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Sample records for acquired immunodeficiency disease

  1. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  2. Simian virus 40-induced disease in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, C. J.; Simon, M. A.; Bergsagel, D. J.; Pauley, D. R.; King, N. W.; Garcea, R. L.; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) disease was diagnosed in four rhesus monkeys that died with SIV-induced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). One juvenile monkey seroconverted for SV40 6 months after inoculation with SIV and developed severe bilateral tubulointerstitial nephritis. In contrast, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurred in two adult monkeys that were seropositive for SV40 before SIV inoculation, as well as a third adult that was naturally infected with SIV and seropositive for SV40 5 years before death. Large intranuclear inclusions containing abundant polyomavirus particles were limited to either renal tubular epithelial cells or oligodendrocytes. In situ DNA hybridization for SV40 large T antigen further demonstrated that SV40 nucleic acid was localized to either kidney or brain tissue. By immunohistochemical analysis, areas of central nervous system inflammation and demyelination were shown to contain CD68+ macrophages (gitter cells), aggregates of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and numerous gemistocytic astrocytes that labeled for glial fibrillary acidic protein. These observations indicate that rhesus monkeys with SIV-induced AIDS are predisposed to polyomaviral disease, in which SV40 nucleic acid is observed in renal tissue in primary infections and brain tissue after viral reactivation. Furthermore, this organ-specific replication suggests that tissue-tropic strains of SV40 may develop in immunodeficient monkeys. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1376560

  3. Cranial CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: spectrum of diseases and optimal contrast enhancement technique.

    PubMed

    Post, M J; Kursunoglu, S J; Hensley, G T; Chan, J C; Moskowitz, L B; Hoffman, T A

    1985-11-01

    A retrospective review of cranial CT scans obtained over a 4 year period in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and documented central nervous system (CNS) pathology is presented. The spectrum of diseases and the value of CT in detecting new, recurrent, and superimposed disease processes were determined. Fifty-one AIDS patients with confirmed CNS pathology were identified. Six of them had two coexistent diseases. Opportunistic infections predominated, especially Toxoplasma encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, while tumor was seen infrequently. Initial CT was positive in 76% of cases. In contrast to meningeal processes, where it was not very effective, CT was very sensitive in detecting most parenchymal disease processes. Characteristic although not pathognomonic CT patterns were found for certain diseases. Improvement or resolution of CT abnormalities in patients on medical therapy for Toxoplasma encephalitis correlated well with clinical improvement. Recurrence of CT abnormalities correlated well with medical noncompliance. The optimal contrast enhancement technique for detecting CNS pathology and for monitoring the effectiveness of medical therapy was also evaluated by a prospective study in which both immediate (IDD) and 1 hr delayed (DDD) double-dose contrast CT scans were compared. The examination found to be diagnostically superior in 30 of the 41 IDD/DDD studies was the delayed scan. It is recommended that CT be used routinely and with the 1 hr DDD scan to evaluate and follow AIDS patients with neurologic symptoms and/or signs.

  4. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  5. Women and the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, Constance B.

    1988-01-01

    SPECIAL EDITOR'S NOTE: Constance B. Wofsy, MD, is Co-Director of AIDS Activities at San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, as well as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco; Assistant Chief, Infectious Diseases, San Francisco General Hospital; and Principal Investigator, Project AWARE (Association for Women's AIDS Research and Education). Although she was not able to contribute an article for WOMEN AND MEDICINE on this very important subject, she kindly agreed to an interview. Both physicians and nonphysicians were asked what questions they had about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women. Images PMID:3250110

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J Q; Semiatin, S L

    1991-01-01

    We summarize information from three sets of epidemiologic data: the Nevada AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] Surveillance System, which contains information about every case identified within the state boundaries through September 1989; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence reporting systems, which currently include data on all HIV-positive reports submitted statewide to public health authorities; and surveys on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Nevadans concerning HIV-related disease. The Nevada State AIDS Task Force outlined major policy recommendations, nearly half of which concerned testing; only 2 dealt with preventing HIV transmission. Greater efforts should go into education, particularly directed toward groups at greatest risk of exposure to HIV, and to improve community-based care of infected persons.

  7. The thymus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Comparison with other types of immunodeficiency diseases, and presence of components of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, H. J.; Krone, W. J.; Broekhuizen, R.; van Baarlen, J.; van Veen, P.; Golstein, A. L.; Huber, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied thymus specimens taken at autopsy from eight acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and compared these with those taken from four patients with congenital immunodeficiency (unrelated to an intrinsic thymus defect) and seven patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In all cases, histology showed a severely involuted architecture, compatible with a debilitating disease before death. There were no major differences between thymus tissue in AIDS patients and in the other patients studied. This argues against the claim expressed in the literature that the epithelial microenvironment incurs particular HIV-1-induced injury in AIDS. This conclusion is substantiated by immunohistochemistry for HIV-1 gag and env proteins, and by hybridohistochemistry for gag/pol and env mRNA of HIV-1. Positive cells were observed only in low numbers, both inside the epithelial parenchyma and in the (expanded) perivascular areas. An interesting finding was the labeling of subcapsular/medullary epithelium in normal uninvoluted thymus by a number of antibodies to HIV-1 gag p17 and p24 proteins. Compatible with this labeling was the staining of epithelial stalks in hyperinvoluted thymuses irrespective of disease category. The previously reported cross-reactivity between HIV-1 core protein and thymosin alpha 1 cannot fully explain this observation, because the epithelium in the hyperinvoluted state is negative for thymosin alpha 1. This study confirms and extends previous reports on the endogenous presence of epitopes of retroviral antigens in thymic epithelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2474255

  8. Bacillary angiomatosis associated with extensive esophageal polyposis: a new mucocutaneous manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Chang, A D; Drachenberg, C I; James, S P

    1996-10-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a rare infection that has been associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. The causative organism is Rochalimaea henselae and contact with cats is a risk factor. We present a case of a 37-yr-old man who had recent prolonged exposure to a cat and presented with fever, iron deficiency anemia, and guaiac-positive stools who had biopsy-proven bacillary angiomatosis skin lesions and on esophagogastroduodenoscopy had multiple, diffuse, friable, polypoid lesions in the esophagus. The histology of the esophageal polyps was identical to the skin lesions, and the polyps disappeared after treatment with erythromycin. Bacillary angiomatosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of infectious upper gastrointestinal manifestations associated with AIDS.

  9. Epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at a reference hospital for infectious diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Renata Buccheri; Atobe, Jane Harumi; Souza, Simone Aparecida; de Castro Lima Santos, Daniel Wagner

    2014-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent one of the main causes of morbimortality in immunocompromised patients. Pneumocystosis, cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis are the most frequently occurring IFIs in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Fungi, such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., may cause severe diseases during the course of an HIV infection. Following the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, there has been a marked reduction of opportunistic fungal infections, which today is 20-25 % of the number of infections observed in the mid-1990s. This study is an observational and retrospective study aimed at the characterising IFI incidence and describing the epidemiology, clinical diagnostic and therapeutic features and denouement in HIV/AIDS patients. In HIV/AIDS patients, the IFI incidence is 54.3/1,000 hospitalisation/year, with a lethality of 37.7 %. Cryptococcosis represents the main opportunistic IFI in the population, followed by histoplasmosis. Nosocomial pathogenic yeast infections are caused principally by Candida spp., with a higher candidemia incidence at our institution compared to other Brazilian centres.

  10. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): a commentary on the international aspects of the disease.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1988-02-01

    By the beginning of 1987 there were 1100 heterosexual cases of AIDS in the US, and by 1991 an estimated 1/4 million US citizens will have AIDS, or will have already died from it. The situation in the 3rd World is even more grim. In parts of Africa the annual incidence of HIV infection is approaching 1%. Up to 12% of pregnant women in urban hospitals in Zaire carry the virus, and 25-88% of the prostitutes in some of the large cities in sub-Sahara Africa have the disease. Already, 5-10 million people around the world may be carrying HIV. Like the influenza virus, HIV can change its protein coat rapidly. The victim can appear perfectly healthy and still spread the disease. In countries with low maternal mortality, it could become the most common cause of maternal death. If people are to adopt safe sex practices, they must be convinced that they are at risk, that a lethal disease can be asymptomatic but ineffective for many years. They must know that safety practices--including the use of condoms, and perhaps especially spermicidally lubricated condoms--offer worthwhile protection. If any link in this chain is broken, individuals will not adopt such voluntary practices. There are no known political or geographical barriers to human copulation; now is the time to act, particularly in countries with a low or no prevalence of AIDS. Obstetricians must fight AIDS with the same commitment to preventative medicine that they bring to good obstetrics and good family planning.

  11. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war. PMID:10330595

  12. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the prevalence of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Southeast Asia. The spread of HIV infection in this region has been predicted to be worse than that of Africa. The high-prevalence countries are Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar, where prevalence rates in the population at risk (15-49 year olds) are up to 2%; while low prevalence countries with rates of 0.1% include the Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Brunei, and Singapore. Heterosexual transmission in Southeast Asia is the main mode of spread of HIV. Another route is through migration, rural-to-urban or international migration of people seeking jobs; with concurrent loneliness and anonymity, they become vulnerable to STDs and HIV infection. Intravenous drug use poses an increasing risk of transmission. The unavailability of data in some countries makes it difficult to evaluate the extent of the epidemic or if there's an impending epidemic. There are a number of caveats to the data compilation from various countries. These include the following: under-reporting of cases; underdiagnosis; missed diagnosis; and differences in the time of data collection. It is clear that poverty, illiteracy, and poor access to educational information in most countries in this region facilitate the rapid spread of HIV. These coupled with lack of primary health care services, and in most instances, enormously high cost of drugs make the pain and suffering due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic a human disaster far worse than the ravages of war.

  13. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities.

  15. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  16. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  18. Current Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2006-01-01

    Since the original description of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in 1952, the number of independent primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) has expanded to more than 100 entities. By definition, a PID is a genetically determined disorder resulting in enhanced susceptibility to infectious disease. Despite the heritable nature of these diseases, some PIDs are clinically manifested only after prerequisite environmental exposures but they often have associated malignant, allergic, or autoimmune manifestations. PIDs must be distinguished from secondary or acquired immunodeficiencies, which are far more common. In this review, we will place these immunodeficiencies in the context of both clinical and laboratory presentations as well as highlight the known genetic basis. PMID:17162365

  19. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebral lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, M A; Pell, M F; Brew, B J

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy, mortality and morbidity of CT directed stereotactic biopsy of a cerebral lesion in 32 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients between July 1991 and June 1994 who had an atypical presentation for toxoplasmosis or who were failing or intolerant of empirical antitoxoplasmosis treatment was evaluated. An histological diagnosis was able to be made in 85%: progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in 13, primary cerebral lymphoma in 10, toxoplasmosis in 3 and HIV encephalitis in one. Non-specific reactive changes or gliosis were seen in 5 patients. There was no mortality, and morbidity occurred in 2 patients: one intraventricular haemorrhage and one transient third nerve palsy. Correct diagnosis made by image-directed stereotactic biopsy of central nervous system (CNS) disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients may improve outcome, particularly in those diseases where effective treatment strategies already exist and become increasingly available in the future.

  20. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  1. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  2. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  3. Thymus involution in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grody, W W; Fligiel, S; Naeim, F

    1985-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, predominantly affecting homosexual males and other high-risk groups and characterized by profound alterations in T-lymphocyte function. The authors have examined thymus tissue from 14 patients who died of AIDS and compared the results with findings in five control groups: healthy age-matched controls, elderly individuals, patients with chronic or debilitating illnesses other than AIDS, infants with conditions causing "stress atrophy," and patients with myasthenia gravis. The AIDS group included 11 homosexual males, 1 Haitian, 1 homosexual who was also a drug abuser, and a 10-month-old infant believed to have contracted AIDS following blood transfusion. All the AIDS cases showed marked thymus involution with severe depletion of both lymphocytes and epithelial elements. The latter component consisted primarily of thin cords and nests of primitive-appearing epithelial cells that could be defined by positive immunohistochemical staining for keratin. Many cases showed a variable plasma cell infiltration, and the majority exhibited distinct vascular changes in the form of hyalinization and/or onion-skin patterns, primarily in the adventitia. Most striking of all was the marked paucity of Hassall's corpuscles; four patients had none at all, while in the other ten patients all the Hassall's corpuscles were calcified. These changes were far more extensive than those seen in any of the control groups, which retained most of their complement of Hassall's corpuscles even in the face of marked overall involution. The physiologic function of Hassall's corpuscles is not known, but recent immunohistochemical studies have implicated them in the synthesis of "facteur thymique serique" (FTS, thymulin) and other thymic hormones known to play a role in regulating T-helper and suppressor cell activity. It is conceivable that the extensive destruction of Hassall's corpuscles observed in

  4. [Cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, A; Feuermannová, A; Hejsek, L; Jirásková, N; Plíšek, S; Rozsíval, P

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS) is the most common opportunistic infection. This infection is harmless for healthy individuals, but for weakened individuals cause disease. The most common form of CMV-infection in patients with AIDS is cytomegalovirus retinitis, which occurs in 15% to 40% of cases. We report the case of aman twenty-five year old, treated for CMV retinitis and retinal vasculitis vessels. Prescribed Valcyte 900mg tbl. twice daily for 21 days with agood therapeutic effect. In patients with AIDS and decreased visual acuity is need be primarily thinking about the possible presence of CMV-infection and in time to start treatment.Key words: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, AIDS, valganciklovir.

  5. Fear of contagion: a stress response to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meisenhelder, J B; LaCharite, C L

    1989-01-01

    The threat of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has triggered an affective stress response to illness: fear of contagion, an anxious response to the perceived threat of catching a disease. Three behaviors characterize this fear: avoidance, extreme precautions, and verbal expressions of fear regarding the disease. Despite the scientific evidence for the low risk of occupational exposure to this infection, many health care workers appear to demonstrate highly fearful behavior. Social and cultural values, which attach a deep symbolic meaning to AIDS, combine with misperceptions about transmission to create this stress response. This article suggests education on cross-cultural, sexual, and death-related issues, as well as factural information on AIDS to decrease this fear. Implications for nursing research are included.

  6. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis and concurrent Kaposi's sarcoma in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berger, T G; Tappero, J W; Kaymen, A; LeBoit, P E

    1989-11-01

    Two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed simultaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis. The distinguishing clinical and histologic features of these two vascular proliferations associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease are described. The lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis contained bacteria, while the lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma did not. With erythromycin therapy, the lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis cleared, while those of Kaposi's persisted. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis, a treatable but potentially fatal opportunistic infection of human immunodeficiency virus disease, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular lesions in immunosuppressed patients.

  7. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  8. Toxicity of oral radiotherapy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.

    1987-03-01

    Although radiotherapy is a standard form of management of head and neck tumors, treatment of the oral cavity in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has produced unacceptable toxicity. Five such patients are described as a warning of enhanced toxicity of oral radiotherapy in this patient population.

  9. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  10. Emergence of resistance to fluconazole as a cause of failure during treatment of histoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wheat, L J; Connolly, P; Smedema, M; Brizendine, E; Hafner, R

    2001-12-01

    In sequential clinical trials of treatment for histoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, therapy with fluconazole failed in a higher proportion of patients than did therapy with itraconazole. To determine the cause for failure with fluconazole, antifungal susceptibility testing that used modified National Committee on Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures was performed on all baseline and failure isolates. Failure occurred more frequently in patients with baseline isolates with fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or =5 microg/mL versus lower MICs; 29% versus 3%, respectively. There was at least a 4-fold increase in fluconazole MIC in the isolates from 10 (59%) of 17 patients for whom paired pretreatment and failure or relapse isolates were available. Cross-resistance to itraconazole was not seen. In conclusion, fluconazole is less active than itraconazole for Histoplasma capsulatum and induces resistance during therapy, which accounted for treatment failure in some patients.

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  12. [Reflection on treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Ni

    2012-02-01

    The current situation of Chinese medicine and Western medicine treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has made the integrative medicine treatment of AIDS an important treatment strategy. Integrative medicine treatment of AIDS has made certain achievements in clinical research, basic research, and other aspects. It has good mass foundation and curative efficacy, as well as insufficiency. I hope integrative medicine can be brought into full play in the treatment of AIDS and make breakthrough progress.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Patel, Shital M; Flash, Charlene A; Stager, Charles E; Goodman, Jerry C; Woc-Colburn, Laila

    2014-07-01

    As a result of global migration, a significant number of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection now live in the United States, Canada, many countries in Europe, and other non-endemic countries. Trypanosoma cruzi meningoencephalitis is a rare cause of ring-enhancing lesions in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that can closely mimic central nervous system (CNS) toxoplasmosis. We report a case of CNS Chagas reactivation in an AIDS patient successfully treated with benznidazole and antiretroviral therapy in the United States.

  14. Bacillary angiomatosis: a new entity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hnatuk, L A; Brown, D H; Snell, G E

    1994-06-01

    Since the recognition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1981, previously rare infections and neoplasms have become increasingly common. Bacillary angiomatosis, undescribed in the medical literature prior to 1983, is now second in frequency only to Kaposi's sarcoma with respect to the cutaneous manifestations associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Caused by Rochalimaea henselae, bacillary angiomatosis is easily treated, when diagnosed early, with erythromycin. We present two cases of bacillary angiomatosis that presented to Toronto General Hospital and review this new and clinically interesting entity. The incidence of bacillary angiomatosis will undoubtedly increase as the HIV epidemic accelerates. Since bacillary angiomatosis commonly affects the head and neck region, it is important for the otolaryngologist to become increasingly proficient in its diagnosis and treatment. The current AIDS crisis demands that the otolaryngologist become aware not only of bacillary angiomatosis, but also of the other cutaneous head and neck manifestations of HIV infection.

  15. Polymorphous hemangioendothelioma in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephan R; Hurford, Matthew T; Miettinen, Markku M; Aronoff, Stephen C; Delvecchio, Michael; Grewal, Harsh; Tuluc, Madalina

    2008-03-01

    Polymorphous hemangioendotheliomas (PH) are rare and borderline malignant tumors that are among the wide range of vascular tumors. We report here a 13-year-old male presenting with a history of weight loss, opportunistic infections, and lymphadenopathy. He was determined to be HIV positive and to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A biopsy of a femoral node was diagnostic of PH. His systemic lymphadenopathy appeared to resolve with anti-retroviral therapy. This tumor should be considered within the differential diagnoses of pediatric and immunocompromised patients.

  16. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  17. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  18. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  19. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  20. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  1. Experience with rehabilitation in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, P G; Levinson, S F

    1991-08-01

    Patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a novel referral population for rehabilitation services. Limited information about the rehabilitation needs of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection is available. We reviewed 51 consecutive patients with AIDS referred to a rehabilitation consult service. Common problems encountered included generalized deconditioning (27%) and neurologic dysfunction (45%). Neurologic presentations were diverse and included hemiparesis, diffuse cognitive dysfunction and dementia, myelopathy, myopathy and peripheral neuropathy. Other patients were referred for wound care as well as the management of the local effects of Kaposi's sarcoma, various musculoskeletal syndromes and new onset blindness. Problems identified included impaired mobility (76%), difficulty with self-care (57%), impaired cognition (29%) and uncontrolled pain (37%). Among the rehabilitation interventions utilized were therapeutic exercise (73%), gait aids (45%), bathroom and safety equipment (45%), orthotics (29%), vocational counseling (4%), pain management (29%) and whirlpool treatments (10%). Five patients were too ill or refused treatment. We conclude that AIDS patients referred for rehabilitation have a wide variety of physical deficits, demonstrate a considerable degree of functional impairment and may require multiple rehabilitation interventions. PMID:1878178

  2. Lymphadenopathy, productive cough, eosinophilia, and a new-onset acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dzhindzhikhashvili, Megi; Absy-Jaghab, Minou; Frieri, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    We present a complicated case of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected male patient with a complexity of confounding and overlapping symptoms that can masquerade as another diagnosis. This is the case of a patient with multiple secondary sexually transmitted infectious diseases, lymphadenopathy, B-cell lymphoma, a productive cough, a clinical picture suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis, eosinophilia, and a new-onset acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Our presentation highlights those deteriorations seen in our patient as well as various underlying immunologic changes in the content of HIV infection. This case may not be unique, but less severe cases occur and can be underdiagnosed, indicating the need of timely screening, close evaluation, and monitoring of HIV-infected patients as well as those with high risk of acquiring HIV.

  3. Resource utilization patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Okello, D O

    1994-12-01

    A survey in 1991 of resource use patterns and factors affecting the cost of care for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, revealed that drugs constitute 97% of the mean cost of care of affected individuals in the outpatient and 37% in hospitalized patients. The cost of drugs per treatment episode was Ug.Sh.5785.00 in the outpatient and Ug.Sh.8309.00 for inpatients. (The exchange rate for 1991 was US$ = Ug.Sh.910.00). Analysis of an attempt to provide essential drugs for the growing number of AIDS subjects shows that drugs alone could consume the entire health budget of the Ministry of Health in Uganda. There is therefore need to critically consider options to control the high cost for drugs in AIDS care.

  4. Resource utilization patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Okello, D O

    1994-12-01

    A survey in 1991 of resource use patterns and factors affecting the cost of care for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, revealed that drugs constitute 97% of the mean cost of care of affected individuals in the outpatient and 37% in hospitalized patients. The cost of drugs per treatment episode was Ug.Sh.5785.00 in the outpatient and Ug.Sh.8309.00 for inpatients. (The exchange rate for 1991 was US$ = Ug.Sh.910.00). Analysis of an attempt to provide essential drugs for the growing number of AIDS subjects shows that drugs alone could consume the entire health budget of the Ministry of Health in Uganda. There is therefore need to critically consider options to control the high cost for drugs in AIDS care. PMID:7705257

  5. Pancreatic tuberculosis with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meesiri, Somchai

    2012-02-21

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a relatively rare disease that can mimic carcinoma, lymphoma, cystic neoplasia, retroperitoneal tumors, pancreatitis or pseudocysts. Here, I report the case of a 31-year-old immigrant Burmese woman who exhibited epigastralgia, fever, weight loss and an epigastric mass. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic TB and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and was treated with antituberculous drugs and percutaneous catheter drainage without a laparotomy. The clinical presentation, radiographic investigation and management of pancreatic TB are summarized in this paper to emphasize the importance of considering this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses concomitant with human immunodeficiency virus infection. I also emphasize the need for both histopathological and microbiological diagnosis via fine-needle aspiration.

  6. Microsporum gypseum dermatophytosis in a patient of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Bhagra, S; Ganju, S A; Sood, A; Guleria, R C; Kanga, A K

    2013-01-01

    Microsporum gypseum, a geophillic dermatophyte is rarely isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report tinea corporis due to Microsporum gypseum, an uncommon aetiological agent, in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from our region. The clinical presentation resembled psoriasis characterised by atypical, scaly and hyperkeratotic lesions.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS

  8. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  9. Primary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Head and Neck in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Clinicopathologic Study of 24 Patients in a Single Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  10. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients. PMID:25992103

  11. Primary extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinicopathologic study of 24 patients in a single hospital of infectious diseases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María; Bistmans, Alicia; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are commonly described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and are related with an atypical morphology and aggressive clinical course. AIDS-associated lymphomas are characterized by their rapid progression, frequent extranodal manifestations, and poor outcome. Objective The aim of this article is to remake the clinical features of head and neck (HN) NHL in patients with AIDS to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 24 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS with primary HN NHL treated at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Histopathologic diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Additional immunohistochemical stains were applied in all cases. Results Eighteen patients (75%) were men and the median of age was 39 years. The gingiva and the hard palate were the most common sites of the lesions (15 patients, 62.5%). Lactate dehydrogenase levels were elevated in 16 cases (84%). Bone marrow infiltration was detected only in 4 cases (16.6%). The median CD4 T-cell count was 100 cells/µL. According to the histopathologic evaluation, the most common subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (12 cases, 50%), followed by plasmablastic lymphoma (9 cases, 37.5%) and Burkitt lymphoma (3 cases, 12.5%). Conclusion HN NHL is a severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Early diagnosis followed by chemotherapy plus highly active antiretroviral treatment is necessary to improve the prognosis and the survival of these patients.

  12. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and black Americans: special psychosocial issues.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, V M; Cochran, S D

    1987-01-01

    Approximately 25 percent of persons diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been black. This paper examines three areas of concern when focusing on AIDS in the black population: differences from whites in patterns of transmission of the infection, cultural factors that may affect health education efforts, and ethnically relevant issues in the provision of medical care to black persons with AIDS. Recognition of these differences is important in developing appropriate AIDS-related services for the black population. First, the epidemiologic pattern of infection in the black population differs from whites. Although they represent only 12 percent of the American population, blacks make up nearly one-quarter of reported AIDS cases. Currently, it is estimated that between 1 and 1.4 percent of the black population may be infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), a rate estimated to be three times that of whites. In addition, epidemiologic patterns of viral transmission in the black community suggest a greater incursion into the heterosexual population. Second, educational interventions designed to slow the rate of infection need to be sensitive to cultural and behavioral differences between blacks and whites who are at increased risk for acquiring or transmitting an HTLV-III/LAV infection. These include possible differences in perceptions of being at risk and actual risk behaviors. Third, in caring for black AIDS patients there are psychological, sociocultural, and medical care issues that are relevant. Research findings specific to health care for blacks are reviewed with particular reference to concerns that might arise in the treatment of black persons with AIDS. Recommendations for research and health education efforts in the black community are presented. PMID:3104981

  13. Investigation of potent lead for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chan, Yueh-Chiu; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has become, because of the rapid spread of the disease, a serious global problem and cannot be treated. Recent studies indicate that VIF is a protein of HIV to prevent all of human immunity to attack HIV. Molecular compounds of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database filtered through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations to inhibit VIF can protect against HIV. Glutamic acid, plantagoguanidinic acid, and Aurantiamide acetate based docking score higher with other TCM compounds selected. Molecular dynamics are useful for analysis and detection ligand interactions. According to the docking position, hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding changes, and structure variation, the study try to select the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine compound Aurantiamide acetate is better than the other for protein-ligand interactions to maintain the protein composition, based on changes in the structure.

  14. Skin aging in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Favarato, Grace Kelly Naves; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the histomorphometric skin changes over aging patients with autopsied acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 29 skin fragments of autopsied elderly (older than 50 years) and nonelderly patients with AIDS, epidermal thickness, the number of layers, the diameter of cells, the percentage of collagen and elastic fibers in the dermis, and the number and morphology of Langerhans cells were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed by SigmaStat 2.03 program. The thickness of the epidermis (92.55 × 158.94 μm), the number of layers (7 × 9 layers), and the diameter of the cells (13.27 × 17.6 μm) were statistically lower among the elderly. The quantity of collagen fibers (9.68 × 14.11%) and elastic fibers (11.89 × 15.31%) was also significantly lower in the elderly. There was a decrease in total (10.61 × 12.38 cel/mm(2)) and an increase in immature Langerhans cells (6.31 × 4.98 cel/mm(2)) in elderly patients with AIDS. The aging of the skin of patients with AIDS is amended in different histomorphometric aspects, the epidermis constituents suffer less pronounced changes in normal aging, and the dermis has more intense changes in elastic fibers and collagen.

  15. Skin aging in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Favarato, Grace Kelly Naves; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the histomorphometric skin changes over aging patients with autopsied acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 29 skin fragments of autopsied elderly (older than 50 years) and nonelderly patients with AIDS, epidermal thickness, the number of layers, the diameter of cells, the percentage of collagen and elastic fibers in the dermis, and the number and morphology of Langerhans cells were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed by SigmaStat 2.03 program. The thickness of the epidermis (92.55 × 158.94 μm), the number of layers (7 × 9 layers), and the diameter of the cells (13.27 × 17.6 μm) were statistically lower among the elderly. The quantity of collagen fibers (9.68 × 14.11%) and elastic fibers (11.89 × 15.31%) was also significantly lower in the elderly. There was a decrease in total (10.61 × 12.38 cel/mm(2)) and an increase in immature Langerhans cells (6.31 × 4.98 cel/mm(2)) in elderly patients with AIDS. The aging of the skin of patients with AIDS is amended in different histomorphometric aspects, the epidermis constituents suffer less pronounced changes in normal aging, and the dermis has more intense changes in elastic fibers and collagen. PMID:27649952

  16. Colon perforation with peritonitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient due to cytomegalovirus and amoebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Eng-Rin; Yen, Chuan-Min; Liu, Yung-Ching

    2005-11-01

    Invasive amoebiasis is rarely seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, even in endemic areas. By contrast, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is recognized as a major clinical problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. A 34-year-old HIV-infected man with amoeba colitis, disseminated Mycobacterium avian complex and CMV infection with cecum perforation, presented with the initial symptoms of fever, shortness of breath and painful sensation when swallowing. He was treated with fluconazole, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and hydrocortisone under the impression of esophageal candidiasis and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. However, diarrhea and abdominal pain developed on day 6 of hospitalization. Invasive amoebiasis and CMV colitis was diagnosed after examination of colon pathological specimens. Emergent laparotomy was performed. Right hemicolectomy with double barrel ileostomy and colostomy was done due to perforation of the cecum. Iodoquinol was given, followed by metronidazole 14 days afterwards. He underwent closure of double barrel ileostomy and colostomy 5 months later. This case illustrates the diagnostic challenge of caring for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome persons with multiple illnesses and medication use. CMV infection, amoebic colitis and possibly corticosteroid may have played a role in colon perforation in our patient.

  17. Accelerated neutrophil apoptosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pitrak, D L; Tsai, H C; Mullane, K M; Sutton, S H; Stevens, P

    1996-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMNL) function defects occur as a consequence of HIV infection. This study examined PMNL apoptosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) to determine if accelerated apoptosis contributes to impaired function. PMNL were isolated from 10 HIV-infected patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts < 200/mm3 without signs of active infection and 7 healthy volunteers. PMNL were stained with acridine orange and ethidium bromide after 0, 3, 6, and 18 h in culture, and examined for the morphologic changes of apoptosis and viability by fluorescent microscopy. Apoptosis was also demonstrated by electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and DNA gel electrophoresis. Apoptosis was minimal at 0 h, but PMNL from AIDS patients exhibited significantly greater apoptosis than controls at 3 h (22.5+/-11.5 vs. 8.9+/-6.9%, P = 0.015), 6 h (38.1+/-14.2 vs. 18.1+/-4.5%, P = 0.003), and 18 h (71.3+/-19.0 vs. 38.8+/-16.7%, P = 0.002). Viabilities were > or = 88.0% for both groups from 0-6 h, but by 18 h viability was significantly decreased for the HIV group (58.8+/-12.4 vs. 83.5+/-10.4%, P = 0.001) due to an increase in non-viable apoptotic cells. Incubation with serum from AIDS patients had no effect on control PMNL, and incubation with control serum did not reduce the rate of apoptosis of PMNL from AIDS patients. Incubation with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro significantly decreased apoptosis for PMNL from AIDS patients. PMNL from patients with AIDS exhibit markedly accelerated apoptosis ex vivo. In vivo, apoptosis and functional impairment of PMNL may contribute to the risk of secondary infections, and cytokine therapy may be of potential clinical benefit in this circumstance. PMID:8981916

  18. Radiologic evaluation of the acute abdomen in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS): the role of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Wu, C M; Davis, F; Fishman, E K

    1998-04-01

    Abdominal complaints are common in the HIV-infected patient, and the signs and symptoms of disease may be masked by concurrent illness and a weak immune response, making accurate diagnosis difficult. Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are susceptible to diseases common to the general population; however, their generalized state of immunodeficiency places them at increased risk for many unusual disorders, predominately infectious and neoplastic. Radiologic evaluation, in particular, computed tomography (CT) with its ability to image the entire abdomen and pelvis, plays a crucial role in the prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of these patients.

  19. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea. PMID:27433384

  20. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A; Yoon, Hee Jung

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea.

  1. Acquired cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, E

    1996-09-01

    ACKD is characterized by the development of many fluid-filled renal cysts and sometimes neoplasms in the kidneys of individuals with chronic renal failure but without a history of hereditary cystic disease. The condition is seen mainly in dialysis patients, but often begins in patients with ESRD before dialysis is started. Most patients with ACKD are asymptomatic, but the disorder may be associated with such serious complications as retroperitoneal hemorrhage and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The diagnosis of ACKD and its complications is best achieved by CT scanning, although US and MR imaging may be useful in evaluation, particularly in patients not treated with dialysis. Cyst hemorrhage is common in ACKD and may cause flank pain and hematuria. Hemorrhagic cysts may be recognized by their CT scan, sonographic, or MR imaging features. Hemorrhagic cysts may rupture into the perinephric space causing large perinephric hematomas. These can usually be treated-conservatively. Patients with ACKD, particularly those treated with dialysis, have an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. Renal cell carcinoma may also develop in the native kidneys of renal transplant recipients with good graft function many years after transplantation. Annual imaging of the native kidneys of all dialysis patients or of transplant recipients for the development of carcinoma is not justified, however, because it has not been shown to have a significant effect on patient outcome. Screening may, however, be useful in selected dialysis patients with good general medical condition and who have known risk factors for renal cell carcinoma including prolonged dialysis, large kidneys, ACKD, and male gender. Screening of the native kidneys of transplant recipients may be performed when they are referred for US evaluation of the renal allograft.

  2. History of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Moin, Mostafa; Rezaei, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric immunology came into sight in the second half of 20th century, when pediatricians and basic immunologists began to give attention to diagnosis and treatment of children with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Understanding the genetic and mechanistic basis of PIDs provides unique insight into the functioning of the immune system. By progress in basic and clinical immunology, many infrastructural organizations and academic centers have been established in many countries worldwide to focus on training and research on the immune system and related disorders. Along with progress in basic and clinical immunology in the world, pediatric immunology had a good progress in Iran during the last 33-year period. Now, patients with PIDs can benefit from multidisciplinary comprehensive care, which is provided by clinical immunologists in collaboration with other specialists. Patients with history of recurrent and/or chronic infections suggestive of PIDs are evaluated by standard and research-based testing and receive appropriate treatment. The progress in PIDs can be described in three periods. Development of training program for clinical fellowship in allergy and immunology, multidisciplinary and international collaborative projects, primary immunodeficiency diseases textbooks, meetings on immunodeficiency disorders, improvement in diagnosis and treatment, and construction of Iranian primary immunodeficiency association, Students' research group for immunodeficiencies, Iranian primary immunodeficiency registry, and the immunological societies and centers were the main activities on PIDs during these years. In this article, we review the growth of modern pediatric immunology and PIDs status in Iran. PMID:23056678

  3. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis: a cause of pulmonary gallium-67 uptake in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckier, L.S.; Ongseng, F.; Goldfarb, C.R.

    1988-05-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is currently recognized as a frequent pediatric manifestation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report the gallium scan findings in a 3-yr-old girl with this disorder and review its clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features. LIP must be a prime consideration in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary gallium uptake in pediatric AIDS patients. Further experience will afford greater perspective on the diagnostic role that nuclear medicine will ultimately play in this disease. 49 references.

  4. Lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thakur, B K; Verma, S; Mishra, J

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at increased risk of drug reactions because of immune dysregulation and multiple drug intake. Lichenoid drug reactions to isoniazid have been reported previously in the literature. However, for lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid to be so extensive to present as exfoliative dermatitis is rare. We report here a rare case of lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  5. Acquired immunodeficiency similar to Gulf War illness in a dead former serviceman.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Luca; Gatti, A M; Pusiol, T; Barbolini, G; Maiorana, A

    2015-06-01

    A 38-year-old non-commissioned officer was certified unfit for military duty several months before his death. The forensic autopsy revealed a severe bone marrow aplasia and a pulmonary angioinvasive aspergillosis. Moreover, the presence of inorganic foreign particles in the pulmonary macrophages and intestinal endothelia was observed. The microanalysis implemented on these last selected specimens revealed the presence of silica particles microimpregnated by lanthanides and steel. The patient's acquired immunodeficiency appears comparable with that of Iraqi civilians suffering from Gulf War illness. This is the first report in the literature of the presence of intestinal endothelia engulfed by foreign war particulates; the silica particles may have entered the intestinal endothelia via the blood stream or by ingestion of impregnated fruit and vegetable foodstuffs. This finding provides new perspectives in the assessment of war-associated diseases and includes electron probe microanalysis among the new techniques of military and forensic medicine.

  6. Risk reduction for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Hopkins, W

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous drug users are the second largest risk group for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and a bridge to two other groups: children and heterosexual partners. In the absence of effective treatment or vaccines, control of the epidemic among drug users will rely on efforts to reduce needle sharing. However, the traditional image of intravenous drug users leads one to expect little or no risk reduction. We review characteristics of AIDS as a disease that impede efforts at risk reduction among drug users and report on current risk reduction among intravenous drug users in New York City. There has been a sustained increase in the demand for new, unused needles, as shown in the emergence of "resealed" needles and in interviews with persons selling needles in illicit drug-purchasing areas.

  7. HIV-2 and its role in conglutinated approach towards Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Batul; Saxena, Rupali; Tiwari, Archana

    2013-12-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the most critically acclaimed endemic diseases, caused by two lentiviruses HIV-1 and 2. HIV-2 displays intimate serological and antigenic resemblance to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) along with less pathogenicity, lower infectivity and appreciable cross reactivity with HIV-1 antigens. The present era is confronted with the challenge to fabricate a vaccine effective against all clades of both the species of HIV. But vaccine development against HIV-1 has proven highly intricate, moreover the laborious and deficient conventional approaches has slackened the pace regarding the development of new vaccines. These concerns may be tackled with the development of HIV-2 vaccine as a natural control of HIV-1 that has been found in ancestors of HIV-2 i.e. African monkeys, mangabeys and macaques. Thereby, suggesting the notion of cross protection among HIV-2 and HIV-1. Assistance of bioinformatics along with vaccinomics strategy can bring about a quantum leap in this direction for surpassing the bottleneck in conventional approaches. These specifics together can add to our conception that HIV-2 vaccine design by in silico strategy will surely be a constructive approach for HIV-1 targeting.

  8. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection.

  9. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  10. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival.

  11. Avian influenza: potential impact on sub-Saharan military populations with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Robert L; Nickell, Kent

    2007-07-01

    Several sub-Saharan militaries have large percentages of troops with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With the arrival of avian influenza in Africa, the potential exists that some of those soldiers might also become infected with H5N1, the virus responsible for the disease. Two possible scenarios have been postulated regarding how such a coinfection of HIV and H5N1 might present. (1) Soldiers already weakened by HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome rapidly succumb to H5N1. The cause of death is a "cytokine storm," essentially a runaway inflammatory response. (2) The weakened immune system prevents the cytokine storm from occurring; however, H5N1 is still present, replicating, and being shed, leading to the infection of others. A cytokine storm is particularly dangerous for individuals of military age, as evidenced by the large number of soldiers who died during the 1918 influenza epidemic. If large numbers of sub-Saharan soldiers suffer a similar fate from avian influenza, then military and political instability could develop.

  12. Glioblastoma multiforme of the brain stem in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Zimmermann, M; Marquardt, Gerhard; Lanfermann, H; Nafe, R; Seifert, V

    2002-09-01

    Glioblastoma of the brain stem is rare and there is no description of such a lesion in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The majority of intracerebral mass lesions are due either to toxoplasmosis or primary central nervous system lymphomas so that it is usually not included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions of the central nervous system in these patients. A 31-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected man presented with a four months history of slowly progressive deterioration of brainstem associated symptoms despite antitoxoplasmic therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large ring enhancing lesion in the brainstem. Clinical and neuroradiological data could not establish a proper diagnosis and a stereotactic serial biopsy was undertaken. Histological examination of the specimen showed a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as the first reported case of GBM located in the brainstem in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. Patient management and effectiveness of stereotactic serial biopsy are discussed.

  13. Central nervous system infection due to Mycobacterium haemophilum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buppajarntham, Aubonphan; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rutjanawech, Sasinuj; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is an environmental organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who had central nervous system infection due to M. haemophilum. The diagnosis required brain tissue procurement and molecular identification method while the treatment outcome was unfavourable.

  14. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  15. Neuronal damage and its relation to dementia in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Trillo-Pazos, G; Everall, I P

    1996-01-01

    There are an estimated 21.8 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide [Weekly Epidemiol Rec 1996; 27:204-208] and 90% of these people will have some form of neuropathological abnormality during the course of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this review, we will highlight the primary HIV-associated brain disorders. The role of HIV proteins and cytokines on neuronal damage will be assessed. We will also discuss the role of neuronal loss and functional damage in HIV-associated dementia.

  16. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: ... Resources (6 links) American Liver Foundation Children's Liver Disease ... Foundation International Patient Organisation for Primary Immunodeficiencies ...

  18. Decline in CD4+ cell numbers in cats with naturally acquired feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Fezer, G; Thum, J; Ackley, C; Herbold, M; Mysliwietz, J; Thefeld, S; Hartmann, K; Kraft, W

    1992-03-01

    T-cell subsets were studied by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in 57 feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-seropositive cats with naturally acquired FIV infection to see whether CD4(+)-CD8+ alterations were comparable to those observed in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. CD4+ values were decreased and CD8+ values were increased. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio was reduced to 1.6, compared with 3.3 in 33 FIV-seronegative control cats. Variance analysis of data showed a significant influence of FIV seropositivity, sex, and spaying of female cats on CD4+ values. CD8+ values were significantly influenced by FIV seropositivity, age, and breed. These findings indicate a similarity between FIV and human immunodeficiency virus infections, as far as alterations of T-cell subsets are concerned. PMID:1310760

  19. Utility of the National Death Index in ascertaining mortality in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome surveillance.

    PubMed

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Maddox, Lorene M; Lieb, Spencer; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2011-07-01

    To assess the utility of the National Death Index (NDI) in improving the ascertainment of deaths among people diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the authors determined the number and characteristics of additional deaths identified through NDI linkage not ascertained by using standard electronic linkage with Florida Vital Records and the Social Security Administration's Death Master File. Records of people diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome between 1993 and 2007 in Florida were linked to the NDI. The demographic characteristics and reported human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission modes of people whose deaths were identified by using the NDI were compared with those whose deaths were ascertained by standard linkage methods. Of the 15,094 submitted records, 719 had confirmed matches, comprising 2.1% of known deaths (n = 34,504) within the cohort. Hispanics, males, people 40 years of age or older, and injection drug users were overrepresented among deaths ascertained only by the NDI. In-state deaths comprised 59.0% of newly identified deaths, and human immunodeficiency virus was less likely to be a cause of death among newly identified compared with previously identified deaths. The newly identified deaths were not previously ascertained principally because of slight differences in personal identifying information and could have been identified through improved linkages with Florida Vital Records.

  20. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  1. [Hemophagocytic syndrome associated with tuberculosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    González, Norma E; Álvarez Ponte, Silvia; López, Mariela; Fronti, Pablo; Smith, Silvina; Pawluk, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The secondary hemophagocytic syndrome is rare in children and even rarer associated with tuberculosis. e report the case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, disseminated tuberculosis and hemophagocytic syndrome. An 8-year-old girl, diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, was admitted due to fever, vomiting and abdominal pain. She presented abdominal distension, dehydration, tachypnea, crackles and wheezing in both lungs, anemia, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. She received broad-spectrum antibiotics and exploratory laparotomy was performed with appendectomy and lymph node biopsy. After 72 hours the patient presented tonic clonic seizure, impaired sensory, fever, hypoxemia, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites and peripheral edema. She developed bicytopenia, hyperferritinemia and bone marrow microscopic examination with hemophagocytosis. She received intravenous gammaglobulin, steroids and blood transfusions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured in gastric aspirate, bone marrow and abdominal lymph node biopsy. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol, showing marked improvement.

  2. Frequency of hyponatremia and nonosmolar vasopressin release in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vitting, K.E.; Gardenswartz, M.H.; Zabetakis, P.M.; Tapper, M.L.; Gleim, G.W.; Agrawal, M.; Michelis, M.F. )

    1990-02-16

    The frequency and pathophysiology of hyponatremia were studied in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Of 71 hospitalized patients surveyed retrospectively, hyponatremia was observed in 37 (52%). Of 48 patients studied prospectively, 27 (56%) were hyponatremic. In 16 hyponatremic patients, volume status; serum and urine osmolalities; renal, adrenal, and thyroid function; and plasma vasopressin levels were assessed. Urine osmolalities were inappropriately elevated relative to serum osmolalities. Four patients had moderate renal insufficiency. Plasma vasopressin levels, measured by radioimmunoassay, were elevated in 15 patients, with the highest levels seen in patients who died. Hyponatremia of multiple etiologies occurred in a majority of inpatients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, often following the administration of hypotonic fluids, and was associated with a 30% (8/27) short-term mortality.

  3. [Hemophagocytic syndrome associated with tuberculosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    González, Norma E; Álvarez Ponte, Silvia; López, Mariela; Fronti, Pablo; Smith, Silvina; Pawluk, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The secondary hemophagocytic syndrome is rare in children and even rarer associated with tuberculosis. e report the case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, disseminated tuberculosis and hemophagocytic syndrome. An 8-year-old girl, diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, was admitted due to fever, vomiting and abdominal pain. She presented abdominal distension, dehydration, tachypnea, crackles and wheezing in both lungs, anemia, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. She received broad-spectrum antibiotics and exploratory laparotomy was performed with appendectomy and lymph node biopsy. After 72 hours the patient presented tonic clonic seizure, impaired sensory, fever, hypoxemia, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites and peripheral edema. She developed bicytopenia, hyperferritinemia and bone marrow microscopic examination with hemophagocytosis. She received intravenous gammaglobulin, steroids and blood transfusions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured in gastric aspirate, bone marrow and abdominal lymph node biopsy. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol, showing marked improvement. PMID:27606663

  4. CD4 T cells in murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: polyclonal progression to anergy

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the kinetics of changes that occur in the helper T cell subset during murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which occurs after infection with the mix of viruses known as BM5. We find that there is expansion of the CD4 T cells by 2 wk, 50% of the CD4 T cells become large as the disease progresses, and the CD4 T cell population is increasingly comprised of cells with a memory/activated phenotype. These effects are apparent by 2 wk postinfection, and the change is nearly complete by 6-8 wk. The phenotypic shift is paralleled by the loss of the ability of the CD4 T cells to proliferate or to produce interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-3, IL-4, and interferon gamma in response to stimulation with mitogens, superantigen, or anti-CD3. There is no obvious expansion or deletion of CD4 T cells expressing particular V beta genes, as might be expected if a conventional superantigen were driving the changes. The results suggest, however, that the total CD4 population has been driven to anergy by some potent polyclonal stimulus directly associated with viral infection. PMID:1588283

  5. Nontropical pyomyositis as a cause of subacute, multifocal myalgia in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, R.F.; Sprenger, H.G.; Mooyaart, E.L.; Tamsma, J.T.; Kengen, R.A.; Weits, J. )

    1990-11-01

    We report a case of nontropical pyomyositis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection, in which severe myalgia was the presenting symptom over several weeks. Multifocal muscle lesions were identified by gallium scanning and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The epidemiology, possible pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic imaging, and therapy are reviewed. Early suspicion of nontropical pyomyositis in severely immunocompromised patients with cryptic myalgia is recommended.

