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Sample records for acquired methicillin resistant

  1. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Galiana, Antonio; Pedreira, Walter; Mowszowicz, Martin; Christophersen, Inés; Machiavello, Silvia; Lope, Liliana; Benaderet, Sara; Buela, Fernanda; Vicentino, Walter; Albini, María; Bertaux, Olivier; Constenla, Irene; Bagnulo, Homero; Llosa, Luis; Ito, Teruyo

    2005-01-01

    A novel, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone (Uruguay clone) with a non–multidrug-resistant phenotype caused a large outbreak, including 7 deaths, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The clone was distinct from the highly virulent community clone represented by strain MW2, although both clones carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and cna gene. PMID:15963301

  2. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  3. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  4. First report of infection with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in South America.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Apoena; Dias, Cícero; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Berquó, Laura; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes; Santos, Raquel Neves Soares; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie

    2005-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged in the southwestern Pacific, North America, and Europe. These S. aureus isolates frequently shared some genetic characteristics, including the SCCmec type IV and lukS-lukF genes. In this paper we show that typical CA-MRSA isolates have spread to South America (Brazil).

  5. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a group home setting.

    PubMed

    Collins, Rebeccah J

    2007-09-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an infection involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with onset in the community in an individual lacking established health care-associated MRSA risk factors. A 74-year-old group home resident with a history of hypertension and mental retardation presents with a spider bite-like lesion that rapidly progresses to multiple areas of her body. Culture results reveal MRSA. The patient's advanced age and the severity and rapidity of progression of the condition warranted treatment, and options are discussed. Pharmacists should assist in selecting antibiotics for patients with resistant infections and provide strategies for preventing the spread of resistant organisms. Current and complete medical records are critical in the group home setting. The role of the caregiver and the consultant pharmacist in this setting is discussed.

  6. Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a women's collegiate basketball team.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael P; Bearman, Gonzalo; Rosato, Adriana; Edmond, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are becoming increasingly frequent, and cutaneous disease with this organism is often seen in otherwise healthy organized sports participants. A case of CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infection in a female collegiate basketball player is presented, and screening and management of her team is discussed. Interestingly, multiple MRSA strains were discovered on testing of the team, raising concern that the prevalence of colonization in this population may be high.

  7. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Central Australia.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Claire L; Ralph, Anna; McLeod, James E T; McDonald, Malcolm I

    2006-01-01

    To date, there has been scant information about the burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Central Australia. Our aims were to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus infections due to methicillin-resistant strains in Central Australia, to characterise resistance to non-beta lactam antibiotics and to correlate findings with available demographic information. We retrospectively reviewed S. aureus isolates identified by the Microbiology Laboratory of the Pathology Department, Alice Springs Hospital between September 2005 and February 2006. Multi-resistance was defined as resistance to three or more non-beta lactam antibiotics. We identified the recovery site and extended antibiotic resistance profile of each isolate. Demographic data included place of residence, discharge diagnosis and ethnicity. There were 524 S. aureus isolates: 417 (79.6%) methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, 104 (19.7%) non-multi-resistant MRSA (nmrMRSA) and 3 (0.7%) multi-resistant MRSA (mrMRSA). MRSA accounted for 7/22 (32%) invasive infections and 91/474 (19.2%) cases of staphylococcal skin infections. Aboriginal people comprised 89 per cent (93/104) of patients with nmrMRSA; 57 per cent lived in remote communities, 21 per cent in suburban Alice Springs, and 18 per cent in Alice Springs Town Camps. Six per cent (6/104) of nmrMRSA were hospital-acquired. Of the nmrMRSA isolates, 57 per cent (59/104) were resistant to erythromycin and 7 per cent (7/104) to fusidic acid. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to co-trimoxazole. In conclusion, Central Australia has high rates of community-acquired nmrMRSA and low rates of multi-resistant MRSA. Erythromycin resistance in S. aureus is also common. These findings should prompt the review of antimicrobial prescribing guidelines for the region, especially for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections.

  8. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with meningitis caused by community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dinaker, Manjunath; Sharabu, Chandrahasa; Kattula, Sri Rama Surya Tez; Kommalapati, Varun

    2014-05-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare clinical condition. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen causing septic cavernous sinus thrombosis [CST], it is an uncommon cause of meningitis. We report the first case of CST with meningitis in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, caused by community acquired epidemic strain of Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus [MRSA], in a previously healthy individual with no risk factors. The patient recovered completely following treatment with Vancomycin. We consecutively reviewed all cases of community acquired staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] with central nervous system involvement available in literature. PMID:25508014

  9. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with meningitis caused by community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dinaker, Manjunath; Sharabu, Chandrahasa; Kattula, Sri Rama Surya Tez; Kommalapati, Varun

    2014-05-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare clinical condition. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen causing septic cavernous sinus thrombosis [CST], it is an uncommon cause of meningitis. We report the first case of CST with meningitis in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, caused by community acquired epidemic strain of Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus [MRSA], in a previously healthy individual with no risk factors. The patient recovered completely following treatment with Vancomycin. We consecutively reviewed all cases of community acquired staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] with central nervous system involvement available in literature. PMID:25438497

  10. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study. PMID:20336341

  11. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance. PMID:27514947

  12. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  13. Sentinel cases of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus onboard a naval ship.

    PubMed

    LaMar, James E; Carr, Russell B; Zinderman, Craig; McDonald, Kimberly

    2003-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is emerging as a community-acquired organism. A number of recent reports have documented its involvement in a variety of infections in which no risk factors for nosocomial transmission are present. This report presents the initial cases of a MRSA outbreak on a U.S. Navy ship. Each patient failed traditional antibiotic therapy and one required hospitalization. Their presentations evolved simultaneously and proved to be sentinel cases of an outbreak of cutaneous MRSA infections. The events of this outbreak emphasize the growing need to consider the prevalence of resistant organisms in outpatient settings, as well as the impact that infections from resistant organisms might have on the combat readiness of a military unit. Recommendations addressing infection-control guidelines for MRSA within close-quarter environments of healthy adults, such as military units, need to be developed and existing infection-control measures need to be regularly emphasized.

  14. Nasal colonization in children with community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Davoodabadi, Fazlollah; Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Koushki, Ali Mehrabi; Moghadasizadeh, Zahra; Meidani, Mohsen; Shirani, Kiana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of infections. The changing epidemiology of MRSA became evident in the 1990s when CA-MRSA cases were first reported. Nasal carriage of CA-MRSA is associated with an increased risk for development of infections in various populations. Materials and Methods: Anterior nares culture for the presence of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA was taken from 345 children attending kindergartens, who didn’t have any known risk factor for MRSA colonization. Also, children demographic variables were recorded. Identification of SA and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with standard microbiological test was performed. Finally, the susceptibility of isolated to various antibiotics determined. The data were analyzed with Whonet 5.6 software. Results: Of 345 children, 20 children (5.8%) were colonized with CA-MRSA, 86 children (24.9%) with MSSA and 239 cases (69.3%) didn’t have SA colonization. The highest rate of MSSA and MRSA colonization was obtained at the age of 6 years. The frequency distribution of SA (MSSA and MRSA) colonization prevalence didn’t have any significant differences based on age, gender and the admission time (P > 0.05); but it was significantly different in the urban areas (P < 0.001). The lowest resistance rate of CA-MRSA isolates, with a frequency of 10%, was detected with gentamicin, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Conclusions: In summary, CA-MRSA colonization was observed in child care centers remarkably. Therefore, by facing various infections due to SA especially in areas of low socio-economic status, it must be considered. Based on antibiogram test, empirical treatment with rifampin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin is recommended during CA-MRSA infections. PMID:27274501

  15. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in two scuba divers returning from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Bochet, Mélanie; Francois, Patrice; Longtin, Yves; Gaide, Olivier; Renzi, Gesuele; Harbarth, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    We describe two patients who had skin infection due to identical strains of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) after returning from the Philippines. Both patients did not share risk factors for CA-MRSA acquisition besides scuba diving. Scuba diving equipment may represent a possible new mode of acquisition of CA-MRSA.

  16. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  17. Fulminant necrotising fasciitis by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Non, Lemuel; Kosmin, Aaron

    2015-03-30

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a rare cause of necrotising fasciitis (NF), and is usually not fulminant as in group A Streptococcus (GAS), the archetypal aetiology. We report an unusually fulminant case of NF by CA-MRSA in an immunocompetent patient. A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department with 1 week of progressive left thigh pain and swelling. The patient had ecchymoses, bullae and hypoesthesia of the involved skin, and CT scan revealed extensive fascial oedema. He was immediately started on broad spectrum antibiotics. Within 12 h of presentation, he underwent surgical debridement. Despite aggressive supportive care, the patient died less than 24 h after presentation. MRSA, with an antibiogram suggestive of a community-acquired strain, was recovered from intraoperative specimens and admission blood cultures. This case underscores that CA-MRSA, while rarely reported, can cause a fulminant presentation of NF similar to GAS in immunocompetent patients.

  18. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  19. Effectiveness of various hospital-based solutions against community- acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perona, Paul J; Johnson, Aaron J; Perona, John P; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be particularly burdensome and difficult to eradicate. One of the measures that infection control officers have emphasized in our hospitals has been the use of various hand sanitizers throughout the hospital. Our objective was to determine the level of growth inhibition of common hand sanitizers and surgical scrub solutions that are used to prevent the spread of community-acquired strains of MRSA. Various hospital and surgical agents (n = 13) were applied to community-acquired MRSA bacteria that had been cultured on agar plates. These different commercially available solutions were incubated for 48 h, and the plates were assessed to determine the level of growth inhibition (0, 25, 75, or 100%). The negative control was a test in which no agent was added to the MRSA culture, while a positive control tested 100% alcohol. Eight of the solutions tested had 100% growth inhibition, four solutions had partial growth inhibition effects, and one solution did not inhibit MRSA. Of the solutions with alcohol, the 62% solution did not kill MRSA, while the 80% solution only inhibited MRSA. Both the 95 and 100% alcohol solutions had 100% growth inhibition. Of the two surgical scrub solutions, only the one with iodine had 100% growth inhibition, whereas the solution with chloroxylenol (PCMX 3%) had only partial growth inhibition. This study suggests that the solutions with high levels of alcohol, chlorhexidine, or iodine appear to better kill MRSA and might best be used to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA in both the hospital and the surgical environment. PMID:24266441

  20. Length of stay an important mediator of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wong, J G; Chen, M I; Win, M K; Ng, P Y; Chow, A

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) is becoming increasingly established in Asian hospitals. The primary aim of this study was to decompose the risk factors for HA-MRSA based on conceptual clinical pathways. The secondary aim was to show the amount of effect attributable to antibiotic exposure and total length of stay before outcome (LBO) so that institutions can manage at-risk patients accordingly. A case-control study consisting of 1200 inpatients was conducted in a large tertiary hospital in Singapore between January and December 2006. Results from the generalized structural equation model (GSEM) show that LBO [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 14·9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8·7-25·5], prior hospitalization (aOR 6·2, 95% CI 3·3-11·5), and cumulative antibiotic exposure (aOR 3·5, 95% CI 2·3-5·3), directly affected HA-MRSA acquisition. LBO accounted for the majority of the effects due to age (100%), immunosuppression (67%), and surgery (96%), and to a lesser extent for male gender (22%). Our model enabled us to account and quantify effects of intermediaries. LBO was found to be an important mediator of age, immunosuppression and surgery on MRSA infection. Traditional regression approaches will not only give different conclusions but also underestimate the effects. Hospitals should minimize the hospital stay when possible to reduce the risk of MRSA.

  1. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and spontaneous rupture: a potentially fatal quandary.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Audra; Dyamenahalli, Umesh; Greenberg, S Bruce; Drummond-Webb, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    We present the case of a 6-month-old previously healthy girl who presented with high fever, labored breathing, and an enlarged cardiac silhouette on her chest radiograph. Comprehensive evaluation discovered a ductus arteriosus aneurysm and pericardial effusion with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite pericardiocentesis and appropriate intravenous antibiotics, there was rapid enlargement of the aneurysm and accumulation of echogenic material within the ductus arteriosus aneurysm. Infected aneurysm rupture was identified during emergency surgery. This infant also had vocal cord paresis, a likely complication of the surgery. The clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient are discussed. Infection of a ductus arteriosus or an infected ductal arteriosus aneurysm is a rare and potentially fatal clinical entity. In the era of increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus infections, this is a diagnosis that requires a high index of suspicion.

  2. Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Related to Medicare Antibiotic Prescriptions: A State-Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Wesley K; Taira, Deborah A; Davis, James W; Seto, Todd B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) results in almost half of all deaths caused by antibiotic resistant organisms. Current evidence suggests that MRSA infections are associated with antibiotic use. This study examined state-level data to determine whether outpatient antibiotic use was associated with hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. The 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Healthcare-Associated Infections Progress Report was used to obtain HA-MRSA infection rates. Data on the number of antibiotic prescriptions with activity towards methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) at the state level were obtained from the 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Part D Prescriber Public Use File. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between the number of antibiotic prescriptions and HA-MRSA infection rates. The average number of HA-MRSA infections was 0.026 per 1000 persons with the highest rates concentrated in Southeastern and Northeastern states. The average number of outpatient prescriptions per capita was 0.74 with the highest rates in Southeastern states. A significant correlation (ρ = 0.64, P <.001) between infections and prescriptions was observed, even after adjusting for non-reporting hospitals. This association provides evidence of the importance of appropriate antibiotic prescribing. Prescriber and heat map data may be useful for targeting antimicrobial stewardship programs in an effort to manage appropriate antibiotic use to help stop antibiotic resistance. PMID:27738564

  3. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Silvina; Murzicato, Sofía; Sandoval, Orlando; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Mollerach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient. PMID:25681265

  4. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Silvina; Murzicato, Sofía; Sandoval, Orlando; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Mollerach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  5. Surveillance of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Celia; Ochota, Meredith A

    2003-01-01

    In September 2001, the South Australian state-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surveillance system was expanded to include three surveillance indicators namely: estimated MRSA burden, MRSA morbidity and estimated MRSA acquisition. The last two indicator rates have been stratified into intensive care unit (ICU) versus non-ICU. Between September 2001 and March 2002, state-wide MRSA burden rates (prevalence) ranged from 27.5 to 39.8 per 10,000 occupied bed days (OBDs). Acquisition rates ranged from 28.2 to 69.0 per 10,000 OBDs (ICU) and 6.3 to 10.1 per 10,000 OBDs (non-ICU). Morbidity rates ranged from 12.9 to 43.1 per 10,000 OBDs (ICU) and 3.0 to 5.0 per 10,000 OBDs (non-ICU). In association with the changes to surveillance indicators, a new monthly surveillance report was developed. Assuring confidentiality to individual contributing hospitals has been a major consideration in the development of the data collection system. Individual contributors have access only to their own indicator rates and pooled state-wide indicator rates. Contributing institutions are urged to use great caution if wishing to compare their own rates with state-wide rates. In particular, contributors are asked to take inter-institutional differences in MRSA burden and casemix complexity into account when making such comparisons.

  6. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B toxic shock syndrome induced by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Takeru; Kikuchi, Ken; Abe, Shinji; Kato, Hidehito; Hayashi, Hiroki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Kamio, Koichiro; Usuki, Jiro; Takeda, Shinhiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Imanishi, Ken'ichi; Yagi, Junji; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    We herein report a case of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) associated with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus and a community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection in a 16-year-old Vietnamese girl. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was detected in the patient's serum, and the level of anti-SEB antibodies was found to be elevated. A flow cytometric analysis showed evidence of activated SEB-reactive Vβ3+ and Vβ12+ T cells. These data suggest that the CA-MRSA-induced activation of SEB-reactive T cells may cause TSS in patients with pH1N1 virus infection. Moreover, this is the first report describing immunological confirmation of SEB contributing directly to TSS in a patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of TSS.

  7. Multifocal pelvic abscesses and osteomyelitis from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 17-year-old basketball player.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takeshi; Yabe, Shizuka; Otsuka, Taketo; Takizawa, Yoko; Takano, Tomomi; Dohmae, Soshi; Higuchi, Wataru; Tsukada, Hiroki; Gejyo, Fumitake; Uchiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    A 17-year-old female basketball player suffered from cutaneous abscesses, which complicated into a systemic progression to osteomyelitis and simultaneous iliopsoas and piriformis abscesses, adjacent to the sacroiliac joint. The causative agent was community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with multilocus sequence type 30, spa19, and SCCmecIVc. The clinical importance of this genotype is discussed.

  8. Clinical features and molecular characteristics of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Taiwanese children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Wong, Kin-Sun; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2007-11-01

    Highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been associated with morbidity and mortality in various countries of the world. We characterized the clinical and molecular features of pediatric invasive CA-MRSA infections in Taiwan. Between July 2000 and June 2005, 31 previously healthy children with invasive CA-MRSA infections were identified from 423 children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The medical records were reviewed. The clinical isolates, if available, were collected for molecular characterization. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male, and the mean age was 5.7 years. Adolescents accounted for 9 (29%) cases. Eighteen children had bone and/or joint infections, 14 had deep-seated soft tissue infections, 11 had pneumonia, and 2 had central nervous system infections. Multiorgan involvement was identified in 8 of 20 bacteremic cases. Twenty-two patients (71%) required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 27.4 days. All of the 15 available isolates were classified as sequence type (ST) 59 or its single locus variant and belonged to 2 previously reported community-associated clones containing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or type V(T) in Taiwan. Most of the isolates were multiresistant to clindamycin (94%) and erythromycin (97%). Eleven (73.3%) isolates carried pvl genes, and the strains harboring pvl genes were significantly associated with lung involvement. In conclusion, invasive CA-MRSA infections in pediatric population were not limited to young children. Surgical interventions were often required, and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy was needed. A multiresistant CA-MRSA clone characterized as ST59 was identified from these children in Taiwan. PMID:17662565

  9. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. PMID:26884428

  10. Electric stimulations mediated beta lactam resistance reversal and correlation with growth dynamics of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kainthola, Anup; Uniyal, Akshat; Srivastava, Nidhi; Bhatt, Ajay B

    2015-08-01

    The community associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a serious issue of public health. Here, we conducted an experimental approach to determine: (i) the optimal significant stimulation range of electrical current for effective checking of CA-MRSA growth; (ii) the effect of electrical stimulations on methicillin susceptibility and possible beta lactam resistance reversal; and (iii) the variation in the level of ATP as function of exposure to electric current. An 8 chambered electrical system was developed for DC flow in control and test sets, with and without drug (oxacillin 4 mg/ml). Measurement of growth by CFU/ml and spectrometry, susceptibility and ATP levels were calculated and interpreted. Linear pattern in reduction of ATP was observed with respect to the intensity of electric current (EC) and an enhanced inhibitory effect was explicit with 1000 microampere (μA) with 30 min exposure. At 4000 μA exposure to DC at 180 min and in combination of drug (μA+D), the growth of CA-MRSA was substantially checked to 0.23 absorbance in comparison to current without drug and the effect of DC electrical current to the culture showed that 10 μA, 100 μA and 4000 μA current exposure in combination of oxacillin (μA+D), markedly reduced the CFU to an average of 256.4. ATP level was linearly reduced with exposure to EC.

  11. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  12. Induction of the Staphylococcal Proteolytic Cascade by Antimicrobial Fatty Acids in Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Arsic, Benjamin; Zhu, Yue; Heinrichs, David E.; McGavin, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), and the USA300 strain of CA-MRSA in particular, are known for their rapid community transmission, and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections. To assess factors that contribute to these hallmark traits of CA-MRSA, we evaluated how growth of USA300 and production of secreted virulence factors was influenced on exposure to physiologic levels of unsaturated free fatty acids that would be encountered on the skin or anterior nares, which represent the first sites of contact with healthy human hosts. There was a sharp threshold between sub-inhibitory and inhibitory concentrations, such that 100 µM sapienic acid (C16∶1) and linoleic acid (C18∶1) were sufficient to prevent growth after 24 h incubation, while 25 µM allowed unrestricted growth, and 50 µM caused an approximate 10–12 h lag, followed by unimpeded exponential growth. Conversely, saturated palmitic or stearic acids did not affect growth at 100 µM. Although growth was not affected by 25 µM sapienic or linoleic acid, these and other unsaturated C16 and C18 fatty acids, but not their saturated counterparts, promoted robust production of secreted proteases comprising the Staphylococcal proteolytic cascade. This trait was also manifested to varying degrees in other CA-MRSA, and in genetically diverse methicillin susceptible S. aureus strains. Therefore, induction of the Staphylococcal proteolytic cascade by unsaturated fatty acids is another feature that should now be evaluated as a potential contributing factor in the aggressive nature of skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300, and as a general virulence mechanism of S. aureus. PMID:23029337

  13. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel If

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy.

  14. A Typical Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clone Is Widespread in the Community in the Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    Biber, Asaf; Abuelaish, Izeldeen; Rahav, Galia; Raz, Meir; Cohen, Liran; Valinsky, Lea; Taran, Dianna; Goral, Aviva; Elhamdany, Abedalla; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological data on community acquired methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) carriage and infection in the Middle-East region is scarce with only few reports in the Israeli and Palestinian populations. As part of a Palestinian-Israeli collaborative research, we have conducted a cross-sectional survey of nasal S. aureus carriage in healthy children and their parents throughout the Gaza strip. Isolates were characterized for antibiotic susceptibility, mec gene presence, PFGE, spa type, SCCmec-type, presence of PVL genes and multi-locus-sequence-type (MLST). S. aureus was carried by 28.4% of the 379 screened children-parents pairs. MRSA was detected in 45% of S. aureus isolates, that is, in 12% of the study population. A single ST22-MRSA-IVa, spa t223, PVL-gene negative strain was detected in 64% of MRSA isolates. This strain is typically susceptible to all non-β-lactam antibiotics tested. The only predictor for MRSA carriage in children was having an MRSA carrier-parent (OR = 25.5, P = 0.0004). Carriage of the Gaza strain was not associated with prior hospitalization. The Gaza strain was closely related genetically to a local MSSA spa t223 strain and less so to EMRSA15, one of the pandemic hospital-acquired-MRSA clones, scarcely reported in the community. The rapid spread in the community may be due to population determinants or due to yet unknown advantageous features of this particular strain. PMID:22916171

  15. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Ryuta; Kuwana, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Kengo; Inamo, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan. PMID:26819794

  16. Recurrence of pelvic abscess from Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive community-acquired ST30 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hirokazu; Miyasaka, Dai; Ito, Tomoyuki; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Akihito; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Khokhlova, Olga E; Okubo, Takeshi; Endo, Naoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2013-02-01

    A 17-year-old female patient (a basketball player) suffered from recurrent pelvic abscesses from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The first episode, from strain NN12, occurred in October 2004. Her cutaneous abscesses complicated into systemic progression to osteomyelitis and multifocal pelvic abscesses, adjacent to the sacroiliac joint. The second episode, abscesses at tissues adjacent to the sacroiliac joint from strain NN31A, occurred late in February 2005. The third episode, from strain NN31B, occurred on July 30, 2005, repeating the second episode. Three MRSA strains were identical in terms of genotypes (belonging to Panton-Valentine leukocidin [PVL]-positive ST30 community-acquired MRSA, CA-MRSA), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and peptide cytolysin gene (psmα) expression levels. The three MRSA strains exhibited superior THP-1 cell invasion ability over hospital-acquired MRSA (New York/Japan clone). The data suggest that PVL-positive ST30 CA-MRSA, with high levels of cell invasion and peptide cytolysins, causes recurrence of pelvic abscesses in a healthy adolescent.

  17. Molecular characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from outpatients with skin and soft tissue infections in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Jiansheng; Jiang, Yuanshan; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lihua; Zhou, Yanfei; Xu, Huiqiong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristics and virulence genes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) isolates with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Outpatients with SSTIs visiting five medical and health institutions were enrolled from 2011 to 2013. Available ITALIC! S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of PVL genes. For CA-MRSA isolates, we performed typing of staphylococcal cassette chromosome ITALIC! mec(SCC ITALIC! mec), multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and carriage of 27 virulence genes. A total of 203 ITALIC! S. aureusstrains were isolated from 1400 outpatients with SSTIs, and 21 (10.3%) were CA-MRSA isolates. The positive rate of PVL genes among ITALIC! S. aureus, CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible ITALIC! S. aureus(MSSA) isolates were 39.4%, 71.4% and 35.7%, respectively. CA-MRSA strains had greater sensitivity to non-β-lactam antimicrobial agents. All CA-MRSA isolates belonged to SCC ITALIC! mecIV and V, accounting for 47.6% and 52.4%, respectively. ST59 was the most common lineage accounting for 76.2%; ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIVa-PVL-positive clone was found to be the predominant clone, accounting for 38.1%. All CA-MRSA isolates were found to be positive for one or more virulence genes, 28.6% of isolates carried PVL, ITALIC! seb, ITALIC! sek, ITALIC! seq, ITALIC! hla, ITALIC! hlb, ITALIC! hldand ITALIC! hlg-2. CA-MRSA infections were relatively uncommon in outpatients with SSTIs, but they carried many virulence genes, ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIV a-PVL-positive clone was the predominant clone in Wuhan, China.

  18. Incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Pantone-Valentine leucocidin gene at a referral hospital in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Dash, Nihar; Panigrahi, Debadatta; Al Zarouni, Mansour; Yassin, Faten; Al-Shamsi, Moza

    2014-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in hospitalized patients worldwide. The present study was undertaken to identify CA-MRSA in hospitalized patients in a 350-bed tertiary care hospital in Sharjah, UAE over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. CA-MRSA was defined based on identification within first 48 h of admission in the hospital. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing of the CA-MRSA isolates was carried out by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection of PVL and mecA genes was done by PCR using the GenoType(®) MRSA test system (Hain Lifescience). Patient's clinical data and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates were also evaluated. Fifty seven of the 187 MRSA isolates were identified as CA-MRSA. All the CA-MRSA strains in our study belonged to SCCmecIV type and were positive for both PVL and mecA genes. The patients with CA-MRSA infections were young (median age, 32 years) and the majority of infections involved the skin and soft tissue (36%). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates showed a better susceptibility profile to the non-beta-lactam antimicrobials with the exception of ciprofloxacin having 28% resistance. This study evidently strengthens the recent observation of an increase in CA-MRSA emergence among hospitalized patients in the UAE. PMID:23919760

  19. The first report in Brazil of severe infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, R; Sampaio, M G; Batista, G S; Garibaldi, A M; Terra, G M F; Souza, M J; Vieira, E N; Silva-Carvalho, M C; Teixeira, L A; Figueiredo, A M S

    2009-08-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emergent pathogen in Brazil. However, there are no data on the prevalence of CA-MRSA. We report here the first well-characterized case of severe life-threatening CA-MRSA infection in a child living in Rio de Janeiro city. The patient had many complications including hematogenous osteomyelitis and involvement of multiple sites requiring drainage of soft-tissue abscess, and pleural and pericardial empyema. The MRSA isolates recovered were genotyped using PFGE, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing. Disk diffusion tests were performed following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. In addition, the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was assessed by PCR amplification, using specific primers for lukF-pv (encoding for the F subunit of the PVL). The bacterial isolates were related to the ST30-SCCmecIV lineage (Oceania Southwest Pacific clone), a PVL producer CA-MRSA previously detected in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Also, the isolates analyzed were susceptible to all non-beta-lactam antibiotics tested. The present report demonstrates that disseminated CA-MRSA disease is also occurring in Rio de Janeiro. Thus, the empirical treatment of moderate or severe infections suspected of being associated with CA-MRSA needs to be reviewed in order to allow prompt initiation of an effective therapy that also covers these microorganisms.

  20. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and virtual screening of Fructose 1, 6 biphosphate aldolase-II in community acquired- methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Gautam, Budhayash; Singh, Satendra; Yadav, Madhu; Srivastav, Upasana; Singh, Brijendra

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged as a nosocomial pathogen to the community which commonly causes skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). This strain (MW2) has now become resistant to the most of the beta-lactam antibiotics; therefore it is the urgent need to identify the novel drug targets. Recently fructose 1,6 biphosphate aldolase-II (FBA) has been identified as potential drug target in CA-MRSA. The FBA catalyses the retro-ketolic cleavage of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to yield dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) in glycolytic pathway. In the present research work the 3D structure of FBA was predicted using the homology modeling method followed by validation. The molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the predicted model was carried out using the 2000 ps time scale and 1000000 steps. The MDS results suggest that the modeled structure is stable. The predicted model of FBA was used for virtual screening against the NCI diversity subset-II ligand databases which contain 1364 compounds. Based on the docking energy scores, it was found that top four ligands i.e. ZINC01690699, ZINC13154304, ZINC29590257 and ZINC29590259 were having lower energy scores which reveal higher binding affinity towards the active site of FBA. These ligands might act as potent inhibitors for the FBA so that the menace of antimicrobial resistance in CA-MRSA can be conquered. However, pharmacological studies are required to confirm the inhibitory activity of these ligands against the FBA in CA-MRSA.

  1. A comparison of virulence patterns and in vivo fitness between hospital- and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus related to the USA400 clone.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, M A; Ramundo, M S; Américo, M A; de Mattos, M C; Souza, R R; Ramos-Júnior, E S; Coelho, L R; Morrot, A; Melo, P A; Fracalanzza, S E L; Ferreira, F A; Figueiredo, A M S

    2015-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates genetically related to the CA-MRSA clone MW2/USA400 (ST1-SCCmecIV lineage) from the United States have emerged in hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and are associated with nosocomial bloodstream infections. To understand the virulence mechanisms involved in the adaptability of ST1 isolates as a hospital pathogen in Rio de Janeiro, we compared the virulence traits and fitness properties of the Brazilian isolates with those displayed by the CA-MRSA isolates from the United States. Similar to the USA400 from the United States, all the Brazilian isolates tested carried the genes encoding SEH and LukDE. In contrast, none of the Brazilian isolates carried the lukSF PVL, sea, sec, and sek genes. Competition experiments in mice demonstrated a significant increase in the fitness for the CA-MRSA isolates MW2 and USA400-0051 from the United States compared to other isolates. In the foreign body animal model, 83 % more North-American bacterial cells were recovered compared to the Brazilian ST1 isolates. Differences in gene expression of important virulence factors were detected. Transcription of rnaIII and psmα3 was increased about two-fold in the isolates from the United States, and sasG about two-fold in the Brazilian isolates. Thus, it is possible that the virulence attenuation observed among the Brazilian hospital isolates, associated with the acquisition of multiple resistant determinants, are consequences of microevolutionary events that contributed to the necessary fitness adjustment of this lineage, allowing a typically community-acquired MRSA (MW2/USA400) to emerge as a successful hospital pathogen (Brazilian ST1-SCCmecIV).

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Tracey; Kaye, Keith; Rubin, Adam D

    2010-09-01

    Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become more prevalent, in part because of the emergence and spread of community-acquired MRSA. This trend is particularly concerning because of the significant rates of morbidity and mortality associated with MRSA infections, and because MRSA strains are often resistant to many classes of antibiotics. Reports of infections of the head and neck, including wound infections, cellulitis, sinusitis, otitis media, and otitis externa, are well documented. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reports of bacterial laryngitis due to MRSA. We report the first published case of bacterial laryngitis caused by MRSA.

  3. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents.

  4. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Lynne; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; O'Brien, Frances G.; Pearman, John W.; Christiansen, Keryn; Grubb, Warren B.

    2005-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a notable cause of hospital-acquired infections. A statewide screening and control policy was implemented in Western Australia (WA) after an outbreak of epidemic MRSA in a Perth hospital in 1982. We report on statutory notifications from1998 to 2002 and review the 20-year period from 1983 to 2002. The rate of reporting of community-associated Western Australia MRSA (WAMRSA) escalated from 1998 to 2002 but may have peaked in 2001. Several outbreaks were halted, but they resulted in an increase in reports as a result of screening. A notable increase in ciprofloxacin resistance during the study period was observed as a result of more United Kingdom epidemic MRSA (EMRSA) -15 and -16. WA has seen a persistently low incidence of multidrug-resistant MRSA because of the screening and decolonization program. Non–multidrug-resistant, community-associated WAMRSA strains have not established in WA hospitals. PMID:16318700

  6. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Noella Maria Delia; Shah, Ira; Ohri, Alpana; Shah, Forum

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis is rarely known to occur in children. We report an 11-year-old girl with fever, headache and vomiting, right hemiparesis with left-sided upper motor neuron facial nerve palsy and bladder incontinence. On investigation, she was found to have MRSA meningitis with an acute left thalamo-corpuscular infarct. She was treated with vancomycin, linezolid and rifampicin. She recovered successfully with residual right-sided lower limb monoparesis. MRSA meningitis is rare but can occur in children. PMID:26609421

  7. First report in South America of companion animal colonization by the USA1100 clone of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST30) and by the European clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (ST71)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant staphylococci can colonize and cause diseases in companion animals. Unfortunately, few molecular studies have been carried out in Brazil and other countries with the aim of characterizing these isolates. Consequently, little is known about the potential role of companion animals in transmitting these resistant bacteria to humans. In this work we searched for mecA gene among Staphylococcus isolates obtained from nasal microbiota of 130 healthy dogs and cats attended in a veterinary clinic located in the west region of Rio de Janeiro. The isolates recovered were identified to the species level and characterized using molecular tools. Results A community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) isolate related to USA1100 (Southwest Pacific clone) and susceptible to all non-β-lactams was detected in a cat (1.7%, 1/60). Another coagulase-positive isolate harboring mecA was recovered from a dog (1.4%, 1/70) and identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) related to the European clone (ST71). The two isolates of Staphylococcus conhii subsp. urealyticus (1.4%, 1/70 dogs and 1.7%, 1/60 cats), similarly to the MRSP isolate, also presented high-level multiresistance. The majority of the methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci recovered were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (5.7%, 4/70 dogs and 6.7%, 4/60 cats) and all clustered into the same PFGE type. Conclusions This work demonstrates that mecA-harboring Staphylococcus isolates are common members of the nasal microbiota of the healthy companion animals studied (9.2%, 12/130 animals), including some high-level multiresistant isolates of S. pseudintermedius and S. conhii subsp. urealyticus. The detection, for the first time in South America, of USA1100-related CA-MRSA and of ST71 MRSP (European clone), colonizing companion animals, is of concern. Both S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus are important agents of infections for animals. The USA1100 CA

  8. Staphylococcal methicillin resistance: fine focus on folds and functions.

    PubMed

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Marrero, Aniebrys; García-Piquè, Sonia; García-Castellanos, Raquel; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2004-06-01

    Globalisation has entailed a massive increase in trade and human mobility facilitating the rapid spread of infectious agents, including those that are drug resistant. A particularly serious threat to human health is posed by methicillin-resistant staphylococcal strains which have acquired molecular mechanisms to evade the action of beta-lactam antibiotics (BLAs). Full expression of high-level methicillin resistance involves a complex network of molecules and depends primarily on sufficient expression of a penicillin-binding protein with low sensitivity towards BLAs. Other factors include the fine-tuned regulation of autolytic activity of cell-wall components, as well as an optimal rate of peptidoglycan precursor formation and a highly specific peptidoglycan precursor structure. Three-dimensional structural data are available on several of the pieces involved in the jigsaw puzzle and provide a molecular basis for the understanding of methicillin resistance and for the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  9. THE FREQUENCY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (CA-MRSA) AMONG SAMPLES IN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH IN CANTON SARAJEVO

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Sabaheta; Obradovic, Amina; Aljicevic, Mufida; Numanovic, Fatima; Hodzic, Dunja; Sporisevic, Lutvo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections lacking risk factors for exposure to the health care system has been associated with the recognition of new MRSA clones known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). These strains have been distinguished from health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains by epidemiological, molecular and genetic means as well as by antibiotic susceptibility profile, tissue tropism and virulence traits. Objective: To assess prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profile of CA-MRSA in Canton Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Results: Out of 1.905 positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various samples of outpatients collected during six months, 279 (14,64%) were MRSA isolates. Out of 279 MRSA samples, 133 (47,67%) were found in nasal swabs, from which 48 (36,09%) were in the age group <1 year and 39 (29,32 %) are in the age 1-5 year. Rate of the positive skin swabs was highest among the subject of age group <1 year (46 or 54,12 %) and 1-5 year (18 or 21,18 %). Predominantly antibiotic types among MRSA strains are resistant to penicillin and cefoxitin (36,90 %) and to penicillin, cefoxitin and erythromycin (61,35 %). Conclusion: Continued monitoring of epidemiology and emerging drug resistance data is critical for the effective management of these infections. PMID:27047271

  10. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Woods, G L; Hall, G S; Rutherford, I; Pratt, K J; Knapp, C C

    1986-09-01

    To determine whether methods suggested for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus apply equally to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 135 S. epidermidis isolates were tested by the Vitek AMS gram-positive susceptibility card (Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) and by modifications of agar screen, disk diffusion, and microdilution methods. Modifications included 24- versus 48-h incubation, unsupplemented versus 2% NaCl-supplemented broth, and standard versus direct inoculum. At 24 h, the highest number of resistant strains, 59, was detected by oxacillin (1 microgram) disk diffusion. At 48 h, three additional strains were judged resistant. With one exception, results for oxacillin disk diffusion and agar screen were equivalent at 24 and 48 h. Vitek detected 50 resistant strains. Significantly fewer resistant strains were detected at 24 h by methicillin disk diffusion (5 micrograms) and methicillin microdilution with 2% NaCl. For oxacillin microdilution, neither 2% NaCl supplementation nor the method of inoculum preparation significantly affected the results. Oxacillin microdilution with cation- rather than non-cation-supplemented broth detected significantly fewer (n = 33) resistant strains at 24 h; 51 were resistant at 48 h. To detect methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, a direct inoculum with either 24-h oxacillin disk diffusion and reincubation of intermediate strains for an additional 24 h or 24-h oxacillin agar screen and reincubation of strains with no growth for a total of 48 h is recommended.

  11. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Woods, G L; Hall, G S; Rutherford, I; Pratt, K J; Knapp, C C

    1986-09-01

    To determine whether methods suggested for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus apply equally to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 135 S. epidermidis isolates were tested by the Vitek AMS gram-positive susceptibility card (Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.) and by modifications of agar screen, disk diffusion, and microdilution methods. Modifications included 24- versus 48-h incubation, unsupplemented versus 2% NaCl-supplemented broth, and standard versus direct inoculum. At 24 h, the highest number of resistant strains, 59, was detected by oxacillin (1 microgram) disk diffusion. At 48 h, three additional strains were judged resistant. With one exception, results for oxacillin disk diffusion and agar screen were equivalent at 24 and 48 h. Vitek detected 50 resistant strains. Significantly fewer resistant strains were detected at 24 h by methicillin disk diffusion (5 micrograms) and methicillin microdilution with 2% NaCl. For oxacillin microdilution, neither 2% NaCl supplementation nor the method of inoculum preparation significantly affected the results. Oxacillin microdilution with cation- rather than non-cation-supplemented broth detected significantly fewer (n = 33) resistant strains at 24 h; 51 were resistant at 48 h. To detect methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, a direct inoculum with either 24-h oxacillin disk diffusion and reincubation of intermediate strains for an additional 24 h or 24-h oxacillin agar screen and reincubation of strains with no growth for a total of 48 h is recommended. PMID:3639087

  12. Imported Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Örtqvist, Åke; Ringberg, Håkan; Larsson, Leif; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Hæggman, Sara; Kalin, Mats; Ekdahl, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Countries such as Sweden that have a low prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) offer the opportunity to discern and study transmission of imported cases of MRSA. We analyzed 444 imported cases of MRSA acquisition reported in Sweden during 2000–2003. Risk for MRSA in returning travelers ranged from 0.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.01–0.4) per 1 million travelers to Nordic countries to 59.4 (95% CI 44.5–79.3) per 1 million travelers to North Africa and the Middle East. Most imported cases (246, 55%) were healthcare acquired, but regions with the highest risk for MRSA in travelers showed a correlation with community acquisition (r = 0.81, p = 0.001). Characteristic differences in MRSA strains acquired were dependent on the region from which they originated and whether they were community or healthcare acquired. Knowledge of differences in transmission of MRSA may improve control measures against imported cases. PMID:20113546

  13. Application of monoclonal antibodies generated against Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL-S) toxin for specific identification of community acquired methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Niveditha Sundar; Ramlal, Shylaja; Urs, Radhika Madan; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-12-01

    Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) produced by community acquired methicillin Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) involved in skin and soft-tissue infections and necrotizing pneumonia comprised of two fractions, namely PVL S and PVL F. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies designated as MAb1, MAb9 and MAb10 were generated against recombinant PVL-S (35kDa) protein of S. aureus. All the three MAbs specifically reacted to confirm PVL-S positive strains of S. aureus recovered from clinical samples in Western blot analysis. Similarly all the three MAbs did not show any binding to other tested 14 different pathogenic bacteria belonging to other genera and species in Western blot analysis. Furthermore, a simple dot-ELISA method was standardized for the identification of PVL-S toxin containing S. aureus strains. Initially in dot-ELISA, Protein A (Spa) of S. aureus posed background noise problems due to the non-specific binding of antibodies resulting in false positive reactions. With the addition of 10mM diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) along with 5% milk in PBS in the blocking step prevented this non-specific binding of Spa to mouse anti-PVL monoclonal antibodies in dot-ELISA. Once standardized, this simple dot-ELISA was evaluated with nine PVL positive strains recovered from food, environmental and clinical samples and the results were compared with PCR assay for the presence of PVL toxin genes and also with Western blot analysis. A 100% correlation was found between dot-ELISA, PCR assay and Western blot analysis. Collectively our results suggest the newly developed simple dot-ELISA system can be of immense help in providing, rapid detection of the PVL toxin containing S. aureus strains at a relatively low cost and will be a valuable tool for the reliable identification of CA-MRSA.

  14. Systemic Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Upon infection with necrotizing pathogens many plants develop an enhanced resistance to further pathogen attack also in the uninoculated organs. This type of enhanced resistance is referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the SAR state, plants are primed (sensitized) to more quickly and more effectively activate defense responses the second time they encounter pathogen attack. Since SAR depends on the ability to access past experience, acquired disease resistance is a paradigm for the existence of a form of “plant memory”. Although the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of the 20th century, major progress in the understanding of SAR was made over the past sixteen years. This review covers the current knowledge of molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms that are associated with SAR. PMID:19521483

  15. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F; Monagle, Shaun; Korman, Tony M; Johnson, Paul D R; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Howden, Brian O; Davies, John K; Howden, Benjamin P; Stinear, Timothy P

    2011-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159) to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total). These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300) share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2). This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid dissemination of a

  16. Impetigo update: new challenges in the era of methicillin resistance.

    PubMed

    Geria, Aanand N; Schwartz, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    Impetigo is a bacterial infection of the superficial epidermis most commonly seen in infants and children. It is clinically characterized by crusted erosions or ulcers that may arise as a primary infection in which bacterial invasion occurs through minor breaks in the cutaneous surface or a secondary infection of a preexisting dermatosis or infestation. Impetigo occurs in 2 forms: bullous and nonbullous. Staphylococcus aureus currently is the most common overall cause of impetigo, but Streptococcus pyogenes remains an important cause in developing nations. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus (CA-MRSA) poses a challenge because of its enhanced virulence and increasing prevalence in children. For limited uncomplicated impetigo, either topical mupirocin or fusidic acid is as effective if not more effective than systemic antibiotics. For extensive or complicated impetigo, systemic antibiotics may be warranted, but beta-lactam antibiotics should be avoided if methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is suspected.

  17. Emergence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive ST8-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (USA300 clone) in Korea causing healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Song, E H; Park, S Y; Lee, S-R; Park, S-J; Sung, H; Kim, M-N; Kim, S-H; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Woo, J H; Kim, Y S; Chong, Y P

    2016-08-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive sequence type (ST)8-MRSA-SCCmec IVa (USA300) is the epidemic strain of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in North America. USA300 is extremely rare in South Korea, and PVL-negative ST72 SCCmec type IVc is the predominant CA-MRSA clone. In a multicentre, prospective cohort study of S. aureus bacteraemia, we identified PVL-positive ST8-MRSA isolates by performing multilocus sequence typing and PCR for PVL. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients with PVL-positive ST8-MRSA bacteraemia, and performed SCCmec, spa, and agr typing, PCR for arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), virulence gene profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among a total of 818 MRSA isolates, we identified ten isolates of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA (USA300) (3 from Hospital D, 4 from Hospital G, and 3 from Hospital A), all of which involved exclusively healthcare-associated (5 isolates) and hospital-acquired bacteraemia (5 isolates). This strain accounted for 8~10 % of the hospital-acquired MRSA bacteraemia in Hospitals D and G. Bacteraemia of unknown origin was the most common type of infection followed by pneumonia. All the isolates were SCCmec type IVa, spa type t008, and agr group I. Eight of the isolates harboured ACME. In a PFGE analysis, four isolates were identical to the USA300 control strain, five differed by a single band, and the remaining one differed by two bands. All the isolates were pulsed-field type USA300. This is the first report of healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia caused by USA300 in South Korea. USA300 seems to be an emerging hospital clone in this country. PMID:27209287

  18. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital▿

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takashi; Kikuchi, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Namiko; Kamata, Shinichi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococcus (MRCPS) strains from 57 (26 inpatient and 31 outpatient) dogs and 20 veterinary staff in a veterinary teaching hospital. From the staff, three MRCPS strains were isolated, and two were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In contrast, 18 MRCPS strains were detected in both inpatient (12 of 26 [46.2%]) and outpatient (6 of 31 [19.4%]) dogs. Among them, only one strain was MRSA. Using direct sequencing of sodA and hsp60 genes, the 18 MRCPS strains other than MRSA from a staff and 17 dogs, were finally identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, a novel species of Staphylococcus from a cat. All of the methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains were multidrug resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and levofloxacin. Most of the MRSP strains showed high-level resistance to oxacillin (≥128 μg/ml, 15 of 18 [83.3%]), and 10 of 15 (66.7%) high-level oxacillin-resistant MRSP strains carried type III SCCmec. DNA fingerprinting of MRSP strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis yielded eight clusters: clone A with four subtypes, clone B with four subtypes, clone C with three subtypes, and five other different single clones. MRSP strains from the staff and some inpatient and outpatient dogs shared three major clones (clones A, B, and C), but the strains of the other five different clusters were distributed independently among inpatient or outpatient dogs. This genetic diversity suggested that the MRSP strains were not only acquired in this veterinary teaching hospital but also acquired in primary veterinary clinics in the community. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MRSP in dogs and humans in a veterinary institution. PMID:17267624

  19. Transduction of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Dependent on an Unusual Specificity of the Recipient Strain

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sidney; Sweeney, Helen M.

    1970-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin was transduced by phage 80 or 53 from two naturally occurring methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus to methicillin-susceptible recipient strains at frequencies of 10−7 to 10−9. Ultraviolet irradiation of transducing phage and posttransductional incubation at 30 C were essential for useful frequencies of transduction. Effectiveness as a recipient for this transduction was highly specific. Strain NCTC 8325 (PS47) in its native state was an ineffective recipient but became effective after it had received by transduction one of several penicillinase plasmids. This acquired effectiveness was retained in most cases after elimination of the plasmid by ethidium bromide treatment. Like the donor strain, the progeny were heterogeneous in the degree of their resistance to methicillin, which was expressed by a higher proportion of cells as the temperature of incubation was lowered from 37 to 30 C. Separate transductants varied widely in the degree of resistance acquired by transduction. Methicillin resistance was stable in the donor and transductant strains. We favored the interpretation that methicillin resistance in our strains was determined by a single chromosomal gene, although the possibility that it was determined by two or more closely linked genes could not be excluded. PMID:16559089

  20. Methicillin-Susceptible, Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Panesso, Diana; Planet, Paul J; Diaz, Lorena; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Tran, Truc T; Narechania, Apurva; Munita, Jose M; Rincon, Sandra; Carvajal, Lina P; Reyes, Jinnethe; Londoño, Alejandra; Smith, Hannah; Sebra, Robert; Deikus, Gintaras; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E; Rossi, Flavia; Arthur, Michel; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-10-01

    We report characterization of a methicillin-susceptible, vancomycin-resistant bloodstream isolate of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from a patient in Brazil. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus would indicate that this resistance trait might be poised to disseminate more rapidly among S. aureus and represents a major public health threat. PMID:26402569

  1. Methicillin-Susceptible, Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Panesso, Diana; Planet, Paul J; Diaz, Lorena; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Tran, Truc T; Narechania, Apurva; Munita, Jose M; Rincon, Sandra; Carvajal, Lina P; Reyes, Jinnethe; Londoño, Alejandra; Smith, Hannah; Sebra, Robert; Deikus, Gintaras; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E; Rossi, Flavia; Arthur, Michel; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-10-01

    We report characterization of a methicillin-susceptible, vancomycin-resistant bloodstream isolate of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from a patient in Brazil. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus would indicate that this resistance trait might be poised to disseminate more rapidly among S. aureus and represents a major public health threat.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Spanish hospital over a 4-year period: clonal replacement, decreased antimicrobial resistance, and identification of community-acquired and livestock-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Menegotto, Fabíola; González-Cabrero, Sandra; Lorenzo, Belén; Cubero, África; Cuervo, Williams; Gutiérrez, María Purificación; Simarro, María; Orduña, Antonio; Bratos, Miguel Ángel

    2012-12-01

    This study was carried out on 189 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates collected in a third-level hospital in Valladolid, Spain, between 2005 and 2008 in order to investigate the changes in molecular epidemiology and genetic backgrounds associated with the changes in resistance phenotypes produced over time. The MRSA isolates were classified as belonging to 10 different clones, including the identification of a novel MRSA clone, ST2422-MRSA-IV, belonging to CC121; 1 CA-MRSA strain from a USA300 clone; another from ST97-MRSA-IV, associated with clones adapted to livestock (LA-MRSA); and 2 strains belonging to a new spa type (t10258) related to the ST8-MRSA-IV clone. Sixty-two percent of the strains belonging to Spanish-prevalent MRSA sequence type ST125 harboured composite or multiple SCCmec elements including SCCmec type IV plus ccrA/B4 (ST125-SCCmec IV/VI). In the years studied, it was observed that ST125-SCCmec IV/VI replaced the multiresistant ST228-SCCmec I previously prevalent, and, as a consequence, decreased gentamicin and clindamycin resistance was further observed.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview for manual therapists☆

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Egan, Jonathon Todd; Rosenthal, Michael; Griffith, Erin A.; Evans, Marion Willard

    2012-01-01

    Objective Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with difficult-to-treat infections and high levels of morbidity. Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments. Methods PubMed and CINAHL were searched from the beginning of their respective indexing years through June 2011 using the search terms MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Texts and authoritative Web sites were also reviewed. Pertinent articles from the authors' libraries were included if they were not already identified in the literature search. Articles were included if they were applicable to ambulatory health care environments in which manual therapists work or if the content of the article related to the clinical management of MRSA. Results Following information extraction, 95 citations were included in this review, to include 76 peer-reviewed journal articles, 16 government Web sites, and 3 textbooks. Information was organized into 10 clinically relevant categories for presentation. Information was organized into the following clinically relevant categories: microbiology, development of MRSA, risk factors for infection, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, screening tests, reporting, treatment, prevention for patients and athletes, and prevention for health care workers. Conclusion Methicillin-resistant S aureus is a health risk in the community and to patients and athletes treated by manual therapists. Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community

  4. Presence of the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Is Associated with Severity and Clinical Outcome of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in a Single Center Study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanling; Guo, Liang; Chu, Xu; Shen, Limeng; Guo, Yuanyu; Dong, Huali; Mao, Jianfeng; van der Veen, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have previously been associated with severe infections. Here, the impact of the PVL genes on severity of disease and clinical outcome of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to MRSA was investigated in a single center observational study in a hospital in China. HAP due to MRSA was diagnosed in 100 patients and 13 of the patients were PVL positive, while VAP was diagnosed in 5 patients and 2 were PVL positive. The PVL positive patient group showed a significantly higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (14.3 ±7.8 vs. 10.1 ±4.7, P = 0.005) and significantly more patients with CRP levels >80 mg/L (8/15 vs. 12/90, P = 0.006) or WBC counts >15x109/L (7/15 vs. 12/90, P = 0.006), indicating that the severity of disease is affected by the presence of the PVL genes. The outcome of the study was defined by 30-day mortality. Four (27%) of the PVL positive patients and four (4%) of the PVL negative patients died within 30 days (P = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated for the PVL positive and PVL negative patient groups, which differed significantly (P = 0.003). Among the patients that died, the mean interval between diagnosis and death was shorter for the PVL positive patients (9.3 ±5.6 vs. 40.8 ±6.6 days, P = 0.013). Further analysis within the HAP and VAP patient groups showed that the presence of PVL in MRSA impacted the severity of disease and clinical outcome of HAP, but for VAP the number of patients included in the study was too low. In conclusion, in this single center study in a Chinese hospital the presence of the PVL genes in MRSA impacted the severity of disease and clinical outcome in patients with HAP due to MRSA. PMID:27249225

  5. [Drug resistance in nosocomial strains of staphylococci to methicillin].

