunodeficiency virus gp41, gp45 from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) could be used for comparison because both wild-type and vaccine strain of EIAV have been extensively studied. From structural studies of these proteins, the conformational changes during viral invasion could be unveiled, and a more effective acquired immune deficiency syndrome vaccine immunogen might be designed based on this information.

  16. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis: potential causes of surgical emergencies of the hand.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Johnny J; Sheka, Kedambady P; Gheewala, Anup; Rowe, Norman M

    2008-07-01

    Compartment Syndrome (CS) is a disease that has 2 etiologies, that of acute events and that of chronic. It occurs when the pressure in a fascia-encased compartment exceeds the profusion pressure in tissue. The end result, when left untreated, is muscle and nerve ischemia that can cause significant morbidity. Nerve paralysis, muscle necrosis and fibrosis and, when occurring in an extremity, loss of the limb are some of the potential outcomes of missed diagnosis. This case series involves 2 cases of CS that where caused by vasculitis with etiologies of human immunodeficiency virus and systemic lupus erythematosis. Autoimmune vasculitis has many systemic and local manifestations, but to our knowledge CS has not been described as one of its sequelae. The following is literature review and presentation of these 2 cases.

  17. Intestinal microsporidiosis in a Chilean patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Oddó, D; Chuaqui, R; Hoffmann, E; Garcia, M

    1993-03-01

    A 24-year-old male patient with AIDS diagnosed in 1989, and with several episodes of pneumocystosis, was admitted because of a chronic diarrheic syndrome and severe epigastric pain. Endoscopy showed a granular duodenal mucosa. Light microscopy showed a moderate villous atrophy with round-cell inflammatory infiltration of the chorion. Giemsa, Ziehl-Neelsen, and Gram stains showed microsporidial spores measuring between 1.5 and 2 microns in the supranuclear cytoplasm of some enterocytes. Electron microscopy showed sporoblasts and spores consistent with Enterocytozoon bieneusi, with an apparently non-tubular, rather electron-dense polar filament showing up to 7 coils and also a microtubular internal structure with annular disposition, a finding which has not been adequately emphasized in the pertinent literature, probably representing a contractile property of the polar filament, rather than a mere duct for the parasitic sporoplasm to be inoculated.

  18. Pediatric renal cryptococcosis: novel manifestations in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome era.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Deonarain, Julian; Bhimma, Rajendra; Chotey, Nivesh; Sewram, Vikash

    2011-06-01

    Pediatric cryptococcosis has been documented in various organs, but pediatric renal cryptococcosis (RC) remains undocumented to date. The authors report RC in 2 children with AIDS, 7 and 9 years of age, with proteinuria. Both patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ARV) for 28 (patient 1) and 54 (patient 2) weeks each, had secured viral immunosuppression, but immune restoration was realized by patient 1 only. Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was diagnosed on the renal biopsy from patient 1 based on the clinicopathological profile and the presence of segmental glomerular and an interstitial lymphoplasmacytic and granulomatous reaction to Cryptococcus neoformans, with a predominance of capsule-deficient fungal forms. The renal biopsy from patient 2 demonstrated typical HIV-associated nephropathy with focal intratubular and interstitial C neoformans yeasts. Pediatric AIDS-associated renal disease must be expanded to include RC and cryptococcal IRIS, and the kidney must be included as a potential sentinel site of IRIS.

  19. Studies in homosexual patients with and without lymphadenopathy. Relationships to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    deShazo, R D; Penico, J P; Pankey, G A; Nordberg, J A; Newton, J L; Bozelka, B; Cortez, L M; Dalovisio, J R

    1984-06-01

    We studied the immunologic function of 19 sexually active homosexual men, ten of whom had persistent lymphadenopathy. Analysis of mononuclear cell populations distinguished homosexuals from heterosexual controls since, as a group, homosexuals had increased percentages of natural killer cells (Leu 7+), decreased helper-inducer T lymphocytes (OKT-4+), increased suppressor/cytotoxic (OKT-8+) T lymphocytes, low OKT-4:OKT-8 ratios, and depressed mitogenic responses. Homosexuals without lymphadenopathy were distinguishable from controls by increased percentages of Ia+ cells, decreased OKT-4+ cells, and decreased OKT-4:OKT-8 ratios. Four had positive findings simultaneously for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and surface antibody, and five had positive findings for HBsAg alone. Homosexuals with lymphadenopathy were distinguishable from controls by increased percentages of Leu 7+ cells, increased total lymphocyte numbers per cubic millimeter, decreased percentages of both OKT-4+ and OKT-8+ cells, abnormal OKT-4:OKT-8 ratios, and depressed mitogenic responses. Only histories of larger numbers of sexually acquired diseases, higher numbers of OKT-8+ cells per cubic millimeter, and lower mitogenic responses in homosexuals with lymphadenopathy distinguished this group from homosexuals without lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, none of the nine patients tested in this group was HBsAg positive. We conclude that homosexuals without lymphadenopathy are distinguishable from those with lymphadenopathy by both immunologic and serologic abnormalities.

  20. Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy: the Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saperstein, D S; Amato, A A; Wolfe, G I; Katz, J S; Nations, S P; Jackson, C E; Bryan, W W; Burns, D K; Barohn, R J

    1999-05-01

    We report 11 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor (MADSAM) neuropathy, defined clinically by a multifocal pattern of motor and sensory loss, with nerve conduction studies showing conduction block and other features of demyelination. The clinical, laboratory, and histological features of these patients were contrasted with those of 16 patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Eighty-two percent of MADSAM neuropathy patients had elevated protein concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid, compared with 9% of the MMN patients (P < 0.001). No MADSAM neuropathy patient had elevated anti-GM1 antibody titers, compared with 56% of MMN patients (P < 0.01). In contrast to the subtle abnormalities described for MMN, MADSAM neuropathy patients had prominent demyelination on sensory nerve biopsies. Response to intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was similar in both groups (P = 1.0). Multifocal motor neuropathy patients typically do not respond to prednisone, but 3 of 6 MADSAM neuropathy patients improved with prednisone. MADSAM neuropathy more closely resembles chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and probably represents an asymmetrical variant. Given their different clinical patterns and responses to treatment, it is important to distinguish between MADSAM neuropathy and MMN.

  1. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  2. The acquired immune deficiency syndrome: an overview for the emergency physician, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Guss, D A

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) affects all organ systems. Infection of the heart can manifest with evidence of myocarditis, pericarditis, or cardiomyopathy. The most common gastrointestinal symptom is diarrhea, which can result from infection with a variety of bacterial, fungal, or protozoal organisms. In about 15% of cases, no pathogen is recognized and the diarrhea syndrome is termed AIDS enteropathy. Any portion of the alimentary tract can be affected as well as the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas. Cryptosporidium, a previously infrequent cause of human illness, has emerged as an important pathogen in the HIV-infected patient and is responsible for chronic diarrhea, cholecystitis, and biliary tract obstruction. Evidence of neurologic involvement is present in more than 80% of patients at the time of autopsy. Cryptococcal meningitis, toxoplasma encephalitis, and neurosyphilis are the most often encountered central nervous system infections. While all three are responsive to therapy, treatment must be prolonged or persist for the duration of the patient's life to avoid recurrence. Peripheral nervous system manifestations include myelopathy, myopathy, and a variety of peripheral neuropathies. Retinal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and toxoplasma can lead to irreversible loss of vision. Cotton wool spots are a common benign physical finding that must be differentiated from the early signs of CMV or toxoplasma infection. Management of the HIV-infected patient, while most often conducted by specialists in Internal Medicine or Infectious Diseases, is often an issue for the emergency physician. Many of the commonly afforded therapies are reviewed. Part 1 of this two-part series discussed the pathophysiology and clinical expression, epidemiology, laboratory testing, and the general clinical manifestations of AIDS, as well as dermatologic, pulmonary, and cardiac symptoms. Part 2 discusses the gastrointestinal, neurologic, and ocular symptoms, as well as the

  3. Illustrated operative management of spontaneous bleeding and compartment syndrome of the lower extremity in a patient with acquired hemophilia A: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous bleeding resulting in compartment syndrome at the lower adult leg due to acquired hemophilia A is rare. There are no reports on operative management of this entity. Case presentation We present a case of atraumatic compartment syndrome of the lower leg due to acquired factor VIII deficiency, in an 83-year-old Caucasian man of European descent. He was treated surgically with a long and complicated postoperative course after presenting to a community hospital with a 2-day history of increasing pain and swelling in his left lower leg without a previous history of trauma. Conclusions Awareness, prompt diagnosis and effective treatment of compartment syndrome caused by a rare bleeding disorder, which is usually acquired by the elderly, is essential and may spare a patient from surgery or even limb loss, if early administration of recombinant factor VIIa is effective. The course of disease in a patient with operative management of spontaneous bleeding, compartment syndrome and acquired hemophilia A may be prolonged. However, an interdisciplinary approach with meticulous surgical treatment and bleeding management with recombinant factor VIIa as well as inhibitor eradication by immunosuppressive treatment can be successful and expensive. PMID:24886030

  4. Autopsy findings in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A report of 395 cases from the south of France.

    PubMed

    Hofman, P; Saint-Paul, M C; Battaglione, V; Michiels, J F; Loubière, R

    1999-01-01

    Necropsy findings in 395 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who died in Nice, France, between March 1983 and May 1996 were compared retrospectively with antemortem diagnoses, risk factors and number of positive T CD4 lymphocytes at the time of death. Special emphasis on bacterial infections was made in this study. Lesions observed from 1983 through 1989 and from 1990 through 1996 were compared. We assessed the role of organ lesions in the immediate cause of death. The organ system distribution of major opportunistic infections and neoplasms was similar throughout the years of the study. The most common diagnostic disease entities in all organ sites were cytomegalovirus infection, toxoplasmosis and candidiasis. Toxoplasmosis was more common in the intravenous drug abuser group. Bacterial infections were frequent and contributed to the mortality and morbidity of all risk factor groups. Kaposi' sarcoma continued to occur more frequently in the homosexual population. Cytomegalovirus infection remained one of the most common causes of death from 1983 to 1996. Mortality from fungal and bacterial infections, and mycobacteriosis increased in frequency during the course of this study whereas deaths from pneumocystosis declined. The death rate from malignant lymphoma and carcinoma increased after 1989. The clinical cause of death concurred with the pathological cause in 55% of the cases. Lung was the most frequent organ involved followed by the central nervous system the gastrointestinal tract and the heart.

  5. Circulating cytokine levels, Epstein-Barr viremia and risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, Charles S.; Engels, Eric A.; Landgren, Ola; Schuurman, Rob; Camargo, M. Constanza; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Goedert, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine dysregulation and decontrol of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are potential mechanisms for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We therefore assessed circulating blood levels in pre-diagnosis plasma or serum from 63 AIDS-related NHL cases 0.1 – 2.0 (median 1.0) years pre-NHL and 181 controls matched for CD4+ T-cell count. Cytokines were measured by Millipore 30-plex Luminex assays and cell-free EBV DNA detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations in multiplex cytokine levels were summarized by factor analysis. Individual cytokines and their principal factors were analyzed for associations with NHL by conditional logistic regression. Cases had higher levels for 25 of the 30 cytokines. In analyses of cytokine profiles, cases had significantly higher scores for a principal factor primarily reflecting levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (four gene products with coordinated transcription in vitro), as well as IL-1alpha. Epstein-Barr viremia was not significantly associated based on 113 evaluable samples without PCR inhibition. We found increases of T-helper type 2 interleukins and generalized elevations of other inflammatory cytokines and growth factors up to two years before AIDS-NHL. Cytokine-mediated hyperstimulation of B-cell proliferation may play a role in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis. PMID:22022727

  6. Addiction and sexually transmitted disease (STD), human immunodeficiency virus, (HIV), and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS): their mutual interactions.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Manuella

    2006-01-01

    We explore the links between substance use, misuse, addiction, and dependency1 and sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases (STD), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) to increase our awareness of their interdependence and to identify new ways to perceive, judge, and intervene (or not to) with associated problems. We consider the sociocultural and economic context in which these behaviors occur; the impact these behaviors have on one another; the personal opinions and attitudes; the religious, moral, or political beliefs and agendas; the physiological and fiscal constraints; and theories of rational decision-making and psychological motivation that act to increase or reduce the incidence of these behaviors and their sequellae, while hindering or facilitating prevention, harm reduction, and treatment interventions. Mechanisms of epidemic spread of STDS/HIV/AIDS are presented in the Appendix. Each of these terms are loaded "container concepts" that are culture-bound and stakeholder-driven and whose dimensions are less than consensus-based. They represent a range of meanings, uses, and misuses in an ongoing politicalized area of human and systemic functioning and adaptations.

  7. Demonstration of defective C3-receptor-mediated clearance by the reticuloendothelial system in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B S; Bohnsack, J F; Sourlis, S H; Frank, M M; Quinn, T C

    1987-01-01

    The function of macrophage C3 receptors was assessed in vivo by measuring the clearance of C3-sensitized autologous erythrocytes in seven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, eight healthy homosexual men, eight healthy heterosexual men, and four infected controls. Healthy heterosexual men had an initial clearance of 50.1 +/- 2.0% of the inoculum, with a release of a small portion of these cells (10.9 +/- 1.3%) into the circulation. Healthy homosexual men had a greater initial clearance of 66.0 +/- 4.2% (P less than 0.01) followed by a similar release (14.0 +/- 3.3%). AIDS patients had an initial clearance of 60.6 +/- 7.5% but had a relatively large release of cells (25.6 +/- 3.2%) (P less than 0.005 vs. heterosexuals; P less than 0.05 vs. homosexuals), suggesting a failure of macrophage phagocytosis. Infected controls had an initial clearance of 59.4 +/- 4.9%, with a release of 19.6 +/- 3.8% (P = NS vs. AIDS). These data, in addition to Fc-receptor dysfunction, demonstrate a global reticuloendothelial system dysfunction in AIDS patients. This may contribute to their frequent infections with opportunistic pathogens and inappropriate immune responses against these microorganisms. Images PMID:3546375

  8. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: von Willebrand factor propeptide to von Willebrand factor antigen ratio predicts remission status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adrienne; Sinclair, Gary; Valentine, Karen; James, Paula

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) secondary to a nonneutralizing anti-von Willebrand factor (VWF) antibody associated with an autoimmune disorder. At diagnosis, VWF activity (VWF:Act), antigen (VWF:Ag), multimers, and factor VIII coagulant activity were virtually absent. VWF propeptide (VWFpp) was elevated with an infinitely high VWFpp to VWF:Ag ratio (VWFpp:Ag) consistent with rapid VWF clearance. Immunosuppressive treatment resulted in phenotypic remission 1 with normalization of VWF/factor VIII levels and multimer pattern. However, VWFpp:Ag remained elevated (∼2× normal), consistent with ongoing VWF clearance by the remaining anti-VWF antibody still present by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This suggests that increased VWF secretion was compensating for the incomplete remission state. Relapse occurred when VWFpp:Ag was again infinitely high, with associated decreased VWFpp but unchanged anti-VWF titers; switching the balance to favor VWF clearance over secretion. Complete remission with undetectable anti-VWF occurred only when VWFpp:Ag was normal. This case of relapsing-remitting AVWS demonstrates the use of VWFpp:Ag for predicting remission status. PMID:24951428

  9. Disseminated histoplasmosis: a comparative study between patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and non-human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Tobón, Angela M; Agudelo, Carlos A; Rosero, David S; Ochoa, Juan E; De Bedout, Catalina; Zuluaga, Alejandra; Arango, Myrtha; Cano, Luz E; Sampedro, Jaime; Restrepo, Angela

    2005-09-01

    We studied 52 patients with disseminated histoplasmosis, 30 with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (cohort 1) and 22 not co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (cohort 2). Demographic, clinical, laboratory, mycologic findings, as well as antifungal therapy and highly active antiretroviral (HAART), were analyzed. Skin lesions were significantly higher in cohort 1 than in cohort 2 (P = 0.001). Anemia, leukopenia, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate were also more pronounced in cohort 1 than in cohort 2 (P < 0.001). Histoplasma capsulatum was isolated more often in cohort 1 than in cohort 2 (P < 0.05) patients, but antibodies to H. capsulatum were detected more frequently in cohort 2 than in cohort 1 (P < 0.05). Itraconazole treatment was less effective in cohort 1 than in cohort 2 (P = 0.012). In cohort 1 patients, HAART improved response to antifungals when compared with individuals not given HAART (P = 0.003), who exhibited higher mortality rates (P = 0.025). Cohort 1 patients who were given dual antifungal and anti-retroviral therapies responded as well as the non-HIV patients in cohort 2, who were treated only with itraconazole. These results indicate the need to promote restoration of the immune system in patients with AIDS and histoplasmosis.

  10. Severe anemia is an important negative predictor for survival with disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sathe, S S; Gascon, P; Lo, W; Pinto, R; Reichman, L B; Gascone, P

    1990-12-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually unresponsive to antimycobacterial therapy. We examined clinical and laboratory characteristics of MAI organisms and their relationship to the length of survival. We studied factors influencing survival and compared these in 76 patients with AIDS with and without MAI. Serum levels of p24 antigen and erythropoietin, and CD4-positive helper T-lymphocytes in blood were assessed in 36 additional patients with various clinical stages of HIV infection. In patients with MAI infection, survival was significantly related only to total lymphocyte count, hematocrit, platelet count, and sex. Of these, hematocrit and total lymphocyte count were the only linear predictors of survival. Anemia was significantly more profound in patients with AIDS and MAI than in the other patients. This anemia in patients with MAI could not be ascribed to increased peripheral destruction of red cells, deficient nutritional factors, or erythropoietin production, HIV viral or bacterial load, or a general effect on other blood elements such as neutrophils or platelets. The influence of MAI on survival in patients with AIDS did depend upon whether the MAI occurred as an index infection or was preceded by other opportunistic infections. Patients with other preceding opportunistic infection lived for a much shorter duration from the time of diagnosis of MAI.

  11. High rate of mutation K103N causing resistance to nevirapine in Indian children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, S; Pasricha, N; Singh, S

    2008-01-01

    In north India the number of paediatric cases with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is on the rise. Most drug combinations used for treatment of AIDS incorporate nevirapine, resistance to which develops very fast if given singly or because of unplanned interruptions. This paper investigates presence of mutations at codon 103 and codon 215 of the HIV pol gene causing resistance to nevirapine and zidovudine (AZT) respectively in 25 children with AIDS. Mutations T215Y and K103N were detected by a nested cum amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR) and the results were confirmed by direct sequencing in five randomly selected cases. Nineteen patients had received nevirapine containing regimen and six were drug naive. Mutation K103N was observed in 56% (14/25) of the children while mutation T215Y was found in none. Two of the six drug naïve children also showed K103N mutation. Thus, Indian children drug naïve or treated with nevirapine containing regimens show a high rate of mutation conferring resistance to nevirapine which calls for a judicious use of nevirapine both in antenatal and postnatal setting.

  12. Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin

    1996-09-01

    The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

  13. Epidemiology of children with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (stage 3): A referral hospital-based study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Zahra; Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Keshavarz Valian, Nasrin; Sabouni, Farah; Ramezani, Amitis; Bahador, Abbas; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Lack of recognition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection especially in children and delayed implementation of effective control programs makes HIV infection as a major cause for concern. Information on HIV epidemiology in Iran as well as other Islamic countries is limited. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical manifestation and laboratory finding of HIV infected children who were admitted to a referral Children Medical Center (CMC) in Tehran, Iran, during 11 years from January 2002 to January 2013. This was a retrospective study carried out over a period of 11 years. The records of all patients attending to the CMC with confirmed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were screened. The patients were evaluated for social circumstance, family history, age, gender, clinical, and laboratory features. Clinical data including fever, respiratory distress, diarrhea, rash, etc. as well as laboratory tests including complete blood count, serum glucose level, electrolytes, liver function test, cultures, CD4 lymphocyte count were evaluated. During the study period, 32 HIV positive children were enrolled. The majority of patients were presented with weight loss, prolonged fever, respiratory infection and chronic diarrhea. In this study, salmonella infections as well as streptococcal pneumonia and candida infections followed by, tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were the predominant opportunistic infections. Since the number of HIV-positive children has been alarmingly increasing in recent years and perinatal transmission is the most common route of HIV infection in children, essential recommendations for prenatal HIV testing as well as appropriate antiretroviral therapy by HIV infected mothers are needed.

  14. Epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at a reference hospital for infectious diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Renata Buccheri; Atobe, Jane Harumi; Souza, Simone Aparecida; de Castro Lima Santos, Daniel Wagner

    2014-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent one of the main causes of morbimortality in immunocompromised patients. Pneumocystosis, cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis are the most frequently occurring IFIs in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Fungi, such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., may cause severe diseases during the course of an HIV infection. Following the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, there has been a marked reduction of opportunistic fungal infections, which today is 20-25 % of the number of infections observed in the mid-1990s. This study is an observational and retrospective study aimed at the characterising IFI incidence and describing the epidemiology, clinical diagnostic and therapeutic features and denouement in HIV/AIDS patients. In HIV/AIDS patients, the IFI incidence is 54.3/1,000 hospitalisation/year, with a lethality of 37.7 %. Cryptococcosis represents the main opportunistic IFI in the population, followed by histoplasmosis. Nosocomial pathogenic yeast infections are caused principally by Candida spp., with a higher candidemia incidence at our institution compared to other Brazilian centres.