  6. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  7. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Seeborg, Filiz O; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  8. International military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome policies and programs: strengths and limitations in current practice.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R; Hendrix, C W; Kingma, S

    2000-02-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) policies and programs in 119 countries. Ninety-eight percent of the 62 respondents provide prevention education, 95% in group settings but only 53% individually. Predeployment briefings are more common than postdeployment briefings. Condoms are promoted more often than provided. Seventy-eight respondents report some form of mandatory HIV testing, and 58% perform mandatory recruit testing, with recruitment denied to HIV-positive individuals in 17%. Counseling accompanies mandatory testing less than voluntary testing. In-service care for AIDS patients is universal. Many military prevention programs can be improved through postdeployment briefings and proactive interventions involving education, condom distribution, and counseling combined with testing. Mandatory testing is often inconsistent with stated goals, and AIDS care policies may strain military budgets. Testing based on cost-benefit assessments may increase efficiency in military HIV control. Military budgets may benefit from greater civil-military cost sharing in AIDS care. PMID:10709366

  9. International military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome policies and programs: strengths and limitations in current practice.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R; Hendrix, C W; Kingma, S

    2000-02-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) policies and programs in 119 countries. Ninety-eight percent of the 62 respondents provide prevention education, 95% in group settings but only 53% individually. Predeployment briefings are more common than postdeployment briefings. Condoms are promoted more often than provided. Seventy-eight respondents report some form of mandatory HIV testing, and 58% perform mandatory recruit testing, with recruitment denied to HIV-positive individuals in 17%. Counseling accompanies mandatory testing less than voluntary testing. In-service care for AIDS patients is universal. Many military prevention programs can be improved through postdeployment briefings and proactive interventions involving education, condom distribution, and counseling combined with testing. Mandatory testing is often inconsistent with stated goals, and AIDS care policies may strain military budgets. Testing based on cost-benefit assessments may increase efficiency in military HIV control. Military budgets may benefit from greater civil-military cost sharing in AIDS care.

  10. New clinical and histological patterns of acute disseminated histoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ollague Sierra, Jose E; Ollague Torres, Jose M

    2013-04-01

    Histoplasmosis has attained increasing relevance in the past 3 decades because of the appearance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In most immunocompetent persons, the infection is asymptomatic or can produce a respiratory condition with symptoms and radiological images similar to those observed in pulmonary tuberculosis; in non-HIV+ immunocompromised patients, it can cause respiratory symptoms or evolve into a disseminated infection. The same can occur in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. We have observed a series of HIV+ patients with AIDS who presented with cutaneous histoplasmosis and in whom the clinical and histopathological features were highly unusual, including variable mucocutaneous lesions that were difficult to diagnose clinically. These patients displayed unusual, previously undescribed, histological patterns, including lichenoid pattern, nodular pseudomyxoid pattern, pyogenic granuloma-like pattern, perifollicular pattern, and superficial (S), mid (M), and deep perivascular dermatitis; and more commonly encountered patterns, such as histiocytic lobular panniculitis and focal nodular dermatitis. The novel histopathological patterns of cutaneous involvement by histoplasmosis seen in these patients resembled other common inflammatory and infectious conditions and required a high level of suspicion and the application of special stains for organisms for confirmation. These new, clinical, and histological findings do not seem to be commonly encountered in HIV- patients infected with the fungus but seem to be displayed most prominently in HIV+ patients with AIDS.

  11. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Araújo, Paulo Sérgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(®); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country.

  12. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Araújo, Paulo Sérgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(®); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country. PMID:26416105

  13. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8. PMID:26469702

  14. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  15. Monocyte/macrophage trafficking in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis: lessons from human and nonhuman primate studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Bell, Christie; Croul, Sidney; Lewis, Mark; Rappaport, Jay

    2008-08-01

    whose viral burden was predominantly at 1 x 10(6) copies/ml or greater developed encephalitis. To further investigate the relationship between CD163(+)/CD16(+) MPhis/microglia in the CNS and altered homeostasis in the periphery, the authors performed flow-cytometric analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The results demonstrate an increase in the percent frequency of CD163(+)/CD16(+) monocytes in animals with detectable virus that correlated significantly with increased viral burden and CD4(+) T-cell decline. These results suggest the importance of this monocyte subset in HIV/SIV CNS disease, and also in the immune pathogenesis of lentiviral infection. The authors further discuss the potential role of CD163(+)/CD16(+) monocyte/MPhi subset expansion, altered myeloid homeostasis, and potential consequences for immune polarization and suppression. The results and discussion here suggest new avenues for the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutics and vaccine design.

  16. Treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in China: opportunity, advancement and challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Hui-Juan; Jin, Yan-Tao; Guo, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Zhen; Xu, Li-Ran

    2013-08-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has been used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for 30 years and the demonstrated therapeutic effects of CM, such as reducing plasma HIV viral load, increasing CD4(+)T cell counts, promoting immunity reconstitution, ameliorating symptoms and signs, improving the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and counteracting against the effects of anti-retroviral drugs, were summarized and reviewed in this article. The authors point out that it had been a good opportunity to use CM for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS in the past and also there are huge challenges ahead for CM research and clinicians to discover more effective CM and its underlying mechanisms for treatment of AIDS.

  17. Impairment of polymorphonuclear leucocyte function in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarin, A; Uberti Foppa, C; Galli, M; Mantovani, A; Poli, G; Franzetti, F; Nóvati, R

    1986-01-01

    Granulocyte functions were studied in 20 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), 20 subjects with lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) and 15 symptom-free drug addicts (SFDA). Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans appeared normal in homosexual men with AIDS, while drug addicts with AIDS or LAS and SFDA showed a significant defect of these functions as compared to healthy controls. Migration of PMNL in response to a chemoattractant was normal in SFDA, but markedly defective both in LAS and in AIDS patients. In the AIDS group no significant differences were evident between homosexual men and drug addicts. We conclude that defective PMNL phagocytosis and killing, unlike defective migration, are somehow related to drug abuse rather than to infection with the causative agent of the immunodeficiency. PMID:3791696

  18. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  19. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2013-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including in-depth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions.

  20. Lymphoma Secondary to Congenital and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes at a Turkish Pediatric Oncology Center.

    PubMed

    Tanyildiz, Hikmet G; Dincaslan, Handan; Yavuz, Gulsan; Unal, Emel; Ikinciogulları, Aydan; Dogu, Figen; Tacyildiz, Nurdan

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of lymphoma in primary immunodeficiency cases and autoimmune diseases, as well as on a background of immunodeficiency following organ transplants, is increasing. The lymphoma treatment success rate is known to be a low prognosis. Our study aimed to emphasize the low survival rates in immunodeficient vs. immunocompetent lymphoma patients and also to investigate the effect of rituximab in patients with ataxia telangiectasia and other immunodeficiencies. We summarized the clinical characteristics and treatment results of 17 cases with primary immunodeficiency that developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) retrospectively. Seven patients were diagnosed with ataxia-telangiectasia, two with common variable immunodeficiency, two with selective IgA deficiency, one with X-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, one with Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative syndrome, one with interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) deficiency, and one with lymphoma developing after autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). One patient underwent a renal transplant. Of the nine males and eight females (aged 3-12 years, median = 7) that developed lymphoma, seven were diagnosed with HL and ten with NHL (seven B-cell, three T-cell). The NHL patients were started on the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster, POG9317, LMB-96, or R-CHOP treatment protocols with reduced chemotherapy dosages. HL cases were started on the doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and/or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (COPP) protocol, also with modified dosages. Importantly, all seven cases of HL are alive and in remission, while six of the ten NHL patients have died. Primary immunodeficiency is a strong predisposing factor for developing lymphoma. Low treatment success rates relative to other lymphomas and difficulties encountered during treatment indicate that new treatment agents are needed

  1. Vulvar carcinoma in a 12-year-old girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, C; Del Mistro, A; De Rossi, A; Bertorelle, R; Giacomet, V; Ruga, E; Minucci, D

    2000-10-01

    We report the first case of a girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, who developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva at 12 years of age. Lesions resembling bowenoid papulosis covered the perianal area as well. She underwent a nonmutilating surgical excision of the infiltrating lesion. More than 3 years later, her clinical condition is excellent, although dysplastic, noninfiltrating multifocal lesions persist. This case highlights the need to perform careful periodic genital examinations in all HIV-infected children and adolescents born to HIV-positive mothers.

  2. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  3. De Novo intracerebral aneurysm in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G; Ahamed, Naushad A; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated aneurysmal vasculopathy is a rare complication of HIV infection affecting the pediatric and adult population. We present a case of a 7-year-old male child known to have a congenitally acquired HIV infection presenting with a ruptured left distal internal carotid artery fusiform aneurysm that was diagnosed on MRI scans 6 months prior to his presentation. He underwent craniotomy and successful aneurysm reconstruction. He had uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. This case is among the few reported pediatric cases of HIV-associated cerebral arteriopathy to undergo surgery. We also reviewed the relevant literature of this rare condition.

  4. Peripheral Blood and Bone Marrow Abnormalities in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frontiera, Michael; Myers, Adam M.

    1987-01-01

    In reviewing the peripheral hematologic manifestations, bone marrow changes and clinical course in 41 consecutive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), frequent findings included anemia (95%), leukopenia (76%), bone marrow hypercellularity (73%) and pancytopenia (41%). These hematologic abnormalities were not clearly associated with specific clinical manifestations of AIDS, but support the conclusion that the hematopoietic system is a target organ in AIDS. The mechanisms of these abnormalities still need to be evaluated. Clinicians should be aware of these commonly encountered changes. Images PMID:3660772

  5. Detection of thoracic infections by nuclear medicine techniques in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The challenge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for nuclear medicine has been the early detection of related intrathoracic opportunistic infections, inflammatory conditions, and neoplasms. Gallium-67 citrate scanning has proved a sensitive test not only for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but for many of the other opportunistic infections and malignancies, including mycobacterial infections and lymphoma. Patterns and intensity of gallium uptake may suggest more specific diagnoses. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells may also be a valuable diagnostic tool in the AIDS patient.41 references.

  6. [Cystic lymphoid hyperplasia of the parotid in relation to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV+). Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, J M; Chomette, G; Talbi, M; Labrousse, F; Szpirglas, H; Raphael, B; Gentilini, M; Auriol, M; Guilbert, F

    1989-01-01

    Cystic lymphoid hyperplasia of the parotid, a rare disease, was recently described in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We reported here 2 new cases of this illness. The 2 HIV+ patients showed an enlargement of parotid gland. A superficial parotidectomy was performed. The histological and immunohistochemical studies were completed in one case by a histoenzymological and ultrastructural study. We could see numerous cystic cavities lined with a cylindrical or metaplastic malpighian epithelium and surrounded by a lymphoid tissue, similar to a true lymph node with germinal centers. In these lymphoid structures, we could find some epithelial remnants and numerous epimyoepithelial islands. Besides, anomalies similar to those described in persistent generalized lymphadenopathies were obvious: hyperplastic germinal centers with multiplication of B lymphocytes and thin mantle zone, perifollicular hypervascularization, numerous macrophages, plasmocytes and T lymphocytes with increase of T8 cytotoxic subset in interfollicular and paracortical areas. An early opportunist infection is suggested in the histogenesis of this disease. PMID:2727611

  7. Difficulties with diagnosis and consequential poor outcome due to stigma of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Vuletic, Vladimira; Nevajda, Branimir; Spero, Martina; Chudy, Darko

    2013-09-01

    Low incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been detected in Croatia so far. Toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) is the most common opportunistic cerebral infection in AIDS patients and is highly responsive to antiparasitic chemotherapy, if treated at an early stage. We present the case of the brain biopsy confirmed as TE on a 36-year-old female patient who at admission presented with unconsciousness and a right hemiplegia. A MSCT was performed and two hypodense lesions were diagnosed. The patient's family initially denied the presence or history of any medical problem or infection. An MRI showed multiple ring-enhanced mass lesions. An infectologist required a brain biopsy to exclude cerebral lymphoma and multiple metastases. Pathohistological analysis suggested TE. Meanwhile, patient's blood samples were found to be HIV positive. The patient was transferred to University Hospital for Infectious Diseases in Zagreb, where she died 2 days following admission. The patient's family terminally confessed that the patient had been HIV positive for 10 years and had refused any treatment. Family's denial of infection as well as 'hiding information' concerning patient's health from physicians involved in her treatment caused a delay in proper on-time patient treatment. We would like to emphasize that TE must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with multiple cerebral lesions, including patients without acknowledged past history of HIV infection. A stigma towards HIV infection and ignorance of the disease still exist and therefore hinders proper treatment.

  8. [Retrospective bacteriological study of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pangon, B; Michon, C; Bizet, C; Perronne, C; Katlama, C; Marche, C; Lévy-Frébault, V; Buré, A

    1988-05-21

    The main species of mycobacteria isolated in 62 of the 316 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients admitted to the Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris, between January, 1983 and October, 1986 were studied retrospectively according to their site of isolation and their pathogenic role. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated in 19 cases (from pulmonary specimens in 17 cases); this species was present in 59 percent of our African patients as against 20 percent of our European patients. M. avium intracellulare was isolated in 33 cases (17 from blood, 12 from the lung and 11 from the gastrointestinal tract) and was found in 55 p. 100 of our European patients. Other species that were isolated less frequently were M. xenopi (5 cases), M. kansasii (3 cases), M. aurum, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. gordonae, M. simiae and M. terrae (1 case each). Post mortem specimens obtained from 110 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients were cultivated during the same period. In 20 patients, at least one specimen was positive for a mycobacterium: M. tuberculosis in 2 cases, M. avium intracellulare in 18 cases. Twenty-nine of the 33 patients in whom M. avium intracellulare was isolated were considered a posteriori as being infected by this organism. The therapeutic approach varies according to the species involved. No treatment seems to be truly effective against M. avium intracellulare. Pending the results of cultures, no direct bacteriological examination can provide information on the mycobacterial species concerned; however, a conventional antituberculosis treatment may be instituted, particularly in patients from Africa or Haiti.

  9. In vivo treatment with interleukin 12 protects mice from immune abnormalities observed during murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS)

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Lymphoproliferation, chronic B cell activation resulting in hypergammaglobulinemia, and profound immunodeficiency are prominent features of a retrovirus-induced syndrome designated murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS). In vivo treatment of infected mice with recombinant interleukin 12 (IL-12) beginning at the time of infection or up to 9 wk after virus inoculation markedly inhibited the development of splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, as well as B cell activation and Ig secretion. Treatment with IL-12 also had major effects in preventing induction of several immune defects including impaired production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-2 and depressed proliferative responses to various stimuli. The therapeutic effects of IL-12 on the immune system of mice with MAIDS were also associated with reduced expression of the retrovirus that causes this disease (BM5def), with lesser effects on expression of ecotropic MuLV. IL-12 treatment was not effective in IFN-gamma knockout mice or in infected mice treated simultaneously with IL-12 and anti-IFN-gamma. These results demonstrate that induction and progression of MAIDS are antagonized by IL-12 through high-level expression of IFN-gamma and may provide an experimental basis for developing treatments of retrovirus- induced immune disorders with similar immunopathogenic mechanisms. PMID:7964495

  10. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173). Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%), followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. Conclusions: The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area. PMID:27499166

  11. Histoplasmosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS): multicenter study of outcomes and factors associated with relapse.

    PubMed

    Myint, Thein; Anderson, Albert M; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N; Bamberger, David M; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N; Wheat, L Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p < 0.0001) and 5% death (p = 0.28) in the PC group. Relapse occurred in 53% of the nonadherent patients but not in the adherent patients (p < 0.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients with initial central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis relapsed compared to 15% of patients without CNS involvement (p = 0.0004), which may be accounted for by nonadherence. In addition, patients with antigenuria above 2.0 ng/mL at 1-year follow-up were 12.82 times (95% confidence interval, 2.91-55.56) more likely to relapse compared to those with antigenuria below 2.0 ng/mL. Discontinuation of antifungal therapy was safe in adherent patients who completed at least 1 year of antifungal treatment, and had CD4 counts >150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis.

  12. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-03-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive.

  13. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-01-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive. Images PMID:2536830

  14. Intravitreal foscarnet for cytomegalovirus retinitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Llopis, M; Chipont, E; Sanchez, S; España, E; Navea, A; Menezo, J L

    1992-12-15

    We treated a patient who had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and cytomegalovirus retinitis of the left eye. After anesthetic had been topically administered, the patient received intravitreal injections of 1,200 micrograms of foscarnet. Plasma and vitreous foscarnet levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Systemic absorption of the drug was not evident. Elimination half-life from the vitreous after one injection was 54.0 hours. Vitreous levels remained above the mean 50% inhibition value for cytomegalovirus for approximately 56 hours and above the mean inhibition value for human immunodeficiency virus for approximately 241 hours. The patient's visual acuity improved from 20/30 to 20/25 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed the retinal lesion to have become inactive, and no reactivation occurred during the follow-up period of more than four months. The drug was well tolerated and no retinal toxicity was evident. We suggest an induction treatment regimen of two injections weekly for three weeks, followed by a maintenance treatment regimen of one injection weekly.

  15. Exome Sequencing Reveals Primary Immunodeficiencies in Children with Community-Acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Samira; McLaren, Paul J.; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Wong, Richard; Bartha, Istvan; Francis, Joshua R.; Abarca, Katia; Gelderman, Kyra A.; Agyeman, Philipp; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Fellay, Jacques; Schlapbach, Luregn J.; Posfay-Barbe, Klara

    2016-01-01

    One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. Two out of eight (25%) fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in PID genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing PIDs in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying PIDs. PMID:27703454

  16. First report of Cystoisospora belli parasitemia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; di Risio, Cecilia Alicia; Etchart, Cristina Beatriz; Chertcoff, Agustín Víctor; Nigro, Mónica Gabriela; Pantano, María Laura; Ledesma, Bibiana Alba; Vittar, Natalia; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Cystoisospora belli in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been described as cause of chronic diarrhea and disseminated cystoisosporosis. Diagnosis of intestinal cystoisosporosis can be achieved at the tissue level in the villus epithelium of the small bowel. Disseminated cystoisosporosis is diagnosed by microscopy identification of unizoite tissue cysts in the lamina propria of the intestine. We report a case of disseminated cystoisosporosis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with detection of parasitemia. We studied a 39-year old patient with AIDS and chronic diarrhea by analysis of stool and duodenal biopsy samples. Blood samples were also collected and examined by light microscopy and molecular techniques for C. belli DNA detection. The unizoite tissue cyst stages were present in the lamina propria, with unsporulated oocysts in feces. Zoites were present in blood smears and DNA of C. belli was detected in blood samples. Our study identified a new stage in the life cycle of C. belli. Detection of parasitemia is a novel and noninvasive tool for diagnosis of disseminated cystoisosporosis.

  17. Differences in histoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Kian; Wheat, L Joseph; Connolly, Patricia; Cloud, Gretchen; Hajjeh, Rana; Wheat, Emerson; Alves, Katia; Lacaz Cd, Carlos da Silva; Keath, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Demographic and clinical parameters among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and histoplasmosis in Brazil and United States were compared. The Brazilian isolates were typed by restriction-fragment length polymorphism analysis and were DNA fingerprinted by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Skin lesions occurred in 66% of Brazilian case patients, compared with 1%-7% of US case patients. Of 21 treated case patients, 4 (19%) died, a rate similar to that of the US case patients (5%-13%). By nuclear gene typing, the Brazilian isolates were equally divided between South American classes 5 and 6, and RAPD-PCR showed 18 distinct genetic fingerprints in 20 isolates. Skin lesions are more common in infection with class 5 or 6 organisms than with class 2 Histoplasma capsulatum. The role of genetic differences in the organism as a cause for the clinical differences requires investigation. PMID:12447743

  18. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  19. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Chang, P; Moreno, K; Fernández-Fernández, V; Montes de Oca, G; Araiza, J; Ponce, R M

    2009-06-01

    Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis is an opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a series of 23 cases (21 men, two women; median age 29 years) with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis seen at two hospital centres. Most of the patients (21/23) were classified as stage C3. The most common dermatological findings were papules, crusting plaques, nodules and ulcers, mainly located on the face and chest. Of the 23 cases, 15 (65%) had pulmonary involvement. Amphotericin B and itraconazole were the main drugs used for treatment. Treatment response was variable: four of the patients were cured, six improved and remain stable, nine patients died, and four patients were lost to follow-up.

  20. Immunotherapy of Murine Retrovirus-Induced Acquired Immunodeficiency by CD4 T Regulatory Cell Depletion and PD-1 Blockade ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus induces a complex disease featuring an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome termed murine AIDS (MAIDS) in susceptible strains of mice, such as C57BL/6 (B6). CD4 T helper effector cells are required for MAIDS induction and progression of viral pathogenesis. CD8 T cells are not needed for viral pathogenesis, but rather, are essential for protection from disease in resistant strains, such as BALB/c. We have discovered an immunodominant cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope encoded in a previously unrecognized LP-BM5 retroviral alternative (+1 nucleotide [nt]) gag translational open reading frame. CTLs specific for this cryptic gag epitope are the basis of protection from LP-BM5-induced immunodeficiency in BALB/c mice, and the inability of B6 mice to mount an anti-gag CTL response appears critical to the initiation and progression of LP-BM5-induced MAIDS. However, uninfected B6 mice primed by LP-BM5-induced tumors can generate CTL responses to an LP-BM5 retrovirus infection-associated epitope(s) that is especially prevalent on such MAIDS tumor cells, indicating the potential to mount a protective CD8 T-cell response. Here, we utilized this LP-BM5 retrovirus-induced disease system to test whether modulation of normal immune down-regulatory mechanisms can alter retroviral pathogenesis. Thus, following in vivo depletion of CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells and/or selective interruption of PD-1 negative signaling in the CD8 T-cell compartment, retroviral pathogenesis was significantly decreased, with the combined treatment of CD4 Treg cell depletion and PD-1 blockade working in a synergistic fashion to substantially reduce the induction of MAIDS. PMID:21917983

  1. A controlled study of funding for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome as resource capacity building in the health system in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Donald S; Zeng, Wu; Amico, Peter; Rwiyereka, Angelique K; Avila-Figueroa, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Because human inmmunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receives more donor funding globally than that for all other diseases combined, some critics allege this support undermines general health care. This empirical study evaluates the impact of HIV/AIDS funding on the primary health care system in Rwanda. Using a quasi-experimental design, we randomly selected 25 rural health centers (HCs) that started comprehensive HIV/AIDS services from 2002 through 2006 as the intervention group. Matched HCs with no HIV/AIDS services formed the control group. The analysis compared growth in inputs and services between intervention and control HCs with a difference-in-difference analysis in a random-effects model. Intervention HCs performed better than control HCs in most services (seven of nine), although only one of these improvements (Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination) reached or approached statistical significance. In conclusion, this six-year controlled study found no adverse effects of the expansion of HIV/AIDS services on non-HIV services among rural health centers in Rwanda.

  2. The Basic Nature of Ethical Problems Experienced by Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Implications for Nursing Ethics Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Miriam E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) described and validated 100 ethical problems that are experienced by people with AIDS from 3 levels of ethical inquiry: descriptive ethics, normative ethics, and metaethics. Findings suggest strategies for improving nursing ethics education. (JOW)

  3. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  4. Spectrum of immunodeficiencies with Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, J J; Laughter, A H; Rice, L; Ford, R

    1980-01-01

    The role of six suppressor mechanisms upon T and B cell responses was studied on 17 untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Proliferative hyporesponsiveness to mitogen was greatly impaired in 8 of the 13 patients. 10 of these patients had an excessive degree of suppression by cells that adhered to foreign surfaces. Suppression by adherent cells correlated with impairment of proliferative responses and, in some instances, suppression was largely inhibited with indomethacin. Likewise, adherent cells suppressed immunoglobulin synthesis. A correlation was evident between suppression of T and B cell responses by adherent mononuclear leukocytes from individual patients. This suppression coincided with elevated percentages of monocytes in the patient mononuclear cell preparations. This excess of monocytes was not the result of a circulating monocytosis. The monocyte excess may have been acquired during isopyknic cell separation. A second form of suppression was observed in 5 of the 11 patients affected by a lymphocyte that neither adhered to glass wool nor required preactivation. It did not inhibit allogeneic lymphocytes, which contrasts with the suppressor abnormality of monocytoid cells. PMID:6448268

  5. Transdermal testosterone administration in women with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome wasting: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Corcoran, C; Armstrong, C; Caramelli, K; Anderson, E; Cotton, D; Basgoz, N; Hirschhorn, L; Tuomala, R; Schoenfeld, D; Daugherty, C; Mazer, N; Grinspoon, S

    1998-08-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease is increasing rapidly among women, no prior studies have investigated gender-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its complications in this population. Markedly decreased serum androgen levels have been demonstrated in women with AIDS and may be a contributing factor to the wasting syndrome in this population. To assess the effects of androgen replacement therapy in women with AIDS wasting, we conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, pilot study of transdermal testosterone administration. The primary aim of the study was to determine efficacy in terms of the change in serum testosterone levels, safety parameters and tolerability. A secondary aim of the study was to investigate testosterone effects on weight, body composition, quality of life, and functional indexes. Fifty-three ambulatory women with the AIDS wasting syndrome defined as weight less than 90% of ideal body weight or weight loss of more than 10% of the preillness maximum, free of new opportunistic infection within 6 weeks of study initiation, and with screening serum levels of free testosterone less than the mean of the normal reference range (< 3 pg/mL) were enrolled in the study. Subjects were age 37 +/- 1 yr old (mean +/- SEM), weighed 92 +/- 2% of ideal body weight, and had lost 17 +/- 1% of their maximum weight. CD4 count was 324 +/- 36 cells/mm3, and viral burden was 102,382 +/- 28,580 copies. Subjects were randomized into three treatment groups, in which two placebo patches (PP), one active/one placebo patch (AP group), or two active patches (AA group) were applied twice weekly to the abdomen for 12 weeks. The expected nominal delivery rates of testosterone were 150 and 300 microg/day, respectively, for the AP and AA groups. Forty-five subjects completed the study (PP group, n = 13; AP group, n = 14; AA group, n = 18). Two additional subjects from the PP group and two from the AP

  6. Immunomodulatory effect of gold sodium thiomalate on murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Ushijima, H; Hisano, M; Inoue, Y; Shimamura, T; Hirano, T; Müller, W E

    2001-01-01

    Induction of IL-2 production and increased expression of CD25 were observed in C57BL/10 mice after weekly treatment with gold sodium thiomalate (GST). LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) infected mice treated with GST survived longer, had less cervical lymph node swelling, lower spleen weight, and fewer abnormalities in the expression of the cell surface markers, CD4, CD8a and CD45R/B220 on spleen cells than those that were not treated with GST. Thus, GST treatment may be beneficial through a decrease in disease progression via IL-2 induction in MuLV infected mice. This may have application in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

  7. Benign cystic lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland an unusual presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galindo, L M; Franceschini, A; Soltero, E; Dávila, R

    1991-08-01

    This article presents a case of a young, otherwise asymptomatic male patient with a parotid gland enlargement. The initial clinical history did not reveal any risk factors related with HIV infection. A fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lesion showed a benign cystic lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland. This once unusual lesion of the salivary gland has been recently associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is presently encountered with increased frequency in the clinical practice. The knowledge of the association between these two entities led, in this case, to the diagnosis of HIV infection in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Early detection of HIV infection is of vital importance since it has been demonstrated that prompt treatment of these patients with AZT slows down the progression of the disease.

  8. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus knowledge, attitudes, and practices, and use of healthcare services among rural migrants: a cross-sectional study in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Today’s rapid growth of migrant populations has been a major contributor to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, relatively few studies have focused on HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related knowledge, attitudes, and practice among rural-to-urban migrants in China. This cross-sectional study was to assess HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and perceptions, including knowledge about reducing high-risk sex. Methods Two-phase stratified cluster sampling was applied and 2,753 rural migrants participated in this study. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was conducted in Guangdong and Sichuan provinces in 2007. Descriptive analysis was used to present the essential characteristics of the respondents. Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression models were performed to examine the associations between identified demographic factors and high-risk sex, sexually transmitted disease (STD) symptoms, and access to HIV screening services among the seven types of workers. Results 58.6% of participants were knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS transmission, but approximately 90% had a negative attitude towards the AIDS patients, and that 6.2% had engaged in high-risk sex in the past 12 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed sex, marital status, income, migration and work experience to be associated with high-risk sex. Among the 13.9% of workers who reported having STD symptoms, risk factors that were identified included female gender, high monthly income, being married, daily laborer or entertainment worker, frequent migration, and length of work experience. Only 3% of migrant workers received voluntary free HIV screening, which was positively associated with monthly income and workplace. Conclusions HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and practices among rural migrants in China remain a thorny health issue, and use of healthcare services needs to be improved. Low levels of education and knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS among

  9. Sodium stibogluconate (pentostan) overdose in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reymond, J M; Desmeules, J

    1998-12-01

    A 32-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) admitted to the hospital for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis was inadvertently given 10 times the prescribed first dose of sodium stibogluconate ([Sb] 6.5 g instead of 0.65 g). He experienced no immediate major toxicity during the first 48 hours, but a significant rise of pancreatic enzyme activities was observed (amylase at 10 times the upper limit of normal, lipase at 50 times the upper limit of normal) without clinical signs or indications on computed tomography (CT) of pancreatitis. The third day after the overdose, he developed appendicitis, which appeared coincidental; he recovered uneventfully from surgery. Most of the overdose of Sb was eliminated within the first few hours. Pharmacokinetics remained linear; the rapid, long elimination half-lives (2.7 hours and 54 hours, respectively) were similar to those in previously published results. The administration of a chelating agent, dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), 72 hours after the Sb overdose did not modify the pharmacokinetics of the medication.

  10. Disseminated histoplasmosis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Uberaba, MG, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mora, Delio José; dos Santos, Celso Tadeu Barbosa; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2008-03-01

    Histoplasmosis occurs in approximately 5% of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in endemic areas and often evolves to a disseminated picture if diagnosis is delayed and/or CD4 count falls below 150 cells x mm(3) without high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This report presents clinical features of patients with histoplasmosis admitted from 1992 to 2005. Of the 57 individuals, 45 (79%) were male, aged 20-40 years; 30 (52.6%) presented histoplasmosis together with HIV diagnosis and 35 (61.4%) referred illness course up to 4 weeks. Fever, hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, dyspnea and skin lesions were noticed in 50 (87.7%), 38 (66.7%), 30 (52.6%) and 25 (43.9%) patients respectively. High levels of lactic acid dehydrogenase, X-ray lung interstitial pattern, pancytopenia and CD4 count <100 cells x mm(3) were observed in 48 (84.2%), 35 (66%), 34 (59.6%) and 33 (94%) patients respectively. Mycological diagnosis was performed by one or more methods in all patients. Thirty nine (68.4%) received amphotericin B and/or itraconazole. A cure rate was observed in 76.9% and nine (23.1%) died early during therapy. Otherwise death occurred in 18 (31.6%) before diagnosis was completed. Despite free HAART disposal in public Brazilian health services, histoplasmosis still occurs as the first AIDS baseline condition in patients without antiretroviral therapy, many of whom are not receiving any medical care for HIV infection. PMID:18254750

  11. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis Combined with Vitreous Hemorrhage in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    You, Yong Sung; Lee, Sung Jin; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Chang Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To describe an unusual case of rapidly progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) with vitreous hemorrhage in a 41-year-old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), who had retinitis developed from what was probably varicellar-zoster virus combined with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex type 1,2, as proven by the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). Methods This study is a case report detailing clinical follow-up and an aqueous humor test by PCR-RFLP. Results The deep, white retinal lesions coalesced and progressively expanded in a circumferential manner, with sparing of the perivascular retina. However, retinal and vitreous hemorrhages, unusual findings for PORN, could be noted around the optic nerve. Varicellar-zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and herpes simplex types 1,2 (HSV-1,2) were detected in the aqueous humor by PCR. Conclusions PORN has been described as a variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy, occurring particularly in patients with AIDS. Although the etiologic agent has been reported to be VZV, concurrent or combined etiologic agents can include HSV-1, HSV-2, and CMV in AIDS patients. Therefore, combined antiviral therapy with acyclovir and ganciclovir could be more reasonable as an initial therapy. PMID:17460434

  12. Herpetic (non-cytomegalovirus) retinal infections in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    Human herpes viruses cause significant morbidity in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Even after the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), herpes viruses remain the leading causes of blindness in AIDS patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and the closely-related immune reconstitution uveitis syndrome are the most common causes of blindness, but progressive outer retinal necrosis and acute retinal necrosis due to varicella zoster and herpes simplex are also important causes of vision loss. Successful treatment of these conditions requires an aggressive approach with multi-drug intravenous therapy or repeated intravitreal antiviral injections. Since the rate of retinal detachment is alarmingly high despite successful antiviral therapy, internists and ophthalmologists must work closely together to recognize and treat complications as they arise. Fortunately, Epstein-Barr virus is a rare cause of retinal infection and human herpes virus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8 do not appear to be primary pathogens. However, increasing evidence suggests that HHV-6 and HHV-7 play important roles in modulating the immune system and potentiating infection by CMV.

  13. Outcomes of laparoscopic and open appendectomy for acute appendicitis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Mills, Steven D; Dolich, Matthew O; Dang, Phat; Carmichael, Joseph C; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare outcomes of appendectomy between acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and nonAIDS patients and laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) versus open appendectomy (OA) in AIDS patients. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, from 2006 to 2008, clinical data of patients with AIDS who underwent LA and OA were evaluated. A total of 800 patients with AIDS underwent appendectomy during these years. Patients with AIDS had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate (22.56% vs 10.36%), longer length of stay [(LOS) 4.9 vs 2.9 days], and higher mortality (0.61% vs 0.16%) compared with non-AIDS patients. In nonperforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA was associated with a significantly lower complication rate (11.25% vs 21.61%), lower mortality (0.0% vs 2.78%), and shorter mean LOS (3.22 days vs 4.82 days) compared with OA. In perforated cases in patients with AIDS, LA had a significantly lower complication rate (27.52% vs 57.50%), and shorter mean LOS (5.92 days vs 9.67 days) compared with OA. No mortality was reported in either group. In patients with AIDS, LA has a lower morbidity, lower mortality, and shorter LOS compared with OA. Laparoscopic appendectomy should be considered as a preferred operative option for acute appendicitis in patients with AIDS.

  14. Monitoring of HAART regime antiretrovirals in serum of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Casas-Breva, I; Peris-Vicente, J; Rambla-Alegre, M; Carda-Broch, S; Esteve-Romero, J

    2012-09-21

    A methodology based on micellar liquid chromatography to monitor five antiretroviral drugs (lamivudine, stavudine, tenofovir, zidovudine and efavirenz) was proposed. Antiretrovirals were studied in sets of three, corresponding to each highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regime, prescribed to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-infected patients. Four aqueous micellar mobile phases buffered at pH 7 were optimized to separate these compounds, using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the tensioactive, and 1-propanol or 1-pentanol as the organic modifier. The composition of each mobile phase was optimized for each antiretroviral. The common separation conditions were: C18 apolar column (125 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size), UV detection set at 214 nm, and mobile phase running at 1 mL min(-1) without controlling the temperature. The finally suggested method was validated for five analysed antiretroviral drugs following the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines in terms of: linearity between 0.5 and 50 ppm (r(2) > 0.9995), sensitivity (LOD lower than 0.25 ppm), intra- and inter-day precision (<7.1 and <5.2%, respectively) and accuracy (recovery 88.5-105.3% and 93.5-101.3%, respectively), as well as robustness (<6.5%). The proposed method was used to monitor the level of antiretrovirals in the serum of AIDS patients. The suggested methodology was found to be useful in the routine analysis of antiretrovirals in serum samples.

  15. Pathologic findings in the adrenal glands of autopsied patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Denise; Reis, Marlene; Teixeira, Vicente; Silva-Vergara, Mário; Filho, Dalmo Correia; Adad, Sheila; Lazo, Javier

    2002-01-01

    A morphologic evaluation was carried out on adrenal glands from 128 autopsied patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The adrenal gland was compromised in 99.2% of the cases, with distinct pathological features and infectious agents. Inflammatory infiltrates were observed in 99.2% of the cases with a predominance of mononuclear cells in 97.4%, affecting mainly the medulla. Necrosis, fibrosis, hemorrhages and neoplasias were observed. We also described 3 (2.3%) cases of calcification located in the adrenal gland central vein (AGCV). This is seldom mentioned in the literature. Cytomegalovirus was the most frequent infectious agent, observed in 48.4% of cases. Balamuthia mandrillaris, a free living ameba, was found in one case affecting the entire gland. We also found a nest of Trypanosoma cruzi in the musculature of the AGCV. The presence of the nest of T cruzi in AGCV may play a role in the reactivation of this infection in immunosuppressed individuals. Pathologic processes and opportunistic infections may contribute to the alterations in the adrenal gland that lead to multiple organ failure observed in terminal AIDS patients.

  16. Decreased skin reactivity to codeine in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simonart, T h; Parent, D; Heenen, M; Farber, C M; Van Vooren, J P

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the skin reactivity and the mast cell releasibility in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), 24 patients with AIDS were skin tested with histamine (1 mg/ml) and codeine phosphate (0.9, 0.09, and 0.009 mg/ml), a mast cell degranulating agent. They were compared to 12 HIV-negative healthy volunteers and 16 urticaria-prone subjects. Reactivity to codeine phosphate was lower in patients with AIDS than in HIV-negative subjects. This difference in skin reactivity was the more significant when the AIDS group was compared to the urticaria-prone group. There was no correlation between the reactivity to codeine and the IgE levels. Possible explanations to the decreased skin reacting to codeine in patients with AIDS include a decrease of local mast cell density or releasibility. This suggests that a mechanism related to urticaria and involving mast cells is quite unlikely to be at the origin of the hypersensitivity reactions observed in AIDS.

  17. Progressive outer retinal necrosis associated with occlusive vasculitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Chi; Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chen, Huan-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    A 45-year-old man, a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, received a highly active antiretroviral therapy at the outpatient service for 4 years without regular follow-up. He experienced progressively blurred vision for 6 months and a cutaneous zoster on his back 3 months ago. He was diagnosed with progressive outer retinal necrosis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism using an aqueous humor sample, which revealed an existence of varicella zoster virus. He was given a combination of systemic, intravitreal antiviral and a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Occlusive vasculitis, an unusual finding for progressive outer retinal necrosis, developed in both eyes 1 week after the secondary intravitreal injection. Unfortunately, his vision deteriorated to no light perception in both eyes within 2 weeks. Progressive outer retinal necrosis is characterized clinically as showing minimal or no inflammation in the aqueous and vitreous humors, absence of retinal vasculitis, and patches of yellowish spots located deep in the retina. Physicians should pay attention to this rare case of progressive outer retinal necrosis associated occlusive vasculitis with very poor prognosis in spite of aggressive treatment.

  18. Morphometric comparisons of optic nerve axon loss in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenhula, W N; Xu, S Z; Madigan, M C; Heller, K; Freeman, W R; Sadun, A A

    1992-01-15

    Axonal degeneration and diminution of the axonal population in the optic nerve have been documented in aging and in various neuro-ophthalmic conditions. We applied morphometric techniques to the postmortem examination of optic nerves obtained from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Twelve optic nerves (eight from patients with AIDS and four from age-matched control eyes) were stained with paraphenylenediamine and morphometrically analyzed with a computer-assisted image and measurement system. Degeneration was often severe and was scattered throughout all of the AIDS-affected optic nerves. In the AIDS-affected optic nerves, the mean axonal population was markedly lower than the mean obtained from normal optic nerves (880,000 vs 1,507,000). Despite the approximate 40% loss of axons, mean axonal diameters were not markedly different, suggesting that no particular class of axon was especially susceptible to AIDS-associated degeneration. The extent and pattern of axonal loss in optic nerves of patients with AIDS suggest that the changes may not only be secondary to damage at the retina, but may reflect an AIDS-associated primary optic neuropathy.

  19. Morphological changes of an inflammatory myopathy in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Gravell, M; London, W T; Cunningham, G; Sever, J L

    1987-09-01

    Eleven of 25 rhesus monkeys which died of simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) caused by infection with a type D retrovirus related to Mason-Pfizer monkey virus showed evidence of muscle weakness and atrophy and had elevated levels of muscle enzymes. Biopsies of affected muscle studied with enzyme histochemistry showed the characteristic features of polymyositis. Inflammatory cells consisting of lymphocytes, macrophages, and large vacuolated bizarre-shaped cells of undetermined type were surrounding or invading muscle fibers and were present in the perivascular spaces and endomysia septa. Within the perivascular infiltrates, lymphocytes were abundant but very few macrophages were present. Other myopathic features including profound proliferation of fibrous tissue, necrosis, and phagocytosis of muscle fibers were noted to a variable degree. The retrovirus was isolated from affected muscles. The clinical and historical features of polymyositis in rhesus monkeys with SAIDS are very similar to those of human polymyositis. The polymyositis in SAIDS induced by a type D retrovirus related to Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is an excellent primate model to study the mechanism and morphological changes of viral-induced muscle damage.

  20. Disguising the taste of antiretrovirals for pediatric patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: creative flavor compounding and techniques, part 2.

    PubMed

    Horace, Alexis E; Akbarian-Tefagh, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to antiretrovirals for pediatric patients is challenging for a variety of reasons, many of which are quite obvious. The medication's taste and texture may contribute to a child's resistance to following their regimen. To make the problem of compliance even more complex, there are fewer pediatric-friendly formulations available and fewer alternative options for antiretrovirals when compared to formulations and alternatives available to adults. For the sake of compliance, it is vital that parents and/or caregivers be offered innovative ways to disguise the taste of antiretrovirals for pediatric patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Compounding pharmacists can play an important role in finding answers to this situation. This article provides an in-depth discussion on some of the specific flavoring and taste-masking options that are available in the effort to increase adherence in the pediatric patient population.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression in the central nervous system correlates directly with extent of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, B.; La Neve, D.; Eilbott, D.J.; Burger, H.; Seidman, R. ); Peress, N. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY )

    1990-05-01

    To investigate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in infected individuals and examine the correlation of HIV-1 expression with extent of clinical and pathologic disease, the authors studied spinal cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a wide range of spinal cord pathology. By performing in situ hybridization with HIV-1-specific riboprobes, they detected HIV-1 RNA in all 10 cords from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with a common, characteristic pathologic entity called vacuolar myelopathy but not in 10 control cords from HIV-1-infected and uninfected patients. In the cords from individuals with vacuolar myelopathy, the level of HIV-1 RNA expression correlated directly with extent of spinal cord pathology and clinical findings. These data support a role for HIV-1 int he pathogenesis of tissue damage and related clinical disease in infected individuals.

  2. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cancers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J O

    2001-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is considered home to more than 60% of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected cases, with an estimated adult prevalence of 8.0%. It is stated that this region has contributed more than 90% of childhood deaths related to HIV infection and about 93% of childhood acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related deaths. Although no country in Africa is spared of the infection, the bulk is seen in East and South Africa, with the highest recorded rates of 20% to 50% in Zimbabwe. On the other hand, West Africa is less affected, while countries in Central Africa have relatively stable infection rates. Although infections, especially tuberculosis, have emerged as the most important HIV/AIDS-associated killers in recent times, AIDS-associated malignancies are increasingly identified in the late stages. As a result of incomplete data from African countries, it is unclear whether the epidemiology and risks of these cancers are the same as observed in the developed countries. Since the advent of AIDS, epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has become more common in both sexes in Africa, with a dramatic lowering of the male to female ratio from 19:1 to 1.7:1, especially in East Africa. Although there has been a rising trend of AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) worldwide, there is an apparently lower risk in Africa compared with that in the developing world. At present, there is no strong evidence linking increased incidence of invasive cervical cancer to the HIV epidemic; however, some studies have demonstrated an association between HIV and the increased prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). On the other hand, HIV infection is now established as a risk factor for the development of squamous cell neoplasia of the conjunctiva based on studies from Rwanda, Malawi, and Uganda. Despite the problems and limitations of information from sub-Saharan Africa, interesting trends of HIV/AIDS-related cancers

  3. Assessment of sexual risk behaviors and perception of vulnerability to sexually transmitted diseases/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in women, 1999-2012: a population based survey in a medium-sized Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    Mesenburg, Marilia Arndt; Muniz, Ludmila Correa; Silveira, Mariângela Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Sexual behavior is a key factor for susceptibility to sexually transmitted diseases. An evaluation of the sexual behavior of women at reproductive age was conducted in 1999. A replication of this study aims to evaluate the current situation and identify changes in sexual behavior, 13 years later. This is a population-based cross-sectional study, conducted with 1071 women in Pelotas, Brazil. Compared to the 1999 study, a 14% increase in early sexual debut and an 8% decrease in the non-use of condoms were observed in 2012. The proportion of women who reported anal sex doubled between these periods. There was no trend of increase or decrease in the prevalence of behaviors with distinct patterns being observed for each of them. Reduction of non-use of condoms may be an indicator of the effectiveness of campaigns to promote safe sex. However, the increased prevalence of early sexual debut and anal sex indicates the need for campaigns to continue and to expand their focus, especially among vulnerable groups.