    PubMed

    Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Rokosz, A; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, F

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the analysis of drug susceptibility of MRSA and MRCNS strains isolated from patients hospitalized in 14 wards of the State Clinical Hospital No 1 in Warsaw. The strains were identified (ID 32 STAPH), and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (ATB STAPH) was determined in ATB system (bioMérieux, France). Four methods were applied to confirm the resistance to methicillin: ATB-plus system, disc-diffusion method (Oxa 1 microgram, Oxoid, U.K.), Crystal MRSA ID (Becton Dickinson-BBL, USA) and agar screen test in TSA medium (Difco, USA) with methicillin (25 mg/l, Sigma, USA). 108 Staphylococcus spp. strains were found in 300 clinical specimens. 56 strains were methicillin-resistant (52%). Among methicillin-resistant strains 13 MRSA, 28 MRSE and 15 of other species were found. All MRSA strains were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and fusidic acid. MRCNS were susceptible first of all to vancomycin (43/43), minocycline (42/43) and pristinamycin (42/43). On the basis of the obtained results it can be stated that methicillin-resistant staphylococci occur in hospital wards. The greatest number of methicillin-resistant strains was cultured from patients hospitalized in surgery wards (32), methicillin-resistant strains much more frequently occur among coagulase-negative staphylococci, especially in Staphylococcus epidermis. Glycopeptide antibiotics are most active against isolated MRSA strains. The most active therapeutic agent against MRCNS is vancomycin. PMID:9857608

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jufeng; Gao, Jianjun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Tang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most critical causes of healthcare-related or community-related infections. Resistance to most β-lactam antibiotics makes MRSA a big threat to clinical treatment. Utilization of low efficiency antibiotics such as vancomycin and teicoplanin makes new choices for therapies. Recently, much researchhas shed light on relevance between genetic mutations of MRSA and clinical characteristics such as antibiotic resistance, and virulence. These findings could contribute to development of novel antibiotics and vaccines.

  7. Expression of methicillin resistance in heterogeneous strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, B J; Tomasz, A

    1986-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of methicillin resistance was studied in a number of clinical isolates and laboratory strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains could be divided into three classes, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and thermosensitive heterogeneous methicillin-resistant S. aureus, on the basis of their plating efficiencies at 30 or 37 degrees C on methicillin-containing agar plates. Heterogeneous strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were composed of two subpopulations: a small minority of cells (10(-5) to 10(-3); MIC, 600 to 1,000 micrograms/ml) that expressed resistance to high concentrations of methicillin at 37 degrees C, and a majority of cells (MIC, 5 micrograms/ml) that remained susceptible to the drug at 37 degrees C. Cultures of a thermosensitive heterogeneous strain were able to grow in the presence of high concentrations of methicillin, provided that the growth temperature was 30 degrees C. Such cultures lost their phenotypic resistance within 30 min (i.e., in less than one doubling time) after the growth temperature was shifted to the nonpermissive 37 degrees C. Shift of the temperature of the culture in the reverse direction (37 to 30 degrees C) resulted in an equally rapid expression of phenotypic resistance. The majority of the cells in such heterogeneous strains may be considered heat (or salt) conditional in their phenotypic expression of methicillin resistance. Both heterogeneous and thermosensitive heterogeneous strains, irrespective of their temperature of cultivation and degree of phenotypic resistance, contained detectable quantities of the 78-kilodalton penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP 2a) that previous studies have suggested is a biochemical correlate of methicillin resistance in homogeneous strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. However, in contrast to the homogeneous stains, in heterogeneous and thermosensitive heterogeneous isolates the ability to synthesize PBP 2a is apparently not

  8. Restriction maps of the regions coding for methicillin and tobramycin resistances on chromosomal DNA in methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, K; Nonoguchi, R; Matsuhashi, M; Song, M D; Konno, M

    1989-01-01

    Chromosomal BamHI DNA fragments containing both the mecA gene encoding the penicillin-binding protein responsible for methicillin resistance and the aadD gene encoding 4',4"-adenylyltransferase responsible for tobramycin resistance were cloned from three methicillin- and tobramycin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Physical maps of the fragments were similar, suggesting their unique origin. Images PMID:2817861

  9. Changing Trends in Resistance Pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kali, Arunava; Stephen, Selvaraj; Umadevi, Sivaraman; Kumar, Shailesh; Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with multidrug resistance, an aggressive course, increased mortality and morbidity in both community and health care facilities. Monitoring of newly emerging and prevalent Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains for their resistance patterns to conventional as well as novel drugs, are essential for infection control. Aims: To study the changing trends in resistance patterns of MRSA at our hospital. Settings and Design: This cross sectional study was carried out in a 750 bed tertiary care hospital in south India. Material and Methods: One hundred and two clinical isolates of MRSA which were obtained in 2004-2011 were identified by using oxacillin, cefoxitin disc diffusion test and oxacillin screening agar test. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done for commonly used non beta lactam anti-Staphylococcal drugs, as well as for anti-MRSA drugs like vancomycin, linezolid, mupirocin and rifampicin. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined by using Vancomycin HiComb strip (Himedia, Mumbai, India). Statistical Analysis which was done: Chi-square test and proportions were used to compare the two groups. Results: MRSA isolates showed high resistance to co-trimoxazole (82.3%), ciprofloxacin (76.4%), gentamicin (64.7%) and tetracycline (49%) as compared to other drugs. High prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance was detected, particularly among outpatients. Multi resistant MRSA with a ≥ 3 non-beta lactam agent resistance was 79%. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, linezolid, mupirocin and rifampicin. MRSA had displayed increase in resistance to most antibiotics except tetracycline in recent years. Conclusions: Taking into consideration the prevalence of multidrug resistance in MRSA, resistance patterns should be evaluated periodically and antibiotic therapy should be guided by susceptibility testing. PMID:24179914

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis sequentially complicated with septic arthritis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although most reports describing patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis have been published in Japan, this concept remains a matter of debate and diagnostic criteria have not yet been defined. Case presentation The general status of a 74-year-old Japanese man referred to our hospital (day 1) with severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia gradually improved with antibiotic therapy. Thereafter, up to 4 L/day of acute watery diarrhea that started on day 19 was refractory to metronidazole but responded immediately to oral vancomycin. Gram staining stool samples was positive for abundant fecal leukocytes from which dominant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (104 CFU/mL) were isolated, suggesting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis. High fever with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was evident at day 30, and suppurative right hip arthritis developed around day 71. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from stools, blood and aspirated synovial fluid separated in the same manner on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, as well as two other strains isolated from sputum, belonged to the same clone as sequence type (ST) 764 (complex clonal 5), and carried SCCmec type II. Conclusion The clinical, microbiological and molecular biological findings of this patient indicated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enterocolitis that led to septic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. PMID:24405901

  11. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Extracts of Acacia Aroma Against Methicillin-Resistant And Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, C.M.; Satorres, S.E.; Sosa, A.; Fusco, M.; Alcará, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of organic and aqueous extracts of Acacia aroma was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inhibition of bacterial growth was determined using agar diffusion and bioautographic methods. Among all assayed organic extracts only ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts presented highest activities against all tested Staphylococcus strains with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 2.5 to 10 mg/ml and from 2.5 to 5 mg/ml respectively. The aqueous extracts show little antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus strains. The bioautography assay demonstrated well-defined growth inhibition zones against S. aureus in correspondence with flavonoids and saponins. A. aroma would be an interesting topic for further study and possibly for an alternative treatment for skin infections. PMID:24031532

  13. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus replacing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Lipsitch, Marc; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive research on the emergence of and treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), prior studies have not rigorously evaluated the impact of methicillin resistance on the overall incidence of S. aureus infections. Yet, there are direct clinical and research implications of determining whether methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection rates remain stable in the face of increasing MRSA prevalence or whether MSSA will be replaced over time. A synthesis of prior studies indicates that the emergence of healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has led to an increase in the overall incidence of S. aureus infections, with MRSA principally adding to, rather than replacing, MSSA. However, colonization with CA-MRSA may at least partially replace colonization with MSSA. So far, evidence indicates that MSSA still accounts for many infections. Therefore, eradication of MRSA alone is not sufficient to address the public health burden of S. aureus. PMID:21737459

  14. [The development and testing of reagents kit for detection and qualitative evaluation of DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and also methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. applying technique of polymerase chain reaction in "real time" mode].

    PubMed

    Skachkova, T S; Shipulina, O Iu; Domonova, É A; Subbotovskaia, A I; Kozyreva, V S; Il'ina, V N; Shipulin, G A

    2013-06-01

    The reagents kit is developed to identify and quantitatively detect DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. in biological material using technique of polymerase chain reaction with hybridizational fluorescent detection and having higher analytical and diagnostic characteristics. The application of the given reagents kit makes it possible to optimize the epidemiologic monitoring of propagation of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. Significantly decreasing duration and laboriousness of study.

  15. Reversion From Methicillin Susceptibility to Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus During Treatment of Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Megan K; Palace, Samantha G; Gandra, Sumanth; Torres, Brenda; Weir, Susan; Stiles, Tracy; Ellison, Richard T; Goguen, Jon D

    2016-03-15

    Approximately 3% of Staphylococcus aureus strains that, according to results of conventional phenotypic methods, are highly susceptible to methicillin-like antibiotics also have polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results positive for mecA. The genetic nature of these mecA-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains has not been investigated. We report the first clearly defined case of reversion from methicillin susceptibility to methicillin resistance among mecA-positive MSSA within a patient during antibiotic therapy. We describe the mechanism of reversion for this strain and for a second clinical isolate that reverts at a similar frequency. The rates of reversion are of the same order of magnitude as spontaneous resistance to drugs like rifampicin. When mecA is detected by PCR in the clinical laboratory, current guidelines recommend that these strains be reported as resistant. Because combination therapy using both a β-lactam and a second antibiotic suppressing the small revertant population may be superior to alternatives such as vancomycin, the benefits of distinguishing between mecA-positive MSSA and MRSA in clinical reports should be evaluated.

  16. Epidemic neonatal gentamicin-methicillin--resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection associated with nonspecific topical use of gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Graham, D R; Correa-Villasenor, A; Anderson, R L; Vollman, J H; Baine, W B

    1980-12-01

    One hundred sixteen infants in an intensive care nursery acquired Staphylococcus aureus resistant to gentamicin and methicillin; 54 patients acquired S. aureus sensitive to gentamicin and methicillin. Topical application of gentamicin ointment was significantly associated with acquisition of GMRS. Of 78 infants who acquired GMRS, 38 had received GmO before GMRS was first cultured, whereas only one of 49 infants with GMSS had previously received GmO (P = 8.6 X 10(-8)). Infants with GMRS were also more likely than patients with GMSS to have had a lower mean birth weight, Apgar score, and gestational age; systemic antibiotic therapy and incubator care were significantly prolonged for patients with GMRS, but these factors did not explain susceptibility to GMRS infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that use of GmO was the single most important risk factor.

  17. Isolation of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in the dental operatory.

    PubMed

    Horiba, N; Yoshida, T; Suzuki, K; Maekawa, Y; Ito, M; Matsumoto, T; Nakamura, H

    1995-01-01

    The state of contamination by methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at the conservative dentistry section of the School of Dentistry, Aichi-Gakuin University, was investigated. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were detected in 8 (20.5%) of 39 dental staff (28 dentists, 8 dental hygienists, and 3 dental assistants), but MRSA was not detected. MRCNS was also detected in locations such as the dental chair, dental bracket, dental cabinet, and floor, as well as in airborne samples. The presence of the same strain in both the oral cavity of staff persons and the dental chair/floor locations was determined by biochemical properties, antibiotic sensitivity tests, and electrophoretic patterns.

  18. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Growing Risk in the Hospital and in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Raygada, Jose L.; Levine, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a common and continuously growing cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The type, disease severity, and clinical outcomes of these infections, as well as the genotypic and susceptibility patterns of the bacteria differ according to the setting in which the infection occurs—a healthcare facility or the community setting. The incidence of these infections in the community setting has been growing consistently in the past decade or so. In addition, resistance to the many current antibiotics used to treat these infections is also growing, further complicating management. Rapid-diagnosis tests and new therapeutic agents are constantly under investigation. The authors review the current understanding of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, including the growing problem of resistance. In addition, they discuss promising diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives, as well as new control strategies to prevent its transmission or the development of infection among carriers. PMID:25126276

  19. Methicillin resistant S. aureus in human and bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mark A; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous organism that causes a variety of diseases including mastitis in cattle and humans. High-level resistance of S. aureus to β-lactams conferred by a mecA gene encoding a modified penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) was first observed in the early 1960's. These methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have been responsible for both hospital acquired infections (HA-MRSA) and, more recently, community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). A small number of human MRSA mastitis cases and outbreaks in maternity or neonatal units have been reported which are generally the result of CA-MRSA. The establishment of the sequence type 398 (ST398) in farm animals, primarily pigs, in the early 2000's has provided a reservoir of infection for humans and dairy cattle, particularly in continental Europe, described as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Prior to the emergence of ST398 there were sporadic reports of MRSA in bovine milk and cases of mastitis, often caused by strains from human associated lineages. Subsequently, there have been several reports describing bovine udder infections caused by ST-398 MRSA. Recently, another group of LA-MRSA strains was discovered in humans and dairy cattle in Europe. This group carries a divergent mecA gene and includes a number of S. aureus lineages (CC130, ST425, and CC1943) that were hitherto thought to be bovine-specific but are now also found as carriage or clinical isolates in humans. The emergence of MRSA in dairy cattle may be associated with contact with other host species, as in the case of ST398, or with the exchange of genetic material between S. aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, which are the most common species associated with bovine intramammary infections and commonly carry antimicrobial resistance determinants.

  20. Endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Nurses' risk perceptions and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Ana Luisa; Sousa-Uva, António; Pina, Elaine

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the most difficult challenges for prevention, control, and treatment of health care-associated infections. A survey and interviews were conducted on nurses from a hospital center. We found that most nurses' perceived risk of acquiring MRSA related to themselves (72%), other nurses (88.5%), and patients (97.8%). This perception influences attitudes, leading to compliance with the existing recommendations.

  1. Transmission Dynamics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Crombé, Florence; Argudín, M. Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Hermans, Katleen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    From the mid-2000s on, numerous studies have shown that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), renowned as human pathogen, has a reservoir in pigs and other livestock. In Europe and North America, clonal complex (CC) 398 appears to be the predominant lineage involved. Especially worrisome is its capacity to contaminate humans in close contact with affected animals. Indeed, the typical multi-resistant phenotype of MRSA CC398 and its observed ability of easily acquiring genetic material suggests that MRSA CC398 strains with an increased virulence potential may emerge, for which few therapeutic options would remain. This questions the need to implement interventions to control the presence and spread of MRSA CC398 among pigs. MRSA CC398 shows a high but not fully understood transmission potential in the pig population and is able to persist within that population. Although direct contact is probably the main route for MRSA transmission between pigs, also environmental contamination, the presence of other livestock, the herd size, and farm management are factors that may be involved in the dissemination of MRSA CC398. The current review aims at summarizing the research that has so far been done on the transmission dynamics and risk factors for introduction and persistence of MRSA CC398 in farms. PMID:23518663

  2. Methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococcus: From colonizer to a pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Mehreen; Usman, Javaid; Latif, Mahwish; Munir, Tehmina; Gill, Maria Mushtaq; Anjum, Rabia; Babar, Nazish

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the frequency of methicillin resistance in coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) and to determine its in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to various other routinely used antibiotics. It was a cross sectional study conducted at the department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from June 2011 to May 2012. The organisms were identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram staining, catalase, DNAase and slide/tube coagulase tests. The organisms were considered to be methicillin resistant when the diameter of zone of inhibition was less than 25mm around 30μg cefoxitin disc. Antibiotic sensitivity was determined using the Modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. From a total of 337 CoNS, 201 were methicillin resistant and were included in the study. All were resistant to Penicillin, followed by Erythromycin (93•1%), Ciprofloxacin (77%), Co-trimoxazole (74•8%), Gentamicin (68•3%), Clindamycin (51•06%), Tetracycline (44•6%), Fusidic acid (40%), Rifampicin (39•5%), Chloramphenicol (19•3%), Linezolid (2%), Minocycline (1•1%), and Vancomycin (0%). More than half of CoNS were methicillin resistant. Vancomycin is the only drug to which all of the MRCoNS were sensitive, with more than 98% of the isolates being sensitive to Linezolid and Minocycline. PMID:27393446

  3. Methicillin resistant coagulase negative staphylococcus: From colonizer to a pathogen.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Mehreen; Usman, Javaid; Latif, Mahwish; Munir, Tehmina; Gill, Maria Mushtaq; Anjum, Rabia; Babar, Nazish

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the frequency of methicillin resistance in coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) and to determine its in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to various other routinely used antibiotics. It was a cross sectional study conducted at the department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from June 2011 to May 2012. The organisms were identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram staining, catalase, DNAase and slide/tube coagulase tests. The organisms were considered to be methicillin resistant when the diameter of zone of inhibition was less than 25mm around 30μg cefoxitin disc. Antibiotic sensitivity was determined using the Modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. From a total of 337 CoNS, 201 were methicillin resistant and were included in the study. All were resistant to Penicillin, followed by Erythromycin (93•1%), Ciprofloxacin (77%), Co-trimoxazole (74•8%), Gentamicin (68•3%), Clindamycin (51•06%), Tetracycline (44•6%), Fusidic acid (40%), Rifampicin (39•5%), Chloramphenicol (19•3%), Linezolid (2%), Minocycline (1•1%), and Vancomycin (0%). More than half of CoNS were methicillin resistant. Vancomycin is the only drug to which all of the MRCoNS were sensitive, with more than 98% of the isolates being sensitive to Linezolid and Minocycline.

  4. Methicillin resistance and the biofilm phenotype in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Hannah; Rudkin, Justine K.; Black, Nikki S.; Gallagher, Laura; O'Neill, Eoghan; O'Gara, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and biofilm-forming capacity contribute to the success of Staphylococcus aureus as a human pathogen in both healthcare and community settings. These virulence factors do not function independently of each other and the biofilm phenotype expressed by clinical isolates of S. aureus is influenced by acquisition of the methicillin resistance gene mecA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains commonly produce an icaADBC operon-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA)-dependent biofilm. In contrast, the release of extracellular DNA (eDNA) and cell surface expression of a number of sortase-anchored proteins, and the major autolysin have been implicated in the biofilm phenotype of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. Expression of high level methicillin resistance in a laboratory MSSA strain resulted in (i) repression of PIA-mediated biofilm production, (ii) down-regulation of the accessory gene regulator (Agr) system, and (iii) attenuation of virulence in murine sepsis and device infection models. Here we review the mechanisms of MSSA and MRSA biofilm production and the relationships between antibiotic resistance, biofilm and virulence gene regulation in S. aureus. PMID:25674541

  5. Incidence of methicillin resistant coagulase positive & coagulase negative staphylococci in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Jesudason, M V; Anandaraj, W S; Jegadeesan, P

    1997-04-01

    Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) from blood culture of bacteraemic patients were studied for methicillin resistance is 1993 and 1996. An increase in methicillin resistance among these isolates was observed in 1996. In 1993, 32.6 per cent isolates of S. aureus were methicillin resistant, this increased to 45.7 per cent in 1996. Methicillin resistance in CONS were 1.6 and 14.6 per cent respectively in 1993 and 1996. This increase in methicillin resistance may pose therapeutic problems and requires more effective drugs based on susceptibility testing of such isolates.

  6. Phenotypic Suppression of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus by Mutant Noninducible Penicillinase Plasmids1

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sidney; Gibson, Carol J.; Sweeney, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    Methicillin (intrinsic) resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was suppressed almost completely by regulatory gene (penI1) mutations of penicillinase plasmids that made penicillinase production strictly noninducible. Methicillin resistance was restored by secondary regulatory gene mutations that altered the noninducible phenotype or by complementation with a compatible plasmid that did not bear the noninducible mutation. No evidence was obtained for genetic linkage between a penicillinase plasmid and the gene for methicillin resistance. We suggest, therefore, that the mutant noninducible repressor acted in trans by binding to a site on the methicillin resistance determinant. This hypothesis would imply an appreciable degree of homology between penicillinase plasmids and methicillin resistance genes. PMID:5086657

  7. Endogenous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis after leg trauma.

    PubMed

    Larson, Katie E; Carrillo-Marquez, Maria

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of endogenous endophthalmitis in a 13-year-old boy with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. The patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain after intermittent anisocoria was noted on examination, leading to a diagnosis of endophthalmitis with a chorodial abscess.

  8. Public computer surfaces are reservoirs for methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Issmat I; Sigler, Von; Esseili, Malak A

    2007-07-01

    The role of computer keyboards used by students of a metropolitan university as reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci was determined. Putative methicillin (oxacillin)-resistant staphylococci isolates were identified from keyboard swabs following a combination of biochemical and genetic analyses. Of 24 keyboards surveyed, 17 were contaminated with staphylococci that grew in the presence of oxacillin (2 mg l(-1)). Methicillin (oxacillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), -S. epidermidis (MRSE) and -S. hominis (MRSH) were present on two, five and two keyboards, respectively, while all three staphylococci co-contaminated one keyboard. Furthermore, these were found to be part of a greater community of oxacillin-resistant bacteria. Combined with the broad user base common to public computers, the presence of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci on keyboard surfaces might impact the transmission and prevalence of pathogens throughout the community.

  9. Typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by antibiotic resistance phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, M T; Lyon, B R; Skurray, R A

    1990-01-01

    The identification of new epidemic strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is essential for rapid, effective infection control. We have developed a typing method which uses antibiotic sensitivity patterns to differentiate methicillin-resistant S. aureus and which is faster and more cost-effective than biochemical analysis or bacteriophage typing. Characterisation of phenotypes which are chromosomally-encoded, plasmid- or chromosomally-encoded or exclusively plasmid-mediated has enabled us to separate Australian strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus into 11 classes, representatives of which were indistinguishable by bacteriophage type, or plasmid profile alone. The value of this procedure is thus clearly shown.

  10. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible S. Aureusin the Saliva of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Milton Jorge; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Hayashida, Miyeko; Gir, Elucir; da Silva, Adriana Maria; Barbosa, Caio Parente; da Silva Canini, Silvia Rita Marin; Santiago, Silvana

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: S. aureus is one of the main agents of nosocomial infection and is sometimes difficult to treat with currently available active antimicrobials. PURPOSE: To analyze the prevalence of methicillin-susceptible S.aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as well as the MRSA antimicrobial susceptibility profile isolated in the saliva of health professionals at a large public education hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The project was approved by the research and ethics committee of the institution under study. Three samples of saliva from 340 health professionals were collected. The saliva analysis used to identify S. aureus was based on mannitol fermentation tests, catalase production, coagulase, DNAse, and lecithinase. In order to detect MRSA, samples were submitted to the disk diffusion test and the oxacillin agar screening test. In order to identify the minimum inhibitory concentration, the Etest® technique was used. RESULTS: The prevalence of MSSA was 43.5% (148/340), and MRSA was 4.1% (14/340). MRSA detected by the diffusion disk test, was 100% resistant to penicillin and oxacillin, 92.9% resistant to erythromycin, 57.1% resistant to clindamycin, 42.9% resistant to ciprofloxacin and 57.1% resistant to cefoxetin. CONCLUSION: This subject is important for both the education of health professionals and for preventative measures. Standard and contact-precautions should be employed in professional practice. PMID:19488585

  11. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci: implications for our food supply?

    PubMed

    Doyle, M Ellin; Hartmann, Faye A; Lee Wong, Amy C

    2012-12-01

    Food-borne intoxication, caused by heat-stable enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, causes over 240,000 cases of food-borne illness in the United States annually. Other staphylococci commonly associated with animals may also produce these enterotoxins. Foods may be contaminated by infected food handlers during slaughter and processing of livestock or by cross-contamination during food preparation. S. aureus also causes a variety of mild to severe skin and soft tissue infections in humans and other animals. Antibiotic resistance is common in staphylococci. Hospital-associated (HA) S. aureus are resistant to numerous antibiotics, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) presenting significant challenges in health care facilities for over 40 years. During the mid-1990s new human MRSA strains developed outside of hospitals and were termed community-associated (CA). A few years later, MRSA was isolated from horses and methicillin resistance was detected in Staphylococcus intermedius/pseudintermedius from dogs and cats. In 2003, a livestock-associated (LA) MRSA strain was first detected in swine. These methicillin-resistant staphylococci pose additional food safety and occupational health concerns. MRSA has been detected in a small percentage of retail meat and raw milk samples indicating a potential risk for food-borne transmission of MRSA. Persons working with animals or handling meat products may be at increased risk for antibiotic-resistant infections. This review discusses the scope of the problem of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and some strategies for control of these bacteria and prevention of illness.

  12. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. isolated from US West Coast public marine beaches

    PubMed Central

    Soge, Olusegun O.; Meschke, John S.; No, David B.; Roberts, Marilyn C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (MRCoNS) from marine water and intertidal beach sand from public beaches in Washington State, USA. Methods Fifty-one staphylococci from Washington State beaches were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility testing, carriage of acquired tetracycline and/or macrolide resistance genes, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, the BBL Crystal™ Gram-Positive ID System and/or 16S rRNA sequencing, coagulase test and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for MRSA. Results Five multidrug-resistant MRSA SCCmec type I, of which three were MLST type ST45, one ST59 and one a new MLST type, ST1405, plus one susceptible non-typeable (NT) MRSA ST30 were characterized. Thirty-three MRCoNS isolates, representing 21 strains from 9 Staphylococcus spp., carried a range of SCCmec types [I (2), II (6), III (3), V (2), I/II (1) and NT (7)] and varied in their antibiotic susceptibility to other antibiotic classes and carriage of acquired tetracycline/macrolide resistance gene(s). MRSA and MRCoNS donors co-transferred tet(M) and erm(A) genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient at a frequency of 10−8. Conclusions This is the first report of MRSA and MRCoNS isolated from marine water and intertidal beach sand. The MLST types and antibiotic carriage of five MRSA isolates were similar to hospital MRSA isolates rather than US community-acquired MRSA isolates. Our results suggest that public marine beaches may be a reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors as well as an ecosystem for exchange of antibiotic resistance genes among staphylococci and related genera. PMID:19837712

  13. Treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: vancomycin and beyond.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Natasha E; Tong, Steven Y C; Davis, Joshua S; van Hal, Sebastiaan J

    2015-02-01

    There has been a welcome increase in the number of agents available for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Vancomycin remains an acceptable treatment option, with moves toward individualized dosing to a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) target. Numerous practicalities, however, would need to be resolved before implementation. Lipoglycopeptides as a class show excellent in vitro potency. Their long half-lives and complex PKs may preclude these agents being used in critically ill patients. Anti-MRSA cephalosporins provide great promise in the treatment of MRSA. These agents, despite broad-spectrum activity, should be reserved for patients with MRSA infections as it is likely that usage will be associated with increased rates of resistance. Daptomycin is currently the only antibiotic to have shown noninferiority to vancomycin in the treatment of MRSA bacteremia. The results of an open-labeled trial to address the superiority of daptomycin compared with vancomycin in reduced vancomycin susceptibility infections are eagerly anticipated. No drug to date has shown superiority to vancomycin in the treatment of MRSA infections with the possible exception of linezolid in hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), making linezolid an important option in the treatment of MRSA-proven HAP. Whether these strengths and features are agent or class specific are unclear but will likely be answered with the marketing of tedizolid. There are insufficient data to recommend either quinupristin/dalfopristin or tigecycline, as first line in the treatment of severe MRSA infections. These agents however remain options in patients with no other alternatives. PMID:25643268

  14. The Evaluation of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction. As community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a health concern in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts aboard ISS or the space station itself. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis of archived ISS isolates confirmed our earlier studies indicating a transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers. In addition, this fingerprinting also indicated a transfer between crewmembers and their environment. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and the environment, phenotypic evaluations indicated minimal methicillin resistance. However, positive results for the Penicillin Binding Protein, indicative of the presence of the mecA gene, were detected in multiple isolates of archived Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Phenotypic analysis of these isolates confirmed their resistance to methicillin. While MRSA has not been isolated aboard ISS, the potential exists for the transfer of the gene, mecA, from coagulase negative environmental Staphylococcus to S. aureus creating MRSA strains. This study suggests the need to expand environmental monitoring aboard long duration exploration spacecraft to include antibiotic resistance profiling.

  15. A model for surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Simons, Hannah; Alcabes, Philip

    2008-01-01

    It is well recognized that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a community pathogen. Several key differences between community-associated and hospital-associated MRSA strains exist, including distinct methicillin resistance genes and genetic backgrounds and differing susceptibility to antibiotics. Recent studies have demonstrated that typical hospital and community strains easily move between hospital and community environments. Despite evidence of MRSA's expanding reach in the community, the best methods for population-level detection and containment have not been established. In an effort to determine effective methods for monitoring the spread of MRSA, we reviewed the literature on hospital-associated and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) in the community and proposed a model for enhanced surveillance. By linking epidemiologic and molecular techniques within a surveillance system that coordinates activities in the community and health-care setting, scientists and public health officials can begin to measure the true extent of CA-MRSA in communities and hospitals.

  16. Comparative activity of CGP 31608, nafcillin, cefamandole, imipenem, and vancomycin against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, M; Hackbarth, C; Stella, F B; Chambers, H F

    1987-10-01

    The activity of CGP 31608 for 53 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 48 strains of S. epidermidis, both methicillin susceptible and resistant, was compared with that of vancomycin, nafcillin, cefamandole, and imipenem. Microdilution MICs were determined in Mueller-Hinton broth with or without 2.5% NaCl at an inoculum of 3 x 10(5) CFU/ml with a 20-h, 37 degrees C incubation. The MICs of imipenem and CGP 31608 for methicillin-resistant strains were lower than the MICs of nafcillin or cefamandole for these strains; these differences diminished in the presence of 2.5% NaCl. Subpopulations were detected in strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis that were resistant to all the beta-lactam antibiotics tested at 5 micrograms/ml. This resistant subpopulation produced progeny that were uniformly resistant to high concentrations of each of the beta-lactams.

  17. Comparative activity of CGP 31608, nafcillin, cefamandole, imipenem, and vancomycin against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, M; Hackbarth, C; Stella, F B; Chambers, H F

    1987-10-01

    The activity of CGP 31608 for 53 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 48 strains of S. epidermidis, both methicillin susceptible and resistant, was compared with that of vancomycin, nafcillin, cefamandole, and imipenem. Microdilution MICs were determined in Mueller-Hinton broth with or without 2.5% NaCl at an inoculum of 3 x 10(5) CFU/ml with a 20-h, 37 degrees C incubation. The MICs of imipenem and CGP 31608 for methicillin-resistant strains were lower than the MICs of nafcillin or cefamandole for these strains; these differences diminished in the presence of 2.5% NaCl. Subpopulations were detected in strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis that were resistant to all the beta-lactam antibiotics tested at 5 micrograms/ml. This resistant subpopulation produced progeny that were uniformly resistant to high concentrations of each of the beta-lactams. PMID:3481245

  18. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  19. Comparison of Biofilm Formation between Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Abdolmajid; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Bakhshi, Bita; Mirzaee, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the biofilm formation and the prevalence of biofilm-associated genes between the isolates of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: In total, 209 S. aureus isolates were collected. The antibiotic susceptibility test was conducted using nine antibiotics according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Phenotypic biofilm formation was performed with microtiter plate assay. The polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect icaA, icaD, icaB, icaC, clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, cna, eno, ebps, bbp, mecA, and SCCmec types as well as agr group genes with specific primers. Results: Sixty-four (30.62%) isolates were resistant to methicillin, and 54 (83%) MRSA harbored SCCmec III. Furthermore, 122 (58.3%) isolates belonged to agr group I. Twenty-six (36.1%) MRSA and 42 (28.9%) MSSA isolates were strong biofilm producers (no significant difference). The prevalence of icaA, icaD, icaB, and icaC genes in MSSA isolates was 71, 41, 76, and 72%, respectively. The frequency of clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, cna, eno, ebps, and bbp in MSSA was 100, 100, 56, 46, 74, 54, 78, 11, and 1%, respectively. However, in MRSA isolates, the frequency was 97, 97, 64, 51, 76, 56, 79, and 12% with no track of bbp, respectively. Conclusion: Statistical difference between MSSA and MRSA regarding biofilm formation and the frequency of all biofilm-encoding genes was not significant. The majority of the S. aureus isolates harbored clfA, clfB, eno, fib, icaA, and icaD genes. PMID:26948126

  20. Nosocomial Infections and Drug Susceptibility Patterns in Methicillin Sensitive and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitish Kumar; Garg, Raina; Baliga, Shrikala; Bhat K., Gopalkrishna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and is known for its ability to develop resistance to antibiotics. The drug susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) may vary. Aims and Objectives: This study was carried out to determine and compare the drug susceptibility patterns in nosocomial MSSA and MRSA. Material and Methods: The study was conducted between September 2009 and August 2011. Standard conventional methods were used for the isolation and identification of S. aureus. MRSA was identified by the cefoxitin (30 μg) disk method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and the interpretation of the results was done using CLSI guidelines. Results: Out of 685 strains of S. aureus studied, 173(25.25%) were MRSA and 512 (74.25%) were MSSA. Out of 173 MRSA strains, 114(65.89%) were isolated from pus, 22(12.71%) from vaginal swab, 18(10.40%) from central catheter tip and the remaining from other specimens. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and least number of isolates were susceptible to penicillin. MRSA displayed significantly higher resistance to other antibiotics. 45.7% of MRSA strains were resistant to clindamycin, 64.7% to ciprofloxacin, 87.3% to cotrimoxazole, 54.3% to erythromycin, 17.3% to gentamicin, 16.8% to netilmycin, and 58.38% to tetracycline. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected in 37 (21.38%) strains of MRSA. Conclusion: Nosocomial infections caused by MRSA is a significant problem. MRSA and MSSA differ with their susceptibility to antibiotics. All MRSA isolates in our hospitals were susceptible to vancomycin. Proper selection of the antibiotics based on antibiotic susceptibility test results is needed for effective treatment and prevention of emergence of resistance in MRSA and MSSA. PMID:24298469

  1. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society: Part 3: Current Perspectives on Skin and Soft Tissue Infections with Emphasis on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Commonly Encountered Scenarios when Antibiotic Use May Not Be Needed, and Concluding Remarks on Rational Use of Antibiotics in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Rosen, Ted; Thiboutot, Diane; Webster, Guy F; Gallo, Richard L; Leyden, James J; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    In this third article of the three-part series, management of skin and soft tissue infections is reviewed with emphasis on new information on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Due to changes in the evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones, previous distinctions between healthcare-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are currently much less clinically relevant. Many nosocomial cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection are now caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with changing patterns of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance. Also reviewed are clinical scenarios where antibiotics may not be needed and suggestions for optimal use of antibiotic therapy for dermatologie conditions, including recommendations on perioperative antibiotic use. PMID:27386047

  2. Haemodialysis nurses knowledge about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Maria; Lindberg, Magnus

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare workers may lack knowledge about antibiotic-resistant bacteria and thereby increase the spread of such organisms. The aim of the present study was to describe the relationship between self-rated knowledge and actual knowledge about methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among 326 Swedish haemodialysis nurses. Data were collected through a postal questionnaire. The findings suggest that ongoing education about MRSA should be provided to haemodialysis nurses, but also that standardised evaluation of adequate knowledge, skills and competencies' regarding safe practices is warranted. Future research should focus on effective mechanisms to ensure that haemodialysis nurses provide safe MRSA care. PMID:22085397

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resistance Funding Information National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ​​​​​​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ...

  4. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, your provider will consider the potential for antibiotic resistance. Thus, if MRSA is suspected, your provider will avoid treating you with beta-lactam antibiotics, a class of antibiotic observed not to be ...

  5. Staphylococcus aureus CC398: Host Adaptation and Emergence of Methicillin Resistance in Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik; Aziz, Maliha; Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James; Gillece, John; Driebe, Elizabeth; Liu, Cindy M.; Springer, Burkhard; Zdovc, Irena; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Żmudzki, Jacek; Schwarz, Stefan; Butaye, Patrick; Jouy, Eric; Pomba, Constanca; Porrero, M. Concepción; Ruimy, Raymond; Smith, Tara C.; Robinson, D. Ashley; Weese, J. Scott; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Yu, Fangyou; Laurent, Frederic; Keim, Paul; Skov, Robert; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock-associated MRSA possessing three different staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types (IV, V, and VII-like) including nine subtypes. The human-associated isolates from the basal clades carried phages encoding human innate immune modulators that were largely missing among the livestock-associated isolates. Our results strongly suggest that livestock-associated MRSA CC398 originated in humans as MSSA. The lineage appears to have undergone a rapid radiation in conjunction with the jump from humans to livestock, where it subsequently acquired tetracycline and methicillin resistance. Further analyses are required to estimate the number of independent genetic events leading to the methicillin-resistant sublineages, but the diversity of SCCmec subtypes is suggestive of strong and diverse antimicrobial selection associated with food animal production. PMID:22354957

  6. Inhibition of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miletić, Maja; Vuković, Dragana; Živanović, Irena; Dakić, Ivana; Soldatović, Ivan; Maletić, Dejan; Lazović, Saša; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran; Puač, Nevena

    2014-03-01

    In numerous recent papers plasma chemistry of non equilibrium plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure has been linked to plasma medical effects including sterilization. In this paper we present a study of the effectiveness of an atmospheric pressure plasma source, known as plasma needle, in inhibition of the growth of biofilm produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Even at the lowest powers the biofilms formed by inoculi of MRSA of 104 and 105 CFU have been strongly affected by plasma and growth in biofilms was inhibited. The eradication of the already formed biofilm was not achieved and it is required to go to more effective sources.

  7. Community Acquisition of Gentamicin-Sensitive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Southeast Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmo, Graeme R.; Schooneveldt, Jacqueline; O'Kane, Gabrielle; McCall, Brad; Vickery, Alison

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) susceptible to gentamicin has been reported in a number of countries in the 1990s. To study the acquisition of gentamicin-sensitive MRSA (GS-MRSA) in southeast Queensland and the relatedness of GS-MRSA to other strains of MRSA, 35 cases of infection due to GS-MRSA from October 1997 through September 1998 were examined retrospectively to determine the mode of acquisition and risk factors for MRSA acquisition. Thirty-one isolates from the cases were examined using a variety of methods (antibiotyping, phage typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] fingerprinting, and coagulase typing by restriction analysis of PCR products) and were compared with strains of local hospital-acquired gentamicin-resistant MRSA (GR-MRSA) and of Western Australian MRSA (WA-MRSA). Only 6 of 23 cases of community-acquired GS-MRSA had risk factors for MRSA acquisition. Twenty of 21 isolates from cases of community-acquired infection were found to be related by PFGE and coagulase typing and had similar phage typing patterns. Hospital- and nursing home-acquired GS-MRSA strains were genetically and phenotypically diverse. Community-acquired GS-MRSA strains were not related to nosocomial GR-MRSA or WA-MRSA, but phage typing results suggest that they are related to GS-MRSA previously reported in New Zealand. PMID:11060046

  8. Colonization of Cimex lectularius with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Barbarin, Alexis M; Hu, Baofeng; Nachamkin, Irving; Levy, Michael Z

    2014-05-01

    A recent paper published by Lowe and Romney in Emerging Infectious Diseases titled, Bed bugs as Vectors for Drug-Resistant Bacteria has sparked a renewed interest in bed bug vector potential. We followed a pyrethroid resistant strain of the human bed bug (Cimex lectularius, L.) fed either human blood or human blood with added methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for 9 days post-feeding. Results indicated that while the bed bug midgut is a hospitable environment for MRSA, the bacteria does not survive longer than 9 days within the midgut. Additionally, MRSA is not amplified within the midgut of the bug as the infection was cleared within 9 days. Due to the weekly feeding behaviours of bed bugs, these results suggest that bed bug transmission of MRSA is highly unlikely. PMID:24589308

  9. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in canine pyoderma cases in primary care veterinary practices in Canada: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Daniel; Goulding, Fiona; Langelier, Ken; Magyar, Gabor; McCurdy, Les; Milstein, Moe; Nielsen, Kia; Villemaire, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma in dogs is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus spp., and significant emergence of methicillin resistance in staphylococcal pyoderma has been reported. This preliminary study of the prevalence of methicillin resistance in canine pyoderma cases in Canadian primary care veterinary practices revealed that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were present in 12.1% of 149 staphylococcal positive skin culture cases. PMID:26483585

  10. Disc-diffusion and PCR detection of methicillin resistance in environmental airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp..

    PubMed

    Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna; Lenart-Boroń, Anna; Kasprowicz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the species composition of airborne Staphylococcus spp. in public premises, to determine the methicillin resistance of the isolates and the prevalence of mecA gene, determining resistance to β-lactams. In total 65 Staphylococcus strains were isolated from 54 sites. Four strains exhibited phenotypic methicillin resistance, while the presence of mecA gene was found in 11 strains. The results of both assays were compared, showing that the phenotypic tests revealed methicillin resistance only in 36% of the examined samples. This study revealed high species diversity among airborne Staphylococcus spp. population, which consists of multidrug resistant strains.

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Healthy Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Chung; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2013-01-01

    To determine the long-term carriage patterns, strain relatedness, and incidence of subsequent infections among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) carriers, we screened 154 high school students for nasal carriage of S. aureus on 8 occasions over 11 months. Persistent carriage was defined as a positive culture on ≥7 occasions. Two consecutive isolates from the same subject comprised a pair, and strain relatedness was determined for each pair by molecular typing. Of 1,232 nasal swab cultures obtained on 8 occasions, 323 (26.2%) were positive for S. aureus. Forty-five isolates (3.7%) were MRSA and 278 isolates (22.6%) were MSSA from 12 and 63 subjects, respectively. Thirty-five (77.8%) MRSA isolates harbored a type IV or VT staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec element. Among the 154 subjects, 52 (33.8%) were intermittent (1 to 6 positive swabs) carriers. Persistent carriage was identified in 23 (14.9%) subjects, and the incidence was not significantly different for MRSA and MSSA carriers (3/12 [25%] versus 20/63 [31.7%]; P = 0.7449). The MRSA and MSSA isolates were composed of 33 and 215 strain pairs, respectively. Of them, an indistinguishable genotype was identified in 33 (100%) MRSA pairs and 173 (80.5%) MSSA pairs (P = 0.0053). Five subjects developed cellulitis, and the incidence of this was higher for MRSA carriers (2/12 [16.7%]) than for MSSA carriers (1/63 [1.58%]; P = 0.0632) and noncarriers (2/79 [2.56%]; P = 0.0828). In conclusion, the long-term carriage patterns for MRSA and MSSA in healthy individuals were similar. MRSA carriers were more likely to carry a single strain, with a trend toward a higher chance of developing cellulitis than for MSSA carriers. PMID:23678067

  12. Recurrent Challenges for Clinicians: Emergence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin Resistance, and Current Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Tarai, Bansidhar; Das, Poonam; Kumar, Dilip

    2013-07-01

    Gram-positive pathogens mainly, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, are developing increasing resistance to glycopeptides that pose a problem in treating infections caused by these pathogens. Vancomycin is the treatment of choice in treating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Community-acquired MRSA is associated with infections in patients without recent history of hospital admission and without the classical risk factors for MRSA carriage (including healthcare personnel). MRSA poses new threats and challenges beyond the hospital with the emergence of community-acquired MRSA. Indiscriminate use of vancomycin leads to the emergence and spread of vancomycin resistance in multidrug resistant strains is of growing concern in the recent years. Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) remains an important determinant in choosing the right antibiotics. Infections caused by MRSA strains with vancomycin MIC > 4 μg/mL leads to the vancomycin treatment failure. The Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute had also lowered the cut-off susceptibility and resistance breakpoints for vancomycin. Despite the availability of newer antimicrobial agents (Linezolid, Daptomycin, Tigecycline) for drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, clinicians and patients still need options for treatment of MRSA infection. There is a need to reduce the global burden of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens and its resistant strains (mainly MRSA). Continuous efforts should be made to prevent the spread and the emergence of glycopeptide resistance by early detection of the resistant strains and using the proper infection control measures in the hospital setting. PMID:24701097

  13. Strategies for controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyce, J M

    1995-07-01

    In areas where the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is very low, aggressive strategies, which appear to have been effective, such as those used in the Netherlands and western Australia, may be feasible. In hospitals where MRSA is epidemic or highly endemic, less rigorous strategies are appropriate. However, which isolation techniques and barrier precautions are optimal is controversial. In addition, there is no consensus regarding the epidemiological importance of environmental contamination. Rapid detection of MRSA, prompt implementation of barrier precautions and prospective surveillance are essential components of a successful control programme. Eradicating nasal carriage of MRSA among patients and personnel can be useful during epidemics, but the cost-effectiveness of using this approach in hospitals where the prevalence of MRSA is low is unknown. Additional studies of this issue need to include surveillance for mupirocin-resistant strains.

  14. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Iowa, USA.

    PubMed

    Van De Griend, Philip; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Alvis, Bret; DeMartino, Mary; Heilmann, Kristopher; Doern, Gary; Winokur, Patricia; Vonstein, Diana DeSalvo; Diekema, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    We performed antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing and molecular typing on invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates (n = 1,666) submitted to the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory during 1999-2006 as part of a statewide surveillance system. All USA300 and USA400 isolates were resistant to

  15. [Molecular epidemiological study of community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) - an examination of commercially distributed meat as a possible vehicle for CA-MRSA].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kikuyo; Narimatsu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has occupied an important position in public health as a cause of food poisoning and hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. The spread of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections has also recently become a concern. However, the sources of this infection remain unclear, and there are few reports of epidemiology information. In order to understand MRSA spread in the community, we investigated the distribution of MRSA strains in commercially distributed raw meat samples (n=305) and stool samples from outpatients with diarrhea (n=1,543) from the same meat distribution region in Oita Prefecture, Japan. 301 Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated and 18 of them were MRSA (2 from chicken meat, 1 from duck meat, 1 from pork meat, and 14 from patients with diarrhea). All 18 MRSA strains were negative for Panton-Valentine leucocidin gene. In this study conducting a comparison of properties and a molecular epidemiological analysis of MRSA isolated from commercially distributed meat and diarrhea patient stools, the results suggest that commercially distributed meat could play a role in the prevalence of CA-MRSA in the community.

  16. Insights on Evolution of Virulence and Resistance from the Complete Genome Analysis of an Early Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain and a Biofilm-Producing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain†

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Steven R.; Fouts, Derrick E.; Archer, Gordon L.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Ravel, Jacques; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolonay, James F.; Brinkac, Lauren; Beanan, Mauren; Dodson, Robert J.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Madupu, Ramana; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Durkin, A. Scott; Haft, Daniel H.; Vamathevan, Jessica; Khouri, Hoda; Utterback, Terry; Lee, Chris; Dimitrov, George; Jiang, Lingxia; Qin, Haiying; Weidman, Jan; Tran, Kevin; Kang, Kathy; Hance, Ioana R.; Nelson, Karen E.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the major causative agent of numerous hospital- and community-acquired infections. Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a causative agent of infections often associated with implanted medical devices. We have sequenced the ∼2.8-Mb genome of S. aureus COL, an early methicillin-resistant isolate, and the ∼2.6-Mb genome of S. epidermidis RP62a, a methicillin-resistant biofilm isolate. Comparative analysis of these and other staphylococcal genomes was used to explore the evolution of virulence and resistance between these two species. The S. aureus and S. epidermidis genomes are syntenic throughout their lengths and share a core set of 1,681 open reading frames. Genome islands in nonsyntenic regions are the primary source of variations in pathogenicity and resistance. Gene transfer between staphylococci and low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria appears to have shaped their virulence and resistance profiles. Integrated plasmids in S. epidermidis carry genes encoding resistance to cadmium and species-specific LPXTG surface proteins. A novel genome island encodes multiple phenol-soluble modulins, a potential S. epidermidis virulence factor. S. epidermidis contains the cap operon, encoding the polyglutamate capsule, a major virulence factor in Bacillus anthracis. Additional phenotypic differences are likely the result of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which are most numerous in cell envelope proteins. Overall differences in pathogenicity can be attributed to genome islands in S. aureus which encode enterotoxins, exotoxins, leukocidins, and leukotoxins not found in S. epidermidis. PMID:15774886

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Lisa R; Haack, Sheridan K; Johnson, Heather E; Brennan, Angela K; Isaacs, Natasha M; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA+femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci 'excellent' recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  19. Comparative phenotypic and genotypic discrimination of methicillin resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hamid, Marwa I; Bendary, M M

    2015-09-26

    The present study was designed to elucidate the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of S. aureus isolates in Egypt. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of 133 identified S. aureus isolates revealed that over 70% of the isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR). Fifty MDR isolates were characterized using antibiotyping and different molecular typing methods. Amplification of mecA gene confirmed 30 strains as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 20 as methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Generally, 22 MRSA (73.33%) and ten MSSA (50%) harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) gene with no statistically significant difference (p=0.093). Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing revealed that 48% of the typeable MRSA isolates possessed SCCmec type IV. SCCmec and antimicrobial susceptibility typing signified the presence of community-acquired (CA)-MRSA in Egypt. Surprisingly, all isolates of SCCmec types I, II and III and 50% of both MRSA isolates of SCCmec types IV and V possessed pvl gene. It was clear that staphylococcal protein A (spa) and coagulase (coa) typing discriminated the isolates into eight different groups, whilst polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of coagulase gene yielded ten distinct RFLP banding patterns. This study presented the first baseline information on the characterization of MRSA and MSSA in Egypt.