  15. New clinical and histological patterns of acute disseminated histoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ollague Sierra, Jose E; Ollague Torres, Jose M

    2013-04-01

    Histoplasmosis has attained increasing relevance in the past 3 decades because of the appearance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In most immunocompetent persons, the infection is asymptomatic or can produce a respiratory condition with symptoms and radiological images similar to those observed in pulmonary tuberculosis; in non-HIV+ immunocompromised patients, it can cause respiratory symptoms or evolve into a disseminated infection. The same can occur in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. We have observed a series of HIV+ patients with AIDS who presented with cutaneous histoplasmosis and in whom the clinical and histopathological features were highly unusual, including variable mucocutaneous lesions that were difficult to diagnose clinically. These patients displayed unusual, previously undescribed, histological patterns, including lichenoid pattern, nodular pseudomyxoid pattern, pyogenic granuloma-like pattern, perifollicular pattern, and superficial (S), mid (M), and deep perivascular dermatitis; and more commonly encountered patterns, such as histiocytic lobular panniculitis and focal nodular dermatitis. The novel histopathological patterns of cutaneous involvement by histoplasmosis seen in these patients resembled other common inflammatory and infectious conditions and required a high level of suspicion and the application of special stains for organisms for confirmation. These new, clinical, and histological findings do not seem to be commonly encountered in HIV- patients infected with the fungus but seem to be displayed most prominently in HIV+ patients with AIDS.

  16. Difficulties with diagnosis and consequential poor outcome due to stigma of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Vuletic, Vladimira; Nevajda, Branimir; Spero, Martina; Chudy, Darko

    2013-09-01

    Low incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been detected in Croatia so far. Toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) is the most common opportunistic cerebral infection in AIDS patients and is highly responsive to antiparasitic chemotherapy, if treated at an early stage. We present the case of the brain biopsy confirmed as TE on a 36-year-old female patient who at admission presented with unconsciousness and a right hemiplegia. A MSCT was performed and two hypodense lesions were diagnosed. The patient's family initially denied the presence or history of any medical problem or infection. An MRI showed multiple ring-enhanced mass lesions. An infectologist required a brain biopsy to exclude cerebral lymphoma and multiple metastases. Pathohistological analysis suggested TE. Meanwhile, patient's blood samples were found to be HIV positive. The patient was transferred to University Hospital for Infectious Diseases in Zagreb, where she died 2 days following admission. The patient's family terminally confessed that the patient had been HIV positive for 10 years and had refused any treatment. Family's denial of infection as well as 'hiding information' concerning patient's health from physicians involved in her treatment caused a delay in proper on-time patient treatment. We would like to emphasize that TE must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with multiple cerebral lesions, including patients without acknowledged past history of HIV infection. A stigma towards HIV infection and ignorance of the disease still exist and therefore hinders proper treatment.

  17. South Asian Consensus Guidelines for the rational management of diabetes in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Baruah, Manash P.; Latt, Tint Swe; Shrestha, Dina; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Somasundaram, Noel; Sahay, Rakesh; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-01-01

    As newer methods of management are made available, and accessible, survival rates with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are increasing. This means that chronic, metabolic complications of HIV are becoming more frequent in clinical practice, as acute morbidity is controlled. Management of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is gradually expanding to include these chronic and metabolic complications of the disease, and the adverse effects associated with its treatments, including diabetes. Unfortunately, no guidelines are available to help the medical practitioners choose appropriate therapy for patients with these conditions. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with HIV. The development of these guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. These guidelines and associated review of literature represent a compilation of available knowledge regarding rational management of diabetes in HIV. Patients of diabetes with concomitant HIV infection are managed optimally with insulin therapy and judicious use of highly active antiretroviral therapy with suitable alternatives is also recommended. These guidelines should prove helpful to physicians, not only in South Asia, but also across the globe, while managing patients with coexistent HIV and diabetes. PMID:22028994

  18. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  19. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, C

    1989-07-01

    The AIDS epidemics is a serious threat to world health. Transmission of infection follows well defined routes: sexual contact with infected people, transfusion of blood or other contaminated products and the transplacental infection. The bulk of cases is due homo or heterosexual contact. Measures to decrease the risk of transmission associated to blood transfusion are already operative in Chile. Campaigns for public education are starting and should be increased. Risky conducts can be decreased by these measures which are the responsibility of society at large.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus disease in California. Effects of the 1993 expanded case definition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, J A; Tabnak, F; Kuan, J; Rutherford, G W

    1996-01-01

    On January 1, 1993, the case definition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in adults and adolescents used for monitoring the AIDS epidemic in California was expanded to include persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with CD4 T-lymphocyte counts of less than 200 x 10(6) per liter (< 200 per mm3), pulmonary tuberculosis, recurrent pneumonia, or invasive cervical cancer. To assess the implications of this revision on AIDS case reporting in California, we compared cases reported through the end of 1994 based on 1 or more of the 4 new AIDS-defining conditions added in 1993 to cases reported based on pre-1993 AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and cancers. The 4 new conditions included in the 1993 expanded AIDS case definition accounted for a 23% increase in cumulative AIDS cases reported in California by the end of 1993, a 170% increase in the number of cases reported during 1993, and an 88% increase in the number of patients with AIDS living at the end of 1993. The number of cases reported in 1993 (19,629) was 124% more than that reported in 1992 (8,780) and 69% more than that reported in 1994 (11,587). The proportion of cases among women, injection-drug users, and African Americans also increased as a result of this change in the case definition. The expansion of the case definition may have resulted in a peak or plateau in the AIDS incidence in California because of reporting earlier in the HIV disease progression. The expanded case definition has enhanced the usefulness of AIDS surveillance data for targeting secondary prevention efforts, but more behavioral and HIV serosurveys are still needed to adequately target primary HIV prevention efforts. Images Figure 1. PMID:8775725

  1. Extrachromosomal sequences of hepatitis B virus DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Noonan, C A; Yoffe, B; Mansell, P W; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1986-08-01

    The primary etiologic agent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a human T-lymphotropic retrovirus (the AIDS virus). However, the pathogenesis of this virus suggests that other cofactors may contribute to the development of clinically overt disease. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated as a potential cofactor because HBV and AIDS virus infections frequently coexist, striking similarities exist in their epidemiologic patterns, and recent data indicate that HBV is lymphotropic. To establish the prevalence of HBV infections in lymphoid cells from individuals with AIDS-related disorders, sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 16 males with AIDS virus infections were examined for the presence of HBV DNA by DNA X DNA blot hybridization. Fifteen (94%) of these individuals had serologic evidence of a recent or prior HBV infection. HBV DNA was detected in the PBMC of all of these patients, regardless of existing HBV serology. Among the 36 control individuals without AIDS-related symptomatology, PBMC-associated HBV DNA was detected in 8 of 14 carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and in 3 of 10 individuals immune to HBV, but it was absent from the PBMC of 12 individuals without HBV infection. In all instances, the HBV DNA was extrachromosomal and existed as replicative intermediates or high molecular weight oligomers of the viral genome. Replicative intermediates and serum-associated HBV DNA were detected in all hepatitis B e antigen-positive carriers, regardless of their clinical status. In contrast, the high molecular weight oligomers of HBV DNA were detected in the PBMC of all of the AIDS virus-infected patients examined, but in only 33% of those in the control group who had evidence of HBV infection. This finding suggests that a unique and complex HBV-host-cell interaction exists in patients infected with the AIDS virus.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Survey in African-Americans with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, Claire; McCarty, Frances; Hankerson-Dyson, Dana; DiClemente, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of the current study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a culturally- and stage-of-disease-appropriate measure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among a population of African-American individuals with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) using a mixed-method design. Design Data were collected in two phases. In phase 1, qualitative data were used to refine an existing CAM measure for the specific study population in the present study. In phase 2, this refined instrument was implemented in a larger sample. The resulting numeric data were analyzed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the revised CAM instrument. Setting Data were collected from patients who were receiving care from the infectious disease clinic of a large, public, urban hospital in the Southeastern United States. Subjects Patients were eligible to participate if they (1) were receiving their care from the clinic, (2) had an AIDS diagnosis, (3) were identified as African-American, (4) were ≥21 years of age, (5) spoke English, and (6) were not cognitively impaired. Measures Focus groups in phase 1 were conducted with a semistructured focus group guide. Participants also completed a basic sociodemographic survey. Phase 2 participants used programmed laptops to answer questions about their CAM use and several sociodemographic questions. Results Information from the focus groups prompted some substantive revisions in the already-existing CAM survey. The revised instrument had satisfactory face validity and adequate test–retest reliability (r = 0.79). Furthermore, the instrument factored in a manner that was interpretable and consistent with prior findings. Conclusions In order for human immunodeficiency virus health care providers to provide the best care to their patients, they need to be informed about the types and frequency of CAM use among their patients. This can be accomplished by methodologically developing

  3. Oral Candida albicans isolates from nonhospitalized normal carriers, immunocompetent hospitalized patients, and immunocompromised patients with or without acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1989-01-01

    A total of 128 human oral isolates of Candida albicans were collected from asymptomatic healthy carriers (64 isolates); asymptomatic, nonimmunosuppressed, hospitalized patients (25 isolates); immunosuppressed transplant patients (19 isolates); and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and oral candidiasis (20 isolates). Isolates were serotyped as A or B and tested for reactivity with an agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody (H9). Immunocompetent individuals colonized by oral C. albicans were almost equally likely to carry serotype A as serotype B cells, while immunocompromised individuals were at least twice as likely to be infected by serotype B than serotype A strains. The reactivity of isolates with H9 antibody followed a similar but more distinctive pattern. Approximately half of the strains from immunocompetent individuals reacted strongly with H9, and the remainder reacted weakly. However, up to 75% of the isolates from immunocompromised patients reacted weakly with H9, while the remainder reacted strongly. A correlation between H9 reactivity and the serotypes of these isolates existed (P = 0.16). The correlation between H9 reactivity and immune status was even stronger (P = 0.025). The monoclonal antibody activities described above were determined by agglutination tests during defined phases of C. albicans growth. Expression of antigen at various times during growth of several isolates was confirmed at the cellular level by analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Despite the correlation between serotype A and H9 reactivity, H9 antigen was not identical to the serotype A antigen because four serotype A strains reacted only weakly with H9 antibody, and one strain reacted strongly with H9 but was serotype B. These data indicate that oral strains of C. albicans from immunocompetent individuals differ as a group from C. albicans isolated from those who are immunosuppressed. PMID

  4. Cryptococcosis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Patients Clinically Confirmed and/or Diagnosed at Necropsy in a Teaching Hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rafael Garcia; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Micheletti, Adilha Rua; Ribeiro, Barbara de Melo; Silva, Leonardo Eurípedes Andrade; Mora, Delio Jose; Paim, Kennio Ferreira; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2016-10-05

    Cryptococcosis occurs in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with poor compliance to antiretroviral therapy or unaware of their human immunodeficiency virus status who present severe immunosuppression at admission. Consequently, high mortality rates are observed due to disseminated fungal infection. This report presents clinical and postmortem data of AIDS patients with cryptococcosis in a teaching hospital in Brazil. Retrospectively, medical and necropsy records of AIDS patients with cryptococcosis clinically confirmed and/or postmortem verified were reviewed. Clinical data were compared with those of patients presenting a good outcome to evaluate disseminated fungal infection and the agreement between clinical and postmortem diagnosis. At admission, most of the 45 patients with cryptococcal meningitis who died, presented more altered consciousness (P = 0.0047), intracranial increased pressure (P = 0.047), and severe malnutrition (P = 0.0006) than the survivors. Of 29 (64.4%) patients with cryptococcal meningitis, 23 died before week 2 on antifungal therapy, and the other six during the next 3 months. The remaining 16 (35.6%) cases had other diagnoses and died soon after. At necropsy, 31 (68.9%) presented disseminated infection involving two or more organs, whereas 14 (31.1%) cases had meningeal or pulmonary localized infection. The agreement of 64.4% between clinical and postmortem diagnosis was similar to some studies. However, other reports have shown figures ranging from 34% to 95%. Currently, a progressive worldwide decrease of autopsies is worrying because the role of postmortem examination is pivotal to verify or identify the death causes, which contributes to improve the quality of clinical diagnosis and medical training.

  5. Measures to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome transmission by blood transfusion. Evidence of volunteer blood donor cooperation.

    PubMed

    Pindyck, J; Waldman, A; Zang, E; Oleszko, W; Lowy, M; Bianco, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether volunteers giving blood to the Greater New York Blood Program (GNYBP) cooperated with procedures implementing public health recommendations intended to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) transmission by blood transfusion. Predonation medical screening was expanded to exclude donors who might be ill with AIDS. To exclude possible asymptomatic carriers of the disease, members of groups at increased risk of AIDS were asked either not to give blood or to give it for laboratory studies. A confidential questionnaire, administered to all donors after medical screening, provided the vehicle for donors to advise the GNYBP whether their donation was for laboratory studies or for patient transfusion. We found that the number of male donors decreased; AIDS-related questions in medical history led to a 2 percent increase in donor rejections; 97 percent of donors said their blood could be used for transfusions; 1.4 percent said their blood could be used for laboratory studies only; and 1.6 percent did not respond. Only units designated for transfusion were released to hospitals. People who indicated that their donation was for laboratory studies had a higher prevalence of markers for hepatitis B virus and of antibodies to cytomegalovirus. White cell counts and helper/suppressor T lymphocyte ratios were not significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that volunteer donors have cooperated with the established procedures. None of the laboratory assays identified blood units donated by individuals who, based on information about AIDS high-risk groups, designated their donation for laboratory studies.

  6. Study of infections among human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Shadan Hospital, Telangana, India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sukumar Gajjala; Ali, Syed Yousuf; Khalidi, Azheel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemicity is a major concern today as it causes greater loss of productivity than any other disease. HIV infection leads to profound immune deficiency and patients become highly susceptible to opportunistic infections (OIs). HIV epidemic in India is heterogeneous in nature, both in terms of routes of transmission as well as geographical spread. Aims: (1) Determine prevalence of OIs among HIV-seropositive patients and their relation to CD4 count and to focus on the routes of transmission. (2) Analyze the route of transmission. Methods: This is a single-center prospective study including all the patients attending acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care center during the period of January 2014 to December 2014. Results: Among 71 patients included in this study, mean age was 30 years, 57.7% (41 patients) were male, 42.3% (30 patients) were female. Mean CD4 cell count of the study group was 260.11 and of patients on antiretroviral therapy increased subsequently to 553.37 cells/ml. Among the infections, the prevalence of candidiasis, tuberculosis (TB), tinea infections, seborrheic dermatitis, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and Entamoeba histolytica were 36.6%, 29.58%, 4.22%, 2.82%, 4.22%, 1.4%, and 1.4%. Most predominant routes were heterosexual transmission at 94.3%. It was followed by vertical transmission seen in 2.8%. Homosexual transmission is 1.4% and intravenous drug abuse 1.4%. Conclusion: The frequency of infections among HIV/AIDS patients has got a similar linear relation with CD4 cell count. This study reports data will serve as a matrix for future evaluation. It is concluded that candidiasis, TB are the most common infections in the HIV-seropositive patients in the present study group. PMID:27890948

  7. Elevated levels of interferon-induced 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in generalized persistent lymphadenopathy and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Read, S E; Williams, B R; Coates, R A; Evans, W K; Fanning, M M; Garvey, M B; Shepherd, F A

    1985-09-01

    The levels of the 2'-5' oligoadenylate enzyme synthetase in extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC) were measured and compared with synthetase levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMs) from healthy heterosexual and homosexual controls. The mean basal synthetase level in heterosexual and homosexual controls was 14 +/- 13 and 12 +/- 9 pmol per hr/10(5) PBMs, respectively. Thirteen individuals with AIDS had a mean basal level of 129 +/- 75 pmol. Serial levels were persistently elevated in six of these individuals over a one- to 10-month period. Twelve of the 13 individuals had antibodies to human T cell lymphotrophic virus-III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). Thirty-three individuals with ARC had a mean basal synthetase level of 68 +/- 84 pmol. Thirty-two of the 33 had antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV. Eleven (33%) have had consistently normal synthetase levels (less than 2 SD above the mean for the homosexual controls, i.e., 30 pmol) over a three- to nine-month follow-up period. Fourteen (42%) had persistently elevated levels over the same period; four (29%) of these developed AIDS during the follow-up period. Eight have had fluctuating levels but have remained clinically well. These studies suggest that persistently elevated synthetase levels in individuals with ARC and antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV indicate progressive virus-induced disease activity. Elevated synthetase levels may be an important prognostic indicator of increased risk of progression to AIDS.

  8. Effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment and Isolation Precautions in Protecting Healthcare Workers from Acquiring Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SARS outbreak revealed that inapparent infection with SARS was uncommon. 34-37 6 In response to this new disease, SARS infection control guidelines were... pneumonia , 12 March 2003. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/ news /releases/2003/pr22/en/. Accessed June 15, 2005. 3. World Health Organization...is another area deserving of attention. 2 INTRODUCTION The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged as a new syndrome due to a novel human

  9. A Case of Mycobacterium riyadhense in an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Patient with a Suspected Paradoxical Response to Antituberculosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Samar Assem

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old male patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) presented with clinical picture suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was commenced on antituberculosis therapy (ATT) with signs of improvement. Then he developed cervical lymph node abscess which was drained. Steroid was started for presumed paradoxical response to ATT which results in clinical regression. The culture result revealed Mycobacterium riyadhense. This report addresses the rarity of this bacteria in medical literature. It reviews clinical presentations and medical treatment particularly in the setting of coinfections. PMID:27703819

  10. [Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome, periarteritis nodosa, non-Hodgkin's lymphoplasmocytic lymphoma and acquired C4 deficiency].

    PubMed

    Herreman, G; Ferme, I; Diebold, J; Baviera, E; Audouin, J; Bazin, C; Godeau, P

    1983-01-01

    A Sjögren syndrome was confirmed histologically in a 19 year old woman. Four years later, periarteritis nodosa (PAN) with characteristic vascular lesions on muscle biopsy occurred simultaneously with lymphatic hyperplasia comprising splenomegaly and polyadenopathy. The PAN was cured with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide and the lymphadenopathy regressed. Several months after treatment was stopped the lymphadenopathy recurred which histologically resembled a malignant non-hodgkin lymphoplasmocytoma secreting an IgM kappa monoclonal immunonoglobulin. During the PAN and the establishment of the lymphoproliferative syndrome a severe C4 deficit was detected which disappeared after chemotherapy.

  11. Avian influenza: potential impact on sub-Saharan military populations with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Robert L; Nickell, Kent

    2007-07-01

    Several sub-Saharan militaries have large percentages of troops with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With the arrival of avian influenza in Africa, the potential exists that some of those soldiers might also become infected with H5N1, the virus responsible for the disease. Two possible scenarios have been postulated regarding how such a coinfection of HIV and H5N1 might present. (1) Soldiers already weakened by HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome rapidly succumb to H5N1. The cause of death is a "cytokine storm," essentially a runaway inflammatory response. (2) The weakened immune system prevents the cytokine storm from occurring; however, H5N1 is still present, replicating, and being shed, leading to the infection of others. A cytokine storm is particularly dangerous for individuals of military age, as evidenced by the large number of soldiers who died during the 1918 influenza epidemic. If large numbers of sub-Saharan soldiers suffer a similar fate from avian influenza, then military and political instability could develop.

  12. Attitudes of Baccalaureate Nursing Students toward Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome According to Mode of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrea M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Nursing students (n=236) completed the AIDS Knowledge Scale and AIDS Attitude Scale. Results showed most stigma attached to AIDS acquired through drug use or sexual contact, the least through maternal transmission or blood transfusion. Demographic characteristics did not influence attitudes. (SK)

  13. Factors Associated with Student Nurses' Intent to Provide Physical and Psychosocial Care to Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Frank L.

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 125 of 290 nursing undergraduates indicated their attitudes ranged from most to least positive regarding people with AIDS acquired through blood transfusion, heterosexual activity, homosexual activity, and needle sharing. Homophobia, fear of AIDS, and perceived susceptibility were inversely related with intention to care for AIDS…

  14. Successful recovery of MERS CoV pneumonia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Sarah; AlZahrani, Abdulwahab; Simhairi, Raed; Mushtaq, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS CoV) may cause severe pneumonia with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with multiple comorbid condition. MERS CoV pneumonia has not been previously reported in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Herein, we report a case of MERS CoV pneumonia with a successful outcome in a patient recently diagnosed with HIV.

  15. Nocardia and Lungs in COPD: Beyond Immuno-deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maggiorelli, Claudia; Di Pierro, Irene; Manta, Carmen; Maccari, Uberto; Galanti, Irene; Scala, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen and Pulmonary Nocardiosis (PN) occurred in more than half of the cases in subjects with immuno-suppressed status. COPD is one of the most common comorbidity observed in immuno-competent patients with PN. In this perspective study, we report the clinical patterns, the outcomes and the comorbidities of all cases of PN admitted in our Unit in the years 1999-2012. Among 6545 patients admitted in our Unit during the study time, we identified PN in 4 patients. COPD was coexistent in 3 out of 4 cases. A delayed time for the diagnosis was observed. Clinical-radiological improvement was detected in all cases after one month of specific anti-PN therapy. According to our experience, PN is a rare disease that should be suspected also in immuno-competent patients. COPD is confirmed to be a risk factor for the development of PN, probably due to reduced respiratory defenses and prolonged steroid therapy.

  16. Mommy, Daddy--What's AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners, Cherry Hill, NJ.

    This brochure is designed to help parents answer the questions that their children may ask them about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. It provides basic information about AIDS and HIV, as well as sources for further information, such as the National AIDS Hotline. It…

  17. Children, Teachers and the AIDS Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G.

    For schools, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) initially represented a policy problem requiring legal and public health experts to assess their ability to exclude students or staff infected with the human immuno-deficiency virus. As the crisis over the potential presence of people with AIDS in the schools abated and with the growing…

  18. [Bilateral cavernous sinus non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the presenting sign of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Barreira Junior, Alan Kardec; Moura, Frederico Castelo; Monteiro, Mario Luiz Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Case report of bilateral cavernous sinus syndrome due to primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the central nervous system in a patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. A 51-year-old male patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus but without antiretroviral treatment developed paralysis of the V and VI cranial nerves. Imaging studies were obtained to investigate an orbital apex and a cavernous sinus syndrome. A computerized tomography scan of the orbit was normal but a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bilateral enlargement of the cavernous sinus. Although primary lymphoma of the central nervous system is a rare condition, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients who develop ocular motility abnormalities and imaging signs suggestive of infiltrative cavernous sinus lesions.