  4. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  5. The hypertriglyceridemia of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is associated with an increased prevalence of low density lipoprotein subclass pattern B

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Krauss, R.M.; Pang, M.; Doerrler, W.; Jensen, P.; Grunfeld, C. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-06-01

    To better define the role of environmental factors on LDL phenotypic expression, the authors determined LDL patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and infection characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and weight loss. Similar to previous studies, plasma triglyceride levels were increased, whereas plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol levels were decreased in the AIDS subjects compared to those in age-matched controls. The percentage of AIDS subjects with the LDL B phenotype was increased 2.5-fold, demonstrating an increased prevalence of the LDL B phenotype in an acquired form of hypertriglyceridemia. For each LDL phenotype in AIDS, serum triglyceride levels were higher than the same phenotypic pattern in controls, with the most marked elevations in triglycerides found in AIDS subjects with the LDL B phenotype. In contrast to what was observed in controls, HDL cholesterol levels were decreased in all AIDS subjects and were unrelated to LDL pattern. Total and LDL cholesterol levels were higher in controls with the LDL B phenotype than in those with the LDL A phenotype, but there was no difference in total and LDL cholesterol in AIDS subjects with LDL B compared to A. On multiple regression analysis in subjects with AIDS, plasma triglyceride levels, age, and HDL cholesterol all contribute to the occurrence of the LDL B phenotype, but elevations in plasma triglyceride levels are the strongest independent predictor. Body mass index was not a predictor of LDL B phenotype in AIDS. These results suggest that disturbances in triglyceride metabolism that are caused by AIDS lead to the appearance of the LDL subclass B phenotype and provide further evidence that environmental or disease states that perturb lipid metabolism can produce an increased prevalence of the LDL B phenotype. 35 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Investigation of chronic diarrhoea in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A prospective study of 155 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Blanshard, C; Francis, N; Gazzard, B G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The optimum diagnostic investigation for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and diarrhoea is not known. Often no pathogen is detected and it is unclear whether this is because pathogens are absent in some patients or the investigations used fail to detect them. The hypothesis that AIDS related diarrhoea is usually due to an infection, which can be identified by a simple diagnostic strategy based on the results of intensive investigation of a cohort of such patients, was investigated. METHODS: 155 patients with AIDS and chronic diarrhoea underwent contemporaneous examination of stools, duodenal, jejunal, and rectal biopsy specimens and duodenal aspirate for bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens. A decision tree analysis was used to determine the best sequential diagnostic strategy for clinicians. RESULTS: 128 of 155 patients investigated (83%) had at least one potential pathogen. The presenting clinical features could not predict the presence or site of the pathogens. Stool analysis identified the most pathogens (93 of 199, 47%). Rectal biopsy was essential for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus and adenovirus. Duodenal biopsy was as helpful as jejunal biopsy and detected some treatable pathogens missed by other methods. Electron microscopy, impression smears, and duodenal aspirate yielded little extra information. If gut biopsy was reserved for patients without a stool pathogen, some treatable pathogens would have been missed. CONCLUSION: Most patients with AIDS and chronic diarrhoea have at least one gut pathogen, which can be identified by stool analysis and light microscopic examination of duodenal and rectal biopsies. Some pathogens will be missed unless all these investigations are done on all such patients. PMID:9038664

  7. [Acquired cystic renal disease. Association with hypernephroma].

    PubMed

    Comesaña, E; Pesqueira, D; Tardáguila, F; De la Fuente, A; Antón, I; Vidal, L; Zungri, E

    1992-02-01

    Emergence of multiple bilateral renal cysts observed in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis is 40%. The pathology, known as Acquired Cystic Renal Disease (A.C.R.D.) presents a high association to renal cancer. Two cases of A.C.R.D. and their association with hypernephroma, one resulting in secondary retroperitoneal haemorrhage and the other in intracystic haemorrhage, are presented. Forms and diagnosis are analyzed, insisting upon the need of monitoring the patients in haemodialysis from the point of view of tumour emergence.

  8. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — an assessment of the present situation in the world: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A consultative meeting was convened by the World Health Organization in Geneva on 22-25 November 1983 to assess the present situation of AIDS (the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in the world and to encourage collaboration between the different nations affected by this disease. AIDS was first reported in the USA in 1981, but probably existed there as early as 1978. Soon after its recognition in the USA, similar cases were identified in other areas of the world. In most western European countries and Canada, the epidemiological pattern is very similar to that in the United States, the majority of cases being in homosexual men. In other areas such as equatorial Africa and the Caribbean, the pattern seems to be different with no identifiable risk factors for the majority of cases. The disease is manifested by opportunistic infections and/or selected malignancies, with apparent differences in the clinical presentation between the cases in North America and Europe, on the one hand, and those in the tropics. To date there is no treatment that has significantly improved the underlying cellular immune deficiency, and the mortality is very high. The etiology of AIDS is unknown, but the epidemiological pattern is most consistent with its being caused by a transmissible agent; retroviruses come on top of the list of candidate agents. Despite the unknown etiology and the lack of laboratory diagnostic tests, sufficient information is available to permit health authorities to make recommendations that may reduce appreciably the incidence of the disease. AIDS is an important health problem in a number of countries and has international implications. Collaborative laboratory, epidemiological and clinical research between countries is needed to accelerate control efforts. In the meantime, WHO will coordinate exchange of information among countries. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6331905

  9. Persistence and Fitness of Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquired in Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bluma G.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Petrella, Marco; Moisi, Daniela; Oliveira, Maureen; Detorio, Mervi; Spira, Bonnie; Essabag, Vidal; Conway, Brian; Lalonde, Richard; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the persistence and fitness of multidrug-resistant (MDR) viruses acquired during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection (PHI). In four individuals, MDR infections persisted over the entire study period, ranging from 36 weeks to 5 years, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In stark contrast, identified source partners in two cases showed expected outgrowth of wild-type (WT) virus within 12 weeks of treatment interruption. In the first PHI case, triple-class MDR resulted in low plasma viremia (1.6 to 3 log copies/ml) over time compared with mean values obtained for an untreated PHI group harboring WT infections (4.1 to 4.3 log copies/ml). Increasing viremia in PHI patient 1 at week 52 was associated with the de novo emergence of a protease inhibitor-resistant variant through a recombination event involving the original MDR virus. MDR infections in two other untreated PHI patients yielded viremia levels typical of the untreated WT group. A fourth patient's MDR infection yielded low viremia (<50 to 500 copies/ml) for 5 years despite his having phenotypic resistance to all antiretroviral drugs in his treatment regimen. In two of these PHI cases, a rebound to higher levels of plasma viremia only occurred when the M184V mutation in reverse transcriptase could no longer be detected and, in a third case, nondetection of M184V was associated with an inability to isolate virus. To further evaluate the fitness of MDR variants acquired in PHI, MDR and corresponding WT viruses were isolated from index and source partners, respectively. Although MDR viral infectivity (50% tissue culture infective dose) was comparable to that observed for WT viruses, MDR infections in each case demonstrated 2-fold and 13- to 23-fold reductions in p24 antigen and reverse transcriptase enzymatic activity, respectively. In dual-infection competition assays, MDR viruses consistently demonstrated a marked replicative disadvantage compared with WT virus. These results

  10. [Facial deformity associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Castillo Ariza, M; Almonte Paulino, R; Ariza Castillo, F

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss 2 cases of facial dysmorphism associated with AIDS. Both children were evaluated by staff members an results showed that the 4-year old male showed most of the criteria for the diagnosis of facial dysmorphism (a severe case). The 10-month infant showed a less typical form of dysmorphism, described by the author as more moderate in severity. The 2 children were severely immunodepressed and showed positive HIV titers. In the 1st case, the mother did of an undiagnosed immunodeficiency status when the child was 2 years old. In the other case, both parents were HIV positive and the father was suffering from the disease at that time. The facial features included: boxlike forehead, a flattened, scooped-out appearance of the nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent triangular philtrum, prominent patoulos lips, prominent palpebrae fissure, mild upward obliquity of the eyes, blue sclerae, and 2 epicanthal folds unique to these cases. The 2 children represent the 1st cases of facial dysmorphism associated with congenital AIDS in the medical literature. (author's modified)

  11. What High School Students Who Are Mildly Mentally Retarded Know about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Hazel B.; Horn, Charles J., Jr.

    Alabama high school students (N=309) with mild mental retardation completed a questionnaire concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and sources of information about human immune deficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Students demonstrated some basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and expressed some concern about getting AIDS. They…

  12. Attitudes of Baccalaureate Nursing Students toward Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome According to Mode of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Andrea M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Nursing students (n=236) completed the AIDS Knowledge Scale and AIDS Attitude Scale. Results showed most stigma attached to AIDS acquired through drug use or sexual contact, the least through maternal transmission or blood transfusion. Demographic characteristics did not influence attitudes. (SK)

  13. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the “Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer”. Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Comorbidities and Treatment”, “Public Health Perspectives”, and “Best Practices”. This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:24227993

  14. [A case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient].

    PubMed

    Mori, Naoyoshi; Maeda, Hikaru; Fujiwara, Kentarou; Taniguchi, Haruki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient. The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese woman who received salvage combination anti-retroviral therapy with darunavir plus ritonavir plus raltegravir plus tenofovir/emtricitabine in May 2009. She was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma (T3N3M1, stage IV) in November 2010 and was not found to possess any activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene. Therefore, 6 courses of carboplatin plus pemetrexed and 3 courses of gemcitabine followed by erlotinib were administrated, and therapy was changed to home medical care. The only drug-related adverse event was grade 1 neutropenia, and drug interaction between the simultaneously administered anti-retroviral and chemotherapeutic agents was not confirmed. The patient battled lung adenocarcinoma for 1 year after the diagnosis and died of cancer progression in October 2011. Her performance status was stable and the CD4 (+) lymphocyte count and HIV load were well controlled throughout the course of treatment. In conclusion, the agents used for this patient show high tolerability and can be used as an effective treatment strategy for lung cancer occurring in HIV-positive patients.

  15. Escitalopram treatment of depression in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Jacqueline; Carey, Paul; Joska, John A; Carrara, Henri; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Stein, Dan J

    2014-02-01

    Depression can be a chronic and impairing illness in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Large randomized studies of newer selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as escitalopram in the treatment of depression in HIV, examining comparative treatment efficacy and safety, have yet to be done in HIV-positive patients. This was a fixed-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study to investigate the efficacy of escitalopram in HIV-seropositive subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, major depressive disorder. One hundred two participants were randomly assigned to either 10 mg of escitalopram or placebo for 6 weeks. An analysis of covariance of the completers found that there was no advantage for escitalopram over placebo on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (p = 0.93). Sixty-two percent responded to escitalopram and 59% responded to placebo on the Clinical Global Impression Scale. Given the relatively high placebo response, future trials in this area need to be selective in participant recruitment and to be adequately powered.

  16. The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, R M; Russell, E; Yungbluth, M; Hidvegi, D F; Brody, B A; Dal Canto, M C

    1992-02-01

    A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

  17. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a spatio-temporal analysis of cases reported in the period 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Alves, André T J; Nobre, Flávio F

    2014-05-01

    Despite increased funding for research on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), neither vaccine nor cure is yet in sight. Surveillance and prevention are essential for disease intervention, and it is recognised that spatio-temporal analysis of AIDS cases can assist the decision-making process for control of the disease. This study investigated the dynamic, spatial distribution of notified AIDS cases in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2001 and 2010, based on the annual incidence in each municipality. Sequential choropleth maps were developed and used to analyse the incidence distribution and Moran's I spatial autocorrelation statistics was applied for characterisation of the spatio-temporal distribution pattern. A significant, positive spatial autocorrelation of AIDS incidence was observed indicating that municipalities with high incidence are likely to be close to other municipalities with similarly high incidence and, conversely, municipalities with low incidence are likely to be surrounded by municipalities with low incidence. Two clusters were identified; one hotspot related to the State Capital and the other with low to intermediate AIDS incidence comprising municipalities in the north-eastern region of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

  18. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  19. The physical activity levels among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome receiving high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Frantz, J M; Murenzi, A

    2013-01-01

    The accessibility of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for local human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients is improving in Rwanda. It is well known that this therapy is associated with serious adverse effects, such as metabolic and morphologic changes. One of the recommended preventive modalities for these complications is participation in physical activity. The current study aims to determine the anthropometric profile and physical activity levels among people living with HIV and receiving HAART in Kigali, Rwanda. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive quantitative survey. The participant's levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire for 407 clients passing through the clinics. Of the participants, approximately 70% were inactive and in addition, 40% were obese and 43% overweight. Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity. Lack of motivation, and time as well as fear of worsening the disease were found to be barriers to participation in physical activity.

  20. CT findings in complications of acquired renal cystic disease.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O; Miller, L R; Lichtman, J B

    1987-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with end-stage renal disease developed acquired renal cystic disease. The left kidney underwent tumorous degeneration necessitating nephrectomy. Eight months later acute hemorrhagic renal cyst rupture culminated in right nephrectomy.

  1. An Aggressive Plasmablastic Lymphoma of the Oral Cavity as Primary Manifestation of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Minué, Gonzalo; Campitelli, Ana; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare entity that was first described in the jaws and the oral cavity of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Plasmablastic lymphoma is considered as a diffuse, large, B-cell lymphoma with a unique phenotype and a predilection for the oral cavity. Objective The authors describe a case of an aggressive plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity as the primary manifestation of AIDS. Resumed Report We report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma involving only the oral cavity as the first manifestation of AIDS. Diagnosis was confirmed by the oral lesion biopsy and the histopathologic examination that showed a dense infiltrate composed of atypical lymphocytes with numerous plasmocytes that expressed the plasma cell markers MUM-1 and CD138 and that were negative for the B-cell markers CD3, CD20, and CD45. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization revealed the Epstein-Barr virus genome in the atypical cells. Polymerase chain reaction was also positive for human herpesvirus-8 RNA. Conclusion The HIV serologic status should be evaluated in all patients with plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity or extraoral sites.

  2. [The use of growth hormone to treat endocrine-metabolic disturbances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients].

    PubMed

    Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana A; da Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2008-07-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids) was initially related to HIV-associated wasting syndrome, and its metabolic disturbances to altered body composition. After Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) was started, malnutrition has declined and HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome has emerged as an important metabolic disorder. Aids is also characterized by hormonal disturbances, principally in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. The use of recombinant human GH (hrGH) was formerly indicated to treat wasting syndrome, in order to increase lean body mass. Even though the use of hrGH in lipodystrophy syndrome has been considered, the decrease in insulin sensitivity is a limitation for its use, which has not been officially approved yet. Diversity in therapeutic regimen is another limitation to its use in Aids patients. The present study has reviewed the main HIV-related endocrine-metabolic disorders as well as the use of hrGH in such conditions.

  3. Correlation of Pneumocystis carinii cyst density with mortality in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, W; Miller, C N; Chew, K L; Mayall, B H; Griffiss, J M

    1992-06-01

    Fifteen percent to 20% of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pneumocystis pneumonia do poorly despite early intervention. It is not known what distinguishes those who die, despite early intervention and aggressive therapy, from those who readily respond to therapy. We used image analysis to determine the relative abundance of cysts within aggregates of Pneumocystis carinii found in induced sputa (21 patients) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (14 patients) from 35 patients with pneumocystis pneumonia. We calculated a cyst density (number of cysts per area of aggregate) for each aggregate and a mean cyst density for all of the aggregates on the smear. Six patients died within 2 weeks of diagnosis; four of these six patients who had autopsies all had residual P carinii. The mean cyst density for those who died was 9.7 +/- 3.9 (range, 5 to 15 x 10(-3)). The 29 patients who survived beyond 2 weeks had a mean cyst density of 18.4 +/- 8.7 (range, 5 to 35 x 10(-3); P = .01). Mean cyst density was not influenced by the number of aggregates present in the smear, the variation in cyst density among aggregates in a smear, or the episode of pneumocystis pneumonia. Cyst density determinations alone should not be used to predict outcome for individuals with P carinii pneumonia until further study is completed. Nevertheless, the current study suggests that a low cyst density specimen, which may indirectly indicate a greater proportion of trophozoites compared with a high cyst density specimen, may be associated with an unfavorable outcome in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated pneumocystis pneumonia.

  4. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  6. Acquired immunodeficiencies and tuberculosis: focus on HIV/AIDS and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ronacher, Katharina; Joosten, Simone A; van Crevel, Reinout; Dockrell, Hazel M; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2015-03-01

    The spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection within Africa led to marked increases in numbers of cases of tuberculosis (TB), and although the epidemic peaked in 2006, there were still 1.8 million new cases in 2013, with 29.2 million prevalent cases. Half of all TB cases in Africa are in those with HIV co-infection. A brief review of the well-documented main immunological mechanisms of HIV-associated increased susceptibility to TB is presented. However, a new threat is facing TB control, which presents itself in the form of a rapid increase in the number of people living with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), particularly in areas that are already hardest hit by the TB epidemic. T2DM increases susceptibility to TB threefold, and the TB burden attributable to T2DM is 15%. This review addresses the much smaller body of research information available on T2DM-TB, compared to HIV-TB comorbidity. We discuss the altered clinical presentation of TB in the context of T2DM comorbidity, changes in innate and adaptive immune responses, including lymphocyte subsets and T-cell phenotypes, the effect of treatment of the different comorbidities, changes in biomarker expression and genetic predisposition to the respective morbidities, and other factors affecting the comorbidity. Although significant gains have been made in improving our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of T2DM-associated increased susceptibility, knowledge gaps still exist that require urgent attention.

  7. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  8. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  9. The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection in patients with factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease)

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J M; Variakojis, D; Phair, J P; Green, D

    1987-06-01

    Early reports suggested that hemophiliacs with factor IX deficiency (Christmas Disease) may be at less risk for developing the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) than patients with classic hemophilia. We evaluated 12 factor IX deficient patients for clinical and immunologic abnormalities related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibody to HIV was not detected in these patients prior to 1982. By 1985, 66 percent (eight of 12) patients were seropositive. All three concentrates available commercially before 1985 were associated with seropositivity. Furthermore, seropositive hemophiliacs had received on average significantly more factor IX concentrate than seronegative hemophiliacs (27,825 +/- 17,976 (S.D.) versus 1,250 +/- 1,500 factor units/year, (p less than 0.02). Half of the seropositive individuals had generalized lymphadenopathy with splenomegaly. Two seropositive patients have developed AIDS, one with cryptococcal meningitis and another with a large cell immunoblastic lymphoma. Infection with HIV has occurred with high frequency in hemophiliacs who received unmodified factor IX concentrates.

  10. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  11. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a “nucleoplasmic reticulum,” into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  12. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  14. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Beenish; Fernandes, Denise; Chaucer, Benjamin; Chevenon, Marie; Nandi, Minesh; Saverimuttu, Jessie; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top. PMID:26793479

  15. [Cerebral infarction and intracranial aneurysm related to the reactivation of varicella zoster virus in a Japanese acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Okada, Kazumasa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-01-01

    A 35-years-old right-handed man admitted to our hospital with a worsening of dysarthria, left facial palsy and left hemiparesis for 2 days. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed when he was 28 years old. At that time, he also was treated for syphilis. After highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) was introduced at the age of 35 years old, serum level of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was not detected, but the number of CD4+ T cells was still less than 200/μl. He had no risk factors of atherosclerosis including hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. He had neither coagulation abnormality nor autoimmune disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed acute ischemic infarction spreading from the right corona radiate to the right internal capsule without contrast enhancement. Stenosis and occlusion of intracranial arteries were not detected by MR angiography. Although argatroban and edaravone were administered, his neurological deficits were worsened to be difficult to walk independently. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed a mild mononuclear pleocytosis (16/μl). Oligoclonal band was positive. The titer of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies was increased, that indicated VZV reactivation in the central nervous system (CNS), although VZV DNA PCR was not detected. Therefore, acyclovir (750 mg/day for 2 weeks) and valaciclovir (3,000 mg/day for 1 month) were administered in addition to stroke therapy. He recovered to be able to walk independently 2 month after the admission.Angiography uncovered a saccular aneurysm of 3 mm at the end of branch artery of right anterior cerebral artery, Heubner artery, 28 days after the admission. We speculated that VZV vasculopathy caused by VZV reactivation in CNS was involved in the pathomechanism of cerebral infarction rather than HIV vasculopathy in the case.

  16. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children Can Reveal a Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaschignard, Jean; Levy, Corinne; Chrabieh, Maya; Boisson, Bertrand; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Dubos, François; Durand, Philippe; Gaudelus, Joël; Gendrel, Dominique; Gras Le Guen, Christèle; Grimprel, Emmanuel; Guyon, Gaël; Jeudy, Catherine; Jeziorski, Eric; Leclerc, Francis; Léger, Pierre-Louis; Lesage, Fabrice; Lorrot, Mathie; Pellier, Isabelle; Pinquier, Didier; de Pontual, Loïc; Sachs, Philippe; Thomas, Caroline; Tissières, Pierre; Valla, Frédéric V.; Desprez, Philippe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bossuyt, Xavier; Cohen, Robert; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pediatric patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) die from the disease. Some primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are known to confer predisposition to IPD. However, a systematic search for these PIDs has never been carried out in children presenting with IPD. Methods. We prospectively identified pediatric cases of IPD requiring hospitalization between 2005 and 2011 in 28 pediatric wards throughout France. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture, polymerase chain reaction result, and/or soluble antigen detection at a normally sterile site. The immunological assessment included abdominal ultrasound, whole-blood counts and smears, determinations of plasma immunoglobulin and complement levels, and the evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines. Results. We included 163 children with IPD (male-to-female ratio, 1.3; median age, 13 months). Seventeen children had recurrent IPD. Meningitis was the most frequent type of infection (87%); other infections included pleuropneumonitis, isolated bloodstream infection, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and mastoiditis. One patient with recurrent meningitis had a congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula. The results of immunological explorations were abnormal in 26 children (16%), and a PID was identified in 17 patients (10%), including 1 case of MyD88 deficiency, 3 of complement fraction C2 or C3 deficiencies, 1 of isolated congenital asplenia, and 2 of Bruton disease (X-linked agammaglobulinemia). The proportion of PIDs was much higher in children aged >2 years than in younger children (26% vs 3%; P < .001). Conclusions. Children with IPD should undergo immunological investigations, particularly those aged >2 years, as PIDs may be discovered in up to 26% of cases. PMID:24759830

  17. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is active against hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chi, SungGi; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Asako; Takaoka, Masato; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital to initiate highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for documented acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The HIV load was 2.5 million copies/mL and the CD4-positive lymphocyte count was only 52 cells/µL at presentation. The HAART regimen consisted of lamivudine and abacavir as the backbone, plus raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir as the base. The day after initiating HAART, his body temperature rose to 102.4 °F (39.1 °C), accompanied by elevated levels of liver enzymes, neutropenia, coagulopathies, and an extremely high serum ferritin level, prompting us to suspect hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). To correct the coagulation abnormalities, recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM) was initiated at 375 U/kg. Surprisingly, fever resolved almost immediately, in parallel with dramatic decreases in serum levels of ferritin and liver enzymes and prompt normalization of coagulopathy with only two doses of rTM. The patient subsequently developed amebiasis, which was successfully treated using metronidazole. In summary, the use of rTM dramatically improved not only DIC, but also HLH, suggesting potent anti-inflammatory effects of the agent. Although further clinical reports and trials are needed, rTM appears to provide an additional therapeutic option in the management of HLH.

  18. Lung and chest wall mechanics in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and severe Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E; Calderini, E; Robatto, F M; Puccio, P; Milic-Emili, J

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical characteristics of the respiratory system in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). In 12 mechanically ventilated patients, total respiratory system mechanics was assessed using the technique of rapid airway occlusion during constant flow inflation, and was partitioned into lung and chest wall components using the oesophageal balloon technique. We measured interrupter resistance (Rint), which mainly reflects airway resistance, additional resistance (deltaR) due to viscoelastic behaviour and time constant inequalities, and static elastance (Est). In addition, the static inflation volume-pressure (V-P) curve was assessed. In eight patients, computed tomography scans were performed within 2 days of the assessment of respiratory mechanics. Compared to values reported in the literature for normal subjects, Est and deltaR were markedly increased in AIDS patients with PCP, whilst Rint exhibited a relatively smaller increase. These changes, which involved only the lung and airways, were mainly due to the reduction of ventilated lung units, but additional factors were involved to cause independent modifications of lung stiffness, airway calibre, and viscoelastic properties. The changes in Rint, deltaR, and Est were similar to those observed in other studies on patients with ARDS of different aetiologies. At variance with common observations in the latter patients, none of the AIDS patients with PCP exhibited an inflection point on the static inflation V-P curve, suggesting little or no alveolar recruitment during lung inflation. This finding could be related to the distinctive histopathology of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Indeed, computed tomography revealed homogeneous diffuse interstitial and alveolar infiltration rather than the dense, dependent opacities observed in other studies on acute respiratory

  19. Successful treatment of bowenoid papulosis in a 9-year-old girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, James C; Vaughan, Mary C; Williams, Judith V

    2003-07-01

    A 9-year-old black girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and no history of condyloma acuminata presented with a 4-year history of enlarging and spreading dark brown flat papules in the perineum. Some of the lesions were confluent and extended from the clitoris to the labia majora and posteriorly to the buttocks and perianal region. A biopsy of one of the lesions showed bowenoid features. Our patient had a normal Pap smear, but vaginal and cervical biopsy specimens revealed human papillomavirus type 16. Therapy with topical imiquimod cream every other day was started, but little improvement was noted after 2 months. Application of 25% podophyllin every 4 to 8 weeks was added, and improvement was noted within 1 month. After 1 year of treatment, the patient had complete resolution of all lesions, and she has had no further appearance of lesions. Our case emphasizes the need for increased awareness of the potential for development of bowenoid papulosis in HIV-positive children as well as the successful treatment of our patient with topical therapy alone.

  20. Influence of the greenhouse effect on human health through stratospheric cooling: Possible increase in acquired immunodeficient syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Kazuto; Tsushima, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Shin

    1996-09-01

    The greenhouse effect cools the stratosphere and increases formation of PSC (polar stratospheric cloud) in polar regions and enhances ozone depletion. If the enhanced ozone depletion diffused to lower latitudes, it could increase ultraviolet radiation (UV), which might increase acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemiological studies are made to test this hypothesis. The relation between AIDS prevalence R and latitude {theta}. Comparison of analyses shows that R of Caucasians would be higher than Non-Caucasians at the same {theta}. These trends are similar to those of skin cancers known to be caused by UV. In developing countries poverty, malnutrition, etc., could cause high R, and since most developing countries are located at low {theta}, the low {theta} increase may be due to these factors. However if so in Africa they are about the same and the low {theta} increase would disappear, but data on African countries also show the low {theta} increase and the significant correlation. Some countries at low {theta} have low R, probably because HIV is not prevalent for them. Then the upper envelope of the distribution of R would be cases when HIV is prevalent and UV is most effective. Therefore analyses are repeated using maxima of R within intervals of {theta} of 1, 3 and 5{degree}. In all cases the low {theta} increase and the correlation becomes more significant. These results support the hypothesis that AIDS is promoted by UV.

  1. Imaging of acquired coronary diseases: From children to adults.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, A; Jacquier, A; Falque, C; Gorincour, G; Gaubert, J Y

    2016-05-01

    Acquired coronary diseases include aneurysms, fistulae, dissections, and stenosis. Aneurysms may occur secondarily to Kawasaki disease, a childhood vasculitis, the prognosis of which depends on the coronary involvement, or they may be degenerative, infectious, inflammatory, or traumatic in origin. Fistulae develop between the coronary arterial system and a pulmonary or bronchial artery, or cardiac cavity. Dissections may occur spontaneously or may be post-traumatic. These coronary abnormalities may be found incidentally or may present as complications, infarction or rupture. The goals of this article are to understand acquired childhood and adult coronary diseases and their usual means of presentation, the ways of investigating them, and the principles of their treatment. PMID:27130480

  2. Multiple coronary aneurysms in a young adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, Justin; Petersen, Timothy C.; Flemmer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection can cause multiple deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has supported a direct association between HIV infection and accelerated atherosclerosis. The mechanism for atherosclerosis in HIV-positive patients is multifactorial, an interplay between conventional risk factors, HIV itself and highly active antiretroviral therapy. The case described is a 29-year-old man with HIV, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy and with few cardiovascular risk factors, who presented with chest pain and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed multiple coronary artery aneurysms in the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery. Aneurysmal formation may develop from vasculitis, HIV itself, accelerated atherosclerosis, congenital formation or medications (e.g. protease inhibitors). The researchers provide a review of coronary artery disease, aneurysmal formation and vasculitic processes in the context of HIV. As this clinical entity becomes more apparent, alternative therapeutic options may need to be explored. PMID:27168940

  3. Pediatric renal cryptococcosis: novel manifestations in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome era.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Deonarain, Julian; Bhimma, Rajendra; Chotey, Nivesh; Sewram, Vikash

    2011-06-01

    Pediatric cryptococcosis has been documented in various organs, but pediatric renal cryptococcosis (RC) remains undocumented to date. The authors report RC in 2 children with AIDS, 7 and 9 years of age, with proteinuria. Both patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ARV) for 28 (patient 1) and 54 (patient 2) weeks each, had secured viral immunosuppression, but immune restoration was realized by patient 1 only. Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was diagnosed on the renal biopsy from patient 1 based on the clinicopathological profile and the presence of segmental glomerular and an interstitial lymphoplasmacytic and granulomatous reaction to Cryptococcus neoformans, with a predominance of capsule-deficient fungal forms. The renal biopsy from patient 2 demonstrated typical HIV-associated nephropathy with focal intratubular and interstitial C neoformans yeasts. Pediatric AIDS-associated renal disease must be expanded to include RC and cryptococcal IRIS, and the kidney must be included as a potential sentinel site of IRIS.

  4. Multiple coronary aneurysms in a young adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heizer, Justin; Petersen, Timothy C; Flemmer, Mark C

    2016-05-01

    HIV infection can cause multiple deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has supported a direct association between HIV infection and accelerated atherosclerosis. The mechanism for atherosclerosis in HIV-positive patients is multifactorial, an interplay between conventional risk factors, HIV itself and highly active antiretroviral therapy. The case described is a 29-year-old man with HIV, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy and with few cardiovascular risk factors, who presented with chest pain and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed multiple coronary artery aneurysms in the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery. Aneurysmal formation may develop from vasculitis, HIV itself, accelerated atherosclerosis, congenital formation or medications (e.g. protease inhibitors). The researchers provide a review of coronary artery disease, aneurysmal formation and vasculitic processes in the context of HIV. As this clinical entity becomes more apparent, alternative therapeutic options may need to be explored.

  5. Assessing the risk of laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Sejvar, James J; Johnson, David; Popovic, Tanja; Miller, J Michael; Downes, Frances; Somsel, Patricia; Weyant, Robbin; Stephens, David S; Perkins, Bradley A; Rosenstein, Nancy E

    2005-09-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is infrequently reported as a laboratory-acquired infection. Prompted by two cases in the United States in 2000, we assessed this risk among laboratorians. We identified cases of meningococcal disease that were possibly acquired or suspected of being acquired in a laboratory by placing an information request on e-mail discussion groups of infectious disease, microbiology, and infection control professional organizations. A probable case of laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease was defined as illness meeting the case definition for meningococcal disease in a laboratorian who had occupational exposure to an N. meningitidis isolate of the same serogroup within 14 days of illness onset. Sixteen cases of probable laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease occurring worldwide between 1985 and 2001 were identified, including six U.S. cases between 1996 and 2000. Nine cases (56%) were serogroup B; seven (44%) were serogroup C. Eight cases (50%) were fatal. All cases occurred among clinical microbiologists. In 15 cases (94%), isolate manipulation was performed without respiratory protection. We estimated that an average of three microbiologists are exposed to the 3,000 meningococcal isolates seen in U.S. laboratories yearly and calculated an attack rate of 13/100,000 microbiologists between 1996 and 2001, compared to 0.2/100,000 among U.S. adults in general. The rate and case/fatality ratio of meningococcal disease among microbiologists are higher than those in the general U.S. population. Specific risk factors for laboratory-acquired infection are likely associated with exposure to droplets or aerosols containing N. meningitidis. Prevention should focus on the implementation of class II biological safety cabinets or additional respiratory protection during manipulation of suspected meningococcal isolates.

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Patients with HIV Infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neera; Sharma, Lokesh Kumar; Dutta, Deep; Gadpayle, Adesh Kisanji; Anand, Atul; Gaurav, Kumar; Mukherjee, Sabyasachi; Bansal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV are not well determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV infected Indians. Methods. Consecutive HIV patients, 18–70 years of age, without any severe comorbid state, having at least 1-year follow-up at the antiretroviral therapy clinic, underwent clinical assessment and hormone assays. Results. From initially screened 527 patients, 359 patients (61.44 ± 39.42 months' disease duration), having good immune function [CD4 count >200 cell/mm3: 90.25%; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): 88.58%], were analyzed. Subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH) was the commonest thyroid dysfunction (14.76%) followed by sick euthyroid syndrome (SES) (5.29%) and isolated low TSH (3.1%). Anti-TPO antibody (TPOAb) was positive in 3.90%. Baseline CD4 count had inverse correlation with TPOAb after adjusting for age and body mass index. Stepwise linear regression revealed baseline CD4 count, TPOAb, and tuberculosis to be best predictors of ScH after adjusting for age, weight, duration of HIV, and history of opportunistic fungal and viral infections. Conclusion. Burden of thyroid dysfunction in chronic HIV infection with stable immune function is lower compared to pre-HAART era. Thyroid dysfunction is primarily of nonautoimmune origin, predominantly ScH. Severe immunodeficiency at disease onset, TPOAb positivity, and tuberculosis were best predictors of ScH. PMID:26798547

  7. [Comment on the intervention of Traditional Chinese Medicine on survival rates of patients living with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Jiping; Guo, Huijun; Xu, Liran

    2016-06-01

    Despite many differences between Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and conventional medicine, the use of TCM in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is increasingly recognized and accepted by patients. Recent research findings on the benefits of Chinese herbal medicine on long-term survival in patients with HIV/AIDS are encouraging and hopeful, but inconclusive. More research is needed.

  8. The role of nurses in the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome policy process in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Phaladze, N A

    2003-03-01

    In Botswana, there is dearth of literature on the role of nursing in health-care policy and resource allocation and yet nurses constitute the majority (85%) of health manpower. The health-care delivery system depends mostly on nurses for service provision. There were two main purposes of this study: first, to gather descriptive data from major key players (with particular emphasis on nurses) concerning knowledge of the policy process and resource allocation for management and care of clients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Botswana; and, second, to identify nurse characteristics (e.g. position, education, experience, job category) associated with motivation to influence health-care policy in HIV/AIDS management and care in Botswana. A policy process conceptual framework was used to guide data collection and analysis. A case-study research method was used to conduct in-depth interviews from a purposive sample of 19 policy makers, and a survey questionnaire was used to collect data from a purposive sample of 95 registered nurses from six study sites in Botswana. The study findings indicate minimal participation of nurses in health-care policy process and resource allocation. The demographic variable of position was a predictor of the involvement of nurses in policy and in budgetary decisions. Both survey and interview data indicated that this minimal participation of nurses in the policy process resulted in implementation problems, thus compromising service provision. Implications of the findings for the nursing profession, nursing practice and policy, which address the importance of nurses' involvement, are discussed. PMID:12581124

  9. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions.

  10. Vitamin D status in a Brazilian cohort of adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schtscherbyna, Annie; Gouveia, Carla; Pinheiro, Maria Fernanda Miguens Castelar; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Machado, Elizabeth Stankiewicz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the prevalence and related factors of vitamin D (VitD) insufficiency in adolescents and young adults with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus. A cohort of 65 patients (17.6 ± 2 years) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for pubertal development, nutrition, serum parathormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [s25(OH)D]. s25(OH)D levels < 30 ng/mL (< 75 nmol/L) were defined as VitD insufficiency. CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load, history of worst clinical status, immunologic status as nadir, current immunologic status, and antiretroviral (ART) regimen were also evaluated as risk factors for VitD insufficiency. Mean s25(OH)D was 37.7 ± 13.9 ng/mL and 29.2% had VitD insufficiency. There was no difference between VitD status and gender, age, nutritional status, clinical and immunological classification, and type of ART. Only VitD consumption showed tendency of association with s25(OH)D (p = 0.064). Individuals analysed in summer/autumn season had a higher s25(OH)D compared to the ones analysed in winter/spring (42.6 ± 14.9 vs. 34.0 ± 11.9, p = 0.011). Although, the frequency of VitD insufficiency did not differ statistically between the groups (summer/autumn 17.9% vs. winter/spring 37.8%, p = 0.102), we suggest to monitor s25(OH)D in seropositive adolescents and young adults, especially during winter/spring months, even in sunny regions. PMID:26872341

  11. Orchitis and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected cells in reproductive tissues from men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pudney, J.; Anderson, D.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the male reproductive tract and the sexual transmission of HIV-1 through semen are poorly understood. To address these issues, the authors performed morphologic and immunocytochemical analyses of reproductive tissues obtained at autopsy from 43 male acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing different subpopulations of white blood cells were used to detect leukocyte infiltration and map the location of potential lymphocytic/monocytic HIV-1 host cells and immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques were used to detect HIV-1-infected cells in the testis, excurrent ducts, and prostate. Distinct pathologic changes were observed in a majority of testes of AIDS patients that included azoospermia, hyalinization of the boundary wall of seminiferous tubules, and lymphocytic infiltration of the interstitium. The reproductive excurrent ducts and prostate appeared morphologically normal except for the presence of focal accumulations of white blood cells in the connective tissue stroma. In the testis many white blood cells were shown to be CD4+, indicating the presence of abundant host cells (T-helper/inducer lymphocytes and macrophages) for HIV-1. Furthermore macrophages and cells of lymphocytic morphology were observed migrating across the boundary walls of hyalinized seminiferous in tubules to enter the lumen. In 9 of the 23 cases tested for HIV-1 protein expression by immunocytochemistry. HIV-1 + cells of lymphocytic/monocytic morphology were found in the seminiferous tubules and interstitium of the testis, epididymal epithelium, and connective tissue of the epididymis and prostate. One patient with epididymal blockage had accumulations of HIV-1-antigen-positive cells of macrophages morphology in the distended lumen of the efferent ducts. There was no evidence of active HIV-1 infection in germ cells or Sertoli cells of the seminiferous

  12. Problems in veterinary ultrasonographic analysis of acquired heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bond, B R

    1991-12-01

    Echocardiography in veterinary medicine has both enhanced our ability to diagnose and treat cardiac diseases in small animals and added confusion to what we already know. Because we can actually see the heart beating and visualize blood flows within the cardiac chambers as well as measure velocities of blood flows, we have a tool that increases our non-invasive diagnostic abilities. On the other hand, the lines between different heart diseases are not always clear-cut, and the more we learn about heart disease the more we see the shades of distinction between different diseases become blurred. This chapter will look at the main abnormalities we see in veterinary medicine (mitral regurgitation, pericardial disease, and the different feline and canine cardiomyopathies) and will attempt to help the veterinary echocardiographer avoid common problems encountered in acquired heart disease as well as use echocardiographic information to gain a better understanding of the disease process occurring in animals. PMID:1839366

  13. Immunophenotypic characterization of the cutaneous exanthem of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. Apposition of degenerative Langerhans cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes during the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ringler, D. J.; Hancock, W. W.; King, N. W.; Letvin, N. L.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Murphy, G. F.

    1987-01-01

    A T-cell tropic retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), has recently been isolated from immunodeficient rhesus monkeys. This virus has remarkable similarities to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Subsequent studies of simian infection with SIV have shown it to be a relevant animal model for studying the pathogenesis of AIDS in man. In both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys, a cutaneous maculopapular eruption has been described. To date, the pathogenesis and possible relationship of these exanthema to the evolution of systemic immunosuppression have remained obscure. In this study, the mononuclear cell infiltrates that characterize skin rashes of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys were found to be composed predominantly of cells with phenotypic characteristics of cytotoxic/suppressor (T8+) lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Many of these cells expressed membrane-bound interleukin-2 receptor molecules. Double labeling and immunoelectron microscopy revealed these cells in direct contact with degenerative Langerhans cells within the epidermis and dermis. These observations suggest that the cutaneous rash associated with SIV infection may be the consequence of target cell injury of Langerhans cells by effector cells with cytotoxic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3030113

  14. Imported Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome–Related Histoplasmosis in Metropolitan France: A Comparison of Pre–Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy Eras

    PubMed Central

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985–1994) and HAART (1997–2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era. PMID:22049053

  15. Imported acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis in metropolitan France: a comparison of pre-highly active anti-retroviral therapy and highly active anti-retroviral therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Peigne, Vincent; Dromer, Françoise; Elie, Caroline; Lidove, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum infection is rare outside disease-endemic areas. Clinical presentation and outcome of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis are unknown in non-endemic areas with wide access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of cases recorded at the French National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals during two decades: pre-HAART (1985-1994) and HAART (1997-2006). Clinical features and outcome of all adults with proven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related histoplasmosis were compared between the two periods. One hundred four patients were included (40 during the pre-HAART era and 64 during the HAART era). Diagnosis was established a mean of 62 days after onset of symptoms. One-year overall mortality rates decreased from 53% (pre-HAART era) to 22% (HAART era). Diagnosis during the pre-HAART era and an older age were the only independent factors associated with death. Histoplasmosis is a rare invasive fungal infection outside disease-endemic areas. Its prognosis improved significantly during the HAART era.

  16. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  17. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Feldman, Viktor; Joseph, Mishal; Israel, Hadari

    2012-01-01

    Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID) is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an adult patient with a symptomatic secondary SIgMID associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, with a resolution of clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency and serum IgM normalization following a gluten-free diet. PMID:25374731

  18. Incidence and Long-term Outcomes of the HIV-Neuroretinal Disorder in Patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, Douglas A.; Drye, Lea; Van Natta, Mark L.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Holland, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have an abnormality of retina/optic nerve function, manifested as decreased contrast sensitivity (in the absence of ocular opportunistic infections or media opacity), abnormalities on automated perimetry, and loss of retinal nerve fiber layer, even among those with good visual acuity, termed the HIV-neuroretinal disorder. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, incidence, risk factors for, and outcomes of HIV-neuroretinal disorder. Design Prospective cohort study Participants 1822 patients with AIDS without ocular infections or media opacities. Methods Patients with HIV-neuroretinal disorder were identified by a contrast sensitivity < 1.50 log units in either eye in the absence of ocular opportunistic infections or media opacity. Main outcome measures Incidence of HIV-neuroretinal disorder, mortality, visual impairment (visual acuity 20/50 or worse), and blindness (20/200 or worse) on logarithmic visual acuity charts. Results Sixteen percent of participants had HIV-neuroretinal disorder at enrollment. The estimated cumulative incidence by 20 years after AIDS diagnosis was 51% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46%–55%). HIV-neuroretinal disorder was more common in women and African American persons. Risk factors for it included hepatitis C infection, low CD4+ T cells, and detectable HIV RNA in the blood. Patients with HIV neuroretinal disorder had a 70% excess mortality vs. those without it, even after adjusting for CD4+ T cells and HIV load (hazard ratio=1.7, 95% CI= 1.3–2.1, P<0.0001). Patients with HIV-neuroretinal disorder had increased risks of bilateral visual impairment (hazard ratio=6.5, 95% CI=2.6–10.6, P<0.0001) and blindness (hazard ratio=5.9, 95% CI=2.8–13.7, P=0.01) vs. those without HIV neuroretinal disorder. Conclusions HIV-neuroretinal disorder is a common finding among patients with AIDS, and it is associated with an increased mortality and an increased

  19. Small-intestine pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Shetty, Jayarama; Pins, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    A Pneumocystis jiroveci infection-associated mass clinically mimicking a malignancy (ie, pseudotumor) is rare and usually occurs in the lung in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumors of the small intestine are extremely rare and represent an unusual form of disseminated P jiroveci infection. We present a case of small-intestine P jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness in a patient with coinfection with cytomegalovirus, no pulmonary symptoms, and no known risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection. This case reinforces the potential importance of cytomegalovirus coinfection in the disseminated form of Pneumocystis infection and illustrates the importance of an expanded differential diagnosis when confronted with a clinically atypical mass lesion.

  20. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents induction of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia viruses, a possible animal model for antiretroviral drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Ohnota, H; Okada, Y; Ushijima, H; Kitamura, T; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1990-01-01

    Adult C57BL/10 mice (H-2b Fv-1b) inoculated with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus develop a disease which has many features in common with human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in particular abnormal lymphoproliferation and severe immunodeficiency. In the present study, we examined the possibility that this murine AIDS (MAIDS) model would be useful for evaluating antiretrovirus drugs in vivo through the use of a well-defined antiretrovirus drug, the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (H. Mitsuya, K.J. Weinhold, P.A. Furman, M.H. St. Claire, S. Nusinoff-Lehrman, R.C. Gallo, D. Bolognesi, D.W. Barry, and S. Broder, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7096-7100, 1985) 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). We evaluated the effect of AZT treatment on de novo virus infection as well as on the induction of immunodeficiency by various parameters, including RT activity in serum, splenomegaly, proliferative responses against alloantigens and mitogens, soluble-antigen-presenting cell activity, and immunoglobulin G levels in serum. Our results demonstrated that AZT treatment of C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus efficiently prevented the induction of immunodeficiency if started at the time of virus inoculation. Starting AZT treatment 1 week later provided only a partial protective effect. Starting AZT treatment 2 weeks later was associated with suppression of RT activity in serum but no prevention of immunosuppression. This MAIDS model may allow rapid and cost-effective screening for antiretrovirus drugs targeted against retroviral functions shared between human AIDS and MAIDS, such as those encoded by gag, pol, or env. PMID:1693056

  1. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease. PMID:26694631

  2. Influence of the home environment on the prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sewnunan, A; Modiba, L M

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still a 'family crises' which marks the beginning of the deterioration of the family unit and the trauma in the emotional, psychological and material lives of both the mother and child. In South African context where the majority of HIV-positive mothers are young single women who live in extended families, disclosure to the sexual partner alone is not an adequate condition for the success of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). In South Africa, close to one in three women who attend antenatal clinics are HIV positive. KwaZulu-Natal is one of the worst affected provinces, where as many as 40-60% of pregnant women attending antenatal services are living with HIV infection. The study sought to investigate the link between the home environment and its contribution to the success of the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual study was used in this study to explore whether the home environment for the support system is available for the HIV-positive women on the PMTCT programme. The population of this study included all women who have undergone counselling and tested HIV positive and who have joined the programme on PMTCT of HIV/AIDS in a specific hospital in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Although 14 women agreed to participate in the study, only 10 women were interviewed as saturation was attained. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were audio-taped and field notes were taken. Content analysis was used and it was done manually. This study revealed that one of the major issues still surrounding HIV/AIDS and PMTCT is that of non-disclosure, selective disclosure and the stigma and discrimination that surrounds this disease.