  20. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  1. Personal hygiene and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Turabelidze, George; Lin, Mei; Wolkoff, Barbara; Dodson, Douglas; Gladbach, Stephen; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2006-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections outside the healthcare setting are an increasing concern. We conducted a case-control study to investigate an MRSA outbreak during 2002-2003 in a Missouri prison and focused on hygiene factors. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, and hygiene practices of study participants was collected by interview and medical record review. Logistic regression was used to evaluate MRSA infection in relation to hygiene factors individually and as a composite hygiene score; potential confounding factors were controlled. Selected MRSA isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MRSA infection was significantly associated with a low composite hygiene score. Transmission among prison inmates appeared to be responsible for this outbreak. PFGE analysis showed that isolates were indistinguishable and associated with community-onset MRSA infections in other US prisons. Improving hygiene practices and environmental conditions may help prevent and interrupt future MRSA outbreaks in prison settings. PMID:16704779

  2. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  3. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  4. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  5. Evaluation of laboratory tests for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Coudron, P E; Jones, D L; Dalton, H P; Archer, G L

    1986-11-01

    Few studies evaluating susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant staphylococci have included isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a known pathogen in many types of serious infections. We tested 175 S. epidermidis and 95 Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine the most sensitive procedures for detecting methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Reference procedures included agar dilution with methicillin and 4% NaCl in the agar and broth microdilution with methicillin and 2% NaCl in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth. After 24 h of incubation, the results from both methods correlated well and were within 1 log2 dilution for all isolates tested. Only one-half of all resistant isolates (92 of 183) were detected at 18 h by using the standard disk diffusion technique with 5-micrograms methicillin disks, and even fewer were detected with 10-micrograms methicillin disks and newly recommended zone-size criteria. However, the standard disk diffusion method with 4% NaCl in the agar increased the sensitivity and specificity for identification of the proper phenotype to greater than 92%. The spread plate and new spot techniques, both using agar with 4% NaCl, were also sensitive methods. Of 47 S. epidermidis isolates tested against oxacillin, 6 (13%) were oxacillin susceptible but methicillin resistant. Two automated systems, the Automicrobic system (Vitek Systems) and MicroScan (American MicroScan), as well as two broth screening systems available from Remel and Austin Biological Laboratories, failed to detect several resistant isolates, depending on the species.

  6. Evaluation of laboratory tests for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Coudron, P E; Jones, D L; Dalton, H P; Archer, G L

    1986-11-01

    Few studies evaluating susceptibility testing of methicillin-resistant staphylococci have included isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a known pathogen in many types of serious infections. We tested 175 S. epidermidis and 95 Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine the most sensitive procedures for detecting methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Reference procedures included agar dilution with methicillin and 4% NaCl in the agar and broth microdilution with methicillin and 2% NaCl in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth. After 24 h of incubation, the results from both methods correlated well and were within 1 log2 dilution for all isolates tested. Only one-half of all resistant isolates (92 of 183) were detected at 18 h by using the standard disk diffusion technique with 5-micrograms methicillin disks, and even fewer were detected with 10-micrograms methicillin disks and newly recommended zone-size criteria. However, the standard disk diffusion method with 4% NaCl in the agar increased the sensitivity and specificity for identification of the proper phenotype to greater than 92%. The spread plate and new spot techniques, both using agar with 4% NaCl, were also sensitive methods. Of 47 S. epidermidis isolates tested against oxacillin, 6 (13%) were oxacillin susceptible but methicillin resistant. Two automated systems, the Automicrobic system (Vitek Systems) and MicroScan (American MicroScan), as well as two broth screening systems available from Remel and Austin Biological Laboratories, failed to detect several resistant isolates, depending on the species. PMID:3639887

  7. Genotyping of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Tertiary Care Hospitals in Coimbatore, South India

    PubMed Central

    Neetu, Toms John Peedikayil; Murugan, Sevanan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Globally, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens that causes hospital- and community-acquired infections. The use of molecular typing methods is essential for determining the origin of the isolates, their clonal relations, and also epidemiological investigations. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant MRSA investigate the accessory gene regulator (agr) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types and perform multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Furthermore, the minimum inhibitory concentration of MRSA isolates was determined for vancomycin and daptomycin. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty-nine MRSA isolates were collected from Tertiary Care Hospitals in Coimbatore. Disk diffusion method was employed to assess the sensitivity of MRSA isolates to selected antibiotics and genetic analysis was performed using SCCmec, agr, and MLST typing by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction strategy. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using Ezy MIC (vancomycin) and Biomerieux (daptomycin) E-test strip. Results: Of 259 MRSA isolates, 209 (80.7%) were confirmed as methicillin resistant. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern revealed that all the MRSA isolates were 100% sensitive to linezolid, rifampicin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin. MIC results showed that of 209 MRSA isolates, 10 were found to be vancomycin intermediate S. aureus and 100% of the MRSA isolates were daptomycin-susceptible. The agr group I and SCCmec Type III were the major type among MRSA isolates. In addition to these MLST typing revealed the prevalence of sequence type (ST) 239 (SLV of ST8) among the MRSA isolates. Conclusion: This study confirms that ST239 (Brazilian clone) of MRSA is predominant in this region which is responsible for the hospital-acquired MRSA infections. Thus, the study also suggests that vancomycin and daptomycin can still be used as an alternative

  8. Healthcare-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Jyoti; Shenoy, Shalini M.; Baliga, Shrikala; Chakrapani, M.; Bhat, Gopalkrishna K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common pathogen worldwide and its multidrug resistance is a major concern. This study aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility profile of healthcare-associated MRSA with emphasis on resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotypes and vancomycin. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out between February 2014 and February 2015 across four tertiary care hospitals in Mangalore, South India. Healthcare-associated infections among 291 inpatients at these hospitals were identified according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Clinical specimens were collected based on infection type. S. aureus and MRSA isolates were identified and antibiotic susceptibility tests performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin was determined using the Agar dilution method and inducible clindamycin resistance was detected with a double-disk diffusion test (D-test). Results: Out of 291 healthcare-associated S. aureus cases, 88 were MRSA (30.2%). Of these, 54.6% were skin and soft tissue infections. All of the isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin and linezolid. Four MRSA isolates exhibited intermediate resistance to vancomycin (4.6%). Of the MRSA strains, 10 (11.4%) were constitutive MLSB phenotypes, 31 (35.2%) were inducible MLSB phenotypes and 14 (15.9%) were macrolide-streptogramin B phenotypes. Conclusion: Healthcare-associated MRSA multidrug resistance was alarmingly high. In routine antibiotic susceptibility testing, a D-test should always be performed if an isolate is resistant to erythromycin but susceptible to clindamycin. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin is necessary when treating patients with MRSA infections. PMID:27226908

  9. Investigational drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cuong; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon YC; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is to a large extent due to antibiotic-resistant strains, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). While the toll of invasive MRSA infections appears to decrease in U.S. hospitals, the rate of community-associated MRSA infections remains constant and there is a surge of MRSA in many other countries. This situation calls for continuing if not increased efforts to find novel strategies to combat MRSA infections. Areas covered This review will provide an overview of current investigational antibiotics in clinical development (up to phase II), and of therapeutic antibodies and alternative drugs against S. aureus in preclinical and clinical development, including a short description of the mechanism of action and a presentation of microbiological and clinical data. Expert opinion Increased recent antibiotic development efforts and results from pathogenesis research have led to several new antibiotics and alternative drugs, as well as a more informed selection of targets for vaccination efforts against MRSA. This developing portfolio of novel anti-staphylococcal drugs will hopefully provide us with additional and more efficient ways to combat MRSA infections in the near future and prevent us from running out of treatment options, even if new resistances arise. PMID:26536498

  10. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Michael R; MacDougall, Laura; Cholin, Brenda; Horsman, Greg; Fidyk, Melanie; Woods, Shirley

    2005-06-01

    A total of 184 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains were collected from patients who sought treatment primarily for skin and soft tissue infections from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2002, in east-central Saskatchewan, Canada. Molecular subtyping analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed 2 major clusters. Cluster A (n = 55) was composed of a multidrug-resistant MRSA strain associated with a long-term care facility and was similar to the previously reported nosocomial Canadian epidemic strain labeled CMRSA-2. Cluster B (n = 125) was associated with cases identified at community health centers and was indistinguishable from a community-associated (CA)-MRSA strain identified previously in the United States (USA400). Cluster B remained susceptible to a number of classes of antimicrobial agents and harbored the lukF-PV and lukS-PV toxin genes. Over 50% of both clonal groups displayed high-level resistance to mupirocin. This is the first report of the USA400 strain harboring the lukF-PV and lukS-PV toxin genes in Canada.

  11. Response of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Amicoumacin A

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Tai; Wiersma, Anna M.; Sit, Clarissa S.; Vederas, John C.; Hecker, Michael; Nakano, Michiko M.

    2012-01-01

    Amicoumacin A exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), hence we sought to uncover its mechanism of action. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of S. aureus COL in response to amicoumacin A showed alteration in transcription of genes specifying several cellular processes including cell envelope turnover, cross-membrane transport, virulence, metabolism, and general stress response. The most highly induced gene was lrgA, encoding an antiholin-like product, which is induced in cells undergoing a collapse of Δψ. Consistent with the notion that LrgA modulates murein hydrolase activity, COL grown in the presence of amicoumacin A showed reduced autolysis, which was primarily caused by lower hydrolase activity. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of amicoumacin A, a whole genome comparison of wild-type COL and amicoumacin A-resistant mutants isolated by a serial passage method was carried out. Single point mutations generating codon substitutions were uncovered in ksgA (encoding RNA dimethyltransferase), fusA (elongation factor G), dnaG (primase), lacD (tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase), and SACOL0611 (a putative glycosyl transferase). The codon substitutions in EF-G that cause amicoumacin A resistance and fusidic acid resistance reside in separate domains and do not bring about cross resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that amicoumacin A might cause perturbation of the cell membrane and lead to energy dissipation. Decreased rates of cellular metabolism including protein synthesis and DNA replication in resistant strains might allow cells to compensate for membrane dysfunction and thus increase cell survivability. PMID:22479511

  12. Rapid analysis of microbial systems using vibrational spectroscopy and supervised learning methods: application to the discrimination between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodacre, Royston; Rooney, Paul J.; Kell, Douglas B.

    1998-04-01

    FTIR spectra were obtained from 15 methicillin-resistant and 22 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains using our DRASTIC approach. Cluster analysis showed that the major source of variation between the IR spectra was not due to their resistance or susceptibility to methicillin; indeed early studies suing pyrolysis mass spectrometry had shown that this unsupervised analysis gave information on the phage group of the bacteria. By contrast, artificial neural networks, based on a supervised learning, could be trained to recognize those aspects of the IR spectra which differentiated methicillin-resistant from methicillin- susceptible strains. These results give the first demonstration that the combination of FTIR with neural networks can provide a very rapid and accurate antibiotic susceptibility testing technique.

  13. [Investigation of reduced vancomycin susceptibility in methicillin-resistant staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Kuşcu, Ferit; Oztürk, Doğan Barış; Gürbüz, Yunus; Tütüncü, Emin Ediz; Sencan, Irfan; Gül, Serdar

    2011-04-01

    The first Staphylococcus aureus strain with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin was reported from Japan in 1996, and since then an increasing numbers of cases had been reported from various countries. Along with the unfeasibility in the identification of these strains with routine laboratory methods, the use of glycopeptid antibiotics in infections due to these strains may result in therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of vancomycin intermediate staphylococcus (VIS) and heterogenous VIS (hVIS) strains with the use of agar screening, macro E-test, and population analysis profile (PAP-UC; population analysis profile-area under the curve) methods. A total of 148 methicillin-resistant staphylococcus strains isolated from different clinical samples (48 tracheal aspirate, 48 blood, 39 wound swabs, eight urine, two cerebrospinal fluid, two pleural fluid, one catheter tip sample) between November 2007 and May 2009, were included in the study. Of the isolates 107 were identified as S.aureus and 41 were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS; 23 Staphylococcus epidermidis, six Staphylococcus haemolyticus, five Staphylococcus chromogenes, three Staphylococcus hominis and four others) by API Staph kit (bioMerieux, USA). Methicillin resistance has been determined by standard disk diffusion method with oxacillin (1 µg) and cefoxitin (30 µg) disks, according to "Clinical and Laboratory Standarts Institute (CLSI)" guidelines. For the identification of VIS and hVIS strains, brain-heart infusion agar plates containing 6 µg/ml vancomycin (BHI-V6) were used for screening. The suspected VISA/hVISA strains which grew in this agar were further tested by macro E-test and PAP-AUC methods. Total VIS and hVIS rates among the tested isolates, were found as 3.4% (5/148) and 1.4% (2/148), respectively. These rates for CNS strains were 9.8% (4/41) and 2.4% (1/41), and for S.aureus strains were 0.9% (1/107) ve 0.9% (1/107), respectively. In the

  14. Studies on clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to methicillin. Evidence of cross-resistance between methicillin and cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Nord, M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro susceptibility to cephalothin and cefuroxime of 195 isolates of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was determined by the agar-diffusion test, using 7.5% NaCl-supplemented agar. The distribution of the inhibition zone diameters for isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1) as well as for S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) was trimodal. While 4% of the isolates were found susceptible to cefuroxime, 39% of the S. epidermidis/S. hominis (S. biotype 1) isolates and 34% of the S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) isolates were found susceptible to cephalothin by this method. Eight of these isolates (six S. epidermidis, two S. haemolyticus) were selected for susceptibility testing by the tube-dilution method, together with four isolates (three S. haemolyticus, one S. epidermidis) found resistant to cephalothin by the agar-diffusion test. The first-mentioned isolates were all found susceptible to cephalothin with MICs less than or equal to 2 micrograms/l, while the last-named all were resistant with MICs greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. Population analyses revealed sub-populations of highly resistant bacteria in all methicillin-resistant isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1), as well as in all isolates of S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4). We thus concluded that methicillin-resistance in isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci implies resistance to cephalosporins and that the difference between S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus as regards cephalosporin-susceptibility is quantitative and not qualitative. Eighty-nine per cent of the 195 methicillin-resistant isolates in this study were resistant to penicillin and at least one more antibiotic. We therefore think that resistance to penicillin and one or more non-beta-lactam antibiotics strongly suggests methicillin-resistance and that such isolates should be further tested on hypertonic media.

  15. Studies on clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to methicillin. Evidence of cross-resistance between methicillin and cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Nord, M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro susceptibility to cephalothin and cefuroxime of 195 isolates of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was determined by the agar-diffusion test, using 7.5% NaCl-supplemented agar. The distribution of the inhibition zone diameters for isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1) as well as for S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) was trimodal. While 4% of the isolates were found susceptible to cefuroxime, 39% of the S. epidermidis/S. hominis (S. biotype 1) isolates and 34% of the S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4) isolates were found susceptible to cephalothin by this method. Eight of these isolates (six S. epidermidis, two S. haemolyticus) were selected for susceptibility testing by the tube-dilution method, together with four isolates (three S. haemolyticus, one S. epidermidis) found resistant to cephalothin by the agar-diffusion test. The first-mentioned isolates were all found susceptible to cephalothin with MICs less than or equal to 2 micrograms/l, while the last-named all were resistant with MICs greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml. Population analyses revealed sub-populations of highly resistant bacteria in all methicillin-resistant isolates of S. epidermidis (S. biotype 1), as well as in all isolates of S. haemolyticus (S. biotype 4). We thus concluded that methicillin-resistance in isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci implies resistance to cephalosporins and that the difference between S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus as regards cephalosporin-susceptibility is quantitative and not qualitative. Eighty-nine per cent of the 195 methicillin-resistant isolates in this study were resistant to penicillin and at least one more antibiotic. We therefore think that resistance to penicillin and one or more non-beta-lactam antibiotics strongly suggests methicillin-resistance and that such isolates should be further tested on hypertonic media. PMID:3345258

  16. Efficacy of clarithromycin on biofilm formation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) caused by biofilm-forming methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) have emerged as the most common hospital-acquired infections in companion animals. No methods currently exist for the therapeutic remediation of SSIs caused by MRSP in biofilms. Clarithromycin (CLA) has been shown to prevent biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus. This study aims to assess the in vitro activity of CLA in eradicating MRSP biofilm formation on various materials. Results Quantitative assay results (P = 0.5126) suggest that CLA does not eradicate MRSP biofilm formation on polystyrene after 4 – 24 h growth periods. Scanning electron micrographs confirmed that CLA did not eradicate MRSP biofilm formed on orthopaedic implants. Conclusions By determining the in vitro characteristics and activities of MRSP isolates alone and against antibiotics, in vitro models of biofilm related infections can be made. In vitro data suggests that CLA does not effectively eradicate S. pseudintermedius biofilms in therapeutic doses. PMID:23171620

  17. Deferoxamine mesylate enhances virulence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Andrew J; Hannauer, Mélissa; Welch, Ian; Heinrichs, David E

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacterial infections. Strains of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), such as USA300, display enhanced virulence and fitness. Patients suffering from iron overload diseases often undergo iron chelation therapy with deferoxamine mesylate (DFO). Here, we show that USA300 uses this drug to acquire iron. We further demonstrate that mice administered DFO I.P., versus those not administered DFO, had significantly higher bacterial burden in livers and kidneys after I.V. challenge with USA300, associated with increased abscess formation and tissue destruction. The virulence of USA300 mutants defective for DFO uptake was not affected by DFO treatment.

  18. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in college residential halls.

    PubMed

    Tonn, Katelynn; Ryan, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once a predominantly hospital-acquired organism but community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has become a concern in athletics, prisons, and other nonclinical closed populations. As such, college residential hall occupants and workers may be at elevated risk of spreading or contracting MRSA. Environmental samples were obtained to identify the occurrence of MRSA on surfaces in bathrooms of 15 university residential halls. Sterile swabs and BBL CHROMagar plates were used to sample seven categories of potentially contaminated surfaces in each location. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were prepared. All sites had at least one positive sample for MRSA, and shower floors displayed the greatest prevalence (50%). These results indicate areas for heightened sanitation, and illustrate CA-MRSA potential from such surfaces. The need for hygiene education of affected persons about skin and soft tissue infections like MRSA, and intervention opportunities for public health professionals, are discussed.

  19. Prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in high school wrestling environments.

    PubMed

    Stanforth, Bethany; Krause, Andrew; Starkey, Chad; Ryan, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) was predominantly a hospital-acquired organism; recently, however, community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has been causing outbreaks in otherwise healthy individuals involved in athletics. As such, CA-MRSA is of emerging concern to sanitarians and public health officials. Secondary school athletic trainers and student athletes may be at elevated risk of spreading or contracting MRSA. The absence of proper hygiene protocols or equipment may further increase this risk. In the study discussed in this article, environmental samples were obtained to identify the prevalence of MRSA on surfaces in high school athletic training and wrestling facilities mats in nine rural Ohio high schools. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were prepared. All nine (100%) of the sites tested had at least one positive sample for the presence of MRSA. The need for heightened sanitation, hygiene education of affected persons about skin and soft tissue infections like MRSA, and intervention opportunities for public health professionals are discussed.

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) from different sources in China.

    PubMed

    Chao, Guoxiang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaorong; Huang, Yao; Xu, Lan; Zhou, Liping; Yang, Weixia; Jiang, Yuan; Xue, Feng; Wu, Yantao

    2013-03-01

    A diverse collection of 261 Staphylococcus aureus strains from human, animal, food, and environmental sources were tested for the presence and type of SCCmec elements, antibiotic susceptibility to various antibiotics, and non-ß-lactam antibiotic resistance genes. About 18.39% (48/261) of strains were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) including 29.75% (36/121) human strains of which 29 strains were hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and 7 strains were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and 19.67% (12/61) animal strains that all were CA-MRSA strains. The percentage of CA-MRSA strains from animals was significantly higher than that from human (p<0.01). Most of MRSA strains and a part of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains harbored unique combinations of non-ß-lactamase genes aac(6')/aph(2″), aph(3')-III, ant (4',4″), ermA, ermC, mrsA, tetM, and tetK. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected more frequently in HA-MRSA strains than in CA-MRSA strains (p<0.01). MRSA strains and MSSA strains had 22 and 39 antibiotic profiles to 15 tested antibiotics, respectively. The resistant proportion was higher in HA-MRSA strains than in CA-MSSA strains for various antibiotics, as well as higher in MRSA strains than in MSSA strains. Animal MRSA reservoirs (particularly pigs and cows) might represent an important source of human CA-MRSA. CA-MRSA strains might acquire more different resistance genes gradually, depending on the selective pressure of antibiotics in different regions or environments. CA-MRSA is not yet endemic in China, but could be prevalent in future, contributing to its acquiring more resistance genes and huge animal sources. Infection with multidrug-resistant MSSA strains acquired from food, animal, and human sources might also become a significant problem for human medicine, which warrants further study.

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia: role of linezolid in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Lesher, Beth; Gao, Xin; Chen, Yixi; Liu, Zhengyin

    2016-01-01

    The burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia in the People's Republic of China is high, with methicillin-resistance rates greater than 80% reported for patients with S. aureus pneumonia treated in intensive care units. Historically, vancomycin was the treatment of choice for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections. Recent evidence suggests that the minimum inhibitory concentration for vancomycin is increasing. Additionally, patients treated with vancomycin require monitoring of vancomycin trough concentrations and can develop nephrotoxicity. Linezolid is a treatment option for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections that can be administered either intravenously or orally. Analysis of data from a worldwide linezolid surveillance program initiated in the year 2004 shows no evidence of increasing linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations. The clinical efficacy of linezolid for patients with gram-positive, including MRSA, nosocomial pneumonia, was evaluated in numerous studies. In general, results from these studies show higher or similar clinical success with no mortality difference for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Results from a Phase IV study enrolling patients with MRSA-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia suggest higher clinical cure rates for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Although acquisition costs are higher for linezolid compared to vancomycin therapy, evidence suggests similar overall medical costs. Cost-analysis results from a Chinese perspective show that linezolid dominated vancomycin therapy for MRSA nosocomial pneumonia in ∼35% of bootstrap simulations whereas vancomycin dominated linezolid in less than 2% of bootstrap simulations. In summary, results from both clinical and economic studies, including studies conducted from a Chinese perspective, support the use of linezolid for the treatment of patients with MRSA nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:27069370

  2. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  3. [Methicillin resistance detection in Staphylococcus aureus: comparison between conventional methods and MRSA-Screen latex agglutination technique].

    PubMed

    Soloaga, R; Corso, A; Gagetti, P; Faccone, D; Galas, M

    2004-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant pathogen that has emerged over the last four decades, causing both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Rapid and accurate detection of methicillin resistance in S. aureus is important for the use of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and for the control of nosocomial spread of MRSA strains. We evaluated the efficiency of conventional methods for detection of methicillin resistance such as the disk diffusion, agar dilution, oxacillin agar screen test, and the latex agglutination test MRSA-Screen latex, in 100 isolates of S. aureus, 79 mecA positive and 21 mecA negative. The MRSA-Screen latex (Denka Seiken, Niigata, Japón), is a latex agglutination method that detects the presence of PLP-2a, product of mecA gene in S. aureus. The PCR of the mecA gene was used as the "gold standard" for the evaluation of the different methods tested. The percentages of sensitivity and specificity were as follows: disk difusión 97 and 100%, agar dilution 97 and 95%, oxacillin agar screen test 100 and 100%, and MRSA-Screen latex, 100 and 100 %. All methods presented high sensitivity and specificity, but MRSA-Screen latex had the advantage of giving a reliable result, equivalent to PCR, in only 15 minutes.

  4. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher F; Elbe, Laura A; Neal, Tyler D; Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic misuse and overuse in both the healthcare and agricultural fields have dramatically increased the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. Two strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43330 and a wild-type) and 1 strain of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (ATCC 25923) were challenged (9 runs in triplicate) in a preliminary study with ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) doses ranging from 0.25 to 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The mean percent kill was calculated for each strain when compared with the control plates (no exposure to UVGI). Then, each strain was challenged (22 runs in triplicate) with UVGI doses of 2.00, 2.50, and 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The results suggest a difference between the doses required to disinfect surfaces with each strain. Assuming a standard error rate of α = 0.05, there was a significant difference in variance between the MRSA (ATCC 43330 and wild type) strains and the S. aureus (ATCC 25923) methicillin-susceptible strain.

  5. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher F; Elbe, Laura A; Neal, Tyler D; Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic misuse and overuse in both the healthcare and agricultural fields have dramatically increased the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. Two strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43330 and a wild-type) and 1 strain of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (ATCC 25923) were challenged (9 runs in triplicate) in a preliminary study with ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) doses ranging from 0.25 to 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The mean percent kill was calculated for each strain when compared with the control plates (no exposure to UVGI). Then, each strain was challenged (22 runs in triplicate) with UVGI doses of 2.00, 2.50, and 3.00 mJ/cm(2). The results suggest a difference between the doses required to disinfect surfaces with each strain. Assuming a standard error rate of α = 0.05, there was a significant difference in variance between the MRSA (ATCC 43330 and wild type) strains and the S. aureus (ATCC 25923) methicillin-susceptible strain. PMID:26376157

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a cause of nosocomial wound infections.

    PubMed

    Sisirak, Maida; Zvizdic, Amra; Hukic, Mirsada

    2010-02-01

    Postoperative wound infections represent about 16% of hospital-acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of nosocomial wound infections. Increased frequency of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires permanent control of MRSA spread in the hospital.The purpose of this study was to analyse the frequency of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the swabs taken from the surgical wounds, the presence of MRSA infection in surgical departments and to examine antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates. Wound swabs were examined from January 2006 to December 2008. The isolates were identified by conventional methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method as per NCCLS guidelines.A total of 5755 wound swabs were examined: 938 (16,3%) swabs were sterile and 4817 (83,7%) were positive. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 1050 (22,0%) swabs and it was the most common cause of wound infections. MRSA was isolated from 12,4% samples in 2006, from 6,7% samples in 2007 and from 3,7% samples during 2008. Wound infections caused by MRSA dominated in the department of plastic surgery (24,4%) and in the department of orthopaedic surgery (24,1%). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 73% of MRSA isolates were with the same antibiotic sensitivity pattern (antibiotyp)-sensitive only to vancomycin, tetracycline, fucid acid and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxasole. Our results show decreasing of MRSA infection in the surgical wards. These results appear to be maintained with strategies for preventing nosocomial infection: permanent education, strong application of protocols and urging the implementation of strict infection control policy.

  7. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Types Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherirad, Akram; Jahanbakhsh, Roghayeh; Shakeri, Fatemeh; Anvary, Shaghayegh; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections around the world. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing methods are often used to study MRSA molecular epidemiology. Objectives The current study was designed to explore the distribution profiles of different SCCmec types among methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains isolated from hospitals in Gorgan, in northern Iran, and to correlate the types into observed bacterial virulence factors. Materials and Methods Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing of 62 MRSA strains isolated from patients and health-care workers in Gorgan was performed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The prevalence of the strains was then compared according to isolation source, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, biofilm production, and the presence of the Panton-Valentine gene in isolates. Results The most common SCCmec type was type III, with a frequency rate of 76%, followed by types IV, I, and V, with frequency rates of 11.2%, 4.8%, and 3.2%, respectively; three isolates (4.8%) were not typeable by this method. SCCmec type I was only isolated from blood culture, and types IV and V were mainly isolated from wounds and urine samples; SCCmec type III was isolated from all of the clinically samples. All of the MRSA strains that were isolated from healthy carriers were type III. Multidrug resistance in the type III strains was higher compared to the other types. The frequencies of Panton-Valentine and biofilm production were significantly lower in the type III strains compared to the other SCCmec types (P < 0.05). Conclusions Similarly to other geographical regions of Iran, the SCCmec type III MRSA strain was the most frequently isolated strain from patients in Gorgan. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III showed fewer virulence factors compared to other SCCmec types. PMID:27800133

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detected at Four U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rachel E. Rosenberg; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Davis, Johnnie A.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Schreiber, Nicole A.; Mukherjee, Sampa; Joseph, Sam W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing in the United States, and it is possible that municipal wastewater could be a reservoir of this microorganism. To date, no U.S. studies have evaluated the occurrence of MRSA in wastewater. Objective: We examined the occurrence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) at U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Methods: We collected wastewater samples from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest wastewater treatment plants between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for MRSA and MSSA using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) screening, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed to further characterize the strains. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. Results: We detected MRSA (n = 240) and MSSA (n = 119) in 22 of 44 (50%) and 24 of 44 (55%) wastewater samples, respectively. The odds of samples being MRSA-positive decreased as treatment progressed: 10 of 12 (83%) influent samples were MRSA-positive, while only one of 12 (8%) effluent samples was MRSA-positive. Ninety-three percent and 29% of unique MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively, were multidrug resistant. SCCmec types II and IV, the pvl gene, and USA types 100, 300, and 700 (PFGE strain types commonly found in the United States) were identified among the MRSA isolates. Conclusions: Our findings raise potential public health concerns for wastewater treatment plant workers and individuals exposed to reclaimed wastewater. Because of increasing use of reclaimed wastewater, further study is needed to evaluate the risk of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in treated

  9. Clinical Outcomes with Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Routine Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Nicolsen, Nicole C.; LeCroy, Nicholas; Alby, Kevin; Laux, Jeffrey; Lin, Feng-Chang; Daniels, Lindsay; Weber, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of bacteremia, with a substantial impact on morbidity and mortality. Because of increasing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin has become the standard empirical therapy. However, beta-lactam antibiotics remain the best treatment choice for methicillin-susceptible strains. Placing patients quickly on the optimal therapy is one goal of antimicrobial stewardship. This retrospective, observational, single-center study compared 33 control patients utilizing only traditional full-susceptibility methodology to 22 case patients utilizing rapid methodology with CHROMagar medium to detect and differentiate methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains hours before full susceptibilities were reported. The time to targeted therapy was statistically significantly different between control patients (mean, 56.5 ± 13.6 h) and case patients (44.3 ± 17.9 h) (P = 0.006). Intensive care unit status, time of day results emerged, and patient age did not make a difference in time to targeted therapy, either singly or in combination. Neither length of stay (P = 0.61) nor survival (P = 1.0) was statistically significantly different. Rapid testing yielded a significant result, with a difference of 12.2 h to targeted therapy. However, there is still room for improvement, as the difference in time to susceptibility test result between the full traditional methodology and CHROMagar was even larger (26.5 h). This study supports the hypothesis that rapid testing plays a role in antimicrobial stewardship by getting patients on targeted therapy faster. PMID:24088861

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation to Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Grace; Paulino, Franklin; Wachtel, Sarah; Parker, Dane; Wickersham, Matthew; Zhang, Dongni; Brown, Armand; Lauren, Christine; Dowd, Margaret; West, Emily; Horst, Basil; Planet, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skin is the most common site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. While most of these infections are self-limited, recurrent infections are common. Keratinocytes and recruited immune cells participate in skin defense against infection. We postulated that S. aureus is able to adapt to the milieu within human keratinocytes to avoid keratinocyte-mediated clearance. From a collection of S. aureus isolated from chronically infected patients with atopic dermatitis, we noted 22% had an agr mutant-like phenotype. Using several models of human skin infection, we demonstrate that toxin-deficient, agr mutants of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 are able to persist within keratinocytes by stimulating autophagy and evading caspase-1 and inflammasome activation. MRSA infection induced keratinocyte autophagy, as evidenced by galectin-8 and LC3 accumulation. Autophagy promoted the degradation of inflammasome components and facilitated staphylococcal survival. The recovery of more than 58% agr or RNAIII mutants (P < 0.0001) of an inoculum of wild-type (WT) MRSA from within wortmannin-treated keratinocytes compared to control keratinocytes reflected the survival advantage for mutants no longer expressing agr-dependent toxins. Our results illustrate the dynamic interplay between S. aureus and keratinocytes that can result in the selection of mutants that have adapted specifically to evade keratinocyte-mediated clearance mechanisms. PMID:25900653

  11. Discovery of Antivirulence Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Khodaverdian, Varandt; Pesho, Michelle; Truitt, Barbara; Bollinger, Lucy; Patel, Parita; Nithianantham, Stanley; Yu, Guanping; Delaney, Elizabeth; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    Antivirulence agents inhibit the production of disease-causing virulence factors but are neither bacteriostatic nor bactericidal. Antivirulence agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA300, the most widespread community-associated MRSA strain in the United States, were discovered by virtual screening against the response regulator AgrA, which acts as a transcription factor for the expression of several of the most prominent S. aureus toxins and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Virtual screening was followed by similarity searches in the databases of commercial vendors. The small-molecule compounds discovered inhibit the production of the toxins alpha-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulin α in a dose-dependent manner without inhibiting bacterial growth. These antivirulence agents are small-molecule biaryl compounds in which the aromatic rings either are fused or are separated by a short linker. One of these compounds is the FDA-approved nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal. This represents a new use for an old drug. Antivirulence agents might be useful in prophylaxis and as adjuvants in antibiotic therapy for MRSA infections. PMID:23689713

  12. Origins of Community Strains of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Edwin D.; Perdreau-Remington, Françoise; Kreiswirth, Barry; Bangsberg, David R.; Ciccarone, Daniel; Diep, Binh A.; Ng, Valerie L.; Chansky, Kimberly; Edlin, Brian; Chambers, Henry F.

    2008-01-01

    To characterize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains circulating in the community, we identified predictors of isolating community MRSA and genotyped a sample of MRSA collected from a community-based, high-risk population. Computerized databases of the Community Health Network of San Francisco and the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory were searched electronically for the years 1992–1999 to identify community-onset infections caused by MRSA. Sequential analyses were performed to identify predictors of MRSA strains. The majority (58%) of infections were caused by strains traceable to the hospital or to long-term care facilities. Injection drug use was associated with infections that were not associated with health care settings. Genotypes for 20 of 35 MRSA isolates recovered from injection drug users did not match any of >600 genotypes of clinical isolates. In a nonoutbreak setting, the hospital was the main source of community MRSA; however, the presence of genetically distinct and diverse MRSA strains indicates MRSA strains now also originate from the community. PMID:15206052

  13. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Chambers, Henry F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in hospitals worldwide and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Healthcare-associated MRSA infections occur in individuals with predisposing risk factors for disease, such as surgery or presence of an indwelling medical device. By contrast, community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections often occur in otherwise healthy individuals who lack such risk factors. In addition, CA-MRSA infections are epidemic in some countries. These observations suggest that CA-MRSA strains are more virulent and transmissible than traditional hospital-associated MRSA strains. Relatively limited treatment options for CA-MRSA infections compound the problem of enhanced virulence and transmission. Although progress has been made toward understanding emergence of CA-MRSA, virulence, and treatment of infections, our knowledge in these areas remains incomplete. Here were review the most current knowledge in these areas and provide perspective on future outlook for prophylaxis and/or new therapies for CA-MRSA infections. PMID:20206987

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses and horse personnel.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott

    2004-12-01

    Fortunately, MRSA infection and colonization are currently uncommon in veterinary medicine. Nevertheless, the increasing reports of the occurrence of MRSA infection in horses, veterinarians, and equine personnel dictate that serious consideration be given to the control of this pathogen in veterinary hospitals as well as in the equine community. It is unclear whether extrapolation from human hospitals and people in the community is appropriate; however, given the rapid increase in nosocomial MRSA in human hospitals and the recent shift of certain clones of MRSA into the community, it would be unwise to ignore this potential pathogen. If equine MRSA did, indeed, originate in the human population, complete eradication in the equine population is unlikely, regardless of the prevalence of infection in horses and the intensity of infection control measures, without concurrent eradication of MRSA in the human population, which is surely an impossible feat. Early institution of appropriate surveillance and other infection control measures should be used to attempt to limit the impact of MRSA in veterinary medicine, however. It has been stated, "The time to act is now, before the prevalence of MRSA in the community begins to rise and we end up with 50% of the community strains becoming methicillin-resistant". This statement was directed at control of MRSA in people; however, it is equally relevant in the veterinary context and should receive strong consideration. PMID:15519821

  15. Effects of bacteriocins on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Ken-ichi; Zendo, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Yamada, Satomi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-11-01

    Control of biofilms formed by microbial pathogens is an important subject for medical researchers, since the development of biofilms on foreign-body surfaces often causes biofilm-associated infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. The present study examined the effects of different kinds of bacteriocins, which are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, on biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The activities and modes of action of three bacteriocins with different structures (nisin A, lacticin Q, and nukacin ISK-1) were evaluated. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used in the treatment of MRSA infections, showed bactericidal activity against planktonic cells but not against biofilm cells. Among the tested bacteriocins, nisin A showed the highest bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Lacticin Q also showed bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells, but its activity against biofilm cells was significantly lower than that of nisin A. Nukacin ISK-1 showed bacteriostatic activity against planktonic cells and did not show bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Mode-of-action studies indicated that pore formation leading to ATP efflux is important for the bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Our results suggest that bacteriocins that form stable pores on biofilm cells are highly potent for the treatment of MRSA biofilm infections. PMID:23979748

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Canada: a historical perspective and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cimolai, Nevio

    2010-02-01

    The history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Canada has many similarities to MRSA evolution worldwide, but especially to that in the United States and United Kingdom. Reports of MRSA occurred as early as 1964, and community isolates were cited in the 1970s. Nosocomial outbreaks were becoming common by 1978 and flourished gradually thereafter. Endemic institutional MRSA became predominant in the 1990s, threatening large teaching hospitals in particular. In the last decade, both hospital-acquired and community-acquired MRSA have created major medical problems in Canada. More recently, an epidemic of Canadian community-acquired MRSA-10, has led to heightened public health concerns. Canadian contributions to MRSA science are numerous, with organized surveillance continuing to mature across the nation. A typing system for epidemic clones is now available and is being judiciously applied. Estimated costs for MRSA surveillance, treatment, and control are extraordinary, paralleling the dramatic rise in the number of MRSA isolations. Whereas surveillance continues to form an essential aspect of MRSA management, control, eradication, and overall diminution, MRSA reservoirs deserve much greater attention. Such efforts, however, must be as widely publicized in the community and in patient homes as they are in medical institutions responsible for both acute and long-term care.

  17. Evaluation for a novel methicillin resistance (mecC) homologue in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from injured military personnel.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Crawford, Katrina; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley; Ellis, Michael; Tribble, David R; Weintrob, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 102 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 50 injured service members (June 2009 to December 2011) at U.S. military treatment facilities were analyzed for the conventional mecA gene and mecC homologue by using standard PCR-based methods. The prevalence of the mecC homologue was zero.

  18. Biochemical Fingerprinting of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Sewage and Hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Fateh; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known as a common pathogen in nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Sewage acts as an environmental reservoir and may have a significant role in development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the epidemiological relatedness between the MRSA isolated from sewage and human infections. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected from a referral hospital and also a sewage treatment plant in Tehran, Iran, during 2010. All the MRSA isolates were identified at the species level and typed using Phene plate (PhP) system and SCCmec typing. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were also performed. Results: Of the 1142 isolates, 200 MRSA strains from the sewage (n = 100) and the clinic (n = 100) were isolated. Distinct PhP types, consisting of 16 common types and 13 single types, and also 3 different staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types (III, IVa and IVc) were found amongst the MRSA isolated from the two different sources. The results of antibiotic susceptibility testing showed an increased resistance to penicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. In addition, none of the isolates showed resistance to vancomycin, quinupristin -dalfopristin and linezolid. Conclusions: The presence of common PhP types and also SCCmec type III, as an indicator for hospital strains, among the isolates, may indicate an epidemiological link between clinical and sewage MRSA isolates in Tehran. PMID:26421131

  19. Performance of CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Diederen, Bram; van Duijn, Inge; van Belkum, Alex; Willemse, Piet; van Keulen, Peter; Kluytmans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar MRSA was evaluated for its ability to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A well-defined collection consisting of 216 MRSA strains and 241 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates was used. The sensitivity of CHROMagar MRSA after 24 h of incubation was 95.4%, increasing to 100% after 48 h. The specificity was already 100% after 24 h. PMID:15815020

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Dayane de Melo; Kipnis, André; Leão-Vasconcelos, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; Rocha-Vilefort, Larissa Oliveira; Telles, Sheila Araújo; André, Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Ribeiro, Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves; Pereira, Mayara Regina; Prado-Palos, Marinésia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03), habit of nail biting (p = 0.04) and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04) were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking. PMID:25477910

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus sp. colonizing health care workers of a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Costa, Dayane de Melo; Kipnis, André; Leão-Vasconcelos, Lara Stefânia Netto de Oliveira; Rocha-Vilefort, Larissa Oliveira; Telles, Sheila Araújo; André, Maria Cláudia Dantas Porfírio Borges; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Lima, Ana Beatriz Mori; Ribeiro, Nádia Ferreira Gonçalves; Pereira, Mayara Regina; Prado-Palos, Marinésia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological and microbiological aspects of oral colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus of health care workers in a cancer hospital. Interview and saliva sampling were performed with 149 health care workers. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Polymerase Chain Reaction, Internal Transcribed Spacer-Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis were performed for genotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus. Risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus colonization prevalence was 19.5%, denture wearing (p = 0.03), habit of nail biting (p = 0.04) and preparation and administration of antimicrobial (p = 0.04) were risk factors identified. All methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus were S. epidermidis, 94.4% of them had mecA gene. Closely related and indistinguishable methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis were detected. These results highlight that HCWs which have contact with patient at high risk for developing infections were identified as colonized by MRSE in the oral cavity, reinforcing this cavity as a reservoir of these bacteria and the risk to themselves and patients safety, because these microorganisms may be spread by coughing and talking. PMID:25477910

  2. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  3. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miall, L; McGinley, N; Brownlee, K; Conway, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is increasingly found in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).
AIMS—To determine whether MRSA infection has a deleterious effect on the clinical status of children with CF.
METHODS—Children with MRSA in respiratory cultures during a seven year period were identified and compared with controls matched for age, sex, and respiratory function. Respiratory function tests, anthropometric data, Shwachman-Kulczycki score, Northern chest x ray score, intravenous and nebulised antibiotic therapy, and steroid therapy were compared one year before and one year after MRSA infection.
RESULTS—From a clinic population of 300, 10 children had positive sputum or cough swab cultures for MRSA. Prevalence rose from 0 in 1992-1994 to 7 in 1998. Eighteen controls were identified. Children with MRSA showed significant worsening of height standard deviation scores and required twice as many courses of intravenous antibiotics as controls after one year. They had significantly worse chest x ray scores at the time of the first MRSA isolate and one year later, but showed no increase in the rate of decline in chest x ray appearance. There was a trend towards lower FEV1 and FEF25-75 in children with MRSA. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to change in weight, body mass index, or Shwachman score. There was no significant difference in prior use of steroids or nebulised antibiotics.
CONCLUSION—MRSA infection in children with CF does not significantly affect respiratory function, but may have an adverse effect on growth. Children with MRSA require significantly more courses of intravenous antibiotics and have a worse chest x ray appearance than controls.

 PMID:11159295

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G. J.; Pararajasingam, R.; Nasim, A.; Dennis, M. J.; Sayers, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is emerging as a major problem in vascular surgical practice. The aim of this study was to review the management of patients with MRSA infection complicating vascular surgical operations. METHODS: Data were obtained from the vascular audit, case notes, intensive therapy unit (ITU) notes, high dependency unit (HDU) notes and microbiological records of patients who underwent either arterial reconstruction (n = 464) or limb amputation (n = 110) between April 1994 and October 1998. RESULTS: Forty-nine vascular surgical patients developed clinical MRSA infection (9%). Clinical MRSA infection in patients who had undergone aorto-iliac reconstruction (n = 18) was associated with a 56% mortality (n = 10) and the most common infections were bacteraemia (55%) and pneumonia (50%). MRSA infection occurred in 17 patients who had undergone infra-inguinal bypass and was associated with a 29% mortality (n = 5). The most common site of MRSA infection was the groin wound (76%) leading to anastomotic dehiscence and death in one patient (11%) and necessitating wound debridement in 4 patients (22%). MRSA infection of the groin wound in the presence of a prosthetic graft (n = 3) led to anastomotic dehiscence in 2 patients, and graft excision in 2 patients. Similar complications were not observed in the presence of an underlying autogeneous long saphenous vein graft (n = 16). MRSA infection following major lower limb amputation (n = 14) was associated with death in 5 patients (36%). Wound infection in 10 amputees (71%) led to revision of the amputation to a higher level in 2 (14%) and wound debridement in 2 (14%). CONCLUSIONS: MRSA infection has a high mortality in vascular surgical patients in general, and following aorto-iliac reconstruction in particular. Autogeneous vein may confer some protection against local complications following groin wound infection. Strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of infection

  5. The role of primary care prescribers in the diagnosis and management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Kenneth R; Golik, Monica V; Davidson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were first reported in the United States in the early 1960s. Beginning in the 1990s, healthy individuals from the community with no risk factors for resistant bacteria began presenting with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, acquiring the name "community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA has a tendency to affect the skin and skin structures, generally in the form of abscesses and furuncles, carbuncles, and cellulitis. Cases of invasive infections including bacteremia, endocarditis, and necrotizing pneumonia have also been reported. A patient complaint of a "spider bite" is frequently associated with CA-MRSA. CA-MRSA and the traditional health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are distinguished by their genetic composition, virulence factors, and susceptibility patterns to non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Appropriate management of CA-MRSA skin and skin structure infections includes incision and drainage of infected tissue and appropriate antimicrobial therapy. It has been suggested that when prevalence of CA-MRSA within a community eclipses 10%-15%, empiric use of non-beta-lactam antibiotics with in vitro activity against CA-MRSA be initiated when treating skin and skin structure infections. CA-MRSA retains susceptibility to a range of older antibiotics available in oral formulations such as minocycline, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and clindamycin. Local susceptibility patterns and individual patient factors should guide the selection of antibiotics. PMID:19617720

  6. The role of primary care prescribers in the diagnosis and management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Kenneth R; Golik, Monica V; Davidson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were first reported in the United States in the early 1960s. Beginning in the 1990s, healthy individuals from the community with no risk factors for resistant bacteria began presenting with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, acquiring the name "community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA has a tendency to affect the skin and skin structures, generally in the form of abscesses and furuncles, carbuncles, and cellulitis. Cases of invasive infections including bacteremia, endocarditis, and necrotizing pneumonia have also been reported. A patient complaint of a "spider bite" is frequently associated with CA-MRSA. CA-MRSA and the traditional health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are distinguished by their genetic composition, virulence factors, and susceptibility patterns to non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Appropriate management of CA-MRSA skin and skin structure infections includes incision and drainage of infected tissue and appropriate antimicrobial therapy. It has been suggested that when prevalence of CA-MRSA within a community eclipses 10%-15%, empiric use of non-beta-lactam antibiotics with in vitro activity against CA-MRSA be initiated when treating skin and skin structure infections. CA-MRSA retains susceptibility to a range of older antibiotics available in oral formulations such as minocycline, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and clindamycin. Local susceptibility patterns and individual patient factors should guide the selection of antibiotics.

  7. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE IN MOUSE TYPHOID

    PubMed Central

    Blanden, R. V.; Mackaness, G. B.; Collins, F. M.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments in vitro comparing normal mouse peritoneal macrophages with cells from Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice have shown that the "immune" macrophages have conspicuously enhanced microbicidal properties. Whereas normal macrophages could inactivate only 50 to 60% of intracellular S. typhimurium pretreated with immune serum, cells from infected animals killed virtually all ingested organisms and did so at an accelerated rate. Macrophages from Listeria monocytogenes-infected mice were shown to possess similarly enhanced microbicidal activity against S. typhimurium. Furthermore, the growth of S. typhimurium in the liver and spleen was more effectively restricted in Listeria-infected mice than in animals vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium, even though the Listeria-infected animals possessed no demonstrable cross-reacting antibody to S. typhimurium. The lack of resistance in the mice vaccinated with heat-killed organisms could not be attributed to any deficiency of humoral factors, since the serum from these animals was as effective at promoting phagocytosis and killing by macrophages as serum from actively infected (and demonstrably resistant) mice. Conversely, Salmonella-infected mice were totally resistant to intravenous challenge with L. monocytogenes. The level of resistance in individual animals was related to the numbers of residual Salmonellae remaining in the tissues; mice with heavier residual infections being the more resistant. Specific antiserum from mice vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium was found to be significantly protective only when the intraperitoneal route of challenge was employed. The foregoing studies have been interpreted to mean that enhancement of the microbicidal ability of macrophages is the mechanism of major importance in acquired resistance to S. typhimurium infection in mice. PMID:4958757

  8. Use of a multiplex molecular beacon platform for rapid detection of methicillin and vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sinsimer, Daniel; Leekha, Surbhi; Park, Steven; Marras, Salvatore A E; Koreen, Larry; Willey, Barbara; Naidich, Steve; Musser, Kimberlee A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2005-09-01

    Drug resistance, particularly vancomycin and methicillin resistance, in Staphylococcus aureus continues to emerge as a significant public health threat in both the hospital and community settings. In addition to the limited treatment options, S. aureus strains acquire and express numerous virulence factors that continue to increase its ability to cause a wide spectrum of human disease. As a result, empirical treatment decisions are confounded and there is a heightened need for a diagnostic test (or assay) to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance and specific virulence determinants and indicate the appropriate treatment. To that end we developed a platform using multiplex molecular beacon probes with real-time PCR for the rapid detection of drug resistance-determining genes and virulence factors in S. aureus. In this study, we demonstrate the specificity and sensitivity of our platform for detection of the genes conferring methicillin (mecA) and vancomycin (vanA) resistance as well as a gene encoding the virulence factor Panton-Valentine leucocidin (lukF) in S. aureus isolates.