  19. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired Long-QT Syndrome (aLTQS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired Long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O’Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired Long QT Syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  20. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr–drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  1. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E

    2015-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of I(Kr) blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in I(Kr) channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants.Weused themodel to predict themost potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed “in silico mutagenesis” by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human I(Kr) channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of I(Kr) channels. We then screened and identified the properties of I(Kr) blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes formild,moderate and severe variants. Mutant I(Kr) channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of I(Kr)-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and I(Kr) mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the I(Kr) channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a

  2. In silico screening of the impact of hERG channel kinetic abnormalities on channel block and susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucia; Trenor, Beatriz; Yang, Pei-Chi; Saiz, Javier; Clancy, Colleen E

    2014-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of predisposition to long QT syndrome is crucial for reducing the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In recent years, drug-induced provocative tests have proved useful to unmask some latent mutations linked to cardiac arrhythmias. In this study we expanded this concept by developing a prototype for a computational provocative screening test to reveal genetic predisposition to acquired long-QT syndrome (aLQTS). We developed a computational approach to reveal the pharmacological properties of IKr blocking drugs that are most likely to cause aLQTS in the setting of subtle alterations in IKr channel gating that would be expected to result from benign genetic variants. We used the model to predict the most potentially lethal combinations of kinetic anomalies and drug properties. In doing so, we also implicitly predicted ideal inverse therapeutic properties of K channel openers that would be expected to remedy a specific defect. We systematically performed "in silico mutagenesis" by altering discrete kinetic transition rates of the Fink et al. Markov model of human IKr channels, corresponding to activation, inactivation, deactivation and recovery from inactivation of IKr channels. We then screened and identified the properties of IKr blockers that caused acquired long QT and therefore unmasked mutant phenotypes for mild, moderate and severe variants. Mutant IKr channels were incorporated into the O'Hara et al. human ventricular action potential (AP) model and subjected to simulated application of a wide variety of IKr-drug interactions in order to identify the characteristics that selectively exacerbate the AP duration (APD) differences between wild-type and IKr mutated cells. Our results show that drugs with disparate affinities to conformation states of the IKr channel are key to amplify variants underlying susceptibility to acquired long QT syndrome, an effect that is especially pronounced at slow frequencies. Finally, we developed a mathematical

  3. Incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated opportunistic diseases and the effect of treatment on a cohort of 1115 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, 1989-1997.

    PubMed

    San-Andrés, Francisco-Javier; Rubio, Rafael; Castilla, Jesús; Pulido, Federico; Palao, Guillermo; de Pedro, Inmaculada; Costa, José-Ramón; del Palacio, Angel

    2003-05-01

    Temporal trends in the incidence of opportunistic diseases (ODs) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied during 1989-1997 in 1115 outpatients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (331 of whom had AIDS) in a hospital in Madrid, Spain. We analyzed the effect of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis on the incidence of OD. Diseases that showed a significant decreasing trend were esophageal candidiasis, pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and cerebral toxoplasmosis. Patients who adhered to antiretroviral therapy had a smaller risk of OD. Patients who adhered to PCP prophylaxis had a reduced risk of cerebral toxoplasmosis and PCP. A reduction in the incidence of AIDS-related ODs was observed, mainly in patients who underwent prophylaxis. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment and PCP prophylaxis was associated with a reduction in the risk of disease.

  4. A single-center case series of eight patients with the rare plasma cell dyscrasia of acquired Fanconi syndrome secondary to monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhu, Tienan; Xu, Lingling; Qin, Yan; Zhuang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Acquired Fanconi syndrome (FS) is a rare presentation of monoclonal gammopathy. We retrospectively summarized the cases of eight patients with FS secondary to monoclonal gammopathy at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) from January 2007 to April 2014. All patients had generalized or partial impairment of proximal renal tubular function. Six patients were diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and two were diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM). Although chemotherapy was administered to the two patients with MM and to one patient with MGUS, decreased paraprotein levels did not lead to improvements in metabolic abnormalities. All patients received continuous supplementation with deficient nutrients, leading to marked remission of bone pain and improved quality of life. Although renal function in most patients gradually declined, none of the patients developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) during an average follow-up time of 31 months, and no case of MGUS has yet transformed into MM.

  5. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease.

  6. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in a case of polycythemia vera resulting in recurrent and massive bleeding events in the pleural and abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanchao; Nie, Jing; Zhang, Zhirong; Ji, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital three times in a span of 5 years in hypovolemic shock because of spontaneous and massive bleeding in the pleural and abdominal cavity. Blood tests revealed a high number of blood cells, and bone marrow smears showed trilineage myeloproliferation. Serum erythropoietin level was decreased. Analysis revealed a V617F mutation in the JAK2 protein. Her activated partial thromboplastin time was slightly prolonged, the ratio between von Willebrand factor (vWF) propeptide and vWF antigen was in the normal range, but the ratio between vWF and ristocetin cofactor was decreased dramatically. Further investigation revealed the absence of large and intermediate vWF-multimers. She was diagnosed with polycythemia vera with acquired von Willebrand syndrome. The bleeding was stopped using a transfusion of freshly thawed plasma and cryoprecipitate.

  7. Induction of antibody to asialo GM1 by spermatozoa and its occurrence in the sera of homosexual men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Sonnabend, J; Richards, J M; Purtilo, D T

    1983-01-01

    Compared to healthy homosexual and heterosexual men, homosexual men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) possessed significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to the neutral glycolipid asialo GM1 (ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide) (P less than 0.01). Of 31 homosexuals with AIDS, 36% possessed levels of this antibody that were at least two standard deviations above the mean of the healthy men. Furthermore, asialo GM1 antibody could be removed from serum by adsorption with spermatozoa. Weekly rectal insemination of male rabbits with rabbit semen also led to the appearance of antibody to asialo GM1 by 15 weeks. These results suggest that asialo GM1 is a component of ejaculated spermatozoa and demonstrate that rectal insemination by itself can lead to the production of antibodies to this glycolipid in the rabbit. In addition, asialo GM1 antibodies may be of value as a serological marker for the early detection of individuals with AIDS. PMID:6652964

  8. Analysis of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus antibody responses in treated hemophiliacs. Implications for the study of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, S H; Sullivan, J L; Brettler, D B; Levine, P H

    1984-07-06

    One hundred hemophiliacs were studied for serological evidence of infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis B virus. Ninety-eight percent had markers of hepatitis B infection, while 69% had antibody to EBV and only 42% had antibody to CMV, suggesting that factor VIII preparations do not transmit EBV and CMV efficiently. Seventy-one percent of those seropositive to EBV had an antibody pattern suggestive of active infection, as compared with 23% of healthy young adult blood donors. These findings make the patients with hemophilia an unusually favorable population for the study of the role of persistent viral infection in the immunodeficiency now found to be widespread in groups at high risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and for the contribution of CMV and EBV to AIDS itself.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome prevention in injection drug users and their partners and children: lessons learned in Latin America--the Argentinean case.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diana; Goltzman, Paula; Cymerman, Pablo; Touzé, Graciela; Weissenbacher, Mercedes

    2003-12-15

    Thirty-nine percent of Argentineans living with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were infected with human immunodeficiency virus through the injection of drugs. However, it was not until the 1990s that harm reduction programs were created. Research and outreach projects have been developed to identify and interact with the hidden injection drug user (IDU) population. Implementation of rapid assessment and response methodology contributed to the founding of Argentina's first syringe exchange program. Community-based outreach is the appropriate method for working with the impoverished population of Buenos Aires. Seroprevalence studies and focused prevention campaigns targeting IDUs and their sex partners and children have been developed. Collaborations between government and nongovernmental organizations in various cities supported the distribution of prevention and harm reduction messages to 900 IDUs within a 3-month period. Ongoing research, community-based interventions, and collaborative work among different organizations allow for more frequent and more consistent contact with the IDU population of Argentina.

  10. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8(th) Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2013-10-05

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the "Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer". Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing "Comorbidities and Treatment", "Public Health Perspectives", and "Best Practices". This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers.

  11. Small-intestine pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Shetty, Jayarama; Pins, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    A Pneumocystis jiroveci infection-associated mass clinically mimicking a malignancy (ie, pseudotumor) is rare and usually occurs in the lung in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumors of the small intestine are extremely rare and represent an unusual form of disseminated P jiroveci infection. We present a case of small-intestine P jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness in a patient with coinfection with cytomegalovirus, no pulmonary symptoms, and no known risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection. This case reinforces the potential importance of cytomegalovirus coinfection in the disseminated form of Pneumocystis infection and illustrates the importance of an expanded differential diagnosis when confronted with a clinically atypical mass lesion.

  12. Acquired long QT syndrome and monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after alternative treatment with cesium chloride for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Anuj K; Harding, John D; Verdino, Ralph J

    2004-08-01

    Individuals searching for symptomatic relief or a potential cure are increasingly seeking and using nontraditional therapies for their various diseases. Little is known about the potential adverse effects that patients may encounter while undergoing these alternative treatments. Cesium chloride is an unregulated agent that has been reported to have antineoplastic properties. Cesium chloride is advertised as an alternative agent for many different types of cancers and can be purchased easily on the Internet. Recently, QT prolongation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia were reported in several patients taking cesium chloride as alternative treatment for cancer. We report acquired QT prolongation and sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia in a patient who self-initiated and completed a course of cesium chloride as adjunctive treatment for brain cancer.

  13. Acquired epileptiform aphasia: a dimensional view of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the relation to regressive autistic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefanatos, Gerry A; Kinsbourne, Marcel; Wasserstein, Jeanette

    2002-09-01

    Acquired epileptiform aphasia (AEA) is characterized by deterioration in language in childhood associated with seizures or epileptiform electroencephalographic abnormalities. Despite an extensive literature, discrepancies and contradictions surround its definition and nosological boundaries. This paper reviews current conceptions of AEA and highlights variations in the aphasic disturbance, age of onset, epileptiform EEG abnormalities, temporal course, and long-term outcome. We suggest that AEA, rather than being a discrete entity, is comprised of multiple variants that have in common the features of language regression and epileptiform changes on EEG. Viewed this way, we argue that AEA can be conceptualized on a spectrum with other epileptiform neurocognitive disorders that may share pathophysiological features. The implications of this viewpoint are discussed, with emphasis on parallels between the AEA variants and regressive autistic spectrum disorders.

  14. Acquired Gitelman Syndrome in an Anti-SSA Antibody-positive Patient with a SLC12A3 Heterozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kusuda, Takeshi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Mori, Takayasu; Ihara, Katsuhito; Nishida, Hidenori; Chiga, Motoko; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Koike, Ryuji; Uchida, Shinichi; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman developed hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis after anti SS-A antibody was found to be positive. Diuretic loading test results were compatible with Gitelman syndrome (GS). The patient had a heterozygous mutation in SLC12A3, which encodes for thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCCT). While the mutation may be responsible for a latent hypofunction of NCCTs, the underlying anti-SSA antibody-associated autoimmunity induced the manifestation of its hypofunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that anti SS-A antibody-associated autoimmunity may induce GS in a patient with a SLC12A3 heterozygous mutation. PMID:27803420

  15. Reversible acquired epileptic frontal syndrome and CSWS suppression in a child with congenital hemiparesis treated by hemispherotomy.

    PubMed

    Kallay, Christine; Mayor-Dubois, Claire; Maeder-Ingvar, Malin; Seeck, Margritta; Debatisse, Damien; Deonna, Thierry; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2009-09-01

    A boy with a right congenital hemiparesis due to a left pre-natal middle cerebral artery infarct developed focal epilepsy at 33 months and then an insidious and subsequently more rapid, massive cognitive and behavioural regression with a frontal syndrome between the ages of 4 and 5 years with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) on the EEG. Both the epilepsy and the CSWS were immediately suppressed by hemispherotomy at the age of 5 years and 4 months. A behavioural-cognitive follow-up prior to hemispherotomy, an per-operative EEG and corticography and serial post-operative neuropsychological assessments were performed until the age of 11 years. The spread of the epileptic activity to the "healthy" frontal region was the cause of the reversible frontal syndrome. A later gradual long-term but incomplete cognitive recovery, with moderate mental disability was documented. This outcome is probably explained by another facet of the epilepsy, namely the structural effects of prolonged epileptic discharges in rapidly developing cerebral networks which are, at the same time undergoing the reorganization imposed by a unilateral early hemispheric lesion. Group studies on the outcome of children before and after hemispherectomy using only single IQ measures, pre- and post-operatively, may miss particular epileptic cognitive dysfunctions as they are likely to be different from case to case. Such detailed and rarely available complementary clinical and EEG data obtained in a single case at different time periods in relation to the epilepsy, including per-operative electrophysiological findings, may help to understand the different cognitive deficits and recovery profiles and the limits of full cognitive recovery.

  16. Altered erythrocyte C3b receptor expression, immune complexes, and complement activation in homosexual men in varying risk groups for acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Tausk, F A; McCutchan, A; Spechko, P; Schreiber, R D; Gigli, I

    1986-01-01

    We studied levels of erythrocyte C3b receptors (E-CR1) and correlated them to the level of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and complement activation in patients with or at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A significant reduction was found in patients with AIDS (185 +/- 93 CR1/cell), AIDS-related complex, and generalized lymphadenopathy, whereas healthy male homosexuals or normal controls had 434 +/- 193 and 509 +/- 140 CR1/cell, respectively (P less than 0.001). Family studies indicate that this defect is acquired. Reduction in E-CR1 was associated with increased levels of CIC when assayed by binding to Raji cells, but not when tested by C1q binding. Complement activation was assessed by levels of C3bi/C3d-g in plasma, measured with a monoclonal antibody specific for a neoantigen in C3d. AIDS patients had increased C3 activation (2.68 +/- 1.67%) when compared with normal controls (0.9 +/- 0.22%) (P less than 0.01). The decreased E-CR1, the presence of CIC, and C3 activation suggest that complement activation by immune complexes may play a role in the clinical expression of the disease. PMID:2944915

  17. Acquired Dysfibrinogenemia Caused by Autoantibody Inhibiting Fibrin Polymerization in a Patient with MELAS Syndrome and Bleeding Tendency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nuri; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Gu, JaYoon; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho; Koh, Youngil; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of acquired dysfibrinogenemia caused by an autoantibody that inhibited fibrin polymerization in a patient previously diagnosed with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes). The patient showed prolonged PT, aPTT, and thrombin time. There was no factor deficiency but fibrinogen antigen and activity were decreased. ELISA for detection of fibrinogen antibodies were performed and IgG purified from the patient's plasma bound to fibrinogen more strongly than did control IgG, indicating the presence of a fibrinogen-specific antibody. Thrombin-mediated fibrin polymerization was severely impaired in the patient, although thrombin-induced fibrinopeptide A release was normal. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the structure of fibrin clots and revealed many pores on the surface of patient's fibrin clots. Since MELAS is often associated with autoimmune disorders, a work-up for the presence of anti-fibrinogen antibody is necessary when bleeding tendency occurs in MELAS patients along with prolonged thrombin time.

  18. Prevalence and Predictors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Patients with HIV Infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An Indian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neera; Sharma, Lokesh Kumar; Dutta, Deep; Gadpayle, Adesh Kisanji; Anand, Atul; Gaurav, Kumar; Mukherjee, Sabyasachi; Bansal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV are not well determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV infected Indians. Methods. Consecutive HIV patients, 18-70 years of age, without any severe comorbid state, having at least 1-year follow-up at the antiretroviral therapy clinic, underwent clinical assessment and hormone assays. Results. From initially screened 527 patients, 359 patients (61.44 ± 39.42 months' disease duration), having good immune function [CD4 count >200 cell/mm(3): 90.25%; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): 88.58%], were analyzed. Subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH) was the commonest thyroid dysfunction (14.76%) followed by sick euthyroid syndrome (SES) (5.29%) and isolated low TSH (3.1%). Anti-TPO antibody (TPOAb) was positive in 3.90%. Baseline CD4 count had inverse correlation with TPOAb after adjusting for age and body mass index. Stepwise linear regression revealed baseline CD4 count, TPOAb, and tuberculosis to be best predictors of ScH after adjusting for age, weight, duration of HIV, and history of opportunistic fungal and viral infections. Conclusion. Burden of thyroid dysfunction in chronic HIV infection with stable immune function is lower compared to pre-HAART era. Thyroid dysfunction is primarily of nonautoimmune origin, predominantly ScH. Severe immunodeficiency at disease onset, TPOAb positivity, and tuberculosis were best predictors of ScH.

  19. Animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus: Human relevance of acquired beyond hereditary syndromes and the role of oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to review different animal models of Central Diabetes Insipidus, a neurobiological syndrome characterized by the excretion of copious amounts of diluted urine (polyuria), a consequent water intake (polydipsia), and a rise in the serum sodium concentration (hypernatremia). In rodents, Central Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by genetic disorders (Brattleboro rats) but also by various traumatic/surgical interventions, including neurohypophysectomy, pituitary stalk compression, hypophysectomy, and median eminence lesions. Regardless of its etiology, Central Diabetes Insipidus affects the neuroendocrine system that secretes arginine vasopressin, a neurohormone responsible for antidiuretic functions that acts trough the renal system. However, most Central Diabetes Insipidus models also show disorders in other neurobiological systems, specifically in the secretion of oxytocin, a neurohormone involved in body sodium excretion. Although the hydromineral behaviors shown by the different Central Diabetes Insipidus models have usually been considered as very similar, the present review highlights relevant differences with respect to these behaviors as a function of the individual neurobiological systems affected. Increased understanding of the relationship between the neuroendocrine systems involved and the associated hydromineral behaviors may allow appropriate action to be taken to correct these behavioral neuroendocrine deficits.

  20. Human-Dromedary Camel Interactions and the Risk of Acquiring Zoonotic Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C; Danielson, N; Gervelmeyer, A; Berthe, F; Faye, B; Kaasik Aaslav, K; Adlhoch, C; Zeller, H; Penttinen, P; Coulombier, D

    2016-02-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases without documented contact with another human MERS-CoV case make up 61% (517/853) of all reported cases. These primary cases are of particular interest for understanding the source(s) and route(s) of transmission and for designing long-term disease control measures. Dromedary camels are the only animal species for which there is convincing evidence that it is a host species for MERS-CoV and hence a potential source of human infections. However, only a small proportion of the primary cases have reported contact with camels. Other possible sources and vehicles of infection include food-borne transmission through consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and raw meat, medicinal use of camel urine and zoonotic transmission from other species. There are critical knowledge gaps around this new disease which can only be closed through traditional field epidemiological investigations and studies designed to test hypothesis regarding sources of infection and risk factors for disease. Since the 1960s, there has been a radical change in dromedary camel farming practices in the Arabian Peninsula with an intensification of the production and a concentration of the production around cities. It is possible that the recent intensification of camel herding in the Arabian Peninsula has increased the virus' reproductive number and attack rate in camel herds while the 'urbanization' of camel herding increased the frequency of zoonotic 'spillover' infections from camels to humans. It is reasonable to assume, although difficult to measure, that the sensitivity of public health surveillance to detect previously unknown diseases is lower in East Africa than in Saudi Arabia and that sporadic human cases may have gone undetected there.

  1. The link between abnormal calcium handling and electrical instability in acquired long QT syndrome--Does calcium precipitate arrhythmic storms?

    PubMed

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J; Salama, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Release of Ca(2+) ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into myocyte cytoplasm and their binding to troponin C is the final signal form myocardial contraction. Synchronous contraction of ventricular myocytes is necessary for efficient cardiac pumping function. This requires both shuttling of Ca(2+) between SR and cytoplasm in individual myocytes, and organ-level synchronization of this process by means of electrical coupling among ventricular myocytes. Abnormal Ca(2+) release from SR causes arrhythmias in the setting of CPVT (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia) and digoxin toxicity. Recent optical mapping data indicate that abnormal Ca(2+) handling causes arrhythmias in models of both repolarization impairment and profound bradycardia. The mechanisms involve dynamic spatial heterogeneity of myocardial Ca(2+) handling preceding arrhythmia onset, cell-synchronous systolic secondary Ca(2+) elevation (SSCE), as well as more complex abnormalities of intracellular Ca(2+) handling detected by subcellular optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts. The regional heterogeneities in Ca(2+) handling cause action potential (AP) heterogeneities through sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) activation and eventually overwhelm electrical coupling of the tissue. Divergent Ca(2+) dynamics among different myocardial regions leads to temporal instability of AP duration and - on the patient level - in T wave lability. Although T-wave alternans has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, non-alternans lability is observed in pre-clinical models of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) and CPVT, and in LQTS patients. Analysis of T wave lability may provide a real-time window on the abnormal Ca(2+) dynamics causing specific arrhythmias such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP).