  3. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: an Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency 2015.

    PubMed

    Picard, Capucine; Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Holland, Steven M; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Oksenhendler, Eric; Puck, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Tang, Mimi L K; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-11-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies compiled by the Primary Immunodeficiency Expert Committee (PID EC) of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). In the two years since the previous version, 34 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. In this new version we continue to see the increasing overlap between immunodeficiency, as manifested by infection and/or malignancy, and immune dysregulation, as manifested by auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, and/or allergy. There is also an increased number of genetic defects that lead to susceptibility to specific organisms which reflects the finely tuned nature of immune defense systems. This classification is the most up to date catalogue of all known and published primary immunodeficiencies and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the genetic and molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases.

  4. Successful recovery of MERS CoV pneumonia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Sarah; AlZahrani, Abdulwahab; Simhairi, Raed; Mushtaq, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS CoV) may cause severe pneumonia with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with multiple comorbid condition. MERS CoV pneumonia has not been previously reported in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Herein, we report a case of MERS CoV pneumonia with a successful outcome in a patient recently diagnosed with HIV.

  5. Primary Immunodeficiencies: “New” Disease in an Old Country

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pamela P W; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) are rare inborn errors of the immune system. Patients with PIDs are unique models that exemplify the functional and phenotypic consequences of various immune defects underlying infections, autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, allergy and cancer. Over 150 PID syndromes were characterized in the past 60 years, with an ever growing list of new entities being discovered. Because of their rarity, multi-center collaboration for pooled data analysis and molecular studies is important to gain meaningful insights into the phenotypic and genetic diversities of PIDs. In this article, we summarize our research findings on PIDs in Chinese population in the past 20 years. Close collaboration among various immunology centers, cross-referrals and systematic data analysis constitute the foundation for research on PIDs. Future directions include establishment of a national PID registry, raising awareness of PIDs and securing sufficient resources for patient care and scientific research. PMID:20003815

  6. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  7. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  8. Functional T lymphocytes are required for a murine retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency disease (MAIDS)

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Athymic nu/nu mice were found to be resistant to the immunodeficiency disease and lethality induced in normal mice by the injection of the LP- BM5 mixture of murine retroviruses (LP-BM5 MuLV). Susceptibility to disease induction was reconstituted by injection of nu/nu mice with purified, mature T lymphocytes. The extent of viral replication of both the ecotropic and mink cell focus forming (MCF) components of LP-BM5 MuLV was equivalent in both nu/nu and normal animals. Retrovirally- induced immunodeficiency disease in mice (MAIDS) is thus dependent upon the presence of functional T lymphocytes, and high virus titers in athymic mice have little or no effect on the immune system. PMID:3035057

  9. The genetic immunodeficiency disease, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Chen; Bauer, Thomas R; Ackermann, Mark R; Smith, C Wayne; Kehrli, Marcus E; Starost, Matthew F; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2004-08-01

    This review highlights the genotype-phenotype relationship of the genetic immunodeficiency disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice, and provides assessment of the opportunities that each animal species provides in the understanding of leukocyte biology and in developing new therapeutic approaches to LAD in humans. This comparison is important since animal models of genetic diseases in humans provide the opportunity to test new therapeutic approaches in an appropriate, disease-specific model. The success of this approach is dependent on the relationship of the phenotype in the animal to the phenotype of the disease in humans. PMID:15357315

  10. Fulminant community-acquired infectious diseases: diagnostic problems.

    PubMed

    Levin, S; Goodman, L J; Fuhrer, J

    1986-09-01

    The processes presented here do not represent an all-inclusive list of fulminant infectious diseases. Some of the more common acute, overwhelming infections of the central nervous system and lungs are covered elsewhere in this issue. We have selected less common, potentially catastrophic syndromes that might be recognized earlier if certain historical clues, physical findings, or laboratory abnormalities are appreciated. Specific and effective therapy is available for most of the diseases we have chosen. Meningitis due to Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba that may invade the central nervous system through the cribriform plate in persons swimming in brackish water, and hemorrhagic mediastinitis due to inhalation of Bacillus anthracis, which is acquired in occupational exposure to goat's hair, wool, or an animal with anthrax, are other examples but are lacking in proven effective therapy. Although most physicians quickly consider exotic and overwhelming infections in the severely compromised patient, fewer recognize this risk in the diabetic, cirrhotic, or healthy person with a unique occupational or travel history. During the present epidemic of AIDS, previous exposure to the HTLV-3 virus must be considered in all severely ill patients. The proper use of new diagnostic tests may permit the physician to intercede effectively if these life-threatening diseases are suspected. PMID:3736273

  11. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Library ▸ Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies Share | Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI ...

  12. Plasma viral RNA load predicts disease progression in accelerated feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, L J; Mathiason-Dubard, C K; O'Neil, L L; Hoover, E A

    1996-01-01

    Viral RNA load has been shown to indicate disease stage and predict the rapidity of disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. We had previously demonstrated that feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA levels in plasma correlate with disease stage in infected cats. Here we expand upon those observations by demonstrating that plasma virus load is 1 to 2 logs higher in cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease than in long-term survivors. Differences in plasma FIV RNA levels are evident by 1 to 2 weeks after infection and are consistent throughout infection. We also evaluated humoral immune responses in FIV-infected cats for correlation with survival times. Total anti-FIV antibody titers did not differ between cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease and long-term survivors. These findings indicate that virus replication plays an important role in FIV disease progression, as it does in HIV-1 disease progression. The parallels in virus loads and disease progressions between HIV-1 and FIV support the idea that the accelerated disease model is well suited for the study of therapeutic agents directed at reducing lentiviral replication. PMID:8642679

  13. Factors Associated with Student Nurses' Intent to Provide Physical and Psychosocial Care to Persons with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Frank L.

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 125 of 290 nursing undergraduates indicated their attitudes ranged from most to least positive regarding people with AIDS acquired through blood transfusion, heterosexual activity, homosexual activity, and needle sharing. Homophobia, fear of AIDS, and perceived susceptibility were inversely related with intention to care for AIDS…

  14. Severe combined immunodeficiency. A model disease for molecular immunology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Le Deist, Françoise; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Basile, Geneviève de Saint; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2005-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCIDs) consist of genetically determined arrest of T-cell differentiation. Ten different molecular defects have now been identified, which all lead to early death in the absence of therapy. Transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCT) can restore T-cell development, thus saving the lives of SCID patients. In this review, the different characteristics of HSCT are discussed along with the available data regarding the long-term outcome. Transient thymopoiesis caused by an exhaustion of donor progenitor cells and possibly a progressive loss of thymus function can lead to a progressive decline in T-cell functions. The preliminary results of gene therapy show the correction of two SCID conditions. Based on the assumption that long-lasting pluripotent progenitor cells are transduced, these data suggest that gene therapy could overcome the long-term recurrence of the T-cell immunodeficiency. SCID is thus a disease model for experimental therapy in the hematopoietic system.

  15. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26999990

  16. Successful treatment with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    NAGAI, Yuya; MORI, Minako; INOUE, Daichi; KIMURA, Takaharu; SHIMOJI, Sonoko; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; TABATA, Sumie; MATSUSHITA, Akiko; NAGAI, Kenichi; Imai, Yukihiro; Takafuta, Toshiro; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection while suffering from recurrent herpes zoster infection. Laboratory examination revealed CD4(+) lymphocyte count 16 cells/mul and HIV loading 150,000 copies/ml at presentation. In addition, he had multiple lymph node swelling. Histologic diagnosis of a biopsied lymph node was diffuse, large, B cell-type malignant lymphoma. The karyotype of the lymphoma cells was t(8;14)(q24;q32), which was confirmed by G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Positron emission tomography (PET)-combined CT scanning revealed systemic extranodal tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and bone marrow. The clinical stage of the lymphoma was IVB and the international prognosis index was categorized as high. Complete remission (CR) of the lymphoma was obtained after 2 courses of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) chemotherapy and 4 subsequent courses of rituximab-combined CHOP (R-CHOP). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was started at the initiation of CHOP. Because of the poor prognosis of AIDS-related lymphoma, he received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with the MEAM protocol (ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) as a conditioning procedure without a severe infectious episode. He remains in CR 24 months after the transplantation. PMID:20009441

  17. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  18. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A true or perceived risk?

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Shima; Manicardi, Marcella; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    After the successful introduction of highly active antiretroviral agents the survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in developed countries has increased substantially. This has allowed the surfacing of several chronic diseases among which cardiovascular disease (CVD) is prominent. The pathogenesis of CVD in HIV is complex and involves a combination of traditional and HIV related factors. An accurate assessment of risk of CVD in these patients is still elusive and as a consequence the most appropriate preventive and therapeutic interventions remain controversial. PMID:26516417

  19. ACQUIRED PES CAVUS IN CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Maranho, Daniel Augusto; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of the forefoot, hindfoot or it may be a combination of both locations. Related deformities, mainly the varus and toe clawing require appropriate evaluation; clinical characteristics such as severity of the deformity, impairment of the muscular power, flexibility and patient's age are important characteristics in the treatment decision. Conservative treatment of the cavusvarus foot with physiotherapy, insoles and shoe modifications are reserved to young patients and mild deformities. However, there is a tendency of the deformity to become more severe over time because of the progressive feature of the underlying neurological condition. So, the surgical treatment by using classical techniques is performed in early stages. Most importantly is the identification of the primary and main components of each deformity to properly correct them, if possible. Muscular transfers are used to treat the dynamic unbalance, retracted structures should be either divided or lengthened and localized osteotomies should be preferred over arthrodeses, which are reserved for stiff and severely deformed feet in adults. PMID:27077056

  20. ACQUIRED PES CAVUS IN CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Maranho, Daniel Augusto; Volpon, José Batista

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of the forefoot, hindfoot or it may be a combination of both locations. Related deformities, mainly the varus and toe clawing require appropriate evaluation; clinical characteristics such as severity of the deformity, impairment of the muscular power, flexibility and patient's age are important characteristics in the treatment decision. Conservative treatment of the cavusvarus foot with physiotherapy, insoles and shoe modifications are reserved to young patients and mild deformities. However, there is a tendency of the deformity to become more severe over time because of the progressive feature of the underlying neurological condition. So, the surgical treatment by using classical techniques is performed in early stages. Most importantly is the identification of the primary and main components of each deformity to properly correct them, if possible. Muscular transfers are used to treat the dynamic unbalance, retracted structures should be either divided or lengthened and localized osteotomies should be preferred over arthrodeses, which are reserved for stiff and severely deformed feet in adults.

  1. Histoplasma capsulatum fungemia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: detection by lysis-centrifugation blood-culturing technique.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Fernandes, Sérgio Sônego; Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Guazzelli, Luciana Silva; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis (PDH) is an increasingly common cause of infection in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report 21 cases of PDH associated with AIDS diagnosed by lysis-centrifugation blood culture method. The most prevalent clinical findings were fever, weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and mucocutaneous lesions. Chest roentgenogram showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in 13 of 21 patients (62%). Bronchoalveolar fluid has yielded positive culture in four patients only in medium with cycloheximide. PMID:17625688

  2. Immunodeficiency in the chicken. IV. An immunological study of infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, J; Morris, R

    1976-01-01

    Chickens inoculated orally with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) 1 day after hatching subsequently showed a 50% incidence of immunodeficiency but little mortality. Antibody responses against IBDV and to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or human serum albumin (HSA) were suppressed. Serum IgG concentration was decreased while IgM occurred exclusively in its 7S monomeric form (mIgM). An allotypic marker of chicken IgM (Mla) was lacking in mIgM derived from IBDV-infected birds. The loss of Mla occurred gradually in several birds between 3 and 12 weeks after perinatal infection. Inoculation of IBDV into chickens 3 weeks after hatching resulted in 50% mortality level but little immunodeficiency. Paradoxically, the serum IgG concentration was elevated, in comparison with normal birds. Histology of the bursa showed permanent hypo- or aplasia of follicles irrespective of the age of infection. The results suggest that bursal but not peripheral B cells are targets for IBDV, and immunodeficiency results from impaired peripheral seeding of B cells in infected juvenile chickens. Images Fig. 2 PMID:177236

  3. Hospital-acquired infections: diseases with increasingly limited therapies.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, M N

    1994-01-01

    About 5% of patients admitted to acute-care hospitals acquire nosocomial infections. A variety of factors contribute: increasing age of patients; availability, for treatment of formerly untreatable diseases, of extensive surgical and intensive medical therapies; and frequent use of antimicrobial drugs capable of selecting a resistant microbial flora. Nosocomial infections due to resistant organisms have been a problem ever since infections due to penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus were noted within a few years of the introduction of penicillin. By the 1960s aerobic Gram-negative bacilli had assumed increasing importance as nosocomial pathogens, and many strains were resistant to available antimicrobials. During the 1980s the principal organisms causing nosocomial bloodstream infections were coagulase-negative staphylococci, aerobic Gram-negative bacilli, S. aureus, Candida spp., and Enterococcus spp. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and S. aureus are often methicillin-resistant, requiring parenteral use of vancomycin. Prevalence of vancomycin resistance among enterococcal isolates from patients in intensive care units has increased, likely due to increased use of this drug. Plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance in up to 50% of enterococcal isolates, along with enhanced penicillin resistance in some strains, leaves few therapeutic options. The emergence of Enterobacteriaceae with chromosomal or plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lactamases presents a world-wide problem of resistance to third generation cephalosporins. Control of these infections rests on (i) monitoring infections with such resistant organisms in an ongoing fashion, (ii) prompt institution of barrier precautions when infected or colonized patients are identified, and (iii) appropriate use of antimicrobials through implementation of antibiotic control programs. Images PMID:8146133

  4. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma: 1. Course during the 20 years of the epidemic. 2. The experience at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán: 1986-2003].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, E Gabriela; Gómez-Roel, Xóchitl; Villasís-Keever, Angelina

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this presentation is the description of the epidemiologic evolution and changes in natural history of the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) epidemic itself and its relation with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma (ARL). We have started with the description of the world's state of the HIV epidemic, its features since the first case report in the United States of America in 1981, through the peak of new diagnoses in 1993 until the event that changed the natural history of the disease: the era of the widespread use of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), introduced in 1995 in the world and in 1997 in our country. The widespread introduction of HAART led to dramatic reductions in AIDS related mortality and morbidity throughout the developed world with a marked fall in the incidence of the major opportunistic infections in AIDS. We describe the main risk factors for the development of ARL, and the prognostic factors for survival and response to treatment. There is no clear definition in the literature of the roll that has played the use of HAART in relation to survival and response to treatment in ARL, but there is evidence that the basal count of CD4 cells has increased with HAART, leading to a better survival and response in ARL. The debate regarding this issue is surely affected by factors such as degree of antiretroviral treatment compliance, antiretroviral therapy resistance and chemotherapy heterogeneity. Finally we present the preliminary results of the analysis of our experience in ARL from 1986 to 2003.

  5. Disseminated vaccine-strain varicella as initial presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Tripp, Michael S; Dell, Trevor G; Bennett, Jason W; Ahluwalia, Jaspal S; Tamminga, Cindy; Baldwin, James C; Starr, Clarise Rivera; Grinkemeyer, Michael D; Dempsey, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections have declined in many industrialized countries due to vaccination with the attenuated Oka strain virus. Rare cases of severe, disseminated vaccine-strain VZV infection have occurred in the immunocompromised, although rarely in HIV-infected persons. We describe a man with previously-undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who received VZV vaccination and subsequently presented to a combat hospital in Afghanistan with disseminated varicella, respiratory failure, and sepsis. The patient recovered with ventilator and hemodynamic support, intravenous acyclovir, and empiric antibiotic therapy. DNA sequencing detected Oka strain virus from patient blood specimens. Although safe in most populations, the VZV vaccine may cause life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Improved detection of HIV infection may be useful in preventing such cases.

  6. Disseminated vaccine-strain varicella as initial presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Tripp, Michael S; Dell, Trevor G; Bennett, Jason W; Ahluwalia, Jaspal S; Tamminga, Cindy; Baldwin, James C; Starr, Clarise Rivera; Grinkemeyer, Michael D; Dempsey, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections have declined in many industrialized countries due to vaccination with the attenuated Oka strain virus. Rare cases of severe, disseminated vaccine-strain VZV infection have occurred in the immunocompromised, although rarely in HIV-infected persons. We describe a man with previously-undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who received VZV vaccination and subsequently presented to a combat hospital in Afghanistan with disseminated varicella, respiratory failure, and sepsis. The patient recovered with ventilator and hemodynamic support, intravenous acyclovir, and empiric antibiotic therapy. DNA sequencing detected Oka strain virus from patient blood specimens. Although safe in most populations, the VZV vaccine may cause life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Improved detection of HIV infection may be useful in preventing such cases. PMID:24257110

  7. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on oral manifestations of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome in South India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. V. S. Eswara; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Kattappagari, Kiran Kumar; Kantheti, Lalith Prakash Chandra; Poosarla, Chandrasekhar; Baddam, Venkat Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a global health problem, although the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease into a manageable disease with improved quality-of-life mainly in the developed countries. Very few studies are available regarding effect of HAART on oral lesions in developing countries like India. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to document and compare oral lesions in HIV-seropositive patients before and after HAART. Materials and Methods: Oral manifestations were recorded in 320 HIV seropositive patients attending to the Voluntary Counseling and Confidential Testing Centre at the Government General Hospital, Guntur, before and after treating with HAART and the results were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results: Oral Candidiasis was significantly reduced in patients under HAART after 3 months. Furthermore, there was decreased incidence of periodontal diseases, but increased hyperpigmentation in patients undergoing HAART. Conclusion: The oral manifestations of HIV infection have changed due to the advent of HAART. Many opportunistic infections have resolved as a result of an improved immune system. Though the risk of hyperpigmentation in those with HAART has increased the prevalence of oral candidiasis and periodontal diseases were less in patients who had access to HAART. PMID:26392652

  8. Attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals towards people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akgun Kostak, Melahat; Unsar, Serap; Kurt, Seda; Erol, Ozgul

    2012-10-01

    Health professionals caring for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) show poor or negative attitudes because of fear of contagion. Therefore, it is important to know the attitudes of midwives' and nurses' towards people living with HIV/AIDS. The aim of this descriptive and cross-sectional study is to assess the attitudes of Turkish midwives and nurses working at hospitals to people living with HIV/AIDS and to identify factors that affect these attitudes. A group of 46 midwives and 192 nurses working in hospitals were included in the study. Data were collected through AIDS Attitude Scale. Age, professional experience, number of children and marital status influenced the attitudes of the participants towards people living with HIV/AIDS. We concluded that higher level of education appear to positively influence the attitudes of the participants. Education programmes including evidence-based nursing implications might be planned to improve positive attitudes and to prevent stigmatization of people living with HIV/AIDS.

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated lymphomas are efficiently lysed through complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by rituximab.

    PubMed

    Golay, Joseè; Gramigna, Rosanna; Facchinetti, Valeria; Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Introna, Martino

    2002-12-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera) and alemtuzumab (Campath(R), Mabcampath(R)) are non-conjugated IgG1 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies directed against the CD20 and CD52 surface antigens respectively. They are presently used in the therapy of indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) and of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and are thought to act mainly through complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here we have analysed the capacity of these two monoclonal antibodies to lyse cell lines of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related B-NHL through either complement activation or antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Rituximab strongly activated both CDC and ADCC against CD20-positive AIDS-NHL cells lines, inducing up to 60-98% and 20% specific lysis respectively. In contrast, alemtuzumab was a poor activator of CDC, even in the AIDS-NHL cell lines expressing high amounts of CD52, leading to a lysis of only 1-30%, whereas it was at least as strong as rituximab in inducing ADCC of the same lines (up to 30% specific lysis). Altogether, these data offer a first in vitro rationale supporting the therapeutic use of rituximab for CD20-positive AIDS-NHL.

  10. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  11. Clinical utility of Ga-67 pulmonary scans in the diagnosis and treatment of p. carinii pneumonitis in the setting of acquired immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hattner, R.S.; Sollitto, R.A.; Golden, J.A.; Okerlund, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe disorder of cellular immunity of obscure etiology. Since its original recognition in 1981 the incidence of AIDS has doubled in each of the succeeding six months. The most common causes of death in AIDS are Kaposi's sarcoma and p. carinii pneumonia (PCP). The latter is treatable if diagnosed early, and AIDS patients (pts) may suffer recurrent episodes of PCP. Since the invasive technique of fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy, brushing, and bronchialveolar lavage are necessary for diagnosis and follow-up a noninvasive method of categorizing which AIDS pts require this procedure would be most welcome. Fourteen symptomatic pts with AIDS were found to have PCP by the microscopic observation of the organism obtained from washings during fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Three had normal chest roentgenograms. Ga-67 scans of the thorax activity performed in each and pulmonary was graded 1-4 by three experienced observers (1, less than or equal to adjacent soft tissues; 2, greater than adjacent soft tissues, but less than liver; 3, equal to liver; 4, greater than liver). All scans were grades 3 or 4. After appropriate treatment 10 scans reverted to grades 1 or 2, corresponding with bronchoscopic resolution of PCP. Two pts with persistent grade 4 scans had persistent PCP at repeat bronchoscopy. Two pts died. These findings suggest that serial graded Ga scans may supplant bronchoscopy in the follow-up of treated PCP in AIDS and identify those AIDS pts with PCP resistant to conventional therapy requiring alternate therapy.

  12. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:26577109

  13. Clonal analysis of T lymphocytes in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Evidence for an abnormality affecting individual helper and suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Margolick, J B; Volkman, D J; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S

    1985-01-01

    Purified helper-inducer (T4+) and suppressor-cytotoxic (T8+) lymphocytes from eight patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and eight healthy heterosexual donors were examined by limiting dilution analysis for their ability to be clonally expanded. It was demonstrated that viable T4+ and T8+ lymphocytes from patients with AIDS had markedly reduced proportions of clonable cells compared to the healthy donors (T4 = 1:255 vs. 1:34, P = 0.06; T8 = 1:355 vs. 1:55, P = 0.01). However, the cloned T cells that were obtained from the patients with AIDS demonstrated normal proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and alloantigen, and normal ability to help or suppress pokeweed mitogen-driven IgG synthesis. These results strongly suggest that, in addition to a quantitative diminution of T4+ lymphocytes in AIDS, there is an intrinsic functional defect in the surviving T4+ and T8+ lymphocytes, which is reflected by a severe decrease in their potential for clonal expansion. PMID:3161909

  14. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Course Is Predicted by the Extent of Virus Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staprans, Silvija I.; Dailey, Peter J.; Rosenthal, Ann; Horton, Chris; Grant, Robert M.; Lerche, Nicholas; Feinberg, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between early viral infection events and immunodeficiency virus disease progression, quantitative-competitive and branched-DNA methods of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA quantitation were cross-validated and used to measure viremia following infection of rhesus macaques with the pathogenic SIVmac251 virus isolate. Excellent correlation between the methods suggests that both accurately approximate SIV copy number. Plasma viremia was evident 4 days postinfection, and rapid viral expansion led to peak viremia levels of 107 to 109 SIV RNA copies/ml by days 8 to 17. Limited resolution of primary viremia was accompanied by relatively short, though variable, times to the development of AIDS (81 to 630 days). The persistent high-level viremia observed following intravenous inoculation of SIVmac251 explains the aggressive disease course in this model. Survival analyses demonstrated that the disease course is established 8 to 17 days postinfection, when peak viremia is observed. The most significant predictor of disease progression was the extent of viral decline following peak viremia; larger decrements in viremia were associated with both lower steady-state viremia (P = 0.0005) and a reduced hazard of AIDS (P = 0.004). The data also unexpectedly suggested that following SIVmac251 infection, animals with the highest peak viremia were better able to control virus replication rather than more rapidly developing disease. Analysis of early viral replication dynamics should help define host responses that protect from disease progression and should provide quantitative measures to assess the extent to which protective responses may be induced by prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10233944

  15. Cytokine immunomodulation for the treatment of infectious diseases: lessons from primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Donald C

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, management of infectious diseases focuses on identification of the causative microbe and the use of pathogen-targeted therapy. With increasing antimicrobial resistance, novel approaches are required. One strategy is to modulate those natural host immune responses that critically mediate resistance to specific microbes. Clinically, this host-directed tactic could be used either alone or in combination with antimicrobial therapy. While conceptually attractive, there is potential concern that the pathways governing host resistance to pathogens in animal models may not extrapolate linearly to humans. Targeting these immune processes clinically may precipitate damaging, epiphenomenal responses. The field of Primary Immunodeficiencies focuses on the characterization of humans with inborn errors of immunity. These rare conditions permit the identification of those molecular and cellular processes that are central to human susceptibility to microbes. In efforts to compensate for defective host responses, this field has also provided a wealth of clinical experience in the effective use of cytokines to treat various active infections, while demonstrating their safety. In this review, we provide a historical perspective of the treatment of infectious diseases, evolving from a focus on the microbe, to an understanding of human immunity; we then outline the growing contribution of Primary Immunodeficiencies to the rational use of adjunctive cytokine immunotherapy in the management of infections.

  16. [Pathology of the internal organs and central nervous system in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (with special reference to opportunistic infections)].

    PubMed

    Masini, T; Chinaglia, D; Riviera, L; Capricci, E; Gullotta, F; Spigolon, G; Bauer, A L

    1990-01-01

    Extracerebral and cerebral pathology in AIDS (with particular emphasis on the opportunistic infections). The Authors present the extracerebral pathology of 27 cases of AIDS observed at the Department of Pathology of Milan and the cerebral pathology of 80 cases of AIDS collected by three Institutes (Department of Pathology of Milan, Department of Pathology of Rimini and Department of Neuropathology of Münster) with particular emphasis on the pathology of the opportunistic infections. In the adults' group, the most frequent infections are the protozoan ones (T. gondii) followed with equal incidence by the viral and fungal diseases. In the pediatric group the viral diseases are the most frequently seen. Almost all of the adults show multiple infections in the same organ or in different organs. Diffuse lesions with heavy pathologic fields were observed also without tissue reaction. As to cerebral pathology AIDS' patients with opportunistic infections show focal symptoms, whereas the so called "subacute microglial encephalitis" generally appears as a demential syndrome. In cases with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy JC virus was always found and in one case also SV 40 - and BK virus. The diffuse demyelinization in some cases of HIV-Encephalopathy is aspecific. In HIV-positive newborns with cerebral signs, the lesions are characterized by oedema, spongiosis and microcalcifications of the basal ganglia; these are aspecific lesions which can be found in toxic and infectious encephalopathies.

  17. Interrelatedness between dysbiosis in the gut microbiota due to immunodeficiency and disease penetrance of colitis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Avijit; Dittel, Bonnie N

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the microbiome in health and disease has only recently become a major research focus. Although it is clear that an imbalance or dysbiosis in the microbiota is associated with disease, its interrelatedness to disease penetrance is largely unknown. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an excellent disease in which to explore these questions because of the extensive genetic studies identifying disease susceptibility loci and the ability to easily sample the intestinal microbiota in IBD patients due to the accessibility of stool samples. In addition, mouse models of IBD have contributed to our understanding of the interrelatedness of the gut microbiota and genes associated with IBD. The power of the mouse studies is that multiple colitis models exist that can be used in combination with genetically modified mice that harbour deficiencies in IBD susceptibility genes. Collectively, these studies revealed that bacterial dysbiosis does occur in human IBD and in mouse colitis models. In addition, with an emphasis on immune genes, the mouse studies provided evidence that specific immune regulatory proteins associated with IBD influence the gut microbiota in a manner consistent with disease penetrance. In this review, we will discuss studies in both humans and mice that demonstrate the impact of immunodeficiences in interleukin-10, interleukin-17, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) 2, NOD-like receptor proteins 3 and 6, Toll-like receptor or IgA have on the interrelatedness between the composition of the gut microbiota and disease penetrance of IBD and its mouse models.

  18. Public perceptions about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward people living with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Iran.

    PubMed

    Masoudnia, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Negative and discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are one of the biggest experienced challenges by people suffering from HIV, and these attitudes have been regarded as a serious threat to the fundamental rights of all infected people who are affected or associated with this disease in Iran. This study aimed to determine the relationship between public perception about HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA . The present study was conducted using a descriptive and survey design. Data were collected from 450 patients (236 male and 214 female) in Tehran and Yazd cities. The research instruments were modified HIV-related knowledge/attitude and perception questions about PLWHA, and discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. The results showed that prevalence of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA in the studied population was 60.0%. There was a significant negative correlation between citizens' awareness about HIV/AIDS, HIV-related attitudes, negative perception toward people with HIV/AIDS symptoms and their discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA (p < .01). The hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that components of public perception about HIV/AIDS explained for 23.7% of the variance of discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA. Negative public perceptions about HIV/AIDS in Iran associated with discriminatory attitudes toward PLWHA and cultural beliefs in Iran tend to stigmatize and discriminate against the LWHA.

  19. Concise review: lessons learned from clinical trials of gene therapy in monogenic immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-05-01

    Thirty years ago, retroviral transfer of genetic material into hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSC/Ps) led to predictions that this technology would transform modern medicine [Nature 1983;305:556-558; Nature 1984;310:476-480]. Studies in several immunodeficiency diseases in the past 15 years have demonstrated clear proof of principle that gene therapy can have long-lasting, potentially curative effects without the need to search for allogeneic donors and without risk of graft-versus-host disease. Improvement in gene transfer efficiency for target HSC/Ps brought to light issues of insertional mutagenesis caused by transfer vectors, resulting in oncogene transactivation and leukemias. Lessons from these adverse events have now led to a new generation of vectors, refinements in conditioning regimens, and manufacturing, which are paving the way for expanded applications of the current technology and recent emphasis on gene targeting/genome editing as the next advancements in the field. PMID:24682287

  20. Stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases: The North American Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sung-Yun; Cowan, Morton J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review This review describes recent studies on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for primary immunodeficiency (PID) in North America including severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Recent Findings Using uniform diagnostic criteria, the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) described the baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed infants with SCID in North America. Analysis of outcomes of HCT for SCID in North America from 2000–2009 showed that young infants, and older infants without active infection, had excellent survival irrespective of type of donor, or transplant approach with regards to conditioning. While pre-transplant conditioning with chemotherapy had a clear and strong negative impact on survival in infants with active infection at the time of transplant, among survivors, conditioning was associated with improved immune reconstitution. However, the potential late effects of conditioning in these infants remain to be characterized. Advances in transplant outcomes for WAS and CGD support the strategy of early transplantation before the onset of severe complications; additional multicenter studies are needed to fully define optimal approaches. Summary The formation of the PIDTC, a multi-institutional North American consortium, has contributed to our understanding of outcomes after transplant for PID. PMID:25259542

  1. Prevalence and Morbidity of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases, United States 2001–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kobrynski, Lisa; Powell, Rachel Waltenburg; Bowen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have estimated population prevalence and morbidity of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). We used administrative healthcare databases to estimate the prevalence of PIDD diagnoses in the United States from 2001 to 2007. Methods MarketScan databases compile claims from commercial health insurance plans and Medicaid, recording individual diagnoses for outpatient encounters and hospital stays. We used a cross sectional survey to estimate prevalence of PIDD using related ICD-9 codes (279.0, 279.1, 279.2, 279.8, 279.9, 288.1 and 288.2). Persons with secondary immunodeficiency diagnoses were excluded from analysis. Results Between 2001 and 2007, prevalence of any PIDD diagnosis increased from 38.9 to 50.5 per 100,000 among privately insured and from 29.1 to 41.1 per 100,000 among publicly insured persons. B cell defects predominated. Prevalence was more than twice as high among Whites as among Blacks or Hispanics. Conclusion In this large database, we found a higher prevalence of diagnosed PIDD than has been reported previously from registries. Increased awareness may have contributed to the increasing prevalence. PMID:25257253

  2. Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase involvement in signal transduction and immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Burkhardt, A L; Bolen, J B

    1995-09-01

    The nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have been grouped into 10 different enzyme families based on predicted amino acid sequences. As the number of enzymes belonging to the nonreceptor class of PTK is increasing, one challenge is to determine how these various classes of PTKs interact within the cell to promote signal transduction. Herein, the activation of four classes of nonreceptor PTKs is discussed in relation to their interactions with each other as well as with other signaling molecules during the process of lymphocyte surface antigen receptor-mediated activation. Recent findings of nonreceptor PTK loss-of-function mutations in different immunodeficiency diseases has revealed the important contribution of this group of enzymes to lymphocyte development. PMID:7554458

  3. Fever of unknown origin in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency associated with multisystemic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel; Francisco-Javier, Castelbón-Fernández; Yolanda, Rodriguez-Gil; Miguel-Ingel, Martánez-González; Cristina, Garfia-Castillo; Jesús, Ruiz-Contreras

    2007-01-01

    Non-caseating epithelioid granulomas have been described in a small number of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We report a 26-year-old woman diagnosed with CVID nine years earlier, who developed non-caseating granulomas in the liver, bone marrow and skin. She was referred to our department for a fever of more than one year duration without apparent focus. Extensive search for underlying malignancy or occult infection was unremarkable. Empirical treatment with prednisone was begun and the patient showed a marked improvement. The literature on the association between CVID and non-caseating granulomatous disease, and the differential diagnosis of hepatic granulomas as a cause of fever of unknown origin, is also reviewed.

  4. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era.

    PubMed

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era.

  5. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease.

  6. [Anesthesia for non-cardiac surgery in children with congenital and acquired heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Le Bel, S

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this review are to recall some pathophysiological principles at work in most of congenital heart diseases; to specify factors to be considered when defining perioperative risk for a child with an acquired or congenital heart disease; to describe an anaesthetic management strategy in the context of some specific heart diseases.

  7. Spectrum of disease caused by Rhodococcus equi in human immunodeficiency virus infection: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Willsie-Ediger, Sandra K; Stanford, James F; Salzman, Gary A; Bamberger, David M

    1990-01-01

    Since the first report of Rhodococcus equi infection in an acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient in 1986, seven additional cases have been described. A patient is described in whom the diagnosis was delayed due to misidentification of the organism as an atypical mycobacterial species. The literature regarding R equi infection in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus is reviewed. The most common presentation is one of a chronic, indolent pulmonary infiltrative disease (78%). Fever (78%), cough (67%), and hemoptysis (44%) are frequently present. Coexistent opportunistic illnesses are common (67%). In the laboratory identification of this organism, it is important to communicate the clinical setting to the microbiologist and to recognize the potential for the organism to be overlooked as normal flora or a contaminant, or misidentified as an organism with similar phenotypic characteristics (Nocardia species or a rapidly growing mycobacterium). Based on experience in foals, therapy with erythromycin and rifampin is suggested. PMID:22553450

  8. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genetic evolution in children with different rates of development of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshan, S; Dickover, R E; Korber, B T; Bryson, Y J; Wolinsky, S M

    1997-01-01

    The rate of development of disease varies considerably among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. The reasons for these observed differences are not clearly understood but most probably depend on the dynamic interplay between the HIV-1 quasispecies virus population and the immune constraints imposed by the host. To study the relationship between disease progression and genetic diversity, we analyzed the evolution of viral sequences within six perinatally infected children by examining proviral sequences spanning the C2 through V5 regions of the viral envelope gene by PCR of blood samples obtained at sequential visits. PCR product DNAs from four sample time points per child were cloned, and 10 to 13 clones from each sample were sequenced. Greater genetic distances relative to the time of infection were found for children with low virion-associated RNA burdens and slow progression to disease relative to those found for children with high virion-associated RNA burdens and rapid progression to disease. The greater branch lengths observed in the phylogenetic reconstructions correlated with a higher accumulation rate of nonsynonymous base substitutions per potential nonsynonymous site, consistent with positive selection for change rather than a difference in replication kinetics. Viral sequences from children with slow progression to disease also showed a tendency to form clusters that associated with different sampling times. These progressive shifts in the viral population were not found in viral sequences from children with rapid progression to disease. Therefore, despite the HIV-1 quasispecies being a diverse, rapidly evolving, and competing population of genetic variants, different rates of genetic evolution could be found under different selective constraints. These data suggest that the evolutionary dynamics exhibited by the HIV-1 quasispecies virus populations are compatible with a Darwinian system evolving under the constraints of

  10. Unusually high seroprevalence of Borna disease virus in clade E human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients with sexually transmitted diseases in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Auwanit, W; Ayuthaya, P I; Nakaya, T; Fujiwara, S; Kurata, T; Yamanishi, K; Ikuta, K

    1996-01-01

    The seroprevalence of Borna disease virus (BDV) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals in Thailand was examined by using recombinant BDV p24. A high (38 to 48%) rate of seroprevalence of BDV was observed in clade E-infected patients with sexually transmitted diseases, compared with those in clade E-infected prostitutes (8.3%), pregnant women (0%), clade B-infected intravenous-drug users (0%), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1-negative blood donors (1.9%). PMID:8877141

  11. Oxfendazole treatment of sheep with naturally acquired hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Dueger, E L; Moro, P L; Gilman, R H

    1999-09-01

    A blinded, randomized placebo-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of oxfendazole for the treatment of ovine hydatid disease. Cyst fertility and parasite viability were measured following daily, weekly, and monthly treatment schedules with 30 mg of oxfendazole per kg of body weight. The 12-week trial was conducted in 215 adult sheep in the central Peruvian Andes and was masked for both treatment group and scheduling. In this trial oxfendazole significantly reduced protoscolex viability relative to controls in all treatment groups. In the daily, weekly, and monthly groups, 100, 97, and 78% of sheep, respectively, were either cured or improved following treatment, compared to 35% cured or improved animals in the control group. However, daily dosing at 30 mg of oxfendazole per kg proved highly toxic to sheep, resulting in a 24% death rate in the daily group as compared to a 4 to 6% mortality rate in all other groups. If found safe in humans, oxfendazole may prove to be a useful and inexpensive treatment for cestode infections in humans. This study suggests that a staggered dosing regimen of oxfendazole, and possibly other benzimidazoles, may be as efficacious as daily treatment regimens for hydatidosis while decreasing both the cost and adverse effects associated with daily dosing.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  13. Low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury accelerates disease and mortality in acquired murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Via, Charles S; Nguyen, Phuong; Niculescu, Florin; Papadimitriou, John; Hoover, Dennis; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2003-08-01

    Inorganic mercury (iHg) is known to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible rodent strains. Additionally, in inbred strains of mice prone to autoimmune disease, iHg can accelerate and exacerbate disease manifestations. Despite these well-known links between iHg and autoimmunity in animal models, no association between iHg alone and autoimmune disease in humans has been documented. However, it is possible that low-level iHg exposure can interact with disease triggers to enhance disease expression or susceptibility. To address whether exposure to iHg can alter the course of subsequent acquired autoimmune disease, we used a murine model of acquired autoimmunity, lupus-like chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which autoimmunity is induced using normal, nonautoimmune prone donor and F1 recipient mice resistant to Hg-induced autoimmunity. Our results indicate that a 2-week exposure to low-dose iHg (20 or 200 micro g/kg every other day) to donor and host mice ending 1 week before GVHD induction can significantly worsen parameters of disease severity, resulting in premature mortality. iHg pretreatment clearly worsened chronic lupus-like disease, rather than GVHD worsening iHg immunotoxicity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that low-level, nontoxic iHg preexposure may interact with other risk factors, genetic or acquired, to promote subsequent autoimmune disease development.

  14. Heart failure in congenital heart disease: a confluence of acquired and congenital.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Akl C; Roberts, Amy E; Mital, Seema; Lakdawala, Neal K

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in congenital heart disease (CHD), with increasing prevalence because of improved treatment options and outcomes. Genetic factors and acquired postnatal factors in CHD might play a major role in the progression to HF. This article proposes 3 routes that lead to HF in CHD: rare monogenic entities that cause both CHD and HF; severe CHD lesions in which acquired hemodynamic effects of CHD or surgery result in HF; and, most commonly, a combined effect of complex genetics in overlapping pathways and acquired stressors caused by the primary lesion.

  15. Renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus - Not just HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Vali, P S; Ismal, K; Gowrishankar, S; Sahay, M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the various histopathological lesions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with renal dysfunction and to establish clinicopathological correlation. Over a period of two years from January 2008 to March 2010, 27 HIV positive patients with renal dysfunction were subjected to renal biopsy. Of the 27 patients, 23 were males and four were females (85.2% males, 14.8% females). Mean age was 38.2 ± 10.36 (range 20 - 60) years. The probable mode of acquisition of HIV infection was sexual in 22 patients (81.5%). Thirteen patients (48%) had nephrotic proteinuria. The CD4 count ranged from 77 to 633/microliter. The kidneys were of normal size in 19 (70.4%) and bulky in eight (29.6%) patients. Thirteen patients required renal replacement therapy. Eleven patients had acute tubule-interstitial lesions (40.7%) while 15 (55.5%) had glomerular lesions. The various glomerular lesions were, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in five, amyloidosis in three, diffuse proliferative GN in two, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN), membranous GN, minimal change disease, diabetic nephropathy, crescentic GN, and thrombotic microangiopathy were seen in one each. None of the clinical or laboratory variables, except hypertension, was found to predict glomerular versus non-glomerular lesions on biopsy. In conclusion we show that a variety of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions can be seen on renal histology. Hence, renal biopsy is indicated in renal dysfunction associated with HIV for making proper diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  17. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  18. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  19. Legionnaires' Disease acquired within the homes of two patients: link to the home water supply

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.; Muraca, P.

    1987-03-06

    Two patients with sporadic community-acquired legionnaires' disease are described. Legionella pneumophila was isolated from sputum specimens, and seroconversion of antibody titers was demonstrated for both patients. Legionella pneumophila was also recovered from the residential water supply of both patients. In each case, the serogroup of the environmental organism matched that of the infecting organism. In one patient, serogroup 3 was isolated - a rare cause of legionnaires' disease, and in the second case, monoclonal antibody testing confirmed that the serogroup 1 organisms isolated from sputum and residential water supply samples were identical. The incubation period of legionnaires' disease is presumed to be up to two weeks. Because of medical problems, both patients had been confined to their homes for the entire two weeks before the onset of symptoms. This is the first report that links acquisition of community-acquired legionnaires' disease to contaminated water supplies within the homes of susceptible patients.

  20. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Are Associated with Adult-Onset Immunodeficiency with Acquired Anti-Interferon-Gamma Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pithukpakorn, Manop; Roothumnong, Ekkapong; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Umrod, Pinklow; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Foongladda, Suporn; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2015-01-01

    Recently a newly identified clinical syndrome of disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial diseases (with or without other opportunistic infections in adult patients who were previously healthy, has been recognized in association with an acquired autoantibody to interferon-gamma. This syndrome is emerging as an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among people of Asian descent. Trigger for the production of this autoantibody remains unknown, but genetic factors are strongly suspected to be involved. We compared HLA genotyping between 32 patients with this clinical syndrome, and 38 controls. We found that this clinical syndrome was associated with very limited allele polymorphism, with HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles, especially HLA-DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02. Odds ratio of DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02 were 7.03 (95% CI, 2.18–22.69, P<0.0001, 9.06 (95% CI, 2.79–29.46, P<0.0001), 6.68 (95% CI, 2.29–19.52, P = 0.0004), and 6.64 (95% CI, 2.30–19.20, P = 0.0004), respectively. Further investigation is warranted to provide better understanding on pathogenesis of this association. PMID:26011559

  1. Increased expression of the inflammatory chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma in lymphoid tissues of rhesus macaques during simian immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Todd A; Fallert, Beth A; Pfeifer, Melanie E; Sanghavi, Sonali; Capuano, Saverio; Rajakumar, Premeela; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Day, Richard; Fuller, Craig L; Schaefer, Todd M

    2002-05-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell trafficking during immune inductive and effector activities, and dysregulation of their expression might contribute to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and the related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). To understand better the effects of SIV infection on lymphoid tissues in rhesus macaques, we examined chemokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns by using DNA filter array hybridization. Of the 34 chemokines examined, the interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma (CXCL9/Mig) was one of the most highly up-regulated chemokines in rhesus macaque spleen tissue early after infection with pathogenic SIV. The relative levels of expression of CXCL9/Mig mRNA in spleen and lymph nodes were significantly increased after infection with SIV in both quantitative image capture and analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, in situ hybridization for CXCL9/Mig mRNA revealed that the patterns of expression were altered after SIV infection. Associated with the increased expression of CXCL9/Mig were increased numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-positive cells in tissues and reduced percentages of CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 3(+)/CD3(+) and CXCR3(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes in peripheral blood. We propose that SIV replication in vivo initiates IFN-gamma-driven positive-feedback loops in lymphoid tissues that disrupt the trafficking of effector T lymphocytes and lead to chronic local inflammation, thereby contributing to immunopathogenesis.

  2. A case of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection with the rare complication of acquired angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I; Scott, G

    2014-06-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), a polyclonal lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology, is a well-recognised complication of HIV disease. We present a case of MCD in an HIV-positive patient that is unusual on two counts: our patient's MCD first presented in the context of an immune restoration inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), following the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, her MCD was associated with the unusual complication of acquired angioedema (AAE), which resolved following treatment of the MCD. While AAE is frequently found to have an underlying diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disease, this is the first reported case linking AAE to MCD.

  3. Alternating and intermittent regimens of zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) and dideoxycytidine (2',3'-dideoxycytidine) in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Skowron, G; Merigan, T C

    1990-05-21

    The deoxynucleoside analogues 2',3'-dideoxy-cytidine (ddC) and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT) are active as single agents in conferring immunologic and virologic benefits in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex. Both drugs, however, produce dose-limiting toxicities. AZT is associated with unacceptable levels of bone marrow suppression, and ddC can cause painful peripheral neuropathy. The different toxicity profiles of these two drugs provide the rationale for testing them in alternating dosing combinations in an attempt to retain the antiretroviral activity of each against human immunodeficiency virus, while reducing the toxicities of both. A preliminary trial showed that 200 mg AZT given orally every four hours for seven-day periods, alternating with ddC at 0.03 mg/kg body weight orally every four hours for seven-day periods is a promising treatment regimen. An expanded multicenter study is evaluating ddC at 0.01 mg/kg and 0.03 mg/kg alternating with AZT at 200 mg in weekly or monthly periods. Weekly intermittent doses of AZT at 200 mg and ddC at 0.03 mg/kg are also being tested. The rationale and methods of the trial are discussed.