  9. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Olaitan, Abiola O.; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25505462

  10. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Olaitan, Abiola O; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Important Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first complete genome sequences of three predominant clones (ST68, ST71, and ST84) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in North America. All strains were isolated from canine infections and have different SCCmec elements and antibiotic resistance gene patterns. PMID:27795289

  12. Staphylococcus haemolyticus as an important hospital pathogen and carrier of methicillin resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Barros, E M; Ceotto, H; Bastos, M C F; Dos Santos, K R N; Giambiagi-Demarval, M

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and molecular methods were used to characterize the antibiotic resistance of 64 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus haemolyticus. By PCR of the mecA gene, 87% were found to be methicillin resistant. Approximately 55% harbored staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) type V, and only one SCCmec type IV. Many isolates (75%) displayed multiresistance, and pulsotype analysis showed a high diversity. PMID:21976766

  13. Staphylococcus haemolyticus as an Important Hospital Pathogen and Carrier of Methicillin Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Barros, E. M.; Ceotto, H.; Bastos, M. C. F.; dos Santos, K. R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and molecular methods were used to characterize the antibiotic resistance of 64 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus haemolyticus. By PCR of the mecA gene, 87% were found to be methicillin resistant. Approximately 55% harbored staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) type V, and only one SCCmec type IV. Many isolates (75%) displayed multiresistance, and pulsotype analysis showed a high diversity. PMID:21976766

  14. Surgical Site Infection by Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus– on Decline?

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Susmita; Jain, Sonia; Chatterjee, Shiv Sekhar; Konar, Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Site Infection (SSI) is the most common healthcare associated infection that could be averted by antibiotics prophylaxis against the probable offending organisms. As Staphylococcus aureus has been playing a substantial role in the aetiology of SSIs, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) happens to be a problem while dealing with the postoperative wound infection. Aim To determine the prevalence of SSI caused by MRSA and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of MRSA. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal from July 2009 to December 2012. A total of 19,359 surgical procedures were done of which 3003 culture positive SSIs have been documented. The clinical samples were collected from patients of both sexes and all ages suspected to be suffering from SSI from different specialities. Samples were processed according to CLSI, 2007 guidelines. The isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus were screened for MRSA by detection of resistance to Cefoxitin disc (zone of inhibition was ≤21 mm) and slidex staph latex agglutination tests were done on cefoxitin resistant strains to spot phenotypic expression of mec A gene. Then PCR was performed for detection of mecA gene. Antibiotic sensitivity test was done following Kirby Bauer technique. Results In this 3½ year study, 1049 Staphylococcus aureus (34.93%) were reported from 3003 cases of SSI followed by Escherichia coli (20.34%), Klebsiella spp. (18.08%), Pseudomonas spp. (7.99%), Acinetobacter spp. (7.49%) respectively. Among the Staphylococcus aureus, 267 strains were derived as MRSA (25.45%). MRSA were isolated from 167 (62.54%) male patients and 100 (37.45%) female patients having surgical site infections. Inpatients and outpatients distribution of MRSA were 235 (88.01%) and 32 (11.98%) respectively. Majority of the MRSA cases were reported from Surgery (12.49%) and Orthopaedics (11.85%) departments in the age

  15. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  16. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  17. Classification and characteristics of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, B J; Maxwell, S; Schaus, S M

    1980-08-01

    Sixty-five clinical isolates of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci have been classified as Staphylococcus epidermidis (63.0%), "phosphatase-negative S. epidermidis" (12.3%), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hominis (3.1%), and Staphylococcus warneri (1.5%). Five of the organisms (7.7%) could not be classified with certainty as currently recognized species. Novobiocin resistance was encountered in eight of the strains, but these were not classified as the accepted novobiocin-resistant staphylococcal species. Some differences in antibiotic resistance patterns to those typical of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were noted in that, although 29 strains were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, sulfamethizole, streptomycin, and tetracycline, the remainder of the strains were sensitive to streptomycin or tetracycline or both. In a majority of the strains (42 of 65), methicillin susceptibility testing by the disk method at 30 or at 37 degrees C in the presence of NaCl did not appear to enhance resistance expression. Most of the strains produced beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6), but none of the 21 strains tested produced enterotoxin B.

  18. Classification and characteristics of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, B J; Maxwell, S; Schaus, S M

    1980-08-01

    Sixty-five clinical isolates of coagulase-negative, methicillin-resistant staphylococci have been classified as Staphylococcus epidermidis (63.0%), "phosphatase-negative S. epidermidis" (12.3%), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hemolyticus (6.2%), Staphylococcus hominis (3.1%), and Staphylococcus warneri (1.5%). Five of the organisms (7.7%) could not be classified with certainty as currently recognized species. Novobiocin resistance was encountered in eight of the strains, but these were not classified as the accepted novobiocin-resistant staphylococcal species. Some differences in antibiotic resistance patterns to those typical of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were noted in that, although 29 strains were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, sulfamethizole, streptomycin, and tetracycline, the remainder of the strains were sensitive to streptomycin or tetracycline or both. In a majority of the strains (42 of 65), methicillin susceptibility testing by the disk method at 30 or at 37 degrees C in the presence of NaCl did not appear to enhance resistance expression. Most of the strains produced beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6), but none of the 21 strains tested produced enterotoxin B. PMID:6971871

  19. Distribution of mec regulator genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus clinical strains.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, E; Kuwahara-Arai, K; Richardson, J F; Hiramatsu, K

    1993-01-01

    The distributions of the mec regulator genes mecI and mecR1, which were identified on the chromosome of mecA-carrying Staphylococcus aureus N315, in methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated in Japan and various countries were studied. Screening by dot blot hybridization by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified probes revealed that at least the 5'-end region of the mecR1 gene was present in all strains tested, whereas about 40% of the strains were negative for the mecI gene. The data suggested that these regulator genes were the original components of the additional mec region DNA of methicillin-resistant S. aureus as well as methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci of seven staphylococcal species (S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. sciuri, S. capitis, S. caprae, and S. warneri). The mecI gene, which presumably codes for the repressor protein of the mecA gene, was found to harbor a point mutation in all six mecI-positive methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains, and their basal level of mecA gene transcription was elevated compared with that of strain N315, which harbors a presumably intact counterpart of the mecI gene. The data suggested that the mecI gene encodes for a strong repressor function on mecA gene transcription and is deleted or mutated in clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains with high levels of resistance to methicillin. Images PMID:8328773

  20. Bovine mastitis Staphylococcus aureus: antibiotic susceptibility profile, resistance genes and molecular typing of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengfeng; Wang, Zhicai; Yan, Zuoting; Wu, Jianyong; Ali, Tariq; Li, Jianjun; Lv, Yanli; Han, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dairy animals is of great concern for livestock and public health. The aim of present study was to detect new trends of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) towards antibiotic susceptibility, resistance genes and molecular typing by methods of disc diffusion, multiplex PCR assay and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 219 S. aureus strains were isolated from bovine mastitis cases from six provinces of China, including 34 MRSA strains. The results revealed that more than 70% isolated strains showed resistance to various antibiotics, and multiple-drugs resistance to more than five categories of antibiotics was found more common. The ermC was the most prevalent resistance gene, followed by other genes; however, ermA was the least frequently detected gene. Twenty-eight mecA-negative MRSA and six mecA-positive MRSA strains were detected, and in which three strains were ST97-MRSA-IV, others were ST965-MRSA-IV, ST6-MRSA-IV and ST9-MRSA-SCCmec-NT. The mecA-negative MRSA strains were found resistant to most of the antibiotics, and harbored aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-III and tetM genes higher than MSSA strains. The resistance to most of the antibiotics was significantly higher in MRSA than in MSSA strains. The MLST profiles showed that these strains mainly belonged to CC5, CC398, CC121 and CC50 lineage, especially within ST97 and ST398, while some novel sequence types (ST2154, ST2165 and ST2166) were identified and deposited in the MLST database. This indicates that the resistance of S. aureus is becoming more complicated by changes in multi-drug resistance mechanism and appearance of mecA-negative MRSA isolates, and importantly, MRSA-IV strains in different MLST types are emerging.

  1. Desired vancomycin trough serum concentration for treating invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Frymoyer, Adam; Guglielmo, B Joseph; Hersh, Adam L

    2013-10-01

    Vancomycin area under the curve/minimal inhibitory concentration (AUC/MIC) >400 best predicts the outcome when treating invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; however, trough serum concentrations are used clinically to assess the appropriateness of dosing. We used pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to examine the relationship between vancomycin trough values and AUC/MIC in children receiving vancomycin 15 mg/kg every 6 hours and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MIC of 1 μg/mL. A trough of 7-10 μg/mL predicted achievement of AUC/MIC >400 in >90% of children.

  2. Targeting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with short salt-resistant synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed F; Hamed, Maha I; Panitch, Alyssa; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2014-07-01

    The seriousness of microbial resistance combined with the lack of new antimicrobials has increased interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as novel therapeutics. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activities of two short synthetic peptides, namely, RRIKA and RR. These peptides exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and their antimicrobial effects were significantly enhanced by addition of three amino acids in the C terminus, which consequently increased the amphipathicity, hydrophobicity, and net charge. Moreover, RRIKA and RR demonstrated a significant and rapid bactericidal effect against clinical and drug-resistant Staphylococcus isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA), linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. In contrast to many natural AMPs, RRIKA and RR retained their activity in the presence of physiological concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2. Both RRIKA and RR enhanced the killing of lysostaphin more than 1,000-fold and eradicated MRSA and VRSA isolates within 20 min. Furthermore, the peptides presented were superior in reducing adherent biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis compared to results with conventional antibiotics. Our findings indicate that the staphylocidal effects of our peptides were through permeabilization of the bacterial membrane, leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and cell death. Furthermore, peptides were not toxic to HeLa cells at 4- to 8-fold their antimicrobial concentrations. The potent and salt-insensitive antimicrobial activities of these peptides present an attractive therapeutic candidate for treatment of multidrug-resistant S. aureus infections.

  3. Targeting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with short salt-resistant synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed F; Hamed, Maha I; Panitch, Alyssa; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2014-07-01

    The seriousness of microbial resistance combined with the lack of new antimicrobials has increased interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as novel therapeutics. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activities of two short synthetic peptides, namely, RRIKA and RR. These peptides exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and their antimicrobial effects were significantly enhanced by addition of three amino acids in the C terminus, which consequently increased the amphipathicity, hydrophobicity, and net charge. Moreover, RRIKA and RR demonstrated a significant and rapid bactericidal effect against clinical and drug-resistant Staphylococcus isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA), linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. In contrast to many natural AMPs, RRIKA and RR retained their activity in the presence of physiological concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2. Both RRIKA and RR enhanced the killing of lysostaphin more than 1,000-fold and eradicated MRSA and VRSA isolates within 20 min. Furthermore, the peptides presented were superior in reducing adherent biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis compared to results with conventional antibiotics. Our findings indicate that the staphylocidal effects of our peptides were through permeabilization of the bacterial membrane, leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and cell death. Furthermore, peptides were not toxic to HeLa cells at 4- to 8-fold their antimicrobial concentrations. The potent and salt-insensitive antimicrobial activities of these peptides present an attractive therapeutic candidate for treatment of multidrug-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:24798285

  4. Pharmacological Properties of the Marine Natural Product Marinopyrrole A against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Haste, Nina M.; Hughes, Chambers C.; Tran, Dan N.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in hospital and community settings presents a great challenge to public health and illustrates the urgency of discovering new antibiotics. Marinopyrrole A is a member of a structurally novel class of compounds identified from a species of marine-derived streptomycetes with evidence of antistaphylococcal activity. We show that marinopyrrole A has potent concentration-dependent bactericidal activity against clinically relevant hospital- and community-acquired MRSA strains, a prolonged postantibiotic effect superior to that of the current first-line agents vancomycin and linezolid, and a favorable resistance profile. Marinopyrrole A showed limited toxicity to mammalian cell lines (at >20× MIC). However, its antibiotic activity against MRSA was effectively neutralized by 20% human serum. A variety of marinopyrrole analogs were isolated from culture or synthetically produced to try to overcome the inhibitory effect of serum. While many of these compounds retained potent bactericidal effect against MRSA, their activities were also inhibited by serum. Marinopyrrole A has significant affinity for plastic and may therefore have potential as a potent anti-MRSA agent in cutaneous, intracatheter, or antibiotic-lock applications. PMID:21502631

  5. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolated from dogs in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Bae, Dong hwa; Cho, Jae-Keun; Bahk, Gyung Jin; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Lee, Young Ju

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from dogs in animal hospitals, animal shelters, and the Daegu PET EXPO to investigate the characteristics of circulating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRS) strains in companion animals in Korea. A total of 36/157 isolates were classified as MRS, and subdivided as follows: 1 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 4 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and 29 MRS spp. Among the 36 MRS isolates tested, 100% were resistant to oxacillin and penicillin, and at least 50% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (69.4%), erythromycin (63.9%), tetracycline (58.3%), cefoxitin (55.6%), clindamycin (50.0%) or pirlimycin (50.0%). Additionally, 34/36 MRS isolates (94.4%) were mecA positive, 15 of which were further classified as SCCmec type V, 6 isolates as type I, 4 isolates as type IIIb, 1 isolate as type IVa, 1 isolate as type IV, with 7 isolates being non-classifiable. The results of multilocus sequence typing and spa typing for the one MRSA strain were ST 72 (1-4-1-8-4-4-3) and spa t148. Our results provide evidence that companion animals like dogs may be MRS carriers, and that continued surveillance of MRS in companion animals is required to prevent increased incidences in humans.

  6. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. isolated from dogs in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Bae, Dong hwa; Cho, Jae-Keun; Bahk, Gyung Jin; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Lee, Young Ju

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from dogs in animal hospitals, animal shelters, and the Daegu PET EXPO to investigate the characteristics of circulating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal (MRS) strains in companion animals in Korea. A total of 36/157 isolates were classified as MRS, and subdivided as follows: 1 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 4 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and 29 MRS spp. Among the 36 MRS isolates tested, 100% were resistant to oxacillin and penicillin, and at least 50% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (69.4%), erythromycin (63.9%), tetracycline (58.3%), cefoxitin (55.6%), clindamycin (50.0%) or pirlimycin (50.0%). Additionally, 34/36 MRS isolates (94.4%) were mecA positive, 15 of which were further classified as SCCmec type V, 6 isolates as type I, 4 isolates as type IIIb, 1 isolate as type IVa, 1 isolate as type IV, with 7 isolates being non-classifiable. The results of multilocus sequence typing and spa typing for the one MRSA strain were ST 72 (1-4-1-8-4-4-3) and spa t148. Our results provide evidence that companion animals like dogs may be MRS carriers, and that continued surveillance of MRS in companion animals is required to prevent increased incidences in humans. PMID:25597186

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among dental patients: a problem for infection control in dentistry?

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Melanie; Widmer, Andreas F; Dangel, Marc; Filippi, Andreas; Frei, Reno; Meyer, Jürg

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the frequency of carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among 500 dental patients of a university clinic. From each participant, two specimens were taken from the anterior nares and the pharynx and analysed by culture. The participants completed a questionnaire on possible risk factors of MRSA infection. Two hundred ten individuals carried S. aureus, 90 in the nares only, 51 in the throat only and 69 in nares and throat. Isolates of 208 patients were methicillin-sensitive; two isolates were methicillin-resistant, both carried in the throat exclusively. In conclusion, the frequency of nasal and/or throat carriers of MRSA among dental patients was low and suggests few opportunities of exposure in the dental clinic assessed.

  8. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Jia; Xie, Cheng-Bin; Sun, Feng-Hui; Guo, Li-Juan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Yong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics. PMID:27338374

  9. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Jia; Xie, Cheng-Bin; Sun, Feng-Hui; Guo, Li-Juan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Yong-Xin

    2016-06-22

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics.

  10. Molecular Characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Abdominal Skin of Females before Laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Jia; Xie, Cheng-Bin; Sun, Feng-Hui; Guo, Li-Juan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Xi; Ma, Yong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, especially methicillin-resistant strains, may be the source of surgical site infections and may be a reservoir of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) for S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy and determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of these isolates. MRSE was found in 54 of 157 isolates based on mecA gene detection, and there was no difference in icaA gene carriage rate between MRSE and methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE) isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the latest CLSI manuals. All MRSE isolates had unfavorable antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Twenty-three MRSE strains (42.6%) were multi-drug resistant. SCCmec typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was performed. Thirty-nine (72.2%) had a single SCCmec type, whereas 1.9% had two types. Fourteen strains (25.9%) were non-typeable (NT). The most frequent MRSE genotype was SCCmec type IVa. High diversity with PFGE patterns was obtained for MRSE, and there were no isolates exhibiting identical pulsotype. The results confirm that methicillin-resistant strains are frequently present among S. epidermidis on the abdominal skin of females before laparotomy. Moreover, resistance profiles seem to have no association with the SCCmec types or PFGE types for most common antibiotics. PMID:27338374

  11. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 107 MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen. PMID:26826226

  12. Resistance of canine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains to pradofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kizerwetter-Świda, Magdalena; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Binek, Marian

    2016-09-01

    We investigated in vitro activity of a novel veterinary fluoroquinolone, pradofloxacin, against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) isolates and compared with other fluoroquinolones. A total of 38 MRSP isolates were subjected to agar disk diffusion tests for sensitivity to pradofloxacin, orbifloxacin, marbofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of pradofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin were determined. Mutations in the genes encoding DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (GrlA) proteins associated with fluoroquinolone resistance were studied by an analysis of partial sequences of the genes encoding these proteins. Two MRSP isolates were susceptible in disk diffusion and microdilution test to all fluoroquinolones tested, including pradofloxacin. Based on the results of the disk diffusion testing, 33 of 38 isolates showed resistance to pradofloxacin and 3 were intermediate, whereas, by pradofloxacin MIC testing, 35 isolates were classified as resistant and 1 as intermediate. Single alterations in GyrA and GrlA proteins were observed in the 35 resistant isolates and the 1 intermediate isolate (MIC results). These same 36 isolates were also resistant to the other tested fluoroquinolones. The results of the current study showed that MRSP isolates are usually resistant to all fluoroquinolones, including pradofloxacin. Therefore, in routine susceptibility testing to pradofloxacin by disk diffusion, the results should be carefully interpreted for MRSP isolates, especially those resistant to other fluoroquinolones and, in questionable cases, the pradofloxacin MIC should be determined to confirm the susceptibility testing results.

  13. Quantitative differences in antibiotic resistance between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Hungary, Austria and Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Horvath, A; Rozgonyi, F; Pesti, N; Kocsis, E; Malmos, G; Kristof, K; Nagy, K; Lagler, H; Presterl, E; Stich, K; Gattringer, R; Kotolacsi, G; Cekovska, Z; Graninger, W

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quantitative susceptibility of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA) strains from three European countries to nine antistaphylococcal agents. The antibiotic susceptibility of 274 MRSA and 284 MSSA strains from Hungary, Austria and macedonia was tested by the broth microdilution method. The clonal relationship of strains was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin appeared in Macedonian MRSA strains. Macedonian MRSA strains had high-level amikacin and gentamicin resistance. MSSA strains generally were susceptible to all drugs at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC(50)) except for gentamicin resistance in Macedonian strains. In Hungary and Austria a common antibiotic resistance phenotype of MRSA predominated, while in macedonia three other phenotypes were also prevalent. Geographical differences in the resistance of S. aureus are still high. Since resistance levels of MRSA and MSSA strains differ extensively, they should be considered separately for antibiotic resistance analysis.

  14. Quantitative NMR metabolite profiling of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus discriminates between biofilm and planktonic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B; Tripet, Brian P; Carlson, Ross P; Kirker, Kelly R; Gross, Michael A; Stanisich, Jessica J; Copié, Valérie

    2014-06-01

    Wound bioburden in the form of colonizing biofilms is a major contributor to nonhealing wounds. Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe commonly found in chronic wounds; however, much remains unknown about the basic physiology of this opportunistic pathogen, especially with regard to the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of S. aureus biofilms have suggested that S. aureus biofilms exhibit an altered metabolic state relative to the planktonic phenotype. Herein, comparisons of extracellular and intracellular metabolite profiles detected by (1)H NMR were conducted for methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) S. aureus strains grown as biofilm and planktonic cultures. Principal component analysis distinguished the biofilm phenotype from the planktonic phenotype, and factor loadings analysis identified metabolites that contributed to the statistical separation of the biofilm from the planktonic phenotype, suggesting that key features distinguishing biofilm from planktonic growth include selective amino acid uptake, lipid catabolism, butanediol fermentation, and a shift in metabolism from energy production to assembly of cell-wall components and matrix deposition. These metabolite profiles provide a basis for the development of metabolite biomarkers that distinguish between biofilm and planktonic phenotypes in S. aureus and have the potential for improved diagnostic and therapeutic use in chronic wounds.

  15. The evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Canadian hospitals: 5 years of national surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Simor, Andrew E.; Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Bryce, Elizabeth; Green, Karen; McGeer, Allison; Mulvey, Michael; Paton, Shirley

    2001-01-01

    Background To better understand the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Canadian hospitals, surveillance has been conducted in sentinel hospitals across the country since 1995. We report the results of the first 5 years of the program. Methods For each newly identified inpatient with MRSA, medical records were reviewed for demographic and clinical data. Isolates were subjected to susceptibility testing and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results A total of 4507 patients infected or colonized with MRSA were identified between January 1995 and December 1999. The rate of MRSA increased each year from a mean of 0.95 per 100 S. aureus isolates in 1995 to 5.97 per 100 isolates in 1999 (0.46 per 1000 admissions in 1995 to 4.12 per 1000 admissions in 1999) (p < 0.05). Most of the increase in MRSA occurred in Ontario, Quebec and the western provinces. Of the 3009 cases for which the site of MRSA acquisition could be determined, 86% were acquired in a hospital, 8% were acquired in a long-term care facility and 6% were acquired in the community. A total of 1603 patients (36%) were infected with MRSA. The most common sites of infection were skin or soft tissue (25% of MRSA infections), pulmonary tissues (24%) and surgical sites (23%); 13% of the patients were bacteremic. An epidemiologic link with a previously identified MRSA patient was suspected in 53% of the cases. Molecular typing indicated that most (81%) of the isolates could be classified as related to 1 of the 4 Canadian epidemic strains of MRSA. Interpretation There has been a significant increase in the rate of isolating MRSA in many Canadian hospitals, related to the transmission of a relatively small number of MRSA strains. PMID:11468949

  16. A pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), which causes a wide range of hospital and community-acquired infections worldwide. Conventional testing for detection of MRSA takes 2–5 days to yield complete information of the organism and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Results The present study focused on the development of a pentaplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of MRSA. The assay simultaneously detected five genes, namely 16S rRNA of the Staphylococcus genus, femA of S. aureus, mecA that encodes methicillin resistance, lukS that encodes production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a necrotizing cytotoxin, and one internal control. Specific primer pairs were successfully designed and simultaneously amplified the targeted genes. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of the pentaplex PCR assay was evaluated by comparing it with the conventional method. The analytical sensitivity of the pentaplex PCR at the DNA level was found to be 10 ng DNA. The analytical specificity was evaluated with 34 reference staphylococci and non-staphylococcal strains and was found to be 100%. The diagnostic evaluation of MRSA carried out using 230 clinical isolates, showed 97.6% of sensitivity, 99.3% of specificity, 98.8% of positive predictive value and 98.6% of negative predictive value compared to the conventional method. The presence of an internal control in the pentaplex PCR assay is important to exclude false-negative cases. Conclusion The pentaplex PCR assay developed was rapid and gave results within 4 h, which is essential for the identification of Staphylococcus spp., virulence and their resistance to methicillin. Our PCR assay may be used as an effective surveillance tool to survey the prevalence of MRSA and PVL-producing strains in hospitals and the community. PMID:19476638

  17. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chah, Kennedy F; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Nwanta, John A; Asadu, Brendan; Agbo, Ifeoma C; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence, resistance phenotype and molecular mechanisms of resistance of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from groin swabs of 109 clinically healthy dogs in Nsukka, Nigeria were investigated. The groin swab samples were cultured on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 10 μg of cloxacillin. Sixteen methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), all harbouring the mecA gene were isolated from 14 (12.8%) of the 109 dogs studied. The MRCoNS isolated were: S. sciuri subspecies rodentium, S. lentus, S. haemolyticus, and S. simulans with S. sciuri subspecies rodentium (62.5%) being the predominant species. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were resistant to tetracycline while 12 (75%) and 10 (62.5%) were resistant to kanamycin and trimthoprim-sulphamethoxazole respectively. None of the isolates was resistant to fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Thirteen (81.3%) of the MRCoNS were multi-drug resistance (MDR). Other antimicrobial genes detected were: blaZ, tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), lnu(A), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfr(G), cat pC221 , and cat pC223 . Methicillin-resistant staphylococci are common colonizers of healthy dogs in Nigeria with a major species detected being S. sciuri subsp. rodentium. PMID:24948934

  18. Epidemiology and genotypic characteristics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains of porcine origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA in pigs and pork. Genotypic relatedness of isolates on-farm, at slaughter and retail was assessed. Paired nasal and peri-anal swab samples we...

  19. A case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pyoderma in a Labrador retriever dog.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male Labrador retriever dog with generalized pruritis had a history of recurring atopic dermatitis and superficial pyoderma. Cocci and yeast were found on cytology and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was cultured. A regimen of marbofloxacin, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine in addition to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine shampoo resulted in marked improvement.

  20. Cluster of Infections Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in Humans in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Stefan; Grönlund-Andersson, Ulrika; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Melhus, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    The dog-associated Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a rare pathogen in humans. Here we describe a cluster of infections caused by the methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius clone ST71-J-t02-II–III. It involved four elderly patients at a tertiary hospital. Three patients had wound infections, and the strain had a tendency to cause bullous skin lesions. PMID:24871217

  1. Presence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pigs in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Carmen S.; Güere, Mariella E.; Larsen, Jesper; Skov, Robert L.; Gilman, Robert H.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in pigs in Peru. The isolates belong to a livestock-associated lineage previously reported in North America and Europe, CC398, and a highly virulent USA300-like ST8-IV variant, which is the predominant community-associated lineage in Latin America. PMID:22174831

  2. A case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pyoderma in a Labrador retriever dog.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male Labrador retriever dog with generalized pruritis had a history of recurring atopic dermatitis and superficial pyoderma. Cocci and yeast were found on cytology and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was cultured. A regimen of marbofloxacin, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine in addition to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine shampoo resulted in marked improvement. PMID:25392557

  3. Preventing Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" among Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Many, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) was once thought to be a bacterium causing infections in only hospitalized patients. However, a new strain of MRSA has emerged among healthy individuals who have not had any recent exposure to a hospital or to medical procedures. This new strain is known as "community-associated MRSA". Studies…

  4. Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in south Florida hospital and recreational environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a frequent human pathogen, may also be found in the flora of healthy persons and in the environments that they frequent. Strains of MRSA circulating in the community classified as USA 300 are now found not only in the community but also...

  5. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders R.; Westh, Henrik; Agersø, Yvonne; Fetsch, Alexandra; Kraushaar, Britta; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Feβler, Andrea T.; Schwarz, Stefan; Cuny, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Butaye, Patrick; Denis, Olivier; Haenni, Marisa; Madec, Jean-Yves; Jouy, Eric; Laurent, Frederic; Battisti, Antonio; Franco, Alessia; Alba, Patricia; Mammina, Caterina; Pantosti, Annalisa; Monaco, Monica; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; de Boer, Enne; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Heck, Max; Domínguez, Lucas; Torres, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Price, Lance B.; Skov, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat implicated as a probable source. PMID:27655995

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kidon; Iram, Saira; Nawaz, Mohamed; Xu, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates, hospital-associated perirectal isolate 32S (ST 239) from a colitis tracheostomy patient and community-associated MRSA isolate 42S (ST 772) from a hepatic-splenomegaly patient in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. PMID:26868381

  7. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by healthy companion animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant human pathogen and has also been associated with wounded or ill companion animals. Healthy animals may also harbor MRSA without presenting any symptoms, but little is known about the prevalence of MRSA among these animals. Therefo...

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prevalence among Captive Chimpanzees, Texas, USA, 20121

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Kirstin F.; Abee, Christian R.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Weese, J. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in humans and animals is concerning. In 2012, our evaluation of a captive chimpanzee colony in Texas revealed MRSA prevalence of 69%. Animal care staff should be aware of possible zoonotic MRSA transmission resulting from high prevalence among captive chimpanzees. PMID:26583847

  9. Scarlet fever caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Lo, Wen-Tsung

    2011-07-01

    We describe a previously healthy 2.5-year-old boy with staphylococcal scarlet fever associated with acute suppurative otitis media due to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was successfully treated by spontaneous drainage in combination with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy.

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prevalence among Captive Chimpanzees, Texas, USA, 2012(1).

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick W; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Abee, Christian R; Lambeth, Susan P; Weese, J Scott

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in humans and animals is concerning. In 2012, our evaluation of a captive chimpanzee colony in Texas revealed MRSA prevalence of 69%. Animal care staff should be aware of possible zoonotic MRSA transmission resulting from high prevalence among captive chimpanzees.

  11. A case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pyoderma in a Labrador retriever dog

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male Labrador retriever dog with generalized pruritis had a history of recurring atopic dermatitis and superficial pyoderma. Cocci and yeast were found on cytology and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was cultured. A regimen of marbofloxacin, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine in addition to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine shampoo resulted in marked improvement. PMID:25392557

  12. Congenital Cataract, Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction, and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Conjunctivitis: When to Operate?

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Zafar, Saemah Nuzhat

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the toughest organisms to treat, especially in cases where intraocular surgery is contemplated, because the risks are aggravated. Conjunctival swab culture and sensitivity tests are significant when there is history of recent hospitalization. In this report, an infant with successful cataract surgery after elimination of the organism is presented. PMID:27383382

  13. The prevalence of methicillin resistant organisms among pacemaker and defibrillator implant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, David J; Afzal, Aisha; Evonich, Rudolph; Haines, David E

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pacemaker and defibrillator infections are an uncommon, but catastrophic complication of device implantation. The present study examined the prevalence of device-related infections, the patterns of antibiotic resistance, and the presence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nares colonization in device implant recipients. Methods Two protocols were employed using a retrospective and a prospective analysis. A retrospective chart review of 218 patients with suspected device infection from 1/2000 to 1/2011 was performed. Demographics, infection rates, and patterns of antibiotic resistance were compared. The prospective analysis enrolled one hundred eighty two patients undergoing device implantations or generator replacements. The nares were swabbed and analyzed for the presence of staphylococcus aureus, and tested for methicillin sensitivity. Results Over a period of ten years, 12,771 device implants/generator changes/system revisions were performed, with an infection rate of 1.2%. Methicillin resistance (MR) was identified in 98/218 (44.9%) of patients. Those with MR infection had more diabetes and cardiomyopathy. There was no significant increase in methicillin resistance over time (p=0.30). Our prospective analysis included 110 men. A total of 32 patients (17.6%) had positive cultures for SA: 6.6% with MRSA. Patients positive for MRSA nares colonization had a statistically significant greater length of hospital stay 8.5 days (mean) versus 4.4 days (P=0.049). Conclusions Methicillin resistant organisms appear to be emerging and persistent pathogens in device implants. The screening of MRSA colonization may identify new populations at risk. Further studies and analysis are needed to determine the cost effectiveness of a screening protocol. PMID:22720201

  14. Typing of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-encoding phages carried by methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, A; Del Grosso, M; Villa, L; Ammendolia, M G; Superti, F; Monaco, M; Pantosti, A

    2014-11-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is the hallmark of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) but can also be found in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) sharing pathogenic and epidemiological characteristics of CA-MRSA. PVL is encoded by two co-transcribed genes that are carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. We applied an extended PCR-based typing scheme for the identification of two morphological groups (elongated-head group and icosahedral-head group I phages) and specific PVL phage types in S. aureus isolates recovered in Italy. We examined 48 PVL-positive isolates (25 MSSA and 23 MRSA) collected from different hospital laboratories from April 2005 to May 2011. spa typing, multilocus sequence typing and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing were applied to categorize the isolates. Phage typeability was 48.0% in MSSA and 91.3% in MRSA, highlighting the limitation of the PCR typing scheme when applied to PVL-positive MSSA. Five different PVL phages and two variants of a known phage were detected, the most prevalent being ΦSa2usa, recovered in 15 out of 48 (31.2%) isolates, and carried by both MSSA and MRSA belonging to CC8 and CC5. The recently described ΦTCH60 was recovered in four isolates. A PVL phage (ΦSa119) from an ST772 MRSA, that was not detected using the previous typing scheme, was sequenced, and new primers were designed for the identification of the icosahedral-head group II PVL phages present in ST772 and ST59 MRSA. A comprehensive PVL-phage typing can contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of PVL-positive MSSA and MRSA.

  15. Mutation in the C-Di-AMP Cyclase dacA Affects Fitness and Resistance of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dengler, Vanina; McCallum, Nadine; Kiefer, Patrick; Christen, Philipp; Patrignani, Andrea; Vorholt, Julia A.; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Senn, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    Faster growing and more virulent strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are increasingly displacing highly resistant MRSA. Elevated fitness in these MRSA is often accompanied by decreased and heterogeneous levels of methicillin resistance; however, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not yet fully understood. Whole genome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic basis of this apparent correlation, in an isogenic MRSA strain pair that differed in methicillin resistance levels and fitness, with respect to growth rate. Sequencing revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the diadenylate cyclase gene dacA in the faster growing but less resistant strain. Diadenylate cyclases were recently discovered to synthesize the new second messenger cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP). Introduction of this mutation into the highly resistant but slower growing strain reduced resistance and increased its growth rate, suggesting a direct connection between the dacA mutation and the phenotypic differences of these strains. Quantification of cellular c-di-AMP revealed that the dacA mutation decreased c-di-AMP levels resulting in reduced autolysis, increased salt tolerance and a reduction in the basal expression of the cell wall stress stimulon. These results indicate that c-di-AMP affects cell envelope-related signalling in S. aureus. The influence of c-di-AMP on growth rate and methicillin resistance in MRSA indicate that altering c-di-AMP levels could be a mechanism by which MRSA strains can increase their fitness levels by reducing their methicillin resistance levels. PMID:24013956

  16. Frequency of Aminoglycoside-Resistance Genes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiyoun, Seyed Mohsen; Kazemian, Hossein; Ahanjan, Mohammad; Houri, Hamidreza; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causative agents in community- and hospital-acquired infections. Aminoglycosides are powerful bactericidal drugs that are often used in combination with beta-lactams or glycopeptides to treat staphylococcal infections. Objectives The main objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in hospitalized patients in Sari and Tehran, Iran. Methods In this study, 174 MRSA strains isolated from different clinical samples, such as blood, sputum, tracheal exudates, bronchus, pleura, urine, wounds, and catheters, were collected from hospitalized patients in Tehran and Sari during 2014. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed against nine antibiotics with the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. The MRSA strains were examined with oxacillin and cefoxitin disks. MRSA was then validated by detection of the mecA gene. PCR was used to evaluate the prevalence of the aminoglycoside-resistance genes aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’) among the MRSA isolates. Results The results of drug susceptibility testing showed that the highest rate of resistance was against erythromycin in Tehran (84.4%) and gentamicin (71.7%) in Sari. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, and all strains harbored the mecA gene. The aac (6’)-Ie/aph (2”), aph (3’)-IIIa, and ant (4’)-Ia genes were detected among 134 (77%), 119 (68.4%), and 122 (70.1%) of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions The present study showed a high prevalence of aminoglycoside-resistance genes among MRSA isolates in two cities in Iran. PMID:27800135

  17. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant S aureus strains isolated from hospital effluents.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Ghosh, Ananta K; Pati, Bikas R

    2015-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strains were examined in hospital effluents. Most S aureus strains are resistant to methicillin (MRSA), followed by tetracycline. Approximately 15% of MRSA strains are also resistant to vancomycin (VRSA). All VRSA strains developed a VanR/VanS-regulated 2-component system of VanA-type resistance in their genome. Results indicate that there is a possibility of developing resistance to aminoglycosides by VRSA strains in the near future.

  18. Study of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern in Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus with Special Reference to Newer Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Dardi Charan; Chate, Sadhana Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of antibiotic resistance is in danger of ending the golden age of antibiotic therapy. Resistance impacts on all areas of medicine, and is making successful empirical therapy much more difficult to achieve. Staphylococcus aureus demonstrates a unique ability to quickly respond to each new antibiotic with the development of a resistance mechanism, starting with penicillin, until the most recent, linezolid and daptomycin. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become endemic today in hospitals worldwide. Resistance to the newer antimicrobial-agents — linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin are been reported and also the fear of pandrug-resistance. This study was carried out to know the antimicrobial resistant pattern of MRSA to newer antibiotic, to know any isolates are extensively-drug resistant (XDR)/pandrug resistant (PDR), inducible macrolide-lincosamide streptogramin B (iMLSB), and mupirocin resistance. Thirty-six MRSA isolates resistant to the routinely tested antibiotic were further tested for list of antibiotic by a group of international experts. Isolates were tested for iMLSB and mupirocin resistance by the disk diffusion method. Of 385 MRSA, 36 (9.35%) isolates of MRSA were resistant to the routinely tested antibiotic. Among these 36 MRSA isolates, none of our isolates were XDR/PDR or showed resistant to anti-MRSA cephalosporins (ceftaroline), phosphonic acids, glycopeptides, glycylcyclines, and fucidanes. Lower resistance was seen in oxazolidinones (2.78%), streptogramins (5.56%), lipopeptide (5.56%). Thirty-four (94.44%) isolates showed constitutive MLSB (cMLSB) resistance and two (5.56%) iMLSB phenotypes. High- and low-level mupirocin resistance were seen in 13 (36.11%) and six (16.67%), respectively. In our study, none of our isolates were XDR or PDR. No resistance was observed to ceftaroline, telavancin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin; but the presence of linezolid resistance (1, 2.28%) and daptomycin resistance (2

  19. High-dose daptomycin plus fosfomycin is safe and effective in treating methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Miró, José M; Entenza, José M; Del Río, Ana; Velasco, Maria; Castañeda, Ximena; Garcia de la Mària, Cristina; Giddey, Marlyse; Armero, Yolanda; Pericàs, Juan M; Cervera, Carlos; Mestres, Carlos A; Almela, Manuel; Falces, Carlos; Marco, Francesc; Moreillon, Philippe; Moreno, Asuncion

    2012-08-01

    We describe 3 patients with left-sided staphylococcal endocarditis (1 with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA] prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis and 2 with methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA] native-valve endocarditis) who were successfully treated with high-dose intravenous daptomycin (10 mg/kg/day) plus fosfomycin (2 g every 6 h) for 6 weeks. This combination was tested in vitro against 7 MSSA, 5 MRSA, and 2 intermediately glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus isolates and proved to be synergistic against 11 (79%) strains and bactericidal against 8 (57%) strains. This combination deserves further clinical study.

  20. High-Dose Daptomycin plus Fosfomycin Is Safe and Effective in Treating Methicillin-Susceptible and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Entenza, José M.; del Río, Ana; Velasco, Maria; Castañeda, Ximena; Garcia de la Mària, Cristina; Giddey, Marlyse; Armero, Yolanda; Pericàs, Juan M.; Cervera, Carlos; Mestres, Carlos A.; Almela, Manuel; Falces, Carlos; Marco, Francesc; Moreillon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We describe 3 patients with left-sided staphylococcal endocarditis (1 with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA] prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis and 2 with methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA] native-valve endocarditis) who were successfully treated with high-dose intravenous daptomycin (10 mg/kg/day) plus fosfomycin (2 g every 6 h) for 6 weeks. This combination was tested in vitro against 7 MSSA, 5 MRSA, and 2 intermediately glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus isolates and proved to be synergistic against 11 (79%) strains and bactericidal against 8 (57%) strains. This combination deserves further clinical study. PMID:22644033

  1. Occurrence and characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci from bovine mastitis milk samples in Finland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) are increasingly being isolated in bovine mastitis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the occurrence of MRS in Finnish mastitis milk samples and characterize the MRS isolates using molecular methods. Results Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was a rare finding in bovine mastitis in Finland. Only two out of 135 (1.5%) S. aureus isolates were positive for mec genes. One of these carried mecA and was of spa type t172, SCCmec type IV and ST375, and the other harboured mecC, being spa type t3256, and ST130. MRSA ST375 is common among human MRSA isolates in Finland, but this is the first report in the country of bovine mecC MRSA. In coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) originating from bovine mastitis, methicillin resistance was more common. In the two CoNS collections studied, 5.2% (17/324) and 1.8% (2/110) of the isolates were mecA positive. Eighteen of these were methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), which were divided into 6 separate PFGE clusters. One pulsotype was detected in different parts of the country, indicating clonal spread. Most MRSE (13/18) were of SCCmec type IV, one was of type V and four were non-typeable. Comparison with a human staphylococcal database indicated that bovine MRSE strains were not closely related to human MRSE isolates. Conclusions The occurrence of MRS, especially MRSA, in bovine mastitis in Finland was low. Most methicillin-resistant bovine CoNS are MRSE, and we found evidence of a bovine MRSE strain that may spread clonally. This is the first report of a Finnish bovine isolate of MRSAmecC ST130. The study provides a baseline for further MRS monitoring. PMID:23985065

  2. Vancomycin Tolerant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Reveals the Effects of Vancomycin on Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Ochoa, Sara A.; Escalona, Gerardo; Arellano-Galindo, José; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; López-Villegas, Edgar O.; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes both healthcare- and community-acquired infections. An increase in the incidence of these infections may lead to a substantial change in the rate of vancomycin usage. Incidence of reduced susceptibility to vancomycin has been increasing worldwide for the last few years, conferring different levels of resistance to vancomycin as well as producing changes in the cell wall structure. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of vancomycin on cell wall thickening in clinical isolates of vancomycin-tolerant (VT) MRSA obtained from pediatric patients. From a collection of 100 MRSA clinical isolates from pediatric patients, 12% (12/100) were characterized as VT-MRSA, and from them, 41.66% (5/12) exhibited the heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) phenotype. Multiplex-PCR assays revealed 66.66% (8/12), 25% (3/12), and 8.33% (1/12) of the VT-MRSA isolates were associated with agr group II, I, and III polymorphisms, respectively; the II-mec gene was amplified from 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates, and the mecIVa gene was amplified from 16.66% (2/12) of the isolates. Pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprint analysis showed 62% similarity among the VT-MRSA isolates. Thin transverse sections analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an average increase of 24 nm (105.55%) in the cell wall thickness of VT-MRSA compared with untreated VT-MRSA isolates. In summary, these data revealed that the thickened cell walls of VT-MRSA clinical isolates with agr type II and SCCmec group II polymorphisms are associated with an adaptive resistance to vancomycin. PMID:25793280

  3. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis.

  4. Treating Central Catheter-Associated Bacteremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Beyond Vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Holt, Shannon; Thompson-Brazill, Kelly A; Sparks, E Ryan; Lipetzky, Juliana

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of hospital-associated infections, including central catheter-associated bacteremia. Vancomycin has been the drug of choice for treating this type of bacteremia for decades in patients who have no contraindications to the antibiotic. However, resistance to vancomycin is an emerging problem. Newer antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug Administration have activity against methicillin-resistant S aureus Some of the antibiotics also have activity against strains of S aureus that are intermediately susceptible or resistant to vancomycin. This article uses a case study to highlight the clinical signs of vancomycin failure and describes the indications for and appropriate use of alternative antimicrobials such as ceftaroline, daptomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and telavancin. (Critical Care Nurse 2016;36[4]:46-57). PMID:27481801

  5. First report of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from cage-cultured tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Atyah, M A S; Zamri-Saad, M; Siti-Zahrah, A

    2010-08-26

    Swabs from the brain, eyes and kidneys of tilapia from 11 farms were collected for a period of 2 years. They were grown on blood agar before cultures of suspected Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to ABI STAPH Detection Kit and PCR for identification. They were then grown on oxacillin resistance screening agar base (ORSAB) and subjected to PCR using the MRSA 17 kb forward and reverse primers to identify the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A total of 559 isolates of Staphylococcus spp. were obtained, from which 198 (35%) isolates were identified as S. aureus. Of the 198 S. aureus isolated from tilapias, 98 (50%) were identified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Since global spread of multi-drug-resistant bacteria has increased in the past decade, this new finding in fish should be of concern. PMID:20189324

  6. Successful use of broth microdilution in susceptibility tests for methicillin-resistant (heteroresistant) staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C; McDougal, L K

    1983-11-01

    We studied the broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedure to see whether it could be made reliable for determining resistance of staphylococci to methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, and cephalothin. With 45 selected strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 12 selected strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis we found that the addition of 2% NaCl to cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth permitted us to discriminate reliably between resistant and susceptible organisms. A screening test in which resistant staphylococci grew on agar containing 4% NaCl and methicillin (10 micrograms/ml), oxacillin (6 micrograms/ml), or nafcillin (6 micrograms/ml) incubated at 35 degrees C for 24 h (additional 24 h if no growth) was also reliable. In vitro cephalothin resistance occurred in heteroresistant S. aureus but usually did not occur in heteroresistant S. epidermidis. PMID:6643661

  7. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated at the military hospital of Constantine/Algeria.

    PubMed

    Ouchenane, Z; Agabou, A; Smati, F; Rolain, J-M; Raoult, D

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec is a genetic mobile element that carries the gene mecA mediating the methicillin resistance in staphylococci. The aim of this study is to type the Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in 64 non-redundant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains recovered at the military hospital of Constantine (Algeria) between 2005 and 2007. Methicillin resistance was detected by oxacillin and cefoxitin discs and PBP2a test, and then confirmed by mecA PCR. The SCCmec complex types were determined by real time PCR. The analysis showed that 50 isolates were hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) and 14 were community-acquired (CA-MRSA). SCCmec type IV and V (traditionally attributed to CA-MRSA) were harbored by both HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA, while SCCmec type I, II and III were not recorded. These findings motivate more investigations to be carried on HA-MRSA in our hospital and other national health care centers.

  8. The multifaceted resources and microevolution of the successful human and animal pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most important bacterial pathogens based on its incidence and the severity of its associated infections. In addition, severe MRSA infections can occur in hospitalised patients or healthy individuals from the community. Studies have shown the infiltration of MRSA isolates of community origin into hospitals and variants of hospital-associated MRSA have caused infections in the community. These rapid epidemiological changes represent a challenge for the molecular characterisation of such bacteria as a hospital or community-acquired pathogen. To efficiently control the spread of MRSA, it is important to promptly detect the mecA gene, which is the determinant of methicillin resistance, using a polymerase chain reaction-based test or other rapidly and accurate methods that detect the mecA product penicillin-binding protein (PBP)2a or PBP2’. The recent emergence of MRSA isolates that harbour a mecA allotype, i.e., the mecC gene, infecting animals and humans has raised an additional and significant issue regarding MRSA laboratory detection. Antimicrobial drugs for MRSA therapy are becoming depleted and vancomycin is still the main choice in many cases. In this review, we present an overview of MRSA infections in community and healthcare settings with focus on recent changes in the global epidemiology, with special reference to the MRSA picture in Brazil. PMID:24789555

  9. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northeastern Scotland in 2003 to 2007: Evolving Strain Distribution and Resistance Patterns▿

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, A. C.; Edwards, B.; Girvan, E. K.; Cosgrove, B.; Edwards, G. F. S.; Gould, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored strain distribution and resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) over a 5-year period in northeastern Scotland. We noted a shift in the relative rates of epidemic strains and an increase in community-associated strains. Use of oral antibiotics to eradicate throat carriage may have contributed to trimethoprim resistance, which was observed to increase 10-fold. PMID:21411588

  10. Emergence of rifampicin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated at a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ilknur; Udo, Edet E; Noronha, Bobby; Caylan, Rahmet; Aydin, Faruk; Yetiskul, Serpil; Koksal, Iftihar

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-three rifampicin-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated in three wards at a university hospital in Turkey between June, 2000, and February, 2001, were studied for their genetic relatedness using a combination of antibiogram, coagulase serotyping, coagulase gene polymorphism (coa-RFLP), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). They all expressed high-level rifampicin resistance (MIC, >256 mg/L) and were resistant to gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and cadmium acetate and were susceptible to fusidic acid, vancomycin, trimethoprim, and mupirocin. They belonged to the same coagulase serotype (serotype IV) and had identical coa-RFLP patterns. In contrast, PFGE generated nine banding patterns designated type A, types A1-A5, B, C, and D. The most common PFGE pattern (type A) and its subtypes (types A1-A5) were seen in 20 (87%) of the 23 isolates in the three wards. The results demonstrated the acquisition of rifampicin resistance by different MRSA clones and the spread of one clone among patients in the three wards.

  11. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage, Antibiotic Resistance and Molecular Pathogenicity among Healthy Individuals Exposed and Not Exposed to Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Veena; Renushri, Bhadravati Virupaksha; Nagaraj, Elkal Rajappa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare workers as well as healthy community-dwelling individuals may be colonised by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Healthcare workers who carry MRSA may transmit it to patients, causing various nosocomial infections. Literature shows that the differences between MRSA isolated from healthcare settings and from community settings, with regard to multi-drug resistance (traditionally exhibited by the former) and possession of pvl genes (traditionally exhibited by the latter), is diminishing due to a large community reservoir and increasing influx of community harboured strains into the hospital. However, there is no literature on the current scenario in India. Aims and Objectives: This study examines the influence of exposure to hospital environment on MRSA carriage, antimicrobial resistance patterns of MRSA, and the presence of genes encoding five extracellular pathogenicity determinants (pvl, sea, seb, tsst-1 and hly a). Materials and Methods: Nasal, throat and palmar swabs were collected from 119 nursing students of the age group 18-23 years (exposed group) and 100 age matched pharmacy students (non-exposed group). S. aureus was identified and antibiogram obtained as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. MRSA was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion test and by growth on oxacillin screen agar as per CLSI guidelines. Conventional PCR was performed for mecA, pvl, sea, seb, tsst-1 and hly a. Results: The differences in carrier rates, antibiotic resistance patterns and expression of extracellular pathogenicity determinants between MRSA isolates from the two study groups were not significant, and pvl was found in all the MRSA isolates. Conclusion: The nursing students carried MRSA strains similar to those carried by the non-exposed group. Our results suggest that healthcare workers could act as a link and transmit MRSA acquired from the community to patients. PMID:25177563

  12. Intrarenal abscess caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C Y; Chan, S Y; Yeung, C S; Kwok, P C; Chak, W L; Wu, T C; Chau, K F

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is important in solid organ transplant recipients, because it can jeopardize patient and graft survival. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are not rare in kidney transplant recipients. On the other hand, infections related to community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains are seldom reported in the literature. Herein, we report the first patient, to our knowledge, with CA-MRSA renal graft abscess who was successfully treated with drainage and parenteral antibiotics.

  13. Heavy metal and disinfectant resistance genes among livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Lauzat, Birgit; Kraushaar, Britta; Alba, Patricia; Agerso, Yvonne; Cavaco, Lina; Butaye, Patrick; Porrero, M Concepción; Battisti, Antonio; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Fetsch, Alexandra; Guerra, Beatriz

    2016-08-15

    Livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has emerged in animal production worldwide. Most LA-MRSA in Europe belong to the clonal complex (CC) 398. The reason for the LA-MRSA emergence is not fully understood. Besides antimicrobial agents used for therapy, other substances with antimicrobial activity applied in animal feed, including metal-containing compounds might contribute to their selection. Some of these genes have been found in various novel SCCmec cassettes. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of metal-resistance genes among a LA-S. aureus collection [n=554, including 542 MRSA and 12 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)] isolated from livestock and food thereof. Most LA-MRSA isolates (76%) carried at least one metal-resistance gene. Among the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates (n=456), 4.8%, 0.2%, 24.3% and 71.5% were positive for arsA (arsenic compounds), cadD (cadmium), copB (copper) and czrC (zinc/cadmium) resistance genes, respectively. In contrast, among the LA-MRSA non-CC398 isolates (n=86), 1.2%, 18.6% and 16.3% were positive for the cadD, copB and czrC genes, respectively, and none were positive for arsA. Of the LA-MRSA CC398 isolates, 72% carried one metal-resistance gene, and the remaining harboured two or more in different combinations. Differences between LA-MRSA CC398 and non-CC398 were statistically significant for arsA and czrC. The czrC gene was almost exclusively found (98%) in the presence of SCCmec V in both CC398 and non-CC398 LA-MRSA isolates from different sources. Regarding the LA-MSSA isolates (n=12), some (n=4) were also positive for metal-resistance genes. This study shows that genes potentially conferring metal-resistance are frequently present in LA-MRSA.