  2. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the Veterans' Administration. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Hospitals and Health Care of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the role of the Veterans' Administration (VA) in combating AIDS. Opening statements are included from Representatives G. V. Montgomery, J. Roy Rowland, Joseph P. Kennedy, II,…

  3. Histopathology of cerebral toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection: a comparison between patients with early-onset and late-onset acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Falangola, M F; Reichler, B S; Petito, C K

    1994-10-01

    We reviewed the histological features of untreated toxoplasmosis in 18 cases with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), eight of which were surgical biopsies and 10 of which were autopsy specimens. The results were compared according to the clinical status of the patient at the time the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was made (early-onset v late-onset AIDS) and according to the source of the specimen (surgical biopsy specimen v autopsy specimen). Cerebral toxoplasmosis was the AIDS-defining illness in half of the cases (six surgical biopsy specimens and three autopsy specimens). Inflammation in these cases was moderate in 44% and severe in 56%. Fibrous capsules were found in five cases. Lymphocytes and plasma cells were more prominent than neutrophils. Cerebral toxoplasmosis developed in or was part of the terminal AIDS illness in the remaining nine cases (two surgical biopsy specimens and seven autopsy specimens). In this group inflammation was sparse in 44%, moderate in 55%, and severe in only 11%. Fibrous capsules were usually absent and neutrophils were the predominant cell type. Comparisons between surgical biopsy specimens and autopsy specimens showed moderate to severe inflammation and frequent fibrous encapsulation in all of the former specimens but only in those autopsy specimens in which toxoplasmosis was the initial manifestation of AIDS. Thus, this study demonstrates varied neuropathological patterns of untreated cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with AIDS and correlates the inflammatory response in the brain with the clinical stage of the patient's human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) infection. Inflammation and fibrous encapsulation were common only in patients with early-onset AIDS in whom cerebral toxoplasmosis was the first manifestation of the illness. This study highlights important differences between the histology of this infection at surgical biopsy and at autopsy, and stresses the need to consider toxoplasma as a potential cause of

  4. AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987. Hearings on S. 1575: To Amend the Public Health Service Act To Establish a Grant Program To Provide for Counseling and Testing Services Relating to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and To Establish Certain Prohibitions for the Purpose of Protecting Individuals with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or Related Conditions. Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document presents the text from two Senate hearings on the AIDS Federal Policy Act of 1987 which concerns voluntary testing for AIDS virus, education and counseling to stop the spread of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), and confidentiality and discrimination against AIDS victims. In the first hearing, opening statements are…

  5. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the “Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer”. Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Comorbidities and Treatment”, “Public Health Perspectives”, and “Best Practices”. This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:24227993

  6. The spectrum of pathological changes in the lung in children with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: an autopsy study of 36 cases.

    PubMed

    Moran, C A; Suster, S; Pavlova, Z; Mullick, F G; Koss, M N

    1994-09-01

    We present the pulmonary findings in 36 autopsies of children affected by the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Twenty-three patients were male and 13 were female, ranging in age between 3 days and 13 years. Twenty children had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive parents or parents who were at high risk of exposure (intravenous drug abusers and prostitutes), five had a history of transfusion, and one had a history of renal transplantation and blood transfusion. Clinically, the patients presented with recurrent infections, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, fever, cough, and/or hemoptysis. Histologically, specific infectious processes were the most common finding (75% of cases), with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia being the most prevalent type of infection, followed by bacterial pneumonia. Neoplastic conditions and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia were less frequent (approximately 10% of cases). In addition, in approximately 10% of the cases the pulmonary findings were non-specific (ie, pulmonary edema and atelectasis) and probably unrelated to HIV infection. Our findings suggest that specific infectious conditions constitute the most common type of pulmonary pathology in children with AIDS. However, because there is a small percentage of children with nonspecific findings, a transbronchial biopsy is important for proper evaluation before institution of therapy.

  7. Atypical mucocutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient: T-cell responses and remission of lesions associated with antigen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Da-Cruz, A M; Filgueiras, D V; Coutinho, Z; Mayrink, W; Grimaldi, G; De Luca, P M; Mendonca, S C; Coutinho, S G

    1999-01-01

    An atypical case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated mucocutaneous lesions due to Leishmania braziliensis is described. Many vacuolated macrophages laden with amastigote forms of the parasite were found in the lesions. Leishmanin skin test and serology for leishmaniasis were both negative. The patient was resistant to therapy with conventional drugs (antimonial and amphotericin B). Interestingly, remission of lesions was achieved after an alternative combined therapy of antimonial associated with immunotherapy (whole promastigote antigens). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated and stimulated in vitro with Leishmania antigens to test the lymphoproliferative responses (LPR). Before the combined immunochemotherapy, the LPR to leishmanial antigens was negligible (stimulation index - SI=1.4). After the first course of combined therapy it became positive (SI=4.17). The antigen responding cells were predominantly T-cells (47.5%) most of them with CD8+ phenotype (33%). Very low CD4+ cells (2.2%) percentages were detected. The increased T-cell responsiveness to leishmanial antigens after combined therapy was accompanied by interferon-g (IFN-g) production as observed in the cell culture supernatants. In this patient, healing of the leishmaniasis lesions was associated with the induction of a specific T-cell immune response, characterized by the production of IFN-g and the predominance of the CD8+ phenotype among the Leishmania-reactive T-cells.

  8. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  9. Findings from the Horizontes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Education project: the impact of indigenous outreach workers as change agents for injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Birkel, R C; Golaszewski, T; Koman, J J; Singh, B K; Catan, V; Souply, K

    1993-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) intervention using indigenous outreach workers was implemented with Hispanic injection drug users (IDUs) and their sexual partners in three locations: Laredo, Texas; San Diego, California; and San Juan, Puerto Rico. A total of 2,169 subjects were contacted, given health education, HIV antibody testing, and follow-up counseling. This article reports on the 1,616 IDUs (75%) who completed the initial and follow-up interviews. The results indicated significant increases in health knowledge on AIDS, decreases in needle risk drug taking behaviors, some decreases in sex risk behaviors, and more realistic perceptions of personal AIDS risk. Using multivariate analyses, gender (male) and increasing age (older than age 25 years) were the strongest predictors of behavior change. Surprisingly, the identification of a positive HIV serostatus was not a significant predictor of behavior change. Although intended as a comparison study between contrasting levels of intervention, logistical and administrative problems undermined the use of a true quasi-experimental design. Nonetheless, the results from this research suggest that the use of indigenous outreach workers is an effective means of combatting the spread of HIV in this difficult to reach population. Some programmatic recommendations are provided for future efforts of this kind, particularly in relation to role conflicts experienced by outreach workers.

  10. Escitalopram treatment of depression in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Jacqueline; Carey, Paul; Joska, John A; Carrara, Henri; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Stein, Dan J

    2014-02-01

    Depression can be a chronic and impairing illness in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Large randomized studies of newer selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as escitalopram in the treatment of depression in HIV, examining comparative treatment efficacy and safety, have yet to be done in HIV-positive patients. This was a fixed-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study to investigate the efficacy of escitalopram in HIV-seropositive subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, major depressive disorder. One hundred two participants were randomly assigned to either 10 mg of escitalopram or placebo for 6 weeks. An analysis of covariance of the completers found that there was no advantage for escitalopram over placebo on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (p = 0.93). Sixty-two percent responded to escitalopram and 59% responded to placebo on the Clinical Global Impression Scale. Given the relatively high placebo response, future trials in this area need to be selective in participant recruitment and to be adequately powered.

  11. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  12. The thymus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Comparison with other types of immunodeficiency diseases, and presence of components of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, H. J.; Krone, W. J.; Broekhuizen, R.; van Baarlen, J.; van Veen, P.; Golstein, A. L.; Huber, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied thymus specimens taken at autopsy from eight acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and compared these with those taken from four patients with congenital immunodeficiency (unrelated to an intrinsic thymus defect) and seven patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In all cases, histology showed a severely involuted architecture, compatible with a debilitating disease before death. There were no major differences between thymus tissue in AIDS patients and in the other patients studied. This argues against the claim expressed in the literature that the epithelial microenvironment incurs particular HIV-1-induced injury in AIDS. This conclusion is substantiated by immunohistochemistry for HIV-1 gag and env proteins, and by hybridohistochemistry for gag/pol and env mRNA of HIV-1. Positive cells were observed only in low numbers, both inside the epithelial parenchyma and in the (expanded) perivascular areas. An interesting finding was the labeling of subcapsular/medullary epithelium in normal uninvoluted thymus by a number of antibodies to HIV-1 gag p17 and p24 proteins. Compatible with this labeling was the staining of epithelial stalks in hyperinvoluted thymuses irrespective of disease category. The previously reported cross-reactivity between HIV-1 core protein and thymosin alpha 1 cannot fully explain this observation, because the epithelium in the hyperinvoluted state is negative for thymosin alpha 1. This study confirms and extends previous reports on the endogenous presence of epitopes of retroviral antigens in thymic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2474255

  13. Characterization and growth in human macrophages of Mycobacterium avium complex strains isolated from the blood of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Meylan, P R; Richman, D D; Kornbluth, R S

    1990-01-01

    Strains of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) yield opaque and transparent colonial variants when cultivated in vitro. The transparent variants are more virulent than the opaque for animals, but little is known about the respective roles of these colonial variants in humans. To assess which variant infects humans, various blood fractions from eight patients with MAC bacteremia were plated directly onto 7H10 agar. In cell fractionation studies, all the M. avium complex CFU were associated with leukocytes and none were found free in plasma. All colonies on the primary culture plate exhibited the transparent phenotype. However, during subculture in 7H9 broth or on Lowenstein-Jensen agar, opaque variants appeared in seven of eight strains. Isogenic pairs of transparent and opaque variants were prepared and used to infect in vitro human monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy seronegative individuals. Transparent variants invariably grew inside macrophages, but only one of seven opaque variants did so. These observations indicate that the bacteremia of M. avium complex in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients consists exclusively of the transparent variants, perhaps because these variants are able to multiply inside macrophages. In contrast, opaque variants appear after in vitro subculture and are controlled by human macrophages, consistent with their reduced virulence in animals. Images PMID:2370109

  14. Decreased expression of human class II antigens on monocytes from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Increased expression with interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Kelley, V E; Strom, T B; Mayer, K; Shapiro, H M; Mandel, R; Finberg, R

    1984-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR (a class II histocompatibility antigen) on monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was investigated by the use of dual fluorescent staining and cytofluorometry. In animal models the absence of class II positive monocytes is linked to a failure of T cells to respond to antigens. We now report that patients with AIDS have a paucity of HLA-DR+ monocytes. The percentage of HLA-DR+ monocytes among eight normal individuals ranged from 49.3 to 95.0%+, and only one individual had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes. HLA-DR expression on monocytes from homosexual male patients with lymphadenopathy was similar to that of normal subjects (range, 58.0 to 97.4%+). In contrast, seven of nine patients with AIDS had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes (range, 13.4 to 78.8%+). The in vitro incubation of monocytes from AIDS patients with cloned human interferon-gamma resulted in an increase of the expression of HLA-DR to near normal levels. PMID:6439741

  15. Soluble suppressor factors in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and its prodrome. Elaboration in vitro by T lymphocyte-adherent cell interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Gottlieb, A B; Kunkel, H G

    1983-01-01

    Supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from certain patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or its prodrome were capable of depressing spontaneous and pokeweed mitogen-driven B lymphocyte differentiation into plasmacytes, and the proliferative responses of T cells to specific antigen. These soluble suppressor factors (SSF) were present in uniquely high concentrations, with significant differences from healthy controls and from patients with various other conditions previously associated with factor-mediated immunosuppression. T cell-independent functions were not modified by SSF. Suppression was not genetically constrained, and did not appear to be mediated by cytotoxicity, prostaglandin, or alpha or gamma interferons. SSF was a product of the interaction of T lymphocytes with adherent cells. T cells or T cell factors from AIDS patients, but not from normal controls, could collaborate with control adherent cells in the formation of SSF. Restoration of DNA synthesis-independent differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasmacytes in SSF-treated cultures was realized by addition of reducing agents, such as 2-mercaptoethanol, on culture initiation. These data suggest inhibitory mechanisms possibly related to that of concanavalin A-induced soluble immune response suppression, and perhaps offer clues to clinically applicable substances which are potentially capable of mitigating such responses. PMID:6605980

  16. Attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals towards people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akgun Kostak, Melahat; Unsar, Serap; Kurt, Seda; Erol, Ozgul

    2012-10-01

    Health professionals caring for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) show poor or negative attitudes because of fear of contagion. Therefore, it is important to know the attitudes of midwives' and nurses' towards people living with HIV/AIDS. The aim of this descriptive and cross-sectional study is to assess the attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals to people living with HIV/AIDS and to identify factors that affect these attitudes. A group of 46 midwives and 192 nurses working in hospitals were included in the study. Data were collected through AIDS Attitude Scale. Age, professional experience, number of children and marital status influenced the attitudes of the participants towards people living with HIV/AIDS. We concluded that higher level of education appear to positively influence the attitudes of the participants. Education programmes including evidence-based nursing implications might be planned to improve positive attitudes and to prevent stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS.

  17. Is human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome decreasing among Brazilian injection drug users? Recent findings and how to interpret them.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Francisco I; Bongertz, Vera; Teixeira, Sylvia Lopes; Morgado, Mariza G; Hacker, Mariana A

    2005-02-01

    We briefly review findings from Brazilian settings where the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic among injection drug users (IDUs) seems to be decreasing, highlighting recent findings from Rio de Janeiro and discussing methodological alternatives. Former analyses using serologic testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion have shown that HIV incidence has been low in IDUs recruited by two different surveys carried out in Rio, where low injection frequencies and infection rates have been found among new injectors. The proportion of AIDS cases among IDUs in Rio has been fairly modest, compared to São Paulo and especially to the southernmost states. Notwithstanding, the interpretation of findings from serial surveys constitutes a challenge, magnified in the assessment of HIV spread among IDUs due to the dynamic nature of the drug scenes and limitations of sampling strategies targeting hard-to-reach populations. Assessment of epidemic trends may profit from the triangulation of data, but cannot avert biases associated with sampling errors. Efforts should be made to triangulate data from different sources, besides exploring specific studies from different perspectives. In an attempt to further assess the observed trends, we carried out original analyses using data from Brazilian AIDS databank.

  18. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of cystic benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland in patients at risk for the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finfer, M D; Gallo, L; Perchick, A; Schinella, R A; Burstein, D E

    1990-01-01

    Cystic benign lymphoepithelial lesion (BLL), a previously rare lesion of the parotid gland consisting of marked lymphoid hyperplasia with accompanying squamous-lined cysts, has recently been described in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS risk factors. Thirteen fine needle aspiration (FNA) samples of parotid gland masses from patients with AIDS (one case), AIDS risk factors (five cases) or denial of AIDS risk factors (two cases) and a histopathologic diagnosis of BLL were examined. The FNA features that correlated best with the histopathologic findings were (1) a heterogeneous lymphoid population, (2) scattered single and/or clustered foamy macrophages and (3) superficial and/or anucleated squamous cells. Most aspirates showed some combination of these three components. The differential diagnostic considerations, the clinical and radiologic correlations and the relationship of this lesion to HIV infection are discussed. Patients with parotid masses whose aspirates consist of some combination of squamous cells, lymphocytes and foamy macrophages should be questioned for possible AIDS risk factors.

  19. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  20. A controlled study of funding for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome as resource capacity building in the health system in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Donald S; Zeng, Wu; Amico, Peter; Rwiyereka, Angelique K; Avila-Figueroa, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Because human inmmunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receives more donor funding globally than that for all other diseases combined, some critics allege this support undermines general health care. This empirical study evaluates the impact of HIV/AIDS funding on the primary health care system in Rwanda. Using a quasi-experimental design, we randomly selected 25 rural health centers (HCs) that started comprehensive HIV/AIDS services from 2002 through 2006 as the intervention group. Matched HCs with no HIV/AIDS services formed the control group. The analysis compared growth in inputs and services between intervention and control HCs with a difference-in-difference analysis in a random-effects model. Intervention HCs performed better than control HCs in most services (seven of nine), although only one of these improvements (Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination) reached or approached statistical significance. In conclusion, this six-year controlled study found no adverse effects of the expansion of HIV/AIDS services on non-HIV services among rural health centers in Rwanda.

  1. [A case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient].

    PubMed

    Mori, Naoyoshi; Maeda, Hikaru; Fujiwara, Kentarou; Taniguchi, Haruki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient. The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese woman who received salvage combination anti-retroviral therapy with darunavir plus ritonavir plus raltegravir plus tenofovir/emtricitabine in May 2009. She was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma (T3N3M1, stage IV) in November 2010 and was not found to possess any activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene. Therefore, 6 courses of carboplatin plus pemetrexed and 3 courses of gemcitabine followed by erlotinib were administrated, and therapy was changed to home medical care. The only drug-related adverse event was grade 1 neutropenia, and drug interaction between the simultaneously administered anti-retroviral and chemotherapeutic agents was not confirmed. The patient battled lung adenocarcinoma for 1 year after the diagnosis and died of cancer progression in October 2011. Her performance status was stable and the CD4 (+) lymphocyte count and HIV load were well controlled throughout the course of treatment. In conclusion, the agents used for this patient show high tolerability and can be used as an effective treatment strategy for lung cancer occurring in HIV-positive patients.

  2. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2013-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including in-depth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions.

  3. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a spatio-temporal analysis of cases reported in the period 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Alves, André T J; Nobre, Flávio F

    2014-05-01

    Despite increased funding for research on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), neither vaccine nor cure is yet in sight. Surveillance and prevention are essential for disease intervention, and it is recognised that spatio-temporal analysis of AIDS cases can assist the decision-making process for control of the disease. This study investigated the dynamic, spatial distribution of notified AIDS cases in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2001 and 2010, based on the annual incidence in each municipality. Sequential choropleth maps were developed and used to analyse the incidence distribution and Moran's I spatial autocorrelation statistics was applied for characterisation of the spatio-temporal distribution pattern. A significant, positive spatial autocorrelation of AIDS incidence was observed indicating that municipalities with high incidence are likely to be close to other municipalities with similarly high incidence and, conversely, municipalities with low incidence are likely to be surrounded by municipalities with low incidence. Two clusters were identified; one hotspot related to the State Capital and the other with low to intermediate AIDS incidence comprising municipalities in the north-eastern region of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

  4. Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Hospitalized Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Shahri, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Kouhpayeh, Hamid-Reza; Moazen, Javad; Farrokhian, Mohsen; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies show that nearly 40 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) around the world and since the beginning of the epidemic, about 35 million have died from AIDS. Heterosexual intercourse is the most common route for transmission of HIV infection (85%). People with a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as syphilis, genital herpes, chancroid, or bacterial vaginosis, are more likely to obtain HIV infection during sex. On the other hand, a patient with HIV can acquire other infections such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and also STIs. Co-infections and co-morbidities can affect the treatment route of patients with HIV/AIDs. Sometimes, physicians should treat these infections before treating the HIV infection. Therefore, it is important to identify co-infection or comorbidity in patients with HIV/AIDS. Objectives This study was conducted in order to understand the prevalence of HIV/AIDS/STI co-infection. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated all HIV/AIDS patients who were admitted to the infectious wards of Boo-Ali hospital (Southeastern Iran) between March 2000 and January 2015. All HIV/AIDS patients were studied for sexually transmitted infections (STI) such as syphilis, gonorrhea, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and genital herpes. A questionnaire including data on age, sex, job, history of vaccination against HBV, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), HCV-Ab, venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) test, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-Abs) test, and urine culture was designed. Data was analyzed by the Chi square test and P values of < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Among the 41 patients with HIV/AIDS (11 females and 30 males; with age range of 18 to 69 years) five cases (12.1%) had a positive test (1:8 or more) for

  5. Acquired gynatresia

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Shipra; Khan, Tamkin; Gupta, Hemprabha

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal stenosis (gynatresia) is commonly congenital, occurring as a part of Mayer-Kustner-Hauser syndrome. Those occurring postabortal or postpartum are rarely seen nowadays. Here, we report two cases, one in which there was complete stenosis postpartum following a retained gauze and another case, with chemical vaginal burns following attempted abortion by a local untrained midwife. PMID:24777085

  6. [Cryptococcosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lobos, T; Acuña, G; Espinoza, R; León, E

    1990-03-01

    The diagnosis of cryptococcal infection was established in 3 patients with AIDS. Infection was meningo-encephalic in all and presented a violent outset. The chemical characteristics of the CSF were normal. Detection of cryptococcal antigen, presence of encapsulated yeast forms revealed by india-ink staining and positive cultures allowed a definitive diagnosis. Response to therapy with amphotericin B alone or in combination with 5-fluorocytosine was poor. A maintenance therapy with fluconazole is recommended.

  7. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  8. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173). Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%), followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. Conclusions: The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area. PMID:27499166

  9. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease.