  4. The use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital and acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven), a novel hemostatic agent originally developed for the treatment of bleeding episodes in hemophilia A or B patients with inhibitors, has been recently employed with benefit for the management of hemorrhages in other nonhemophilic congenital and acquired hemostatic abnormalities. This review focuses on the use of this drug in acquired and congenital von Willebrand disease. The analysis of the literature data shows that recombinant activated factor VII is an effective agent for the treatment of refractory bleeding in von Willebrand disease patients and for the treatment or prevention of bleeding in those patients with alloantibodies or autoantibodies against von Willebrand factor. Further studies are needed, however, to assess its safety and to optimize the dosages and regimens of therapy in such patients.

  5. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus on the Severity of Buruli Ulcer Disease: Results of a Retrospective Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Christinet, Vanessa; Comte, Eric; Ciaffi, Laura; Odermatt, Peter; Serafini, Micaela; Antierens, Annick; Rossel, Ludovic; Nomo, Alain-Bertrand; Nkemenang, Patrick; Tsoungui, Akoa; Delhumeau, Cecile; Calmy, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Buruli ulcer is the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy and is particularly frequent in rural West and Central Africa. However, the impact of HIV infection on BU severity and prevalence remains unclear. Methods.  This was a retrospective study of data collected at the Akonolinga District Hospital, Cameroon, from January 1, 2002 to March 27, 2013. Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among BU patients was compared with regional HIV prevalence. Baseline characteristics of BU patients were compared between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and according to CD4 cell count strata in the latter group. Buruli ulcer time-to-healing was assessed in different CD4 count strata, and factors associated with BU main lesion size at baseline were identified. Results.  Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among BU patients was significantly higher than the regional estimated prevalence in each group (children, 4.00% vs 0.68% [P < .001]; men, 17.0% vs 4.7% [P < .001]; women, 36.0% vs 8.0% [P < .001]). Individuals who were HIV positive had a more severe form of BU, with an increased severity in those with a higher level of immunosuppression. Low CD4 cell count was significantly associated with a larger main lesion size (β-coefficient, −0.50; P = .015; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.91–0.10). Buruli ulcer time-to-healing was more than double in patients with a CD4 cell count below 500 cell/mm3 (hazard ratio, 2.39; P = .001; 95% CI, 1.44–3.98). Conclusion.  Patients who are HIV positive are at higher risk for BU. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression seems to have an impact on BU clinical presentation and disease evolution. PMID:25734094

  6. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, distribution of viral types and risk factors in cervical samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive women attending three human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immune deficiency syndrome reference centres in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barboza, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Maruza, Magda; Tenório, Terezinha; Ximenes, Ricardo AA

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have a greater prevalence of coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is of high oncogenic risk. Indeed, the presence of the virus favours intraepithelial squamous cell lesion progression and may induce cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection, distribution of HPV types and risk factors among HIV-positive patients. Cervical samples from 450 HIV-positive patients were analysed with regard to oncotic cytology, colposcopy and HPV presence and type by means of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The results were analysed by comparing demographic data and data relating to HPV and HIV infection. The prevalence of HPV was 47.5%. Among the HPV-positive samples, 59% included viral types of high oncogenic risk. Multivariate analysis showed an association between HPV infection and the presence of cytological alterations (p = 0.003), age greater than or equal to 35 years (p = 0.002), number of partners greater than three (p = 0.002), CD4+ lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 (p = 0.041) and alcohol abuse (p = 0.004). Although high-risk HPV was present in the majority of the lesions studied, the low frequency of HPV 16 (3.3%), low occurrence of cervical lesions and preserved immunological state in most of the HIV-positive patients were factors that may explain the low occurrence of precancerous cervical lesions in this population. PMID:25317701

  7. Expression of Ley antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human T cell lines and in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Ley determinant (Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta 1----4[Fuc alpha 1---- 3]GlcNAc beta 1----R) defined by mAb BM-1 is highly expressed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell lines and in CD3+ peripheral mature T cells of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS-related complex (ARC). Ley expression increased greatly in the CD3+ population in the advanced stage of AIDS when the CD4+ population decreased greatly. Six other carbohydrate antigens tested by their respective mAbs were not detected in these same cells. None of the carbohydrate antigens tested by the seven mAbs used in this study were found in noninfected T cell lines and in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:3258005

  8. Herd immunity acquired indirectly from interactions between the ecology of infectious diseases, demography and economics.

    PubMed

    Bonds, Matthew H; Rohani, Pejman

    2010-03-01

    Patterns of morbidity and mortality around the globe are determined by interactions between infectious diseases and systematic human socioeconomic processes. The most obvious of these patterns is that the greatest burdens of infectious diseases are found among the poor, who lack the basic resources for disease prevention and treatment. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that many infectious diseases are themselves causes of poverty owing to their effects on labour productivity. A particularly subtle phenomenon that receives little attention in the epidemiology literature and is especially important for poor communities is the role of the birth rate as an important direct cause of high disease burdens. Because of their high rates of transmission and life-long immunity, the persistence of many child diseases such as measles relies on high rates of reproduction as their source of susceptible individuals. Thus, there are significant direct health benefits of lower fertility rates, which are further enhanced by interactions with economic processes. Indeed, fertility, poverty and disease all interact with each other in important and predictable ways that can be built into traditional disease ecology models. We present such a model here that provides insights into the long-term effect of policy interventions. For example, because of indirect income effects, herd immunity may be acquired with lower vaccine coverage than previously thought. Reductions in the disease burden can also occur through lower fertility. Our model thus provides a disease ecology framework that is useful for the analysis of demographic transitions.

  9. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. PMID:26669818

  10. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases.

  11. Unrelated Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Combined Immunodeficiency with Granulomatous Disease and Autoimmunity Secondary to RAG Deficiency.

    PubMed

    John, Tami; Walter, Jolan E; Schuetz, Catherina; Chen, Karin; Abraham, Roshini S; Bonfim, Carmem; Boyce, Thomas G; Joshi, Avni Y; Kang, Elizabeth; Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares Costa; Mahajerin, Arash; Nugent, Diane; Puthenveetil, Geetha; Soni, Amit; Su, Helen; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi; Buchbinder, David

    2016-10-01

    The use of HLA-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) demonstrates overall survival rates greater than 75 % for T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency secondary to pathogenic mutation of recombinase activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2). Limited data exist regarding the use of HSCT in patients with hypomorphic RAG variants marked by greater preservation of RAG activity and associated phenotypes such as granulomatous disease in combination with autoimmunity. We describe a 17-year-old with combined immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation characterized by granulomatous lung disease and autoimmunity secondary to compound heterozygous RAG mutations. A myeloablative reduced toxicity HSCT was completed using an unrelated bone marrow donor. With the increasing cases of immune dysregulation being discovered with hypomorphic RAG variants, the use of HSCT may advance to the forefront of treatment. This case serves to discuss indications of HSCT, approaches to preparative therapy, and the potential complications in this growing cohort of patients with immune dysregulation and RAG deficiency. PMID:27539235

  12. Unrelated Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Combined Immunodeficiency with Granulomatous Disease and Autoimmunity Secondary to RAG Deficiency.

    PubMed

    John, Tami; Walter, Jolan E; Schuetz, Catherina; Chen, Karin; Abraham, Roshini S; Bonfim, Carmem; Boyce, Thomas G; Joshi, Avni Y; Kang, Elizabeth; Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares Costa; Mahajerin, Arash; Nugent, Diane; Puthenveetil, Geetha; Soni, Amit; Su, Helen; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi; Buchbinder, David

    2016-10-01

    The use of HLA-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) demonstrates overall survival rates greater than 75 % for T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency secondary to pathogenic mutation of recombinase activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2). Limited data exist regarding the use of HSCT in patients with hypomorphic RAG variants marked by greater preservation of RAG activity and associated phenotypes such as granulomatous disease in combination with autoimmunity. We describe a 17-year-old with combined immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation characterized by granulomatous lung disease and autoimmunity secondary to compound heterozygous RAG mutations. A myeloablative reduced toxicity HSCT was completed using an unrelated bone marrow donor. With the increasing cases of immune dysregulation being discovered with hypomorphic RAG variants, the use of HSCT may advance to the forefront of treatment. This case serves to discuss indications of HSCT, approaches to preparative therapy, and the potential complications in this growing cohort of patients with immune dysregulation and RAG deficiency.

  13. First Experimental In Vivo Model of Enhanced Dengue Disease Severity through Maternally Acquired Heterotypic Dengue Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Zhang, Summer Lixin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Yan, Benedict; Maria Martinez Gomez, Julia; Tan, Wei Yu; Lam, Jian Hang; Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) represents the most serious arthropod-borne viral disease. DEN clinical manifestations range from mild febrile illness to life-threatening hemorrhage and vascular leakage. Early epidemiological observations reported that infants born to DEN-immune mothers were at greater risk to develop the severe forms of the disease upon infection with any serotype of dengue virus (DENV). From these observations emerged the hypothesis of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease severity, whereby maternally acquired anti-DENV antibodies cross-react but fail to neutralize DENV particles, resulting in higher viremia that correlates with increased disease severity. Although in vitro and in vivo experimental set ups have indirectly supported the ADE hypothesis, direct experimental evidence has been missing. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study has challenged the influence of maternal antibodies in disease outcome. Here we have developed a mouse model of ADE where DENV2 infection of young mice born to DENV1-immune mothers led to earlier death which correlated with higher viremia and increased vascular leakage compared to DENV2-infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers. In this ADE model we demonstrated the role of TNF-α in DEN-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, upon infection with an attenuated DENV2 mutant strain, mice born to DENV1-immune mothers developed lethal disease accompanied by vascular leakage whereas infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers did no display any clinical manifestation. In vitro ELISA and ADE assays confirmed the cross-reactive and enhancing properties towards DENV2 of the serum from mice born to DENV1-immune mothers. Lastly, age-dependent susceptibility to disease enhancement was observed in mice born to DENV1-immune mothers, thus reproducing epidemiological observations. Overall, this work provides direct in vivo demonstration of the role of maternally acquired heterotypic dengue antibodies in the enhancement of dengue

  14. First experimental in vivo model of enhanced dengue disease severity through maternally acquired heterotypic dengue antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jowin Kai Wei; Zhang, Summer Lixin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Yan, Benedict; Martinez, Julia Maria; Tan, Wei Yu; Lam, Jian Hang; Tan, Grace Kai Xin; Ooi, Eng Eong; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-04-01

    Dengue (DEN) represents the most serious arthropod-borne viral disease. DEN clinical manifestations range from mild febrile illness to life-threatening hemorrhage and vascular leakage. Early epidemiological observations reported that infants born to DEN-immune mothers were at greater risk to develop the severe forms of the disease upon infection with any serotype of dengue virus (DENV). From these observations emerged the hypothesis of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease severity, whereby maternally acquired anti-DENV antibodies cross-react but fail to neutralize DENV particles, resulting in higher viremia that correlates with increased disease severity. Although in vitro and in vivo experimental set ups have indirectly supported the ADE hypothesis, direct experimental evidence has been missing. Furthermore, a recent epidemiological study has challenged the influence of maternal antibodies in disease outcome. Here we have developed a mouse model of ADE where DENV2 infection of young mice born to DENV1-immune mothers led to earlier death which correlated with higher viremia and increased vascular leakage compared to DENV2-infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers. In this ADE model we demonstrated the role of TNF-α in DEN-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, upon infection with an attenuated DENV2 mutant strain, mice born to DENV1-immune mothers developed lethal disease accompanied by vascular leakage whereas infected mice born to dengue naïve mothers did no display any clinical manifestation. In vitro ELISA and ADE assays confirmed the cross-reactive and enhancing properties towards DENV2 of the serum from mice born to DENV1-immune mothers. Lastly, age-dependent susceptibility to disease enhancement was observed in mice born to DENV1-immune mothers, thus reproducing epidemiological observations. Overall, this work provides direct in vivo demonstration of the role of maternally acquired heterotypic dengue antibodies in the enhancement of dengue

  15. Assessment of intracellular cytokines and regulatory cells in patients with autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiencies - novel tool for diagnostics and patient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Osnes, Liv T; Nakken, Britt; Bodolay, Edit; Szodoray, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Serum and intracytoplasmic cytokines are mandatory in host defense against microbes, but also play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by initiating and perpetuating various cellular and humoral autoimmune processes. The intricate interplay and fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes drive, whether inflammation and eventually organ damage will occur, or the inflammatory cascade quenches. In the early and late, as well as inactive and active stages of autoimmune diseases, different cellular and molecular patterns can dominate in these patients. However, the simultaneous assessment of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers aids to define the immunological state of a patient. A group of the most useful inflammatory biomarkers are cytokines, and with increasing knowledge during the last decade their role have been well-defined in patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies. Multiple pathological processes drive the development of autoimmunity and immunodeficiencies, most of which involve quantitative and qualitative disturbances in regulatory cells, cytokine synthesis and signaling pathways. The assessment of these biomarkers does not aid only in the mechanistic description of autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies, but further helps to subcategorize diseases and to evaluate therapy responses. Here, we provide an overview, how monitoring of cytokines and regulatory cells aid in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies furthermore, we pinpoint novel cellular and molecular diagnostic possibilities in these diseases.

  16. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys.

  17. A constant threat for HIV: Fc-engineering to enhance broadly neutralizing antibody activity for immunotherapy of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-08-01

    Passive immunotherapy with polyclonal or hyperimmune serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an efficient means of protecting immunocompromised patients from microbial infections. More recently, the use of passive immunotherapy to prevent or to treat established infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has gained much attention, due to promising preclinical data obtained in monkey and humanized mouse in vivo model systems, demonstrating that the transfer of HIV-specific antibodies can not only prevent HIV infection, but also diminish virus load during chronic infection. Furthermore, an array of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies has become available and the importance of the IgG constant region as a critical modulator of broadly neutralizing activity has been demonstrated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings with regard to the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for antibody-mediated clearance of HIV infection, and to discuss how this may help to improve HIV therapy via optimizing Fcγ-receptor-dependent activities of HIV-specific antibodies.

  18. Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Immune Cells Develop a Severe AIDS-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Zaher; Kay, Denis G.; Cool, Marc; Jothy, Serge; Rebai, Najet; Jolicoeur, Paul

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the entire human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coding sequences in cells targeted by HIV-1 infection in humans. These Tg mice developed a severe AIDS-like disease leading to early death (<1 month). They developed muscle wasting, severe atrophy and fibrosis of lymphoid organs, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis. In addition the expression of RANTES was increased in various tissues of these Tg mice relative to that in the normal controls. Disease appearance was correlated with the levels of transgene expression. The numerous pathologies observed in these mice are remarkably similar to those observed in human AIDS and, more specifically, in pediatric AIDS. PMID:9420207

  19. Virus-triggered acquired immunodeficiency by cytotoxic T-cell-dependent destruction of antigen-presenting cells and lymph follicle structure.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B; Eppler, M; Leist, T P; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-01-01

    Virus-induced acquired immune suppression in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is shown here to be caused by the CD8+-T-cell-dependent elimination of macrophages/antigen-presenting cells. Surprisingly, this is associated with severe destruction of the follicular organization of lymphoid organs, indicating a crucial role for dendritic cells and marginal zone macrophages in maintaining follicular structure. Once established, this immunopathology cannot be readily reversed by the elimination of CD8+ effector cells. Such a T-cell-mediated pathogenesis may play a pivotal role in acquired virus-induced immunosuppression and may represent one strategy by which virus escapes immune surveillance and establishes persistent infections in initially immunocompetent hosts. Images PMID:1910175

  20. Exome Sequencing Analysis Reveals Variants in Primary Immunodeficiency Genes in Patients With Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelsen, Judith R.; Dawany, Noor; Moran, Christopher J.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Sarmady, Mahdi; Sasson, Ariella; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Martinez, Alejandro; Maurer, Kelly; Soong, Joanne; Rappaport, Eric; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas; Winter, Harland S.; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Devoto, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD), IBD diagnosed ≤5 y of age, frequently presents with a different and more severe phenotype than older-onset IBD. We investigated whether patients with VEO-IBD carry rare or novel variants in genes associated with immunodeficiencies that might contribute to disease development. Methods Patients with VEO-IBD and parents (when available) were recruited from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from March 2013 through July 2014. We analyzed DNA from 125 patients with VEO-IBD (ages 3 weeks to 4 y) and 19 parents, 4 of whom also had IBD. Exome capture was performed by Agilent SureSelect V4, and sequencing was performed using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Alignment to human genome GRCh37 was achieved followed by post-processing and variant calling. Following functional annotation, candidate variants were analyzed for change in protein function, minor allele frequency <0.1%, and scaled combined annotation dependent depletion scores ≤10. We focused on genes associated with primary immunodeficiencies and related pathways. An additional 210 exome samples from patients with pediatric IBD (n=45) or adult-onset Crohn's disease (n=20) and healthy individuals (controls, n=145) were obtained from the University of Kiel, Germany and used as control groups. Results Four-hundred genes and regions associated with primary immunodeficiency, covering approximately 6500 coding exons totaling > 1 Mbp of coding sequence, were selected from the whole exome data. Our analysis revealed novel and rare variants within these genes that could contribute to the development of VEO-IBD, including rare heterozygous missense variants in IL10RA and previously unidentified variants in MSH5 and CD19. Conclusions In an exome sequence analysis of patients with VEO-IBD and their parents, we identified variants in genes that regulate B- and T-cell functions and could contribute to pathogenesis. Our analysis could lead to the

  1. Massive renal and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in a case of acquired renal cystic disease with atypical epithelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Verani, R; Wagner, E; Thompson, C

    1988-07-01

    We present a case of acquired renal cystic disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus who was dialysis dependent for 5 years. Renal hemorrhage and neoplastic transformation of the cyst epithelium are the two major complications of acquired renal cystic disease, and were present in this patient. The full clinical significance of the acquired renal cystic lesion is still unclear, although the possibility of renal tumors and massive renal and retroperitoneal hemorrhage should be considered in the long-term dialysis population.

  2. Prevalence of obesity among patients with congenital and acquired heart disease.

    PubMed

    Shustak, Rachel J; McGuire, Sharda B; October, Tessie W; Phoon, Colin K L; Chun, Anne J L

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obesity rates have risen dramatically in the United States, with subsequent detrimental comorbidity risks. The rates for obesity among children with congenital and acquired heart disease have rarely been reported. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children with heart disease and to identify subgroups at increased risk. A total of 795 cases were identified from a chart review of patients presenting to an urban center's Pediatric Cardiology Program between 1 January and 31 December 2006. A body mass index (BMI) at the 85th percentile or higher was defined as overweight, and a BMI at the 95th percentile or higher was defined as obese. Subjects with comorbidities affecting body habitus were excluded from the study. Overall, overweight and obesity rates were similar to national data. No significant differences in overweight or obesity rates were detected between heart disease and non-heart disease groups (P = 0.50). According to multivariate analysis, Hispanic ethnicity and male gender were the only predictors of obesity. This study shows that children with heart disease are not immune to the common predictors of obesity such as gender and ethnicity and that the future care of children with heart disease should include general discussions about the risks for obesity.

  3. The Influence of Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Perceived Susceptibility Patterns on Sexual Risk Reduction for Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershaw, Trace S.; Ethier, Kathleen A.; Milan, Stephanie; Lewis, Jessica B.; Niccolai, Linda M.; Meade, Christina; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2005-01-01

    Risky sexual behavior can lead to pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Our study of 300 adolescent females takes an integrative approach by incorporating these multiple outcomes to assess the influence of risk perceptions on sexual behavior by (1) identifying subgroups of perceived susceptibility…

  4. Inclusion body disease of cranes: comparison of pathologic findings in cranes with acquired vs. experimentally induced disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuh, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Siegfried, L.M.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes was the cause of death in 17 immature and mature cranes of 5 different species in Wisconsin. A herpesvirus of unknown origin was the apparent cause. An isolate of this herpesvirus was used to experimentally infect 3 species of cranes. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions associated with naturally acquired and experimentally induced disease were essentially identical. Multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis was found in all cranes evaluated. Necrosis of the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius also was seen in some of the cranes. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies often were commonly associated with hepatic lesions, sometimes with the splenic lesions, and rarely with the thymic or gastrointestinal tract lesions. The lesions of this inclusion body disease were similar to those reported for cranes in Austria from which a crane herpesvirus was isolated.

  5. A Glimpse of the Early Years of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic: A Fellow's Experience in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Armstrong, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a manageable chronic disease in the United States, yet the first author's experience on a general infectious diseases (ID) consult service illustrates that certain areas of the United States still experience high rates of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related complications. PMID:25734112

  6. Immunodeficiency disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... destroy bacteria and other foreign substances. Proteins called complement help with this process. Immunodeficiency disorders may affect any part of the immune system. Most often, these conditions occur when special white ...

  7. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Downregulation of the T-Cell Receptor by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Nef Does Not Protect against Disease Progression▿

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Jérôme; Leligdowicz, Aleksandra; Jaye, Assan; Dong, Tao; Whittle, Hilton; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic immune activation is thought to play a major role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis, but the relative contributions of multiple factors to immune activation are not known. One proposed mechanism to protect against immune activation is the ability of Nef proteins from some HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus strains to downregulate the T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex of the infected cell, thereby reducing the potential for deleterious activation. HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Nef has lost this property. In contrast to HIV-1, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a marked disparity in the disease course, with most individuals maintaining a normal life span. In this study, we examined the relationship between the ability of HIV-2 Nef proteins to downregulate the TCR and immune activation, comparing progressors and nonprogressors. Representative Nef variants were isolated from 28 HIV-2-infected individuals. We assessed their abilities to downregulate the TCR from the surfaces of CD4 T cells. In the same individuals, the activation of peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated by measurement of the expression levels of HLA-DR and CD38. We observed a striking correlation of the TCR downregulation efficiency of HIV-2 Nef variants with immune activation in individuals with a low viral load. This strongly suggests that Nef expression can influence the activation state of the immune systems of infected individuals. However, the efficiency of TCR downregulation by Nef was not reduced in progressing individuals, showing that TCR downregulation does not protect against progression in HIV-2 infection. PMID:19812166

  9. [Executive summary of the recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Gorriz, José L; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullàs, Joan C; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose R; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofán, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, María J; Gràcia, Sílvia; Iribarren, José A; Knobel, Hernando; López-Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martínez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañés, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María J; Portilla, Joaquín; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaría, Juan M; Sanz, José; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glycosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir, or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  12. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  13. An unusually long-lasting outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease, 2005-2008, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, M; Fontana, S; Crippa, S; Caporali, M G; Seyler, T; Veschetti, E; Villa, G; Rota, M C; Ricci, M L

    2015-08-01

    An unusually long-lasting community-acquired outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred in the inhabitants of a town in northern Italy from 2005 to 2008. Overall, 43 cases were diagnosed including five deaths. Hundreds of water samples were collected for Legionella isolation but only two clinical samples were obtained. Clinical strains were ST23 as were environmental isolates detected in most Legionella-positive patients' homes and those from a public fountain. Although no Legionella was found in the municipal water mains, a continuous chlorination was applied in 2008. This action resulted in a halving of cases, although incidence remained tenfold higher than the Italian average incidence until the end of 2013, when it dropped to the expected rate. Retrospective analyses of prevalent wind direction suggested that a hidden cooling tower could have been the main cause of this uncommon outbreak, highlighting the importance of implementation of cooling tower registers in supporting LD investigations. PMID:25427871

  14. The variable in common variable immunodeficiency: a disease of complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common and clinically most important severe primary antibody deficiency and is characterized by low levels of IgG, IgA, and/or IgM, with a failure to produce specific antibodies. This diagnostic category represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, which present not only with acute and chronic infections but also with a range of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as an increased incidence of lymphoma and other malignancies. Patients can now be categorized into distinct clinical phenotypes based on analysis of large cohort studies and be further stratified by immunologic laboratory testing. The biologic importance of this categorization is made clear by the 11-fold increase in mortality if even one of these phenotypes (cytopenias, lymphoproliferation, or enteropathy) is present. Limited progress in defining the underlying molecular causes has been made with known causative single gene defects accounting for only 3% of cases, and, for this and the reasons mentioned above, CVID remains resolute in its variability. This review provides a practical approach to risk stratification of these complex phenotypes by using current clinical categories and laboratory biomarkers. The effects of infection as well as inflammatory and autoimmune complications on different organ systems are discussed alongside strategies to reduce diagnostic delay. Recent developments in diagnostics and therapy are also explored. PMID:24565700

  15. Progress toward production of immunologic tolerance with no or minimal toxic immunosuppression for prevention of immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Good, R A

    2000-07-01

    With donor and recipient matched at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, peripheral lymphoid tissue transplantation can be carried out without producing a graft-versus-host reaction or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), thus correcting profound T cell immunodeficiencies of neonatally thymectomized mice. This analysis set the stage for clinical application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to provide for the first time cure of a human disease. With successful BMT, we cured immunologic deficiencies of a patient with XL severe combined immunodeficiency; thereafter we were the first to employ BMT to cure aplastic anemia. BMT regularly corrects immune and hematologic deficiencies caused by fatal irradiation without producing GVHD if the bone marrow (BM) used for the transplants has been purged of postthymic T cells. Over two decades in conjunction with Ikehara et al., we have shown that lethal total body irradiation (TBI) plus allogeneic BMT prevents or cures many organ-specific and systemic experimental autoimmune diseases. Animal models successfully treated by BMT include type I diabetes in nonobese diabetes (NOD) mice, type II diabetes in insulin-insensitive, glucose intolerant, diabetes mellitus (KK/Ay) mice, and autoimmune lupus erythematosus (LE) and glomerulonephritis in New Zealand Black x New Zealand White first generation hybrid (NZB x NZW)F1 females. El-Badri extended Ildstad's original research showing a high frequency of survival with a normal functioning immune system after stable mixed chimerism is produced by mixed BMT in C57BL/6 (normal long-lived black strain) mice transplanted with T cell-depleted marrow (TCDM) from BALB/c ("normal" long-lived strain) allogeneic donors and C57BL/6 syngeneic donors. We showed that osteoblasts act as facilitator cells for allogeneic BMT and promote engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells. Wang et al. then showed that the autoimmunities and fulminating renal disease of BXSB (C57BL x SB cross and

  16. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States. PMID:26454313

  17. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV+ and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV+ and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV+ adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV+ males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV+ adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV+ youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents.

  18. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents.

  19. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV+) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV+ and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV+ and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV+ and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV+ adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV+ males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV+ adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV+ youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  20. Sexual Behavior and Knowledge among Adolescents with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Compared to HIV-Uninfected Adolescents at an Urban Tertiary Center in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ashlesha; Pineda, Carol; Kest, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual behaviors and knowledge among PHIV-infected (PHIV(+)) adolescents in comparison with HIV-uninfected youths are not well understood and continue to be studied actively. Objective. To compare sexual behavior and sexual knowledge of PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents at an urban, tertiary-care center in New Jersey. Study Design. Modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance questionnaire was administered to PHIV(+) and HIV-uninfected adolescents to assess and compare sexual behavior and knowledge over a 1-year-period. Results. Twenty-seven PHIV(+) and 100 HIV-uninfected adolescents were studied; 59% PHIV(+) and 52% HIV-uninfected adolescents were sexually active. A significantly higher proportion of PHIV(+) adolescents compared to HIV-uninfected adolescents reported ≥1 occasion of unprotected penetrative sex (p < 0.0001) and reported multiple (>4) sexual partners (p = 0.037). Significantly more PHIV(+) males reported receptive anal intercourse (p < 0.001). About 1/3 of adolescents in both groups were unaware that sexual abstinence can prevent HIV transmission and >80% adolescents in both groups did not consider multiple sexual partners a risk factor for HIV transmission. Only 25% PHIV(+) adolescents reported disclosing their seropositive status to their first sexual partners. Conclusions. High risk sexual behaviors were significantly more prevalent among PHIV(+) youths; however both groups demonstrated considerable gaps in sexual knowledge. There is an urgent need for heightening awareness about risky behaviors, interventions for prevention, and reproductive health promotion among adolescents. PMID:27595131

  1. The Urine Urokinase Concentration in End Stage Renal Disease with Acquired Renal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sae Yong; Yang, Dong Ho; Lee, Byoung Ho; Ki, Eun Kyong; Chung, Kwang Hoe

    1991-01-01

    To see whether there was any difference in the urine urokinase concentration between acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) group and control (non cyst) group in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD), we evaluated fifty ESRD patients who had been maintained on chronic hemodialysis for various period. The urine urokinase concentration was higher in the ACKD group (17.5±14.7 unit/ml, range 13.5–47.0 unit/ml, n=9) than the control group (4.1±3.4 unit/ml, range 0.5–12.0 unit/ml, n=36) (p<0.001), and polycyst group (2.6±1.8 unit/ml, range 1.0–5.1 unit/ml, n=5) (p<0.01). But there was no difference between the control group and polycyst group. In the control group and the ACKD group, there was a direct relation between the dialysis duration and the urokinase concentration and the longer the dialysis duration, the higher the urine urokinase concentration (r squared=0.424, p=0.0001). The hemodialysis duration was longer in the ACKD group (42±17.0 months) than the control group (20.0±12.5 months) (p<0.005). These findings suggest that urokinase may be responsible for cystogenic degeneration in ESRD. PMID:1807367

  2. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: further characterization of the morphologic and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soomin; Kwon, Ghee Young; Cho, Yong Mee; Jun, Sun-Young; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yong Wook; Park, Weon Seo; Shim, Jung Won

    2013-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma (ACD-RCC) is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with unique morphologic features found exclusively in the background of end-stage renal disease. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features and immumoreactive profiles of 12 cases of ACD-RCC to further characterize this recently recognized entity. Review of histologic slides was performed in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining directed to the contemporary diagnostic antibodies and the putative target therapy-related markers. Histologically, the tumors showed characteristic inter-or intracellular microlumens and eosinophilic tumor cells. Intratumoral hemosiderin deposition and degenerating foamy tumor cells were consistent findings which were not previously described. Immunohistochemically, all the tumors were positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, CD10, pan-cytokeratin, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and c-met, while negative for carbonic anhydrase-9, CD57, CD68, c-kit, pax-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. Heterogenous staining was found for CK7 and kidney-specific cadherin. Positive reaction to c-met suggests its utility as a plausible therapeutic target in ACD-RCC. Thus, we present the unique morphologic and immunopathologic features of ACD-RCC, which may be helpful in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:23471757

  3. [Stimulus of the hypophyseal-adrenocortical axis with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Evidence for activation of the immune-neuroendocrine system].

    PubMed

    Lewi, D S; Kater, C E; Moreira, A C

    1995-01-01

    Ten-20% of patients with AIDS may present clinical evidence of primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. PURPOSE--To evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) with CRH in patients with AIDS. METHODS--We studied 20 patients with AIDS and 17 normal subjects (NS) with exogenous ACTH (cosyntropin, 250 micrograms IV bolus) followed one week later by ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH 1 microgram/kg BW IV bolus). Basal and 60' cortisol (micrograms/dL) were determined in the former whereas ACTH (pg/mL) and cortisol were measured every 15-30' for 2 hours in the latter. RESULTS--Basal and peak values (mean +/- SD) of ACTH and cortisol for both tests were: cosyntropin test (AIDS x NS): basal cortisol 22.5 +/- 7.1 x 10.6 +/- 3.6 (p < 0.01), peak 36.0 +/- 12.8 x 28.3 +/- 7.6 (p < 0.05); oCRH test: basal ACTH 42.2 +/- 33.5 x 28.9 +/- 12.7 (NS), peak 104.7 +/- 62.2 x 59.3 +/- 17.6 (p < 0.05); basal cortisol 19.7 +/- 9.0 x 10.1 +/- 3.4 (p < 0.01), peak 27.5 +/- 8.9 x 18.3 +/- 5.1 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--AIDS patients had elevated basal and CRH stimulated ACTH levels and an intact glucocorticoid pathway with elevated basal and peak cortisol levels to both stimulation tests. This situation is probably due to the stressful disease condition, where lymphokines may play a role activating the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. PMID:8520591

  4. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration May Not Attenuate Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression in Female Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Angela M.; Nichols, Whitney A.; LeCapitaine, Nicole J.; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Birke, Leslie L.; Lacour, Nedra; Winsauer, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) frequently use cannabinoids, either recreationally by smoking marijuana or therapeutically (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol; Δ9-THC dronabinol). Previously, we demonstrated that chronic Δ9-THC administration decreases early mortality in male simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. In this study, we sought to examine whether similar protective effects resulted from chronic cannabinoid administration in SIV-infected female rhesus macaques. Clinical and viral parameters were evaluated in eight female rhesus macaques that received either Δ9-THC (0.18–0.32 mg/kg, intramuscularly, twice daily) or vehicle (VEH) starting 28 days prior to intravenous inoculation with SIVmac251. SIV disease progression was assessed by changes in body weight, mortality, viral levels in plasma and mucosal sites, and lymphocyte subsets. In contrast to our results in male animals, chronic Δ9-THC did not protect SIV-infected female rhesus macaques from early mortality. Markers of SIV disease, including viral load and CD4+/CD8+ ratio, were not altered by Δ9-THC compared to control females; however, females that received chronic Δ9-THC did not gain as much weight as control animals. In addition, Δ9-THC administration increased total CXCR4 expression in both peripheral and duodenal CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes prior to SIV inoculation. Although protection from early mortality was not evident, chronic Δ9-THC did not affect clinical markers of SIV disease progression. The contrasting effects of chronic Δ9-THC in males versus females remain to be explained, but highlight the need for further studies to explore the sex-dependent effects of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids on the HIV disease course and their implications for virus transmission. PMID:25113915

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease.

    PubMed

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  6. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS). The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression. PMID:23869197

  7. The Unspecific Side of Acquired Immunity Against Infectious Disease: Causes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunity against infectious disease (AIID) has long been considered as strictly dependent on the B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. Consequently, AIID has been viewed as highly specific to the antigens expressed by pathogens. However, a growing body of data motivates revision of this central paradigm of immunology. Unrelated past infection, vaccination, and chronic infection have been found to induce cross-protection against numerous pathogens. These observations can be partially explained by the poly-specificity of antigenic T and B receptors, the Mackaness effect and trained immunity. In addition, numerous studies highlight the importance of microbiota composition on resistance to infectious disease via direct competition or modulation of the immune response. All of these data support the idea that a non-negligible part of AIID in nature can be nonspecific to the pathogens encountered and even of the antigens expressed by pathogens. As this protection may be dependent on the private T and B repertoires produced by the random rearrangement of genes, past immune history, chronic infection, and microbiota composition, it is largely unpredictable at the individual level. However, we can reasonably expect that a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will allow us to statistically predict cross-protection at the population level. From an evolutionary perspective, selection of immune mechanisms allowing for partially nonspecific AIID would appear to be advantageous against highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving pathogens. This new emerging paradigm may have several important consequences on our understanding of individual infectious disease susceptibility and our conception of tolerance, vaccination and therapeutic strategies against infection and cancer. It also underscores the importance of viewing the microbiota and persisting infectious agents as integral parts of the immune system. PMID:26793171

  8. Patterns of risk behaviour for patients with sexually transmitted diseases and surveillance for human immunodeficiency virus in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lye, M S; Archibald, C; Ghazali, A A; Low, B T; Teoh, B H; Sinniah, M; Rus, S C; Singh, J; Nair, R C

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of establishing a sentinel human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) surveillance system involving patients with sexually transmitted diseases attending private clinics and a government sexually transmitted disease clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Information on risk behaviours for HIV infection were also collected. A total of 84 female and 91 male patients were interviewed and tested for HIV infection; 41.7% of the women reported working as prostitutes, other occupations included masseuses, hairdressers, waitresses, salesgirls, receptionists, factory workers, and others. The most common diagnosis was gonorrhoea. Other diagnoses included non-specific genital infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, genital herpes and syphilis. 58.3% of the women had a hundred or more sex partners during the previous month; 99% had 6 or more sex partners. Only 4.8% of female patients had their male partners using condoms most of the time, 11.9% hardly used condoms at all. Of the males, 93.3% were heterosexual, while 6.7% were bisexuals, 41.1% had between 6-20 different partners in the previous year. 78.0% of them had prostitutes as their sex partners most of the time. 41.8% had experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. 73.6% never used condoms, while 19.8% only used condoms rarely. Although all patients were tested negative for HIV antibodies, lot quality assurance sampling methods indicate that the upper limits of prevalences for females and males were 3.5% and 3.3% respectively, at a 5% type I error. The study has shown that it is feasible to carry out a sentinel surveillance programme among STD patients and provided useful baseline data for future comparisons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of changes in human ecology and behavior on patterns of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserheit, J N

    1994-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed six striking changes in patterns of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): emergence of new STD organisms and etiologies, reemergence of old STDs, shifts in the populations in which STDs are concentrated, shifts in the etiological spectra of STD syndromes, alterations in the incidence of STD complications, and increases in antimicrobial resistance. For example, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emerged to devastate the United States with a fatal pandemic involving at least 1 million people. The incidence of syphilis rose progressively after 1956 to reach a 40-year peak by 1990. In both cases, disease patterns shifted from homosexual men to include minority heterosexuals. Over the last decade, gonorrhea became increasingly concentrated among adolescents, and several new types of antimicrobial resistance appeared. Three interrelated types of environments affect STD patterns. The microbiologic, hormonal, and immunologic microenvironments most directly influence susceptibility, infectiousness, and development of sequelae. These microenvironments are shaped, in part, by the personal environments created by an individual's sexual, substance-use, and health-related behaviors. The personal environments are also important determinants of acquisition of infection and development of sequelae but, in addition, they mediate risk of exposure to infection. These are, therefore, the environments that most directly affect changing disease patterns. Finally, individuals' personal environments are, in turn, molded by powerful macroenvironmental forces, including socioeconomic, demographic, geographic, political, epidemiologic, and technological factors. Over the past 20 years, the profound changes that have occurred in many aspects of the personal environment and the macroenvironment have been reflected in new STD patterns. PMID:8146135

  10. Natural cytotoxicity in immunodeficiency diseases: preservation of natural killer activity and the in vivo appearance of radioresistant killing

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.F.; Polmar, S.H.; Schacter, B.Z.; Brovall, C.; Hornick, D.L.; Sorensen, R.U.

    1986-01-01

    We studied spontaneous natural killer (NK) cell activity and radiation-resistant NK mediated cytotoxicity in four patients with clinically documented severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID), and in one subject each with intestinal lymphangiectasia and cartilage-hair hypoplasia. We observed the preservation of spontaneous NK activity in all patients despite the presence of profound B- and T-lymphocytopenia and clinical immunodeficiency. NK activity was associated with relatively normal circulating numbers of OKM1+ lymphocytes, a population known to contain NK effectors. Spontaneous NK activity resistant to 3000 rad was increased in all patients, indicating the presence of activated natural killer cells in vivo. The concept of a chronically activated immune system in these patients was further supported by the presence of increased Ia positive T cells in all subjects tested, suggesting that radioresistant NK activity may be a useful parameter to measure when assessing in vivo immune activation. Our data, as well as that of others, supports the hypothesis that at least one population of NK cells is a distinct lineage arising at the differentiation level of myeloid and lymphoid stem cells in the bone marrow.

  11. Bacillary angiomatosis. The histopathology and differential diagnosis of a pseudoneoplastic infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    LeBoit, P E; Berger, T G; Egbert, B M; Beckstead, J H; Yen, T S; Stoler, M H

    1989-11-01

    Cutaneous vascular proliferations that clinically or pathologically resemble Kaposi's sarcoma, pyogenic granuloma, or histiocytoid (epithelioid) hemangioma may occur in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. These lesions, which respond well to antibiotic therapy, harbor bacilli similar to the agent of cat scratch disease. We evaluated 21 biopsy specimens from 13 patients with this condition, which we have called "bacillary angiomatosis." The architecture resembled that of lobular capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma), but the endothelial cells were often larger, polygonal, and sometimes markedly atypical. The presence of neutrophils, leukocytoclastic debris, and granular material (bacteria), and the absence of either spindled cells, bizarrely shaped vascular channels, or hyaline globules help to distinguish bacillary angiomatosis from Kaposi's sarcoma. By electron microscopy, the protuberant endothelial cells were different from those of histiocytoid hemangiomas in that aggregates of intermediate filaments were absent, while numerous Weibel-Palade bodies were present. The immunophenotype of the endothelial cells was distinct from that of Kaposi's sarcoma; almost all cells showed both Factor VIII RAg and Ulex europaeus lectin positivity. Enzyme histochemistry also showed a pattern distinct from Kaposi's sarcoma. Bacillary angiomatosis presents a unique constellation of clinical and microscopic findings. It is important to be aware of these characteristics, because these lesions are easily treatable with antibiotic therapy.

  12. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  13. Is community-acquired pneumonia an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Singanayagam, A; Singanayagam, A; Elder, D H J; Chalmers, J D

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most frequent infectious cause of death in western countries. The high mortality rate in CAP is commonly related to comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Clinical studies in both primary and secondary care settings have identified an increase in short- and long-term risk of cardiovascular events and death from vascular events following acute respiratory infections. The mechanism remains to be fully established, but it has been suggested that the inflammatory state in patients affected by CAP acts to promote platelet activation and thrombosis, and to narrow coronary arteries through vasoconstriction. Acute infections destabilise vascular endothelium and create an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand, leading to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Acute infections have been shown to have both systemic effects and local effects on coronary vessels. These effects are mediated through both the host response to infection and, in some cases, direct effects of bacterial infection or bacterial products. In this review, we discuss the link between CAP and increased risk of cardiovascular events, drawing on existing evidence from clinical and mechanistic studies. Further studies into and increased awareness of this association is warranted to promote novel ways of protecting high-risk patients. PMID:21737556

  14. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  15. Domestically Acquired Legionnaires’ Disease: Two Case Reports and a Review of the Pertinent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2016-01-01

    Background: Legionella species may colonize in home water systems and cause Legionnaires’ disease (LD). We herein report two cases of sporadic LD associated with the solar energy-heated hot water systems of the patients’ houses. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with chronic bronchitis and diabetes mellitus presented with a high fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Physical examination revealed rales, and her chest radiograph showed a homogeneous density in the left lung. The Legionella urinary antigen test was positive, and an indirect fluorescent antibody test revealed a serum antibody titer of 1/520 for L. pneumophila serogroup 1. In the second case, a 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was treated for pneumonia at another hospital. After the patient’s general condition worsened and he required mechanical ventilation, he was referred to our hospital. The Legionella urinary antigen test was positive. Neither of the patients had been hospitalized or travelled within the previous month. Both patients used hot water storage tanks heated by solar energy; both also used an electrical device in the bathroom to heat the water when solar energy alone was insufficient. The hot water samples from the residences of both patients were positive for L. pneumophila sero-group 1. Conclusion: These cases show that domestic hot water systems heated by solar energy must be considered a possible source of community-acquired LD. PMID:27308081

  16. A novel ELISA-based diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand disease with increased VWF proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Antoine; Caron, Claudine; Vincent, Flavien; Jeanpierre, Emmanuelle; Ternisien, Catherine; Boisseau, Pierre; Zawadzki, Christophe; Fressinaud, Edith; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Hermoire, Sylvie; Paris, Camille; Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Veyradier, Agnès; Ung, Alexandre; Vincentelli, André; van Belle, Eric; Lenting, Peter J; Goudemand, Jenny; Susen, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Von Willebrand disease-type 2A (VWD-2A) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) due to aortic stenosis (AS) or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are associated with an increased proteolysis of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Analysis of VWF multimeric profile is the most sensitive way to assess such increased VWF-proteolysis. However, several technical aspects hamper a large diffusion among routine diagnosis laboratories. This makes early diagnosis and early appropriate care of increased proteolysis challenging. In this context of unmet medical need, we developed a new ELISA aiming a quick, easy and reliable assessment of VWF-proteolysis. This ELISA was assessed successively in a LVAD-model, healthy subjects (n=39), acquired TTP-patients (n=4), VWD-patients (including VWD-2A(IIA), n=22; VWD-2B, n=26; VWD-2A(IIE), n=21; and VWD-1C, n=8) and in AVWS-patients (AS, n=9; LVAD, n=9; and MGUS, n=8). A standard of VWF-proteolysis was specifically developed. Extent of VWF-proteolysis was expressed as relative percentage and as VWF proteolysis/VWF:Ag ratio. A speed-dependent increase in VWF-proteolysis was assessed in the LVAD model whereas no proteolysis was observed in TTP-patients. In VWD-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in VWD-2A(IIA) and VWD-2B and significantly decreased in VWD-2A(IIE) versus controls (p< 0.0001). In AVWS-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in AS- and LVAD-patients compared to controls (p< 0.0001) and not detectable in MGUS-patients. A significant increase in VWF-proteolysis was detected as soon as three hours after LVAD implantation (p< 0.01). In conclusion, we describe a new ELISA allowing a rapid and accurate diagnosis of VWF-proteolysis validated in three different clinical situations. This assay represents a helpful alternative to electrophoresis-based assay in the diagnosis and management of AVWS with increased VWF-proteolysis. PMID:26791163

  17. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  18. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; MacFabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels—a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of

  19. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; Macfabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels-a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of mitochondrial

  20. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; Macfabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels-a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of mitochondrial

  1. Granulomatous and lymphocytic interstitial lung disease: a spectrum of pulmonary histopathologic lesions in common variable immunodeficiency--histologic and immunohistochemical analyses of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nagarjun; Mackinnon, A Craig; Routes, John M

    2015-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is a primary immunodeficiency of unknown etiology characterized by low serum immunoglobulin G, a decreased ability to make specific antibodies, and variable T-cell defects. Approximately 10-30% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency develop clinical evidence of a diffuse parenchymal lung disease with a constellation of histopathologic findings termed granulomatous and lymphocytic interstitial lung disease. In this study, we characterized the histologic and immunohistochemical features in a series of 16 cases diagnosed by open lung biopsy. Peribronchiolar and interstitial lymphocytic infiltration, granulomatous inflammation, and organizing pneumonia were consistent features; interstitial fibrosis with architectural remodeling was also found in a subgroup of patients. By immunohistochemistry, a predominance of CD4+ T lymphocytes with variable numbers of CD8+ T cells and B cells was present, with a striking absence of FOXP3-positive T-regulatory cells. This heretofore unrecognized immunohistochemical finding needs further investigation for a potential role in the pathogenesis of the condition. The presence of interstitial fibrosis with or without architectural remodeling in a subset of patients also needs additional study, for effect on prognosis.