  14. Unexpected diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Kong, Fanrong; Xiao, Meng; Wang, Qinning; O'Sullivan, Matthew; Sintchenko, Vitali; Ma, Lin; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2010-10-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) is a large mobile genetic element which is used frequently for subtyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. MRSA SCCmec type IV not only predominates among community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains but also is associated with several genetic lineages of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and with other species. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of MRSA strains classified as SCCmec type IV by using a multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) hybridization assay as well as spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sixty-two primer pairs and 63 probes were designed to interrogate each open reading frame (ORF) of SCCmec type IV sequences. A set of 131 MRSA SCCmec type IV isolates were classified into 79 subtypes by this method. There was considerable concordance between SCCmec type IV subtyping, spa typing, and PFGE patterns for clinical isolates, and the stability of SCCmec type IV subtyping was comparable to that of the other two methods. Using an in-house computer program, we showed that a subset of 20 genetic markers could achieve the same level of discrimination between isolates as the full set of 62, with a Simpson's index of diversity of 0.975. SCCmec type IV has a much higher level of diversity than previously suggested. The application of the mPCR/RLB hybridization assay to MRSA SCCmec type IV subtyping can improve the discriminatory power and throughput of MRSA typing and has the potential to enhance rapid infection control surveillance and outbreak detection.

  15. Intercontinental Spread of a Multidrug-Resistant MethicillinResistant Staphylococcus aureus Clone

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, M. Aires; Sanches, I. Santos; Ferro, M. L.; Vaz, M. J.; Saraiva, Z.; Tendeiro, T.; Serra, J.; de Lencastre, H.

    1998-01-01

    Two hundred ten methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered between 1990 and 1997 from three Portuguese hospitals located in Lisbon and Oporto were analyzed by molecular fingerprinting techniques. The hybridization of ClaI restriction digests with the mecA- and Tn554-specific DNA probes combined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis documented the abrupt appearance and extensive intrahospital spread of the Brazilian epidemic MRSA clone in the 1995 samples of each one of the three hospitals analyzed—suggesting the intercontinental transfer of this strain from Brazil to Portugal. The appearance of this clone may challenge the dominance of another highly epidemic imported clone—the Iberian MRSA, currently the most widely spread MRSA clone in Portuguese hospitals. PMID:9705398

  16. Economic features of antibiotic resistance: the case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Antonanzas, Fernando; Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    This paper analyses and updates the economic information regarding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including information that has been previously reviewed by other authors, and new information, for the purpose of facilitating health management and clinical decisions. The analysed articles reveal great disparity in the economic burden on MRSA patients; this is mainly due to the diversity of the designs of the studies, as well as the variability of the patients and the differences in health care systems. Regarding prophylactic strategies, the studies do not provide conclusive results that could unambiguously orientate health management. The studies addressing treatments noted that linezolid seems to be a cost-effective treatment for MRSA, mostly because it is associated with a shorter length of stay (LOS) in hospital. However, important variables such as antimicrobial susceptibility, infection type and resistance emergence should be included in these analyses before a conclusion is reached regarding which treatment is the best (most efficient). The reviewed studies found that rapid MRSA detection, using molecular techniques, is an efficient technique to control MRSA. As a general conclusion, the management of MRSA infections implicates important economic costs for hospitals, as they result in higher direct costs and longer LOS than those related to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) patients or MRSA-free patients; there is wide variability in those increased costs, depending on different variables. Moreover, the research reveals a lack of studies on other related topics, such as the economic implications of changes in MRSA epidemiology (community patients and lineages associated with farm animals).

  17. Blood neutrophil bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Honoré, Stéphanie; Kirsch, Matthias; Plonquet, Anne; Fernandez, Eric; Touqui, Lhousseine; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Soussy, Claude-James; Loisance, Daniel; Delclaux, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    Whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitutes per se an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality after surgery as compared with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) remains a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to assess whether innate defenses against MRSA and MSSA strains are similarly impaired after cardiac surgery. Both intracellular (isolated neutrophil functions) and extracellular (plasma) defenses of 12 patients undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery were evaluated preoperatively (day 0) and postoperatively (day 3) against two MSSA strains with a low level of catalase secretion and two MRSA strains with a high level of catalase secretion, inasmuch as SA killing by neutrophils relies on oxygen-dependent mechanisms. After surgery, an increase in plasma concentration of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine able to inhibit reactive oxygen species secretion and bactericidal activity of neutrophils, was evidenced. Despite the fact that univariate analysis suggested a specific impairment of neutrophil functions against MRSA strains, two-way repeated-measures ANOVA failed to demonstrate that the effect of S. aureus phenotype was significant. On the other hand, an increase in type-II secretory phospholipase A2 activity, a circulating enzyme involved in SA lysis, was evidenced and was associated with an enhancement of extracellular defenses (bactericidal activity of plasma) against MRSA. Overall, cardiac surgery and S. aureus phenotype had a significant effect on plasma bactericidal activity. Cardiac surgery was characterized by enhanced antibacterial defenses of plasma, whereas neutrophil killing properties were reduced. The overall effect of S. aureus phenotype on neutrophil functions did not seem significant.

  18. Co-colonization and clonal diversity of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in sows.

    PubMed

    Fetsch, Alexandra; Roesler, Uwe; Kraushaar, Britta; Friese, Anika

    2016-03-15

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are colonizers of skin and mucosa. In humans, MSSA and MRSA compete for colonization space in the anterior nares of pig farmers; however, it was also shown that MSSA/MRSA co-colonization is common and one clone can be found rather than differing types of MSSA and MRSA. We investigated the colonization and clonality of both, MSSA and MRSA in pigs over a longer time. Eighteen sows were nasally sampled three times every ten weeks. Additionally, environmental samples were taken. Samples were investigated for MSSA and MRSA, respectively. The spa type was defined from up to five MRSA and MSSA isolates found per sample and sampling time; selected isolates were further investigated by microarray. Three sows (16.7%) were completely negative for MSSA and MRSA. Twelve pigs (66.7%) were irregularly positive for both, MSSA and MRSA over the time, whereas seven out of them (38.9%) were simultaneously colonized. CC398 (t034, t011) MRSA and CC9 (t337, t1430, and t13816) MSSA associated spa types were exclusively found. In 44.4% (n=8) of sows up to two different types of MSSA were present at the same time and sample. Strains of the same clonal lineage showed a high genetic identity despite their origin. Highly identic clones were present in sows and their environment. As conclusion, MSSA/MRSA may not exclude each other in the anterior nares of pigs. Pigs may also carry different clones at the same time.

  19. Co-colonization and clonal diversity of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in sows.

    PubMed

    Fetsch, Alexandra; Roesler, Uwe; Kraushaar, Britta; Friese, Anika

    2016-03-15

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are colonizers of skin and mucosa. In humans, MSSA and MRSA compete for colonization space in the anterior nares of pig farmers; however, it was also shown that MSSA/MRSA co-colonization is common and one clone can be found rather than differing types of MSSA and MRSA. We investigated the colonization and clonality of both, MSSA and MRSA in pigs over a longer time. Eighteen sows were nasally sampled three times every ten weeks. Additionally, environmental samples were taken. Samples were investigated for MSSA and MRSA, respectively. The spa type was defined from up to five MRSA and MSSA isolates found per sample and sampling time; selected isolates were further investigated by microarray. Three sows (16.7%) were completely negative for MSSA and MRSA. Twelve pigs (66.7%) were irregularly positive for both, MSSA and MRSA over the time, whereas seven out of them (38.9%) were simultaneously colonized. CC398 (t034, t011) MRSA and CC9 (t337, t1430, and t13816) MSSA associated spa types were exclusively found. In 44.4% (n=8) of sows up to two different types of MSSA were present at the same time and sample. Strains of the same clonal lineage showed a high genetic identity despite their origin. Highly identic clones were present in sows and their environment. As conclusion, MSSA/MRSA may not exclude each other in the anterior nares of pigs. Pigs may also carry different clones at the same time. PMID:26931385

  20. Determination of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in blood by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Tesařová, Marie; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Sittová, Martina; Roth, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Serious bloodstream infections are a significant complication in critically ill patients. The treatment of these infections has become more difficult because of the increasing prevalence of multiresistant strains, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Rapid differentiation of low number of MRSA from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cells (10(1)-10(2) cells mL(-1)) in blood is necessary for fast effective antibiotic therapy. Currently, three groups of techniques, phenotyping, genotyping, and mass spectrometry, are used for MRSA and MSSA strains differentiation. Most of these techniques are time-consuming. PCR and other molecular techniques allow the detection and differentiation between MSSA and MRSA directly from blood cultures. These methods alone are rapid and they have good reproducibility and repeatability. Potential disadvantages of the genotyping methods include their discrimination ability, technical complexity, financial costs, and difficult interpretation of the results. Recently, capillary electrophoresis (CZE) was successfully used to differentiate between the agar-cultivated MRSA and MSSA strains in fused silica capillaries etched with supercritical water and modified with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane. The possible use of CZE as a fast and low-cost method for distinguishing between the blood-incubated MRSA or MSSA cells has been tested in this manuscript. Our goal was to test low amounts of bacteria (∼10(2) cell mL(-1)) similar to those in clinical samples. The migration times of the purified blood-incubated cells and the agar-cultivated cells were different from each other. However, their isoelectric point was the same for all strains.

  1. Characterization of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains among inpatients and outpatients in a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Fateh; Shokoohizadeh, Leili

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of a variety of infections ranging from wound infections to urinary tract infections (UTI) in hospital and community. In this study during 3 years we characterized the antibiotic resistance patterns of 491 hospital acquired MRSA and community associated MRSA strains by the guidelines of clinical and laboratory standard institute. A combination of high resolution PhP typing method and SCCmec typing were used for clonal dissemination of isolates. Among all 491 MRSA strains, diverse PhP types consisting of 29 common types (CTs) and 4 single types (STs) and also 2 different SCCmec types (III and IVa) were detected. In addition, 18 CTs were common among CA- and HA-MRSA strains and the presence of all 4 STs was limited to HA-MRSA strains. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and high level resistance was observed against ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tobramycin and kanamycin and the rate of resistance to most of the antibiotic tested among HA-MRSA was significantly higher than CA-MRSA isolates. Moreover, all isolates showed susceptibility to linezolid, vancomycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin and very low resistance to fusidic acid, nitrofurantoin and chloramphenicol were detected. Our findings illustrated the increasing rate of clonal dissemination and persistence of highly antibiotic resistant CA-MRSA strains in Tehran hospitals, and also indicated the important role of the hospitals as the reservoir of MRSA strains. PMID:27265678

  2. Characterization of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains among inpatients and outpatients in a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Fateh; Shokoohizadeh, Leili

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of a variety of infections ranging from wound infections to urinary tract infections (UTI) in hospital and community. In this study during 3 years we characterized the antibiotic resistance patterns of 491 hospital acquired MRSA and community associated MRSA strains by the guidelines of clinical and laboratory standard institute. A combination of high resolution PhP typing method and SCCmec typing were used for clonal dissemination of isolates. Among all 491 MRSA strains, diverse PhP types consisting of 29 common types (CTs) and 4 single types (STs) and also 2 different SCCmec types (III and IVa) were detected. In addition, 18 CTs were common among CA- and HA-MRSA strains and the presence of all 4 STs was limited to HA-MRSA strains. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and high level resistance was observed against ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tobramycin and kanamycin and the rate of resistance to most of the antibiotic tested among HA-MRSA was significantly higher than CA-MRSA isolates. Moreover, all isolates showed susceptibility to linezolid, vancomycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin and very low resistance to fusidic acid, nitrofurantoin and chloramphenicol were detected. Our findings illustrated the increasing rate of clonal dissemination and persistence of highly antibiotic resistant CA-MRSA strains in Tehran hospitals, and also indicated the important role of the hospitals as the reservoir of MRSA strains.

  3. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tertiary care hospitals in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Noguchi, Norihisa; Ito, Ayumu; Ikeda, Masashi; Utsumi, Kenta; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Haruo; Senoo, Masako; Takasato, Yoshio; Nishinarita, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains problematic in both hospital and community settings. Investigations of MRSA existing in the local area are necessary to understand the detailed epidemiology of healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). In the present study, molecular epidemiological analysis was performed on 584 MRSA isolated from four hospitals in Tokyo, Japan. In the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, four epidemic pulsotypes (I to IV) were found. The isolates of the epidemic pulsotype I mainly consisted of the SCCmec type II, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 gene (tst)-negative, spa type t002, and ST764 clones. The ST764 clone, which is a novel hybrid variant of the ST5 HA-MRSA lineage with the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), was first found in Niigata, Japan. However, no ACME genes were detected in the isolates of the epidemic pulsotype I. In contrast, the other isolates of the epidemic pulsotypes mainly consisted of the SCCmec type II, tst-positive, spa type t002, and ST5 clones, which are the most predominant clones of HA-MRSA in Japan. Resistance rates of non-β-lactams for the isolates of the epidemic pulsotype I were higher than those of the other epidemic pulsotypes. Our data showed that the novel ACME-negative ST764 clones are being distributed throughout multiple hospitals in Tokyo. The ST764 clones in Tokyo have the potential to acquire ACME in the future, because the ACME-positive ST764 clones have already been found in both hospital and community settings in other areas of Japan.

  4. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Miller, Ruth R; Montoya, Vincent; Hoang, Linda; Romney, Marc G; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp.) from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5%) rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10) containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82), and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85) and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58) compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  5. Performance of CHROMagar Selective Medium and Oxacillin Resistance Screening Agar Base for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Detecting Methicillin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kluytmans, Jan; Van Griethuysen, Arjanne; Willemse, Piet; Van Keulen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Two new selective media, oxacillin resistance screening agar base (ORSAB) and CHROMagar Staph aureus (CSA), were evaluated for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and for screening of methicillin resistance by addition of antimicrobial agents to these media. A well-defined collection consisting of 1,140 staphylococci was used. A total of 624 were S. aureus, of which 358 were methicillin susceptible and 266 were methicillin resistant, and 516 were coagulase-negative staphylococci. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were selected based on the results of phage typing; 247 different types were included in the analysis. For identification of S. aureus, both media performed better after 24 h than after 48 h. The sensitivities at 24 h were comparable (CSA, 98.6%; ORSAB, 97.1%), but the specificity of CSA was significantly higher (CSA, 97.1%; ORSAB, 92.1%). For screening of methicillin resistance, antibiotic supplements were added to both media. The sensitivity was lower after 24 h (CSA, 58.6%; ORSAB, 84.2%) and increased significantly after 48 h (CSA, 77.5%; ORSAB, 91.4%). At both time intervals ORSAB was significantly more sensitive than CSA. However, the specificities of both media were high after 24 h (CSA, 99.1%; ORSAB, 98.3%) and decreased significantly after 48 h of incubation (CSA, 94.7%; ORSAB, 95.5%). In conclusion, for identification of S. aureus, CSA is more accurate than ORSAB because of a significantly higher specificity. For screening of MRSA, ORSAB performs better than CSA, but the usefulness in clinical practice is limited because a significant number of strains are not detected. PMID:12089266

  6. Detection of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci by the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristen N; Andreacchio, Kathleen; Edelstein, Paul H

    2014-09-01

    The accurate performance of the Vitek 2 GP67 card for detecting methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is not known. We prospectively determined the ability of the Vitek 2 GP67 card to accurately detect methicillin-resistant CoNS, with mecA PCR results used as the gold standard for a 4-month period in 2012. Included in the study were 240 consecutively collected nonduplicate CoNS isolates. Cefoxitin susceptibility by disk diffusion testing was determined for all isolates. We found that the three tested systems, Vitek 2 oxacillin and cefoxitin testing and cefoxitin disk susceptibility testing, lacked specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity for detecting methicillin resistance. The Vitek 2 oxacillin and cefoxitin tests had very major error rates of 4% and 8%, respectively, and major error rates of 38% and 26%, respectively. Disk cefoxitin testing gave the best performance, with very major and major error rates of 2% and 24%, respectively. The test performances were species dependent, with the greatest errors found for Staphylococcus saprophyticus. While the 2014 CLSI guidelines recommend reporting isolates that test resistant by the oxacillin MIC or cefoxitin disk test as oxacillin resistant, following such guidelines produces erroneous results, depending on the test method and bacterial species tested. Vitek 2 cefoxitin testing is not an adequate substitute for cefoxitin disk testing. For critical-source isolates, mecA PCR, rather than Vitek 2 or cefoxitin disk testing, is required for optimal antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24951799

  7. A Survey of Staphylococcus sp and its Methicillin Resistance aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Ott, C.; Healy, M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Within the past few years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, such as hospitals and nursing homes. As the International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts occupying ISS or on surfaces of the space station itself. Methods: Identification of isolates was completed using VITEK (GPI cards, BioMerieux), 16S ribosomal DNA analysis (MicroSeq 500, ABI), and Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting (Divemilab, Bacterial Barcodes). Susceptibility tests were performed using VITEK (GPS-105 cards, BioMerieux) and resistance characteristics were evaluated by testing for the presence of the mecA gene (PBP2' MRSA test kit, Oxoid). Results: Rep-PCR analysis indicated the transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers and between crewmembers and ISS surfaces. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and environment, evaluations of the microbial population indicated minimal methicillin resistance. Results of this study indicated that within the semi-closed ISS environment, transfer of bacteria between crewmembers and their environment has been occurring, although there was no indication of a high concentration of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus species. Conclusions: While this study suggests that the spread of methicillin resistant S. aureus is not currently a concern aboard ISS, the increasing incidence of Earth-based antibiotic resistance indicates a need for continued clinical and environmental monitoring.

  8. Fitness cost of VanA-type vancomycin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-06-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated.

  9. Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and de...

  10. Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and de...

  11. Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Strain E140, an ST71 European-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Isolate.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Arshnee; Riley, Matthew C; Kania, Stephen A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-03-07

    We report the first genome sequence of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strain E140, isolated from a canine bite wound infection in Denmark. This strain represents the dominant clonal lineage associated with canine MRSP infections in Europe.

  12. The molecular mechanisms of acquired proteasome inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Andrew J.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    The development of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) has transformed the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. To date, two PIs have been FDA approved, the boronate peptide bortezomib and, most recently, the epoxyketone peptide carfilzomib. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to PIs, for which the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, may limit their efficacy. In this perspective, we discuss recent advances in the molecular understanding of PI resistance through acquired bortezomib resistance in human cell lines to evolved saliniosporamide A (marizomib) resistance in nature. Resistance mechanisms discussed include the upregulation of proteasome subunits and mutations of the catalytic β-subunits. Additionally, we explore potential strategies to overcome PI resistance. PMID:22978849

  13. Control of an outbreak of an epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus also resistant to mupirocin.

    PubMed

    Irish, D; Eltringham, I; Teall, A; Pickett, H; Farelly, H; Reith, S; Woodford, N; Cookson, B

    1998-05-01

    An epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus (EMRSA-3) appeared in a District hospital in June 1989 as part of a regional outbreak. The dynamics of the outbreak were complex and involved patient transfer between hospitals and wards. Control measures followed UK guidelines and included the use of nasal mupirocin. During these efforts a mupirocin-resistant MRSA [MuMRSA: mupirocin minimum inhibitor concentration (MIC) > 256 mg/L] emerged, probably in a patient who had been given eight mupirocin courses over nine months. The MuMRSA had a narrower phage-typing pattern than EMRSA-3, but was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SmaI chromosomal restriction enzyme digests and its susceptibility pattern to other antibiotics. The results of in vitro curing and gene probing indicated that mupirocin resistance was encoded on a 48 Md plasmid. MuMRSA spread occurred in 12 patients and 11 staff. The affected patients were nursed on the same ward. The strain was eradicated from patients with oral ciprofloxacin and rifampicin, triclosan skin treatment and nasal fusidic acid and bacitracin cream. The control of the outbreak had significant medical, social and financial implications. Fortunately, there were alternative topical agents to mupirocin, an agent which has played such a key role in MRSA eradication in recent years.

  14. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals is of increasing interest, raising questions about the presence of MRSA in food of animal origin and potential sources of transmission to humans via the food chain. In this study, the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of MRSA isolates from 200 retail raw chicken samples in Egypt were determined. MRSA was detected by positive amplification of the mecA gene in 38% (76 of 200) of chicken samples analyzed. This represents a potential public health threat in Egypt, as this contamination rate seems to be the highest among other studies reported worldwide. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, and sec) were detected in all of the 288 MRSA isolates. Nonetheless, none of the strains tested carried tst, the gene encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Antimicrobial resistance of MRSA isolates was most frequently detected against penicillin (93.4%), ampicillin (88.9%), and cloxacillin (83.3%). These results suggest that retail chicken might be a significant potential source for transmission of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt. This underlines the need for stricter hygienic measures in chicken production in Egypt to minimize the risk of transmission of these strains to consumers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the isolation and molecular characterization of MRSA in retail chicken samples in Egypt.

  15. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals is of increasing interest, raising questions about the presence of MRSA in food of animal origin and potential sources of transmission to humans via the food chain. In this study, the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of MRSA isolates from 200 retail raw chicken samples in Egypt were determined. MRSA was detected by positive amplification of the mecA gene in 38% (76 of 200) of chicken samples analyzed. This represents a potential public health threat in Egypt, as this contamination rate seems to be the highest among other studies reported worldwide. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, and sec) were detected in all of the 288 MRSA isolates. Nonetheless, none of the strains tested carried tst, the gene encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Antimicrobial resistance of MRSA isolates was most frequently detected against penicillin (93.4%), ampicillin (88.9%), and cloxacillin (83.3%). These results suggest that retail chicken might be a significant potential source for transmission of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt. This underlines the need for stricter hygienic measures in chicken production in Egypt to minimize the risk of transmission of these strains to consumers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the isolation and molecular characterization of MRSA in retail chicken samples in Egypt. PMID:26408138

  16. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from food and wild animal carcasses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Traversa, A; Gariano, G R; Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Orusa, R; Domenis, L; Cavallerio, P; Fossati, L; Serra, R; Decastelli, L

    2015-12-01

    Following the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in food-producing animals, both livestock and wildlife, and derived products, are considered potential sources of MRSA in humans. There is a paucity of data on MRSA in foods in Italy, and the data regarding wild animals are particularly scarce. A total of 2162 food samples collected during official monitoring activities in 2008 were analyzed for the detection of S. aureus. Also, samples from 1365 wild animals collected by the National Reference Center for Wild Animal Diseases in 2003-2009 were subjected to anatomopathological examination. S. aureus isolates were processed for phenotypic and molecular methicillin resistance determinations. S. aureus was found in 2.0% of wild animal carcasses and in 3.2% of wild boar lymph nodes: none showed methicillin resistance. The prevalence of S. aureus in food was 17.1%. Two MRSA strains, both from bulk tank milk (prevalence 0.77%) were isolated: the strains were resistant to tetracycline, had spa-type t899, and were negative for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. The low prevalence of MRSA suggests that the risk of transmission to humans via food is limited. However, attention should be paid to the cattle food chain, which may be a potential route of transmission of LA-MRSA. PMID:26338130

  17. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from food and wild animal carcasses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Traversa, A; Gariano, G R; Gallina, S; Bianchi, D M; Orusa, R; Domenis, L; Cavallerio, P; Fossati, L; Serra, R; Decastelli, L

    2015-12-01

    Following the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in food-producing animals, both livestock and wildlife, and derived products, are considered potential sources of MRSA in humans. There is a paucity of data on MRSA in foods in Italy, and the data regarding wild animals are particularly scarce. A total of 2162 food samples collected during official monitoring activities in 2008 were analyzed for the detection of S. aureus. Also, samples from 1365 wild animals collected by the National Reference Center for Wild Animal Diseases in 2003-2009 were subjected to anatomopathological examination. S. aureus isolates were processed for phenotypic and molecular methicillin resistance determinations. S. aureus was found in 2.0% of wild animal carcasses and in 3.2% of wild boar lymph nodes: none showed methicillin resistance. The prevalence of S. aureus in food was 17.1%. Two MRSA strains, both from bulk tank milk (prevalence 0.77%) were isolated: the strains were resistant to tetracycline, had spa-type t899, and were negative for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. The low prevalence of MRSA suggests that the risk of transmission to humans via food is limited. However, attention should be paid to the cattle food chain, which may be a potential route of transmission of LA-MRSA.

  18. Genotypic Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated from Inpatients and Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Malihe; Shafiee, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Javad; Moghadam, Nasrin Asghari; Saifi, Mahnaz; Pourshafie, Mohammad R

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) isolated from hospitalized patients and outpatients (OP). Out of 350 staphylococcal isolates collected from three hospitals, 190 were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests, detection of mecA, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Among the 190 isolated CoNS, Staphylococcus epidermidis (47.3%) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (44.2%) were the most prevalent species. Other CoNS species that were isolated were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2.1%), Staphylococcus warneri (2.1%), Staphylococcus simulans (1.6%), Staphylococcus capitis (1.1%), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1.1%), and Staphylococcus hominis (0.5%). The rate of resistance to methicillin was 60% with 58 (50%) S. epidermidis and 55 (49%) S. haemolyticus. The rate of resistance to 13 antibiotics tested with the lowest and highest to chloramphenicol and penicillin, respectively. High clonal diversity with different PFGE patterns was obtained for methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus by 32 and 31 types, respectively. Our results indicated that the dissemination of MRCoNS is widespread in Tehran. The majority of these isolates showed distinct genotyping patterns. At the same time, the common patterns were found among the MRCoNS obtained from outpatient and inpatient isolates, suggestive of an epidemiological link. PMID:26248114

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the environment of public transport: data from the metropolitan network in Lyon, France.

    PubMed

    Gaymard, Alexandre; Pichon, Maxime; Degaud, Michaël; Tasse, Jason; Dupieux, Céline; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is involved in community-acquired and nosocomial diseases. The means of MRSA transmission and dissemination in the community remain uncertain. Studies have shown that public transport systems could be a source of MRSA and may serve as a potential source for community-acquired MRSA infections. This study aimed to investigate MRSA contamination on Lyon's metropolitan network (Métro) in France. Hand-touched surfaces were sampled with sterile swabs (Transystem(®)) during a 1-day transversal study by collecting 50 samples in seven hub stations and two trains for each of the four Métro lines. Then, during a longitudinal study, one sample was collected twice daily for 30 consecutive days in the busiest and most congested hub station. All swabs were incubated in enrichment medium for 24 h and then each suspension was plated onto a chromogenic selective medium for MRSA. After 24 h at 36 °C, all presumptive MRSA colonies were tested using VITEK(®) MS to confirm identification as S. aureus as well as by Alere™ PBP2a Culture Colony Test and mecA/mecC PCR to check methicillin resistance. Of the 110 swabs tested, 24 presumptive MRSA colonies were isolated, of which 2 were confirmed as S. aureus by VITEK(®) MS. These two isolates were tested negative using the PBP2a Culture Colony Test and PCR. Unlike other foreign cities such as Lisbon, the current data suggest a low level of MRSA contamination of hand-touched surfaces on Lyon's Métro. This should be put in perspective with the low level of MRSA colonisation in the French community. PMID:27575729

  20. Screening for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Doon Valley Hospitals, Uttarakhand.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Amitabh; Saxena, Seema; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among patients at various hospitals in Doon Valley, Uttrakhand. A total of 300 nasal swabs (male patients: 177, female patients: 123) were subjected to bacteriological investigation following established protocol. Isolates were verified by mannitol fermentation, Gram staining, DNAse test and coagulase positivity. S aureus was isolated in 111 (37%) participants (M: 37%, F: 36.5%). Out of 111 S. aureus isolates, 38 (34.2%) were methicillin resistant (MRSA). Among them, 25 (38%) were male and 13 (29%) were from female. Highest MRSA colonization rate was found among dialysis ward patients (55.5%), followed by burn ward (32.5%) and general medical ward (22.7%) patients. The study also revealed that administration of recent antibiotic was chief predisposing factor for MRSA colonization. High MRSA carriage rate found in this study indicates demand for standard infection control to curb transmission. PMID:27097444

  1. Successful Use of Daptomycin in a Preterm Neonate With Persistent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information regarding the use of daptomycin in the neonatal population, and dosage adjustments for neonates with renal dysfunction. We report on the successful use of daptomycin in a 1-month-old, former 24-week gestation neonate with persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) bacteremia and impaired renal function. We also review the available literature supporting daptomycin use in the neonatal period. Daptomycin peak and trough serum levels were obtained immediately prior to and 60 minutes after the fifth dose. While vancomycin remains the drug of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal infections, due to increasing reports of treatment failures, alternative therapies are recommended. Based on mounting evidence, daptomycin may be considered an option in persistently bacteremic neonates who fail vancomycin therapy, although further investigation is warranted. PMID:25859172

  2. Screening for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Doon Valley Hospitals, Uttarakhand.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Amitabh; Saxena, Seema; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among patients at various hospitals in Doon Valley, Uttrakhand. A total of 300 nasal swabs (male patients: 177, female patients: 123) were subjected to bacteriological investigation following established protocol. Isolates were verified by mannitol fermentation, Gram staining, DNAse test and coagulase positivity. S aureus was isolated in 111 (37%) participants (M: 37%, F: 36.5%). Out of 111 S. aureus isolates, 38 (34.2%) were methicillin resistant (MRSA). Among them, 25 (38%) were male and 13 (29%) were from female. Highest MRSA colonization rate was found among dialysis ward patients (55.5%), followed by burn ward (32.5%) and general medical ward (22.7%) patients. The study also revealed that administration of recent antibiotic was chief predisposing factor for MRSA colonization. High MRSA carriage rate found in this study indicates demand for standard infection control to curb transmission.

  3. Results after Late Polymicrobial, Gram-negative, and Methicillin-resistant Infections in Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; García-Rey, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies of knee arthroplasty infections caused by high-virulence organisms suggest poor outcomes. Polymicrobial and Gram-negative infections are less studied. Questions/purposes This study compared the results of treatment of knee arthroplasty infections by single versus polymicrobial isolates, Gram-positive versus Gram-negative, and methicillin-resistant versus -sensitive Staphylococci. Methods We prospectively followed 47 patients with late knee arthroplasty infections. The mean age was 72 years (range, 20–87 years). The treatment protocol included two-stage exchange and a combination of two oral antibiotics given for 6 months. Minimum followup was 1 year (average, 4.8 ± 3 years; range, 1–12 years). Control of the infection was judged by absence of clinical, serologic, and radiologic signs of infection. The functional outcome was evaluated by Knee Society score at the last followup. Results Infection was controlled in all 15 patients with polymicrobial and in 28 of 32 (88%) with monomicrobial infections, in eight of nine patients with Gram-negative and in 35 of 38 (92%) with Gram-positive isolates. Control was also achieved in 22 of 25 patients (88%) infected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococci and in 14 of 14 by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococci. The Knee Society scores averaged 81-63 in patients with polymicrobial infections and were higher than in monomicrobial infections (75-52). The mean KSS was 85-59 in Gram-negative infections compared to 75-55 in Gram-positive infections. The mean KSS was similar in methicillin-resistant (78-54) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococci (73-56) infections. Conclusions Polymicrobial and Gram-negative infections can be controlled in late knee arthroplasty infections. On the other hand, infections by methicillin-resistant Staphylococci are less likely to be controlled by the regimens we used. Level of Evidence Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete

  4. Hypochlorite killing of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Randall G; Chain, Rebecca L; Hair, Pamela S; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2008-10-01

    We tested in vitro hypochlorite (bleach) killing of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine optimal concentration and duration. For all isolates maximal killing, >3-log decrease in colony forming units (CFU), was found after 5 minutes in 2.5 microL/mL bleach. We estimate that 2.5 microL/mL bleach is approximately one-half cup of bleach in one-quarter tub of water.

  5. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Subspecies coagulans Infection in a Patient With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Swe, Thein; Naing, Akari Thein; Baqui, AAMA; Khillan, Ratesh

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge and literature search, Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans infection in human beings has rarely been described in the medical literature. Furthermore, we believe that this is a first detailed case report of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans infection in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma. Because of the possible association of Staphylococcus schleiferi infection and immunosuppression, any isolates of this bacterium in human beings should be presumed to be pathogenic, unless proven otherwise. PMID:27734018

  6. Chloride anion transporters inhibit growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Share, Andrew I; Patel, Khushali; Nativi, Cristina; Cho, Eun J; Francesconi, Oscar; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Roelens, Stefano; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-06-18

    A series of aminopyrrolic receptors were tested as anion transporters using POPC liposome model membranes. Many were found to be effective Cl(-) transporters and to inhibit clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus growth in vitro. The best transporters proved effective against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Mu50 and HP1173. Tris-thiourea tren-based chloride transporters were also shown to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in vitro.

  7. The Rise of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. Correctional Populations

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging threat to public health, especially in correctional settings. Outbreaks have been seen in jails and prisons in Mississippi, California, Texas, and Georgia in recent years. Also, many correctional settings have seen an increase in MRSA infection greater than in the general population. This article examines the lessons that have been learned about MRSA in correctional settings and ponders what is yet to be learned about this disease in these populations. PMID:21571749

  8. Hypochlorite killing of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Randall G; Chain, Rebecca L; Hair, Pamela S; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2008-10-01

    We tested in vitro hypochlorite (bleach) killing of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates to determine optimal concentration and duration. For all isolates maximal killing, >3-log decrease in colony forming units (CFU), was found after 5 minutes in 2.5 microL/mL bleach. We estimate that 2.5 microL/mL bleach is approximately one-half cup of bleach in one-quarter tub of water. PMID:18756186

  9. Mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swab specimens in Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Danielle Caldeira Martins; da Costa, Thaina Miranda; Rabello, Renata Fernandes; Alves, Fábio Aguiar; de Mondino, Silvia Susana Bona

    2015-06-01

    The isolation of mannitol-negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from nasal swabs is reported. Among the 59 isolates, 9 (15%) isolates were mannitol-negative; all of these isolates were categorized as staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa. This report emphasizes that mannitol fermentation on mannitol salt agar should not be used as the sole criterion when screening nasal swab specimens for S. aureus.

  10. Antibiotics and bioactive natural products in treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains with Methicillin resistance are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, aggressive course, multiple drug resistance and hospital outbreaks. Several first and second line antibiotics are rapidly becoming ineffective for treatment due to emergence of resistance. Extracts of medicinal plants are rich source of unique phytochemicals. Plants used in traditional medicine have been reported to have significant anti-MRSA activity. The objective of this review is to provide a brief overview of antibiotics as well as anti-MRSA natural products and their future prospect. PMID:26009690

  11. Dissimilarity of ccrAB gene sequences between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among bovine isolates in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Kyung; Paik, Young Hwan; Yoon, Jang Won; Fox, Lawrence K.

    2013-01-01

    The sequences of the ccrAB genes from bovine-, canine- and chicken-originating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (S.) epidermidis (MRSE) and bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (MRSA) were compared to investigate the frequency of intra-species horizontal transfer of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) complex. Nineteen MRSE strains were isolated from bovine milk, chickens, and dogs, and their genetic characteristics were investigated by multilocus sequence typing and SCCmec typing. Among the animal MRSE strains, the most frequent SCCmec type was type IV, which consisted of the type B mec complex and ccrAB type 2. The ccrA2 and ccrB2 genes were sequenced from the bovine, chicken and canine MRSE strains and compared with those of the bovine MRSA strains. The sequences generally clustered as MRSA and MRSE groups, regardless of the animal source. Additionally, no bovine MRSE sequence was associated with the bovine MRSA groups. Although most of the bovine MRSE and MRSA isolates possessed SCCmec type IV sequences, our results suggest that the intra-species gene transfer of the SCCmec complex between bovine S. aureus and bovine S. epidermidis strains is not a frequent event. PMID:23820199

  12. Dissimilarity of ccrAB gene sequences between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among bovine isolates in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Kyung; Paik, Young Hwan; Yoon, Jang Won; Fox, Lawrence K; Hwang, Sun Young; Park, Yong Ho

    2013-01-01

    The sequences of the ccrAB genes from bovine-, canine- and chicken-originating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (S.) epidermidis (MRSE) and bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (MRSA) were compared to investigate the frequency of intra-species horizontal transfer of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) complex. Nineteen MRSE strains were isolated from bovine milk, chickens, and dogs, and their genetic characteristics were investigated by multilocus sequence typing and SCCmec typing. Among the animal MRSE strains, the most frequent SCCmec type was type IV, which consisted of the type B mec complex and ccrAB type 2. The ccrA2 and ccrB2 genes were sequenced from the bovine, chicken and canine MRSE strains and compared with those of the bovine MRSA strains. The sequences generally clustered as MRSA and MRSE groups, regardless of the animal source. Additionally, no bovine MRSE sequence was associated with the bovine MRSA groups. Although most of the bovine MRSE and MRSA isolates possessed SCCmec type IV sequences, our results suggest that the intra-species gene transfer of the SCCmec complex between bovine S. aureus and bovine S. epidermidis strains is not a frequent event.

  13. Metabolic pathway analysis approach: identification of novel therapeutic target against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Reaz; Saeed, Kiran; Khan, Waqasuddin; Azam, Syed Sikander; Wadood, Abdul

    2015-02-10

    Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria are no more inhibited by the front line antibiotics due to extreme resistance. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the MDR pathogens notorious for its widespread infection around the world. The high resistance acquired by MRSA needs a serious concern and efforts should be carried out for the discovery of better therapeutics. With this aim, we designed a comparison of the metabolic pathways of the pathogen, MRSA strain 252 (MRSA252) with the human host (i.e., Homo sapiens) by using well-established in silico methods. We identified several metabolic pathways unique to MRSA (i.e., absent in the human host). Furthermore, a subtractive genomics analysis approach was applied for retrieval of proteins only from the unique metabolic pathways. Subsequently, proteins of unique MRSA pathways were compared with the host proteins. As a result, we have shortlisted few unique and essential proteins that could act as drug targets against MRSA. We further assessed the druggability potential of the shortlisted targets by comparing them with the DrugBank Database (DBD). The identified drug targets could be useful for an effective drug discovery phase. We also searched the sequences of unique as well as essential enzymes from MRSA in Protein Data Bank (PDB). We shortlisted at least 12 enzymes for which there was no corresponding deposition in PDB, reflecting that their crystal structures are yet to be solved! We selected Glutamate synthase out of those 12 enzymes owing to its participation in significant metabolic pathways of the pathogen e.g., Alanine, Aspartate, Glutamate and Nitrogen metabolism and its evident suitability as drug target among other MDR bacteria e.g., Mycobacteria. Due to the unavailability of any crystal structure of Glutamate synthase in PDB, we generated the 3D structure by homology modeling. The modeled structure was validated by multiple analysis tools. The active site of Glutamate synthase was

  14. Evaluation of different methods for the detection of methicillin resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Jarløv, J O; Busch-Sørensen, C; Espersen, F; Mortensen, I; Hougaard, D M; Rosdahl, V T

    1997-08-01

    The efficacy of 19 agar diffusion methods for the detection of methicillin resistance among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) within 24 h was evaluated. A total of 359 CoNS isolates were tested, of which 204 were Staphylococcus epidermidis. In 164 isolates, the presence of mecA was investigated; 61 strains were mecA-positive and 103 were mecA-negative by Southern blot analysis. Based on the best agreement shown with the mecA determination (94%) among four agar dilution assays for determining methicillin MIC, an assay with Columbia agar supplemented with NaCl and incubation with a heavy bacterial inoculum of 10(5)-10(6) cfu/spot was used as the reference MIC method. The best agar diffusion results were obtained with a 1 microg oxacillin disc on Columbia agar with 4.5% NaCl supplement. With this method, 99% of S. epidermidis and 94% of non-S. epidermidis were in agreement with the MIC determination. However, Columbia (without NaCl), Mueller-Hinton and Isosensitest agars were almost as useful when a 1 microg oxacillin disc was used. The zone breakpoints for S. epidermidis were, in general, considerably larger than those for other CoNS species and, consequently, differentiation according to species is recommended. Furthermore, resistance to other antibiotics, such as gentamicin and erythromycin, makes methicillin resistance highly likely.

  15. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chunwei; Liu, Yan; Song, Hao; Pan, Lili; Li, Jerry; Qin, Yong; Li, Rongshi

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±)-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33) of marinopyrrole A is ≥63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics. PMID:23955285

  16. [Comparison of chosen methods for identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate effectiveness of methicillin-resistant S. aureus identification using screening method with oxacillin (6 microg/ml), latex agglutination test--Slidex MRSA Detection and a chromogenic agar medium--MRSA ID. The investigation were carried out on 120 S. aureus strains isolated from clinical materials of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Torún. Consistency of results between chromogenic medium and latex agglutination test amounted 97.5%, chromogenic medium and screening method--96.7%. Identical correspondence of results took a stand in case screening method and latex agglutination test. Results consistency of detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus strains between this three methods concerned 95.8% strains. Our investigation demonstrated 96.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity for MRSA ID medium for the detection of methicillin resistance. The sensitivity of MRSA-Screen was 95.0% and its specificity reached 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of screening method amounted 96.7%.

  17. Evaluation of different methods for the detection of methicillin resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Jarløv, J O; Busch-Sørensen, C; Espersen, F; Mortensen, I; Hougaard, D M; Rosdahl, V T

    1997-08-01

    The efficacy of 19 agar diffusion methods for the detection of methicillin resistance among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) within 24 h was evaluated. A total of 359 CoNS isolates were tested, of which 204 were Staphylococcus epidermidis. In 164 isolates, the presence of mecA was investigated; 61 strains were mecA-positive and 103 were mecA-negative by Southern blot analysis. Based on the best agreement shown with the mecA determination (94%) among four agar dilution assays for determining methicillin MIC, an assay with Columbia agar supplemented with NaCl and incubation with a heavy bacterial inoculum of 10(5)-10(6) cfu/spot was used as the reference MIC method. The best agar diffusion results were obtained with a 1 microg oxacillin disc on Columbia agar with 4.5% NaCl supplement. With this method, 99% of S. epidermidis and 94% of non-S. epidermidis were in agreement with the MIC determination. However, Columbia (without NaCl), Mueller-Hinton and Isosensitest agars were almost as useful when a 1 microg oxacillin disc was used. The zone breakpoints for S. epidermidis were, in general, considerably larger than those for other CoNS species and, consequently, differentiation according to species is recommended. Furthermore, resistance to other antibiotics, such as gentamicin and erythromycin, makes methicillin resistance highly likely. PMID:9301990

  18. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (II).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chunwei; Liu, Yan; Song, Hao; Pan, Lili; Li, Jerry; Qin, Yong; Li, Rongshi

    2013-08-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a major problem, causing severe and intractable infections worldwide. MRSA is resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics, and alternative treatments are limited. A very limited number of new antibiotics have been discovered over the last half-century, novel agents for the treatment of MRSA infections are urgently needed. Marinopyrrole A was reported to show antibiotic activity against MRSA in 2008. After we reported the first total synthesis of (±)-marinopyrrole A, we designed and synthesized a series of marinopyrrole derivatives. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies of these novel derivatives against a panel of Gram-positive pathogens in antibacterial assays have revealed that a para-trifluoromethyl analog (33) of marinopyrrole A is ≥ 63-, 8-, and 4-fold more potent than vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, respectively. The results provide valuable information in the search for new-generation antibiotics.

  19. Controlling methicillin resistant Staphyloccocus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infections with a novel biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Lucie; Davis, Stephen C; Peng, Henry T; Hung, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Wound infections, especially those associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, offer considerable challenges for clinicians. Our laboratory has recently developed novel composite biomaterials (DRDC) for wound dressing applications, and demonstrated their in vitro bactericidal efficacy. In the present study, we assessed the proliferation of planktonic and sessile Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in porcine full-thickness wounds covered for up to 48 h with either saline- or mafenide acetate-loaded DRDC puffs and meshes. All biomaterials were applied 4 h following bacterial inoculation of the wounds with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to allow colonization of the tissues and initiation of biofilm formation. The drug-loaded biomaterials eradicated both the planktonic and biofilm bacteria in the wounds within 24 h (p <. 05), irrespective of the bacterial strain or architecture of the dressing. While the wound bioburdens increased in the ensuing 24 h, they remained approximately 2 log(10) colony-forming units (CFU) below (p <. 05) their respective baseline values. Similarly, less than 4 log(10) CFU was recovered in the drug-loaded DRDC biomaterials throughout the study. These data show that the DRDC puffs and meshes are effective in delivering certain medications, such as antimicrobial agents, to the wound bed, suggesting considerable value of this material for treating wounds, especially those with irregular shapes, contours, and depths.

  20. Resistance to methicillin of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W; Szczubial, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms of staphylococcal resistance to methicillin. CNS (n = 100 isolates) were prepared from the mammary inflammatory secretions of 86 cows from farms located in the Lublin region. Methicillin-resistant isolates constituted 20.0% of all CNS. Staphylococcus sciuri (n=8) and Staphylococcus xylosus (n=6) were most abundant, followed by Staphylococcus chromogenes (n=3), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=2) and Staphylococcus warned (n=1). The mecA gene was found in 50.0% of MRCNS (10.0% of all CNS isolates) belonging to two species: S. sciuri and S. xylosus. All mecA-positive isolates contained the protein of low affinity to penicillin (penicillin-binding protein 2a - PBP2a). The enzyme hydrolysing the beta-lactam ring in antibiotics was detected in 40.0% of MRCNS; 10.0% of MRCNS isolates were characterised by the presence of the mecA gene and ability to produce beta-lactamase. The remaining 20.0% of MRCNS isolates showing phenotypic resistance to methicillin were mecA gene-negative and were not able to produce beta-lactamase. PMID:24597303

  1. Predictive value of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal swab PCR assay for MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Benjamin; Chung, Andrew; Webb, Brandon; Seville, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with poor outcomes and frequently merits empirical antibiotic consideration despite its relatively low incidence. Nasal colonization with MRSA is associated with clinical MRSA infection and can be reliably detected using the nasal swab PCR assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the nasal swab MRSA PCR in predicting MRSA pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care center from January 2009 to July 2011. All patients with confirmed pneumonia who had both a nasal swab MRSA PCR test and a bacterial culture within predefined time intervals were included in the study. These data were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinically confirmed MRSA pneumonia. Four hundred thirty-five patients met inclusion criteria. The majority of cases were classified as either health care-associated (HCAP) (54.7%) or community-acquired (CAP) (34%) pneumonia. MRSA nasal PCR was positive in 62 (14.3%) cases. MRSA pneumonia was confirmed by culture in 25 (5.7%) cases. The MRSA PCR assay demonstrated 88.0% sensitivity and 90.1% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 35.4% and a negative predictive value of 99.2%. In patients with pneumonia, the MRSA PCR nasal swab has a poor positive predictive value but an excellent negative predictive value for MRSA pneumonia in populations with low MRSA pneumonia incidence. In cases of culture-negative pneumonia where initial empirical antibiotics include an MRSA-active agent, a negative MRSA PCR swab can be reasonably used to guide antibiotic de-escalation.

  2. Chlorhexidine resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or just an elevated MIC? An in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Cookson, B D; Bolton, M C; Platt, J H

    1991-10-01

    Chlorhexidine (Hibiscrub; ICI) is generally accepted to be effective as an antiseptic hand wash for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), but there is dispute whether the chlorhexidine MIC for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains is higher than that for MSSA strains and, indeed, whether it is relevant. In addition, the link between resistance to chlorhexidine, gentamicin, and "nucleic acid-binding" compounds (NAB; which code, in particular, for propamidine isethionate and ethidium bromide) requires clarification. We performed chlorhexidine MIC and rate of kill tests on a number of MSSA and MRSA isolates. Two gentamicin-resistant MRSA isolates without NAB plasmids were more susceptible (0.25 and 0.5 microgram/ml) than four of eight MSSA that we tested (range, 0.25 to 2 microgram/ml). Chlorhexidine MICs were higher (4 to 8 micrograms/ml) for seven distinct MRSA isolates with plasmids conveying resistance to gentamicin and NAB (GNAB). Curing of the GNAB plasmid from MRSA strains resulted in a fall in the MIC (1 to 3.3 micrograms/ml), but no consistent fall in killing by chlorhexidine was observed. No effect on the chlorhexidine MIC or killing was observed when we cured strains of methicillin resistance. GNAB plasmid transfer resulted in a rise in the chlorhexidine MIC for the strains but not consistent fall in killing by chlorhexidine. Ethical approval was granted for 10 volunteers to each have a methicillin-susceptible, GNAB-resistant, derived transcipient and its GNAB-susceptible isogenic parent applied to separate sites in an in vivo skin test; no significant difference was seen in survival rates after the application of chlorhexidine. These results suggest that chlorhexidine appears to be as effective as a hand-washing agent for MRSA isolates with or with out NAB plasmids as it is for MSSA isolates.

  3. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Dağı, Hatice Türk; Fındık, Duygu; Demirel, Gamze; Arslan, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA). Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3%) nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1%) S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9%) were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%), and 3 (2.9%) isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers. PMID:26167341

  4. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Ready-to-Eat Foods in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Guo, Weipeng; Huang, Jiahui; Cai, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in humans, and its presence in food is a public health concern. MRSA has been identified in foods in China, but little information is available regarding MRSA in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in Chinese retail RTE foods. All isolated S. aureus were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, and MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Of the 550 RTE foods collected from 2011 to 2014, 69 (12.5%) were positive for S. aureus. Contamination levels were mostly in the range of 0.3-10 most probable number (MPN)/g, with five samples exceeding 10 MPN/g. Of the 69 S. aureus isolates, seven were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Six isolates were mecA-positive, while no mecC-positive isolates were identified. In total, 75.8% (47/62) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates and all of the MRSA isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Amongst the MRSA isolates, four were identified as community-acquired strains (ST59-MRSA-IVa (n = 2), ST338-MRSA-V, ST1-MRSA-V), while one was a livestock-associated strain (ST9, harboring an unreported SCCmec type 2C2). One novel sequence type was identified (ST3239), the SCCmec gene of which could not be typed. Overall, our findings showed that Chinese retail RTE foods are likely vehicles for transmission of multidrug-resistant S. aureus and MRSA lineages. This is a serious public health risk and highlights the need to implement good hygiene practices. PMID:27375562

  5. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Ready-to-Eat Foods in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Guo, Weipeng; Huang, Jiahui; Cai, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in humans, and its presence in food is a public health concern. MRSA has been identified in foods in China, but little information is available regarding MRSA in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in Chinese retail RTE foods. All isolated S. aureus were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, and MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Of the 550 RTE foods collected from 2011 to 2014, 69 (12.5%) were positive for S. aureus. Contamination levels were mostly in the range of 0.3–10 most probable number (MPN)/g, with five samples exceeding 10 MPN/g. Of the 69 S. aureus isolates, seven were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Six isolates were mecA-positive, while no mecC-positive isolates were identified. In total, 75.8% (47/62) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates and all of the MRSA isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Amongst the MRSA isolates, four were identified as community-acquired strains (ST59-MRSA-IVa (n = 2), ST338-MRSA-V, ST1-MRSA-V), while one was a livestock-associated strain (ST9, harboring an unreported SCCmec type 2C2). One novel sequence type was identified (ST3239), the SCCmec gene of which could not be typed. Overall, our findings showed that Chinese retail RTE foods are likely vehicles for transmission of multidrug-resistant S. aureus and MRSA lineages. This is a serious public health risk and highlights the need to implement good hygiene practices. PMID:27375562

  6. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Ready-to-Eat Foods in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Guo, Weipeng; Huang, Jiahui; Cai, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in humans, and its presence in food is a public health concern. MRSA has been identified in foods in China, but little information is available regarding MRSA in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in Chinese retail RTE foods. All isolated S. aureus were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, and MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Of the 550 RTE foods collected from 2011 to 2014, 69 (12.5%) were positive for S. aureus. Contamination levels were mostly in the range of 0.3-10 most probable number (MPN)/g, with five samples exceeding 10 MPN/g. Of the 69 S. aureus isolates, seven were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Six isolates were mecA-positive, while no mecC-positive isolates were identified. In total, 75.8% (47/62) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates and all of the MRSA isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Amongst the MRSA isolates, four were identified as community-acquired strains (ST59-MRSA-IVa (n = 2), ST338-MRSA-V, ST1-MRSA-V), while one was a livestock-associated strain (ST9, harboring an unreported SCCmec type 2C2). One novel sequence type was identified (ST3239), the SCCmec gene of which could not be typed. Overall, our findings showed that Chinese retail RTE foods are likely vehicles for transmission of multidrug-resistant S. aureus and MRSA lineages. This is a serious public health risk and highlights the need to implement good hygiene practices.