  10. Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders and/or Hospice Care, Psychological Health, and Quality of Life among Children/Adolescents with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Maureen E.; Williams, Paige L.; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Hutton, Nancy; Butler, Anne M.; Sibinga, Erica; Brady, Michael T.; Oleske, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The frequency of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and hospice enrollment in children/adolescents living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and followed in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) Study 219C was examined, and evaluated for any association with racial disparities or enhanced quality of life (QOL), particularly psychological adjustment. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of children with AIDS enrolled in this prospective multicenter observational study between 2000 and 2005 was conducted to evaluate the incidence of DNR/hospice overall and by calendar time. Linear regression models were used to compare caregivers' reported QOL scores within 6 domains between those with and without DNR/hospice care, adjusting for confounders. Results Seven hundred twenty-six (726) children with AIDS had a mean age of 12.9 years (standard deviation [SD] = 4.5), 51% were male, 60% black, 25% Hispanic. Twenty-one (2.9%) had either a DNR order (n = 16), hospice enrollment (n = 7), or both (n = 2). Of 41 children who died, 80% had no DNR/hospice care. Increased odds of DNR/hospice were observed for those with CD4% less than 15%, no current antiretroviral use, and prior hospitalization. No differences by race were detected. Adjusted mean QOL scores were significantly lower for those with DNR/hospice enrollment than those without across all domains except for psychological status and health care utilization. Poorer psychological status correlated with higher symptom distress, but not with DNR/hospice enrollment after adjusting for symptoms. Conclusions Children who died of AIDS rarely had DNR/hospice enrollment. National guidelines recommend that quality palliative care be integrated routinely with HIV care. Further research is needed to explore the barriers to palliative care and advance care planning in this population. PMID:18363489

  11. [Cerebral infarction and intracranial aneurysm related to the reactivation of varicella zoster virus in a Japanese acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Okada, Kazumasa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-01-01

    A 35-years-old right-handed man admitted to our hospital with a worsening of dysarthria, left facial palsy and left hemiparesis for 2 days. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed when he was 28 years old. At that time, he also was treated for syphilis. After highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced at the age of 35 years old, serum level of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was not detected, but the number of CD4+ T cells was still less than 200/μl. He had no risk factors of atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. He had neither coagulation abnormality nor autoimmune disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute ischemic infarction spreading from the right corona radiate to the right internal capsule without contrast enhancement. Stenosis and occlusion of intracranial arteries were not detected by MR angiography. Although argatroban and edaravone were administered, his neurological deficits were worsened to be difficult to walk independently. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed a mild mononuclear pleocytosis (16/μl). Oligoclonal band was positive. The titer of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies was increased, that indicated VZV reactivation in the central nervous system (CNS), although VZV DNA PCR was not detected. Therefore, acyclovir (750 mg/day for 2 weeks) and valaciclovir (3,000 mg/day for 1 month) were administered in addition to stroke therapy. He recovered to be able to walk independently 2 month after the admission.Angiography uncovered a saccular aneurysm of 3 mm at the end of branch artery of right anterior cerebral artery, Heubner artery, 28 days after the admission. We speculated that VZV vasculopathy caused by VZV reactivation in CNS was involved in the pathomechanism of cerebral infarction rather than HIV vasculopathy in the case.

  12. Histoplasmosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS): multicenter study of outcomes and factors associated with relapse.

    PubMed

    Myint, Thein; Anderson, Albert M; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N; Bamberger, David M; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N; Wheat, L Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p < 0.0001) and 5% death (p = 0.28) in the PC group. Relapse occurred in 53% of the nonadherent patients but not in the adherent patients (p < 0.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients with initial central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis relapsed compared to 15% of patients without CNS involvement (p = 0.0004), which may be accounted for by nonadherence. In addition, patients with antigenuria above 2.0 ng/mL at 1-year follow-up were 12.82 times (95% confidence interval, 2.91-55.56) more likely to relapse compared to those with antigenuria below 2.0 ng/mL. Discontinuation of antifungal therapy was safe in adherent patients who completed at least 1 year of antifungal treatment, and had CD4 counts >150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis.

  13. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heather D; Macgregor, Jennifer L; Nord, Kristin M; Tyring, Stephen; Rady, Peter; Engler, Danielle E; Grossman, Marc E

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

  14. Comparison of inhibitory and binding characteristics of an antibody causing acquired von Willebrand syndrome: an assay for von Willebrand factor binding by antibody.

    PubMed

    Fricke, W A; Brinkhous, K M; Garris, J B; Roberts, H R

    1985-09-01

    An acquired inhibitor of von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity occurring in a patient with benign gammopathy and von Willebrand syndrome (vWS) has been partially characterized. The inhibitor-induced syndrome resulted in low to undetectable plasma levels of vWF/ristocetin, vWF/botrocetin, FVIIIR:Ag, and FVIII:C with a normal to slightly prolonged bleeding time. Platelet vWF was normal. Intensive and continuous infusion of a heat-treated factor VIII concentrate (Hemofil-T, Hyland, Glendale, Calif) elevated the FVIII:C plasma levels to about 100%, with an increase in FVIIIR:Ag levels to about 340% and vWF/ristocetin levels to about 40%, much lower than expected based on the dose of Hemofil-T and its content of vWF and FVIII:C activities. The inhibitor bound to staphylococcal protein A (SpA) with high affinity, indicating an IgG antibody (Ab). An assay for the vWF-binding capacity was developed on the basis of absorption of the Ab from serially diluted plasma by SpA and removal of vWF and FVIII:C activities from normal plasma by the SpA-Ab complex. The Ab-binding site was on the vWF component of the factor VIII complex. The Ab was unable to bind isolated FVIII:C. The combined use of the new vWF-binding assay and a battery of tests for inhibition of vWF-dependent platelet aggregation with ristocetin (which detects high molecular weight vWF), with botrocetin (which detects high and low molecular weight vWF), and with platelet-aggregating factor (which detects high molecular weight vWF) provided a means of analysis of Ab effect on in vitro vWF function. Using these tests, a comparison was made of the effects of the vWS Ab with those of an Ab inhibitor occurring in homozygous von Willebrand's disease. The Ab of the vWS patient had weak inhibitory action on vWF/ristocetin without having an effect on vWF/botrocetin and platelet-aggregating factor, a high titer vWF-binding capacity, and no anamnestic response following concentrate therapy. These findings contrasted with those

  15. Perioperative onset of acquired von Willebrand syndrome: Comparison between HVAD, HeartMate II and on-pump coronary bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goetzenich, Andreas; Aljalloud, Ali; Woelke, Eva; Maas, Judith; Tewarie, Lachmandath; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Autschbach, Ruediger; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Moza, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AvWS) is associated with postoperative bleeding complications in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). The aim of this study is to analyze the perioperative vWF profile comparing an axial pump (HMII) to a centrifugal pump (HVAD) regarding the correlation between perioperative occurrence of AvWS, early- and late-postoperative bleeding events. Methods From July 2013 until March 2015 blood samples of 33 patients (12 HMII/ 8 HVAD/ 13 controls) were prospectively collected at 12 different time points and analyzed for the vWF antigen (vWF:Ag), its activity (vWF:Ac) and the vWF:Ac/vWF:Ag-ratio (vWF:ratio). The follow up period for postoperative bleeding events was from July 2013 until July 2016. Results Postoperatively, there was no difference in the vWF-profile between HVAD and HMII groups. However, a subgroup of patients already had significantly lower vWF:ratios preoperatively. Postoperatively, both CF-LVAD groups presented significantly lower vWF:ratios compared to the control group. Bleeding events per patient-year did not differ between the two groups (HMII vs. HVAD: 0.67 vs. 0.85, p = 0.685). We detected a correlation between vWF:ratio <0.7at LVAD-start (r = -0.583, p = 0.006) or at the end of surgery (r = -0.461, p = 0.035) and the occurrence of pericardial tamponade. In the control group, the drop in both vWF:Ag and vWF:Ac recovered immediately postoperatively above preoperative values. Conclusion A subgroup of patients with end-stage heart failure already suffers AvWS preoperatively. In both CF-LVAD groups, AvWS begins immediately after surgery. Intraoperative vWF:ratios <0.7 correlate with higher incidences of pericardial tamponade and re-operation. The presumably dilutive effect of the heart lung machine on vWF vanishes immediately at the end of surgery, possibly as part of an acute-phase response. PMID:28234916

  16. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus ORF8 Protein Is Acquired from SARS-Related Coronavirus from Greater Horseshoe Bats through Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Feng, Yun; Chen, Honglin; Luk, Hayes K. H.; Yang, Wei-Hong; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Yi; Song, Zhi-Zhong; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Ahmed, Syed Shakeel; Yeung, Hazel C.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the identification of horseshoe bats as the reservoir of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs), the origin of SARS-CoV ORF8, which contains the 29-nucleotide signature deletion among human strains, remains obscure. Although two SARS-related Rhinolophus sinicus bat CoVs (SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs) previously detected in Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) in Yunnan, RsSHC014 and Rs3367, possessed 95% genome identities to human and civet SARSr-CoVs, their ORF8 protein exhibited only 32.2 to 33% amino acid identities to that of human/civet SARSr-CoVs. To elucidate the origin of SARS-CoV ORF8, we sampled 348 bats of various species in Yunnan, among which diverse alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses, including potentially novel CoVs, were identified, with some showing potential interspecies transmission. The genomes of two betacoronaviruses, SARSr-Rf-BatCoV YNLF_31C and YNLF_34C, from greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum), possessed 93% nucleotide identities to human/civet SARSr-CoV genomes. Although these two betacoronaviruses displayed lower similarities than SARSr-Rs-BatCoV RsSHC014 and Rs3367 in S protein to civet SARSr-CoVs, their ORF8 proteins demonstrated exceptionally high (80.4 to 81.3%) amino acid identities to that of human/civet SARSr-CoVs, compared to SARSr-BatCoVs from other horseshoe bats (23.2 to 37.3%). Potential recombination events were identified around ORF8 between SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs and SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs, leading to the generation of civet SARSr-CoVs. The expression of ORF8 subgenomic mRNA suggested that the ORF8 protein may be functional in SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs. The high Ka/Ks ratio among human SARS-CoVs compared to that among SARSr-BatCoVs supported that ORF8 is under strong positive selection during animal-to-human transmission. Molecular clock analysis using ORF1ab showed that SARSr-Rf-BatCoV YNLF_31C and YNLF_34C diverged from civet/human SARSr-CoVs in approximately 1990. SARS

  17. Imported acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis in metropolitan France: a comparison of pre-highly active anti-retroviral therapy and highly active anti-retroviral therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985-1994) and HAART (1997-2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era.

  18. First results about recovery of walking function in patients with intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in patients with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. Design This is a cohort study. Participants We included critically ill patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Setting Post-acute ICU and rehabilitation units in Germany. Measures We measured walking function, muscle strength, activities in daily living, motor and cognitive function. Results We recruited 150 patients (30% female) who fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome recovery of walking function was achieved after a median of 28.5 days (IQR=45) after rehabilitation onset and after a median of 81.5 days (IQR=64) after onset of illness. Our final multivariate model for recovery of walking function included two clinical variables from baseline: the Functional Status Score ICU (adjusted HR=1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and the ability to reach forward in cm (adjusted HR=1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.04). All secondary outcomes but not pain improved significantly in the first 8 weeks after study onset. Conclusions We found good recovery of walking function for most patients and described the recovery of walking function of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Trials registrations number Sächsische Landesärztekammer EK-BR-32/13-1; DRKS00007181, German Register of Clinical Trials. PMID:26700274

  19. Superior oblique muscle entrapment in orbital fracture presenting as acquired brown-like syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Adulkar, Namrata; Kim, Usha; Shetty, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric orbital trauma with fracture involving the junction of roof and medial wall leading to superior oblique entrapment is rare. Here the authors report a case of orbital fracture at the junction of roof and medial wall with entrapment of the superior oblique muscle presenting clinically as canine tooth syndrome which was surgically released. Postoperatively, the ocular motility improved, and the patient was relieved of diplopia. They recommend early surgical exploration in such cases, which lead to successful resolution of diplopia.

  20. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  1. Vibrio vulnificus infection after raw oyster ingestion in a patient with liver disease and acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related complex.

    PubMed

    Chin, K P; Lowe, M A; Tong, M J; Koehler, A L

    1987-03-01

    Sepsis, peritonitis, and gastroenteritis developed in a 45-yr-old homosexual man 1 day after ingestion of raw oysters. The patient had chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis with hepatitis B virus and delta-infection. He also had persistent generalized lymphadenopathy associated with HTLV-III antibody positivity. Vibrio vulnificus was isolated from the patient's blood and peritoneal fluid as well as from the same batch of oysters at the restaurant where the patient had visited. To our knowledge, this is the first report relating direct microbiologic and clinical evidence that the infection is acquired through the gastrointestinal tract by consuming raw seafood containing the pathogen. This is also the first reported case of peritonitis associated with sepsis and gastroenteritis from this organism. Patients with liver disease and other immunocompromised states should be warned about such life-threatening infections and complications associated with the consumption of raw oysters or other undercooked seafoods.

  2. Upgrade from ICD to CRT-D: clinical and haemodynamic impact of biventricular pacing in a patient with acquired long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kawecki, Damian; Jacheć, Wojciech; Wojciechowska, Celina; Morawski, Stanisław; Tomasik, Andrzej; Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is characterised by both the depolarisation and repolarisation disorder of cardiac muscle cells. Cardiac resynchronising therapy (CRT) is an important treatment option for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) when echocardiographic and electrocardiographic criteria are met. Although CRT was introduced in clinical practice 10 years ago, doubts related to application of this treatment method persist because of its potential proarrhythmogenic effect. This is a case describing a 66-year-old Caucasian female with LQTS coexisting with a left bundle branch branch block (LBBB) and an implantable single-cavity cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD VR), who had repeated appropriate high-energy treatments. The upgrade to resynchronisation therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) significantly reduced frequency of ventricular tachycardia and the need for electrical therapies. The normalisation of the left ventricle size, as seen on echo examination, and the improvement of heart failure symptoms were also observed. PMID:28352686

  3. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? In the more severely affected cases of Brown ... acquired and congenital cases. In congenital cases, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  4. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  5. Aberrant methylation of H19-DMR acquired after implantation was dissimilar in soma versus placenta of patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, Ken; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Yoshinaga, Hokuto; Jozaki, Kosuke; Okada, Junichiro; Watanabe, Yoriko; Aoki, Aiko; Shiozaki, Arihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Koide, Kayoko; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2012-07-01

    Gain of methylation (GOM) at the H19-differentially methylated region (H19-DMR) is one of several causative alterations in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), an imprinting-related disorder. In most patients with epigenetic changes at H19-DMR, the timing of and mechanism mediating GOM is unknown. To clarify this, we analyzed methylation at the imprinting control regions of somatic tissues and the placenta from two unrelated, naturally conceived patients with sporadic BWS. Maternal H19-DMR was abnormally and variably hypermethylated in both patients, indicating epigenetic mosaicism. Aberrant methylation levels were consistently lower in placenta than in blood and skin. Mosaic and discordant methylation strongly suggested that aberrant hypermethylation occurred after implantation, when genome-wide de novo methylation normally occurs. We expect aberrant de novo hypermethylation of H19-DMR happens to a greater extent in embryos than in placentas, as this is normally the case for de novo methylation. In addition, of 16 primary imprinted DMRs analyzed, only H19-DMR was aberrantly methylated, except for NNAT DMR in the placental chorangioma of Patient 2. To our knowledge, these are the first data suggesting when GOM of H19-DMR occurs.

  6. The clinical characteristics of 80 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang Autonomous Region and the effect of different treatments on the prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongtong; He, Li; Wan, Xuefeng; Maimaitiaili, Wubuli; Song, Yuxia; Zhang, Yuexin; Lu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the clinical features of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) patients in Xinjiang Autonomous Region and the impact of CD4 (+)T lymphocyte count, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and systemic chemotherapy on the prognosis. The clinical information of 80 AIDS-KS patients admitted in Sixth People's Hospital of Xinjiang Autonomous Region from January 2008 to August 2014 was retrospectively reviewed. Population characteristics, extent of lesions, KS progress, CD4 (+)T lymphocyte count, combined opportunistic infections, treatment and prognosis of these patients were analyzed. The 80 patients were divided into five groups according to treatment methods, including HAART, HAART + chemotherapy, chemotherapy + HAART, chemotherapy, and untreated groups. The efficacy and prognosis of the five groups were compared. Among the 80 patients, 74 (92.50%) patients were Uygur. The average age was 39.5±9.9 years and male-to-female ratio was 3:1. The median of baseline CD4 (+)T lymphocyte count was 152.5 cells/μL and the interquartile was 233.25 cells/μL. CD4 (+)T lymphocyte counts were significantly increased after treatment in HAART, HAART + chemotherapy, and chemotherapy + HAART groups (P < 0.05). CD4 (+)T lymphocyte count in chemotherapy groups was significantly reduced after treatment (P < 0.05). The untreated group had the highest mortality rate (33.3%). In HAART group, KS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory response syndrome (KS-IRIS) appeared in 45.5% cases and 2 death cases were caused by KS-IRIS. In Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the incidence of AIDS-KS is high in young Uygur male people. HAART followed by chemotherapy has ideal efficacy, reduces the incidence of KS-IRIS and improves the prognosis.

  7. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  8. [Detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG, IgM and IgA immunoglobulins in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and neurotoxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Borges, Aercio Sebastião; Figueiredo, José Fernando de Castro

    2004-12-01

    We studied 55 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and neurotoxoplasmosis (group 1), 37 patients with AIDS and neurological involvement due to another etiology (group 2) and 18 anti-HIV-negative individuals with neurological manifestations, by searching for anti-T. gondii IgG, IgA and IgM immunoglobulins in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)and saliva, using ELISA. The negative predictive value of the test for IgG in serum was 100% and in CSF, 92.4%. There was no difference among the three groups studied regarding IgA in serum. For IgA, in CSF the test reached 72.7% specificity (p<0.05). In saliva, only the detection of IgG was found to be correlated with a diagnosis of neurotoxoplasmosis. We emphasize that the absence of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies in serum and CSF strongly indicates the absence of a diagnosis of neurotoxoplasmosis and that specific IgA immunoglobulins in CSF and IgG in saliva may represent two auxiliary markers for the differential diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS.

  9. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and their correlation to cluster of differentiation lymphocyte count in population of North-East India in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Sarat Kumar; Das, Bijay Kumar; Das, Surya Narayan; Mohapatra, Namita; Nayak, Suryakanti; Bhuyan, Lipsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection which manifests as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease involving the defects of the T-lymphocyte arm of the immune system. Certain laboratory parameters such as the cluster of differentiation (CD4) count and clinical parameters have long been used as markers of disease progression. In industrialized countries, many studies show a highly correlation between the incidence of oral lesions and immunosuppression and hence, can be used as a marker of immunosuppression. This might not be applicable to a developing country like India. In this study, efforts have been made to supplement the present knowledge on various aspects of oral manifestations in HIV patients in the Indian subcontinent. Aims: To correlate the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients to the level of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and their effect in anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Subjects and Methods: A total of 104 HIV positive patients were examined for oral lesions. The CD4 count estimated on the same day by fluorescent activated cell sort count machine was then correlated with various oral lesions. Results: Oral manifestations appeared when CD4 count decreased below 500 cells/mm3. Moreover, oral lesions found at different stages showed very strong correlation to their respective CD4 count. Furthermore, there was considerable decline in the incidence of oral manifestations in patients undergoing highly active ART. Conclusions: Oral manifestations are highly predictive markers of severe immune deterioration and disease progression in HIV patients. PMID:27994425

  10. Metastatic thymoma and acquired generalized myasthenia gravis in a beagle.

    PubMed

    Moffet, Adrienne C

    2007-01-01

    A 16-year-old, spayed female beagle was diagnosed with metastatic thymoma causing a probable paraneoplastic syndrome of generalized acquired myasthenia gravis. Anticholinesterase treatment was initiated; however, 5 days later the dog died.

  11. [Pseudotumoral toxoplasmic cystitis revealing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ples, Raluca; Méchaï, Frédéric; Champiat, Bernard; Droupy, Stéphane; Huerre, Michel; Guettier, Catherine; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2011-02-01

    A case of bladder toxoplasmosis in a 57-year-old male Caucasian patient was diagnosed with difficulty due to misleading clinical presentation. The patient presented with pollakiuria and urination burning. Imagery showed pseudotumoral thickening of the vesicle wall. Previously unknown status of HIV infection was found positive through the diagnosis of bladder toxoplasmosis. The patient died rapidly from neurological complications. This is the second published case in which bladder toxoplasmosis reveals an HIV infection.

  12. [Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and opportunistic infections].

    PubMed

    Dvaranauskaite, Lina; Velyvyte, Daiva; Kurklietyte, Virginija; Gumbelevicius, Antanas; Keleras, Evaldas; Laiskonis, Alvydas; Mickiene, Aukse

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a clinical case of late diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis and cytomegalovirus retinitis of right eye in a 32-year-old patient who was unaware of her HIV status. In addition, this article reviews the literature reflecting clinical, diagnostic, and treatment issues of some opportunistic infections in AIDS.

  13. Laryngeal cancer in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shushan, S; Cinamon, U; Levy, D; Sokolov, M; Roth, Y

    2009-08-01

    With improved survival, more AIDS patients, especially heavy smokers and alcohol abusers, may be confronted with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Since curative treatment may require aggressive combined therapy, these patients, often suffering from immunosupression and poor general condition, present unique therapeutic challenges. The objective of the study was to describe treatment dilemmas. This case report presents a detailed description of an AIDS patient with carcinoma of the larynx. A patient with T3N0M0 laryngeal carcinoma and AIDS underwent tracheotomy and biopsy, followed by severe neck and pulmonary infection. After convalescence, radiotherapy was administered, with no evidence of a disease during a 3.5-year follow-up. During his remaining life, the patient developed severe psychoaffective disorder, his immune state deteriorated until he demised from sepsis. In conclusion, patients with HIV infection, especially having a history of tobacco or alcohol abuse, should be carefully examined for head and neck carcinoma that is likely to be more aggressive. Following surgery, AIDS patients may have worse wound healing and a greater tendency to contract infections. Radiotherapy and especially chemotherapy may cause life-threatening complications. Although early detection may increase survival, curative treatment should involve many disciplines and extra caution.

  14. [Bacterial pneumonia in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Flix, S; Castella, J; Puzo, C; Ausina, V; Rodo, M; Mayos, M; Cornudella, R

    1992-04-01

    Sixty five patients with AIDS and clinical and/or radiological evidence of pulmonary infection underwent 78 bronchofibroscopies (BF) with protected brushing and bronchoalveolar washing-out. Out of the 78 BF, bacterial infection was diagnosed in 30 cases and associated opportunistic infection in 12 cases. The 18 cases of exclusively bacterial infection accounted for 23% of the total and most of them were due by H. influenzae and pneumococcus. Just in one patient, the thoracic radiography showed a localized infiltration. Given the high incidence of bacterial infections observed, along with the relevance of myxoid infections (opportunistic and pyogenic bacteria) and the low specificity of the thoracic radiography, bronchoalveolar washing-out and protected brushing in the same BF is a recommended practice.