  2. Cross-reactive acquired immunity influences transmission success of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Maxime; Durand, Jonas; Rais, Olivier; Voordouw, Maarten J

    2015-12-01

    Cross-reactive acquired immunity in the vertebrate host induces indirect competition between strains of a given pathogen species and is critical for understanding the ecology of mixed infections. In vector-borne diseases, cross-reactive antibodies can reduce pathogen transmission at the vector-to-host and the host-to-vector lifecycle transition. The highly polymorphic, immunodominant, outer surface protein C (OspC) of the tick-borne spirochete bacterium Borrelia afzelii induces a strong antibody response in the vertebrate host. To test how cross-immunity in the vertebrate host influences tick-to-host and host-to-tick transmission, mice were immunized with one of two strain-specific recombinant OspC proteins (A3, A10), challenged via tick bite with one of the two B. afzelii ospC strains (A3, A10), and infested with xenodiagnostic ticks. Immunization with a given rOspC antigen protected mice against homologous strains carrying the same major ospC group allele but provided little or no cross-protection against heterologous strains carrying a different major ospC group allele. There were cross-immunity effects on the tick spirochete load but not on the probability of host-to-tick transmission. The spirochete load in ticks that had fed on mice with cross-immune experience was reduced by a factor of two compared to ticks that had fed on naive control mice. In addition, strain-specific differences in mouse spirochete load, host-to-tick transmission, tick spirochete load, and the OspC-specific IgG response revealed the mechanisms that determine variation in transmission success between strains of B. afzelii. This study shows that cross-immunity in infected vertebrate hosts can reduce pathogen load in the arthropod vector with potential consequences for vector-to-host pathogen transmission.

  3. Cross-reactive acquired immunity influences transmission success of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Maxime; Durand, Jonas; Rais, Olivier; Voordouw, Maarten J

    2015-12-01

    Cross-reactive acquired immunity in the vertebrate host induces indirect competition between strains of a given pathogen species and is critical for understanding the ecology of mixed infections. In vector-borne diseases, cross-reactive antibodies can reduce pathogen transmission at the vector-to-host and the host-to-vector lifecycle transition. The highly polymorphic, immunodominant, outer surface protein C (OspC) of the tick-borne spirochete bacterium Borrelia afzelii induces a strong antibody response in the vertebrate host. To test how cross-immunity in the vertebrate host influences tick-to-host and host-to-tick transmission, mice were immunized with one of two strain-specific recombinant OspC proteins (A3, A10), challenged via tick bite with one of the two B. afzelii ospC strains (A3, A10), and infested with xenodiagnostic ticks. Immunization with a given rOspC antigen protected mice against homologous strains carrying the same major ospC group allele but provided little or no cross-protection against heterologous strains carrying a different major ospC group allele. There were cross-immunity effects on the tick spirochete load but not on the probability of host-to-tick transmission. The spirochete load in ticks that had fed on mice with cross-immune experience was reduced by a factor of two compared to ticks that had fed on naive control mice. In addition, strain-specific differences in mouse spirochete load, host-to-tick transmission, tick spirochete load, and the OspC-specific IgG response revealed the mechanisms that determine variation in transmission success between strains of B. afzelii. This study shows that cross-immunity in infected vertebrate hosts can reduce pathogen load in the arthropod vector with potential consequences for vector-to-host pathogen transmission. PMID:26384476

  4. Aggregate Risk of Cardiovascular Disease among Adolescents Perinatally Infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Landy, David C.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Seage, George R.; Williams, Paige L.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Siberry, George K.; Shearer, William T.; Young, Luciana; Scott, Gwendolyn B.; Wilkinson, James D.; Fisher, Stacy D.; Starc, Thomas J.; Miller, Tracie L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents may be susceptible to aggregate atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, as measured by the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) coronary arteries (CA) and abdominal aorta (AA) risk scores, due to prolonged exposure to HIV and antiretroviral therapy. Methods and Results CA and AA PDAY scores were calculated for 165 perinatally HIV-infected adolescents, using a weighted combination of modifiable risk factors: dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking, hypertension, obesity, and hyperglycemia. Demographic and HIV-specific predictors of scores ≥ 1 were identified and trends in scores over time were assessed. 48% and 24% of the perinatally HIV-infected adolescents had CA and AA scores ≥ 1, representing increased CVD risk factor burden. Significant predictors of CA scores ≥ 1 included male sex, history of an AIDS-defining condition, longer duration of use of a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor, and no prior use of tenofovir. Significant predictors of AA scores ≥ 1 included suppressed viral load, history of an AIDS-defining condition, and longer duration of boosted protease inhibitor use. No significant changes in CA and AA risk scores were observed over the 4-year study period. Conclusions A substantial proportion of perinatally HIV-infected youth have high PDAY scores reflecting increased aggregate atherosclerotic CVD risk factor burden. High scores were predicted by HIV disease severity and boosted protease inhibitor use. PDAY scores may be useful in identifying high-risk youth who may benefit from early lifestyle or clinical interventions. PMID:24366631

  5. Acquired cystic kidney disease in children undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Kyushu Pediatric Nephrology Study Group.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    Our cross-sectional study aims to elucidate the prevalence of acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), time of occurrence of ACKD, relationship between the prevalence of ACKD and duration of dialysis, progression of cysts, and ACKD-related complications in 54 children undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). ACKD was defined as four or more cysts detected in each kidney by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of less than four cysts was diagnosed as solitary cysts (SCs). Noncystic primary disease was present as glomerulonephritis in 23 patients (42.6%); hypoplastic kidney, 7 patients (13.0%); reflux nephropathy, 6 patients (11.1%); and other, 18 patients (33.3%). ACKD was evident in 16 patients (29.6%) during the 57.9 +/- 39.8 months after the start of CAPD. Nine patients (16. 7%) had SCs. SCs and ACKD were detected initially in patients with 1 and 3 years of CAPD, respectively. The mean duration of CAPD for patients with ACKD (96.1 +/- 36.6 months) differed from that of patients with SCs (49.8 +/- 29.9 months) and no cysts (38.3 +/- 25.8 months). The groups were classified according to time after the start of CAPD: 0 to 4 years (n = 33), 5 to 9 years (n = 16), and longer than 10 years (n = 5). The prevalence of ACKD among these three groups was 9.1%, 50%, and 80%, respectively, and this prevalence increased significantly with increasing duration of CAPD. Of 15 patients examined two to four times by ultrasonography or CT, the number and size of cysts increased in 7 patients with ACKD and 2 patients with SC. Two patients with many and large cysts experienced gross hematuria, and one of those patients had intracystic and retroperitoneal bleeding caused by cyst rupture. No solid mass lesion was found by imaging diagnostic modalities in the 54 patients. In conclusion, the prevalence of ACKD in children undergoing CAPD is just as high as that in adults. The prevalence of ACKD and number and size of

  6. Pediatric Kawasaki Disease and Adult Human Immunodeficiency Virus Kawasaki-Like Syndrome Are Likely the Same Malady

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Raymond M.; Bergmann, Kelly R.; Manaloor, John J.; Yu, Xiaoqing; Slaven, James E.; Kharbanda, Anupam B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric Kawasaki disease (KD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ adult Kawasaki-like syndrome (KLS) are dramatic vasculitides with similar physical findings. Both syndromes include unusual arterial histopathology with immunoglobulin (Ig)A+ plasma cells, and both impressively respond to pooled Ig therapy. Their distinctive presentations, histopathology, and therapeutic response suggest a common etiology. Because blood is in immediate contact with inflamed arteries, we investigated whether KD and KLS share an inflammatory signature in serum. Methods. A custom multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) defined the serum cytokine milieu in 2 adults with KLS during acute and convalescent phases, with asymptomatic HIV+ subjects not taking antiretroviral therapy serving as controls. We then prospectively collected serum and plasma samples from children hospitalized with KD, unrelated febrile illnesses, and noninfectious conditions, analyzing them with a custom multiplex ELISA based on the KLS data. Results. Patients with KLS and KD subjects shared an inflammatory signature including acute-phase reactants reflecting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α biologic activity (soluble TNF receptor I/II) and endothelial/smooth muscle chemokines Ccl1 (Th2), Ccl2 (vascular inflammation), and Cxcl11 (plasma cell recruitment). Ccl1 was specifically elevated in KD versus febrile controls, suggesting a unique relationship between Ccl1 and KD/KLS pathogenesis. Conclusions. This study defines a KD/KLS inflammatory signature mirroring a dysfunctional response likely to a common etiologic agent. The KD/KLS inflammatory signature based on elevated acute-phase reactants and specific endothelial/smooth muscle chemokines was able to identify KD subjects versus febrile controls, and it may serve as a practicable diagnostic test for KD. PMID:27704015

  7. Recommendations for live viral and bacterial vaccines in immunodeficient patients and their close contacts.

    PubMed

    Shearer, William T; Fleisher, Thomas A; Buckley, Rebecca H; Ballas, Zuhair; Ballow, Mark; Blaese, R Michael; Bonilla, Francisco A; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Gelfand, Erwin W; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian; Holland, Steven M; Hong, Richard; Lederman, Howard M; Malech, Harry L; Miles, Stephen; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Ochs, Hans D; Orange, Jordan S; Puck, Jennifer M; Routes, John M; Stiehm, E Richard; Sullivan, Kathleen; Torgerson, Troy; Winkelstein, Jerry

    2014-04-01

    The present uncertainty of which live viral or bacterial vaccines can be given to immunodeficient patients and the growing neglect of societal adherence to routine immunizations has prompted the Medical Advisory Committee of the Immune Deficiency Foundation to issue recommendations based on published literature and the collective experience of the committee members. These recommendations address the concern for immunodeficient patients acquiring infections from healthy subjects who have not been immunized or who are shedding live vaccine-derived viral or bacterial organisms. Such transmission of infectious agents can occur within the hospital, clinic, or home or at any public gathering. Collectively, we define this type of transmission as close-contact spread of infectious disease that is particularly relevant in patients with impaired immunity who might have an infection when exposed to subjects carrying vaccine-preventable infectious diseases or who have recently received a live vaccine. Immunodeficient patients who have received therapeutic hematopoietic stem transplantation are also at risk during the time when immune reconstitution is incomplete or while they are receiving immunosuppressive agents to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease. This review recommends the general education of what is known about vaccine-preventable or vaccine-derived diseases being spread to immunodeficient patients at risk for close-contact spread of infection and describes the relative risks for a child with severe immunodeficiency. The review also recommends a balance between the need to protect vulnerable subjects and their social needs to integrate into society, attend school, and benefit from peer education.

  8. Tropical parasitic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2008-01-01

    Though parasitic lung diseases are frequently seen in tropical countries, these are being increasingly reported from many parts of the world due to globalisation and travel across the continents. In addition, the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the frequent use of immunosuppressive drugs in many diseases and the increasing numbers of organ transplantations have resulted in a renewed interest in many tropical parasitic lung diseases. This review outlines the recent developments in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of common and rare parasitic lung diseases.

  9. Placental transfer of maternally-derived IgA precludes the use of guthrie card eluates as a screening tool for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Janzi, Magdalena; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Nordvall, Lennart; Winiarski, Jacek; Fasth, Anders; Hammarström, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for neonatal screening tools to improve the long-term clinical outcome of patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Recently, a PCR-based screening method for both TRECs and KRECs using Guthrie card samples has been developed. However, the applicability of these excision circle assays is limited to patients with severe T or B cell lymphopenia (SCID, XLA and A-T), whereas the most common forms of PID are not detected. Absence of serum IgA is seen in a major fraction of patients with immunological defects. As serum IgA in newborns is considered to be of fetal origin, eluates from routinely collected dried blood spot samples might thus be suitable for identification of children with PID. To assess the applicability of such screening assays, stored Guthrie card samples were obtained from 47 patients with various forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (SCID, XLA, A-T, HIGM and IgAD), 20 individuals with normal serum IgA levels born to IgA-deficient mothers and 51 matched healthy newborns. Surprisingly, normal serum IgA levels were found in all SCID, XLA, A-T and HIGM patients and, additionally, in all those IgAD patients born to IgA-sufficient mothers. Conversely, no serum IgA was found in any of the 16 IgAD patients born by IgA-deficient mothers. Moreover, half of the IgA-sufficient individuals born by IgA-deficient mothers also lacked IgA at birth whereas no IgA-deficient individuals were found among the controls. IgA in neonatal dried blood samples thus appears to be of both maternal and fetal origin and precludes its use as a reliable marker for neonatal screening of primary immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:22916257

  10. Sexually transmitted diseases in homosexual and bisexual males from a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus negative volunteers (Project Horizonte), Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lignani, L; Oliveira, E I; Carneiro, M; Greco, M; Andrade, J; Antunes, C M; Greco, D B

    2000-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are very frequent in the whole world. Males who do not use a condom during their sexual relations are at great risk. We report cases of STD during six months of observation, among homosexual/bisexual males who participate in the Project Horizonte. There were 16 cases of genital warts, 6 cases of human immunodeficiency virus infection, 24 cases of unspecific urethritis, 28 cases of herpes simplex virus infection, 30 cases of syphilis, 58 cases of gonorrhea and 84 cases of pediculosis. We concluded that a condom must be used in all sexual relations and new counseling techniques are needed, to avoid this situation.

  11. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  13. Trends in the outcomes of end-stage renal disease secondary to human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Razzak Chaudhary, Sarah; Workeneh, Biruh T.; Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Klotman, Paul E.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the trends in the incidence and outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributed to human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). We sought to define relative incidence among ESRD patients, changes in mortality among patients with ESRD attributed to HIVAN, as well as changes in the excess mortality experienced by patients with ESRD attributed to HIVAN compared with otherwise similar ESRD patients with non-HIVAN causes. Methods We used the US Renal Data System to identify all individuals with reported HIVAN who initiated treatment for ESRD between 1989 and 2011. We plotted their counts and proportions among all incident ESRD patients and tabulated their characteristics across years. We then compared mortality within the HIVAN group across years using Cox regression. In addition, we studied the trends in relative mortality of HIVAN patients versus those with ESRD not reported as HIVAN. Results Overall, 14 719 individuals with HIVAN-ESRD were recorded, with significant reductions in recent years (893 in 2006; 525 in 2011). Compared with patients initiating dialysis between 1989 and 1992, mortality declined by 40% (HR = 0.60; 95% CI, 0.55–0.65) and 64% (HR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.32–0.40) for patients initiating dialysis in 1999/2000 and 2009–11, respectively. The adjusted excess mortality of HIVAN-ESRD patients versus incident ESRD patients from other causes was >5-fold in 1989–92 (HR = 5.21; 95% CI, 4.84–5.60); this excess mortality has subsequently declined but remained at almost 3-fold in recent years (e.g. HR = 2.58; 95% CI, 2.37–2.80, 2009–11 incidence cohort). Conclusions Concurrent with the increasing availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), both the incidence of ESRD due to HIVAN and the mortality of such patients have decreased substantially. However, HIVAN patients reaching ESRD continue to experience substantial excess mortality compared with other ESRD patients

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  15. Neutralizing Polyclonal IgG Present during Acute Infection Prevents Rapid Disease Onset in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3-Infected Infant Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, J. Pablo; Kobie, James; Brower, Zachary; Malherbe, Delphine C.; Landucci, Gary; Sutton, William F.; Guo, Biwei; Reed, Jason S.; Leon, Enrique J.; Engelmann, Flora; Zheng, Bo; Legasse, Al; Park, Byung; Dickerson, Mary; Lewis, Anne D.; Colgin, Lois M. A.; Axthelm, Michael; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Sacha, Jonah B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Forthal, Donald N.; Hessell, Ann J.

    2013-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been widely used in passive studies with HIV neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to test for protection against infection. However, because SHIV-infected adult macaques often rapidly control plasma viremia and any resulting pathogenesis is minor, the model has been unsuitable for studying the impact of antibodies on pathogenesis in infected animals. We found that SHIVSF162P3 infection in 1-month-old rhesus macaques not only results in high persistent plasma viremia but also leads to very rapid disease progression within 12 to 16 weeks. In this model, passive transfer of high doses of neutralizing IgG (SHIVIG) prevents infection. Here, we show that at lower doses, SHIVIG reduces both plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated viremia and mitigates pathogenesis in infected animals. Moreover, production of endogenous NAbs correlated with lower set-point viremia and 100% survival of infected animals. New SHIV models are needed to investigate whether passively transferred antibodies or antibodies elicited by vaccination that fall short of providing sterilizing immunity impact disease progression or influence immune responses. The 1-month-old rhesus macaque SHIV model of infection provides a new tool to investigate the effects of antibodies on viral replication and clearance, mechanisms of B cell maintenance, and the induction of adaptive immunity in disease progression. PMID:23885083

  16. CD34+ Stem Cell Selection for Patients Receiving Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Malignant Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Schwachman Diamond Syndrome; Primary Immunodeficiency Syndromes; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes; Histiocytic Syndrome; Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphocytosis; Lymphohistiocytosis; Macrophage Activation Syndrome; Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH); Hemoglobinopathies; Sickle Cell Disease; Sickle Cell-beta-thalassemia

  17. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  18. Recent key advances in human immunodeficiency virus medicine and implications for China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article we summarize several recent major developments in human immunodeficiency virus treatment, prevention, outcome, and social policy change. Updated international guidelines endorse more aggressive treatment strategies and safer antiretroviral drugs. New antiretroviral options are being tested. Important lessons were learned in the areas of human immunodeficiency virus vaccines and microbicide gels from clinical studies, and additional trials in prevention, especially pre-exposure prophylaxis, are nearing completion. Insight into the role of the virus in the pathogenesis of diseases traditionally thought to be unrelated to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has become a driving force for earlier and universal therapy. Lastly, we review important achievements of and future challenges facing China as she steps into her eighth year of the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program. PMID:20500898

  19. [Paracoccidioidomycosis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection. A necropsy case].

    PubMed

    de Lima, M A; Silva-Vergara, M L; Demachki, S; dos Santos, J A

    1995-01-01

    This is a case report of the association of Paracoccidioidomycosis and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) occurring in a 43-year old male. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first detailed pathological account of that association. Also discussed are the low rates of that association, its natural history and treatment results. It is emphasised the importance of the associations of AIDS and tropical infectious diseases in this country.

  20. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  2. Inheriting vice, acquiring virtue: hereditary disease and moral hygiene in eighteenth-century France.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    This essay examines the medical debates over hereditary disease and moral hygiene in France between 1748 and 1790. During this time, which was marked by two formal academic exchanges about pathological inheritance, doctors critically studied the existence of hereditary diseases--including syphilis, arthritis, phthisis, scrofula, rickets, gout, stones, epilepsy, and insanity--and the problems that heredity might pose for curing and preventing these diseases. Amid public debate, doctors first treated heredity with formal skepticism and then embraced the idea. Their changing attitudes stemmed less from epistemological or cognitive reasons than from new cultural beliefs about gender, domesticity, and demographic policy. Fearing moral degeneracy and demographic decline, they argued that a number of social pathologies were truly hereditary and that these diseases spread within the family itself. These beliefs were seemingly confirmed by new clinical studies on tuberculosis. Though doctors conceded that hereditary diseases might limit Enlightenment hopes to perfect society, they also suggested that sexual hygiene and physical education could cure hereditary degeneracy and transcend genealogy and descent. Consequently, they stressed that physical regeneration was a dynamic process, one that stretched from the conjugal bed to weaning and beyond. Rather than accepting the accidents of birth, physicians believed that their patients could self-consciously overcome inherited defects and thus regenerate themselves and even all of society itself. Heredity thus gave doctors an idiom with which to diagnose a felt social crisis and to prescribe appropriate hygienic responses.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 envelope characteristics associated with disease progression differ in family members infected with genetically similar viruses.

    PubMed

    Baan, Elly; van der Sluis, Renée M; Bakker, Margreet E; Bekker, Vincent; Pajkrt, Dasja; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Kuijpers, Taco W; Berkhout, Ben; Wolthers, Katja C; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein provides the primary contact between the virus and host, and is the main target of the adaptive humoral immune response. The length of gp120 variable loops and the number of N-linked glycosylation events are key determinants for virus infectivity and immune escape, while the V3 loop overall positive charge is known to affect co-receptor tropism. We selected two families in which both parents and two children had been infected with HIV-1 for nearly 10 years, but who demonstrated variable parameters of disease progression. We analysed the gp120 envelope sequence and compared individuals that progressed to those that did not in order to decipher evolutionary alterations that are associated with disease progression when individuals are infected with genetically related virus strains. The analysis of the V3-positive charge demonstrated an association between higher V3-positive charges with disease progression. The ratio between the amino acid length and the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites was also shown to be associated with disease progression with the healthier family members having a lower ratio. In conclusion in individuals initially infected with genetically linked virus strains the V3-positive charges and N-linked glycosylation are associated with HIV-1 disease progression and follow varied evolutionary paths for individuals with varied disease progression.

  4. Benzothiadiazole, a novel class of inducers of systemic acquired resistance, activates gene expression and disease resistance in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, J; Volrath, S; Knauf-Beiter, G; Hengy, G; Beckhove, U; Kogel, K H; Oostendorp, M; Staub, T; Ward, E; Kessmann, H; Ryals, J

    1996-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is an important component of the disease resistance repertoire of plants. In this study, a novel synthetic chemical, benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), was shown to induce acquired resistance in wheat. BTH protected wheat systemically against powdery mildew infection by affecting multiple steps in the life cycle of the pathogen. The onset of resistance was accompanied by the induction of a number of newly described wheat chemically induced (WCI) genes, including genes encoding a lipoxygenase and a sulfur-rich protein. With respect to both timing and effectiveness, a tight correlation existed between the onset of resistance and the induction of the WCI genes. Compared with other plant activators, such as 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid and salicylic acid, BTH was the most potent inducer of both resistance and gene induction. BTH is being developed commercially as a novel type of plant protection compound that works by inducing the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:8624439

  5. CLINICAL APPROACH TO THE DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION OF HERDITARY AND ACQUIRED NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the context of a neuromuscular disease diagnostic evaluation, the clinician still must be able to obtain a relevant patient and family history and perform focused general, musculoskeletal, neurologic and functional physical examinations to direct further diagnostic evaluations. Laboratory studies for hereditary neuromuscular diseases include relevant molecular genetic studies. The EMG and nerve conduction studies remain an extension of the physical examination and help to guide further diagnostic studies such as molecular genetic studies, and muscle and nerve biopsies. All diagnostic information needs to be interpreted not in isolation, but within the context of relevant historical information, family history, physical examination findings, and laboratory data, electrophysiologic findings, pathologic findings, and molecular genetic findings if obtained. PMID:22938875

  6. Survey of Research on Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This survey covers periodical literature published in the field of research on sexually transmitted diseases during 1985. The articles cover the following diseases: (1) genital chlamydial infection; (2) gonorrhea; (3) genital herpes infection; (4) human papillomavirus infection; (5) acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); (6) genital…

  7. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  8. Neutropenia in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sokolic, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Neutropenia is a feature of several primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs). Because of the diverse pathophysiologies of the PIDDs and the rarity of each disorder, data are often lacking, leading to the necessity of empiric treatment. Recent developments in the understanding of neutropenia in several of the PIDDs make a review of the data timely. Recent findings The category of severe congenital neutropenia continues to expand. Mutations in G6PC3 have been identified as the cause of neutropenia in a minority of previously molecularly undefined cases. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical expression of this disorder. A possible function of the C16orf57 gene has been hypothesized that may explain the clinical overlap between Clerucuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia and other marrow diseases. Plerixafor has been shown to be a potentially useful treatment in the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infection, and myelokathexis syndrome. Investigations of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency have identified neutropenia, and particularly susceptibility to myelotoxins, as a feature of this disorder. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is the treatment of choice for neutropenia in PIDD, whereas hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only curative option. Summary The number of PIDDs associated with neutropenia has increased, as has our understanding of the range of phenotypes. Additional data and hypotheses have been generated helping to explain the diversity of presentations of neutropenia in PIDDs. PMID:23196894

  9. Azithromycin Dose To Maximize Efficacy and Suppress Acquired Drug Resistance in Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex is now the leading mycobacterial cause of chronic pneumonia in the United States. Macrolides and ethambutol form the backbone of the regimen used in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, therapy outcomes remain poor, with microbial cure rates of 4% in cavitary disease. The treatment dose of azithromycin has mostly been borrowed from that used to treat other bacterial pneumonias; there are no formal dose-response studies in pulmonary M. avium disease and the optimal dose is unclear. We utilized population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics-derived azithromycin exposures associated with optimal microbial kill or resistance suppression to perform 10,000 patient Monte Carlo simulations of dose effect studies for daily azithromycin doses of 0.5 to 10 g. The currently recommended dose of 500 mg per day achieved the target exposures in 0% of patients. Exposures associated with optimal kill and resistance suppression were achieved in 87 and 54% of patients, respectively, only by the very high dose of 8 g per day. The azithromycin susceptibility breakpoint above which patients failed therapy on the very high doses of 8 g per day was an MIC of 16 mg/liter, suggesting a critical concentration of 32 mg/liter, which is 8-fold lower than the currently used susceptibility breakpoint of 256 mg/liter. If the standard dose of 500 mg a day were used, then the critical concentration would fall to 2 mg/liter, 128-fold lower than 256 mg/liter. The misclassification of resistant isolates as susceptible could explain the high failure rates of current doses. PMID:26810646

  10. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  11. Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.

    PubMed

    Mertz, K J; Trees, D; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Litchfield, B; Pettus, K S; Morse, S A; St Louis, M E; Weiss, J B; Schwebke, J; Dickes, J; Kee, R; Reynolds, J; Hutcheson, D; Green, D; Dyer, I; Richwald, G A; Novotny, J; Weisfuse, I; Goldberg, M; O'Donnell, J A; Knaup, R

    1998-12-01

    To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collected from approximately 50 ulcer patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in each city. Ulcer specimens were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV); sera were tested for antibody to HIV. H. ducreyi was detected in ulcer specimens from patients in Memphis (20% of specimens) and Chicago (12%). T. pallidum was detected in ulcer specimens from every city except Los Angeles (median, 9% of specimens; range, 0%-46%). HSV was detected in >/=50% of specimens from all cities except Memphis (42%). HIV seroprevalence in ulcer patients was 6% (range by city, 0%-18%). These data suggest that chancroid is prevalent in some US cities and that persons with genital ulcers should be a focus of HIV prevention activities.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genome Research Institute: Learning About Severe Combined Immunodeficiency National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune ... Manual Consumer Version Orphanet: T-B+ severe ...

  13. [Choice of optimal perfusion flow rate during surgical correction of combined acquired heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Len'kin, A I; Zakharov, V I; Smetkin, A A; Len'kin, P I; Kirov, M Iu

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac output during the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is defined by perfusion flow rate, which is calculated by multiplying the perfusion index (PI) on the body surface area. To date, there is no clear definition of an optimal PI and flow rate of perfusion. 60 patients operated with CPB were enrolled in the prospective study to determine the relations between different modes of perfusion and oxygen transport during surgical correction of combined valvular heart disease. Calculation of the CPB flow rate was based on PI 2.5 and 3.0 l/min/m2. Results of the study demonstrate that perfusion based on PI 2.5 l/min/m2 provides more stable oxygen transport parameters and reduces the time of ICU stay in comparison with the flow rate based on PI 3.0 l/min/m2.

  14. [Cancer as secondary immunodeficiency. Review].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Secondary immunodeficiencys, previously presented in immunocompetent individuals. The lack of primary or secondary response to the presence of a foreign antigen, in the case of infections is a sentinel data in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency (can be primary or secondary), in the case of a self antigen may generate the presence of Cancer. Cancer has shown an increase in the prevalence and incidence globally. Most current medical treatments in cancer are focused primarily on immunomodulatory actions (immunosuppression / immune stimulation or both). Knowledge of key concepts from the perspective of innate and acquired immunity lead to cancer development, engaging immune surveillance and escape mechanisms of this that contribute to better understand the origin, behavior and treatment of neoplasm's. These treatments can cause immunological disorders such as allergy, anaphylaxis, lack of response immunogenicity care fields specialist in allergy and clinical immunology. PMID:27174760

  15. [Cancer as secondary immunodeficiency. Review].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Guido-Bayardo, Ricardo Leopoldo; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Secondary immunodeficiencys, previously presented in immunocompetent individuals. The lack of primary or secondary response to the presence of a foreign antigen, in the case of infections is a sentinel data in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency (can be primary or secondary), in the case of a self antigen may generate the presence of Cancer. Cancer has shown an increase in the prevalence and incidence globally. Most current medical treatments in cancer are focused primarily on immunomodulatory actions (immunosuppression / immune stimulation or both). Knowledge of key concepts from the perspective of innate and acquired immunity lead to cancer development, engaging immune surveillance and escape mechanisms of this that contribute to better understand the origin, behavior and treatment of neoplasm's. These treatments can cause immunological disorders such as allergy, anaphylaxis, lack of response immunogenicity care fields specialist in allergy and clinical immunology.

  16. Medical examination of aliens--removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from definition of communicable disease of public health significance. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Through this final rule, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending its regulations to remove "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection" from the definition of communicable disease of public health significance and remove references to "HIV" from the scope of examinations for aliens. Prior to this final rule, aliens with HIV infection were considered to have a communicable disease of public health significance and were thus inadmissible to the United States per the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). While HIV infection is a serious health condition, it is not a communicable disease that is a significant public health risk for introduction, transmission, and spread to the U.S. population through casual contact. As a result of this final rule, aliens will no longer be inadmissible into the United States based solely on the ground they are infected with HIV, and they will not be required to undergo HIV testing as part of the required medical examination for U.S. immigration.

  17. Development of a foot-and-mouth disease infection model in severe combined immunodeficient mice for the preliminary evaluation of antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, D J; Neyts, J; De Clercq, K

    2010-12-01

    Recent European guidelines facilitate the use of emergency vaccines during outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease. Antiviral drugs could be used as a complementary measure. This study aimed at developing a small animal model to assess the in vivo activity of early antiviral lead molecules with anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) activity in vitro. In a first attempt, several FMDV strains were titrated in Balb/c mice. Inoculations with O₁ Manisa or C₁ Noville did not induce clinical disease, whereas Asia1 Shamir induced death too rapidly [i.e. within 4 days post-inoculation (dpi)]. Therefore, we switched to severe combined immunodeficient mice which are frequently used as a model for viral infections and experimental therapeutics. Strain O₁ Manisa did not induce clinical disease, but titrations with A₂₂ Iraq, C₁ Noville or Asia1 Shamir resulted in virus-induced morbidity (including respiratory problems and weight loss) with subsequent mortality. Inoculations with strain A₂₂ Iraq resulted in a reproducible mean time of death of 6 dpi (this was shorter for the other strains). In this newly developed rodent model, strain A₂₂ Iraq seems the most suited to assess the in vivo anti-FMDV activity of selective inhibitors of FMDV.

  18. Vertically acquired hepatitis C virus infection: Correlates of transmission and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Calitri, Carmelina; Scolfaro, Carlo; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children is 0.05%-0.4% in developed countries and 2%-5% in resource-limited settings, where inadequately tested blood products or un-sterile medical injections still remain important routes of infection. After the screening of blood donors, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HCV has become the leading cause of pediatric infection, at a rate of 5%. Maternal HIV co-infection is a significant risk factor for MTCT and anti-HIV therapy during pregnancy seemingly can reduce the transmission rate of both viruses. Conversely, a high maternal viral load is an important, but not preventable risk factor, because at present no anti-HCV treatment can be administered to pregnant women to block viral replication. Caution is needed in adopting obstetric procedures, such as amniocentesis or internal fetal monitoring, that can favor fetal exposure to HCV contaminated maternal blood, though evidence is lacking on the real risk of single obstetric practices. Mode of delivery and type of feeding do not represent significant risk factors for MTCT. Therefore, there is no reason to offer elective caesarean section or discourage breast-feeding to HCV infected parturients. Information on the natural history of vertical HCV infection is limited. The primary infection is asymptomatic in infants. At least one quarter of infected children shows a spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) that usually occurs within 6 years of life. IL-28B polymorphims and genotype 3 infection have been associated with greater chances of SVC. In general, HCV progression is mild or moderate in children with chronic infection who grow regularly, though cases with marked liver fibrosis or hepatic failure have been described. Non-organ specific autoantibodies and cryoglobulins are frequently found in children with chronic infection, but autoimmune diseases or HCV associated extrahepatic manifestations are rare. PMID:26819507

  19. Robust spectral analysis of videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant frequency (DF) analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images is a new method to detect small intestinal periodicities that may result from mechanical rhythms such as peristalsis. Longer periodicity is related to greater image texture at areas of villous atrophy in celiac disease. However, extraneous features and spatiotemporal phase shift may mask DF rhythms. Method The robustness of Fourier and ensemble averaging spectral analysis to compute DF was tested. Videocapsule images from the distal duodenum of 11 celiac patients (frame rate 2/s and pixel resolution 576 × 576) were analyzed. For patients 1, 2, ... 11, respectively, a total of 10, 11, ..., 20 sequential images were extracted from a randomly selected time epoch. Each image sequence was artificially repeated to 200 frames, simulating periodicities of 0.2, 0.18, ..., 0.1Hz, respectively. Random white noise at four different levels, spatiotemporal phase shift, and frames with air bubbles were added. Power spectra were constructed pixel-wise over 200 frames, and an average spectrum was computed from the 576 × 576 individual spectra. The largest spectral peak in the average spectrum was the estimated DF. Error was defined as the absolute difference between actual DF and estimated DF. Results For Fourier analysis, the mean absolute error between estimated and actual DF was 0.032 ± 0.052Hz. Error increased with greater degree of random noise imposed. In contrast, all ensemble average estimates precisely predicted the simulated DF. Conclusions The ensemble average DF estimate of videocapsule images with simulated periodicity is robust to noise and spatiotemporal phase shift as compared with Fourier analysis. Accurate estimation of DF eliminates the need to impose complex masking, extraction, and/or corrective preprocessing measures. PMID:21906318

  20. Ertapenem as initial antimicrobial monotherapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalized with typical community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Ian R; McCarroll, Kathleen A; DiNubile, Mark J; Woods, Gail L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a post-hoc analysis of two large studies of typical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in hospitalized patients, focusing on demographics, disease characteristics, and outcome in patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In both studies, ertapenem 1 g IV daily was compared with ceftriaxone 1 g IV daily as initial antimicrobial therapy. Clinically improving patients could be switched to oral antibiotic therapy after 3 days. Of the 857 patients treated in both studies, 264 (31%) had COPD. The proportions of patients who were male, were >/=65 years of age, had a Pneumonia Severity Index of IV/V, or had Haemophilus influenzae isolated in a baseline culture were higher in patients with COPD. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen both in patients with and without COPD. Clinical response rates in assessable patients 7-14 days after completion of therapy for the combined treatment groups were 90% (187/208) for patients with COPD and 93% (424/456) for those without COPD (odds ratio 0.7 [95% CI, 0.4-1.2], P = 0.17). Of assessable COPD patients, 109/121 (90%) treated with ertapenem and 78/87 (90%) treated with ceftriaxone achieved a favorable clinical response (odds ratio 1.0 [95% CI, 0.6-1.8], P = 0.94). The outcome in patients with or without COPD was similar regardless of therapy. In patients with COPD as well as in the overall study population, the efficacy of ertapenem as initial antimicrobial monotherapy for patients with serious typical community-acquired pneumonia was comparable to that of ceftriaxone.

  1. Transformation of sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] with pthA-nls for acquiring resistance to citrus canker disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Hu, Chunhua; Li, Na; Zhang, Jiayin; Yan, Jiawen; Deng, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    The COOH terminal of pthA encoding three nuclear localizing signals (NLS) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the plasmid of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the pathogen of citrus canker disease. Then the sense and antisense strands of the nls were cloned into pBI121 vector. pthA-nls driven by the CaMV35 s promoter was transferred into sweet orange via Agrobacterium -mediated transformation. Successful integration was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting, and 12 sense-nls (nls (+)) and 9 antisense-nls (nls (-)) transgenic clones were obtained. The expression of nls fragment was analyzed by RT-PCR, Real time q-PCR and Western blotting, in which the specific NLS protein was detected only in nls (+) transgenic clones. In an in vitro assay, when pin-puncture inoculation was performed with 2.5 × 10(7) cfu/ml of bacterial solution, the nls (+) transgenic clones showed no typical lesion development, while typical symptoms were observed in the wild types and the nls (-) transgenic clones. In vivo assay results indicated that the nls (+) transgenic clones showed less disease incidence, in comparison with the wild types and the nls (-) transgenic clones, when pin-puncture inoculation was performed with 10(4)-10(5) cfu/ml. The minimum disease incidence was 23.3% for 'Sucarri' sweet orange and 33.3% for 'Bingtang' sweet orange. When 10(4)-10(7) cfu/ml of pathogen was spray inoculated, the nls (+) transgenic clones did not show any symptom, and even the concentration raised to 10(9) cfu/ml, the disease incidence was 20-80%, while the wild types and the nls (-) transgenic clones had 100% disease development with whatever concentration of inoculum. Two transgenic clones were confirmed to be resistant to citrus canker disease in the repeated inoculation. The results suggested that the transformation of nls sense strands may offer an effective way to acquire resistance to citrus canker disease.

  2. Salicylic acid and systemic acquired resistance play a role in attenuating crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ajith; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Ryu, Choong-Min; Allen, Stacy N; Kang, Li; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the effects of salicylic acid (SA) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) on crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Nicotiana benthamiana plants treated with SA showed decreased susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection. Exogenous application of SA to Agrobacterium cultures decreased its growth, virulence, and attachment to plant cells. Using Agrobacterium whole-genome microarrays, we characterized the direct effects of SA on bacterial gene expression and showed that SA inhibits induction of virulence (vir) genes and the repABC operon, and differentially regulates the expression of many other sets of genes. Using virus-induced gene silencing, we further demonstrate that plant genes involved in SA biosynthesis and signaling are important determinants for Agrobacterium infectivity on plants. Silencing of ICS (isochorismate synthase), NPR1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1), and SABP2 (SA-binding protein 2) in N. benthamiana enhanced Agrobacterium infection. Moreover, plants treated with benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid, a potent inducer of SAR, showed reduced disease symptoms. Our data suggest that SA and SAR both play a major role in retarding Agrobacterium infectivity. PMID:18156296

  3. Acquired hemophilia A associated with IgG4-related lung disease in a patient with autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Keishi; Gocho, Kyoko; Ishida, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Hirota, Nao; Sato, Keita; Sano, Go; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Takai, Yujiro; Hata, Yoshinobu; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Homma, Sakae

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related lung diseases can occur in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). However, the causal relationship between AIP and acquired hemophilia A (AH) is unknown. We herein report the first case of AH associated with IgG4-related lung disease that developed in a patient with AIP. A 65-year-old asymptomatic man with a history of AIP and sclerosing cholangitis diagnosed at the age of 57 was admitted to our hospital due to an abnormal reticulonodular shadow on chest X-ray. An examination of lung biopsy specimens revealed IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in the interstitium. The serum IgG4 level was elevated. One year later, the patient developed a progressive severe hematoma in the left femoral muscle. On admission, laboratory examinations revealed severe anemia with a markedly prolonged activated partial prothrombin time, a decreased level of factor VIII (FVIII) activity, and the existence of anti-FVIII antibodies. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of AH. No relapse has been observed over the past 25 months, during which time, corticosteroid therapy has been continuously administered.

  4. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area.

  5. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  6. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased replicative capacity develop during the asymptomatic stage before disease progression.

    PubMed

    Connor, R I; Ho, D D

    1994-07-01

    We examined the replicative properties of a series of sequential isolates and biological clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) obtained from an individual who progressed from seroconversion to AIDS in approximately 5 years. HIV-1 isolated soon after seroconversion replicated slowly and to low levels in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, subsequent isolates obtained during asymptomatic infection showed a marked increase in replication kinetics. This was examined in more detail by using a panel of 35 biological clones of HIV-1 generated from sequential patient peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Each clone was evaluated for replication in primary macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes and for the ability to induce syncytium formation in MT-2 cell cultures. Consistent with earlier observations, we found that all of the clones isolated just after seroconversion were slowly replicating and non-syncytium inducing (NSI). However, NSI variants with increased replication kinetics in macrophages were identified soon thereafter. These variants preceded the appearance of NSI and syncytium-inducing variants, with rapid replication in both macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. To determine whether changes in the rate of replication could be traced to the early stages of the virus life cycle, PCR assays were used to evaluate entry and reverse transcription of selected biological clones in macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found there was no inherent block to entry or reverse transcription for the slowly replicating variants; however, this does not preclude the possibility that small differences in the rate of entry may account for larger differences in the replication kinetics over many cycles. Overall, our results demonstrate that rapidly replicating variants of HIV-1 emerge during the asymptomatic period in a patient who subsequently progressed clinically, suggesting that these variants may play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased replicative capacity develop during the asymptomatic stage before disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    We examined the replicative properties of a series of sequential isolates and biological clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) obtained from an individual who progressed from seroconversion to AIDS in approximately 5 years. HIV-1 isolated soon after seroconversion replicated slowly and to low levels in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, subsequent isolates obtained during asymptomatic infection showed a marked increase in replication kinetics. This was examined in more detail by using a panel of 35 biological clones of HIV-1 generated from sequential patient peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Each clone was evaluated for replication in primary macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes and for the ability to induce syncytium formation in MT-2 cell cultures. Consistent with earlier observations, we found that all of the clones isolated just after seroconversion were slowly replicating and non-syncytium inducing (NSI). However, NSI variants with increased replication kinetics in macrophages were identified soon thereafter. These variants preceded the appearance of NSI and syncytium-inducing variants, with rapid replication in both macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. To determine whether changes in the rate of replication could be traced to the early stages of the virus life cycle, PCR assays were used to evaluate entry and reverse transcription of selected biological clones in macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found there was no inherent block to entry or reverse transcription for the slowly replicating variants; however, this does not preclude the possibility that small differences in the rate of entry may account for larger differences in the replication kinetics over many cycles. Overall, our results demonstrate that rapidly replicating variants of HIV-1 emerge during the asymptomatic period in a patient who subsequently progressed clinically, suggesting that these variants may play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis

  9. Association of CD209L tandem repeats polymorphism with susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection, disease progression, and treatment outcomes: a Moroccan cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fayssel, N; Bensghir, R; Ouladlahsen, A; Abdelghaffar, H; Sodqi, M; Lahlou, K; Benjelloun, S; Marhoum El Filali, K; Ezzikouri, S; Wakrim, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the association between length variation of the CD209L neck region and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 susceptibility, disease progression, and treatment response outcomes, we genotyped 139 HIV-1-seropositive and 109 seronegative individuals. The heterozygous genotype 6/5 showed a significant increased risk of HIV-1 infection (OR 3.03, 95% CI 0.99-9.33, p 0.046). Moreover, after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-1-seropositive individuals carrying the 6/5, 7/5 and 7/7 genotypes and alleles 5, 6 and 7 showed good CD4(+) T-cell recovery. In addition, individuals with the 7/5, 6/6 and 7/7 genotypes showed a significant decrease in viral load during the treatment period as compared with baseline (p < 0.05). Interestingly, we found that alleles 4 and 6 were associated with protection against AIDS progression. D209L variation may influence susceptibility to HIV-1, response to treatment, and disease progression.

  10. Calculating the Dose of Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin for Primary Immunodeficiency Disease in Patients Switched From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Without the Use of a Dose-Adjustment Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Fadeyi, Michael; Tran, Tin

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) is an inherited disorder characterized by an inadequate immune system. The most common type of PIDD is antibody deficiency. Patients with this disorder lack the ability to make functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and require lifelong IgG replacement therapy to prevent serious bacterial infections. The current standard therapy for PIDD is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, but IVIG might not be appropriate for all patients. For this reason, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) has emerged as an alternative to IVIG. A concern for physicians is the precise SCIG dose that should be prescribed, because there are pharmacokinetic differences between IVIG and SCIG. Manufacturers of SCIG 10% and 20% liquid (immune globulin subcutaneous [human]) recommend a dose-adjustment coefficient (DAC). Both strengths are currently approved by the FDA. This DAC is to be used when patients are switched from IVIG to SCIG. In this article, we propose another dosing method that uses a higher ratio of IVIG to SCIG and an incremental adjustment based on clinical status, body weight, and the presence of concurrent diseases. PMID:24391400

  11. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  12. AIDS: Disease Characteristics and Attributions of Sympathy and Blame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Christine L.; Watson, Mary G.

    Weiner (1987) theorized that sympathy and blame are a function of attributions of stability (lethality) and controllability of a disease. This research hypothesizes that all Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients will receive sympathy because the disease is lethal, and that those who could not control the contraction of AIDS…

  13. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, John P; Abel, Kristina; Mendoza, Sally P; Blozis, Shelley A; McChesney, Michael B; Cole, Steve W; Mason, William A

    2008-07-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals' responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how personality (Sociability) and genotype (serotonin transporter promoter) independently interact with social context (Stable or Unstable social conditions) to influence behavioral expression, plasma cortisol concentrations, SIV-specific IgG, and expression of genes associated with Type I interferon early in infection. SIV viral RNA set-point was strongly and negatively correlated with survival as expected. Set-point was also associated with expression of interferon-stimulated genes, with CXCR3 expression, and with SIV-specific IgG titers. Poorer immune responses, in turn, were associated with display of sustained aggression and submission. Personality and genotype acted independently as well as in interaction with social condition to affect behavioral responses. Together, the data support an "interactionist" perspective [Eysenck, H.J., 1991. Personality, stress and disease: an interactionist perspective. Psychol. Inquiry 2, 221-232] on disease. Given that an important goal of HIV treatment is to maintain viral set-point as low as possible, our data suggest that supplementing anti-retroviral therapy with behavioral or pharmacologic modulation of other aspects of an organism's functioning might prolong survival, particularly among individuals living under conditions of threat or uncertainty.