  7. Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcal Isolates from Bovine Milk in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longping; Zhou, Luoxiong; Wang, Lihong; Xue, Huping; Zhao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) in bovine milk is a major public health concern. The primary purpose of this research was to determine molecular genetic characteristics and antibiotic resistance of staphylococcal isolates recovered from milk of mastitic cows in the Shaanxi Province in Northwestern China. One hundred and thirteen methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), one mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA, seven mecA- and mecC- negative but phenotype-positive MRSA and two MR-CoNS including one oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus (OS-MRSH) and one mecA-positive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolates were recovered from 214 quarter milk samples on 4 dairy farms. All above 123 isolates were subjected to antibiotic resistance profiling. S. aureus isolates were also genotyped using the spa typing and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eight MRSA and 2 MR-CoNS isolates were additionally tested for SCCmec types. Resistance was common among isolates against ampicillin or penicillin (80.5%), kanamycin (68.3%), gentamicin (67.5%), tetracycline (43.9%) and chloramphenicol (30.1%). However, no isolate was resistant to vancomycin or teicoplanin. Twenty, 29 and 58 isolates showed resistance to 1, 2 or more than 2 antibiotics, respectively. The predominant multidrug resistance profile was penicillin/ampicillin/kanamycin/gentamicin/tetracycline (46 isolates). Most S. aureus isolates belonged to spa types t524 (n = 63), t11772 (a new type, n = 31) and t4207 (n = 15). At the same time, MLST types ST71 (n = 67) and ST2738 (a new type, n = 45) were identified as dominant sequence types. The mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA isolate had a composite genotype t524-ST71-SCCmecIVa, while 7 mecA-negative but phenotype-positive MRSA isolates were all t524-ST71. The OS-MRSH isolate contained a type V

  8. Characterization of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible staphylococcal isolates from bovine milk in northwestern china.

    PubMed

    Li, Longping; Zhou, Luoxiong; Wang, Lihong; Xue, Huping; Zhao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) in bovine milk is a major public health concern. The primary purpose of this research was to determine molecular genetic characteristics and antibiotic resistance of staphylococcal isolates recovered from milk of mastitic cows in the Shaanxi Province in Northwestern China. One hundred and thirteen methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), one mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA, seven mecA- and mecC- negative but phenotype-positive MRSA and two MR-CoNS including one oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus (OS-MRSH) and one mecA-positive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolates were recovered from 214 quarter milk samples on 4 dairy farms. All above 123 isolates were subjected to antibiotic resistance profiling. S. aureus isolates were also genotyped using the spa typing and the multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eight MRSA and 2 MR-CoNS isolates were additionally tested for SCCmec types. Resistance was common among isolates against ampicillin or penicillin (80.5%), kanamycin (68.3%), gentamicin (67.5%), tetracycline (43.9%) and chloramphenicol (30.1%). However, no isolate was resistant to vancomycin or teicoplanin. Twenty, 29 and 58 isolates showed resistance to 1, 2 or more than 2 antibiotics, respectively. The predominant multidrug resistance profile was penicillin/ampicillin/kanamycin/gentamicin/tetracycline (46 isolates). Most S. aureus isolates belonged to spa types t524 (n = 63), t11772 (a new type, n = 31) and t4207 (n = 15). At the same time, MLST types ST71 (n = 67) and ST2738 (a new type, n = 45) were identified as dominant sequence types. The mecA-positive and phenotype-positive MRSA isolate had a composite genotype t524-ST71-SCCmecIVa, while 7 mecA-negative but phenotype-positive MRSA isolates were all t524-ST71. The OS-MRSH isolate contained a type V

  9. [Antimicrobial spectrum of ceftaroline. In vitro activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, Emilia; Morosini, María Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Because of the increase in bacterial resistance, there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. In particular, Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of severe infections and has an extraordinary capacity to develop antibiotic multiresistance, including resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. Although the incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) seems to have stabilized in the last few years, its wide dissemination in healthcare settings and in the community is a cause of concern. Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In addition, this drug is active against staphylococci showing resistance to glycopeptides, linezolid, and daptomycin. The ceftaroline MIC90 against MRSA ranges from 0.5-2mg/L and that against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci is 0.5mg/L. Ceftaroline has also good activity against respiratory pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Although this drug is active against Enterobacteriaceae, it does not retain activity when these isolates produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, carbapenemases or hyperproduce AmpC. Ceftaroline is not active against nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli. Ceftaroline is an interesting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium against MRSA and constitutes an important option for the treatment of polymicrobial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms.

  10. Cardiac tamponade complicating purulent pericarditis due to community acquired methicilin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Bagavathy, Kavitha; Raju, Shine K; Joseph, Ranjit; Kumar, Anupam

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) is a global pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections with increasing prevalence since the 1990s. Purulentpericarditis, characterized by accumulation of purulent fluid in the pericardial space was historically a disease of the pediatric and early adult population, but through the years the median age of diagnosis has increased from 21 to 49. Mortality rates are as high as 40% even in the treated population. We report a case of purulent pericarditis due to CA-MRSA that was complicated by cardiac tamponade. Early diagnosis and intervention proved to be life-saving. A brief review of the literature and current management options are discussed.

  11. Short communication: Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw milk fresh cheese in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fanny C; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of a collection of 8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates, obtained from samples of fresh cheese (Doble Crema) produced from raw cow milk in small dairies in Colombia. All the isolates harbored the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, presented with SCCmec type IV, and belonged to multilocus sequence type 8 and spa type 024. Seven isolates presented 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Three of them carried the staphylococcal enterotoxin B gene. The isolates were resistant to cefoxitin, oxacillin, penicillin, and ampicillin and susceptible to all non-β-lactams antibiotics tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values for oxacillin of 4 to 8mg/L. The isolates belonged to the community-acquired MRSA group, suggesting a human source of contamination. The risk of human infection by MRSA via contaminated foods is considered low, but contaminated food commodities can contribute to the worldwide dissemination of clones of community-acquired MRSA. PMID:27423957

  12. Short communication: Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw milk fresh cheese in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fanny C; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of a collection of 8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates, obtained from samples of fresh cheese (Doble Crema) produced from raw cow milk in small dairies in Colombia. All the isolates harbored the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, presented with SCCmec type IV, and belonged to multilocus sequence type 8 and spa type 024. Seven isolates presented 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Three of them carried the staphylococcal enterotoxin B gene. The isolates were resistant to cefoxitin, oxacillin, penicillin, and ampicillin and susceptible to all non-β-lactams antibiotics tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration values for oxacillin of 4 to 8mg/L. The isolates belonged to the community-acquired MRSA group, suggesting a human source of contamination. The risk of human infection by MRSA via contaminated foods is considered low, but contaminated food commodities can contribute to the worldwide dissemination of clones of community-acquired MRSA.

  13. Towards the understanding of resistance mechanisms in clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Frey, Kathleen M; Lombardo, Michael N; Wright, Dennis L; Anderson, Amy C

    2010-04-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  14. Towards the Understanding of Resistance Mechanisms in Clinically Isolated Trimethoprim-resistant, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Lombardo, M; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  15. Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fishovitz, Jennifer; Hermoso, Juan A.; Chang, Mayland

    2014-01-01

    Summary High-level resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is due to expression of penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), a transpeptidase that catalyzes cell-wall crosslinking in the face of the challenge by β-lactam antibiotics. The activity of this protein is regulated by allostery at a site 60 Å distant from the active site, where crosslinking of cell wall takes place. This review discusses the state of knowledge on this important enzyme of cell-wall biosynthesis in MRSA. PMID:25044998

  16. Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains from two hospitals in El Paso, Texas.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Frances G; Lim, Tien Tze; Winnett, David C; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie C; Delgado, Alejandro; Langevin, Mark J; Cantore, Stephanie A; Gonzalez, Leti; Gustafson, John E

    2005-06-01

    Seventy-one percent of 76 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from two medical centers in El Paso, Texas, represent three similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types. Overall, six pulsed-field types were identified represented by multilocus sequence/staphylococcal chromosomal cassette DNA mec (SCCmec) types: ST5-MRSA-II; ST36-MRSA-II; ST8 (untypeable SCCmec); and a newly described clonal cluster 8 strain, ST507-MRSA-IV. This study demonstrates the presence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant epidemic MRSA clones in El Paso.

  17. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  18. Detecting mechanisms of acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Roger S; Shi, Hubing

    2014-01-01

    (V600)BRAF mutation was identified as an ideal target for clinical therapy due to its indispensable roles in supporting melanoma initiation and progression. Despite the fact that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) can elicit anti-tumor responses in the majority of treated patients and confer overall survival benefits, acquired drug resistance is a formidable obstacle to long-term management of the disease. Several aberrant events including RTK upregulation, NRAS mutation, mutant BRAF amplification or alternative splicing, and MEK mutation have been reported as acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Clinially, detection of these resistance mechanisms help understand drug response patterns and help guide combinatorial therapeutic strategies. Therefore, quick and accurate diagnosis of the resistant mechanisms in tumor biopsies has become an important starting point for personalized therapy. In this chapter, we review the major acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms, highlight their therapeutic implications, and provide the diagnostic methods from clinical samples.

  19. Structure-Function Studies of the Staphylococcal Methicillin Resistance Antirepressor MecR2*

    PubMed Central

    Arêde, Pedro; Botelho, Tiago; Guevara, Tibisay; Usón, Isabel; Oliveira, Duarte C.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is elicited by the MecI-MecR1-MecA axis encoded by the mec locus. Recently, MecR2 was also identified as a regulator of mec through binding of the methicillin repressor, MecI. Here we show that plasmid-encoded full-length MecR2 restores resistance in a sensitive S. aureus mecR2 deletion mutant of the resistant strain N315. The crystal structure of MecR2 reveals an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, an intermediate scaffold domain, and a C-terminal dimerization domain that contributes to oligomerization. The protein shows structural similarity to ROK (repressors, open reading frames, and kinases) family proteins, which bind DNA and/or sugar molecules. We found that functional cell-based assays of three point mutants affecting residues participating in sugar binding in ROK proteins had no effect on the resistance phenotype. By contrast, MecR2 bound short double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides nonspecifically, and a deletion mutant affecting the N-terminal DNA-binding domain showed a certain effect on activity, thus contributing to resistance less than the wild-type protein. Similarly, a deletion mutant, in which a flexible segment of intermediate scaffold domain had been replaced by four glycines, significantly reduced MecR2 function, thus indicating that this domain may likewise be required for activity. Taken together, these results provide the structural basis for the activity of a methicillin antirepressor, MecR2, which would sequester MecI away from its cognate promoter region and facilitate its degradation. PMID:23733184

  20. Usefulness of previous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening results in guiding empirical therapy for S aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Anthony D; Burry, Lisa; Showler, Adrienne; Steinberg, Marilyn; Ricciuto, Daniel; Fernandes, Tania; Chiu, Anna; Raybardhan, Sumit; Tomlinson, George A; Bell, Chaim M; Morris, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) screening is performed on hospitalized patients for infection control purposes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the usefulness of past MRSA screening for guiding empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study examined consecutive patients with confirmed SAB and previous MRSA screening swab from six academic and community hospitals between 2007 and 2010. Diagnostic test properties were calculated for MRSA screening swab for predicting methicillin resistance of SAB. RESULTS: A total of 799 patients underwent MRSA screening swabs before SAB. Of the 799 patients, 95 (12%) had a positive and 704 (88%) had a negative previous MRSA screening swab. There were 150 (19%) patients with MRSA bacteremia. Overall, previous MRSA screening swabs had a positive likelihood ratio of 33 (95% CI 18 to 60) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.45 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.54). Diagnostic accuracy differed depending on mode of acquisition (ie, community-acquired, nosocomial or health care-associated infection) (P<0.0001) and hospital (P=0.0002). At best, for health care-associated infection, prior MRSA screening swab had a positive likelihood ratio of 16 (95% CI 9 to 28) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.27 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: A negative prior MRSA screening swab cannot reliably rule out MRSA bacteremia and should not be used to guide empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. A positive prior MRSA screening swab greatly increases likelihood of MRSA, necessitating MRSA coverage in empirical antibiotic therapy for SAB. PMID:26361488

  1. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  2. Methicillin Resistance Alters the Biofilm Phenotype and Attenuates Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Device-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rudkin, Justine K.; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Lohan, Amanda J.; Tong, Pin; Loftus, Brendan J.; Pier, Gerald B.; Fey, Paul D.; Massey, Ruth C.; O'Gara, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus can express biofilm phenotypes promoted by the major cell wall autolysin and the fibronectin-binding proteins or the icaADBC-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesin/poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PIA/PNAG). Biofilm production in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains is typically dependent on PIA/PNAG whereas methicillin-resistant isolates express an Atl/FnBP-mediated biofilm phenotype suggesting a relationship between susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics and biofilm. By introducing the methicillin resistance gene mecA into the PNAG-producing laboratory strain 8325-4 we generated a heterogeneously resistant (HeR) strain, from which a homogeneous, high-level resistant (HoR) derivative was isolated following exposure to oxacillin. The HoR phenotype was associated with a R602H substitution in the DHHA1 domain of GdpP, a recently identified c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with roles in resistance/tolerance to β-lactam antibiotics and cell envelope stress. Transcription of icaADBC and PNAG production were impaired in the 8325-4 HoR derivative, which instead produced a proteinaceous biofilm that was significantly inhibited by antibodies against the mecA-encoded penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a). Conversely excision of the SCCmec element in the MRSA strain BH1CC resulted in oxacillin susceptibility and reduced biofilm production, both of which were complemented by mecA alone. Transcriptional activity of the accessory gene regulator locus was also repressed in the 8325-4 HoR strain, which in turn was accompanied by reduced protease production and significantly reduced virulence in a mouse model of device infection. Thus, homogeneous methicillin resistance has the potential to affect agr- and icaADBC-mediated phenotypes, including altered biofilm expression and virulence, which together are consistent with the adaptation of healthcare-associated MRSA strains to the antibiotic-rich hospital environment in which they are

  3. The Prevalence, Genotype and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of High- and Low-Level Mupirocin Resistant Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Shin Moo

    2012-01-01

    Background Mupirocin has been used for the treatment of skin infections and eradication of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The increased use of this antibiotic has been accompanied by outbreaks of MRSA that are resistant to mupirocin. Objective This study aims to determine the prevalence, genotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of mupirocin-resistant MRSA from 4 Korean hospitals. Methods A total 193 MRSA clinical isolates were collected from four university hospitals. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests, including mupirocin, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern analysis were performed. Results Overall, 27 of the 193 (14.1%) MRSA isolates were resistant to mupirocin. All of the (A) hospital isolates showed high-level (HL) mupirocin resistance and the low-level (LL) mupirocin resistant strains were from three other hospitals. The PFGE patterns of 16 mupirocin-resistant isolates were divided into 5 clusters (1-5), and the nine HL mupirocin-resistant isolates belonged to cluster 1. Both the HL and LL mupirocin-resistant MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and rifampin, but they were resistant to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin and tetracycline. The erythromycin and fusidic acid resistance rates were different between the HL and LL resistant isolates. Conclusion HL mupirocin-resistant isolates that could transfer this resistance to other bacteria were detected and these isolates were clonally related. The emergence of mupirocin resistant isolates emphasizes the importance of using antibiotics judiciously and carefully monitoring the prevalence of mupirocin resistance. PMID:22363153

  4. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the NanoLantern Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohsahl, Christopher M.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Krauss, Todd D.

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human illness, and has developed the remarkable ability to resist the bactericidal capabilities of many of the world's leading antibiotics (i.e. MRSA). In an effort to enable rapid detection and treatment of MRSA infections, we have developed a DNA detection technology termed the NanoLantern(TM). The NanoLantern(TM) biosensor technology is based on the simple immobilization of a fluorophore-terminated DNA hairpin onto a gold chip. This produces a label-free sensor that allows for a positive response to be obtained without extensive processing of the sample, saving cost and increasing accuracy. We will also discuss a newly developed method of partial gene analysis, used to develop a DNA hairpin probe that is capable of detecting the presence of the mecR gene, a gene necessary for methicillin resistance to be present in S. aureus, with 100% sequence specificity. The successful incorporation of this probe into the NanoLantern(TM) platform, along with the concomitant development of the paired PCR assay has allowed for the successful detection of methicillin-resistance directly from a culture of S. aureus. These results represent an important step forward in terms of developing the ability to rapidly and effectively detect the presence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

  5. Identification in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus hominis of an active primordial mobile genetic element for the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yuki; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Ma, Xiao Xue; Ui-Mizutani, Yoko; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2003-05-01

    We previously reported that the methicillin resistance gene mecA is carried by a novel type of mobile genetic element, SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec), in the chromosome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These elements are precisely excised from the chromosome and integrated into a specific site on the recipient chromosome by a pair of recombinase proteins encoded by the cassette chromosome recombinase genes ccrA and ccrB. In the present work, we detected homologues of the ccr genes in Staphylococcus hominis type strain GIFU12263 (equivalent to ATCC 27844), which is susceptible to methicillin. Sequence determination revealed that the ccr homologues in S. hominis were type 1 ccr genes (ccrA1 and ccrB1) that were localized on a genetic element structurally very similar to SCCmec except for the absence of the methicillin-resistance gene, mecA. This genetic element had mosaic-like patterns of homology with extant SCCmec elements, and we designated it SCC(12263) and considered it a type I staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC). The ccrB1 gene identified in the S. hominis strain is the first type 1 ccrB gene discovered to retain its function through the excision process as judged by two criteria: (i) SCC(12263) was spontaneously excised during cultivation of the strain and (ii) introduction of the S. hominis ccrB1 into an MRSA strain carrying a type I SCCmec whose ccrB1 gene is inactive generated SCCmec excisants at a high frequency. The existence of an SCC without a mec determinant is indicative of a staphylococcal site-specific mobile genetic element that serves as a vehicle of transfer for various genetic markers between staphylococcal species.

  6. Fluoroquinolone Impact on Nasal Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Durations in Neurologic Long-Term-Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Couderc, Clotilde; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Lawrence, Christine; Bouchiat, Coralie; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Salomon, Jérôme; Guillemot, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a risk factor for subsequent infection. Estimates of colonization duration vary widely among studies, and factors influencing the time to loss of colonization, especially the impact of antibiotics, remain unclear. We conducted a prospective study on patients naive for S. aureus colonization in 4 French long-term-care facilities. Data on nasal colonization status and potential factors for loss of colonization were collected weekly. We estimated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) colonization durations using the Kaplan-Meier method and investigated factors for loss of colonization using shared-frailty Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 285 S. aureus colonization episodes were identified in 149 patients. The median time to loss of MRSA or MSSA colonization was 3 weeks (95% confidence interval, 2 to 8 weeks) or 2 weeks (95% confidence interval, 2 to 3 weeks), respectively. In multivariable analyses, the methicillin resistance phenotype was not associated with S. aureus colonization duration (P = 0.21); the use of fluoroquinolones (hazard ratio, 3.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.31 to 8.71) and having a wound positive for a nonnasal strain (hazard ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 4.07) were associated with earlier loss of MSSA colonization, while no factor was associated with loss of MRSA colonization. These results suggest that the methicillin resistance phenotype does not influence the S. aureus colonization duration and that fluoroquinolones are associated with loss of MSSA colonization but not with loss of MRSA colonization. PMID:26416866

  7. Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

    2012-01-01

    A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often ‘silent’ spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of β-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

  8. Bacteraemia and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community acquired pneumonia: risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrús, Albert; Polverino, Eva; Villegas, Santiago; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Menéndez, Rosario; Niederman, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of blood cultures in the diagnosis of bacteraemia for community-acquired pneumonia is low. Recommendations, by guidelines, to perform blood cultures are discordant. We aimed to determine the incidence, microbial aetiology, risk factors and outcomes of bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia, including cases with antibiotic-resistant pathogens (ARP). A prospective, observational study was undertaken on consecutive adult patients admitted to the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain) with community-acquired pneumonia and blood cultures were obtained. Of the 2892 patients included, bacteraemia was present in 297 (10%) patients; 30 (10%) of whom had ARP (multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and an extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae). In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL(-1) and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. The risk factors for ARP bacteraemia were previous antibiotics and C-reactive protein <22.2 mg·dL(-1), while pleuritic pain was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis. Bacteraemia (excluding ARP), appropriate empiric treatment, neurological disease, arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction <250, pneumonia severity index risk classes IV and V, and intensive care unit admission were independently associated with a 30-day hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis. Inappropriate therapy was more frequent in ARP bacteraemia, compared with other bacteraemias (27% versus 3%, respectively, p<0.001). Antibiotic therapy protected against bacteraemia, but increased specifically the risk of bacteraemia from ARP due to the inappropriate coverage of these pathogens. Identifying patients at risk of ARP bacteraemia would help in

  9. Comparison of Multi-Drug Resistant Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Recreational Beaches and High Touch Surfaces in Built Environments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; Soge, Olusegun O; No, David

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major cause of disease in the general population with no health care exposure or known classical risk factors for MRSA infections. The potential community reservoirs have not been well defined though certain strains such as ST398 and USA300 have been well studied in some settings. MRSA has been isolated from recreational beaches, high-touch surfaces in homes, universities, and other community environmental surfaces. However, in most cases the strains were not characterized to determine if they are related to community-acquired or hospital-acquired clinical strains. We compared 55 environmental MRSA from 805 samples including sand, fresh, and marine water samples from local marine and fresh water recreational beaches (n = 296), high touch surfaces on the University of Washington campus (n = 294), surfaces in UW undergraduate housing (n = 85), and the local community (n = 130). Eleven USA300, representing 20% of the isolates, were found on the UW campus surfaces, student housing surfaces, and on the community surfaces but not in the recreational beach samples from the Northwest USA. Similarly, the predominant animal ST133 was found in the recreational beach samples but not in the high touch surface samples. All USA300 isolates were multi-drug resistant carrying two to six different antibiotic resistance genes coding for kanamycin, macrolides and/or macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B, and tetracycline, with the majority (72%) carrying four to six different antibiotic resistance genes. A surprising 98% of the 55 MRSA isolates were resistant to other classes of antibiotics and most likely represent reservoirs for these genes in the environment.

  10. Genetic basis of resistance waves among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from milk and meat products in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Attia, A M; Abd El-Hamid, M I; El-Shorbagy, I M; Abd El-Kader, S A

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious problem for clinicians worldwide. The present study attempted to evaluate the susceptibility patterns of MRSA to various antimicrobials and the prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance as well as the relevant antibiotic and antiseptic resistance genes among these isolates. Totally, 40 MRSA isolates were recovered from examined milk and meat product samples (18.60%). Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was remarkably observed among 85% of these isolates. There was a good correlation between phenotypic determination of methicillin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and tetracycline resistances and PCR detections of mecA, blaZ and tet(K) genes, respectively, but norA gene was not detected in the four ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. Although, 55% of MRSA expressed resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BC), neither qacA/B nor smr gene was detected. Of 20 isolates exhibiting erythromycin- clindamycin discordant resistance pattern, 8 displayed positive double disk diffusion (D-zone) test denoting inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotype with the inducibly expressed erm(A) and erm(C) genes in 87.5% of these isolates. Besides, the remaining 12 isolates showed MS phenotype (resistant to macrolides and type B streptogramins only) with a variety of erm(A), mph(C), msr(A) or a combination of these genes including erm(C). Finally, the constitutive MLSB phenotype with the constitutive expression of erm(A), erm(B) and erm(C) genes was comprised in 2 isolates with higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for erythromycin (512 and 1024 µg/ml) and clindamycin (16 and 32 µg/ml). These findings suggested the importance of monitoring the evolution of MRSA resistance. PMID:27609468

  11. Regulation of the expression of the β-lactam antibiotic-resistance determinants in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Blas; Llarrull, Leticia I; Luque-Ortega, Juan R; Alfonso, Carlos; Boggess, Bill; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2014-03-18

    β-Lactam antibiotics have faced obsolescence with the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A complex set of events ensues upon exposure of MRSA to these antibiotics, which culminates in proteolysis of BlaI or MecI, two gene repressors, and results in the induction of resistance. We report studies on the mechanism of binding of these gene repressors to the operator regions by fluorescence anisotropy. Within the range of in vivo concentrations for BlaI and MecI, these proteins interact with their regulatory elements in a reversible manner, as both a monomer and a dimer. PMID:24564530

  12. Molecular epidemiology of clinical and carrier strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the hospital settings of north India

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A; Thoker, Manzoor A; Khan, Jamal A; Ali, Asif; Khan, Mohammed A; Rizwan, Mohammed; Bhat, Khalid H; Dar, Mohammad J; Ahmed, Niyaz; Ahmad, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    Background The study was conducted between 2000 and 2003 on 750 human subjects, yielding 850 strains of staphylococci from clinical specimens (575), nasal cultures of hospitalized patients (100) and eye & nasal sources of hospital workers (50 & 125 respectively) in order to determine their epidemiology, acquisition and dissemination of resistance genes. Methods Organisms from clinical samples were isolated, cultured and identified as per the standard routine procedures. Susceptibility was measured by the agar diffusion method, as recommended by the Nat ional Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The modified method of Birnboin and Takahashi was used for isolation of plasmids from staphylococci. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of clinical and carrier Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated during our study was performed as described previously. Results It was shown that 35.1% of Staphylococcus aureus and 22.5% of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates were resistant to methicillin. Highest percentage of MRSA (35.5%) was found in pus specimens (n = 151). The multiple drug resistance of all MRSA (n = 180) and Methicillin resistant Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (MRCNS) (n = 76) isolates was detected. In case of both methicillin-resistant as well as methicillin-sensitive Saphylococcal isolates zero resistance was found to vancomycin where as highest resistance was found to penicillin G followed by ampicillin. It was shown that the major reservoir of methicillin resistant staphylococci in hospitals are colonized/infected inpatients and colonized hospital workers, with carriers at risk for developing endogenous infection or transmitting infection to health care workers and patients. The results were confirmed by molecular typing using PFGE by SmaI-digestion. It was shown that the resistant markers G and T got transferred from clinical S. aureus (JS-105) to carrier S. aureus (JN-49) and the

  13. Characterization of mannitol-fermenting methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from pigs in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwu, Clifford C.; Gomez-Sanz, Elena; Agbo, Ifeoma C.; Torres, Carmen; Chah, Kennedy F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the species distribution, antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes and virulence traits of mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) isolated from pigs in Nsukka agricultural zone, Nigeria. Twenty mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcal (MRCoNS) strains harboring the mecA gene were detected among the 64 Staphylococcus isolates from 291 pigs. A total of 4 species were identified among the MRCoNS isolates, namely, Staphylococcus sciuri (10 strains), Staphylococcus lentus (6 strains), Staphylococcus cohnii (3 strains) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one strain). All MRCoNS isolates were multidrug-resistant. In addition to β-lactams, the strains were resistant to fusidic acid (85%), tetracycline (75%), streptomycin (65%), ciprofloxacin (65%), and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (60%). In addition to the mecA and blaZ genes, other antimicrobial resistance genes detected were tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), erm(C), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfrK, dfrG, cat pC221, and cat pC223. Thirteen isolates were found to be ciprofloxacin-resistant, and all harbored a Ser84Leu mutation within the QRDR of the GyrA protein, with 3 isolates showing 2 extra substitutions, Ser98Ile and Arg100Lys (one strain) and Glu88Asp and Asp96Thr (2 strains). A phylogenetic tree of the QRDR nucleotide sequences in the gyrA gene revealed a high nucleotide diversity, with several major clusters not associated with the bacterial species. Our study highlights the possibility of transfer of mecA and other antimicrobial resistance genes from MRCoNS to pathogenic bacteria, which is a serious public health and veterinary concern. PMID:26413075

  14. Characterization of mannitol-fermenting methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from pigs in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ugwu, Clifford C; Gomez-Sanz, Elena; Agbo, Ifeoma C; Torres, Carmen; Chah, Kennedy F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the species distribution, antimicrobial resistance pheno- and genotypes and virulence traits of mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) isolated from pigs in Nsukka agricultural zone, Nigeria. Twenty mannitol-positive methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcal (MRCoNS) strains harboring the mecA gene were detected among the 64 Staphylococcus isolates from 291 pigs. A total of 4 species were identified among the MRCoNS isolates, namely, Staphylococcus sciuri (10 strains), Staphylococcus lentus (6 strains), Staphylococcus cohnii (3 strains) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one strain). All MRCoNS isolates were multidrug-resistant. In addition to β-lactams, the strains were resistant to fusidic acid (85%), tetracycline (75%), streptomycin (65%), ciprofloxacin (65%), and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (60%). In addition to the mecA and blaZ genes, other antimicrobial resistance genes detected were tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), erm(B), erm(C), aacA-aphD, aphA3, str, dfrK, dfrG, cat pC221, and cat pC223. Thirteen isolates were found to be ciprofloxacin-resistant, and all harbored a Ser84Leu mutation within the QRDR of the GyrA protein, with 3 isolates showing 2 extra substitutions, Ser98Ile and Arg100Lys (one strain) and Glu88Asp and Asp96Thr (2 strains). A phylogenetic tree of the QRDR nucleotide sequences in the gyrA gene revealed a high nucleotide diversity, with several major clusters not associated with the bacterial species. Our study highlights the possibility of transfer of mecA and other antimicrobial resistance genes from MRCoNS to pathogenic bacteria, which is a serious public health and veterinary concern.

  15. Recurrent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Abscesses and Selection of Reduced Chlorhexidine Susceptibility during Chlorhexidine Use.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Schlett, Carey D; Crawford, Katrina; Lanier, Jeffrey B; Merrell, D Scott; Ellis, Michael W

    2015-11-01

    We describe the selection of reduced chlorhexidine susceptibility during chlorhexidine use in a patient with two episodes of cutaneous USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus abscess. The second clinical isolate harbors a novel plasmid that encodes the QacA efflux pump. Greater use of chlorhexidine for disease prevention warrants surveillance for resistance.

  16. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  17. A study of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in patients with pyoderma

    PubMed Central

    Venniyil, Prasanth V.; Ganguly, Satyaki; Kuruvila, Sheela; Devi, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care–associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(HA-MRSA) are resistant to multiple antibiotics, therefore infections caused by them are difficult to treat resulting in high morbidity and mortality. While most of the research activities and public health initiatives are focused on HA-MRSA, the newly emerging pathogen, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) is gaining in significance in respect to patient morbidity. There is a significant paucity of data regarding CA-MRSA in the developing parts of the world. Aim: To study the proportions of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA infections among patients with culture-proven S. aureus infection and to find out how many of these patients showed presence of MRSA in nasal cultures of healthy contacts. Materials and Methods: Clinical details of 227 patients were recorded in the study, such as the duration and recurrence of the infection, history of antibiotic intake, and the presence of other medical illnesses. A pus swab was taken from each lesion and sent for culture and sensitivity. If the culture grew S. aureus, they were screened for methicillin resistance. A swab from the anterior nares of the healthy contact of each patient, whenever available, was collected and it was screened for MRSA. Results: Furunculosis was most common among the primary pyodermas (53/134; 39. 5%). Out of 239 pus culture samples obtained from 227 patients, 192 (84.58%) grew S. aureus; of these 150 (78.12%) were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), whereas 42 (21.98%) were MRSA. Out of the 42 MRSA isolated, 33 turned out to be CA-MRSA (78%) and 9 (22%) were HA-MRSA. Nasal swabs of healthy contacts of 34 MRSA patients were cultured. Out of them, two grew MRSA in the culture. Conclusion: The isolation rate of S. aureus was high in our study. Furthermore, our study, although hospital based, clearly indicated the substantial magnitude of the CA-MRSA problem in the local population. PMID:27294048

  18. Comparison of four genotyping assays for epidemiological study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, A; Bax, R; Prevost, G

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-six methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were genetically differentiated by interrepeat PCR and the results compared with those of ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis obtained in a previous study for the same strains. The comparison showed that the PCR-mediated assays were as discriminatory as PFGE, whereas ribotyping was the least powerful genotyping method. Due to the ease of performance, PCR fingerprinting may become the method of choice for establishing clonal relationship among Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

  19. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis.

  20. Benzimidazole analogs as WTA biosynthesis inhibitors targeting methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Wei; Pan, Jianping; Yang, Christine; Labroli, Marc; Pan, Weidong; Caldwell, John; Ha, Sookhee; Koseoglu, Sandra; Xiao, Jing C; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R; Garlisi, Charles G; Wu, Jin; Lee, Sang Ho; Wang, Hao; Tan, Christopher M; Roemer, Terry; Su, Jing

    2016-10-01

    A series of benzimidazole analogs have been synthesized to improve the profile of the previous lead compounds tarocin B and 1. The syntheses, structure-activity relationships, and selected biochemical data of these analogs are described. The optimization efforts allowed the identification of 21, a fluoro-substituted benzimidazole, exhibiting potent TarO inhibitory activity and typical profile for a wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis inhibitor. Compound 21 displayed a potent synergistic and bactericidal effect in combination with imipenem against diverse methicillin-resistant Staphylococci. PMID:27575474

  1. Colonic Perforation Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Enteritis After Total Gastrectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kenei; Tsutsumi, Jun; Takayama, Sumio; Mashiko, Hiroshi; Shiba, Hiroaki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-03-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent total gastrectomy and splenectomy for adenocarcinoma and low anterior resection for carcinoma in tubulo-villous adenoma of the rectum. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered for postoperative pancreatic fistula. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enteritis occurred on the 50th postoperative day and cecal perforation followed. The patient underwent construction of cecostomy with peritoneal drainage, and vancomycin was administered orally and per cecostomy for 2 weeks. The patient recovered well and was discharged at 35 days after re-operation in good general condition.

  2. Identification of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus inhibitory compound isolated from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Kadouri, Daniel E.; Shanks, Robert M.Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identified an antimicrobial compound produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. Colonies of S. marcescens inhibited the growth of nine different methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and several other tested Gram-positive bacterial species, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Genetic analysis revealed the requirement for the swrW gene which codes for a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase that generates the cyclodepsipeptide antibiotic serratamolide, also known as serrawettin W1. This is the first report describing the anti-MRSA properties of serratamolide. PMID:23791620

  3. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Seap, Bel; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  4. Cultivation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant staphylococci from input and output samples of German biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Sowinsky, Olivia; Brunner, Jana S; Dott, Wolfgang; Kämpfer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were detected in two mesophilic German biogas plants (BGPs) using selective pre-enrichment methods combined with cultivation on CHROMagar media and antibiotic resistance gene screening. Genetic fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed the presence of enterococci isolated by the VRE selective cultivation (67 isolates) in input and output samples of BGPs. In contrast, MRS (44 isolates) were detected in input, but in none of the output samples. Enterococcus isolates showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.8%) to E. lemanii, E. casseliflavus/E. gallinarium or E. devriesei/E. pseudoavium/E. viikkiensis and carried vanA, vanB and/or vanC1 genes. Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis VRE were not detected, but isolates closely related to those species (>99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) were detected by the MRS selective cultivation methods. Staphylococcus isolates shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.9%) with S. haemolyticus, S. lentus and S. sciuri and carried mecA genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were not detected. In summary, manure from livestock husbandry contained both, VRE and MRS. VRE were also detected in output samples, indicating that enterococci with vancomycin resistance genes could be release into the environment by the application of BGP output material as biofertilizers.

  5. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  6. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research. PMID:27399657

  7. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Optimizing testing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Baker, C N; Huang, M B; Tenover, F C

    1994-07-01

    Selection of the appropriate NaCl concentration for test medium for oxacillin susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci has been problematic when using different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. Broth microdilution, using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth + 2% NaCl, is the currently recommended reference method. There is currently no recommendation for the addition of NaCl to agar for dilution susceptibility tests when Staphylococcus species are tested with oxacillin. We examined the effects of adding 0, 2%, 4%, and 5% NaCl to Mueller-Hinton agar and broth for agar dilution, Etest, and broth microdilution tests. The results of these tests were compared with the reference broth microdilution results and with the results of a hybridization assay using a mec gene probe. We tested 223 strains of staphylococci, 128 of which were mec gene positive and had oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) > or = 4 micrograms/ml. Seven strains of S. aureus were mec probe negative but were oxacillin resistant. Seven coagulase-negative strains (three S. epidermidis, one S. haemolyticus, and three S. simulans) were mec probe positive and were oxacillin susceptible. The MICs for oxacillin-resistant strains increased two- to fourfold with the addition of 2% NaCl, but the MICs for oxacillin-susceptible strains were unchanged. Major and very major interpretative rates ranged from 18.2% to 20.2% for agar dilution and Etest without NaCl added to the medium, and these rates decreased to < 1% with the addition of 2% NaCl to the medium. The addition of 4% or 5% NaCl caused major error rates of > 17% for all test methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820997

  9. Application of the SCCmec element in the molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yancheng, Yang; Hang, Cheng; Renjie, Zhou; Xiancai, Rao

    2015-05-01

    Acquisition of the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) is one of the key reasons for the resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SCCmec is composed of a mec gene complex encoding the PBP2a determinant that is responsible for the β-lactam resistance of MRSA, and a ccr gene complex encoding recombinases that mediate the integration of SCCmec into and its excision from the recipient chromosome, and so-called three junkyard (J) regions of different sizes. The SCCmec elements carried by MRSA from different geographic locations are diverse, and each type contains characteristic DNA fragments in size. These characteristics of SCCmec element may facilitate the usage of SCCmec in the molecular typing of MRSA strains. In this review, we summarize the structure and function of SCCmec elecments, and discuss the application of SCCmec elements in the molecular typing of MRSA.

  10. Sanitary status and incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile within Canadian hotel rooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changyun; Weese, Scott J; Namvar, Azadeh; Warriner, Keith

    2015-04-01

    The study described in this article aimed at establishing a baseline assessment of the sanitary status of ice and guest rooms within Canadian hotels. Collectively, 54 hotel rooms belonging to six different national chains were sampled. High-contact surfaces (comforter, alarm clock, bedside lamp, TV remote, bathroom countertop, faucet, and toilet seat) were sampled using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) swabs and replicate organism detection and counting plates. ATP swab readings ranged from 2.12 to 4.42 log relative light units. Coliforms were recovered from 36% of surfaces with high prevalence being recovered from the comforter, TV remote, bathroom countertop, faucet, and toilet seat. Oxacillin-resistant bacteria were recovered from 19% of surfaces with 46% of isolates confirmed as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Two toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolates were recovered in the course of the study. Collectively, 24% of the ice samples harbored coliforms with a single sample testing positive for E. coli. The authors' study demonstrates that hotel rooms represent a potential source of community-acquired infections and the need for enhanced sanitation practices. PMID:25876260

  11. Antibacterial activity of extracellular compounds produced by a Pseudomonas strain against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a world health problem. Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, is one of the most important human pathogens associated with hospital and community-acquired infections. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived compound against MRSA strains. Methods Thirty clinical MRSA strains were isolated, and three standard MRSA strains were evaluated. The extracellular compounds were purified by vacuum liquid chromatography. Evaluation of antibacterial activity was performed by agar diffusion technique, determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration, curve of growth and viability and scanning electron microscopy. Interaction of an extracellular compound with silver nanoparticle was studied to evaluate antibacterial effect. Results The F3 (ethyl acetate) and F3d (dichloromethane- ethyl acetate) fractions demonstrated antibacterial activity against the MRSA strains. Phenazine-1-carboxamide was identified and purified from the F3d fraction and demonstrated slight antibacterial activity against MRSA, and synergic effect when combined with silver nanoparticles produced by Fusarium oxysporum. Organohalogen compound was purified from this fraction showing high antibacterial effect. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that the F3d fraction caused morphological changes to the cell wall of the MRSA strains. Conclusions These results suggest that P. aeruginosa-produced compounds such as phenazines have inhibitory effects against MRSA and may be a good alternative treatment to control infections caused by MRSA. PMID:23773484

  12. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal.

  13. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  14. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H; Coller, Barry S; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most-46 of the 63-wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing.

  15. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G.; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H.; Coller, Barry S.; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most—46 of the 63–wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL+) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26063853

  16. In vitro and in vivo activities of a novel cephalosporin, BMS-247243, against methicillin-resistant and -susceptible staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Fung-Tomc, Joan C; Clark, Junius; Minassian, Beatrice; Pucci, Michael; Tsai, Yuan-Hwang; Gradelski, Elizabeth; Lamb, Lucinda; Medina, Ivette; Huczko, Elizabeth; Kolek, Benjamin; Chaniewski, Susan; Ferraro, Cheryl; Washo, Thomas; Bonner, Daniel P

    2002-04-01

    The recent emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin has intensified the search for alternative therapies for the treatment of infections caused by this organism. One approach has been to identify a beta-lactam with improved affinity for PBP 2a, the target enzyme responsible for methicillin resistance in staphylococci. BMS-247243 is such a candidate, with MICs that inhibit 90% of isolates tested (MIC(90)s) of 4, 2, and 8 microg/ml for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. haemolyticus, respectively, as determined on plates with Mueller-Hinton agar and 2% NaCl. The BMS-247243 MICs for MRSA were minimally affected by the susceptibility testing conditions (inoculum size, prolonged incubation, addition of salt to the test medium) or by staphylococcal beta-lactamases. BMS-247243 MIC(90)s for methicillin-susceptible staphylococcal species ranged from < or = 0.25 to 1 microg/ml. The BMS-247243 MIC(90) for beta-lactamase-producing S. aureus strains was fourfold higher than that for beta-lactamase-nonproducing strains. BMS-247243 is hydrolyzed by staphylococcal beta-lactamases at 4.5 to 26.2% of the rates measured for cephaloridine. The affinity of BMS-247243 for PBP 2a was >100-fold better than that of methicillin or cefotaxime. BMS-247243 is bactericidal for MRSA, killing the bacteria twice as fast as vancomycin. These in vitro activities of BMS-247243 correlated with its in vivo efficacy against infections in animals, including the neutropenic murine thigh and rabbit endocarditis models involving MRSA strains. In conclusion, BMS-247243 has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and thus may prove to be useful in the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant organisms.

  17. In vitro and in vivo activities of a novel cephalosporin, BMS-247243, against methicillin-resistant and -susceptible staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Fung-Tomc, Joan C; Clark, Junius; Minassian, Beatrice; Pucci, Michael; Tsai, Yuan-Hwang; Gradelski, Elizabeth; Lamb, Lucinda; Medina, Ivette; Huczko, Elizabeth; Kolek, Benjamin; Chaniewski, Susan; Ferraro, Cheryl; Washo, Thomas; Bonner, Daniel P

    2002-04-01

    The recent emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin has intensified the search for alternative therapies for the treatment of infections caused by this organism. One approach has been to identify a beta-lactam with improved affinity for PBP 2a, the target enzyme responsible for methicillin resistance in staphylococci. BMS-247243 is such a candidate, with MICs that inhibit 90% of isolates tested (MIC(90)s) of 4, 2, and 8 microg/ml for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. haemolyticus, respectively, as determined on plates with Mueller-Hinton agar and 2% NaCl. The BMS-247243 MICs for MRSA were minimally affected by the susceptibility testing conditions (inoculum size, prolonged incubation, addition of salt to the test medium) or by staphylococcal beta-lactamases. BMS-247243 MIC(90)s for methicillin-susceptible staphylococcal species ranged from < or = 0.25 to 1 microg/ml. The BMS-247243 MIC(90) for beta-lactamase-producing S. aureus strains was fourfold higher than that for beta-lactamase-nonproducing strains. BMS-247243 is hydrolyzed by staphylococcal beta-lactamases at 4.5 to 26.2% of the rates measured for cephaloridine. The affinity of BMS-247243 for PBP 2a was >100-fold better than that of methicillin or cefotaxime. BMS-247243 is bactericidal for MRSA, killing the bacteria twice as fast as vancomycin. These in vitro activities of BMS-247243 correlated with its in vivo efficacy against infections in animals, including the neutropenic murine thigh and rabbit endocarditis models involving MRSA strains. In conclusion, BMS-247243 has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and thus may prove to be useful in the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant organisms. PMID:11897577

  18. Adaptive change inferred from genomic population analysis of the ST93 epidemic clone of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Timothy P; Holt, Kathryn E; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  19. Adaptive Change Inferred from Genomic Population Analysis of the ST93 Epidemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L.; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  20. Adaptive change inferred from genomic population analysis of the ST93 epidemic clone of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Timothy P; Holt, Kathryn E; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change.

  1. Restoration of susceptibility of intracellular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactams: comparison of strains, cells, and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Olivier, Aurélie; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M; Appelbaum, Peter C; Glupczynski, Youri

    2008-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invades eukaryotic cells. When methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 33591 is phagocytized by human THP-1 macrophages, complete restoration of susceptibility to cloxacillin and meropenem is shown and the strain becomes indistinguishable from MSSA ATCC 25923 due to the acid pH prevailing in phagolysosomes (S. Lemaire et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51:1627-1632, 2007). We examined whether this observation can be extended to (i) strains of current clinical and epidemiological interest (three hospital-acquired MRSA [HA-MRSA] strains, two community-acquired MRSA [CA-MRSA] strains, two HA-MRSA strains with the vancomycin-intermediate phenotype, one HA-MRSA strain with the vancomycin-resistant phenotype, and one animal [porcine] MRSA strain), (ii) activated THP-1 cells and nonprofessional phagocytes (keratinocytes, Calu-3 bronchial epithelial cells), and (iii) other beta-lactams (imipenem, oxacillin, cefuroxime, cefepime). All strains showed (i) a marked reduction in MICs in broth at pH 5.5 compared with the MIC at pH 7.4 and (ii) sigmoidal dose-response curves with cloxacillin (0.01x to 100x MIC, 24 h of incubation) after phagocytosis by THP-1 macrophages that were indistinguishable from each other and from the dose-response curve for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) ATCC 25923 (relative potency [50% effect], 6.09x MIC [95% confidence interval {CI}, 4.50 to 8.25]; relative efficacy [change in bacterial counts over the original inoculum for an infinitely large cloxacillin concentration, or maximal effect], -0.69 log CFU [95% CI, -0.79 to -0.58]). Similar dose-response curves for cloxacillin were also observed with MSSA ATCC 25923 and MRSA ATCC 33591 after phagocytosis by activated THP-1 macrophages, keratinocytes, and Calu-3 cells. By contrast, there was a lower level of restoration of susceptibility of MRSA ATCC 33591 to cefuroxime and cefepime after phagocytosis by THP-1 macrophages, even when the data were normalized for

  2. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%–23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%–6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%–20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7–4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9–11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusions The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive

  3. Antibacterial activity of THAM Trisphenylguanide against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Alan J; Shepard, Joyce B; Wilkinson, Royce A; Watkins, Robert L; Walton, Sarah K; Radke, Amanda R; Wright, Thomas J; Awel, Milat B; Cooper, Catherine; Erikson, Elizabeth; Labib, Mohamed E; Voyich, Jovanka M; Teintze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential antibacterial activity of three series of compounds synthesized from 12 linear and branched polyamines with 2-8 amino groups, which were substituted to produce the corresponding guanides, biguanides, or phenylguanides, against Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity was measured for each compound by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration against the bacteria, and the toxicity towards mammalian cells was determined. The most effective compound, THAM trisphenylguanide, was studied in time-to-kill and cytoplasmic leakage assays against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, USA300) in comparison to chlorhexidine. Preliminary toxicity and MRSA challenge studies in mice were also conducted on this compound. THAM trisphenylguanide showed significant antibacterial activity (MIC ∼1 mg/L) and selectivity against MRSA relative to all the other bacteria examined. In time-to-kill assays it showed increased antimicrobial activity against MRSA versus chlorhexidine. It induced leakage of cytoplasmic content at concentrations that did not reduce cell viability, suggesting the mechanism of action may involve membrane disruption. Using an intraperitoneal mouse model of invasive MRSA disease, THAM trisphenylguanide reduced bacterial burden locally and in deeper tissues. This study has identified a novel guanide compound with selective microbicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including a methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain.

  4. Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection – 21st Century Lepers

    PubMed Central

    Mozzillo, Kristin L.; Ortiz, Nancy; Miller, Loren G.

    2009-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, especially community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. Many media descriptions of MRSA are sensational and focus on its potential for severe disease and contagiousness. Our objective is to describe psychological and social morbidity associated with MRSA infection via a case series of five patients with CA-MRSA infection. We also analyze the resulting stigmatization associated with being diagnosed with MRSA infection. We learned that patients describe a variety of stigmatization related to their diagnosis of MRSA, including being shunned at home and in the workplace. Patients describe being asked by family, colleagues, and clients to take extraordinary measures to prevent MRSA transmission. Consequences of MRSA diagnoses have included erosion or termination of key personal and business relationships. In conclusion, stigmatization resulting from the diagnosis of MRSA can have profound personal and social morbidity. Media and public health awareness of MRSA infection needs to be balanced with information about how MRSA transmission is usually preventable with simple hygienic measures. PMID:20236730

  5. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26734530

  6. Bactericidal Effects of Charged Silver Nanoparticles in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce; Velazquez-Salazar, J. Jesus; Lara, Humberto H.; Arellano-Jimenez, Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Yuan, Tony T.; Hwang, Yoon; Desilva, Mauris N.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The increased number of infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major concern to society. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of positively charged AgNPs on methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) cell wall using advanced electron microscopy techniques. Positively charged AgNPs suspensions were synthesized via a microwave heating technique. The suspensions were then characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) showing AgNPs size range from 5 to 30 nm. MSSA and MRSA were treated with positively charged AgNPs concentrations ranging from 0.06 mM to 31 mM. The MIC50 studies showed that viability of MSSA and MRSA could be reduced by 50% at a positively charged AgNPs concentration of 0.12 mM supported by Scanning-TEM (STEM) images demonstrating bacteria cell wall disruption leading to lysis after treatment with AgNPs. The results provide insights into one mechanism in which positively charged AgNPs are able to reduce the viability of MSSA and MRSA. This research is supported by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (G12MD007591) from NIH, NSF-PREM Grant No. DMR-0934218, The Welch Foundation and NAMRU-SA work number G1009.