  15. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  16. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED MYCOSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    laboratory- acquired mycoses . Insofar as possible, the etiological fungus, type of laboratory, classification of personnel, type of work conducted, and other...pertinent data have been listed in this study. More than 288 laboratory- acquired mycoses are described here, including 108 cases of

  17. Prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological impairment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients across pre- and post-highly active antiretroviral therapy eras: a combined study of two cohorts.

    PubMed

    Cysique, Lucette A; Maruff, Paul; Brew, Bruce J

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological impairment in cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals across pre- and post-HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) eras. Two cohorts of HIV-infected individuals attending tertiary referral hospital outpatient clinics were studied. The cohorts represented two eras of antiretroviral medication: monotherapy (n = 51) and HAART (n = 90). Each was compared in nine neuropsychological domains in regard to the prevalence as well as pattern of neuropsychological impairment. Because the authors intended to characterize the prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological deficits in nondemented advanced HIV-infected individuals, patients with a current diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex were not included. The prevalence of impairment was not significantly different across pre-HAART and HAART eras using a standard criterion to define impairment: -2 SD in two neuropsychological measures (41.1%/38.8%). Prevalence of deficits was not significantly reduced in patients with undetectable plasma viral load. The pattern of neuropsychological impairment was different across pre-HAART and HAART eras, with an improvement in attention, verbal fluency, visuoconstruction deficits, but a deterioration in learning efficiency and complex attention. This change remained even in patients with an undetectable plasma viral load, although the severity was partially diminished. Neuropsychological deficits remain common in the HAART era, essentially uninfluenced by HAART. The finding that some neuropsychological functions are improving while other are deteriorating indicates that these deficits do not reflect "burnt out" damage but rather that there is an active intracerebral process occurring, the nature of which is still to be determined.

  18. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma: 1. Course during the 20 years of the epidemic. 2. The experience at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán: 1986-2003].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, E Gabriela; Gómez-Roel, Xóchitl; Villasís-Keever, Angelina

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this presentation is the description of the epidemiologic evolution and changes in natural history of the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) epidemic itself and its relation with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma (ARL). We have started with the description of the world's state of the HIV epidemic, its features since the first case report in the United States of America in 1981, through the peak of new diagnoses in 1993 until the event that changed the natural history of the disease: the era of the widespread use of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), introduced in 1995 in the world and in 1997 in our country. The widespread introduction of HAART led to dramatic reductions in AIDS related mortality and morbidity throughout the developed world with a marked fall in the incidence of the major opportunistic infections in AIDS. We describe the main risk factors for the development of ARL, and the prognostic factors for survival and response to treatment. There is no clear definition in the literature of the roll that has played the use of HAART in relation to survival and response to treatment in ARL, but there is evidence that the basal count of CD4 cells has increased with HAART, leading to a better survival and response in ARL. The debate regarding this issue is surely affected by factors such as degree of antiretroviral treatment compliance, antiretroviral therapy resistance and chemotherapy heterogeneity. Finally we present the preliminary results of the analysis of our experience in ARL from 1986 to 2003.

  19. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  20. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2016-09-29

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  1. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  2. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  4. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  5. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  6. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  7. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  8. Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajeev Kumar; Zi-rong, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Ocean, which is called the ‘mother of origin of life’, is also the source of structurally unique natural products that are mainly accumulated in living organisms. Several of these compounds show pharmacological activities and are helpful for the invention and discovery of bioactive compounds, primarily for deadly diseases like cancer, acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), arthritis, etc., while other compounds have been developed as analgesics or to treat inflammation, etc. The life-saving drugs are mainly found abundantly in microorganisms, algae and invertebrates, while they are scarce in vertebrates. Modern technologies have opened vast areas of research for the extraction of biomedical compounds from oceans and seas.

  9. Poverty of opportunity forcing women into prostitution--a qualitative study in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohsin Saeed; Johansson, Eva; Zaman, Shakila; Unemo, Magnus; Rahat, Naveed I; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2010-04-01

    Our aim for this study was to explore the factors influencing women to initiate and continue as sex workers and to explore their perceptions about human immuno deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and health seeking behavior. We conducted a qualitative study based on interviews with 20 purposively selected women selling sex. Content analysis of data resulted in identification of one main theme: "Poverty of opportunity forcing women into prostitution." The identified driving forces behind women resorting to sell sex were poverty, materialism, and the desire to move up in society. They continued to sell sex due to poverty of opportunity and influencing social factors.

  10. Role of Achara Rasayana and Sadvrta in the Prevention of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, R. K.; Dave, K. J.; Dave, S K

    2001-01-01

    Acquired Immuno Deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as a real threat for mankind since last decade. Lack of knowledge and awareness about AIDS is an important factor responsible for rte rapid spread of the disease. Ayurveda as a part of its holistic approach offers the concepts of Achara Rasayana and sadvrta i.e good conduct for the self and for society. Such concepts can prevent the disease which are basically caused by Prajnaparadha which also appears responsible for the spread of AIDS. PMID:22557014

  11. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  12. Orthostatic intolerance in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tramontozzi, Louis A; Russell, James A

    2012-09-01

    We report a patient with orthostatic intolerance and syncope as a major clinical manifestation of an acquired multifocal neuropathy with the clinical, electrodiagnostic, and cerebrospinal fluid features of multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy or the Lewis-Sumner syndrome. Immunomodulatory therapy led to clinical remission of both somatic and autonomic signs and symptoms. We are unaware of a previous description of symptomatic dysautonomia in this disorder.

  13. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  14. Common acquired causes of thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Jaszianne; Carpenter, Shannon L

    2013-08-01

    Compared to adults, venous thromboembolism in the pediatric population is a rare event. Cancer, cardiac disease, antiphospholipid antibodies, and indwelling catheters are established risk factors for thromboembolism in children. We examined the literature related to thrombophilia in children, childhood cancer and thrombosis, cardiac disease and thrombosis, and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in children. Citations in identified articles yielded additional articles for review. We found that studies of acquired thrombophilia in children are limited. Current treatment for thromboembolism in children is based on adult data therefore optimal treatment in this population remains unclear.

  15. T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeger, Robert C.; Stiehm, E. Richard

    1975-01-01

    Reviewed are diagnostic tests of symphocyte subgroups which identify immuno deficiency disorders (such as DiGeorge's Syndrome) and malignant cells in lymphoproliferative disorders (such as lumphoid leukemia). (CL)

  16. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  17. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  18. Acquired Hypertrichosis Lanuginosa: Typical Presentation and Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Vujović, Svetlana; Dujmović, Irena; Basta, Ivana; Ivović, Miomira; Marina, Ljiljana V; Djordjević, Predrag B; Micić, Dragan

    2015-07-01

    Paraneoplastic syndrome might be the first clinical manifestation of malignancy. We present a menopausal female with the acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa (AHL) as an initial clinical presentation of rectal adenocarcinoma, unusually associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

  19. Acquired myasthenia gravis associated with oral sarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin; Legendre, Loïc; Watson, Shelby

    2011-01-01

    Acquired myasthenia gravis is a common neuromuscular disorder resulting from autoantibody directed against the post-synaptic acetylcholine nicotinic receptors in skeletal muscle. Myasthenia gravis has been reported previously as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This case report presents myasthenia gravis secondary to an oral sarcoma in a juvenile Mastiffdog.

  20. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  1. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  2. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  3. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  4. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  5. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  6. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ramakant S; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Hosmani, Jagadish V

    2012-01-01

    Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is a rare acquired disorder characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia in adults. They appear as macular lesions less than 5 mm in diameter. Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is considered to be a benign disease with no systemic manifestation or malignant potential. Therefore, it is important to rule out other mucocutaneous pigmentary disorders that do require medical management. Prompt clinical recognition also averts the need for excessive and invasive procedures and treatments. In India, the reported cases of this syndrome are very few. We provide a review of literature on Laugier–Hunziker syndrome with its differential diagnosis. PMID:22923898

  7. The Disuse Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortz II, Walter M.

    1984-01-01

    Our cultural sedentariness, recently acquired, lies at the base of much human ill-being. Physical inactivity predictably leads to deterioration of many body functions. A number of these effects coexist so frequently in our society that they merit inclusion in a specific syndrome, the disuse syndrome. The identifying characteristics of the syndrome are cardiovascular vulnerability, obesity, musculoskeletal fragility, depression and premature aging. The syndrome is experimentally reproducible and, significantly, the clinical features are subject to both preventive and restitutive efforts that happily are cheap, safe, accessible and effective. PMID:6516349

  8. Translocations (5; 17) and (7; 17) in patients with de novo or therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. A possible association with acquired pseudo-Pelger-Hut anomaly and small vacuolated granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    La, J.L.Z.; Zandecki, M.; Fenaux, P.; Le Baron, F.; Bauters, F.; Cosson, A.; Deminatti, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Twelve patients (two with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), four with secondary MDS, five with de novo acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), one with secondary ANLL) showed a 17p deletion resulting from translocations involving 17p: t(5;17)(p11;p11) in four cases, t(7;17)(p11;p11) in six cases, complex (5;17)(q23;p12) translocation with dicentric chromosome in one case, and t(17; )(p11-12; ) in the remaining patient. All these structural anomalies were observed in hypodiploid clones associated with total or partial monosomy of chromosomes 5 and 7 (12 cases), monosomy 12 (five cases), monosomy 3 (four cases), and monosomy 4 (three cases). Median survival was only 3.3 months (range 3 days to 8 months). Striking features were observed in bone marrow mature granulocytes: all but one case had a pseudo-Pelger-Hut anomaly in a significant number of granulocytes, and eight patients had granulocytes with reduced size and clear cytoplasmic vacuoles. Careful cytological review of 51 patients with MDS or ANLL and various cytogenetic anomalies was performed for comparison: vacuolated granulocytes were a very uncommon finding. On the other hand, eight patients had a pseudo-Pelger-Hut anomaly, which correlated significantly with total monosomy 17 in these patients. A possible correlation between cytological anomalies and cytogenetic data is discussed, and the role of 17p in the nuclear segmentation of granulocytes is stressed.

  9. Eight-year observation and comparative study of specific pathogen-free cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) subtypes A and B: terminal acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in a cat infected with FIV petaluma strain.

    PubMed

    Kohmoto, M; Uetsuka, K; Ikeda, Y; Inoshima, Y; Shimojima, M; Sato, E; Inada, G; Toyosaki, T; Miyazawa, T; Doi, K; Mikami, T

    1998-03-01

    Three specific pathogen-free cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) strains Petaluma, TM1 and TM2, respectively were observed for over 8 years. Without showing any significant clinical signs of immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for 8 years and 4 months of asymptomatic phase, the Petaluma-infected cat exhibited severe stomatitis/gingivitis, anorexia, emaciation, hematological and immunological disorders such as severe anemia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, and decrease of CD4/CD8 ratio to 0.075, and finally died with hemoperitoneum at 8 years and 8 months post-infection. Histopathological studies revealed that the cat had systemic lymphoid atrophy and bone marrow disorders indicating acute myelocytic leukemia (aleukemic type). Plasma viral titer of the cat at AIDS phase was considerably high and anti-FIV antibody titer was slightly low as compared with the other FIV-infected cats. In addition, immunoblotting analysis using serially collected serum/plasma samples of these cats revealed that antibodies against FIV proteins were induced in all the infected cats, however in the Petaluma-infected cat anti-Gag antibodies disappeared during the asymptomatic period. These results suggested that plasma viral load and anti-FIV Gag antibody response correlated with disease progression, and supported FIV-infected cats as a suitable animal model of human AIDS.

  10. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrian; Podlipnik, Sebastian; Burgos, Fernando; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Cogolludo, Eva; Gallego-Valdes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer's disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth. PMID:27073702

  11. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Horn, J; Hermans, G

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is most often seen in surviving critically ill patients with sepsis or extensive inflammatory response which results in increased duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. Patients with ICUAW often do not fully recover and the disability will seriously impact on their quality of life. In this chapter we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology and risk factors of ICUAW. Tools to diagnose ICUAW, how to separate ICUAW from other disorders, and which possible treatment strategies can be employed are also described. ICUAW is finally receiving the attention it deserves and the expectation is that it can be better understood and prevented.

  12. Severe acquired anaemia in Africa: new concepts.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, Michael B; Jonker, Femkje; Bates, Imelda

    2011-09-01

    Severe anaemia is common in Africa. It has a high mortality and particularly affects young children and pregnant women. Recent research provides new insights into the mechanisms and causes of severe acquired anaemia and overturns accepted dogma. Deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin A, but not of iron or folic acid, are associated with severe anaemia. Bacterial infections and, in very young children, hookworm infections are also common in severe anaemia. Irrespective of the aetiology, the mechanism causing severe anaemia is often red cell production failure. Severe anaemia in Africa is therefore a complex multi-factorial syndrome, which, even in an individual patient, is unlikely to be amenable to a single intervention. Policies and practices concerning anaemia diagnosis, treatment and prevention need to be substantially revised if we are to make a significant impact on the huge burden of severe anaemia in Africa.

  13. Acute periostitis in early acquired syphilis simulating shin splints in a jogger.

    PubMed

    Meier, J L; Mollet, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute periostitis affecting the long bones is a characteristic but uncommon manifestation of syphilis in the adult with an early acquired infection. This report describes the history of a jogger who developed acute localized periostitis of the shaft of both tibiae during the early stage of acquired syphilis. Symptomatology was initially attributed to the medial tibial stress syndrome.

  14. Epidemiology of human immuno-deficiency virus and quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS in China.

    PubMed

    Mkangara, Ommari Baaliy; Nie, Shaofa; Wang, Chongjian; Xu, Yihua; Mweri, Saumu Tobbi; Kobelo, Theresia M; Bapumiia, Mustaafa

    2008-04-01

    HIV/AIDS is increasing in prevalence in China and spread of infection from highly risk populations to the general populations was recognized. Despite the fact, there are still only few scientific reviews on quality of life (QOL) for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). However, many PLWHAs are struggling with social and psychological influences such as substances abuse, cultural beliefs, depression, stigma, poverty, which can affect their QOL. Public unawareness about infection and disease, willingness to seek medical care and motivation to follow therapy are indirectly influencing health outcome. In 2003 Chinese government has established the so-called the "Four Frees and One Care" policy. The policy was officially implemented from 2004 in some areas, yet to date it is not implemented nationwide. This paper discussed the epidemiology of HIV, underlying psychosocial factors affecting PLWHAs and their impact on QOL. We put forward some recommendations for stakeholders, advocacy groups, non-government organizations and Chinese government.

  15. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries.

  16. Recurrent stroke as a presenting feature of acquired partial lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Namburi R.; Reddy, Ponnala A.; Menon, Bindu; Karthik, T. S.; Ahmed, Faizal; Chakravarthy, Mithun

    2012-01-01

    Acquired partial lipodystrophy (PL) (Barraquer–Simons syndrome) is a rare condition with onset in childhood, and it is characterized by progressive loss of subcutaneous fat in a cephalocaudal fashion. This report describes a case of acquired PL in a 16-year-old girl, who had progressive loss of facial fat since 3 years. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anticardiolipin antibody, primary hypothyroidism, diabetes, and dyslipidemia may antedate the development of complications such as cerebrovascular stroke and cardiovascular disease. The girl had developed recurrent left hemiparesis, and withdrawn from school due to poor performance. PMID:23565465

  17. The clinical characteristics of 80 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated Kaposi’s sarcoma in Xinjiang Autonomous Region and the effect of different treatments on the prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tongtong; He, Li; Wan, Xuefeng; Maimaitiaili, Wubuli; Song, Yuxia; Zhang, Yuexin; Lu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the clinical features of AIDS-related Kaposi’s sarcoma (AIDS-KS) patients in Xinjiang Autonomous Region and the impact of CD4 +T lymphocyte count, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and systemic chemotherapy on the prognosis. The clinical information of 80 AIDS-KS patients admitted in Sixth People’s Hospital of Xinjiang Autonomous Region from January 2008 to August 2014 was retrospectively reviewed. Population characteristics, extent of lesions, KS progress, CD4 +T lymphocyte count, combined opportunistic infections, treatment and prognosis of these patients were analyzed. The 80 patients were divided into five groups according to treatment methods, including HAART, HAART + chemotherapy, chemotherapy + HAART, chemotherapy, and untreated groups. The efficacy and prognosis of the five groups were compared. Among the 80 patients, 74 (92.50%) patients were Uygur. The average age was 39.5±9.9 years and male-to-female ratio was 3:1. The median of baseline CD4 +T lymphocyte count was 152.5 cells/μL and the interquartile was 233.25 cells/μL. CD4 +T lymphocyte counts were significantly increased after treatment in HAART, HAART + chemotherapy, and chemotherapy + HAART groups (P < 0.05). CD4 +T lymphocyte count in chemotherapy groups was significantly reduced after treatment (P < 0.05). The untreated group had the highest mortality rate (33.3%). In HAART group, KS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory response syndrome (KS-IRIS) appeared in 45.5% cases and 2 death cases were caused by KS-IRIS. In Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the incidence of AIDS-KS is high in young Uygur male people. HAART followed by chemotherapy has ideal efficacy, reduces the incidence of KS-IRIS and improves the prognosis. PMID:26770484

  18. Acquired and congenital coronary artery abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Young, Ming-Lon; McLeary, Michael; Chan, Kak-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in approximately 20% of young athletes are due to acquired or congenital coronary artery abnormalities. Kawasaki disease is the leading cause for acquired coronary artery abnormalities, which can cause late coronary artery sequelae including aneurysms, stenosis, and thrombosis, leading to myocardial ischaemia and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery can develop adequate collateral circulation from the right coronary artery in the newborn period, which remains asymptomatic only to manifest in adulthood with myocardial ischaemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Anomalous origin of coronary artery from the opposite sinus occurs in 0.7% of the young general population aged between 11 and 15 years. If the anomalous coronary artery courses between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, sudden cardiac death may occur during or shortly after vigorous exercise, especially in patients where the anomalous left coronary artery originates from the right sinus of Valsalva. Symptomatic patients with evidence of ischaemia should have surgical correction. No treatment is needed for asymptomatic patients with an anomalous right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. At present, there is no consensus regarding how to manage asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva and interarterial course. Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in cardiac catheterisation and it rarely causes exercise-induced coronary syndrome or cardiac death. In symptomatic patients, refractory or β-blocker treatment and surgical un-bridging may be considered.

  19. Squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma and Burkitt's lymphoma are consequences of impaired immune surveillance of ubiquitous viruses in acquired immune deficiency syndrome, allograft recipients and tropical African patients.

    PubMed

    Purtilo, D T; Manolov, G; Manolova, Y; Harada, S; Lipscomb, H

    1984-01-01

    The immune system has evolved under Darwinian pressures as a defence against ubiquitous viruses. Immune surveillance against viral antigens protects the normal host. Individuals with inherited or acquired immune-deficiency disorders can become vulnerable to ubiquitous viruses and neoplasms can ensue, such as B-cell lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, and carcinoma of the penis and uterine cervix. Immunodeficiency permits Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus, papillomavirus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus to induce sustained target-cell proliferation. Each virus selects specific cellular targets bearing viral receptors and the infection leads to proliferation of the target cells rather than lysis. Various co-factors, including nutrition, exposure to tumour-promoting agents, parasitic infection, and ultraviolet light, may promote carcinogenesis. Depending on the type and severity of the immune deficiency, gradual proliferation may lead to evolution of a malignant clone. Conversion of polyclonal virally infected proliferating cells to give monoclonal malignancy is probably due to specific cytogenetic rearrangements which allow oncogene activation and endow an altered tumour cell with selective growth advantages over normal diploid cells. Prevention of viral oncogenesis may be possible by treatment of immune-deficient individuals with premalignant disorders. Immunotherapy and antiviral therapy may prevent progression of viral-induced proliferation to malignancy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of immune deficiency and viruses in the induction of malignancies commonly occurring in Africans residing in sub-Saharan Africa (Purtilo, 1976). The types of malignancies commonly occurring in this region are believed to be due to ubiquitous viruses. A failure of immune surveillance mechanisms to recognize viral antigens and abrogate proliferation of infected target cells predisposes to

  20. Membranous nephropathy with acquired factor V inhibitor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. In contrast, acquired factor V inhibitor is a rare bleeding disorder. Case presentation A 62-year-old Asian man with a history of cerebral hemorrhage, purpura, eosinophilia and hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome developed proteinuria. The bleeding disorder was diagnosed with acquired factor V inhibitors. A renal biopsy revealed that he suffered from membranous nephropathy with glomerular endothelial damage which is reported to be involved in another factor disorder. After the steroid administration, the coagulation test and proteinuria were improved. Conclusions The presence of factor V inhibitors may have been involved in the development of membranous nephropathy. PMID:24360027

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy.

  2. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct.