  14. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-10-14

    Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Graft Versus Host Disease; X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; Familial Erythrophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Hyper IgM Syndrome; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome; Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

  15. Detection and titration of human herpesvirus-8-specific antibodies in sera from blood donors, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients, and Kaposi's sarcoma patients using a whole virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Chatlynne, L G; Lapps, W; Handy, M; Huang, Y Q; Masood, R; Hamilton, A S; Said, J W; Koeffler, H P; Kaplan, M H; Friedman-Kien, A; Gill, P S; Whitman, J E; Ablashi, D V

    1998-07-01

    A human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a whole virus lysate as antigen was developed and used to measure the seroprevalence rate and levels of IgG antibodies to HHV-8 in sera/plasma of various patient groups and blood donors. The virus antigen was prepared from the KS-1 cell line, which produces lytic virus, and therefore contains a broad array of viral proteins. Seroprevalence studies using this ELISA showed the following: 10 of 91 blood donors (11%) had an average HHV-8 antibody titer of 118; 67 of 72 (93%) classic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) patients were positive with an average titer of 14,111; and 57 of 62 (92%) KS/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients were positive with an average titer of 4,000. A study on a very limited number of serial serum samples from patients before and after diagnosis with KS showed highly elevated antibody titers to HHV-8 virus after KS lesions developed. Preliminary data show that 50% of the sera from HIV-1(+) homosexual patients contain IgG antibodies to HHV-8 suggesting that this population is at high risk for developing KS. Antibody results correlated well with the confirmatory immunofluorescent assays (IFA) using KS-1 cells as the substrate. This HHV-8 IgG antibody detection ELISA is sensitive and specific and does not cross-react with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or other human herpesviruses. The results of this HHV-8 antibody survey suggest that this rapid ELISA assay can be used to screen large numbers of sera to find those at risk for developing KS.

  16. Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease in the intensive care unit setting: epidemiology, clinical course and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre R; Edmond, Michael B; Wenzel, Richard P; Bearman, Gonzalo ML

    2007-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is a serious nosocomial infection, however few studies have assessed CDAD outcome in the intensive care unit (ICU). We evaluated the epidemiology, clinical course and outcome of hospital-acquired CDAD in the critical care setting. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 58 adults with a positive C. difficile cytotoxin assay result occurring in intensive care units. Results Sixty-two percent of patients had concurrent infections, 50% of which were bloodstream infections. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials prior to CDAD were anti-anaerobic agents (60.3%). Septic shock occurred in 32.8% of CDAD patients. The in-hospital mortality was 27.6%. Univariate analysis revealed that SOFA score, at least one organ failure and age were predictors of mortality. Charlson score ≥3, gender, concurrent infection, and number of days with diarrhea before a positive C. difficile toxin assay were not significant predictors of mortality on univariate analysis. Independent predictors for death were SOFA score at infection onset (per 1-point increment, OR 1.40; CI95 1.13–1.75) and age (per 1-year increment, OR 1.10; CI95 1.02–1.19). Conclusion In ICU patients with CDAD, advanced age and increased severity of illness at the onset of infection, as measured by the SOFA score, are independent predictors of death. PMID:17517130

  17. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation.

  18. Relationship between the Use of Inhaled Steroids for Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Early Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. Methods Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality). Results Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%). In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002) in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787). This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542), with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194), but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027). Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. Conclusions Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis. PMID:24039899

  19. The First World War years of Sydney Domville Rowland: an early case of possible laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Wever, Peter C; Hodges, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sydney Domville Rowland was a bacteriologist and staff member at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine when the First World War broke out in 1914. Following a request to the Director of the Lister Institute to staff and equip a mobile field laboratory as quickly as possible, Rowland was appointed to take charge of No. 1 Mobile Laboratory and took up a temporary commission at the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. On 9 October 1914, Rowland set out for the European mainland and was subsequently attached to General Headquarters in Saint-Omer, France (October 1914-June 1915), No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station in Lijssenthoek, Belgium (June 1915-February 1916, during which period he was promoted Major), and No. 26 General Hospital in Étaples, France (February 1916-March 1917). His research focused on gas gangrene, typhoid fever, trench fever, wound infection and cerebrospinal fever. In February of 1917, while engaged in identifying meningococcal carriers, Rowland contracted cerebrospinal meningitis to which he succumbed at age 44 on 6 March 1917. His untimely death might have been caused by laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease, especially since Rowland's work with Neisseria meningitidis isolates had extended beyond routine laboratory techniques and included risk procedures like immunisation of rabbits with pathogenic strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, microbiology laboratory workers who are routinely exposed to N. meningitidis isolates are recognised as a population at increased risk for meningococcal disease, for which reason recommended preventive measures include vaccination and handling of isolates within a class II biosafety cabinet. PMID:27084843

  20. The First World War years of Sydney Domville Rowland: an early case of possible laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Wever, Peter C; Hodges, A J

    2016-08-01

    Sydney Domville Rowland was a bacteriologist and staff member at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine when the First World War broke out in 1914. Following a request to the Director of the Lister Institute to staff and equip a mobile field laboratory as quickly as possible, Rowland was appointed to take charge of No. 1 Mobile Laboratory and took up a temporary commission at the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps. On 9 October 1914, Rowland set out for the European mainland and was subsequently attached to General Headquarters in Saint-Omer, France (October 1914-June 1915), No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station in Lijssenthoek, Belgium (June 1915-February 1916, during which period he was promoted Major), and No. 26 General Hospital in Étaples, France (February 1916-March 1917). His research focused on gas gangrene, typhoid fever, trench fever, wound infection and cerebrospinal fever. In February of 1917, while engaged in identifying meningococcal carriers, Rowland contracted cerebrospinal meningitis to which he succumbed at age 44 on 6 March 1917. His untimely death might have been caused by laboratory-acquired meningococcal disease, especially since Rowland's work with Neisseria meningitidis isolates had extended beyond routine laboratory techniques and included risk procedures like immunisation of rabbits with pathogenic strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid. Currently, microbiology laboratory workers who are routinely exposed to N. meningitidis isolates are recognised as a population at increased risk for meningococcal disease, for which reason recommended preventive measures include vaccination and handling of isolates within a class II biosafety cabinet.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of zidovudine and its glucuronidated metabolite in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and hepatic disease (AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 062).

    PubMed Central

    Moore, K H; Raasch, R H; Brouwer, K L; Opheim, K; Cheeseman, S H; Eyster, E; Lemon, S M; van der Horst, C M

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) are established in patients with various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. This study was conducted to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ZDV in patients with asymptomatic HIV infection and liver disease. HIV-infected volunteers with normal renal function were stratified according to the severity of liver disease (seven of eight were classified as mild). Each subject received a single intravenous dose of ZDV (120 mg) on the first day, followed by a single oral dose of ZDV (200 mg) on the second day. Blood samples were obtained over a 8-h collection interval, and concentrations of ZDV and its glucuronidated metabolite (GZDV) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained after oral administration of ZDV to HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease; these values were compared with previously reported data in healthy volunteers. The area under the curve (AUC) (1,670 +/- 192 ng.h/ml), maximum concentration of drug in serum (1,751 +/- 180 ng/ml), and half-life (2.04 +/- 0.38 h) of ZDV were increased, while the apparent oral clearance (1.57 +/- 0.31 liter/h/kg of body weight) was decreased; AUC (7,685 +/- 1,222 ng.h/ml) and maximum concentration of drug in serum (5,220 +/- 1,350 ng/ml) of GZDV and the AUC ratio of GZDV to ZDV (2.79 +/- 0.43) after oral administration were decreased. ZDV absolute bioavailability was 0.75 +/- 0.15 in HIV-infected patients with hepatic disease. Although the ZDV apparent oral clearance was not impaired as significantly as in patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis, our results suggest that ZDV, could accumulate in HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease because of impaired formation of GZDV. Patients with mild hepatic disease may require dosage adjustment to avoid accumulation of ZDV after extended therapy. PMID:8593010

  2. [Mikulicz disease as the beginning of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Guiral, H; Risco, J; Razquin, S; Pellicer, E; Figuerola, E; Mayayo, E; Añó, T

    1994-01-01

    Major salivary lymphoepithelial lesions accounted for less than 3 percent of all benign parotid tumors, prior to AIDS acquaintance. Defined as the presence of enlargement of one or more salivary glands and, in some cases, with diminished salivary function. The paper present the case of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome starting as a Mikulicz's disease. Reviewed the medical literature and treatment options.

  3. The gene for severe combined immunodeficiency disease in Athabascan-speaking Native Americans is located on chromosome 10p.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Drayna, D; Hu, D; Hayward, A; Gahagan, S; Pabst, H; Cowan, M J

    1998-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) consists of a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders. The most severe phenotype, T-B- SCID, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by a profound deficiency of both T cell and B cell immunity. There is a uniquely high frequency of T-B- SCID among Athabascan-speaking Native Americans (A-SCID). To localize the A-SCID gene, we conducted a genomewide search, using linkage analysis of approximately 300 microsatellite markers in 14 affected Athabascan-speaking Native American families. We obtained conclusive evidence for linkage of the A-SCID locus to markers on chromosome 10p. The maximum pairwise LOD scores 4.53 and 4.60 were obtained from two adjacent markers, D10S191 and D10S1653, respectively, at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00. Recombination events placed the gene in an interval of approximately 6.5 cM flanked by D10S1664 and D10S674. Multipoint analysis positioned the gene for the A-SCID phenotype between D10S191 and D10S1653, with a peak LOD score of 5.10 at D10S191. Strong linkage disequilibrium was found in five linked markers spanning approximately 6.5 cM in the candidate region, suggesting a founder effect with an ancestral mutation that occurred sometime before 1300 A.D. PMID:9443881

  4. CD4+-T-Cell and CD20+-B-Cell Changes Predict Rapid Disease Progression after Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Dykhuizen, Marta; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Hinds, Paul W.; Preuninger, Brenda L.; Wallace, Marianne; Thomson, James; Montefiori, David C.; Lu, Yichen; Pauza, C. David

    1998-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6PD (SHIV89.6PD) was pathogenic after intrarectal inoculation of rhesus macaques. Infection was achieved with a minimum of 2,500 tissue culture infectious doses of cell-free virus stock, and there was no evidence for transient viremia in animals receiving subinfectious doses by the intrarectal route. Some animals experienced rapid progression of disease characterized by loss of greater than 90% of circulating CD4+ T cells, sustained decreases in CD20+ B cells, failure to elicit virus-binding antibodies in plasma, and high levels of antigenemia. Slower-progressing animals had moderate but varying losses of CD4+ T cells; showed increases in circulating CD20+ B cells; mounted vigorous responses to antibodies in plasma, including neutralizing antibodies; and had low or undetectable levels of antigenemia. Rapid progression led to death within 30 weeks after intrarectal inoculation. Plasma antigenemia at 2 weeks after inoculation (P ≤ 0.002), B- and T-cell losses (P ≤ 0.013), and failure to seroconvert (P ≤ 0.005) were correlated statistically with rapid progression. Correlations were evident by 2 to 4 weeks after intrarectal SHIV inoculation, indicating that early events in the host-pathogen interaction determined the clinical outcome. PMID:9445063

  5. Adverse psychosocial factors predict poorer prognosis in HIV disease: a meta-analytic review of prospective investigations.

    PubMed

    Chida, Yoichi; Vedhara, Kavita

    2009-05-01

    There is a growing epidemiological literature focusing on the association between psychosocial stress and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), but inconsistent findings have been published. We aimed to quantify the association between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression. We searched Medline; PsycINFO; Web of Science; PubMed up to 19 January 2009, and included population studies with a prospective design that investigated associations between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression or AIDS. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, quality, and estimates of associations. The overall meta-analysis examined 36 articles including 100 psychosocial and disease related relationships. It exhibited a small, but robust positive association between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV progression (correlation coefficient as combined size effect 0.059, 95% confidence interval 0.043-0.074, p<0.001). Notably, sensitivity analyses showed that personality types or coping styles and psychological distress were more strongly associated with greater HIV disease progression than stress stimuli per se, and that all of the immunological and clinical outcome indicators (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome stage, CD4+ T-cell decline, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome mortality, and human immunodeficiency virus disease or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome symptoms) except for viral load exhibited detrimental effects by adverse psychosocial factors. In conclusion, the current review reveals a robust relationship between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression. Furthermore, there would appear to be some evidence for particular psychosocial factors to be most strongly associated with HIV disease progression.

  6. Long-Term Outcome After Ablation of Right Atrial Tachyarrhythmias After the Surgical Repair of Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Anguera, Ignasi; Dallaglio, Paolo; Macías, Rosa; Jiménez-Candil, Javier; Peinado, Rafael; García-Seara, Javier; Arcocha, Mari Fe; Herreros, Benito; Quesada, Aurelio; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Alvarez, Miguel; Filgueiras, David; Matía, Roberto; Cequier, Angel; Sabaté, Xavier

    2015-06-15

    Atrial myopathy, atriotomies, and fibrotic scars are the pathophysiological substrate of lines of conduction block, promoting atrial macroreentry. The aim of this study was to determine the acute and long-term outcome of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for right atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in adults after cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) and acquired heart disease (AHD) and predictors of these outcomes. Clinical records of adults after surgery for heart disease undergoing RFCA of right-sided AT were analyzed retrospectively. Multivariate analyses identified clinical and procedural factors predicting acute and long-term outcomes. A total of 372 patients (69% men; age 61 ± 15 years) after surgical repair of CHD (n = 111) or AHD (n = 261) were studied. Cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) was observed in 300 patients and non-CTI-AFL in 72 patients. Ablation was successful in 349 cases (94%). During a mean follow-up of 51 ± 30 months, recurrences were observed in 24.5% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed that non-CTI-AFL (hazard ratio [HR] 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 2.9) and CHD (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.9) were independent predictors of long-term recurrences. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.3), surgery for AHD (HR 95% 2.31, 95% CI 1.5 to 3.7), and left atrial dilatation (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.2) were independent predictors of long-term atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, RFCA of right-sided AT after cardiac surgery is associated with high acute success rates and significant long-term recurrences. Non-CTI-dependent AFL and surgery for CHD are at higher risk of recurrence. Atrial fibrillation is common during follow-up, particularly in patients with AHD and enlarged left atrium. PMID:25896151

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... herpes, syphilis, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]). Ultrasonography: A test in which sound waves are used to examine internal structures. During pregnancy, it can be used to examine ...

  8. Nonpathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Silvestri, Guido; Hirsch, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) are a diverse group of viruses that naturally infect a wide range of African primates, including African green monkeys (AGMs) and sooty mangabey monkeys (SMs). Although natural infection is widespread in feral populations of AGMs and SMs, this infection generally does not result in immunodeficiency. However, experimental inoculation of Asian macaques results in an immunodeficiency syndrome remarkably similar to human AIDS. Thus, natural nonprogressive SIV infections appear to represent an evolutionary adaptation between these animals and their primate lentiviruses. Curiously, these animals maintain robust virus replication but have evolved strategies to avoid disease progression. Adaptations observed in these primates include phenotypic changes to CD4+ T cells, limited chronic immune activation, and altered mucosal immunity. It is probable that these animals have achieved a unique balance between T-cell renewal and proliferation and loss through activation-induced apoptosis, and virus-induced cell death. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural hosts for SIV infection should therefore yield insights into the pathogenesis of AIDS and may inform vaccine design. PMID:22315718

  9. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  10. [Gastric uptake of gallium67 in the human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Escalera Temprado, T; Banzo Marraco, J; Abós Olivares, M D; Olave Rubio, M T; Prats Rivera, E; García López, F; Razola Alba, P

    2004-02-01

    Nowadays, the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is a chronic disease. In the frequent clinical situations with fever, lymph nodes and loss weight it is necessary to determine their etiology, for establishing a specific treatment. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections or gastric lymphomatous or sarcomatous process, which can accumulate Ga67, may be present in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report 2 cases with gastric uptake in which endoscopy and biopsy was obtained. In the first one, with previous treatment with omeprazol and almalgate for gastroesophagic reflux, endoscopy and biopsy were normal and in the second patient an Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed. We think that gastric uptake of Ga67 in HIV patients, must indicate to the clinician to rule out associated pathologies.

  11. Patterns of Healthcare Utilization Among Veterans Infected With Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Coinfected With HIV/HCV: Unique Burdens of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katrak, Shereen; Park, Lawrence P.; Woods, Christopher; Muir, Andrew; Hicks, Charles; Naggie, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and the primary cause of liver transplantation in the United States, and coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases the risk of comorbidities. However, healthcare utilization (HCU) patterns among HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are poorly understood. This study compared the rates of HCU and reasons for hospital admission among HCV-infected, HIV-infected, and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans. Methods. Hepatitis C virus- and HIV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans in care with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from 1998 to 2009 (n = 335 371, n = 28 179, n = 13 471, respectively) were identified by HIV- and HCV-associated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes from the clinical case registry. We assessed rates of HCU using emergency department (ED) visits, outpatient visits, and hospitalization and primary diagnoses associated with hospitalization. Independent risk factors associated with hospitalization were also examined. Results. Rates of outpatient and ED visits increased over the 11-year study period for all groups, with inpatient admission rates remaining stable. The HCU rates were consistently higher for the coinfected than other cohorts. The primary reason for hospital admission for all groups was psychiatric disease/substance use, accounting for 44% of all admissions. Nadir CD4 <350 cells/mm3 was associated with higher rates of hospitalization versus nadir CD4 >500 cells/mm3. Conclusions. As the current population of HCV-infected, HIV-infected, and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans age, they will continue to place a substantial and increasing demand on the US healthcare system, particularly in their utilization of ED and outpatient services. These data suggest the need for an ongoing investment in mental health and primary care within the VA healthcare system. PMID:27704025

  12. MRL/lpr-->severe combined immunodeficiency mouse allografts produce autoantibodies, acute graft-versus-host disease or a wasting syndrome depending on the source of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ashany, D; Hines, J J; Gharavi, A E; Mouradian, J; Drappa, J; Elkon, K B

    1992-01-01

    MRL/lpr (lpr) mice spontaneously develop a lupus-like illness as well as massive lymphadenopathy. Attempts to transfer autoimmunity by adoptive transfer or radiation bone marrow chimeras have been unsuccessful. Since severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have been engrafted with human and rat xenografts without apparent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we subjected SCID mice to low-dose irradiation and reconstituted the mice with spleen cells from young or old lpr mice or with lpr bone marrow. Fourteen out of twenty (70%) of SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from old lpr mice produced autoantibodies (anti-DNA and anti-Sm) without evidence of the severe lymphoid atrophy previously described for lpr spleen-->+/+ chimeras. SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from young lpr mice developed acute GVHD and 5/6 (83%) died within 4 weeks post-transfer. Although 8/11 (73%) of lpr-->SCID bone marrow allografts survived for at least 4 months, these mice developed a wasting disease characterized by lymphoid atrophy and fibrosis without the production of autoantibodies. None of the lpr-->SCID grafts resulted in the transfer of double negative T cells or the lymphoproliferative syndrome characteristic of MRL/lpr mice. These findings indicate that SCID mice can be engrafted with splenocytes from old MRL/lpr mice and that B cells continue to secrete autoantibodies for several months in the SCID recipients. This study also demonstrates that, unlike i.p. transplant of xenogeneic cells, acute GVHD is a consistent feature of i.p. transplants of normal allogeneic mononuclear cells into SCID mice. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 7 PMID:1458684

  13. Tobacco Smoking Is Not Associated With Accelerated Liver Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Hepatitis C Coinfection: A Longitudinal Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Brunet, Laurence; Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen C.; Cooper, Curtis L.; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Gill, M. John; Martel-Laferriere, Valérie; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tobacco smoking has been shown to be an independent risk factor for liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in some cross-sectional studies. No longitudinal study has confirmed this relationship, and the effect of tobacco exposure on liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-HCV coinfected individuals is unknown. Methods. The study population consisted of participants from the Canadian Co-infection Cohort study (CTN 222), a multicenter longitudinal study of HIV-HCV coinfected individuals from 2003 to 2014. Data were analyzed for all participants who did not have significant fibrosis or end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at baseline. The association between time-updated tobacco exposure (ever vs nonsmokers and pack-years) and progression to significant liver fibrosis (defined as an aspartate-to-platelet ratio index [APRI] ≥1.5) or ESLD was assessed by pooled logistic regression. Results. Of 1072 participants included in the study, 978 (91%) had ever smoked, 817 (76%) were current smokers, and 161 (15%) were previous smokers. Tobacco exposure was not associated with accelerated progression to significant liver fibrosis nor with ESLD when comparing ever vs never smokers (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43–1.69 and OR = 1.20, 95% CI, 0.21–2.18, respectively) or increases in pack-years smoked (OR = 1.05, 95% CI, 0.97–1.14 and OR = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.83–1.05, respectively). Both time-updated alcohol use in the previous 6 months and presence of detectable HCV ribonucleic acid were associated with APRI score ≥1.5. Conclusions. Tobacco exposure does not appear to be associated with accelerated progression of liver disease in this prospective study of HIV-HCV coinfected individuals. PMID:27047987

  14. Immunodeficient Mouse Models with Different Disease Profiles by In Vivo Infection with the Same Clinical Isolate of Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Che; Liou, An-Ting; Chang, Ya-Shu; Wu, Szu-Yao; Chang, Chih-Shin; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Kung, John T.; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Yu, Ya-Yen; Lin, Chi-Yung; Lin, Jen-Shiou

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like poliovirus infection, severe infection with enterovirus 71 (EV71) can cause neuropathology. Unlike poliovirus, EV71 is often associated with hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). Here we established three mouse models for experimental infection with the same clinical isolate of EV71. The NOD/SCID mouse model is unique for the development of skin rash, an HFMD-like symptom. While the NOD/SCID mice developed limb paralysis and death at near-100% efficiency, the gamma interferon receptor knockout (ifngr KO) and stat-1 knockout mice exhibited paralysis and death rates near 78% and 30%, respectively. Productive infection with EV71 depends on the viral dose, host age, and inoculation route. Levels of infectious EV71, and levels of VP1-specific RNA and protein in muscle, brain, and spinal cord, were compared side by side between the NOD/SCID and stat-1 knockout models before, during, and after disease onset. Spleen fibrosis and muscle degeneration are common in the NOD/SCID and stat-1 knockout models. The main differences between these two models include their disease manifestations and cytokine/chemokine profiles. The pathology of the NOD/SCID model includes (i) inflammation and expression of viral VP1 antigen in muscle, (ii) increased neutrophil levels and decreased eosinophil and lymphocyte levels, and (iii) hair loss and skin rash. The characteristic pathology of the stat-1 knockout model includes (i) a strong tropism of EV71 for the central nervous system, (ii) detection of VP1 protein in the Purkinje layer of cerebellar cortex, pons, brain stem, and spinal cord, (iii) amplification of microglial cells, and (iv) dystrophy of intestinal villi. Our comparative studies on these new models with oral or intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection underscored the contribution of host immunity, including the gamma interferon receptor, to EV71 pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE In the past decade, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major threat to public health in the Asia

  15. Cancers Related to Immunodeficiencies: Update and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Davod; Khosravi, Adnan; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Aliakbar; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The life span of patients with primary and secondary immunodeficiency is increasing due to recent improvements in therapeutic strategies. While the incidence of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) is 1:10,000 births, that of secondary immunodeficiencies are more common and are associated with posttransplantation immune dysfunction, with immunosuppressive medication for human immunodeficiency virus or with human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection. After infection, malignancy is the most prevalent cause of death in both children and adults with (PIDs). PIDs more often associated with cancer include common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and severe combined immunodeficiency. This suggests that a protective immune response against both infectious non-self-(pathogens) and malignant self-challenges (cancer) exists. The increased incidence of cancer has been attributed to defective elimination of altered or “transformed” cells and/or defective immunity towards cancer cells. The concept of aberrant immune surveillance occurring in PIDs is supported by evidence in mice and from patients undergoing immunosuppression after transplantation. Here, we discuss the importance of PID defects in the development of malignancies and the current limitations associated with molecular pathogenesis of these diseases and emphasize the need for further knowledge of how specific mutations can modulate the immune system to alter immunosurveillance and thereby play a key role in the etiology of malignancies in PID patients. PMID:27703456

  16. A dual infection/competition assay shows a correlation between ex vivo human immunodeficiency virus type 1 fitness and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Mateu, M E; Ball, S C; Marozsan, A J; Torre, V S; Albright, J L; Vanham, G; van Der Groen, G; Colebunders, R L; Arts, E J

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fitness on disease progression through the use of a dual competition/heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA). Despite numerous studies on the impact of HIV-1 diversity and HIV-specific immune response on disease progression, we still do not have a firm understanding of the long-term pathogenesis of this virus. Strong and early CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell and CD4-positive T-helper cell responses directed toward HIV-infected cells appear to curb HIV pathogenesis. However, the rate at which the virus infects the CD4(+) T-cell population and possibly destroys the HIV-specific immune response may also alter the rate of disease progression. For HIV-1 fitness studies, we established conditions for dual HIV-1 infections of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and a sensitive HTA to measure relative virus production. A pairwise comparison was then performed to estimate the relative fitness of various non-syncytium-inducing/CCR5-tropic (NSI/R5) and syncytium-inducing/CXCR4-tropic (SI/X4) HIV-1 isolates. Four HIV-1 strains (two NSI/R5 and two SI/X4) with moderate ex vivo fitness were then selected as controls and competed against primary HIV-1 isolates from an HIV-infected Belgian cohort. HIV-1 isolates from long-term survivors (LTS) were outcompeted by control strains and were significantly less fit than HIV-1 isolates from patients with accelerated progression to AIDS (PRO). In addition, NSI/R5 HIV-1 isolates from PRO overgrew control SI/X4 strains, suggesting that not all SI/X4 HIV-1 isolates replicate more efficiently than all NSI/R5 isolates. Finally, there were strong, independent correlations between viral load and the total relative fitness values of HIV-1 isolates from PRO (r = 0.84, P = 0.033) and LTS (r = 0.86, P = 0.028). Separation of the PRO and LTS plots suggest that HIV-1 fitness together with viral load may be a strong predictor for the rate of disease progression.

  17. Neuromuscular complications of human immunodeficiency virus infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R G

    1994-01-01

    At least 4 distinct peripheral neuropathy syndromes occur in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The most common, painful sensory neuropathy, may be related to the viral infection or may be medication induced and is treated symptomatically. The other 3, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex (some patients), and the progressive polyradiculopathies related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may all respond to appropriate therapy. Both inflammatory myopathy and zidovudine myopathy also abate with early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:8048229

  18. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years.

  19. Systemic Spironucleosis In Two Immunodeficient Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, C; Kramer, J; Mejia, A; MacKey, J; Mansfield, KG; Miller, AD

    2011-01-01

    Spironucleus spp. are parasites of fish and terrestrial vertebrates including mice and turkeys that rarely cause extraintestinal disease. Two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were experimentally inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251). Both progressed to simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) within one year of inoculation and, in addition to common opportunistic infections including rhesus cytomegalovirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus, and rhesus adenovirus, developed systemic protozoal infections. In the first case, the protozoa were associated with colitis, multifocal abdominal abscessation, and lymphadenitis. In the second case they one of a number of organisms associated with extensive pyogranulomatous pneumonia and colitis. Ultrastructural, molecular, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the causative organism to be a species of Spironucleus closely related to Spironucleus meleagridis of turkeys. This is the first report of extraintestinal infection with Spironucleus sp. in higher mammals and further expands the list of opportunistic infections found in immunocompromised rhesus macaques. PMID:20351359

  20. Acquired lymphangiectasis.

    PubMed

    Celis, A V; Gaughf, C N; Sangueza, O P; Gourdin, F W

    1999-01-01

    Acquired lymphangiectasis is a dilatation of lymphatic vessels that can result as a complication of surgical intervention and radiation therapy for malignancy. Acquired lymphangiectasis shares clinical and histologic features with the congenital lesion, lymphangioma circumscriptum. Diagnosis and treatment of these vesiculo-bullous lesions is important because they may be associated with pain, chronic drainage, and cellulitis. We describe two patients who had these lesions after treatment for cancer and review the pertinent literature. Although a number of treatment options are available, we have found CO2 laser ablation particularly effective. PMID:9932832

  1. Evaluation of Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Intervention Programs for Sex Workers in Calcutta, India

    PubMed Central

    GANGOPADHYAY, DWIJENDRA NATH; CHANDA, MITRA; SARKAR, KAMALESH; NIYOGI, SWAPAN KUMAR; CHAKRABORTY, SEKHAR; SAHA, MALAY KUMAR; MANNA, BYOMKESH; JANA, SMARAJIT; RAY, PRATIM; BHATTACHARYA, SUJIT KUMAR; DETELS, ROGER

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective The Sonagachi Project in Calcutta, India, organized sex workers to improve working conditions. Goal To compare rates of sexually transmitted diseases between the Sonagachi Project and other areas in which only the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) interventions were implemented. Study A cross-sectional survey of randomly selected female sex workers. Results There was no difference in the prevalence of all STDs between the 2 areas; both were lower than reported in other surveys in 1992. Analysis using propensity scores also failed to demonstrate any difference. The number of preventive activities was similar in the Sonagachi and NACO-only areas but was more prevalent than in 1992. Sex workers in the Sonagachi area had better treatment-seeking behavior and attitudes. Both the Sonagachi and NACO strategies have resulted in lower STD rates, but the Sonagachi Project also increased the proportion who had an optimistic attitude and increased prevention and treatment-seeking behavior. PMID:16254542

  2. [Oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a human immunodeficiency virus positive child: a case report].

    PubMed

    Astolfo, María Florencia; D'Antonio, Federico; Dartiguelongue, Juan B; Arabolaza, María N; Cheistwer, Ariel; De Matteo, Elena; Torrado, Lidia; Martínez Iriart, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare and aggressive subtype of diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, originally described in the oral cavity of male adults with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. It is composed of neoplastic ceils which resemble immunoblasts but present immunophenotype distinctive of plasma cell and Epstein-Barr virus latent infection. In children, it is an even rarer disease. We present a case of oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus-positive five-year-old child.

  3. Efficacy, Safety, and Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Human Immune Globulin Subcutaneous, 20 % in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases in North America.

    PubMed

    Suez, Daniel; Stein, Mark; Gupta, Sudhir; Hussain, Iftikhar; Melamed, Isaac; Paris, Kenneth; Darter, Amy; Bourgeois, Christelle; Fritsch, Sandor; Leibl, Heinz; McCoy, Barbara; Gelmont, David; Yel, Leman

    2016-10-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) typically require life-long intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy to prevent recurrent infections. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of a highly concentrated (20 %) Ig preparation for SC administration (IGSC 20 %) were evaluated in a prospective trial in patients with PIDD. A total of 74 patients (aged 3-83 years) received 4327 IGSC 20 % infusions over a median of 380.5 days. The rate of validated serious bacterial infections was 0.012 event/patient-year (p < 0.0001 compared with the historical control), and the annualized rate of infection was 2.41 events/patient. Median IgG trough levels were >14.5 g/l. The median maximum infusion rate was 60 ml/h/site (range 4.4-180), resulting in a median infusion duration of 0.95 h. A volume ≥30 ml was infused per site in 74.8 % of IGSC 20 % infusions. Most (84.9 %) infusions were administered using ≤2 infusion sites; for 99.8 % of infusions, there was no need to interrupt/stop administration or reduce the infusion rate. No related serious adverse event (AE) occurred during IGSC 20 % treatment; related non-serious AEs occurred at a rate of 0.036 event/infusion. The incidence of related local AEs was 0.015 event/infusion and of related systemic AEs was 0.021 event/infusion; most were mild in severity, none severe. Increased infusion rates or volumes were not associated with higher AE rates. The investigated IGSC 20 % treatment was shown to be effective and safe, enabling higher infusion rates and volumes per site compared to conventional SC treatments, resulting in fewer infusion sites and shorter infusion durations. PMID:27582171

  4. Acquired von Willebrand disease during CentriMag support is associated with high prevalence of bleeding during support and after transition to heart replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kerry A; Jorde, Ulrich P; Garan, Arthur R; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    The Levitronix CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pump that can be implanted rapidly in the operating room for both right and left ventricular support. Recently, continuous-flow pumps have been associated with excessive bleeding, which can be at least partially explained by acquired von Willebrand disease (vWD). We investigated whether acquired vWD occurs during CentriMag support and determined the frequency of bleeding complications during device support as well as after transition to long-term support. We found that acquired vWD is common early post CentriMag implantation and is associated with frequent bleeding events and high requirement of blood products.

  5. Immune activation and viral burden in acute disease induced by simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14: correlation between in vitro and in vivo events.

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, R; Fultz, P N

    1994-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14 (SIV-PBj14) is an atypical lentivirus that causes acute disease and death in pig-tailed macaques and in vitro replicates efficiently in resting macaque lymphocytes and activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that production of large quantities of SIV-PBj14 induces widespread immune activation and elaboration of cytokines which lead directly to the death of infected pig-tailed macaques. Following intravenous inoculation of pig-tailed macaques with SIV-PBj14, acute disease developed and was characterized by high levels of plasma viremia, p27gag antigenemia, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). All animals died within 10 days of infection, at which time some animals had as many as 100% CD4+ cells in the periphery and lymphoid tissues infected. During the last few days before death, titers of infectious virus in blood increased as much as 10(5)-fold. By using dual-label immunofluorescence assays for detection of cell surface activation markers, both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were shown to express the IL-2 and transferrin receptors following either in vivo or in vitro infection with SIV-PBj14. Furthermore, in vitro infection of quiescent macaque lymphocytes by SIV-PBj14 was accompanied by proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets, as measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine. Increases in numbers of activated lymphocytes and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma coincided with increased amounts of detectable virus in vivo. Clinical signs of disease and pathologic findings were most consistent with death from a shock-like syndrome, in which acute-phase inflammatory cytokines are known to play a major role. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-2, and IL-6 were detected in some cultures infected with SIV-PBj14, but this finding was not consistent. When cytokines were detected, their concentrations were essentially no different

  6. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  7. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  8. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  10. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  11. Current treatment options with immunoglobulin G for the individualization of care in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease1

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, S; Orange, J S; Gardulf, A; Stein, M R; Shapiro, R; Borte, M; Berger, M

    2015-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies require lifelong replacement therapy with immunoglobulin (Ig)G to reduce the incidence and severity of infections. Both subcutaneous and intravenous routes of administering IgG can be effective and well tolerated. Treatment regimens can be individualized to provide optimal medical and quality-of-life outcomes in infants, children, adults and elderly people. Frequency, dose, route of administration, home or infusion-centre administration, and the use of self- or health-professional-administered infusion can be tailored to suit individual patient needs and circumstances. Patient education is needed to understand the disease and the importance of continuous therapy. Both the subcutaneous and intravenous routes have advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered in selecting each patient's treatment regimen. The subcutaneous route is attractive to many patients because of a reduced incidence of systemic adverse events, flexibility in scheduling and its comparative ease of administration, at home or in a clinic. Self-infusion regimens, however, require independence and self-reliance, good compliance on the part of the patient/parent and the confidence of the physician and the nurse. Intravenous administration in a clinic setting may be more appropriate in patients with reduced manual dexterity, reluctance to self-administer or a lack of self-reliance, and intravenous administration at home for those with good venous access who prefer less frequent treatments. Both therapy approaches have been demonstrated to provide protection from infections and improve health-related quality of life. Data supporting current options in IgG replacement are presented, and considerations in choosing between the two routes of therapy are discussed. PMID:25384609

  12. Quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA forms with the second template switch in peripheral blood cells predicts disease progression independently of plasma RNA load.

    PubMed

    Kostrikis, Leondios G; Touloumi, Giota; Karanicolas, Rose; Pantazis, Nikos; Anastassopoulou, Cleo; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Goedert, James J; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2002-10-01

    There are several forms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA in peripheral blood T cells and lymph nodes in untreated HIV-1-infected individuals and in patients whose plasma HIV-1 RNA levels are suppressed by long-term combination antiretroviral therapy. However, it remains to be established whether the concentration of HIV-1 DNA in cells predicts the clinical outcome of HIV-1 infection. In this report, we measured the concentration of HIV-1 DNA forms which has undergone the second template switch (STS DNA) and 2-long-terminal-repeat DNA circles in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples. To do this, we used molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR assays and studied 130 patients with hemophilia in the Multicenter Hemophilia Cohort Study. We assessed the influence of baseline HIV-1 STS DNA levels on the progression of HIV-1 disease in the absence of combination antiretroviral therapy by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. Among the patients who progressed to AIDS, the median levels (interquartile ranges) of STS HIV-1 DNA in PBMC were significantly higher than those of patients who remained AIDS free during the 16 years of follow-up (1,017 [235 to 6,059] and 286 [31 to 732] copies per 10(6) PBMC, respectively; P < 0.0001). Rates of progression to death and development of AIDS varied significantly (log rank P < 0.001) by quartile distribution of HIV-1 STS DNA levels. After adjustment for age at seroconversion, baseline CD4(+) T-cell counts, plasma viral load, and T-cell-receptor excision circles, the relative hazards (RH) of death and AIDS were significantly increased with higher HIV-1 STS DNA levels (adjusted RH, 1.84 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.30 to 2.59] and 2.62 [95% CI, 1.75 to 3.93] per 10-fold increase per 10(6) PBMC, respectively). HIV-1 STS DNA levels in each individual remained steady in longitudinal PBMC samples during 16 years of follow-up. Our findings show that the concentration of HIV-1 STS DNA in PBMC complements the HIV

  13. Preventing opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons: implications for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J E; Hu, D J; Holmes, K K; Jaffe, H W; Masur, H; De Cock, K M

    1996-07-01

    More than 18 million persons in the world are estimated to have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). As immunodeficiency progresses, these persons become susceptible to a wide variety of opportunistic infections (OIs) The spectrum of OIs varies among regions of the world. Tuberculosis is the most common serious OI in sub-Saharan Africa and is also more common in Latin America and in Asia than in the United States. Bacterial and parasitic infections are prevalent in Africa; protozoal infections such as toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and isosporiasis are also common in Latin America. Fungal infections, including cryptococcosis and Penicillium marneffei infection, appear to be prevalent in Southeast Asia. Despite limited health resources in these regions, some measures that are recommended to prevent OIs in the United States may be useful for prolonging and improving the quality of life of HIV-infected persons. These include trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to prevent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections; isoniazid to prevent tuberculosis; and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine to prevent disease due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Research is needed to determine the spectrum of OIs and the efficacy of various prevention measures in resource-poor nations, and health officials need to determine a minimum standard of care for HIV-infected persons. An increasing problem in the developing world, HIV/AIDS should receive attention comparable to other tropical diseases.

  14. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  15. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  16. Assessment of protection from systemic infection or disease afforded by low to intermediate titers of passively acquired neutralizing antibody against bovine viral diarrhea virus in calves.

    PubMed

    Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1995-06-01

    Colostrum-deprived calves (n = 24) were fed various amounts of colostrum, colostrum substitute, or milk replacer to establish a range in titer of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody in serum. The calves were then challenge exposed intranasally with a virulent, noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV-890). After viral challenge exposure, calves were monitored for fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhea. In addition, viral isolation and viral titration were performed on specimens of nasal secretions, buffy coat cells, and serum obtained from the calves. Fever and systemic spread of virus were detected in calves that had viral neutralizing titer of 256 or lower. Calves that had viral neutralizing titer lower than 16 developed severe clinical disease manifested by fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhea. Severity and duration of signs of disease decreased as titers of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody increased. These results indicate that low to intermediate titers of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody were not sufficient to fully protect calves from virulent bovine viral diarrhea virus.

  17. Cystic renal cell carcinoma and acquired renal cystic disease associated with consumption of chaparral tea: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Y; Feddersen, R M; Gardner, K D; Davis, C J

    1994-12-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid is an antioxidant used experimentally to induce cystic renal disease in rats. It may be extracted from the leaves of the creosote bush, which are consumed as chaparral tea in the southwestern United States. We report a case of cystic renal disease and cystic adenocarcinoma of the kidney associated with a history of protracted consumption of chaparral tea.

  18. Adrenocortical function in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    PubMed

    Biglieri, E G

    1988-01-01

    These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from transcriptions, they are prepared by Drs Homer A. Boushey, Professor of Medicine, and David G. Warnock, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Dr Lloyd H. Smith, Jr, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean in the School of Medicine. Requests for reprints should be sent to the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143.

  19. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Nam Joong; Jang, Hee-Chang; Oh, Myoung-don

    2012-01-01

    The clinical features of HIV/AIDS-related ocular manifestations in Korean patients were investigated in this study. Data on 200 consecutive Korean patients diagnosed with AIDS who visited the Seoul National University Hospital from January 2003 to June 2008 were reviewed. Fifty-seven patients (28.5%) had ocular manifestations, and they showed significantly lower CD4+ T cell count than patients without ocular manifestations. Among them, 23 (40.3%) patients showed retinal microvasculopathy, and 22 (38.5%) patients showed cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. Other manifestations included retinal vein occlusion (n = 4), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (n = 4), syphilitic uveitis (n = 2), acute retinal necrosis (n = 1), and progressive outer retinal necrosis (n = 1). The mean CD4+ lymphocyte counts of the patients with retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were 108.5 cells/µL and 69.4 cells/µL, respectively. In conclusion, ocular manifestations including CMV retinitis are common complications in Korean patients with AIDS even in the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Compared to previous reports in western countries, prevalence of CMV retinitis is relatively low and CD4+ lymphocytes count at the time of diagnosis is relatively high. PMID:22563221

  20. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: more than a health-related dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Severin, M J

    1989-01-01

    Many legal issues will affect the health care worker during the AIDS pandemic. These issues are now beginning to be contested in our courts. It is certain that their numbers will continue to grow in the foreseeable future. As local, state, and federal governments design and implement new laws concerning PWA, mechanisms for surveillance, and control of AIDS, new issues are sure to arise. These will undoubtedly involve persons concerned with providing service to those afflicted with this illness. The direction of health care research has already been altered by AIDS. Societal relationships have been affected, as evidenced by the increasing number of legal charges filed when the question of HIV infection involves a patient, student, employee, or other citizen. Inevitably, the health care worker who has contact with PWA will be asked to participate in the mechanisms of the resulting legal contests. If the case reports cited above are an indication of the legal struggles ahead, appearance as a witness to provide scientific information as well as information about the care and treatment afforded PWA will be required of health care workers with increasing frequency. PMID:2680059

  1. Cutaneous colesional acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated Kaposi sarcoma and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Subrayan, Sumeshini; Calonje, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 4 AIDS patients with cutaneous colesional Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and cryptococcosis, a rare phenomenon, are described. Biopsies from 3 patients who were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naive demonstrated predominant KS with a conspicuous spindle cell component and small aggregates of cryptococcal yeasts in 2 biopsies and predominant gelatinous cryptococcosis with attenuated KS spindle cells in 1 biopsy. One patient was HAART exposed. He had childhood pulmonary tuberculosis, was treated for disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis 18 months earlier and presented with cutaneous lesions, odynophagia and massive cervical lymphadenopathy in the eighth week of HAART, after achieving viral suppression and a CD4 cell increase from 28 to 184 cells/μL. His skin biopsy demonstrated a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, neutrophils, and granulomas with admixed aggregates and single Cryptococcus neoformans and focal aggregation of human herpes virus 8-immunopositive spindle cells. Acid fast bacilli were not identified and mycobacterial molecular studies were negative. The features were compatible with cutaneous cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. His nodal and oropharyngeal biopsies demonstrated dense mixed, including granulomatous, inflammation with few cryptococcal yeasts and acid fast bacilli, confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction testing, without KS. These features were also compatible with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, but the exact role of each infection in the extracutaneous sites was unconfirmed. Colesional KS and cryptococcosis served as the sentinel lesion of AIDS in 3 patients and of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in 1 patient.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis. PMID:8930949

  3. Nutrition for the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Solomon, N S; Lyden, C R

    1992-10-01

    Patients with ARC and AIDS develop a variety of symptoms that significantly affect their nutritional status. Podiatrists, although not directly involved with the intricacies of the nutritional management of people with AIDS, should be aware of the effect of the virus on the human body. Investigators are predicting that almost 100% of the estimated 12 million HIV-positive persons in the world will develop AIDS. By giving people with AIDS nutritional education, not only may there be a beneficial response in respect to treatment but it may enhance an individual's quality of life and positive self-image.

  4. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  5. Real time three-dimensional echocardiography for quantification of ventricular volumes, mass, and function in children with congenital and acquired heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Balluz, Rula; Liu, Liwen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Ge, Shuping

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative measurement of left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and function is one of the most common and important indications for echocardiography. These measurements are among the most powerful tools for diagnosis and prognosis of congenital and acquired heart diseases and for assessment of medical, percutaneous, and surgical interventions. Awareness is also growing of the importance of right ventricular (RV) volume, mass, and function in many cardiopulmonary diseases. Furthermore, there are challenges and opportunities to measure the volume, mass, and function of complex chambers such as the left atrium, right atrium, and the univentricular heart. As echocardiography continues to be the imaging modality of choice for these measurements, the strengths and limitations of M-mode, two-dimensional (2D), and recently three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic (3DE) methodologies for accurate and reproducible measurement of these indices have been extensively investigated for congenital and acquired heart diseases. Evidence suggests that 3DE provides improved accuracy and reproducibility over 2D methods for measurement of LV volume and function calculation in adults and in children. Data have accumulated on the utility of 3DE for measuring chamber volumes and function for the RV and for the single ventricle, which may become more widely used in clinical and research arenas in the future. Finally, new advanced modes of analysis such as 3D strain and synchrony analysis by 3DE are promising methodologies that warrant further investigation.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  8. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression.