  7. Biophysical analysis of the putative acetyltransferase SACOL2570 from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hai-Bin; Knapik, Aleksandra A.; Petkowski, Janusz J.; Demas, Matthew; Shumilin, Igor A.; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of a myriad of insidious and intractable infections in humans, especially in patients with compromised immune systems and children. Here, we report the apo- and CoA-bound crystal structures of a member of the galactoside acetyltransferase superfamily from methicillin-resistant S. aureus SACOL2570 which was recently shown to be down regulated in S. aureus grown in the presence of fusidic acid, an antibiotic used to treat MRSA infections. SACOL2570 forms a homotrimerin solution, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering. The protein subunit consists of an N-terminal alpha-helical domain connected to a C-terminal LβH domain. CoA binds in the active site formed by the residues from adjacent LβH domains. After determination of CoA-bound structure, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to model the binding of AcCoA. Binding of both AcCoA and CoA to SACOL2570 was verified by isothermal titration calorimetry. SACOL2570 most likely acts as an acetyltransferase, using AcCoA as an acetyl group donor and an as-yet-undetermined chemical moiety as an acceptor. SACOL2570 was recently used as a scaffold for mutations that lead the generation of cage-like assemblies, and has the potential to be used for the generation of more complex nanostructures. PMID:23963951

  8. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Yacamán, Miguel José

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26734530

  9. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in non-outbreak skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and risk factors for the acquisition of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) as the main cause of skin and soft tissue infections. S. aureus were characterized for the presence of PVL, TSST-1 and mecA genes. SCCmec typing was carried out in mecA positive strains and PFGE was performed only in these strains. During the study period, 127 outpatients attending a dermatology clinical the Botucatu Medical School, a regional tertiary hospital in Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil, were diagnosed with active skin infections. A total 66 (56.9%) S. aureus strains were isolated. The methicillin resistance gene mecA was detected in seven (10.6%) S. aureus strains. The SCCmec types detected in the seven mecA-positive S. aureus strains were type Ia in one, type II in three, and type IV in three. The PVL gene was detected in 10 (15.1%) in sensitive strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed non-clonal diversity among the isolates. The risk factors associated with MRSA acquisition in this study were previous ciprofloxacin use and working in a healthcare environment. The risk factors indicate plausible routes of CA-MRSA transmission among the subjects studied. PMID:25763047

  10. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surface waters near industrial hog operation spray fields.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, S M; Myers, K W; Heaney, C D; Larsen, J; Hall, D; Miller, M B; Stewart, J R

    2016-09-15

    Industrial hog operations (IHOs) have been identified as a source of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, few studies have investigated the presence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in the environment near IHOs, specifically surface waters proximal to spray fields where IHO liquid lagoon waste is sprayed. Surface water samples (n=179) were collected over the course of approximately one year from nine locations in southeastern North Carolina and analyzed for the presence of presumptive MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA media. Culture-based, biochemical, and molecular tests, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to confirm that isolates that grew on CHROMagar MRSA media were S. aureus. Confirmed S. aureus isolates were then tested for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and screened for molecular markers of MRSA (mecA, mecC) and livestock adaptation (absence of scn). A total of 12 confirmed MRSA were detected in 9 distinct water samples. Nine of 12 MRSA isolates were also multidrug-resistant (MDRSA [i.e., resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes]). All MRSA were scn-positive and most (11/12) belonged to a staphylococcal protein A (spa) type t008, which is commonly associated with humans. Additionally, 12 confirmed S. aureus that were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) were recovered, 7 of which belonged to spa type t021 and were scn-negative (a marker of livestock-adaptation). This study demonstrated the presence of MSSA, MRSA, and MDRSA in surface waters adjacent to IHO lagoon waste spray fields in southeastern North Carolina. To our knowledge, this is the first report of waterborne S. aureus from surface waters proximal to IHOs. PMID:27261430

  11. Characterisation of SCCmec elements in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Afshar, Mastaneh; Asghari, Babak; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, especially in burn units all around the world. Because of the emergence of the β-lactam antibiotic-resistant strains since 1961, concern about the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has increased in these units. Resistance to methicillin is mediated by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that have enough affinity for binding to the β-lactam ring, but another kind of protein (PBP2α), which is encoded by the mecA gene, has a lower affinity for binding to these antibiotics. The mecA gene is transferred by SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) as a mobile genetic element, exclusively found in the Staphylococcus genus. Identification of the frequency of the mecA gene, different SCCmec types and also its incidence may have benefit in surveillance prevention and control of MRSA strains in burn units. In this study, 40 S. aureus isolates were collected from patients hospitalised in Motahari burn center of Tehran, during 2012-2013. Conventional microbiological methods were applied and the confirmed isolates were stored at -20°C for molecular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The antibiotic resistance pattern was performed by disc diffusion method and finally the different SCCmec types were determined by specific primers. During this research, 40 isolates of S. aureus were collected from burn patients, of which (37.5%) of the specimens belonged to female patients and 62.5% to male patients. The aetiology of the burn was classified as follows: open flame (35%), liquid (32.5%), chemical (5%) and other (27.5%). By a disc diffusion method, no resistance pattern was observed to vancomycin and fosfomycin. Based on a multiplex PCR assay, the five different SCCmec types were detected as: 47.5% type III, 25% type IV, 10% type V, 10% type II and 7.5% type I. PMID:24211088

  12. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surface waters near industrial hog operation spray fields.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, S M; Myers, K W; Heaney, C D; Larsen, J; Hall, D; Miller, M B; Stewart, J R

    2016-09-15

    Industrial hog operations (IHOs) have been identified as a source of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, few studies have investigated the presence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in the environment near IHOs, specifically surface waters proximal to spray fields where IHO liquid lagoon waste is sprayed. Surface water samples (n=179) were collected over the course of approximately one year from nine locations in southeastern North Carolina and analyzed for the presence of presumptive MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA media. Culture-based, biochemical, and molecular tests, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to confirm that isolates that grew on CHROMagar MRSA media were S. aureus. Confirmed S. aureus isolates were then tested for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and screened for molecular markers of MRSA (mecA, mecC) and livestock adaptation (absence of scn). A total of 12 confirmed MRSA were detected in 9 distinct water samples. Nine of 12 MRSA isolates were also multidrug-resistant (MDRSA [i.e., resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes]). All MRSA were scn-positive and most (11/12) belonged to a staphylococcal protein A (spa) type t008, which is commonly associated with humans. Additionally, 12 confirmed S. aureus that were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) were recovered, 7 of which belonged to spa type t021 and were scn-negative (a marker of livestock-adaptation). This study demonstrated the presence of MSSA, MRSA, and MDRSA in surface waters adjacent to IHO lagoon waste spray fields in southeastern North Carolina. To our knowledge, this is the first report of waterborne S. aureus from surface waters proximal to IHOs.

  13. Short communication: Antimicrobial resistance and virulence characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolates from bovine mastitis cases in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Seixas, R; Santos, J P; Bexiga, R; Vilela, C L; Oliveira, M

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) have already been reported as mastitis agents. Such bacterial species are a public health concern, and the characterization of their antimicrobial resistance and virulence profile is important to better control their dissemination. The present work evaluated the distribution of methicillin-resistance among 204 staphylococci from clinical (n=50) and subclinical (n=154) bovine mastitis. The presence ofthe mecA gene was determined by PCR. Phenotypic expression of coagulase, DNase, lipase, gelatinase, hemolytic enzymes, and biofilm production was evaluated. The presence of biofilm-related genes, icaA, icaD, and bap, was also determined. Antimicrobial resistance patterns for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulphonamides, tetracyclines, and fusidic acid were determined. Nineteen (9.3%) isolates were identified as MRS, and the presence of mecA in these isolates was confirmed by PCR. Virulence factors evaluation revealed that gelatinase was the most frequently detected (94.7%), followed by hemolysins (73.7%) and lipase (68.4%); 84.2% of the MRS isolates produced biofilm and icaA and icaD were detected in almost half of the MRS isolates (52.6%), but all were bap-negative. Resistance against other antimicrobial agents ranged from 0 (fusidic acid, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, enrofloxacin) to 100% (nalidixic acid). Resistance to nalidixic acid and nalidixic acid-tetracycline were the most common antimicrobial resistance profiles (31.6%). This study confirms that despite the low prevalence of MRS, isolates frequently express other virulence traits, especially biofilm, that may represent a serious challenge to clinicians.

  14. Liposome containing cinnamon oil with antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haiying; Li, Wei; Li, Changzhu; Vittayapadung, Saritporn; Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of bacterial disease remains high and is set against a backdrop of increasing antimicrobial resistance. There is a pressing need for highly effective and natural antibacterial agents. In this work, the anti-biofilm effect of cinnamon oil on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated. Then, cinnamon oil was encapsulated in liposomes to enhance its chemical stability. The anti-biofilm activities of the liposome-encapsulated cinnamon oil against MRSA biofilms on stainless steel, gauze, nylon membrane and non-woven fabrics were evaluated by colony forming unit determination. Scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy analyses were employed to observe the morphological changes in MRSA biofilms treated with the encapsulated cinnamon oil. As a natural and safe spice, the cinnamon oil exhibited a satisfactory antibacterial performance on MRSA and its biofilms. The application of liposomes further improves the stability of antimicrobial agents and extends the action time.

  15. Is it time to replace vancomycin in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections?

    PubMed

    van Hal, Sebastiaan J; Fowler, Vance G

    2013-06-01

    For more than 4 decades, vancomycin has been the antibiotic of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Recently, infections due to isolates with high but susceptible vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations have been associated with additional treatment failures and patient mortality. These poorer outcomes may in part be explained by the inability of attaining appropriate vancomycin levels in these patients. However, assumptions that these poor outcomes are solely due to failure to achieve optimal serum levels of vancomycin are premature. The availability of effective alternatives further erodes the position of vancomycin as first-line therapy. The emergence of resistance and cost considerations, however, favor a more measured approach when using alternative antimicrobials. Collectively, the current available data suggest that the optimal therapy for MRSA infections remains unclear. In the absence of further data, the Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines remain relevant and inform clinicians of best practice for treating patients with MRSA infections.

  16. Improved understanding of factors driving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic waves

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Som S; Otto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. Since the global spread of MRSA in the 1960s, MRSA strains have evolved with increased pathogenic potential. Notably, some strains are now capable of causing persistent infections not only in hospitalized patients but also in healthy individuals in the community. Furthermore, MRSA is increasingly associated with infections among livestock-associated workers, primarily because of transmission from animals to humans. Moreover, many MRSA strains have gained resistance to most available antibiotics. In this review, we will present current knowledge on MRSA epidemiology and discuss new endeavors being undertaken to understand better the molecular and epidemiological underpinnings of MRSA outbreaks. PMID:23861600

  17. Liposome containing cinnamon oil with antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haiying; Li, Wei; Li, Changzhu; Vittayapadung, Saritporn; Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of bacterial disease remains high and is set against a backdrop of increasing antimicrobial resistance. There is a pressing need for highly effective and natural antibacterial agents. In this work, the anti-biofilm effect of cinnamon oil on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated. Then, cinnamon oil was encapsulated in liposomes to enhance its chemical stability. The anti-biofilm activities of the liposome-encapsulated cinnamon oil against MRSA biofilms on stainless steel, gauze, nylon membrane and non-woven fabrics were evaluated by colony forming unit determination. Scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy analyses were employed to observe the morphological changes in MRSA biofilms treated with the encapsulated cinnamon oil. As a natural and safe spice, the cinnamon oil exhibited a satisfactory antibacterial performance on MRSA and its biofilms. The application of liposomes further improves the stability of antimicrobial agents and extends the action time. PMID:26838161

  18. Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on a Cochlear Implant Following Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Im, Gi Jung; An, Yun Suk; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2015-12-01

    To demonstrate biofilm formations on a cochlear implant magnet of a pediatric patient suffering from a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The appearance of biofilm colonies was analyzed on different magnet sections. The appearance of MRSA biofilms on the surface of an explanted cochlear implant was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focusing on the pattern of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the biofilms. SEM revealed unique biofilms with a three-dimensional EPS complex and tower-like formations. Biofilm configurations changed from the margin to the center of the magnet. Biofilms were solitary and scattered at the margin; large and plate-like in the center; and stacked in layers, forming towers and water channels, in the middle region. After a MRSA infection, biofilm formations were observed on the surface of a magnet. Bacterial biofilms provide optimal conditions for bacterial growth and antibiotic resistance and can cause intractable infections that lead to device failure.

  19. Antibacterial Characterization of Novel Synthetic Thiazole Compounds against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Haroon; Reddy, P. V. Narasimha; Monteleone, Dennis; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S.; Cushman, Mark; Hammac, G. Kenitra; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a commensal organism of companion animals that is a significant source of opportunistic infections in dogs. With the emergence of clinical isolates of S. pseudintermedius (chiefly methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP)) exhibiting increased resistance to nearly all antibiotic classes, new antimicrobials and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Thiazole compounds have been previously shown to possess potent antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus of human and animal concern. Given the genetic similarity between S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius, this study explores the potential use of thiazole compounds as novel antibacterial agents against methicillin-sensitive S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) and MRSP. A broth microdilution assay confirmed these compounds exhibit potent bactericidal activity (at sub-microgram/mL concentrations) against both MSSA and MRSP clinical isolates while the MTS assay confirmed three compounds (at 10 μg/mL) were not toxic to mammalian cells. A time-kill assay revealed two derivatives rapidly kill MRSP within two hours. However, this rapid bactericidal activity was not due to disruption of the bacterial cell membrane indicating an alternative mechanism of action for these compounds against MRSP. A multi-step resistance selection analysis revealed compounds 4 and 5 exhibited a modest (two-fold) shift in activity over ten passages. Furthermore, all six compounds (at a subinihibitory concentration) demonstrated the ability to re-sensitize MRSP to oxacillin, indicating these compounds have potential use for extending the therapeutic utility of β-lactam antibiotics against MRSP. Metabolic stability analysis with dog liver microsomes revealed compound 3 exhibited an improved physicochemical profile compared to the lead compound. In addition to this, all six thiazole compounds possessed a long post-antibiotic effect (at least 8 hours) against MRSP

  20. Graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite as a promising biocidal agent against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Lima, Bruna Araujo; de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; Brocchi, Marcelo; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been responsible for serious hospital infections worldwide. Nanomaterials are an alternative to conventional antibiotic compounds, because bacteria are unlikely to develop microbial resistance against nanomaterials. In the past decade, graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as a material that is often used to support and stabilize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for the preparation of novel antibacterial nanocomposites. In this work, we report the synthesis of the graphene-oxide silver nanocomposite (GO-Ag) and its antibacterial activity against relevant microorganisms in medicine. Materials and methods GO-Ag nanocomposite was synthesized through the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by sodium citrate in an aqueous GO dispersion, and was extensively characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by microdilution assays and time-kill experiments. The morphology of bacterial cells treated with GO-Ag was investigated via transmission electron microscopy. Results AgNPs were well distributed throughout GO sheets, with an average size of 9.4±2.8 nm. The GO-Ag nanocomposite exhibited an excellent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli. All (100%) MRSA cells were inactivated after 4 hours of exposure to GO-Ag sheets. In addition, no toxicity was found for either pristine GO or bare AgNPs within the tested concentration range. Transmission electronic microscopy images offered insights into how GO-Ag nanosheets interacted with bacterial cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the GO-Ag nanocomposite is a promising antibacterial agent against common nosocomial bacteria, particularly antibiotic-resistant MRSA. Morphological injuries on MRSA cells

  1. [Investigation of the Presence of Disinfectant Resistance Genes qacA/B in Nosocomial Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates and Evaluation of Their In Vitro Disinfectant Susceptibilities].

    PubMed

    Aykan, Sadiye Berna; Cağlar, Kayhan; Engin, Evren Doruk; Sipahi, Ayşe Bilge; Sultan, Nedim; Yalınay Çırak, Meltem

    2013-01-01

    Development of resistance to disinfectant substances in nosocomial microorganisms is an important problem encountered during disinfectant practices. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a significant cause of hospital-acquired infections. Besides being resistant to several antimicrobial agents, MRSA strains can also become resistant to some disinfectant substances. Resistance to disinfectant substances may develop due to the misuse of disinfectants. This may either be due to the frequent use of disinfectant substances or use in lower concentrations than recommended. MRSA strains may harbour the qacA/B disinfectant resistance genes that may cause resistance to quarternary ammonium compounds and some cationic disinfectants. These resistance genes are found in plasmids and are responsible for decreased susceptibility or resistance. In this study, a total of 69 nosocomial MRSA strains isolated from clinical specimens in our hospital were tested for disinfectant activity and the presence of qacA/B disinfectant resistance genes in these isolates was investigated by polymerase chain reaction. We determined whether the presence of these genes caused phenotypic resistance to chlorhexidine and benzalkonium chloride by the use of bactericidal and bacteriostatic tests. For this purpose, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of these disinfectants against MRSA isolates were detected by microdilution method with the proposals of CLSI, and bactericidal effects of these disinfectants were also detected by using quantitative suspension test according to EN13727:2003 European Standard. It has been found that 11.6% (8/69) of the isolates harbored qacA/B resistance genes. MIC values for chlorhexidine and benzalkonium chloride were found in the range of 2-8 µg/ml. Although it was observed that MIC values were higher in five of the qacA/B gene positive isolates, statistically significant difference was not found between gene positive and gene negative

  2. Descriptive Analysis of Antibiotic-Resistant Patterns of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) st398 Isolated from Healthy Swine

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Ana; Castro, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Abreu, Rossana; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Arias, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background: Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) such as the MRSA ST398 strain has spread all over the World and the most worrying aspect of this fact appears to be its capacity to easily spread to humans. The excessive use of antibiotics has made swine a reservoir of MRSA. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profile of MRSA samples isolated from healthy swine of the island of Tenerife (Spain). Methods: A total of 256 MRSA isolates from swine samples and five MRSA isolates from pig worker samples were investigated for MRSA antibiotic resistant patterns. Results: Analysis of the susceptibility status of MRSA pig isolates revealed that 39 isolates were resistant to one antibiotic, 71 isolates were resistant to two antibiotics and 96 isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. SCCmec typing revealed the presence of types IV and V. Isolates having SCCmec IV had an increased resistance to the antimicrobial agents tested than those having SCCmec V. We observed significant differences when comparing the most common resistance patterns and SCCmec type. Conclusions: MRSA isolated from humans showed similar resistance to those isolated from pigs, excepting erythromycin, since all the workers’ isolates were sensitive to this antibiotic. The evolution of new MRSA clones has emphasized the need for infection control practices in animals and humans in close contact. PMID:25588155

  3. β-Lactam Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Is Increased by Inactivation of the ClpXP Protease

    PubMed Central

    Bæk, Kristoffer T.; Gründling, Angelika; Mogensen, René G.; Thøgersen, Louise; Petersen, Andreas; Paulander, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has acquired the mecA gene encoding a peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has decreased affinity for β-lactams. Quickly spreading and highly virulent community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains recently emerged as a frequent cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the health care system. In this study, we found that the inactivation of the components of the ClpXP protease substantially increased the β-lactam resistance level of a CA-MRSA USA300 strain, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of ClpXP controls one or more pathways modulating β-lactam resistance. These pathways do not involve the control of mecA expression, as the cellular levels of PBP2a were unaltered in the clp mutants. An analysis of the cell envelope properties of the clpX and clpP mutants revealed a number of distinct phenotypes that may contribute to the enhanced β-lactam tolerance. Both mutants displayed significantly thicker cell walls, increased peptidoglycan cross-linking, and altered composition of monomeric muropeptide species compared to those of the wild types. Moreover, changes in Sle1-mediated peptidoglycan hydrolysis and altered processing of the major autolysin Atl were observed in the clp mutants. In conclusion, the results presented here point to an important role for the ClpXP protease in controlling cell wall metabolism and add novel insights into the molecular factors that determine strain-dependent β-lactam resistance. PMID:24867990

  4. β-Lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 is increased by inactivation of the ClpXP protease.

    PubMed

    Bæk, Kristoffer T; Gründling, Angelika; Mogensen, René G; Thøgersen, Louise; Petersen, Andreas; Paulander, Wilhelm; Frees, Dorte

    2014-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has acquired the mecA gene encoding a peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has decreased affinity for β-lactams. Quickly spreading and highly virulent community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains recently emerged as a frequent cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the health care system. In this study, we found that the inactivation of the components of the ClpXP protease substantially increased the β-lactam resistance level of a CA-MRSA USA300 strain, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of ClpXP controls one or more pathways modulating β-lactam resistance. These pathways do not involve the control of mecA expression, as the cellular levels of PBP2a were unaltered in the clp mutants. An analysis of the cell envelope properties of the clpX and clpP mutants revealed a number of distinct phenotypes that may contribute to the enhanced β-lactam tolerance. Both mutants displayed significantly thicker cell walls, increased peptidoglycan cross-linking, and altered composition of monomeric muropeptide species compared to those of the wild types. Moreover, changes in Sle1-mediated peptidoglycan hydrolysis and altered processing of the major autolysin Atl were observed in the clp mutants. In conclusion, the results presented here point to an important role for the ClpXP protease in controlling cell wall metabolism and add novel insights into the molecular factors that determine strain-dependent β-lactam resistance.

  5. Cell wall monoglycine cross-bridges and methicillin hypersusceptibility in a femAB null mutant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Strandén, A M; Ehlert, K; Labischinski, H; Berger-Bächi, B

    1997-01-01

    The femAB operon is involved in the formation of the characteristic pentaglycine side chain of the staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Allele replacement of the femAB operon with the tetracycline resistance determinant tetK in a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain resulted in impaired growth, methicillin hypersusceptibility, and lysostaphin resistance. The usual pentaglycine cross-bridges were replaced by monoglycine bridges exclusively, and cross-linking of the peptidoglycan strands was drastically reduced. Complementation of the femAB null mutant by either femA or femAB resulted in the extension of the cross-bridges to a triglycine or a pentaglycine, respectively. This finding suggests that FemA is responsible for the formation of glycines 2 and 3, and FemB is responsible for formation of glycines 4 and 5, of the pentaglycine side chain of the peptidoglycan precursor. Moreover, it can be deduced that addition of the first glycine must occur by a femAB-independent mechanism. PMID:8981974

  6. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  7. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci species isolated from computer keyboards located in secondary and postsecondary schools.

    PubMed

    Boa, Tyler T; Rahube, Teddie O; Fremaux, Bastien; Levett, Paul N; Yost, Christopher K

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a public health threat within the general community, thereby warranting identification of MRSA reservoirs within the community. Computer terminals in schools were sampled for S. aureus and methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The overall prevalence of MRSA on computer keyboards was low: 0.68% for a postsecondary institution and 2% and 0% for two secondary institutes. The MRSA isolate from the postsecondary institution did not correspond to the Canadian epidemic clusters, but is related to the USA 700 cluster, which contains strains implicated in outbreaks within the U.S. The isolate from the secondary institute's keyboard was typed as CMRSA7 (USA 400), a strain that has been implicated in both Canadian and U.S. epidemics. Methicillin-resistant S. haemolyticus and S. epidermidis were also isolated from keyboards, indicating that a mixed community of methicillin-resistant staphylococci can be present on keyboards. Although the prevalence was low, the presence of MRSA combined with the high volume of traffic on these student computer terminals demonstrates the potential for public-access computer terminals and computer rooms at educational institutes to act as reservoirs.

  8. Multiplex PCR assay for identification of six different Staphylococcus spp. and simultaneous detection of methicillin and mupirocin resistance.

    PubMed

    Campos-Peña, E; Martín-Nuñez, E; Pulido-Reyes, G; Martín-Padrón, J; Caro-Carrillo, E; Donate-Correa, J; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, I; Alcoba-Flórez, J; Machín, F; Méndez-Alvarez, S

    2014-07-01

    We describe a new, efficient, sensitive, and fast single-tube multiple-PCR protocol for the identification of the most clinically significant Staphylococcus spp. and the simultaneous detection of the methicillin and mupirocin resistance loci. The protocol identifies at the species level isolates belonging to S. aureus, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. lugdunensis, and S. saprophyticus.

  9. Use of the cobas 4800 system for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Moure, Raquel; Cañizares, Ángeles; Muíño, María; Lobato, Margarita; Fernández, Ana; Rodríguez, María; Gude, Maria José; Tomás, Maria; Bou, Germán

    2016-01-01

    The new cobas® Cdiff and cobas® MRSA/SA tests were compared with conventional methods for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The final concordance between cobas Cdiff Test and GDH/toxin gene screening was 97.62% and between cobas MRSA/SA Test and chromogenic culture, 91.30%, respectively.

  10. Efficacy of alcohol gel for removal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hands of colonized patients.

    PubMed

    Sunkesula, Venkata; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Macinga, David R; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-02-01

    Of 82 patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization, 67 (82%) had positive hand cultures for MRSA. A single application of alcohol gel (2 mL) consistently reduced the burden of MRSA on hands. However, incomplete removal of MRSA was common, particularly in those with a high baseline level of recovery. PMID:25633009

  11. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  12. Potential role of pet animals in household transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-06-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals.

  13. Prevalence and characterization of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from retail meat and humans in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing interest in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, specifically methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), on retail meat products. In this study, staphylococci were isolated from retail pork and retail beef in Georgia and MRSA from the products were compared to human MRSA from the...

  14. Potential role of pet animals in household transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-06-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals. PMID:21142959

  15. Alternative use for spectra MRSA chromogenic agar in detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jess F; Dionisio, Alexander A; Riebe, Katherine M; Hall, Gerri S; Wilson, Deborah A; Whittier, Susan; Dipersio, Joseph R; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2010-06-01

    Spectra MRSA agar (Remel, Lenexa, KS), a novel chromogenic medium originally developed to detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from nasal swabs, was evaluated in this multicenter study for the detection of MRSA from positive blood cultures exhibiting Gram-positive cocci upon initial Gram staining.

  16. Multiplex PCR assay for identification of six different Staphylococcus spp. and simultaneous detection of methicillin and mupirocin resistance.

    PubMed

    Campos-Peña, E; Martín-Nuñez, E; Pulido-Reyes, G; Martín-Padrón, J; Caro-Carrillo, E; Donate-Correa, J; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, I; Alcoba-Flórez, J; Machín, F; Méndez-Alvarez, S

    2014-07-01

    We describe a new, efficient, sensitive, and fast single-tube multiple-PCR protocol for the identification of the most clinically significant Staphylococcus spp. and the simultaneous detection of the methicillin and mupirocin resistance loci. The protocol identifies at the species level isolates belonging to S. aureus, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. lugdunensis, and S. saprophyticus. PMID:24829244

  17. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  18. Importance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus eradication in carriers to prevent postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Pofahl, Walter E; Ramsey, Keith M; Nobles, Delores L; Cochran, M Kathy; Goettler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Although infrequent, postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Previous studies have identified the importance of MRSA screening to diminish the risk of postoperative MRSA SSI. The current study quantifies the importance of eradication of the MRSA carrier state to prevent MRSA SSI. Beginning February 2007, all admissions to an 800-bed tertiary care hospital were screened for MRSA by nasal swab using rapid polymerase chain reaction-based testing. Patients found to be nasal carriers of MRSA were treated with 2 per cent mupirocin nasal ointment and 4 per cent chlorhexidine soap before surgery. The subset of patients undergoing procedures that are part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) were followed for MRSA SSI (n = 8980). The results of preoperative MRSA screening and eradication of the carrier state were analyzed. Since the initiation of universal MRSA screening, 11 patients undergoing SCIP procedures have developed MRSA SSI (0.12%). Of these, six patients (55%) had negative preoperative screens. Of the five patients with positive preoperative screens, only one received treatment to eradicate the carrier state. In patients who develop MRSA SSI, failure to treat the carrier state before surgery results in MRSA SSI. PMID:21396301

  19. Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from human and animal samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-02-29

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been one of the most problematic pathogens. Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major concern for both human and animal. Antibiotic resistance genes dissemination might be possible between human and animal bacteria. The aim of this study is to show phenotypic and genotypic diversity of human and animal MRSA isolates. Antibiogram typing and biofilm production were used as a primary phenotypic typing tool for the characterization of (40) animal and (38) human MRSA isolates. Genetic typing based on sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and virulence gene profiles were done. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of the animal isolates showed little evidence of widespread of resistance, although this was seen in many human isolates. The biofilm production was detected in higher percentage among animal isolates. Based on the genetic typing and multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) index, the majority of animal isolates clustered into lineages that were not found in human isolates. Animal and human MRSA isolates showed diversity in antibiotic resistance and virulence gene profiles may be due to host adaptation or chances for contamination between the two hosts were not present in our study.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Groves, Mitchell D; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D; Giffard, Phil; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3-92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2-532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species.

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; El-Shokry, Mona; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005-2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use.

  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005–2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use. PMID:27433480

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Mitchell D.; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D.; Giffard, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3–92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2–532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species. PMID:26735694

  4. Development of a prediction rule for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus carriage in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center population.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Stefan; Von Stein, Diana; Richardson, Kelly; Page, Joann; Miller, Sara; Winokur, Patricia; Diekema, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    A history of hospital admission in the prior year was the most sensitive predictor of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization at admission to a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) but missed more than one-third of carriers and required screening more than one-half of admitted patients. PMID:18702599

  5. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among medical students in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Zakai, Shadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage status among medical students during their clinical rotations. Methods: This cross-sectional study detected the prevalence of MRSA among medical students at King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, using molecular approaches. Nasal swabs were collected from 150 internship and sixth-year medical students between September 2014 and January 2015, and compared with the control group of 32 third-year medical students who were not exposed to clinical work. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening was performed to identify Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) nuc gene, and an additional PCR was performed on S. aureus positive samples to detect the presence of mecA gene. Results: Out of 150 students screened, 38 were nasal carriers of S. aureus. The prevalence of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) carriers was 18.7% (n=28), whereas 10 students (6.7%) were mecA-positive, representing MRSA carriers. Interns carry MRSA more than 6th year students and students who were not exposed to clinical work (p<0.05), while MSSA is found more in students who were not exposed to clinical work (p<0.01). Conclusion: We found MRSA carriers among medical students at KAU, which showed a possible contribution of this group to transmit infection to hospitalized patients. Medical students must receive sufficient knowledge regarding control measures to avoid spread of this infection in hospitals. PMID:26108584

  6. Alkyl Gallates, Intensifiers of β-Lactam Susceptibility in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Hirofumi; Kondo, Kyoko; Katsuyama, Ryo; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Yoichi; Murakami, Kotaro; Takaishi, Yoshihisa; Arakaki, Naokatu; Higuti, Tomihiko

    2005-01-01

    We found that ethyl gallate purified from a dried pod of tara (Caesalpinia spinosa) intensified β-lactam susceptibility in methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA strains, respectively). This compound and several known alkyl gallates were tested with MRSA and MSSA strains to gain new insights into their structural functions in relation to antimicrobial and β-lactam susceptibility-intensifying activities. The maximum activity of alkyl gallates against MRSA and MSSA strains occurred at 1-nonyl and 1-decyl gallate, with an MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited of 15.6 μg/ml. At concentrations lower than the MIC, alkyl gallates synergistically elevated the susceptibility of MRSA and MSSA strains to β-lactam antibiotics. Such a synergistic activity of the alkyl gallates appears to be specific for β-lactam antibiotics, because no significant changes were observed in the MICs of other classes of antibiotics examined in this study. The length of the alkyl chain was also associated with the modifying activity of the alkyl gallates, and the optimum length was C5 to C6. The present work clearly demonstrates that the length of the alkyl chain has a key role in the elevation of susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:15673731

  7. Acquired resistance to gemcitabine and cross-resistance in human pancreatic cancer clones.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Takizawa-Hashimoto, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Watanabe, Yukiko; Atsuda, Koichiro; Asanuma, Fumiki; Yamada, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine (GEM), a standard treatment agent for pancreatic cancer, is insufficient because of primary or acquired resistance to this drug. Patients with tumors intrinsically sensitive to GEM gradually acquire resistance and require a shift to second agents, which are associated with the risk of cross-resistance. However, whether cross-resistance is actually present has long been disputed. Using six GEM-resistant and four highly GEM-resistant clones derived from the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, we determined the resistance of each clone and parent cell line to GEM and four anticancer agents (5-FU, CDDP, CPT-11, and DTX). The GEM-resistant clones had different resistances to GEM and other agents, and did not develop a specific pattern of cross-resistance. This result shows that tumor cells are heterogeneous. However, all highly GEM-resistant clones presented overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), a target enzyme for metabolized GEM, and showed cross-resistance with 5-FU. The expression level of RRM1 was high; therefore, resistance to GEM was high. We showed that a tumor cell acquired resistance to GEM, and cross-resistance developed in one clone. These results suggest that only cells with certain mechanisms for high-level resistance to GEM survive against selective pressure applied by highly concentrated GEM. RRM1 may be one of the few factors that can induce high resistance to GEM and a suitable therapeutic target for GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  8. Significant antibacterial activity and synergistic effects of camel lactoferrin with antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; El-Baky, Nawal Abd; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Almehdar, Hussein A; Elsaway, Abdulrahman; Gomaa, Abu-Bakr M; Al-Masaudi, Saad Berki; Al-Fassi, Fahad A; AbuZeid, Isam Eldin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes major healthcare problems in many countries, as it is present as several hospital- and community-associated strains. Hospital-associated MRSA is one of the most prevalent nosocomial pathogens throughout the world and infections caused by community-acquired MRSA are rising. This emphasizes the need for new and efficient anti-MRSA agents. We evaluated the antibacterial effects of camel lactoferrin (cLf) and human lactoferrin (hLf) alone and in combination with several antibiotics against MRSA. Antimicrobials were tested against MRSA and an S. aureus control strain by the agar disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for antimicrobials by the broth microdilution method. Synergy between cLf or hLf and antibiotics was examined by checkerboard and time-kill assays. The agar disc diffusion assay showed that MRSA growth was inhibited by cLf at 0.25-3 mg/ml and hLf at 1-3 mg/ml. cLf demonstrated 3 times higher inhibitory activity against MRSA than hLf in terms of MIC values (250 vs. 750 μg/ml, respectively). Biotinylated cLf was recognized by two membrane proteins of MRSA, 66-67 KDa. Combinations of cLf or hLf and oxacillin or vancomycin at sub-MIC levels enhanced in vitro antibacterial activity against MRSA compared with each agent alone. PMID:27130281

  9. Dynamic of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 in Pig Farm Households: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Graells, Cristina; van Cleef, Brigitte A. G. L.; Larsen, Jesper; Denis, Olivier; Skov, Robert; Voss, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term carriage rates and transmission dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pig farmers and their household members. During a 6-month period in 2009–2010, 4 pig farms in Denmark, Belgium, and the Netherlands, respectively, were studied for the presence of MRSA. The proportion of persistent carriers was significantly higher among farmers than among household members (87% vs. 11%) and significantly higher in household members from Belgium compared to those from Denmark and the Netherlands (29% vs. 0% vs. 6%). Determinant analysis of MRSA carriage revealed that pig contact was the most important determinant for MRSA carriage among household members and that the increased MRSA carriage rate observed among household members from Belgium is linked to country-specific differences in pig exposure. These findings demonstrated that even in pig farms with very high carriage rates of MRSA both in livestock and farmers, the risk for household members to acquire MRSA is limited and still depends strongly on pig exposure. By restricting access to the stables and exposure to pigs, MRSA acquisition by household members could be greatly reduced. PMID:23741497

  10. Ceftaroline: clinical and microbiology experience with focus on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after regulatory approval in the USA.

    PubMed

    Stryjewski, Martin E; Jones, Ronald N; Corey, G Ralph

    2015-03-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil was approved in 2010 by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USA-FDA) for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). After approval, several studies and case reports have described the postmarketing clinical experience with ceftaroline in ABSSSIs and CABP and in patients with invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, many of whom had failed prior antibiotics. Successful clinical outcomes observed among the majority of these patients were supported by preapproval and postapproval in vitro surveillance of ceftaroline activity using breakpoint criteria that have been harmonized between the USA-FDA and CLSI. MIC90 values/percentage of strains susceptible to ceftaroline has remained stable over the period 2009-2012. Taken together, these postapproval studies support the use of ceftaroline for ABSSSI as well as CABP. Importantly, these data also suggest that ceftaroline can be effective in patients with serious invasive MRSA infections who have failed other therapies.

  11. Virulence strategies of the dominant USA300 lineage of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Thurlow, Lance R; Joshi, Gauri S; Richardson, Anthony R

    2012-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious threat to worldwide health. Historically, MRSA clones have strictly been associated with hospital settings, and most hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) disease resulted from a limited number of virulent clones. Recently, MRSA has spread into the community causing disease in otherwise healthy people with no discernible contact with healthcare environments. These community-associated MRSA clones (CA-MRSA) are phylogenetically distinct from traditional HA-MRSA clones, and CA-MRSA strains seem to exhibit hypervirulence and more efficient host : host transmission. Consequently, CA-MRSA clones belonging to the USA300 lineage have become dominant sources of MRSA infections in North America. The rise of this successful USA300 lineage represents an important step in the evolution of emerging pathogens and a great deal of effort has been exerted to understand how these clones evolved. Here, we review much of the recent literature aimed at illuminating the source of USA300 success and broadly categorize these findings into three main categories: newly acquired virulence genes, altered expression of common virulence determinants and alterations in protein sequence that increase fitness. We argue that none of these evolutionary events alone account for the success of USA300, but rather their combination may be responsible for the rise and spread of CA-MRSA.

  12. Phloretin derived from apple can reduce alpha-hemolysin expression in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Shui; Li, Wenhua; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Bowen; Liu, Yan; Deng, Xuming; Peng, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly important because it is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections, which have become globally epidemic. Our study specifically focused on the MRSA strain USA300, which was shown in 2014 to be responsible for the most current pandemic of highly virulent MRSA in the United States. We aimed to evaluate the in vitro effect of phloretin on USA300. Susceptibility testing, western blotting assays, hemolysis assays and real-time RT-PCR were employed to examine the in vitro effects of phloretin on alpha-hemolysin (Hla) production when the bacterium was co-cultured with phloretin. The protective effect of phloretin against the USA300-mediated injury of human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) was tested using the live/dead analysis and cytotoxicity assays. We showed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of phloretin have no effect on bacterial viability; however, they can markedly inhibit the production of Hla in culture supernatants and the transcriptional levels of hla (the gene encoding Hla) and agrA (the accessory gene regulator). Phloretin, at a final concentration of 16 µg/ml, could protect A549 cells from injury caused by USA300 in the co-culture system. Our study suggests that phloretin might have a potential application in the development of treatment for MRSA infections. PMID:26026280

  13. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  14. Mutations in mmpL and in the cell wall stress stimulon contribute to resistance to oxadiazole antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiaobin; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections, which exhibit broad resistance to various antibiotics. We recently disclosed the discovery of the oxadiazole class of antibiotics, which has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We report herein that MmpL, a putative member of the resistance, nodulation, and cell division (RND) family of proteins, contributes to oxadiazole resistance in the S. aureus strain COL. Through serial passages, we generated two S. aureus COL variants that showed diminished susceptibilities to an oxadiazole antibiotic. The MICs for the oxadiazole against one strain (designated S. aureus COL(I)) increased reproducibly 2-fold (to 4 μg/ml), while against the other strain (S. aureus COL(R)), they increased >4-fold (to >8 μg/ml, the limit of solubility). The COL(R) strain was derived from the COL(I) strain. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 31 mutations in S. aureus COL(R), of which 29 were shared with COL(I). Consistent with our previous finding that oxadiazole antibiotics inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, we found 13 mutations that occurred either in structural genes or in promoters of the genes of the cell wall stress stimulon. Two unique mutations in S. aureus COL(R) were substitutions in two genes that encode the putative thioredoxin (SACOL1794) and MmpL (SACOL2566). A role for mmpL in resistance to oxadiazoles was discerned from gene deletion and complementation experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a cell wall-acting antibiotic selects for mutations in the cell wall stress stimulon and the first to implicate MmpL in resistance to antibiotics in S. aureus.

  15. Bullous impetigo in children infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus alone or in combination with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: analysis of genetic characteristics, including assessment of exfoliative toxin gene carriage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Da; Higuchi, Wataru; Takano, Tomomi; Saito, Kohei; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao; Nitahara, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2011-05-01

    Among bullous impetigo isolates, exfoliative toxin (ET) gene carriage was found in 61.5% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates versus 90.6% of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. MRSA-only cases were ETB or ETA positive, while MRSA/MSSA coinfection cases were ET negative for MRSA but ETA positive for MSSA. Collagen adhesin may facilitate some MRSA infections.

  16. Synergism between Medihoney and rifampicin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Alber, Dagmar G; Turnbull, Lynne; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Carter, Dee A; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Skin and chronic wound infections caused by highly antibiotic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an increasing and urgent health problem worldwide, particularly with sharp increases in obesity and diabetes. New Zealand manuka honey has potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, has been shown to inhibit the growth of MRSA strains, and bacteria resistant to this honey have not been obtainable in the laboratory. Combinational treatment of chronic wounds with manuka honey and common antibiotics may offer a wide range of advantages including synergistic enhancement of the antibacterial activity, reduction of the effective dose of the antibiotic, and reduction of the risk of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Medihoney in combination with the widely used antibiotic rifampicin on S. aureus. Using checkerboard microdilution assays, time-kill curve experiments and agar diffusion assays, we show a synergism between Medihoney and rifampicin against MRSA and clinical isolates of S. aureus. Furthermore, the Medihoney/rifampicin combination stopped the appearance of rifampicin-resistant S. aureus in vitro. Methylglyoxal (MGO), believed to be the major antibacterial compound in manuka honey, did not act synergistically with rifampicin and is therefore not the sole factor responsible for the synergistic effect of manuka honey with rifampicin. Our findings support the idea that a combination of honey and antibiotics may be an effective new antimicrobial therapy for chronic wound infections. PMID:23469049

  17. First Record of Isolation and Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis from Clinical Samples in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; Obayes, Mohammed H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the frequency of Staphylococcus lugdunensis in different clinical samples. Out of 690 clinical samples, a total of 178 coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolates were recovered. CoNS were identified as 10 different species; 22 isolates belonged to Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Two specific genes for S. lugdunensis were used ( tanA gene and fbl gene) to confirm identification. Both of these specific genes were detected in 15 (68.1%) of 22 isolates that were identified phenotypically. The results of oxacillin MIC showed that 7 of the 15 (46.6%) S. lugdunensis isolates were oxacillin resistant. The antibiotic susceptibility testing against 16 antibiotics showed that resistance rates were variable towards these antibiotics. Eight of fifteen S. lugdunensis isolates (53.3%) were β-lactamase producer. Results of molecular detection of mecA gene found that mecA gene was detected in 6 (40%) of 15 S. lugdunensis. All of these 6 isolates (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, and S6) were resistant to oxacillin. One isolate (S7) was resistant to oxacillin but mecA was not detected in this isolate. This study is a first record of isolation and characterization of methicillin resistant S. lugdunensis (MRSL) from clinical samples in Iraq. PMID:25126573

  18. In vitro activities of antibiotics and antimicrobial cationic peptides alone and in combination against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mataraci, Emel; Dosler, Sibel

    2012-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are most often found as hospital- and community-acquired infections. The danger of MRSA infections results from not only the emergence of multidrug resistance but also the occurrence of bacteria that form strong biofilms. We investigated the in vitro activities of antibiotics (daptomycin, linezolid, teichoplanine, azithromycin, and ciprofloxacin) and antimicrobial cationic peptides {AMPs; indolicidin, CAMA [cecropin (1-7)-melittin A (2-9) amide], and nisin} alone or in combination against MRSA ATCC 43300 biofilms. The MICs and minimum biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) were determined by the broth microdilution technique. Antibiotic and AMP combinations were assessed using the checkerboard technique. For MRSA planktonic cells, MICs of antibiotics and AMPs ranged between 0.125 and 512 and 8 and 16 mg/liter, respectively, and the MBEC values were between 512 and 5,120 and 640 mg/liter, respectively. With a fractional inhibitory concentration of ≤0.5 as the borderline, synergistic interactions against MRSA biofilms were frequent with almost all antibiotic-antibiotic and antibiotic-AMP combinations. Against planktonic cells, they generally had an additive effect. No antagonism was observed. All of the antibiotics, AMPs, and their combinations were able to inhibit the attachment of bacteria at 1/10 MIC and biofilm formation at 1× MIC. Biofilm-associated MRSA was not affected by therapeutically achievable concentrations of antimicrobial agents. Use of a combination of antimicrobial agents can provide a synergistic effect, which rapidly enhances antibiofilm activity and may help prevent or delay the emergence of resistance. AMPs seem to be good candidates for further investigations in the treatment of MRSA biofilms, alone or in combination with antibiotics. PMID:23070152

  19. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  20. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M.; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E.; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Zuber, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Summary Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)1,2, BET inhibitors are being explored as promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers3–5. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced hematologic malignancies6, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, we performed a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL/AF9; NrasG12D -driven AML model, and investigated dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant murine and human leukemias. Our screen reveals that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodeling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signaling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic ChIP- and STARR-seq enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodeled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signaling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting resistance to BET inhibitors and, potentially, other chromatin-targeted therapies. PMID:26367798

  1. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antibiotic Resistance Modifying Effect of Bioactive Plant Extracts on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Chovanová, Romana; Mikulášová, Mária; Vaverková, Stefánia

    2013-01-01

    The crude extracts of plants from Asteraceae and Lamiaceae family and essential oils from Salvia officinalis and Salvia sclarea were studied for their antibacterial as well as antibiotic resistance modifying activity. Using disc diffusion and broth microdilution assays we determined higher antibacterial effect of three Salvia spp. and by evaluating the leakage of 260 nm absorbing material we detected effect of extracts and, namely, of essential oils on the disruption of cytoplasmic membrane. The evaluation of in vitro interactions between plant extracts and oxacillin described in terms of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices revealed synergistic or additive effects of plant extracts and clearly synergistic effects of essential oil from Salvia officinalis with oxacillin in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. PMID:24222768

  2. [Guidelines for the treatment on infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Mensa, J; Barberán, J; Llinares, P; Picazo, Jj; Bouza, E; Alvarez-Lerma, F; Borges, M; Serrano, R; León, C; Guirao, X; Arias, J; Carreras, E; Sanz, Ma; García-Rodríguez, Ja

    2008-12-01

    Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have undergone important changes in the last five years that have influenced the choice of therapy: i) increase of their frequency in hospital-associated settings and, more recently, in community settings; ii) better knowledge of clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of vancomycin; iii) improvement of current standard methods for rapid detection of MRSA in clinical samples; iv) clear evidence that vancomycin is losing efficacy against MRSA with MIC > 1 microg/mL; and v) appearance of new antibiotics suitable for use in these infections (linezolid, daptomycin, tigecyclin). Under this situation guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by MRSA appear to be necessary to improve the efficacy and reduce the mortality.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): a community-based prevalence survey.

    PubMed Central

    Abudu, L.; Blair, I.; Fraise, A.; Cheng, K. K.

    2001-01-01

    A prevalence survey of nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage was undertaken on a random sample of adults (aged over 16) resident in the community in Birmingham, UK during 1998. Microbiological samples were taken from the anterior nares at the subjects' general practice or in their home. Information about risk factors for the acquisition of MRSA was obtained via a self-completed questionnaire. A 58% response rate (280/483) was achieved. The prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization was 1.5% [4/274, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-2.9%]. Twenty-three per cent (63/274) of subjects were nasal carriers of S. aureus. Six per cent (4/63) of S. aureus isolates were MRSA and 2 of the 4 MRSA carriers reported previous contact with health facilities. The prevalence of MRSA colonization in the general adult population in Birmingham appears to be low. PMID:11467791

  4. Evaluation of weekly bathing in allergic dogs with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal colonization.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Shinpei; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Nozawa, Genta; Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; Madarame, Hiroo; Shida, Takuo; Kiuchi, Akio

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of weekly bathing in reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) colonization in canine allergic dermatitis in a pilot clinical trial. Six dogs with allergic dermatitis controlled by prescription medications were treated with weekly bathing for 1 month. The Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index version 3 (CADESI-03) and pruritus scores and frequency of mecA-positive Staphylococcus spp. isolated from three body sites between weeks 0 and 4 were compared. There was no significant difference in CADESI-03 scores with bathing, whereas the pruritus scores were significantly reduced (p < 0.05). Furthermore, MRS frequency was decreased in four of the six dogs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, weekly bathing should be considered for reducing MRS colonization in canine allergic dermatitis. PMID:27506090

  5. Enteral vancomycin and probiotic use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic-associated diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Sizemore, Elizabeth Nicole; Rivas, Kenya Maria; Valdes, Jose; Caballero, Joshua

    2012-07-27

    A geriatric patient status post intraabdominal surgery presented with persistent diarrhoea and heavy intestinal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) growth after multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Additionally, swab cultures of the anterior nares tested positive for MRSA. In order to impede infection and prevent future complications, the patient received a 10-day course of vancomycin oral solution 250 mg every 6 h, 15-day course of Saccharomyces boulardii 250 mg orally twice daily and a 5-day course of topical mupirocin 2% twice daily intranasally. Diarrhoea ceased during therapy and repeat cultures 11 days after initiating therapy demonstrated negative MRSA growth from the stool and nares. Further repeat cultures 5 months later revealed negative MRSA growth in the stools and minimal MRSA growth in the nares. Overall, enteral vancomycin and probiotics successfully eradicated MRSA infection without intestinal recurrence. Although the results were beneficial treating MRSA diarrhoea for our patient, these agents remain highly controversial.

  6. Complication of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: tube exposure with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pansegrau, Morgan L.; Mengarelli, Eddie; Dersu, Inci Irak

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neovascular glaucoma is commonly treated surgically with implantation of glaucoma drainage devices. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent an uneventful Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) placement for radiation-induced neovascular glaucoma but later developed early postoperative infection with tube exposure. The infection was identified 3 weeks postoperatively and antibiotic treatment was immediately initiated. However, the conjunctival melt progressed, and the AGV had to be removed. Culture of the device revealed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is a potential increased risk of postoperative infection and tube exposure following glaucoma valve implantation in patients with previous radiation therapy. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature of MRSA causing early postoperative infection following drainage device placement that required explantation. PMID:27330471

  7. Complication of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: tube exposure with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Pansegrau, Morgan L; Mengarelli, Eddie; Dersu, Inci Irak

    2015-01-01

    Neovascular glaucoma is commonly treated surgically with implantation of glaucoma drainage devices. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent an uneventful Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) placement for radiation-induced neovascular glaucoma but later developed early postoperative infection with tube exposure. The infection was identified 3 weeks postoperatively and antibiotic treatment was immediately initiated. However, the conjunctival melt progressed, and the AGV had to be removed. Culture of the device revealed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is a potential increased risk of postoperative infection and tube exposure following glaucoma valve implantation in patients with previous radiation therapy. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature of MRSA causing early postoperative infection following drainage device placement that required explantation.