  3. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  4. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  5. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  6. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  7. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    PubMed

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  8. [Clinical cases of acquired coagulation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Hino, M; Ota, K; Akahori, M; Hirai, M; Inoue, T; Mugitani, A; Tatsumi, N

    2000-12-01

    The acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are classified into alloantibodies, which appear in association with supplementary treatment for congenital coagulation factor deficiency, and autoantibodies, which are spontaneously produced. We report here 2 cases of acquired factor VIII inhibitor and 1 case of factor V inhibitor. Case 1: A 52-year-old woman noted swelling of the right parotid region in March 1988. Though contrast examination was scheduled, she was admitted for detailed examination due to a markedly prolonged coagulation time. An APTT correction test suggested that decreased factor VIII activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. Since antinuclear antibody and SS-A antibody were positive and infiltration by lymphocytes in the salivary gland acini in a lip biopsy specimen was detected, Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed. Case 2: A 33-year-old woman had normal delivery of her second child in February 1998. In June 1998, she suffered slight contusion in the left lower limb. The affected site became swollen and painful, making walking difficult. Since both upper limbs became markedly swollen after 1 week, she visited our hospital. Prolonged APTT and a marked decrease in factor VIII activity were observed. Factor VIII inhibitor titer was high at 19 Bethesda units. Case 3: A 64-year-old man had had asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria since the beginning of August 1998 but was placed under observation since no abnormal findings were observed on various imaging tests. However, he was admitted to Osaka City General Medical Center because of vesicular tamponade. Factor V activity was markedly decreased to 1.0%. PT correction test suggested that decreased factor V activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. The underlying disease could not be determined in this case. In patients with acquired coagulation inhibitors, bleeding symptoms are reported to be mild in many cases, and severe bleeding is rare. However, cases of death without severe bleeding or

  9. Dropped head syndrome. Three case-reports.

    PubMed

    Chaouat, D; Belange, G

    1999-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome is characterized by gradual forward sagging of the head due to weakness of the neck extensor muscles. We report three cases in elderly patients seen by rheumatologists at our institution. There was some evidence suggestive of a neurogenic process, whereas most reported cases of dropped head syndrome have been ascribed to myopathy. Dropped head syndrome can probably be produced by multiple causes. The close ties between dropped head syndrome and acquired camptocormia in adults are discussed.

  10. A novel acquired cryptic three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2) with a submicroscopic deletion at 11p14.3 in an adult with hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2015-08-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease entity. It is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and organ damage after excluding other causes. Clonal eosinophilia is distinguished from idiopathic eosinophilia by the presence of histologic, cytogenetic, or molecular evidence of an underlying malignancy. There are two distinct subcategories of clonal eosinophilia: chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified and myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and mutations involving platelet-derived growth factor receptor α/β or fibroblast growth factor receptor 1. More than 50% of HES are without knowledge of underlying pathogenic molecular pathways. Here we examined a HES patient by oligo-based aCGH analysis and molecular cytogenetic methods. Examination for the common eosinophilia-related cytogenetic abnormalities involving the genes PDGFRA, PDGFRB, and FGFR1 together with BCR-ABL fusion gene was negative. Cytogenetic analysis and multi-color FISH analysis revealed a novel cryptic three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2). By oaCGH analysis we could not find any copy number changes related to the cytogenetic breakpoints but instead detected a 0.9Mb submicroscopic deletion at 11p14.3. The deleted region involved the 5'-upstream sequences and exons 1-4 of the LUZP2 gene, which encodes a leucine zipper protein. Analysis of surrogate germ-line cells revealed a normal result showing that the detected chromosomal aberrations were acquired. This is the first report on a HES patient associated with a novel complex three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2) and a submicroscopic deletion in chromosome band 11p14.3. The study also demonstrates the benefits of oligo-based aCGH analysis in detecting hidden disease related chromosomal abnormalities. The present findings provide additional clues to unravel important molecular pathways in HES to obtain the full spectrum of acquired chromosomal and

  11. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naqi, Rohana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad; Ahsan, Humera

    2010-04-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis commonly affects patients with advanced HIV immunodeficiency. Toxoplasmosis in patients who are immunocompromised can be severe and debilitating in patients with Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement and the condition may be fatal. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who was a known case of HIV and presented with cerebral toxoplasmosis. His Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan showed multiple ring enhancing lesions with extensive surrounding oedema in supratentorial as well as infratentorial region. Lesions were mainly located in the periventricular region as well as at the grey-white matter junction and showed enhancement in the periphery as well as a tiny nodular enhancement in the centre. Patient was started on Septran DS, empirically for toxoplasmosis and steroids to reduce intracranial pressure. On follow up MRI scan after 10 days there was a reduction in size, number and enhancement of the masses with decrease in the surrounding oedema. Patient was clinically stable, oriented and his fever settled. He was discharged from hospital on same medication and advised to continue regular follow-up.

  12. Extracerebral toxoplasmosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Hofman, P; Bernard, E; Michiels, J F; Thyss, A; Le Fichoux, Y; Loubière, R

    1993-09-01

    Although Toxoplasma gondii frequently causes lesions of the central nervous system in AIDS, the exact incidence of extracerebral toxoplasmosis in these immunodepressed patients remains difficult to determine. Isolation of the parasite outside the central nervous system is rarely performed ante mortem, and most diagnoses of extracerebral toxoplasmosis are made post mortem. This article describes 23 cases of extracerebral toxoplasmosis diagnosed between 1987 and 1991 in an autopsy series of 170 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Ante mortem diagnosis of extracerebral involvement was affirmed in 4 of these 23 patients by identification of trophozoites in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (2 cases), a surgical pulmonary biopsy specimen, and a bladder biopsy. Clinical and paraclinical findings suggested cardiac involvement in 4 other patients. Post mortem examination demonstrated disseminated toxoplasmosis in 18 cases and extracerebral monovisceral involvement in 5 cases. Extracerebral toxoplasmosis was directly responsible for the death of 6 patients. The most frequent extracerebral sites of Toxoplasma gondii involvement were the heart (21/23 cases; 91%), the lungs (14/23 cases; 61%) and the pancreas (6/23 cases; 26%). The tissular consequences of toxoplasmic involvement varied considerably, from formation of pseudocysts or cysts without any surrounding inflammatory reaction to necrotic lesions rich in neutrophilic polynuclear cells containing numerous free parasites. Immunoperoxidase study using antitoxoplasmic antibodies contributed to the diagnosis of 8 extracerebral localizations. Electron microscopy examination of a surgical lung biopsy and myocardial specimens (2 cases) demonstrated the ultrastructural characteristics of Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. An Air Force Readiness Issue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    stages and criteria. Table 1 Walter Reed Classification System HTLV -III Chronic T Helper STAGE Antibody Lymohadenonathy Qells/mm- DHS Thrush 0.1 WR 1...400 NI - - WR 2 + + >400 NI - - WR 3 + +1-  NI - - WR 4 + +/-  P - - WR 5 + +/-  P/C +/- - WR 6 + +/-  P/C +/- + HTLV -1II ANTIBODY...is defined as the presence of antibody to the structural proteins of HTLV -11l as determined by Western Blot techniques. HTLV -1II virus isolation also

  14. Aphthous vaginal ulceration in two women with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schuman, P; Christensen, C; Sobel, J D

    1996-05-01

    Two women with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection are described who were seen with painful aphthous vaginal ulceration and CD4+ lymphocyte counts < 50 cells/mm3. A chronic rectovaginal fistula developed in one patient. In spite of extensive investigation no underlying cause of the ulceration was discovered. Clinical therapeutic response suggests that corticosteroid therapy may be of value in healing or stabilizing the destructive process. Clinicians should be aware of this complication in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with severe vaginal pain and unexplained discharge.

  15. Degos disease in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Requena, L; Fariña, C; Barat, A

    1998-05-01

    Malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare disorder characterized by pathognomonic cutaneous lesions that consist of infarctive thrombosis. Visceral involvement often occurs; the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system are most frequently involved. Malignant atrophic papulosis has not been previously described in an AIDS patient. We describe a 58-year-old homosexual man with AIDS who developed typical cutaneous lesions of malignant atrophic papulosis. No visceral involvement has been detected in 2 years.

  16. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome. A perspective for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sherertz, R J

    1985-07-01

    AIDS is a new disease process with complications and management problems unlike anything ever seen before. An attempt has been made to summarize the available information about its various clinical presentations and how to manage them. Subjects covered will include associated malignancies, infections, transmissibility, prodromal states, and infection control issues.

  17. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hypotheses on the etiology.

    PubMed

    Kelly, T A

    1984-08-01

    AIDS could be caused by a mutant hepatitis B virus or even a prion-like agent. Hepatitis B, as a retro-like virus, might induce cancerous cells, which, like other malignant cells, could produce substances that inhibit macrophages and their activation of T-cells. Hepatitis B, by reverse transcription, might become a provirus in or adjacent to the Ir gene of the major histocompatibility locus (MHC) altering the Ia antigen on macrophages and inhibiting the immune response. A prion could by reverse translation produce a similar effect on the Ir gene or by protein----protein replication create new antigenic proteins which could confuse immune signals from the macrophages to T-cells; create enzymes modifying existing antigenic determinants; and create proteins not recognized as "self" that could initiate a frank, but subtle autoimmune phenomenon. Any one, or an interaction of these events, could create a "negative autoimmunity": the immune system would attack itself.

  18. Systemic sarcocystosis in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Di Risio, Cecilia; Etchart, Cristina B; Chertcoff, Agustín V; Mendez, Nora; Cabrera, Marta G; Labbé, Jorge H; Carnevale, Silvana

    2008-08-01

    Sarcocystis sp is a tissue coccidian parasite in humans that causes intestinal and muscular sarcocystosis in immunocompetent patients. Intestinal sarcocystosis can be diagnosed at the tissue level in the lamina propria of the small bowel and by fecal examination. Muscular sarcocystosis is diagnosed by microscopic examination of muscle biopsies. This report describes a case of systemic sarcocystosis in an HIV-infected patient. We studied a 31-year-old patient with AIDS, chronic diarrhea, cholestatic hepatitis, and musculoskeletal pain by stool analysis and endoscopy with duodenal and liver biopsy specimens that were processed for routine histology. The microgamete and macrogamete stages of Sarcocystis sp were present in the lamina propria, with sporulated oocysts in feces. Schizont stages of the protozoa were found in liver biopsy. In summary, sarcocystosis should be considered another opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients.

  19. AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) and Employment Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    Protozoal and helminthic infections 1. Cryptosporidiosis 2. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (most common disease in AIDS victims) 3. Strongyloidosis 4...diagnosed with either a rare opportunistic infection (01), or cancer2 typically occurring only in individuals with severely compromised immune systems...disorder of the human immune system leading to enhanced susceptibility to particular opportunistic infections and certain cancers.5 In the immune

  20. An ongoing tragedy: the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Desai, B T

    1989-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has, to date, had only a minimal impact in India; however, given the low health status of the population and the lack of adequate health care facilities, the emergence of AIDS on a wider scale would be devastating. India's human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity rate now stands at about 2-3/1000 people tested. In what is suspected to be a racially motivated move, the Government of India has embarked on testing all foreign students (most of whom are from Africa) for HIV and is returning all those who test seropositive to their countries of origin. Of concern is the steady increase in HIV infection in professional blood donors (1.5/1000 in late 1988). Mandatory screening of donated blood is prohibitively expensive in India, and none of the 9 companies that manufacture blood products in India test their donors for HIV infection. Another concern is the finding that 1 of every 6 prostitutes in Bombay is infected with HIV. The response of the Indian Government to the AIDS threat has tended to be punitive toward AIDS victims rather than based on a sound preventive strategy. For example, the 1989 AIDS Prevention Bill forces individuals who are infected with HIV to reveal their past sexual partners, empowers authorities to hospitalize AIDS victims and drug addicts, and contains no provisions to protect the human and civil rights of AIDS victims. The mass media have treated AIDS in a sensationalized manner rather than presenting scientific information about the prevention and transmission of the disease. It is essential that the Government of India--and all world governments--realize that punitive measures will do little to reduce the spread of AIDS. Needed, instead, is a global prevention and control effort based on generosity and compassion.

  1. [Primary hepatic lymphoma in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, V; Causo, T; Fabietti, P; Bellagamba, R; Berardelli, G; Cirelli, A; Catania, S

    1992-02-01

    In this study the authors describe a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma histologically typed "large non-cleaved cell immunophenotype B cell", placed primitively into the liver. It affected a woman twenty seven years old, who contracted HIV infection due to heterosexual intercourse with at risk partner. At the time of diagnosis the woman was already considered AIDS patient on account of a previous Pneumocystis carinii pneumoniae and severe immunodeficiency (DC4 = 13 cells/mm3). The patient received cycles of chemotherapy (adriamycin 40 mg/iv, teniposide 50 mg/iv, cyclophosphamide 500 mg/iv, vincristine 2 mg/iv, bleomycin 15 mg/iv, betamethasone 4 mg/iv). At the 15th day of therapeutic cycle vincristine 2 mg/iv, bleomycin 15 mg/iv and betamethasone 4 mg/iv were given. After one cycle of therapy, hepatic echography showed signs that the lymphoma was reduced significantly. The authors stress the uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphoma localization, which is frequently underestimated in HIV-patients.

  2. [Disseminated histoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pérez, C; Pérez, J; Oddó, D; Labarca, J; Guzmán, S; Acuña, G; León, E D

    1993-01-01

    A twenty nine year old male homosexual presented with malaise, weight loss, fever and profuse sweating. An ill defined abdominal mass was found during physical examination in the right lower quadrant and chest X rays disclosed a pleural effusion. HIV antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen were positive and immunological parameters were altered. Light and electron microscopic examination of operative biopsies of the abdominal mass revealed the presence of Histoplasma capsulatum. Treatment with Amphotericin B was started with a favorable response and the patient was discharged. He was readmitted with a septic shock and died. Necropsy showed pulmonary histoplasmosis. This is the first case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS described in Chile.

  3. [Chagas disease with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Labarca, J; Acuña, G; Saavedra, H; Oddó, D; Sepúlveda, C; Ballesteros, J; Alvarez, M

    1992-02-01

    We report 2 patients with AIDS who developed Chagas infection, one with encephalitis, the other with acute myocarditis. The implications of immune depression for the manifestations and course of Chagas disease are discussed. Chagas disease should be considered in patients with AIDS who live in endemic zones and who develop cerebral or cardiac manifestations.

  4. [Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oddó, D; Thompson, L; Castrillón, M; Sepúlveda, C; Zamboni, R; Arriagada, P

    1993-09-01

    We report a 28 year old heterosexual male with AIDS that presented with progressive motor disturbances and malaise. Light and transmission electron microscopy of a stereotaxic brain biopsy demonstrated a progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This is a demyelinating infectious cerebral disease attributed to JC virus and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system disturbances in AIDS patients.

  5. Nutrition in the management of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thuita, F M; Mirie, W

    1999-09-01

    The role of nutrition in the management of HIV infection and AIDS is now widely recognized. To highlight the influence of nutrition on the progress of HIV/AIDS and the role and importance of good nutrition in the management of the disease, literature selected from local and international scientific books and journals on the subject of nutrition and HIV/AIDS were reviewed and synthesized in this article. As an intervention, it should begin in the early stages of HIV infection and should include nutrition counseling, and in the later stages of the disease, using more advanced nutrition support methods including enteral and parenteral support. These would enable HIV/AIDS patients to achieve an adequate nutrient intake and energy for as long as possible, thus enhancing the quality of their lives and minimizing the symptoms of the disease.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis.

  7. Transfusion-acquired AIDS in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yao, C; Wang, W W; Chung, Y M; Su, Y L; Liu, C Y; Chen, Y M

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be transmitted through blood transfusion. The first transfusion-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient in Taiwan was a 46-year-old woman who received two units of whole blood during a hysterectomy at a provincial hospital in 1985. In 1991, she experienced a herpes zoster infection. In March 1993, she had extensive herpetic gingivostomatitis and another herpes zoster attack, and was treated at the same hospital. Two months later, she had oral candidiasis and was treated at a medical center. She was not tested for HIV-1 infection until she developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in June 1993. In February 1994, and developed cytomegalovirus retinitis and died 6 months later. Donor blood given to the patients during the hysterectomy was HIV-1 positive. The donor's HIV infection was discovered in 1991 and he died of AIDS in 1993. As blood centers in Taiwan did not start screening for HIV-1 until January 1988, it is urgently recommended that any individual who received a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 in Taiwan and who currently experiences repeated episodes of opportunistic infections have an HIV-1 blood test. The receipt of a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 should be listed by the Department of Health as an indication for HIV-1 screening.

  8. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  9. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lalosevic, Jovan; Zivanovic, Dubravka; Skiljevic, Dusan; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare, acquired disorder characterized by lenticular hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia. We present the case of a 63-year-old female with progressive, asymptomatic hyperpigmentation of buccal mucosa and a 7-year history of hyperpigmentation in several fingernails. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical features presented, dermoscopic findings and exclusion of underlying systemic diseases. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is regarded as a diagnosis of exclusion. By identifying Laugier-Hunziker syndrome, other, more severe syndromes associated with hyperpigmentations can be excluded, namely Addison’s disease and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:26312723

  10. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  11. [Syndromes 2. Pfeiffer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Freihofer, H P

    1998-07-01

    Acrocephalosyndactylias are syndromes characterized by abnormalities of the head (craniosynostosis), the face (hypertelorism, retromaxillism), hands and feet (cutaneous or bony syndactyly). Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but spontaneous cases are described also. The group is divided into several syndromes with varying penetrance and expressivity. As an example of an acrocephalosyndactylia is the Pfeiffer syndrome presented.

  12. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  13. Low vision due to cerebral visual impairment: differentiating between acquired and genetic causes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To gain more insight into genetic causes of cerebral visual impairment (CVI) in children and to compare ophthalmological findings between genetic and acquired forms of CVI. Methods The clinical data of 309 individuals (mainly children) with CVI, and a visual acuity ≤0.3 were analyzed for etiology and ocular variables. A differentiation was made between acquired and genetic causes. However, in persons with West syndrome or hydrocephalus, it might be impossible to unravel whether CVI is caused by the seizure disorder or increased intracranial pressure or by the underlying disorder (that in itself can be acquired or genetic). In two subgroups, individuals with ‘purely’ acquired CVI and with ‘purely’ genetic CVI, the ocular variables (such as strabismus, pale optic disc and visual field defects) were compared. Results It was possible to identify a putative cause for CVI in 60% (184/309) of the cohort. In the remaining 40% the etiology could not be determined. A ‘purely’ acquired cause was identified in 80 of the patients (26%). West syndrome and/or hydrocephalus was identified in 21 patients (7%), and in 17 patients (6%) both an acquired cause and West and/or hydrocephalus was present. In 66 patients (21%) a genetic diagnosis was obtained, of which 38 (12%) had other possible risk factor (acquired, preterm birth, West syndrome or hydrocephalus), making differentiation between acquired and genetic not possible. In the remaining 28 patients (9%) a ‘purely’ genetic cause was identified. CVI was identified for the first time in several genetic syndromes, such as ATR-X, Mowat-Wilson, and Pitt Hopkins syndrome. In the subgroup with ‘purely’ acquired causes (N = 80) strabismus (88% versus 64%), pale optic discs (65% versus 27%) and visual field defects (72% versus 30%) could be observed more frequent than in the subgroup with ‘purely’ genetic disorders (N = 28). Conclusions We conclude that CVI can be part of a genetic syndrome and

  14. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  15. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-07

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood.

  16. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  17. Acquired myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Krotje, L J; Fix, A S; Potthoff, A D

    1990-08-15

    Acquired myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma were diagnosed in a 7-year-old English Setter referred because of forelimb lameness, exercise-induced weakness, and fever. Three months earlier, the dog had had a pleuropulmonary infection caused by a Fusobacterium sp. The concurrent development of myasthenia gravis and cholangiocellular carcinoma in this dog may be explained by a paraneoplastic syndrome, although it is unproven. The cholangiocellular carcinoma may have possessed an acetylcholine receptor-like antigen on the tumor surface, which induced autoantibodies to cross-react with acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction.

  18. Moebius Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ... children with Moebius syndrome have some degree of autism. There are four recognized categories of Moebius syndrome: ...

  19. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood.

  20. Clinical Syndromes among the Learning Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.

    1985-01-01

    Four physiological conditions associated with later learning disabilities are noted: Turner Syndrome (a chromosomal abnormality), preterm children with intracranial hemorrhage, children with incompletely developed connecting fibers between the cerebral hemispheres, and children with acquired brain injury. (CL)

  1. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  2. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  3. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  4. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  5. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  6. Acquired haemophilia in recipients of depot thioxanthenes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A J; Manson, L M; Dasani, H; Beddall, A; Collins, P; Shima, M; Ludlam, C A

    2000-11-01

    We present two cases in which the occurrence of acquired haemophilia is associated with the use of depot preparations of the thioxanthenes zuclopenthixol and flupenthixol. These drugs have not previously been implicated in the aetiology of acquired haemophilia.

  7. [Acquired amusia and musical anhedonia].

    PubMed

    Hirel, C; Lévêque, Y; Deiana, G; Richard, N; Cho, T-H; Mechtouff, L; Derex, L; Tillmann, B; Caclin, A; Nighoghossian, N

    2014-01-01

    Amusia is defined as an auditory agnosia, specifically related to music, resulting from a cerebral lesion or being of congenital origin. Amusia is rarely associated to musical anhedonia. We report the case of a 43-year-old patient who suffered in January 2012 from a right ischemic lesion affecting the superior temporal cortex, in particular lateral Heschl Gyrus and the posterior part of the Superior Temporal Gyrus (Brodmann areas 21 and 22). Neuropsychological tests revealed an amusia combined to musical anhedonia. The specificity of this case is based on the combination of both syndromes highlighting the relation between neural networks involved in the processing of musical information in both its perceptual and emotional components.