  9. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  10. Prevention and treatment of tuberculosis among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: principles of therapy and revised recommendations. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1998-10-30

    These guidelines update previous CDC recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of tuberculosis (TB) among adults and children coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States. The most notable changes in these guidelines reflect both the findings of clinical trials that evaluated new drug regimens for treating and preventing TB among HIV-infected persons and recent advances in the use of antiretroviral therapy. In September 1997, when CDC convened a meeting of expert consultants to discuss current information about HIV-related TB, special emphasis was given to issues related to coadministration of TB therapy and antiretroviral therapy and how to translate this information into management guidelines. Thus, these guidelines are based on the following scientific principles: * Early diagnosis and effective treatment of TB among HIV-infected patients are critical for curing TB, minimizing the negative effects of TB on the course of HIV, and interrupting the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to other persons in the community. * All HIV-infected persons at risk for infection with M. tubercu losis must be carefully evaluated and, if indicated, administered therapy to prevent the progression of latent infection to active TB disease and avoid the complications associated with HIV-related TB. * All HIV-infected patients undergoing treatment for TB should be evaluated for antiretroviral therapy, because most patients with HIV-related TB are candidates for concurrent administration of antituberculosis and antiretroviral drug therapies. However, the use of rifampin with protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is contraindicated. Ideally, the management of TB among HIV-infected patients taking antiretroviral drugs requires a) directly observed therapy, b) availability of experienced and coordinated TB/HIV care givers, and in most situations, c) use of a TB treatment regimen that includes rifabutin

  11. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Metersky, Mark L; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A; Palmer, Lucy B; Napolitano, Lena M; O'Grady, Naomi P; Bartlett, John G; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D; File, Thomas M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Roberts, Jason A; Waterer, Grant W; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L; Brozek, Jan L

    2016-09-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. PMID:27418577

  12. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  13. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  14. Social Constructs and Disease: Implications for a Controlled Vocabulary for HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Gillaspy, Mary L.

    1998-01-01

    The body of knowledge associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represents complexity not present in any other disease. A controlled vocabulary and classification structure used to organize the body of knowledge associated with HIV/AIDS is discussed. (Author/AEF)

  15. Sexually Transmitted Diseases as a Risk for Acquiring HIV Infection among the Population of Men Who Have Sex with Men--A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Lakoseljac, Danijela; Gjenero-Margan, Ira; Kolarić, Branko; Rukavina, Tomislav; Blazić, Tatjana Nemeth

    2015-09-01

    At the beginning of the 1980-ies, HIV infection and AIDS were described for the first time, this among the population of men who have sex with other men. Nearly thirty years later, the MSM population is still a population under heightened risk for acquiring HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases. This study investigates sexually transmitted diseases as a risk for HIV infection. A total of 296 men who have sex with men (MSM) were included in this case control study. Differences among the frequencies of sexually transmitted diseases among the MSM of HIV positive and HIV negative status were tested. The history of HIV positive more often states falling ill with sexually transmitted diseases than this was the case before they became HIV positive, unlike those MSM who are not HIV infected (45.9%:11.1% that is OR 6.79, 95% CI 3.49-13.19). Hepatitis B infection is more frequent in HIV positive MSM (11.5%:1.9%; OR 6.58, 95% CI 1.86-23.3). The frequency of gonorrhea in case history of HIV positive MSM is significantly higher than in the HIV negative group (11.5%:3.8%, OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.13-9.34). In the group of HIV positive MSM, unlike the HIV negative group, syphilis (14.8:1.0%, OR 1774, 95% CI 3.43-122.87) and genital herpes (8.2%:0.5%, OR 18.39, 95% CI 2.03-424.7) are more frequent. The results of this study will be used in future preventive activities focused on the population of MSM, as a population under particular risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections. PMID:26898074

  16. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug... Fee Act (PDUFA V). FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily...

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Thirteen Patients with Acute Chagas Disease Acquired through Oral Transmission from Two Urban Outbreaks in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Claudilson J. C.; Aras, Roque; Mota, Gildo; Reis, Francisco; Dias, Juarez Pereira; de Jesus, Robson Silva; Freire, Miralba Silva; de Araújo, Eline G.; Prazeres, Juliana; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2010-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of orally transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi continue to be reported in Brazil and are associated with a high mortality rate, mainly due to myocarditis. Methods This study is a detailed report on the disease progression of acute Chagas disease in 13 patients who were infected during two micro-outbreaks in two northeastern Brazilian towns. Clinical outcomes as well as EKG and ECHO results are described, both before and after benznidazole treatment. Results Fever and dyspnea were the most frequent symptoms observed. Other clinical findings included myalgia, periorbital edema, headache and systolic murmur. Two patients died of cardiac failure before receiving benznidazole treatment. EKG and ECHO findings frequently showed a disturbance in ventricular repolarization and pericardial effusion. Ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction <55%) was present in 27.3% of patients. After treatment, EKG readings normalized in 91.7% of patients. Ventricular repolarization abnormalities persisted in 50% of the patients, while sinus bradycardia was observed in 18%. The systolic ejection fraction normalized in two out of three patients with initially depressed ventricular function, while pericardial effusion disappeared. Conclusions Myocarditis is frequently found and potentially severe in patients with acute Chagas disease. Benznidazole treatment may improve clinical symptoms, as well as EKG and ECHO findings. PMID:20559542

  18. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... funding available to make awards under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Funding...

  19. Impact of health education on knowledge regarding human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angadi, M M; Sorganvi, V S; Algur, V S

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the knowledge of HIV/AIDS among college girl students, to expose the college girl students to targeted HIV/AIDS education and to assess the impact of HIV/ AIDS health education on college girl students. A cross-sectional study was designed over the period September 2009 to February 2010. Study participants included 139 students of BLDEA's Arts and Commerce College for Women, Bijapur, Karnataka. Results indicated knowledge regarding HIV/ AIDS improved substantially, especially, with relation to various modes of transmission viz unsterilised syringes (41% to 72%), pregnant mother to child (23% to 66%) blood transfusion (20% to71%) and regarding preventive measures namely adherence to single partner (68% to 95%), use of condom (18% to 68%/), use of tested blood for transfusion (21% to 55%). The study showed significant difference between pre and post-test knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is clearly one of the most serious health-care crises in the professional lives of contemporary physicians. It cannot be regarded as a curiosity to be dealt with by inner-city infectious-disease experts, but rather must be considered a problem for all health-care providers and a problem in which the obstetrician-gynecologist has a special role to play. PMID:18475370

  1. Nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prem L; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda; Beltran, Thierry; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel compounds that can effectively inhibit both wild type and the most consensus resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary focus in HIV disease management. Combination therapy, comprising at least three classes of drugs, has become the standard of care for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HIV-infected individuals. The drug cocktail can comprise all three classes of HIV inhibitors, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Due to their competitive mode of inhibition and requirement for metabolic activation, almost all NRTI drugs lack the virological potency of NNRTI or PI drugs. However, data from clinical trials indicate that sustained viral suppression could not be achieved with NRTI, NNRTI or PIs alone. Therefore, the NRTIs will remain essential components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the foreseeable future, because they enhance the virological potency of the regimen, they do not bind excessively to protein and most regimens are small pills/tablets given once a day. It has become apparent in recent years that the prolonged use of certain NRTIs exhibits adverse events as a class, limiting the length of time for which they can be safely used. Of major clinical concern is their association with the potentially fatal lactic acidaemia and hepatic steatosis. These class events, as well as individual drug effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are linked to delayed mitochondrial destruction. In addition to toxicity, the development of resistance-conferring mutations against exposure to nucleoside analogs currently in use influences long-term therapeutic benefits. Of critical importance for the evaluation of new NRTIs are recent studies showing that the efficiency of discrimination or excision by pyrophosphorolysis in the presence of nucleotides of a given NRTI is a key

  2. [Recommendations issued by the Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases for the follow-up of the child exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus and to antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy and the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Noguera Julian, A; De José, M I

    2012-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus vertical transmission in developed countries has dramatically decreased to less than 2% over the last 15 years due to the consecutive implementation of different prophylactic measures, including the use of antiretrovirals, elective cesarean section and refraining from breastfeeding. The follow-up of these otherwise healthy children is, by far, the most common situation related to HIV infection that general pediatricians currently face in routine clinical care in Spain. These recommendations issued by the Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases attempt to summarize the main aspects of this follow-up, including birth management, type of feeding, neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, HIV infection diagnosis, common early comorbidities, short- and mid-term toxicities, vaccination and other prophylactic measures and long-term follow-up.

  3. Protein microarrays: a new tool for the study of autoantibodies in immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jacob M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  4. The Science, Spread and Therapy of HIV Disease. Everything You Need To Know, but Had No Idea Who To Ask.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    This book uses a question-and-answer format to provide information on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the disease caused by infection from the virus, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Topics covered include: (1) "Outbreak," which discusses the history of the AIDS outbreak including early theories about the causes of AIDS and…

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage presenting as hemoperitoneum secondary to renal cyst rupture in a peritoneal dialysis patient with acquired cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Biyik, Z; Solak, Y; Gaipov, A; Ozbek, O; Esen, H; Turk, S

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage (SRH) is a rare and potentially fatal condition. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) may cause SRH in hemodialysis patients. However, presentation of retroperitoneal hematoma as hemoperitoneum in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is exceedingly rare. We report a 44-year-old male PD patient who presented with hemoperitoneum secondary to retroperitoneal hematoma. The reason of SRH was rupture of the cysts of ACKD. The patient underwent unilateral nephrectomy with subsequent disappearance of hemoperitoneum. The importance of this case lies in the fact that the patients who have been receiving dialysis for a long time should be under surveillance in terms of ACKD development and potential associated complications such as cyst hemorrhage and malignancy.

  6. Exploiting the unique regenerative capacity of the liver to underpin cell and gene therapy strategies for genetic and acquired liver disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Grant J; de Alencastro, Gustavo; Alexander, Ian E; Yeoh, George C

    2014-11-01

    The number of genetic or acquired diseases of the liver treatable by organ transplantation is ever-increasing as transplantation techniques improve placing additional demands on an already limited organ supply. While cell and gene therapies are distinctly different modalities, they offer a synergistic alternative to organ transplant due to distinct architectural and physiological properties of the liver. The hepatic blood supply and fenestrated endothelial system affords relatively facile accessibility for cell and/or gene delivery. More importantly, however, the remarkable capacity of hepatocytes to proliferate and repopulate the liver creates opportunities for new treatments based on emerging technologies. This review will summarise current understanding of liver regeneration, describe clinical and experimental cell and gene therapeutic modalities and discuss critical challenges to translate these new technologies to wider clinical utility. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: "Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation".

  7. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage presenting as hemoperitoneum secondary to renal cyst rupture in a peritoneal dialysis patient with acquired cystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Biyik, Z.; Solak, Y.; Gaipov, A.; Ozbek, O.; Esen, H.; Turk, S.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage (SRH) is a rare and potentially fatal condition. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) may cause SRH in hemodialysis patients. However, presentation of retroperitoneal hematoma as hemoperitoneum in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is exceedingly rare. We report a 44-year-old male PD patient who presented with hemoperitoneum secondary to retroperitoneal hematoma. The reason of SRH was rupture of the cysts of ACKD. The patient underwent unilateral nephrectomy with subsequent disappearance of hemoperitoneum. The importance of this case lies in the fact that the patients who have been receiving dialysis for a long time should be under surveillance in terms of ACKD development and potential associated complications such as cyst hemorrhage and malignancy. PMID:26199480

  8. Prevalence and Outcomes of Hepatitis B Coinfection and Associated Liver Disease Among Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Individuals in a Rural Tanzanian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Mena, Adrià; Glass, Tracy R.; Winter, Annja; Kimera, Namvua; Ntamatungiro, Alex; Hatz, Christoph; Tanner, Marcel; Battegay, Manuel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wandeler, Gilles; Letang, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver fibrosis/cirrhosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals enrolled in a rural Tanzanian prospective cohort and assessed hepatic fibrosis progression 12–24 months after antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Methods. All ART-naive HIV-infected adults ≥15-year-old enrolled in the Kilombero and Ulanga Antiretroviral Cohort who started ART between 2005 and 2015 were included. Pre-ART factors associated with significant liver fibrosis (aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index [APRI] >1.5) and cirrhosis (APRI > 2.0) were identified using logistic regression. Results. Of 3097 individuals screened, 227 (7.3%; 95% CI, 6.4–8.2) were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive. Before ART initiation, 9.1% individuals had significant liver fibrosis and 5.3% had cirrhosis. Human immunodeficiency virus/HBV-coinfected individuals were more likely to have an APRI score indicating significant fibrosis (14.2% vs 8.7%, P = .03) and cirrhosis (9.2% vs 4.9%, P = .03) than HBV-uninfected patients. CD4 cell count <200 cell/μL and alcohol consumption were independently associated with pre-ART APRI score, indicating significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in multivariable analyses. Among individuals with elevated APRI measurements pre- and 12–24 months post-ART initiation, 53 of 57 (93.0%) of HIV-monoinfected and 4 of 5 (80.0%) of HIV/HBV-coinfected had a regression to APRI < 1.5. Conclusions. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis were common in our cohort, especially among HIV/HBV-coinfected individuals. The APRI improved in most patients. Pre-ART HBsAg screening and early onset of tenofovir-based ART for HIV/HBV-coinfection should be prioritized in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. [Acquired haemophilia (acquired factor VIII inhibitor)].

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, José M; Duboscq, Cristina; Fondevila, Carlos; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia is a rare disorder. The clinical picture ranges from mild ecchymosis and anaemia to life threatening bleeding in up to 20% of patients. The disease is produced by an antibody against Factor VIII and it usually occurs in the elderly, with no previous history of a bleeding disorder. It can be associated to an underlying condition such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, drugs or pregnancy. It has a typical laboratory pattern with isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that fails to correct upon mixing tests with normal plasma and low levels of factor VIII. Treatment recommendations are based on controlling the acute bleeding episodes with either bypassing agent, recombinant activated factor VII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and eradication of the antibody with immunosuppressive therapy.

  10. Systemic Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Upon infection with necrotizing pathogens many plants develop an enhanced resistance to further pathogen attack also in the uninoculated organs. This type of enhanced resistance is referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the SAR state, plants are primed (sensitized) to more quickly and more effectively activate defense responses the second time they encounter pathogen attack. Since SAR depends on the ability to access past experience, acquired disease resistance is a paradigm for the existence of a form of “plant memory”. Although the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of the 20th century, major progress in the understanding of SAR was made over the past sixteen years. This review covers the current knowledge of molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms that are associated with SAR. PMID:19521483

  11. Abrogation of attenuated lentivirus-induced protection in rhesus macaques by administration of depo-provera before intravaginal challenge with simian immunodeficiency virus mac239.

    PubMed

    Abel, Kristina; Rourke, Tracy; Lu, Ding; Bost, Kristen; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    In nonhuman primate models of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, live attenuated lentiviruses provide the most reliable protection from systemic and mucosal challenge with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Although live attenuated lentiviruses may never be used in humans because of safety concerns, understanding the nature of the protective immune mechanisms induced by live attenuated vaccines in primate models will be useful for developing other vaccine approaches. Approximately 60% of rhesus macaques immunized with nonpathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain 89.6 are protected from infection or clinical disease after intravaginal (IVAG) challenge with pathogenic SIVmac239. The goal of the present study was to determine whether administration of Depo-Provera before IVAG challenge with SIV decreases the protective efficacy of infection with SHIV89.6. The rate of protection after IVAG challenge with SIVmac239 was significantly lower (P<.05), and the acute postchallenge plasma viral RNA levels were significantly higher (P<.006), in Depo-Provera-treated, SHIV89.6-immunized macaques than in Depo-Provera-naive, SHIV89.6-immunized macaques. In the primate model of sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, treatment with progesterone before IVAG challenge with a pathogenic virus can decrease the efficacy of a model "vaccine."

  12. A disease model descriptive of progression between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations and community-acquired pneumonia: roles for underlying lung disease and the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M; Monte, Scott V; Schentag, Jerome J; Paladino, Joseph A; Klugman, Keith P; Lavin, Bruce; Yu, Victor L; Singer, Mendel E; Adelman, Martin H

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may progress to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), but there has been no formal study of the factors responsible. We studied the influence of severity of underlying lung disease, pathogen characteristics and the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0-24h to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC24/MIC), i.e. the area under the inhibitory curve (AUIC), during the progression from acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB) in COPD to CAP. The model parameters were derived from a multinational database of 3885 patients with AECB or CAP (April 1996 to July 2006). Patients with underlying COPD were evaluated in two separate analyses: infection progression between COPD and CAP within Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-like grouping (GLG); and distribution of pathogen by GLG, CAP and AECB. Secondary analyses examined the impact of target AUIC attainment on progression to CAP for Streptococcus pneumoniae. The relative impact of GLG and AUIC were modelled in multivariate logistic regression for S. pneumoniae. Progression to CAP linked directly with GLG I/II, III and IV (18.3%, 31.7% and 48.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). Progression to CAP was strongly associated with S. pneumoniae (57.3%), whilst other pathogens were predominant in AECB that did not progress to CAP (61.7%) (P = 0.002). AUIC > or = 100 was associated with AECB (65.1%) and AUIC < 100 with CAP (91.7%) (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the frequency of progression to CAP increases directly with GLG. For S. pneumoniae, achieving an AUIC > or =100 can attenuate progression, regardless of GLG. Thus, AUIC > or = 100 appears to be a viable antibiotic selection strategy to protect patients with S. pneumoniae from developing CAP.

  13. The WOMED model of benign thyroid disease: Acquired magnesium deficiency due to physical and psychological stressors relates to dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to discern whether a relation between biochemical parameters, sonography and musculoskeletal data exists in cases of hyperthyroidism and whether they are modifiable through supplementation with selenomethionine and magnesium citrate as well as by acupuncture and manual medicine methods. Results A direct correlation between whole blood selenium and serum magnesium was found in subjects without thyroid disease and in menopausal women while it was reversed in cases of thyroid diseases as well as in patients with depression, infection, and in infertile women. Vascularization indices were elevated in cases of newly diagnosed benign thyroid diseases. Musculoskeletal changes i.e. lateral tension and idiopathic moving toes, as well as situations of physical and psychological stress and minor trauma and infection led to an increase of vascularization. Magnesium levels correlated negatively with these two conditions. The supplementation brought a reduction of the vascularization indices and reduced the incidence of idiopathic moving toes. Treatment of lateral tension required manual medicine methods and acupuncture (gastrocnemius). A small subgroup of patients showed a further reduction of hyper-vascularization after receiving coenzyme Q10. Conclusions We interpret the elevated thyroid vascularization and low magnesium levels as signs of an inflammatory process related to the musculoskeletal changes. Improvement of thyroid function and morphology can be achieved after correcting the influence of stressors together with the supplementation regime. We hypothesize that the central biochemical event in thyroid disease is that of an acquired, altered mitochondrial function due to deficiency of magnesium, selenium, and coenzyme Q10. PMID:26675817

  14. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  15. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-04-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa.

  16. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  17. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  18. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus from genital ulcers in Nairobi prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, J K; Coombs, R; Plummer, F; Holmes, K K; Nikora, B; Cameron, W; Ngugi, E; Ndinya Achola, J O; Corey, L

    1989-09-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have implicated genital/anorectal ulcer disease as an important cofactor for acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during sexual intercourse. To better understand the mechanism for the association between genital ulcers and HIV, exudates from 62 genital ulcers of 56 HIV-seropositive prostitutes in Nairobi (Kenya) were cultured for HIV. Twenty-six ulcer cultures could not be evaluated for the presence of HIV because of bacterial or fungal contamination. HIV was isolated from 4 (11%) of the 36 remaining uncontaminated ulcer cultures (2 introital, 1 vaginal, and 1 cervical) from 4 separate women. HIV was isolated from the cervical os from only 2 of the 4 women. HIV p24 antigen was detected in exudate from 1 of the 4 culture-positive ulcers and 0 of 32 culture-negative ulcers. Genital ulcers in seropositive patients should be regarded as potential sources of HIV, which could be important in transmission of HIV during intercourse. Public health measures aimed at controlling sexually transmitted genital ulcer diseases should be an integral part of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention programs.

  19. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  20. Salicylic Acid and Systemic Acquired Resistance Play a Role in Attenuating Crown Gall Disease Caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ajith; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Ryu, Choong-Min; Allen, Stacy N.; Kang, Li; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of salicylic acid (SA) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) on crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Nicotiana benthamiana plants treated with SA showed decreased susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection. Exogenous application of SA to Agrobacterium cultures decreased its growth, virulence, and attachment to plant cells. Using Agrobacterium whole-genome microarrays, we characterized the direct effects of SA on bacterial gene expression and showed that SA inhibits induction of virulence (vir) genes and the repABC operon, and differentially regulates the expression of many other sets of genes. Using virus-induced gene silencing, we further demonstrate that plant genes involved in SA biosynthesis and signaling are important determinants for Agrobacterium infectivity on plants. Silencing of ICS (isochorismate synthase), NPR1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1), and SABP2 (SA-binding protein 2) in N. benthamiana enhanced Agrobacterium infection. Moreover, plants treated with benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid, a potent inducer of SAR, showed reduced disease symptoms. Our data suggest that SA and SAR both play a major role in retarding Agrobacterium infectivity. PMID:18156296

  1. Human peripheral blood leucocyte non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene mouse model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease and the role of host major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Covassin, L; Brehm, M A; Racki, W; Pearson, T; Leif, J; Laning, J; Fodor, W; Foreman, O; Burzenski, L; Chase, T H; Gott, B; Rossini, A A; Bortell, R; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L

    2009-01-01

    Immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immune-deficient (scid) mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull) engraft readily with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Here, we report a robust model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease (GVHD) based on intravenous injection of human PBMC into 2 Gy conditioned NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice. These mice develop xenogeneic GVHD consistently (100%) following injection of as few as 5 × 106 PBMC, regardless of the PBMC donor used. As in human disease, the development of xenogeneic GVHD is highly dependent on expression of host major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules and is associated with severely depressed haematopoiesis. Interrupting the tumour necrosis factor-α signalling cascade with etanercept, a therapeutic drug in clinical trials for the treatment of human GVHD, delays the onset and progression of disease. This model now provides the opportunity to investigate in vivo mechanisms of xenogeneic GVHD as well as to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents rapidly. PMID:19659776

  2. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  3. Characteristics and Clinical Management of a Cluster of 3 Patients With Ebola Virus Disease, Including the First Domestically Acquired Cases in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, Allison M.; Davey, Richard T.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Varkey, Jay B.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Tseggay, Gebre K.; Badidi, Oghenetega; Faust, Andrew C.; Brown, Katia V.; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Barrett, Kevin; Wolcott, Mark J.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Lyon, G. Marshall; Weinstein, Gary L.; Weinmeister, Kenney; Sutton, Shelby; Hazbun, Munir; Albariño, César G.; Reed, Zachary; Cannon, Debi; Ströher, Ute; Feldman, Mark; Ribner, Bruce S.; Lane, H. Clifford; Fauci, Anthony S.; Uyeki, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 26 000 cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) have been reported in western Africa, with high mortality. Several patients have been medically evacuated to hospitals in the United States and Europe. Detailed clinical data are limited on the clinical course and management of patients with EVD outside western Africa. Objective To describe the clinical characteristics and management of a cluster of patients with EVD, including the first cases of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection acquired in the United States. Design Retrospective clinical case series. Setting Three U.S. hospitals in September and October 2014. Patients First imported EVD case identified in the United States and 2 secondary EVD cases acquired in the United States in critical care nurses who cared for the index case patient. Measurements Clinical recovery, EBOV RNA level, resolution of Ebola viremia, survival with discharge from hospital, or death. Results The index patient had high EBOV RNA levels, developed respiratory and renal failure requiring critical care support, and died. Both patients with secondary EBOV infection had nonspecific signs and symptoms and developed moderate illness; EBOV RNA levels were moderate, and both patients recovered. Limitation Both surviving patients received uncontrolled treatment with multiple investigational agents, including convalescent plasma, which limits generalizability of the results. Conclusion Early diagnosis, prompt initiation of supportive medical care, and moderate clinical illness likely contributed to successful outcomes in both survivors. The inability to determine the potential benefit of investigational therapies and the effect of patient-specific factors that may have contributed to less severe illness highlight the need for controlled clinical studies of these interventions, especially in the setting of a high level of supportive medical care. Primary Funding Source None. PMID:25961438

  4. Depoliticize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Public-health policy is inconsistent in its approach to the sexually transmitted disease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nearly every health agency has politicized the reporting, finding, and contacting of HIV cases. There is also no consistency among the various state health departments and the various federal health agencies. Until we have a uniform health policy that treats HIV infection as every other reportable sexually transmitted disease, we will make little progress toward controlling its inevitable increase in both cases and costs. PMID:18475369

  5. [Lymphocytes B and primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies represent the most frequent genetic diseases of the immune system and the first to be recognized along immunology history. The antibodies were recognized as part of the humoral immune system long ago, and after immunoglobulin discovery, the first antibody immunodeficiency were recognized and named as "agammaglobulinemia", followed by the common variable immunoendeficiency and the hyper-IgM syndrome. The following discoveries in immunology history made possible the understanding of these pathologies, for example: the discoveries of B cells, pre-B cells, the signaling pathway directed by the antigen receptor and many other cellular and molecular mechanisms. Primary antibody deficiencies have been studied for a long time and the discoveries of new syndromes have been helpful in the understanding of immunological mechanisms that take place in our organism. Then, this manuscript pretends to review the relevant findings in the history of immunology, focused on the B cells and the connection with the description of representative clinical entities of primary antibody deficiencies. The aim of this manuscript is to show to the reader that the generation of scientific knowledge has a direct application in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are affected in these diseases.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Cellular Entry and Exit in the T Lymphocytic and Monocytic Compartments: Mechanisms and Target Opportunities During Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Sullivan, Neil T; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection, a number of cell types throughout the body are infected, with the majority of cells representing CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Both types of cells express, to varying levels, the primary receptor molecule, CD4, as well as one or both of the coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5. Viral tropism is determined by both the coreceptor utilized for entry and the cell type infected. Although a single virus may have the capacity to infect both a CD4+ T cell and a cell of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the mechanisms involved in both the entry of the virus into the cell and the viral egress from the cell during budding and viral release differ depending on the cell type. These host-virus interactions and processes can result in the differential targeting of different cell types by selected viral quasispecies and the overall amount of infectious virus released into the extracellular environment or by direct cell-to-cell spread of viral infectivity. This review covers the major steps of virus entry and egress with emphasis on the parts of the replication process that lead to differences in how the virus enters, replicates, and buds from different cellular compartments, such as CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. PMID:26111588

  7. Severe immunodeficiency associated with a human immunodeficiency virus 1 NEF/3'-long terminal repeat transgene

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have generated several transgenic mouse strains carrying a human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) NEF/3' long terminal repeat (LTR) transgene under control of a T cell-specific promoter-enhancer element, showing a depletion of CD4+ T cells in the thymus and periphery. The immunological functions of the line with the most dramatic changes in lymphocyte populations, B6/338L, were analyzed in greater detail. The presence of the transgene in the heterozygous animal is associated with a dominant severe immunodeficiency. Older animals develop lymph- adenopathy and splenomegaly. CD4+CD8+ and CD4+CD8- single positive thymocytes already are depleted in these mice at the earliest stages in ontogeny, and peripheral T cells are reduced in frequency and present cell surface marker expression, which is characteristic for memory and activated T cells. The immunological response of B6/338L mice to several viral infections is also greatly impaired. Thus, the HIV-1 NEF/3' LTR as transgene in T cells can cause immunodeficiency and disease with striking similarities to a known retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency called murine AIDS (H. C. Morse III, S. K. Chattopadhyay, M. Makino, T. N. Frederickson, A. W. Hugin, and J. W. Hartley. 1992. AIDS. 6:607). PMID:8113676

  8. Prevalence and outcomes of anemia in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Belperio, Pamela S; Rhew, David C

    2004-04-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), anemia is a commonly encountered hematologic abnormality that has a significant impact on clinical outcomes and quality of life (QOL). This review describes the prevalence of anemia in several populations of patients with HIV and the effects of anemia on survival, morbidity, disease progression, transfusion requirements, and QOL. The prevalence of anemia in HIV disease varies considerably, ranging from 1.3% to 95%: it depends on several factors, including the stage of HIV disease, sex, age, pregnancy status, and injection-drug use as well as the definition of anemia used. In general, as HIV disease progresses, the prevalence and severity of anemia increase. Anemia is also more prevalent in HIV-positive women, children, and injection-drug users than in HIV-negative women, children, and injection-drug users. Anemia has been shown to be a statistically significant predictor of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and is independently associated with an increased risk of death in patients with HIV. Treatment of anemia with epoetin-alpha has resulted in significantly fewer patients requiring transfusion as well as decreases in the mean number of units of blood transfused. Resolution of HIV-related anemia has been shown to improve QOL, physical functioning, energy, and fatigue in individuals with HIV. More recently, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has also been associated with a significant increase in hemoglobin concentrations and a decrease in the prevalence of anemia.

  9. Problems of Prophylaxis of Secondary Immunodeficiency States.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Boris B.; Kuzmin, Sergey N.; Medvedev, Vladimir Ya.; Tolstov, Dmitry V.

    1999-12-01

    An attempt is made in this paper to draw up some results of long-term studies conducted by the "Immunoprophylaxis" Center of RANS on such studies. The results of mass and individual studies among 250 thousand blue- and white-collar workers in Russian industrial enterprises are processed in the data bank of the Center, including an analysis of the immunological reactions of 30 thousand individuals studied. An analysis of the results shows that secondary immunodeficiency is encountered in 30% of the people occupied in industrial positions, in 40% of professional athletes and in more than 60% of the children studied. It should be emphasized that in enterprises where there is substantial excessive environmental harm, the frequency of development of immunodeficiency also exceeded the 60% mark. There are many reasons for the development of immunological deficiency and they depend on a large number of factors. Among them, in the first place, is the anthropogenic effect on the environment, which results in contamination of working zones, the earth, water and, as a consequence, food products, the use of which inevitably results in immunodepression. A special place in this problem is occupied by stress, which accompanies almost any professional activity. There is no doubt concerning the opinion that normal functioning of the immune system provides a sufficiently effective "interdiction" against the development of many diseases. Immune deficiency "opens the door" to illness. In other words, immunodeficiency is a detonator for the growth of a pathology.

  10. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with gain of chromosomes 3, 7, and 16, gain of chromosome X, and loss of chromosome Y.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently described. To date, there are no reports on genetic findings of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. In this article, we report the first report of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. A 66-year-old Japanese man was found to have a left renal tumor during the follow-up of hemodialysis consequent to chronic renal failure. Left nephrectomy was performed. Histological examination of three tumors in the left kidney showed the cribriform or microcystic growth pattern of neoplastic cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, and many oxalate crystals were observed. The G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC showed 49, X, +X, -Y, +3, +7, +16. These chromosomal abnormalities resemble those of sporadic papillary RCC that has been previously reported. Finally, we suggest that this tumor may show a close relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC, but a large-scale study will be needed to clarify the relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC.

  11. Primary immunodeficiencies of food animals.

    PubMed

    McVey, D S; Tizard, I

    1993-03-01

    Although there are few, well-characterized PIDs of food animals, these diseases are important because they tend to be severe and with no cure. Most animals with PID do not receive the intensive and aggressive care required for survival: Veterinarians may be consulted only when the animals are in the terminal stages of illness; it is generally not economically practical for livestock producers or practitioners to pay for the exhaustive laboratory tests required to detect and characterize these anomalies. Another reason for the small numbers of characterized clinical cases of PID is that they are rare. It is possible, however, that intensive artificial insemination and embryo transfer could select for heterozygous carriers of these autosomal traits. As seen with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, as the frequency of an allele increases in the population, the numbers of affected animals increase. Furthermore, other immunodeficient syndromes are likely to exist. Veterinarians therefore should be aware of these disorders and should seek laboratory assistance to arrive at a correct diagnosis. Because of the inheritable nature of PID, livestock producers need assistance from veterinarians to identify carriers and establish sound breeding and control programs. One positive outcome from studies of PID is that research scientists and veterinarians learn much about immune systems from these afflicted animals. In fact, these animals may become models for gene therapy or marrow reconstruction procedures. PMID:8457931

  12. Recent advances in treatment of severe primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Gennery, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare, inborn errors that result in impaired, disordered or uncontrolled immune responses. Whilst symptomatic and prophylactic treatment is available, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an option for many diseases, leading to cure of the immunodeficiency and establishing normal physical and psychological health. Newborn screening for some diseases, whilst improving outcomes, is focusing research on safer and less toxic treatment strategies, which result in durable and sustainable immune function without adverse effects. New conditioning regimens have reduced the risk of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and new methods of manipulating stem cell sources should guarantee a donor for almost all patients. Whilst incremental enhancements in transplantation technique have gradually improved survival outcomes over time, some of these new applications are likely to radically alter our approach to treating primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:26918153

  13. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  14. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4(+) cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections.

  15. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4(+) cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  16. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4+ cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    AGARWAL, SHRADHA; MAYER, LLOYD

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders such as chronic or acute diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, and inflammatory bowel diseases can indicate immune deficiency. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, so it is not surprising that intestinal diseases are common among immunodeficient patients. Gastroenterologists therefore must be able to diagnose and treat patients with primary immunodeficiency. Immune-related gastrointestinal diseases can be classified as those that develop primarily via autoimmunity, infection, an inflammatory response, or malignancy. Immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients with gastrointestinal diseases present with similar symptoms. However, intestinal biopsy specimens from immunodeficient patients often have distinct histologic features, and these patients often fail to respond to conventional therapies. Therefore, early recognition of symptoms and referral to an immunologist for a basic immune evaluation is required to select appropriate treatments. Therapies for primary immunodeficiency comprise immunoglobulin replacement, antibiotics, and, in severe cases, bone marrow transplantation. Treatment of immunodeficient patients with concomitant gastrointestinal disease can be challenging, and therapy with immunomodulators often is required for severe disease. This review aims to guide gastroenterologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. PMID:23501398

  18. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  19. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  20. Contrasting Roles of the Apoplastic Aspartyl Protease APOPLASTIC, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1-DEPENDENT1 and LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 in Arabidopsis Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Heiko H; Wenig, Marion; Wittek, Finni; Jordá, Lucia; Maldonado-Alconada, Ana M; Sarioglu, Hakan; Colby, Thomas; Knappe, Claudia; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Pabst, Elisabeth; Mackey, David; Parker, Jane E; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-04-22

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible immune response that depends on ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EDS1 is required for both SAR signal generation in primary infected leaves and SAR signal perception in systemic uninfected tissues. In contrast to SAR signal generation, local resistance remains intact in eds1 mutant plants in response to Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. We utilized the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant to identify new SAR regulatory proteins in plants conditionally expressing AvrRpm1. Comparative proteomic analysis of apoplast-enriched extracts from AvrRpm1-expressing wild-type and eds1 mutant plants led to the identification of 12 APOPLASTIC, EDS1-DEPENDENT (AED) proteins. The genes encoding AED1, a predicted aspartyl protease, and another AED, LEGUME LECTIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (LLP1), were induced locally and systemically during SAR signaling and locally by salicylic acid (SA) or its functional analog, benzo 1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester. Because conditional overaccumulation of AED1-hemagglutinin inhibited SA-induced resistance and SAR but not local resistance, the data suggest that AED1 is part of a homeostatic feedback mechanism regulating systemic immunity. In llp1 mutant plants, SAR was compromised, whereas the local resistance that is normally associated with EDS1 and SA as well as responses to exogenous SA appeared largely unaffected. Together, these data indicate that LLP1 promotes systemic rather than local immunity, possibly in parallel with SA. Our analysis reveals new positive and negative components of SAR and reinforces the notion that SAR represents a distinct phase of plant immunity beyond local resistance.

  1. The impact of a situationally focused individual human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted disease risk-reduction intervention on risk behavior in a 1-year cohort of Nigerian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael W; Essien, E James; Ekong, Ernest; James, T Monique; Amos, Charles; Ogungbade, Gbadebo O; Williams, Mark L

    2006-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted disease (STD)-related risks in peacekeeping troops is a concern when they are stationed in areas of high HIV prevalence. We carried out an assessment of a situationally focused individual HIV/STD reduction intervention (where avoidance of risk situations, as well as risk behaviors, are emphasized) in one Nigerian military unit (N = 1,222), with a comparable unit from the same service as a waiting list control (N = 987). The intervention consisted of a possible five modules that were presented to groups of up to 50 personnel. Data were collected on reported sexual behaviors, condom beliefs, sexual risk behaviors with casual partners, and number of interventions attended. Data indicated significant increases in reported condom use with casual partners and positive condom beliefs at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Risk behavior was reduced 30% from baseline at 6 months and 23% from baseline at 12 months. There was also a significant dose-response effect for number of interventions attended. These data suggest that relatively brief situationally focused individual interventions are effective in military and West African contexts in reducing HIV/STD risk behaviors. PMID:17076449

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  5. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  6. Challenges of Biobanking in South Africa to Facilitate Indigenous Research in an Environment Burdened with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Tuberculosis, and Emerging Noncommunicable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Christoffels, Alan; Grewal, Ravnit; Karam, Locunda A.; Rossouw, Catherine; Staunton, Ciara; Swanepoel, Carmen; van Rooyen, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    The high burden of infectious diseases and the growing problem of noncommunicable and metabolic disease syndromes in South Africa (SA) forces a more focused research approach to facilitate cutting-edge scientific growth and public health development. Increased SA research on these diseases and syndromes and the collection of associated biospecimens has ensured a plethora of biobanks created by individuals, albeit without the foresight of prospective and collective use by other local and international researchers. As the need for access to high-quality specimens in statistically relevant numbers has increased, so has the necessity for the development of national human biobanks in SA and across the Continent. The prospects of achieving sustainable centralized biobanks are still an emerging and evolving concept, primarily and recently driven by the launch of the H3Africa consortium, which includes the development of harmonized and standardized biobanking operating procedures. This process is hindered by a myriad of complex societal considerations and ethico-legal challenges. Efforts to consolidate and standardize biological sample collections are further compromised by the lack of full appreciation by national stakeholders of the biological value inherent in these collections, and the availability of high quality human samples with well-annotated data for future scientific research and development. Inadequate or nonexistent legislative structures that specifically regulate the storage, use, dispersal, and disposal of human biological samples are common phenomena and pose further challenges. Furthermore, concerns relating to consent for unspecified future uses, as well as access to information and data protection, are all new paradigms that require further consideration and public engagement. This article reviews important fundamental issues such as governance, ethics, infrastructure, and bioinformatics that are important foundational prerequisites for the

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  8. Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference ​​​​​ ... and an increased risk of infections. Although the disease usually is diagnosed in ... a defect in the capability of immune cells to produce normal amounts of all types ...

  9. Achieving universal access for human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis: potential prevention impact of an integrated multi-disease prevention campaign in kenya.

    PubMed

    Granich, Reuben; Muraguri, Nicolas; Doyen, Alexandre; Garg, Navneet; Williams, Brian G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Government of Kenya with key stakeholders implemented an integrated multi-disease prevention campaign for water-borne diseases, malaria and HIV in Kisii District, Nyanza Province. The three day campaign, targeting 5000 people, included testing and counseling (HTC), condoms, long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets, and water filters. People with HIV were offered on-site CD4 cell counts, condoms, co-trimoxazole, and HIV clinic referral. We analysed the CD4 distributions from a district hospital cohort, campaign participants and from the 2007 Kenya Aids Indicator Survey (KAIS). Of the 5198 individuals participating in the campaign, all received HTC, 329 (6.3%) tested positive, and 255 (5%) were newly diagnosed (median CD4 cell count 536 cells/μL). The hospital cohort and KAIS results included 1,284 initial CD4 counts (median 348/L) and 306 initial CD4 counts (median 550/μL), respectively (campaign and KAIS CD4 distributions P = 0.346; hospital cohort distribution was lower P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). A Nyanza Province campaign strategy including ART <350 CD4 cell count could avert approximately 35,000 HIV infections and 1,240 TB cases annually. Community-based integrated public health campaigns could be a potential solution to reach universal access and Millennium Development Goals.

  10. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  11. Default Mode Connectivity in Youth With Perinatally Acquired HIV.

    PubMed

    Herting, Megan M; Uban, Kristina A; Williams, Paige L; Gautam, Prapti; Huo, Yanling; Malee, Kathleen; Yogev, Ram; Csernansky, John; Wang, Lei; Nichols, Sharon; Van Dyke, Russell; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2015-09-01

    Youth with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (PHIV+) survive longer with combination antiretroviral therapy, but remain at risk for poor cognitive outcomes. We evaluated whether markers of HIV disease severity relate to default mode resting-state functional connectivity in PHIV+ youth. We conducted resting-state functional neuroimaging and cognitive testing in a subset of 40 PHIV+ youth recruited from a single study site of the Adolescent Master Protocol study conducted by the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) network. Current and past HIV disease severity measures (nadir CD4 lymphocyte percentages and peak HIV RNA plasma levels) were obtained from medical charts. We evaluated associations of both HIV disease severity measures and cognitive functioning with between- and within- default mode network (DMN) connectivity using Analysis of Functional NeuroImaging multiple regression analyses, controlling for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 youth, 31 (mean age = 16.5 years) with minimal motion during scans were included. We observed global alterations in DMN within- and between-network connectivity, with significant associations between disease severity and DMN BOLD correlations. Furthermore, patterns of connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that varied as a function of peak HIV RNA were found to predict processing speed ability. Alterations in within- and between-network DMN connectivity in PHIV+ youth may reflect global reorganization of the DMN; this could lead to compensatory alterations in both the within- and between-connectivity of large-scale networks, which may ultimately relate to known cognitive processing difficulties in PHIV+ youth. PMID:26376381

  12. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  13. Spatial Analysis of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cougars

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; Waller, Lance A.; Biek, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations. PMID:21197421

  14. Early Phase Clinical Trials with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 and Malaria Vectored Vaccines in The Gambia: Frontline Challenges in Study Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Muhammed O.; Adetifa, Jane U.; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Viebig, Nicola K.; Kampmann, Beate; Bojang, Kalifa

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and malaria are among the most important infectious diseases in developing countries. Existing control strategies are unlikely to curtail these diseases in the absence of efficacious vaccines. Testing of HIV and malaria vaccines candidates start with early phase trials that are increasingly being conducted in developing countries where the burden of the diseases is high. Unique challenges, which affect planning and implementation of vaccine trials according to internationally accepted standards have thus been identified. In this review, we highlight specific challenges encountered during two early phase trials of novel HIV-1 and malaria vectored vaccine candidates conducted in The Gambia and how some of these issues were pragmatically addressed. We hope our experience will be useful for key study personnel involved in day-to-day running of similar clinical trials. It may also guide future design and implementation of vaccine trials in resource-constrained settings. PMID:24615122

  15. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  16. Cryptococcal choroidoretinitis and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Church, W H; Palace, J; Dick, D J; Gould, F K

    1987-11-01

    A 30 year old man with Hodgkin's disease, clinically in remission, presented with blurred vision in one eye due to a choroiditis. He developed headaches 10 days after commencing oral steroids and was subsequently found to have cryptococcal meningitis. The meningitis and choroiditis resolved on antifungal medication. This is the first case of cryptococcal choroiditis recorded in the United Kingdom.

  17. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally. PMID:26438160

  18. Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infections in circumcised and uncircumcised cases in India

    PubMed Central

    Nayyar, Charu; Chander, Ram; Gupta, Poonam; Sherwal, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), is now one of the greatest challenges facing the world. Sexual transmission is the primary route of human immunodeficiency virus infection worldwide. Male circumcision is being considered as strategy to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted on 200 HIV positive clients. They were screened for bacterial causes of STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Gardnerella vaginalis). Results: There were 138 males and 62 females. The males were examined and the circumcision status was observed. In the females, circumcision status of their male partners was observed. The coinfection of HIV and STIs in circumcised and uncircumcised cases was found out. Diagnosis was made using standard tests. A total of 23% cases were diagnosed to have HIV –STI coinfection. Most common diagnosed diseases were Chlamydia (10%), Gonorrhoea (9%), Bacterial Vaginosis (4.8%) and Syphilis (2.5%). The coinfection rate in uncircumcised cases was found to be higher (29.2% in males and 39.2% in females) as compared to the circumcised cases (14.2% in males and 13.6% in females). Conclusion: The present study suggests that circumcision is a protective factor for acquisition of STIs in HIV positive clients but other factors like sexual behaviours, use of barrier contraceptives, drug abuse etc also play a role. PMID:26396445

  19. Selective induction of toxicity to human cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat by a conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, L K; Arens, M Q; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) primarily infect CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading eventually to the development of a systemic immune dysfunction termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). An attractive strategy to combat HIV-mediated pathogenesis would be to eliminate the initial pool of infected cells and thus prevent disease progression. We have engineered a replication-defective, conditionally cytotoxic adenovirus vector, Ad-tk, whose action is dependent on the targeted expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (tk), cloned downstream of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, in human cells expressing the HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat. Infection of Tat-expressing human HeLa or Jurkat cells with Ad-tk resulted in high-level tk expression, which was not deleterious to the viability of these cells. However, in the presence of the antiherpetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir, Ad-tk infection resulted in a massive reduction in the viability of these Tat-expressing cell lines. As adenoviruses are natural passengers of the human lymphoid system, our results suggest adenovirus vector-based strategies for the targeted expression, under the control of cis-responsive HIV regulatory elements, of cytotoxic agents in HIV-infected cells for the therapy of HIV-mediated pathogenesis. Images PMID:2247444

  20. Localized or Systemic {italic In Vivo} Heat-Inactivation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A Mathematical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perelson, A.S.; Nys, N.; Nelson, G.; Sessler, D.I.

    1993-12-15

    Temperatures as low as 42 C, maintained for a little as 25 minutes, inactivate {approx}25% of HIV. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T-cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes and susceptibility increases when the cells are pre-sensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia, or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load, are potential antiviral therapies for acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model which evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4{sup +} T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, the results indicate that a daily therapy, reducing the population of actively infected cells by 40% or infectious virus by 50%, would effectively reverse the depletion of T cells. In contrast, a daily reduction of 20% of either actively infected cells or infectious virus would have a marginal effect. However, reduction by 20% of both actively infected cells and infectious virus could restore T cell numbers, assuming that permanent damage had not been inflicted on the thymus. Whole-body hyperthermia seems unlikely to be clinically useful, unless it can be induced non-invasively without general anesthesia. In contrast, heating directed specifically to areas of viral concentration may be effective and have a suitable risk/benefit ratio.