  8. Acquiring Evolving Technologies: Web Services Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards Harry L. Levinson Software Engineering Institute Carnegie...Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards © 2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring

  9. Corticomotoneuronal function and hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Yiannikas, Con; Vincent, Angela; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    Acquired neuromyotonia encompasses a group of inflammatory disorders characterized by symptoms reflecting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, which may be clinically confused in the early stages with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite a clear peripheral nerve focus, it remains unclear whether the ectopic activity in acquired neuromyotonia receives a central contribution. To clarify whether cortical hyperexcitability contributes to development of clinical features of acquired neuromyotonia, the present study investigated whether threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation could detect cortical hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia, and whether this technique could differentiate acquired neuromyotonia from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken in 18 patients with acquired neuromyotonia and 104 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with results compared to 62 normal controls. Short-interval intracortical inhibition in patients with acquired neuromyotonia was significantly different when compared to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (averaged short interval intracortical inhibition acquired neuromyotonia 11.3 +/- 1.9%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2.6 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.001). In addition, the motor evoked potential amplitudes (acquired neuromyotonia 21.0 +/- 3.1%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 38.1 +/- 2.2%, P < 0.0001), intracortical facilitation (acquired neuromyotonia -0.9 +/- 1.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -2.3 +/- 0.6%, P < 0.0001), resting motor thresholds (acquired neuromyotonia 62.2 +/- 1.6%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 57.2 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05) and cortical silent period durations (acquired neuromyotonia 212.8 +/- 6.9 ms; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 181.1 +/- 4.3 ms, P < 0.0001) were significantly different between patients with acquired neuromyotonia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation established corticomotoneuronal integrity

  10. Parry-Romberg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Hasan; Yologlu, Zeynel; Sargın, Husamettin; Metin, Melike Rusen

    2015-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome is an acquired, slowly progressive disorder, occurring more in women, primarily affecting one side of the face, mainly characterized by unilateral atrophy, and loss of skin and subcutaneous tissues of face, muscles, and bones. Ocular and neurologic involvements are common. The possible etiology is unclear without any known cure. We report a rare case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with classical features. The clinical features, radiological imaging findings, differential diagnosis, and available treatment options are discussed in this report. PMID:26492117

  11. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  12. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  13. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  14. Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  15. Dressler's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome may also be called postpericardiotomy syndrome, post-myocardial infarction syndrome and post-cardiac injury syndrome. With recent ... Dressler's syndrome. References LeWinter MM. Pericardial complications of myocardial infarction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 27, ...

  16. Clinical recognition of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Philippart, M

    1986-01-01

    Key manifestations helpful in diagnosing Rett syndrome include progressive loss of previously acquired psychomotor skills, apraxia with loss of use of hands and legs, and "handwashing" automatisms. Four types of clinical presentation can be described: a neurodegenerative disorder, an autistic syndrome, a Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and a chronic encephalopathy. Carbamazepine currently appears to be the anticonvulsant of choice. The mild lactic and pyruvic acidosis along with the ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria in brain and liver biopsies point to a generalized disorder of energy metabolism.

  17. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome.

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, polycystic ovary syndrome can cause menstrual disturbances, weight gain beginning in adolescence, excess hair growth, and impaired insulin action and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome-a combination of ...

  19. The impact of drug-related deaths on mortality among young adults in Madrid.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Bravo, M J; Santacreu, J

    1995-01-01

    The trend from 1983 to 1990 of drug-related mortality (defined as the sum of deaths from acute drug reactions and the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome [AIDS] in drug users) among the population 15 to 39 years of age in Madrid, Spain, was studied and compared with mortality from all causes. All of the mortality rates increased from 1983 to 1990: all causes, from 101/100,000 to 148/100,000; acute drug reactions, from 3/100,000 to 15/100,000; and AIDS, from 0 to 20/100,000. Drug-related mortality represented 60% of the increase in the rate from all causes in males and 170% of the increase in females. The increases in drug-related mortality are likely to continue in the future. PMID:7832243

  20. Homosexuality: a dilemma in discourse!

    PubMed

    Gulia, K K; Mallick, H N

    2010-01-01

    Homosexuality has been in practice even prior to its recorded history. In the Indian cultural context, discourse on sexuality had never gained an agreeable consensus from any platform. However, in the recent past, efforts were made by governmental and nongovernmental organizations to bring sex-related issues to the masses after speculation on presumably the fast spread of AIDS (acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome) particularly through illegal homosexual activities. Nevertheless, strong cultural and religious ideologies discouraged any valid discussions on homosexuality. In light of the given scenario, the present essay aimed to highlight several aspects of homosexuality that include a brief history, biological basis, effect of nature versus nurture, evolutionary perspective and related issues concerning general well-being and health.

  1. A new approach to the etiopathogenesis of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Scaro, J L

    1993-10-01

    This hypothesis proposes as an explanation for the origin of the Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), the homosexual transmission of spermatozoons. The male gamete may possess a depressing action on the immuno-competence of the egg aimed to prevent the rejection of the spermatozoon material. The female organism may be able to inactivate this action, an ability that might be absent in the male organism. As a consequence of the loss of its immunological competence, the body is invaded by a variety of microorganisms, among which certain elemental classes of viruses would strive successfully for long periods of time. Their permanence in the depressed organism would enable them to overcome the immune barriers present in normal subjects, becoming thus, transmissible and in some cases even pathogenic for the new host.

  2. Pulmonary Cryptococcosis in HIV- sero-negative patients: case series from India.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shimpi; Capoor, Malini R; Mallik, Rupali; Gupta, Sonal; Ray, Animesh; Khanna, Geetika; Suri, J C; Bhattacharya, D; Raghavan, Samudrala

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary cryptococcosis is likely to be misdiagnosed due to relatively non-specific clinical and radiological features. It is more frequently associated with immuno-suppressed conditions especially acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Four cases of pulmonary cryptococcosis were diagnosed over a period of eleven years. All patients in this case series were human immune-deficiency virus (HIV)-negative. The predisposing factors in these patients were diabetes mellitus (DM), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), post-partum and pregnancy in one each of the patients. Relapse was seen in two cases. All the patients survived due to strict follow-up. Pulmonary cryptococcosis is common in non-AIDS patients and it warrants rapid diagnosis, treatment and follow-up to prevent relapse.

  3. Acquiring and Managing Electronic Journals. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Donnelyn; Yue, Paoshan

    Electronic journals are both a blessing and a curse for libraries. To be meaningful in the current information environment--to meet users' ever-increasing demands--libraries must acquire as many appropriate full text resources as possible, as quickly as possible, and make them easy to use. This Digest provides tips for acquiring and providing…

  4. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Elise I; Mutasim, Diya F; Heaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) in a 56-year-old white woman. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is an exceedingly rare group of heterogeneous disorders that has been almost exclusively reported in young Japanese males. Our case is unique in that AlGA may be underrecognized in this patient population.

  5. Hereditary and Acquired Thrombophilia in Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Kotru, Mrinalini; Sazawal, Sudha; Ranjan, Ravi; Sharma, Amit; Acharya, Subrat Kumar; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize differences in the prevalence of hereditary and acquired thrombophilia in patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT). A total of 88 consecutive patients with SVT, including Budd Chiari Syndrome (n = 47) and portal extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (n = 41), underwent comprehensive thrombophilia testing, including testing for heritable and acquired causes. In 33 (37.5%) patients, etiology could be explained by at least 1 of the heritable etiologic factors, and 31 (35.2%) patients could be explained by at least 1 of the acquired causes studied. The combination of multiple concurrent factors was present in 9 (11.4%) patients. Among the heritable causes, the risk of SVT was found increased in the presence of thrombophilia resulting from the deficiencies of the naturally occurring anticoagulant proteins, and the acquired thrombogenic factors were significantly associated with causation of thrombosis in adult patients with SVT.

  6. Kawasaki Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.

    1998-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is an acute, sometimes fatal vasculitis of young children. KS has replaced acute rheumatic fever as the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in the United States. The illness is manifested by prolonged fever, conjunctival injection, enanthem, exanthem, erythema and swelling of the hands and feet, and cervical adenopathy. These acute features of illness are self-limiting, but coronary artery abnormalities occur in 20% of untreated patients. The etiology of the illness is unknown, but its clinical and epidemiologic features are most consistent with an infectious cause. Common cardiovascular manifestations of the illness include myocarditis, pericardial effusion, and coronary artery aneurysm formation. Treatment with intravenous gamma globulin (IVGG) and aspirin within the first 10 days of illness reduces the prevalence of coronary artery abnormalities from 20% in those treated with aspirin alone to 4%. Patients who develop coronary artery aneurysms, particularly those who develop giant coronary artery aneurysms, may suffer myocardial infarction secondary to thrombosis or stenosis in the abnormal vessel. Additional research to determine the cause of KS is urgently needed to allow for improved diagnosis, more specific therapy, and prevention of the disorder. PMID:9665974

  7. Acquired surface alexia in Spanish: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Aldo R; Cuitiño, Macarena Martinez; Olmedo, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a case study of acquired surface alexia in Spanish and discusses the most suitable tests to detect this syndrome in a writing system that is very regular for reading at the segmental and supra-segmental levels. Patient MM has surface alexia characterized by quantitatively good performance in reading words and pseudowords; accurate but slow and syllabic reading of words, nonwords and sentences; good performance in lexical decision tasks including words and nonwords; errors in lexical decision with pseudohomophones; and homophone confusions. This pattern of reading can be interpreted as a disorder in the lexical reading route and overdependence on the non-lexical route. We discuss nonlexical impairments and the interpretation of alexia and suggest tasks to identify surface alexia in a shallow orthography.

  8. Acquired Amino Acid Deficiencies: A Focus on Arginine and Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Martindale, Robert G; Sarav, Menaka; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B

    2017-04-01

    Nonessential amino acids are synthesized de novo and therefore not diet dependent. In contrast, essential amino acids must be obtained through nutrition since they cannot be synthesized internally. Several nonessential amino acids may become essential under conditions of stress and catabolic states when the capacity of endogenous amino acid synthesis is exceeded. Arginine and glutamine are 2 such conditionally essential amino acids and are the focus of this review. Low arginine bioavailability plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a growing number of varied diseases, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, malaria, acute asthma, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and trauma, among others. Catabolism of arginine by arginase enzymes is the most common cause of an acquired arginine deficiency syndrome, frequently contributing to endothelial dysfunction and/or T-cell dysfunction, depending on the clinical scenario and disease state. Glutamine, an arginine precursor, is one of the most abundant amino acids in the body and, like arginine, becomes deficient in several conditions of stress, including critical illness, trauma, infection, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. At-risk populations are discussed together with therapeutic options that target these specific acquired amino acid deficiencies.

  9. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The acquired form occasionally develops in association with peripheral neuropathies or after radiation treatment, but more often is ... The acquired form occasionally develops in association with peripheral neuropathies or after radiation treatment, but more often is ...

  10. [Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Cicinskaite, Ilona; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Macas, Andrius; Tamosiūnas, Ramūnas; Kinderyte, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are responsible for 40-60% of all hospital-acquired infections. Increased age of patients and comorbid diseases render hospitalized patients more susceptible to infection. Almost 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are associated with urinary catheters, and only 5-10% of urinary infections are caused by invasive manipulations in the urogenital tract. Pathogens of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are frequently multi-resistant, and antibiotic therapy can only be successful when the complicating factors are eliminated or urodynamic function is restored. For treatment of complicated hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, the antibiotics must exhibit adequate pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties: high renal clearance of unmetabolized form with good antimicrobial activity in both acidic and alkaline urine. For selection of empirical treatment of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, it is necessary to evaluate localization of infection, its severity, possible isolates, and the most frequent pathogens in the department where patient is treated. The best choice for the starting the antimicrobial therapy is the cheapest narrow-spectrum effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infection until microbiological evaluation of pathogens will be received. Adequate management of urinary tract infections lowers the rate of complications, requirements for antibacterial treatment, selection of multi-resistant isolates and is cost effective.

  11. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  12. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are ...

  13. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome has occurred in children who were given aspirin when they had chickenpox or the flu. Reye syndrome has become very rare. This is because aspirin is no longer recommended for routine use in ...

  14. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  15. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... will order several other tests like blood tests, EEG, and brain scans. How Is Tourette Syndrome Treated? ... connected to Tourette syndrome, like ADHD and anxiety. Stress or being upset can make the tics worse, ...

  16. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  17. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  18. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Like for Kids With Marfan Syndrome? en español Síndrome de Marfan Evan couldn't wait for school ... for Marfan syndrome runs in families, getting passed down to children from parents who have the disease. ...

  19. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  20. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  1. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  2. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  3. The Schnitzler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections. In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed. PMID:21143856

  4. The Schnitzler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lipsker, Dan

    2010-12-08

    The Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underdiagnosed entity which is considered today as being a paradigm of an acquired/late onset auto-inflammatory disease. It associates a chronic urticarial skin rash, corresponding from the clinico-pathological viewpoint to a neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, a monoclonal IgM component and at least 2 of the following signs: fever, joint and/or bone pain, enlarged lymph nodes, spleen and/or liver, increased ESR, increased neutrophil count, abnormal bone imaging findings. It is a chronic disease with only one known case of spontaneous remission. Except of the severe alteration of quality of life related mainly to the rash, fever and pain, complications include severe inflammatory anemia and AA amyloidosis. About 20% of patients will develop a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly Waldenström disease and lymphoma, a percentage close to other patients with IgM MGUS. It was exceedingly difficult to treat patients with this syndrome until the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra became available. Anakinra allows a complete control of all signs within hours after the first injection, but patients need continuous treatment with daily injections.In many aspects, the Schnitzler syndrome resembles the genetically determined auto-inflammatory syndromes involving activating mutations of the NLRP3 inflammasome. This latter point and its consequences will be addressed.

  5. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  6. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    PubMed

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  7. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  8. Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Kumari, M K; Kamath, Sulata; Mysorekar, Vijaya V; Nandini, G

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  9. Cost of hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmud; Tuckman, Howard P; Patrick, Robert H; Kountz, David S; Kohn, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The authors assessed the costs of hospital-acquired infections using rigorous econometric methods on publicly available data, controlling for the interdependency of length of stay and the incidence of hospital acquired infection, and estimated the cost shares of different payers. They developed a system of equations involving length of stay, incidence of infection, and the total hospital care cost to be estimated using simultaneous equations system. The main data came from the State of New Jersey UB 92 for 2004, complimented with data from the Annual Survey of Hospitals by the American Hospital Association and the Medicare Cost Report of 2004. The authors estimated that an incidence of hospital acquired infection increases the hospital care cost of a patient by $10,375 and it increases the length of stay by 3.30 days, and that a disproportionately higher portion of the cost is attributable to Medicare. They conclude that reliable cost estimates of hospital-acquired infections can be made using publicly available data. Their estimate shows a much larger aggregate cost of $16.6 billion as opposed to $5 billion reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but much less than $29 billion as reported elsewhere in the literature.

  10. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  11. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  12. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  13. Acquired nasal deformities in fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Schreinemakers, Joyce R C; van Amerongen, Pieter; Kon, Moshe

    2010-07-01

    Fighter pilots may develop slowly progressive deformities of their noses during their flying careers. The spectrum of deformities that may be acquired ranges from soft tissue to osseous changes. The main cause is the varying pressure exerted by the oxygen mask on the skin and bony pyramid of the nose during flying.

  14. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  15. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  16. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  17. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  18. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  19. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  20. Acquiring a Second Language for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Virginia P.

    1995-01-01

    This report offers a conceptual model for use with language minority children who are entering a new school when they must acquire the language of the majority student population. The model has four development components or processes: sociocultural, linguistic, academic, and cognitive. These four components are described in detail. Research is…

  1. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  2. Enterococcal meningitis in association with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sukhwani, Kalpesh S; Bansal, Nitin; Soni, Mamta; Ramamurthy, Anand; Gopalakrishnan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Strongyloidiasis can cause hyperinfection or disseminated infection in an immunocompromised host, and is an important factor linked to enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. Case reports We report two cases highlighting the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in patients with enterococcal meningitis. Conclusion Our cases highlight the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in cases of community acquired enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. PMID:28331839

  3. Do Children with Down Syndrome Have Difficulty in Counting and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelahmeed, Hala

    2007-01-01

    A systematic review of literature in the area of counting in Down syndrome was conducted to identify and analyze ability to count of children with Down syndrome. We firstly reviewed the most famous theories which have explained how typically developing children acquire counting, and then we discussed how children with Down syndrome acquire…

  4. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  5. Anesthetic management in a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkiliineni, Venkata Rama Rao; Panidapu, Nagarjuna; Parasa, Mrunalini; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA) syndrome is one of the most common thrombocytophilias but, unfortunately, goes unrecognized most often. It is an auto-immune disorder in which thrombotic events and a recurrent fetal loss occur in the presence of antibodies to phospholipids. It is the most common acquired hyper-coagulable state. There is a limited literature on peroperative management of patients with this syndrome. We report a case of APLA syndrome in a parturient due to its rarity and complexity.

  6. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-05

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential.

  7. [Acquired paraneoplastic hypertrichosis lanuginosa associated with scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Valda Rodriguez, L; Torrico Velasco, J; Zeballos Vasconcellos, R

    1990-01-01

    Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa is universally recognized as an individual disease and seldom reported as a genuine paraneoplastic manifestation. We report the case of a 30-year old woman with acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa. Due to the finding of a cervical lymph node metastasis, she was investigated for an internal neoplasm, but the original tumour could not be found by the usual methods. A bronchogenic carcinoma was discovered at autopsy. Beside hypertrichosis, this patient had other disorders not described in the literature as associated with that disease, viz.: progressive systemic scleroderma, fissured and hyperpigmented tongue, thrombocytopenia, galactorrhoea, axillary and pubic alopecia and overcurvature of toe nails. A review of similar cases in the literature provided clinical arguments in favour of the hormonal origin of this paraneoplastic hypertrichosis.

  8. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota, Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations.

  9. Clinical laboratory data: acquire, analyze, communicate, liberate.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Elbehery, Ali H A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of portable healthcare devices, which can acquire and transmit medical data to remote experts would dramatically affect healthcare in areas with poor infrastructure. Smartphones, which feature touchscreen computer capabilities and sophisticated cameras, have become widely available with over billion units shipped in 2013. In the clinical laboratory, smartphones have recently brought the capabilities of key instruments such as spectrophotometers, fluorescence analyzers and microscopes into the palm of the hand. Several research groups have developed sensitive and low-cost smartphone-based diagnostic assay prototypes for testing cholesterol, albumin, vitamin D, tumor markers, and the detection of infectious agents. This review covers the use of smartphones to acquire, analyze, communicate, and liberate clinical laboratory data. Smartphones promise to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of healthcare offered in resource-limited areas.

  10. Subcortical infarction resulting in acquired stuttering.

    PubMed

    Ciabarra, A M; Elkind, M S; Roberts, J K; Marshall, R S

    2000-10-01

    Stuttering is an uncommon presentation of acute stroke. Reported cases have often been associated with left sided cortical lesions, aphasia, and difficulties with other non-linguistic tests of rhythmic motor control. Three patients with subcortical lesions resulting in stuttering are discussed. In one patient the ability to perform time estimations with a computerised repetitive time estimation task was characterised. One patient had a pontine infarct with clinical evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. A second patient had a left basal ganglionic infarct and a disruption of timing estimation. A third patient had a left subcortical infarct and a mild aphasia. These findings expand the reported distribution of infarction that can result in acquired stuttering. Subcortical mechanisms of speech control and timing may contribute to the pathophysiology of acquired stuttering.

  11. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  12. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota Jr., Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27777479

  13. Wilkie's Syndrome or Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Fact or Fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Vera; Deeb, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome (known as Wilkie's syndrome) is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. It is an acquired disorder in which acute angulation of the SMA causes compression of the third part of the duodenum between the SMA and the aorta. This is commonly due to loss of fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions. We report a 17-year-old female who presented with intermittent abdominal pain and intractable vomiting following significant weight loss after hospitalization for pneumonia. Symptoms persisted for 2 years and the patient underwent extensive invasive and non-invasive tests, but to no avail. Thereafter she developed acute high intestinal obstruction, which unraveled her diagnosis. This case emphasizes the challenges in the diagnosis of SMA syndrome and the need for increased awareness of this entity. This will improve early recognition in order to reduce irrelevant tests and unnecessary treatments. PMID:26120301

  14. Brucella abortus Infection Acquired in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Pier Luigi; Mastrandrea, Scilla; Rappelli, Paola; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2000-01-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated. PMID:10790142

  15. Acquiring Secure Systems Through Information Economics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Introduction “For all future weapons systems that DoD will acquire or procure, DoD will mandate specific cybersecurity standards for weapons...systems to meet. Acquisition and procurement policy and practice will be updated to promote effective cybersecurity throughout a system’s life cycle...physical damage or injury Motivating Contractor Efforts - Contractors have different priorities than the DOD when it comes to cybersecurity - Classic

  16. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  17. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  18. Acquired ciliary circumscribed grey hair (ACCG).

    PubMed

    Romero, A G; Calatayud, J C

    2001-12-01

    Grey-haired areas usually occur due to aging or inheritance. A case is described of abrupt occurrence of a focal circumscribed grey-hair in the eyebrow region (a single hair) in a 27-year-old woman. The phenomenon was named acquired ciliary circumscribed grey-hair (ACCG). Qualitative and semiquantitative findings were obtained by microanalytical studies. In addition to morphological differences from control hair, the ACCG hair showed a high percentage of sulfur (99.8%) and absence of oligoelements.

  19. Rare presentation of spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Bali, Roseleen Kaur; Das, Kamanasish; Sisodia, Anula; Dewan, R K; Singla, Rupak

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia without any apparent history of trauma is a very rare condition and is very difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain for one month and four episodes of vomiting for one day. Clinical suspicion, chest radiography with nasogastric tube in situ and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the diagnosis. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired surgically. The patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery.

  20. [Cutaneous manifestations of the malabsorption syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, C A; García García, A; Stringa, O

    1984-01-01

    A review of the skin changes in malabsorption syndrome, is presented; dividing the symptoms in skin, mucous membranes and adnexal involvement. In this way, acquired ichtyosis, hiperpigmentation changes, purpura and echimosis and eczematoid or psoriatic-like with generalized pruritus are described. The mucous membranes alterations are the most frequent ones, the angular cheilitis, glositis, ulcerations and aphthaes are pointed out, as well as the changes in the shape and colour of hair and nail abnormalities. Special mention deserve the particular cases of malabsorption syndromes that appears in: acrodermatitis enteropathica, dermatitis herpetiformis, Whipple disease, Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, dermatogenic enteropathy and abnormalities that occur as complication from the surgery treatment for obesity improvement.