  8. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates. PMID:27514959

  9. Cytotoxic Virulence Predicts Mortality in Nosocomial Pneumonia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rose, Hannah R; Holzman, Robert S; Altman, Deena R; Smyth, Davida S; Wasserman, Gregory A; Kafer, Jared M; Wible, Michelle; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Torres, Victor J; Shopsin, Bo

    2015-06-15

    The current study identified bacterial factors that may improve management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia. Isolates were obtained from 386 patients enrolled in a randomized, controlled study of antibiotic efficacy. Isolates were screened for production of virulence factors and for vancomycin susceptibility. After adjustment for host factors such as severity of illness and treatment modality, cytotoxic activity was strongly and inversely associated with mortality; however, it had no effect on clinical cure. Isolates having low cytotoxicity, which were derived largely from healthcare-associated clones, exhibited a greater prevalence of vancomycin heteroresistance, and they were recovered more often from patients who were older and frailer. Additionally, a clone with low cytotoxic activity was associated with death and poor clinical improvement. Clone specificity and attenuated virulence appear to be associated with outcome. To our knowledge, these are the first correlations between MRSA virulence and mortality in nosocomial pneumonia.

  10. Marinopyrrole Derivatives as Potential Antibiotic Agents against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (III)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Haste, Nina M.; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Li, Jerry; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary; Li, Rongshi

    2014-01-01

    The marine natural product, marinopyrrole A (1), was previously shown to have significant antibiotic activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although compound (1) exhibits a significant reduction in MRSA activity in the presence of human serum, we have identified key modifications that partially restore activity. We previously reported our discovery of a chloro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1a) featuring a 2–4 fold improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against MRSA, significantly less susceptibility to serum inhibition and rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. Here, we report a novel fluoro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1e) showing an improved profile of potency, less susceptibility to serum inhibition, as well as rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. PMID:24796304

  11. Surface plasmon resonance detection of E. coli and methicillin-resistant S. aureus using bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Nancy; Sacher, Edward; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Meunier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are key elements in preventing resultant life-threatening illnesses, such as hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and septicemia. In this report, we describe the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for the biodetection of pathogenic bacteria, using bacteriophages as the recognition elements. T4 bacteriophages were used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was used to detect MRSA. We found that the system permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 10(3) colony forming units/milliliter, in less than 20 min. This system promises to become a diagnostic tool for bacteria that cause major public concern for food safety, bioterrorism, and nosocomial infections.

  12. Cytotoxic Virulence Predicts Mortality in Nosocomial Pneumonia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Hannah R.; Holzman, Robert S.; Altman, Deena R.; Smyth, Davida S.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Kafer, Jared M.; Wible, Michelle; Mendes, Rodrigo E.; Torres, Victor J.; Shopsin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The current study identified bacterial factors that may improve management of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia. Isolates were obtained from 386 patients enrolled in a randomized, controlled study of antibiotic efficacy. Isolates were screened for production of virulence factors and for vancomycin susceptibility. After adjustment for host factors such as severity of illness and treatment modality, cytotoxic activity was strongly and inversely associated with mortality; however, it had no effect on clinical cure. Isolates having low cytotoxicity, which were derived largely from healthcare-associated clones, exhibited a greater prevalence of vancomycin heteroresistance, and they were recovered more often from patients who were older and frailer. Additionally, a clone with low cytotoxic activity was associated with death and poor clinical improvement. Clone specificity and attenuated virulence appear to be associated with outcome. To our knowledge, these are the first correlations between MRSA virulence and mortality in nosocomial pneumonia. PMID:25298028

  13. [Treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Luna, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Bavestrello, Luis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2010-08-01

    The global spread of MRSA means it is now a pathogen of worldwide public health concern. Within Latin America, MRSA is highly prevalent, with the proportion of S. aureus isolates that are methicillin-resistant on the rise, yet resources for managing the infection are limited. While several guidelines exist for the treatment of MRSA infections, many are written for the North American or European setting and need adaptation for use in Latin America. In this article, we aim to emphasize the importance of appropriate treatment of MRSA in the healthcare and community settings of Latin America. We present a summary of the available guidelines and antibiotics, and discuss particular considerations for clinicians treating MRSA in Latin America. PMID:21137164

  14. [Treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Luna, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Bavestrello, Luis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2010-08-01

    The global spread of MRSA means it is now a pathogen of worldwide public health concern. Within Latin America, MRSA is highly prevalent, with the proportion of S. aureus isolates that are methicillin-resistant on the rise, yet resources for managing the infection are limited. While several guidelines exist for the treatment of MRSA infections, many are written for the North American or European setting and need adaptation for use in Latin America. In this article, we aim to emphasize the importance of appropriate treatment of MRSA in the healthcare and community settings of Latin America. We present a summary of the available guidelines and antibiotics, and discuss particular considerations for clinicians treating MRSA in Latin America.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ulcerative keratitis in a Thoroughbred racehorse

    PubMed Central

    KURODA, Taisuke; KINOSHITA, Yuta; NIWA, Hidekazu; MIZOBE, Fumiaki; UENO, Takanori; KUWANO, Atsutoshi; HATAZOE, Takashi; HOBO, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis in a racehorse. A 5-year-old mare developed punctate keratitis after racing. The corneal ulcer continued to expand despite ophthalmic antimicrobial therapy. On day 6, a conjunctival graft surgery was performed. The mare was euthanized, following colitis and laminitis development on day 10. MRSA was isolated from the corneal swab taken at the time of euthanasia. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gram-positive and anti-S. aureus monoclonal antibody-positive cocci infiltration of the corneal stroma; and a diagnosis of MRSA ulcerative keratitis was made. An ophthalmic antimicrobial against the isolated MRSA did not improve the ocular lesion. The MRSA strain was found to be staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II, a strain frequently isolated from humans in Japan. PMID:26435683

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ulcerative keratitis in a Thoroughbred racehorse.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taisuke; Kinoshita, Yuta; Niwa, Hidekazu; Mizobe, Fumiaki; Ueno, Takanori; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Hatazoe, Takashi; Hobo, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) keratitis in a racehorse. A 5-year-old mare developed punctate keratitis after racing. The corneal ulcer continued to expand despite ophthalmic antimicrobial therapy. On day 6, a conjunctival graft surgery was performed. The mare was euthanized, following colitis and laminitis development on day 10. MRSA was isolated from the corneal swab taken at the time of euthanasia. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gram-positive and anti-S. aureus monoclonal antibody-positive cocci infiltration of the corneal stroma; and a diagnosis of MRSA ulcerative keratitis was made. An ophthalmic antimicrobial against the isolated MRSA did not improve the ocular lesion. The MRSA strain was found to be staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II, a strain frequently isolated from humans in Japan. PMID:26435683

  17. Nosocomial keratitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report and preventative measures

    PubMed Central

    Braich, Puneet S.; Aggarwal, Shruti; Mukhtar, Sabrina; Almeida, David RP.

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old African-American woman was admitted to the intensive care unit of our community hospital for respiratory failure secondary to severe decompensated heart failure, requiring intubation. In the ensuing days, she developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection of the cornea, despite no growth of MRSA in multiple blood, sputum, and urine cultures. This unexpected corneal infection complicated her hospital stay, and increased morbidity and disease-related cost. Risk factors, warning signs, and preventative measures for MRSA keratitis secondary to lagophthalmos (inability to completely close one's eyelids) are outlined in this case report. Implementing simple precautions such as taping eyelids shut or using artificial lubrication may reduce patient morbidity and disease-related costs. These recommendations are directed to non-ophthalmic clinicians who provide care to patients in settings where MRSA colonization is widespread. PMID:26486112

  18. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (III).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Haste, Nina M; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Li, Jerry; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary; Li, Rongshi

    2014-04-30

    The marine natural product, marinopyrrole A (1), was previously shown to have significant antibiotic activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although compound (1) exhibits a significant reduction in MRSA activity in the presence of human serum, we have identified key modifications that partially restore activity. We previously reported our discovery of a chloro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1a) featuring a 2-4 fold improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against MRSA, significantly less susceptibility to serum inhibition and rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. Here, we report a novel fluoro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1e) showing an improved profile of potency, less susceptibility to serum inhibition, as well as rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA.

  19. A Fatal Case of Eczema Herpeticum With Septic Shock Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Christina L; Weiler, Bethany A; Verceles, Avelino C; McCurdy, Michael T

    2016-07-01

    A 62-year-old woman treated with several courses of corticosteroids for an undifferentiated rash came to the emergency department with progressively worsening cutaneous signs and symptoms and generalized weakness. She had scabies, and despite treatment continued to decompensate. Repeat skin biopsies revealed disseminated herpes simplex virus infection, and results of blood cultures were consistent with infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite antiviral and antimicrobial therapy, sepsis and multiorgan failure developed, and the patient died. This case illustrates the complications of the rare entity eczema herpeticum, which occurs most often in immunocompromised patients and is associated with a high mortality. Maintaining a high index of suspicion for this disease in decompensating patients with an unidentified rash is essential to avoid catastrophic outcomes. PMID:27369040

  20. Global epidemiology of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Mediavilla, José R; Chen, Liang; Mathema, Barun; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2012-10-01

    During the 1990s, various reports of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections appeared in the literature, caused by novel strains genetically distinct from traditional healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). Numerous lineages of CA-MRSA have since emerged on every continent, several of which have spread internationally, most notably USA300. CA-MRSA strains are increasingly implicated in nosocomial infections, and may eventually displace HA-MRSA strains in hospitals. Consequently, distinctions based on clinical epidemiology and susceptibility are becoming less relevant, arguing in favor of genotypic definitions. We review the current molecular epidemiology of CA-MRSA with respect to genetic diversity, global distribution, and factors related to its emergence and spread.

  1. Bactericidal Kinetics of Marine-Derived Napyradiomycins against Contemporary Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Haste, Nina M.; Farnaes, Lauge; Perera, Varahenage R.; Fenical, William; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics to treat hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Previous work has indicated that both terrestrial and marine-derived members of the napyradiomycin class possess potential anti-staphylococcal activities. These compounds are unique meroterpenoids with unusual levels of halogenation. In this paper we report the evaluation of two previously described napyradiomycin derivatives, A80915A (1) and A80915B (2) produced by the marine-derived actinomycete, Streptomyces sp. strain CNQ-525, for their specific activities against contemporary and clinically relevant MRSA. Reported are studies of the in vitro kinetics of these chemical scaffolds in time-kill MRSA assays. Both napyradiomycin derivatives demonstrate potent and rapid bactericidal activity against contemporary MRSA strains. These data may help guide future development and design of analogs of the napyradiomycins that could potentially serve as useful anti-MRSA therapeutics. PMID:21731557

  2. Postoperative infection of an abdominal mesh due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus - a case report.

    PubMed

    Ashok, R; Anuradha, K; Babu, S S; Bheerappa, N; Sastry, R A; Lakshmi, V

    2004-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Stephylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has now become a major problem in hospitals. We present a case of postoperative infection MRSA where the primary source of the infection was found to be an abdominal mesh that was used to reinforce the abdominal wall. After one year of surgery, the patient developed wound dehiscence and discharge. MRSA was isolated from the wound, mesh, external nares, throat and axilla. Initially she was started on clindamycin and discharged from the hospital. After 5 months, patient came back to the hospital with infection at the same site. The patient was then treated with vancomycin and MRSA clearance. She responded to the treatment with complete healing of the wound and clearance of MRSA.

  3. Biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genetic lineage.

    PubMed

    Jotić, Ana; Božić, Dragana D; Milovanović, Jovica; Pavlović, Bojan; Ješić, Snežana; Pelemiš, Mijomir; Novaković, Marko; Ćirković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation has been implicated in the high incidence of persistent otorrhoea after tympanostomy tube insertion. The aim of the study was to investigate whether biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on the genetic profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Capacity of biofilm formation on fluoroplastic tympanostomy tubes (TTs) was tested on 30 MRSA strains. Identification and methicillin resistance were confirmed by PCR for nuc and mecA genes. Strains were genotypically characterised (SCCmec, agr and spa typing). Biofilm formation was tested in microtiter plate and on TTs. Tested MRSA strains were classified into SCCmec type I (36.7 %), III (23.3 %), IV (26.7 %) and V (13.3 %), agr type I (50 %), II (36.7 %) and III (13.3 %), and 5 clonal complexes (CCs). All tested MRSA strains showed ability to form biofilm on microtiter plate. Capacity of biofilm formation on TTs was as following: 13.3 % of strains belonged to the category of no biofilm producers, 50 % to the category of weak biofilm producers and 36.7 % to moderate biofilm producers. There was a statistically significant difference between CC, SCCmec and agr types and the category of biofilm production on TTs tubes (p < 0.001): CC5, SCCmecI type and agrII type with a moderate amount of biofilm, and CC8 and agrI type with a low amount of biofilm. Biofilm formation by MRSA on TTs is highly dependent on genetic characteristics of the strains. Therefore, MRSA genotyping may aid the determination of the possibility of biofilm-related post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea.

  4. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed that adherence was significantly influenced by host and strain genotype regardless of bacterial growth phase. The two MRSP ST71 strains showed greater adherence than MRSP non-ST71 (p < 0.0001) and MSSP (p < 0.0001). This phenotypic trait was not associated to any specific CWAP gene. In general, S. pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p < 0.0001), but the MRSP ST71 strain of human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced in vitro adherence of ST71 needs to be elucidated as this phenotypic trait may be associated to the epidemiological success and zoonotic potential of this epidemic MRSP clone. PMID:24957656

  5. [Molecular diagnosis of methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus: Methods and efficacy].

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Bauer, J W; Laimer, M

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates are a serious public health problem whose ever-increasing rate is commensurate with the pressure it is exerting on the healthcare system. At present, more than 20% of clinical S. aureus isolates in German hospitals are methicillin-resistant, in Austria less than 10%. Strategies from low-prevalence countries show that this development is not necessarily inevitable. In the Scandinavian countries and the Netherlands, thanks to a rigorous prevention programme, MRSA prevalence has been kept at an acceptably low level (< 1-3%). Central to these search-and-destroy control strategies is an admission screening using several MRSA swabs taken from mucocutaneous colonisation sites of high-risk patients (MRSA surveillance). It has also been reported that the speed with which MRSA carriage is detected has an important role, as it is a key component of any effective strategy to prevent the pathogen from spreading. Since MRSA culturing involves a 2-3 day delay before the final results are available, rapid detection techniques (commonly referred to as MRSA rapid tests) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and, most recently, rapid culturing methods have been developed. The implementation of rapid tests reduces the time of detection of MRSA carriers from 48-72 to 2-5 h. Clinical evaluation data have shown that MRSA can thus be detected with very high sensitivity. Specificity, however, is sometimes impaired due to false-positive PCR signals occurring in mixed flora specimens. In order to rule out false-positive PCR results, a culture screen must always be carried out simultaneously. The data provide preliminary evidence that a PCR assay can reduce nosocomial MRSA transmission in high-risk patients or high-risk areas, whereas an approach that screens all patients admitted to the hospital is probably not effective. Information concerning the cost effectiveness of rapid MRSA tests is still sparse and thus the issue

  6. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  7. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Kathleen M.; Liu, Jieying; Lombardo, Michael N.; Bolstad, David B.; Wright, Dennis L.; Anderson, Amy C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance. PMID:19249312

  8. Typing of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Using DNA Fingerprints by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Rebic, Velma; Budimir, Ana; Aljicevic, Mufida; Bektas, Sabaheta; Vranic, Sabina Mahmutovic; Rebic, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for a wide spectrum of nosocomial and community associated infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to analyze MRSA strains from the general population in Canton Sarajevo, B&H. Methods: Our investigation including either phenotypic and genotypic markers such as antimicrobial resistance, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCC typing, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) detection. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility: all MRSA isolates were resistant to the β-lactam antibiotics tested, and all isolates were susceptible trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole, rifampicin, fusidic acid, linezolid and vancomycin. Sixty-eight per cent of the MRSA isolates were resistant to erythromycin, 5% to clindamycin, 5% to gentamicin and 4% to ciprofloxacin. After the PFGE analysis, the isolates were grouped into five similarity groups: A-E. The largest number of isolates belonged to one of two groups: C: 60 (60%) and D: 27 (27%). In both groups C and D, SCCmec type IV was predominant (60% and 88, 8%, respectively). A total of 24% of the isolates had positive expression of PVL genes, while 76% showed a statistically significantly greater negative expression of PVL genes. Conclusion: SCCmec type IV, together with the susceptibility profile and PFGE grouping, is considered to be typical of CA-MRSA PMID:27708486

  9. Antimicrobial activity of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesline, A.; John, Neetu P.; Narayanan, P. M.; Vani, C.; Murugan, Sevanan

    2015-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens responsible for a wide spectrum of infections and the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has lead to treatment drawbacks towards large number of drugs. Formation of biofilms is the main contributing factor to antibiotic resistance. The development of reliable processes for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles is an important aspect of nanotechnology today. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles comprise well-known inhibitory and bactericidal effects. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance by pathogenic bacteria is a major health problem in recent years. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Biofilm production was detected by tissue culture plate method. Out of 30 MRSA isolates, 22 isolates showed strong biofilm production and 2 showed weak and moderate biofilm formation. Two strong and weak biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates were subjected to antimicrobial activity using commercially available zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Thus, the nanoparticles showed considerably good activity against the isolates, and it can be concluded that they may act as promising, antibacterial agents in the coming years.

  10. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones with high-level mupirocin resistance.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, María; Seral, Cristina; Potel, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    A high proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered in one year period showed high-level mupirocin-resistance (HLMUPR-MRSA) in our environment (27.2%). HLMUPR-MRSA isolates were mainly collected from skin and soft tissue samples, and diabetes was the main related comorbidity condition. These isolates were more frequently found in vascular surgery. HLMUPR-MRSA was more resistant to aminoglycosides than mupirocin-susceptible MRSA, linked to the presence of bifunctional and/or nucleotidyltransferase enzymes with/without macrolide resistance associated with the msr(A) gene. Most of HLMUPR-MRSA isolates belonged to ST125/t067. Nine IS257-ileS2 amplification patterns (p3 was the most frequent) were observed in HLMUPR-MRSA isolates, suggesting the presence of several mupirocin-resistance-carrying plasmids in our environment and promoting the emergence of mupirocin resistance. The presence of the same IS257-ileS2 amplification pattern p3 in 65% of HLMUPR-MRSA, all of them ST125/t067, suggests a clonal spread in our hospital and community environment which could explain the high prevalence of HLMUPR-MRSA during the study period. An outbreak situation or an increase in mupirocin consumption was not observed.

  11. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus resistant to tigecycline and daptomycin isolated in a hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dabul, A N G; Camargo, I L B C

    2014-03-01

    We report the molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with resistance to tigecycline and to daptomycin isolated from intensive-care-unit patients in Brazil over a 6-month period. Thirty-six isolates (25 from infection sites, 11 from nasal sites) recovered from 23 patients who presented with MRSA infection during this period were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling. Ten isolates from six patients and two isolates from different patients were resistant to tigecycline and daptomycin, respectively. Eight pulsotypes were identified and one, type A, accounted for 21 isolates from 12 patients; type A isolates were SCCmecII as were a further nine isolates of other pulsotypes. All but four of the total isolates were sequence type (ST) 5 or ST105 and classified as clonal complex (CC) 5; the historically prevalent lineage in Brazil, ST239-SCCmecIII, was identified in only three patients. Tigecycline-resistant strains were all ST105-SCCmecII and two patients were nasally colonized by strains of the same pulsotype found in infection sites. Two ST5-SCCmecII were daptomycin resistant after 48 h incubation. The origin and mechanism of these resistant strains remains unknown and further studies are warranted to determine whether such clones are becoming endemic in Brazilian hospitals and to assess their impact on infection control practice. PMID:23714160

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-08-04

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA.  We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing.  The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003.We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA. We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing. The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003. We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA.  We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing.  The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003.We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  15. Spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus belonging to the Brazilian epidemic clone in a general hospital and emergence of heterogenous resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics among these isolates.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Soares, M J; da Silva-Carvalho, M C; Ferreira-Carvalho, B T; Figueiredo, A M

    2000-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been increasing at an alarming rate world-wide. MRSA epidemics due to the clonal spread of multi-resistant isolates have been described. In this paper we show the absolute predominance of MRSA strains from the Brazilian epidemic clone in a hospital in the Northeast region of Brazil and the emergence of a vancomycin and teicoplanin heterogeneous resistant subpopulation among these isolates.

  16. Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and biofilm formation in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Brito, Carla Ivo; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Oliveira, Adilson de; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to correlate the presence of ica genes, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance in 107 strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures. The isolates were analysed to determine their methicillin resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, ica genes and biofilm formation and the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured for isolates and subpopulations growing on vancomycin screen agar. The mecA gene was detected in 81.3% of the S. epidermidis isolated and 48.2% carried SCCmec type III. The complete icaADBC operon was observed in 38.3% of the isolates; of these, 58.5% produced a biofilm. Furthermore, 47.7% of the isolates grew on vancomycin screen agar, with an increase in the MIC in 75.9% of the isolates. Determination of the MIC of subpopulations revealed that 64.7% had an MIC ≥ 4 μg mL-1, including 15.7% with an MIC of 8 μg mL-1 and 2% with an MIC of 16 μg mL-1. The presence of the icaADBC operon, biofilm production and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin were associated with methicillin resistance. This study reveals a high level of methicillin resistance, biofilm formation and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in subpopulations of S. epidermidis. These findings may explain the selection of multidrug-resistant isolates in hospital settings and the consequent failure of antimicrobial treatment.

  17. Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and biofilm formation in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Brito, Carla Ivo; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Oliveira, Adilson de; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to correlate the presence of ica genes, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance in 107 strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from blood cultures. The isolates were analysed to determine their methicillin resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, ica genes and biofilm formation and the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured for isolates and subpopulations growing on vancomycin screen agar. The mecA gene was detected in 81.3% of the S. epidermidis isolated and 48.2% carried SCCmec type III. The complete icaADBC operon was observed in 38.3% of the isolates; of these, 58.5% produced a biofilm. Furthermore, 47.7% of the isolates grew on vancomycin screen agar, with an increase in the MIC in 75.9% of the isolates. Determination of the MIC of subpopulations revealed that 64.7% had an MIC ≥ 4 μg mL-1, including 15.7% with an MIC of 8 μg mL-1 and 2% with an MIC of 16 μg mL-1. The presence of the icaADBC operon, biofilm production and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin were associated with methicillin resistance. This study reveals a high level of methicillin resistance, biofilm formation and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in subpopulations of S. epidermidis. These findings may explain the selection of multidrug-resistant isolates in hospital settings and the consequent failure of antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25410990

  18. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Colombian hospitals: dominance of a single unique multidrug-resistant clone.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A R; Sanches, I S; Aires de Sousa, M; Castañeda, E; de Lencastre, H

    2001-01-01

    The first study on the molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from Colombia was performed as part of a global surveillance established by the CEM/NET Initiative, under Project RESIST. Seventy-six MRSA isolates recovered from five hospitals during 1996-1998 were analyzed by the hybridization of ClaI restriction digests with mecA- and Tn554-specific probes, and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of chromosomal SmaI digests. All MRSA isolates, with one exception, belonged to a single clonal type II::NH::D. This clone, which was previously described among MRSA isolates recovered in the early 1990s in European and New York and South American hospitals, showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics only and appeared to be associated almost exclusively with pediatric infections ("Pediatric clone" of MRSA). While sharing identical molecular typing properties with the Pediatric clone, the Colombian isolates differed by extensive multidrug resistance and were recovered from patients of all ages. It is also noteworthy that the Brazilian clone of MRSA (XI::B::B), another multidrug-resistant international clone currently widely spread in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, and also in several European countries, was completely absent from this set of isolates from Colombia.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a university hospital in northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Hernández, Marta; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2014-09-01

    Continuous monitoring of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is necessary to understand the clonal evolution of successful lineages. In this study, we identified the MRSA clones circulating in a Spanish hospital during a 2-year period, assessed their relationship with antimicrobial resistance profiles, and investigated the presence of the emerging community-associated and livestock-associated MRSA lineages (CA-MRSA, LA-MRSA). CC5-MRSA-IV isolates were the most frequently recovered, which supports the previously reported prevalence of this clone in Spanish hospitals. We observed ST125 isolates that harbored specific cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) gene elements of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types IV and VI. That clone, which was first detected only recently, has increased resistance to erythromycin. Furthermore, 94% of the infections were caused by non-multiresistant isolates. Neither CA-MRSA nor LA-MRSA isolates were observed. These findings, along with related events over the last decade, suggest the establishment of a clonal endemic population in the Spanish clinical environment. PMID:26419454

  20. Development of novel antibacterial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Lee, Su-Lin; Kapuriya, Naval; Wang, Dasheng; Chen, Yi-Ru; Yu, Sung-Liang; Kulp, Samuel K.; Teng, Lee-Jeng; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious threat to public health because of its resistance to multiple antibiotics most commonly used to treat infection. In this study, we report the unique ability of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib to kill Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA with modest potency. We hypothesize that the anti-Staphylococcus activity of celecoxib could be pharmacologically exploited to develop novel anti-MRSA agents with a distinct mechanism. Examination of an in-house, celecoxib-based focused compound library in conjunction with structural modifications led to the identification of compound 46 as the lead agent with high antibacterial potency against a panel of Staphylococcus pathogens and different strains of MRSA. Moreover, this killing effect is bacteria-specific, as human cancer cells are resistant to 46. In addition, a single intraperitoneal administration of compound 46 at 30 mg/kg improved the survival of MRSA-infected C57BL/6 mice. In light of its high potency in eradicating MRSA in vitro and its in vivo activity, compound 46 and its analogues warrant continued preclinical development as a potential therapeutic intervention against MRSA. PMID:22750009

  1. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in different free-living wild animal species in Spain.

    PubMed

    Porrero, M Concepción; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Sánchez, Sergio; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Gómez-Barrero, Susana; Navarro-Gonzalez, Nora; Serrano, Emmanuel; Casas-Díaz, Encarna; Marco, Ignasi; Fernández-Garayzabal, José-Francisco; Mateos, Ana; Vidal, Dolors; Lavín, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas

    2013-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a life-threatening pathogen in humans and its presence in animals is a public health concern. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of MRSA in free-living wild animals. Samples from red deer (n=273), Iberian ibex (n=212), Eurasian Griffon vulture (n=40) and wild boar (n=817) taken from different areas in Spain between June 2008 and November 2011 were analyzed. Characterization of the isolates was performed by spa typing, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A low prevalence of MRSA was found with 13 isolates obtained from 12 animals (0.89%; 95% CI: 0.46-1.56). All MRSA sequence types belonged to ST398 (t011 and t1451) and ST1 (t127). Genotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns (tetracycline resistance in ST398 and clindamycin-erythromycin-tetracycline resistance in ST1) suggest that the MRSA found probably originated in livestock (ST398) or humans (ST1). This is the first report of MRSA carriers in free-living wild animals in Europe. Although our data showed that MRSA prevalence is currently low, free-living wild animals might act as reservoir and represent a potential risk for human health.

  2. PHACOS, a functionalized bacterial polyester with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dinjaski, Nina; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Selvam, Shivaram; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Lehman, Susan M.; Román, Julio San; García, Ernesto; García, José L.; García, Andrés J.; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections represent a significant clinical problem, and treatment of these microbial infections is becoming troublesome due to the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains. Here, we report a naturally functionalized bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHACOS) with antibacterial properties. We demonstrate that PHACOS selectively and efficiently inhibits the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) both in vitro and in vivo. This ability has been ascribed to the functionalized side chains containing thioester groups. Significantly less (3.2-fold) biofilm formation of S. aureus was detected on PHACOS compared to biofilms formed on control poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), but no differences were observed in bacterial adhesion among these polymers. PHACOS elicited minimal cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on murine macrophages and supported normal fibroblast adhesion. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated minimal inflammation and excellent antibacterial activity for PHACOS compared to controls in an in vivo model of implant-associated infection. Additionally, reductions in neutrophils and macrophages in the vicinity of sterile PHACOS compared to sterile PHO implant were observed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, a similar percentage of inflammatory cells was found in the tissue surrounding sterile PHACOS and S. aureus pre-colonized PHACOS implants, and these levels were significantly lower than S. aureus pre-colonized control polymers. These findings support a contact active surface mode of antibacterial action for PHACOS and establish this functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate as an infection-resistant biomaterial. PMID:24094939

  3. Tolerability of a probiotic in subjects with a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation.

    PubMed

    Warrack, S; Panjikar, P; Duster, M; Safdar, N

    2014-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen of major public health importance. Colonisation precedes infection; thus reducing MRSA carriage may be of benefit for reducing infection. Probiotics represent a novel approach to reducing MRSA carriage. We undertook a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial of the tolerability and acceptability of probiotics for reducing nasal and intestinal carriage of MRSA. In addition, subjects were screened for vancomycin-resistant enterocococci (VRE). Subjects with a history of MRSA were recruited from a large, academic medical center and randomised to take either a placebo or probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001). Subjects returned to the clinic after four weeks for further testing to determine adherence to the probiotic regimen and colonisation of MRSA. 48 subjects were enrolled and randomised. Nearly 25% were transplant recipients and 30% had diabetes. The probiotic was well tolerated in the study population though minor side effects, such as nausea and bloating, were observed. A majority of the subjects randomised to HN001 had good adherence to the regimen. At the four week time point among subjects randomised to the probiotic, MRSA was detected in 67 and 50% of subjects colonised in the nares and the gastrointestinal tract, respectively. Three subjects who initially tested positive for VRE were negative after four weeks of probiotic exposure. Probiotics were well tolerated in our study population of largely immunocompromised subjects with multiple comorbidities. Adherence to the intervention was good. Probiotics should be studied further for their potential to reduce colonisation by multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:25213147

  4. Vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal and enterococcal infections in 15 horses.

    PubMed

    Orsini, James A; Snooks-Parsons, Corinna; Stine, Lynne; Haddock, Marie; Ramberg, Charles F; Benson, Charles E; Nunamaker, David M

    2005-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 15 foals and adult horses in which vancomycin was used, alone or in combination with an aminoglycoside, to treat methicillin-resistant staphylococcal and enterococcal infections. Signalment, presenting complaint, history (including history of treatment for the current complaint), results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, treatment, and outcome were reviewed. The average vancomycin dosage was 7.5 mg/kg q8h, administered by intravenous infusion over 30 min. The infection resolved in all 7 horses with soft tissue infections and in 6 of the 8 horses with infections involving a bone or a joint, or both. No adverse effects of vancomycin therapy were noted. Although the number of cases is small, our findings suggest that vancomycin, alone or in combination with an aminoglycoside, is safe and effective for the treatment of resistant staphylococcal and enterococcal infections in horses and foals. However, owing to the importance of staphylococci and enterococci in human medicine and the problems with emerging resistance, we recommend that the use of vancomycin in horses be limited to cases in which culture and susceptibility results clearly indicate that this agent is likely to be effective and in which there is no reasonable alternative. PMID:16479726

  5. Survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus during thermal processing of frankfurters, summer sausage, and ham.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan A; Dickson, James S; Cordray, Joseph C; Olson, Dennis G; Mendonca, Aubrey F; Prusa, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major concern for human health professionals around the world. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is just one of the resistant organisms of concern. MRSA prevalence has also been recently reported in retail meat products at rates higher than originally thought. Although the risk of contracting an infection from handling contaminated meat products is thought to be low, very little is known about this organism from a food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to determine the survival of MRSA during thermal processing of frankfurters, summer sausage, and boneless ham. Frankfurters, summer sausage, and boneless ham were manufactured using formulations and processing procedures developed at the Iowa State University meat laboratory. Thermal processing resulted in a significant log reduction (p<0.05) for boneless ham, summer sausage, and frankfurters when compared to uncooked, positive controls for each of the three processed meat products. All products were thermally processed to an internal temperature of 70°C and promptly cooled to 7.2°C. Boneless ham showed the highest log reduction (7.28 logs) from cooking, followed by summer sausage (6.75 logs) and frankfurters (5.53 logs). The results of this study indicate that thermal processing of ham, summer sausage, and frankfurters to 70°C is sufficient to reduce the risk of MRSA as a potential food safety hazard.

  6. PCR-based Approaches for the Detection of Clinical Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jiang; Ji, Yinduo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that can cause a variety of infections, including superficial and systematic infections, in humans and animals. The persistent emergence of multidrug resistant S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus, has caused dramatically economic burden and concerns in the public health due to limited options of treatment of MRSA infections. In order to make a correct choice of treatment for physicians and understand the prevalence of MRSA, it is extremely critical to precisely and timely diagnose the pathogen that induces a specific infection of patients and to reveal the antibiotic resistant profile of the pathogen. In this review, we outlined different PCR-based approaches that have been successfully utilized for the rapid detection of S. aureus, including MRSA and MSSA, directly from various clinical specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of detections were pointed out. Both advantages and disadvantages of listed approaches were discussed. Importantly, an alternative approach is necessary to further confirm the detection results from the molecular diagnostic assays. PMID:27335617

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in commercial swine herds is associated with disinfectant and zinc usage.

    PubMed

    Slifierz, Mackenzie Jonathan; Friendship, Robert M; Weese, J Scott

    2015-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originating from swine is concerning for public health, but an understanding of the emergence and persistence of MRSA in nursery herds is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine whether MRSA in nursery pigs is associated with particular herd-level parameters, including the use of antimicrobials, disinfectants, and heavy metals, which may be driving the selection and persistence of antimicrobial resistance. Nasal cultures for MRSA were completed for 390 pigs from 26 farms at the end of the suckling phase and again at 3 weeks postweaning. Herd-level information was collected, and a random subset of MRSA isolates was screened for resistance to zinc and quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). Multivariate analysis revealed that in-feed concentrations of zinc (P < 0.001) and frequent disinfection of nursery pens (P < 0.001) are associated with MRSA shedding in nursery pigs. Furthermore, 62.5% (25/40) of MRSA isolates carried the zinc resistance gene czrC and demonstrated decreased susceptibility to zinc. All MRSA isolates carried at least 1 QAC resistance gene. The most common genotype was qacG qacH smr, which occurred in 32.5% (13/40) of isolates. Seven isolates (17.5%) demonstrated a significant tolerance to benzalkonium chloride, indicating a potential to survive commercial QAC exposure in the presence of organic matter. Overall, these findings indicate that high levels of in-feed zinc and QAC-based disinfectants are important drivers in the selection and persistence of MRSA in commercial swine herds, and these agents may be coselecting for other antimicrobial resistance genes.

  8. A Case of a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Retropharyngeal Abscess With Mediastinal Extension in an 11-Month-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Shanti, Rabie M; Hastings, Mary L; Patel, Stavan; Yeoh, Melvyn S

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of an 11-month-old girl with Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated pneumonia who was subsequently diagnosed with a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus retropharyngeal abscess with mediastinal extension. PMID:26541226

  9. Daptomycin efficacy in the central nervous system of a patient with disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen in the last decades and also represents the second most common pathogen isolated from patients in outpatient settings. Although methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections were traditionally limited to hospitals, community-associated cases of methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections have been reported. In our case, we observed an unexpected event during treatment. Case presentation A 60-year-old Caucasian man developed fever and multiple muscle and brain abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Conclusion Although our patient was given antimicrobials active against the isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain, it was only after the introduction of daptomycin that his skin, soft tissue and muscle lesions and also brain manifestations improved. PMID:22938025

  10. Combinations of β-lactam or aminoglycoside antibiotics with plectasin are synergistic against methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87-89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  11. Combinations of β-Lactam or Aminoglycoside Antibiotics with Plectasin Are Synergistic against Methicillin-Sensitive and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M.; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87–89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  12. Co-infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in bovine mastitis--three cases reported from India.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Samanta, Indranil; Bhattacharyya, Debaraj; Nanda, Pramod Kumar; Kar, Debasish; Chowdhury, Jayanta; Dandapat, Premanshu; Das, Arun Kumar; Batul, Nayan; Mondal, Bimalendu; Dutta, Tapan Kumar; Das, Gunjan; Das, Bikash Chandra; Naskar, Syamal; Bandyopadhyay, Uttam Kumar; Das, Suresh Chandra; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish

    2015-03-01

    Emergence of antimicrobial resistance among bovine mastitis pathogens is the major cause of frequent therapeutic failure and a cause of concern for veterinary practitioners. This study describes intra-mammary infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli in two Holstein Friesian crossbred cows with subclinical mastitis and one non-descript cow with clinical mastitis in two different districts of West Bengal, India. In total, three MRSE, one MRSA and three ESBL producing E. coli were isolated from these cases. Both the crossbreds were detected with MRSE (HFSE1 and HFSE2) and ESBL producing E. coli (HFEC1 and HFEC2), whereas, simultaneous infection of three pathogens viz. MRSA (NDSA1), MRSE (NDSE1) and ESBL producing E. coli (NDEC1) was found in the non-descript cow. The methicillin-resistant isolates possessed mecA gene and exhibited resistance to various antibiotics such as amikacin, tetracycline and glycopeptides. The ESBL producers were positive for blaCTX-M and blaTEM genes; in addition, HFEC1 and HFEC2 were positive for blaSHV and possessed the genes for class I integron (int1), sulphonamide resistance (sul1), quinolone resistance (qnrS) and other virulence factors (papC, iucD and ESTA1). All the ESBL producers exhibited resistance to a variety of antibiotics tested including third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins and were also intermediately resistant to carbapenems. This is the first ever report on simultaneous occurrence of MRSE, MRSA and ESBL producing E. coli in bovine mastitis indicating a major concern for dairy industry and public health as well.

  13. Fermentation of Propionibacterium acnes, a Commensal Bacterium in the Human Skin Microbiome, as Skin Probiotics against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinghua; Kuo, Sherwin; Coda, Alvin; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial interference creates an ecological competition between commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Through fermentation of milk with gut-friendly bacteria, yogurt is an excellent aid to balance the bacteriological ecosystem in the human intestine. Here, we demonstrate that fermentation of glycerol with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a skin commensal bacterium, can function as a skin probiotic for in vitro and in vivo growth suppression of USA300, the most prevalent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). We also promote the notion that inappropriate use of antibiotics may eliminate the skin commensals, making it more difficult to fight pathogen infection. This study warrants further investigation to better understand the role of fermentation of skin commensals in infectious disease and the importance of the human skin microbiome in skin health. PMID:23405142

  14. Antibiotic reduction campaigns do not necessarily decrease bacterial resistance: the example of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kardas-Sloma, Lidia; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Opatowski, Lulla; Guillemot, Didier; Temime, Laura

    2013-09-01

    Interventions designed to reduce antibiotic consumption are under way worldwide. While overall reductions are often achieved, their impact on the selection of antibiotic-resistant selection cannot be assessed accurately from currently available data. We developed a mathematical model of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA) transmission inside and outside the hospital. A systematic simulation study was then conducted with two objectives: to assess the impact of antibiotic class-specific changes during an antibiotic reduction period and to investigate the interactions between antibiotic prescription changes in the hospital and the community. The model reproduced the overall reduction in MRSA frequency in French intensive-care units (ICUs) with antibiotic consumption in France from 2002 to 2003 as an input. However, the change in MRSA frequency depended on which antibiotic classes changed the most, with the same overall 10% reduction in antibiotic use over 1 year leading to anywhere between a 69% decrease and a 52% increase in MRSA frequency in ICUs and anywhere between a 37% decrease and a 46% increase in the community. Furthermore, some combinations of antibiotic prescription changes in the hospital and the community could act in a synergistic or antagonistic way with regard to overall MRSA selection. This study shows that class-specific changes in antibiotic use, rather than overall reductions, need to be considered in order to properly anticipate the impact of an antibiotic reduction campaign. It also highlights the fact that optimal gains will be obtained by coordinating interventions in hospitals and in the community, since the effect of an intervention in a given setting may be strongly affected by exogenous factors.

  15. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with nosocomial infections in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Hanifah, Y A; Hiramatsu, K; Yokota, T

    1992-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a hospital pathogen has presented many clinical problems in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia since 1978. The need for control of spread of these organisms became evident by 1985 when it was noted that the incidence of MRSA among S. aureus isolated from hospital inpatients had increased from 11.5% in 1979 to 18.8% in 1985. The characteristics of 50 MRSA isolates associated with nosocomial infections in the hospital are described here. The predominant strains produced Type IV coagulase and 84% of isolates studied showed moderate to high resistance to methicillin with MIC values of 25 mg l-1 or higher. All the MRSA isolates that could be phagetyped were susceptible to Group III phages, with 76.6% of the isolates being susceptible to phage 85. At least 10 different patterns were distinguishable by plasmid typing, the majority of isolates harbouring up to four small plasmids.

  16. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nadine; Moleiro, Filipa; Lérias, Graça; Silva, Alberto Mello

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae.

  17. Sternoclavicular septic arthritis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a patient with a suprapubic catheter.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nadine; Moleiro, Filipa; Lérias, Graça; Silva, Alberto Mello

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of fever. He had a meatal stenosis and had a suprapubic catheter for 10 months, and had a recent hospitalisation for urosepsis with bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after manipulation of the catheter. Clinical examinations were performed in the emergency department and the patient was hospitalised with the diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infection. The following day, we noticed the development of a mass in the left sternoclavicular joint with inflammatory signs and excruciating pain. Ultrasonographic findings led to the diagnosis of left sternoclavicular synovitis, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus grew in blood cultures leading to the diagnosis of sternoclavicular septic arthritis. Treatment with vancomycin and gentamicin was started and maintained for 4 weeks with complete resolution of symptoms and no complications or sequelae. PMID:25694643

  18. Evolution of community- and healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus☆

    PubMed Central

    Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Otto, Michael; Lowy, Franklin D.; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent cause of human infections globally. The high prevalence of infections is compounded by antibiotic resistance—a significant problem for treatment. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is endemic in hospitals and healthcare facilities worldwide, and is an increasingly common cause of community-associated bacterial infections in industrialized countries. Although much focus is placed on the role of S. aureus as a human pathogen, it is in fact a human commensal organism that has had a relatively long coexistence with the human host. Many S. aureus infections can be explained by host susceptibility or other predisposing risk factors. On the other hand, the emergence/re-emergence of successful S. aureus clones (referred to as epidemic waves) suggests a rapid bacterial adaption and evolution, which includes the emergence of antibiotic resistance and increased virulence and/or transmissibility. It is within this context that we review our understanding of selected S. aureus epidemic waves, and highlight the use of genome sequencing as a means to better understand the evolution of each lineage. PMID:23648426

  19. Antibacterial activity of oxyresveratrol against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Dae-Ki; Mun, Su-Hyun; Choi, Sung-Hoon; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Bae; Lee, Young-Seob; Zhou, Tian; Kong, Ryong; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shin, Dong-Won; Kim, Youn-Chul; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Oxyresveratrol (ORV) is a naturally occurring compound found in mulberries that exhibits a wide spectrum of biological activities. However, the underlying mechanism of the action of ORV against the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) pathogen has not yet been reported. MRSA is multidrug-resistant, causing skin and other types of infections. The aim of the present study was to examine the antimicrobial activity of ORV and the underlying mechanism of its action on MRSA. The antibacterial activity of ORV was evaluated using a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, and the mechanism of its antibacterial action on S. aureus was investigated using a combination of ORV with detergent, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN). In addition, the survival characteristics and changes in MRSA morphology were monitored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The MIC value of ORV against all S. aureus strains was found to be 125 µg/ml. The optical density at 600 nm of each suspension treated using a combination of ORV with Triton X-100, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide or sodium azide was reduced by 68.9–89.8% compared with the value upon treatment with ORV alone. In the ORV and PGN combination assay, direct binding of ORV with PGN from S. aureus was evident. Furthermore, TEM examination of MRSA treated with ORV showed alterations in septa formation. In conclusion, these results showed that ORV has a strong antibacterial effect against S. aureus, mainly by increasing membrane permeability and inhibiting ATPase when combined with other drugs. PMID:27588079

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mandibular osteomyelitis in an extremely low birth weight preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Tumietto, Fabio; Sciutti, Rita; Greco, Laura; Faldella, Giacomo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an established nosocomial pathogen with frequent multidrug resistance. The immaturity of the immune system along with intravascular lines and empirical antibiotic treatments place hospitalized preterm infants at major risk of MRSA infection.We report a case of MRSA mandibular osteomyelitis complicating a persistent S. aureus bacteremia in a 23-week preterm infant. From the first weeks of life, the infant showed recurrent C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation, associated with S. aureus bacteremia. Antibiotic courses, including vancomycin and linezolid, were performed with transitory normalization of blood parameters. On day 74, the infant suddenly deteriorated and showed a significant increase of both CRP and procalcitonin. Empiric vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment was started; nevertheless, she developed a progressive hard swelling of neck and mandible. Radiological evaluation revealed a mandibular osteomyelitis complicated by an abscess, whose culture grew MRSA. Vancomycin was thus changed to teicoplanin and complete clinical and radiological healing was gradually achieved.In the presence of major risk factors, persistent bacteremia and nonspecific symptoms, a localized focus of infection should be suspected. Microbiological diagnosis should always be attempted and antibiotic treatment should be guided by both susceptibility results and clinical response. PMID:26239708

  1. A Field Guide to Pandemic, Epidemic and Sporadic Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Coombs, Geoffrey; Shore, Anna C.; Coleman, David C.; Akpaka, Patrick; Borg, Michael; Chow, Henry; Ip, Margaret; Jatzwauk, Lutz; Jonas, Daniel; Kadlec, Kristina; Kearns, Angela; Laurent, Frederic; O'Brien, Frances G.; Pearson, Julie; Ruppelt, Antje; Schwarz, Stefan; Scicluna, Elizabeth; Slickers, Peter; Tan, Hui-Leen; Weber, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. In addition to the long-known healthcare-associated clones, novel strains have also emerged outside of the hospital settings, in the community as well as in livestock. The emergence and spread of virulent clones expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an additional cause for concern. In order to provide an overview of pandemic, epidemic and sporadic strains, more than 3,000 clinical and veterinary isolates of MRSA mainly from Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Abu Dhabi, Hong Kong, Australia, Trinidad & Tobago as well as some reference strains from the United States have been genotyped by DNA microarray analysis. This technique allowed the assignment of the MRSA isolates to 34 distinct lineages which can be clearly defined based on non-mobile genes. The results were in accordance with data from multilocus sequence typing. More than 100 different strains were distinguished based on affiliation to these lineages, SCCmec type and the presence or absence of PVL. These strains are described here mainly with regard to clinically relevant antimicrobial resistance- and virulence-associated markers, but also in relation to epidemiology and geographic distribution. The findings of the study show a high level of biodiversity among MRSA, especially among strains harbouring SCCmec IV and V elements. The data also indicate a high rate of genetic recombination in MRSA involving SCC elements, bacteriophages or other mobile genetic elements and large-scale chromosomal replacements. PMID:21494333

  2. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Yan-Chen; Kang, Jia-Rui; Chu, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Kai-Lin; Ding, Ling-Yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-Xin; Yin, Yi-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2016-04-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases.

  3. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices.

  4. Structure elucidation of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) flavonoids from balsam poplar buds.

    PubMed

    Simard, François; Gauthier, Charles; Legault, Jean; Lavoie, Serge; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Pichette, André

    2016-09-15

    There is nowadays an urgent need for developing novel generations of antibiotic agents due to the increased resistance of pathogenic bacteria. As a rich reservoir of structurally diverse compounds, plant species hold promise in this regard. Within this framework, we isolated a unique series of antibacterial flavonoids, named balsacones N-U, featuring multiple cinnamyl chains on the flavan skeleton. The structures of these compounds, isolated as racemates, were determined using extensive 1D and 2D NMR analysis in tandem with HRMS. Balsacones N-U along with previously isolated balsacones A-M were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several of the tested balsacones were potent anti-MRSA agents showing MIC values in the low micromolar range. Structure-activity relationships study highlighted some important parameters involved in the antibacterial activity of balsacones such as the presence of cinnamyl and cinnamoyl chains at the C-3 and C-8 positions of the flavan skeleton, respectively. These results suggest that balsacones could represent a potential novel class of naturally occurring anti-MRSA agents.

  5. SLPW: A Virulent Bacteriophage Targeting Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaofei; Zheng, Panpan; Ji, Wenhui; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Sun, Jianhe

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a Gram-positive pathogen causing a variety of infections in humans and animals. Extensive use of antibiotics has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As an alternative antibacterial agent against drug-resistant S. aureus, a lytic phage, designated SLPW, was isolated from fecal sewage in a pig farm. The SLPW was morphologically classified under Podoviridae and contains a double-stranded DNA genome. The genome of SLPW was 17,861 bp (29.35% G+C) containing 20 open reading frames and lacked regions encoding lysogeny-related integrase gene and cI repressor gene. Phage SLPW showed a broad host range and high efficiency of plating against various types of S. aureus. One-step growth curve showed a short latency period (10 min) and a long lytic period (120 min). Phage SLPW remained stable under a wide range of temperatures or pH and was almost unaffected in chloroform or ultraviolet light. Further, it efficiently lysed MRSA strains in vitro and in vivo. Intraperitoneal phage administration at 1 h post-infection cured the mice and reduced the bacterial expression of inflammatory cytokines in mice. Specifically, the phage SLPW displayed a wide antibacterial spectrum. It was therapeutically effective against intra-abdominal infection in mice harboring different multilocus sequence typing (MLST) types of S. aureus strains. Therefore, phage SLPW is a potential therapeutic agent against MRSA infections. PMID:27379064

  6. Control of spread of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Burns Units.

    PubMed

    Muthotho, James N.; Waiyaki, Peter G.; Mbalu, Michael; Wairugu, Anne; Mwanthi, Beth; Odongo, Ben

    1995-02-01

    Results of four years' studies from a number of hospitals in Kenya have shown that nosocomial infections in burns units are due to Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Through chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA, the stain is highly resistant to sulphonamide ointment and other antibiotics. 90% of patients admitted in burns units get colonized or infected with MRSA. The strain prolongs the duration of patients in hospitals. The burns degenerate to second and third degree burns, thereby necessitating skin grafting. The environment has been found to be contaminated with this strain with some staff members having chronic throat infections. Minocycline was found to be effective in treating the infected staff members. Cleaning this environment with Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (precepts)/Sodium hypochlorite (JIK) reduced drastically the mechanical transmission of bacteria in the units. The duration of stay of the patient was reduced. This shows that MRSA which is spread in government and private hospitals can cheaply be controlled by the proper use of disinfectants, antiseptics, and use of effective antibiotics when necessary. PMID:12160450

  7. Structure elucidation of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) flavonoids from balsam poplar buds.

    PubMed

    Simard, François; Gauthier, Charles; Legault, Jean; Lavoie, Serge; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Pichette, André

    2016-09-15

    There is nowadays an urgent need for developing novel generations of antibiotic agents due to the increased resistance of pathogenic bacteria. As a rich reservoir of structurally diverse compounds, plant species hold promise in this regard. Within this framework, we isolated a unique series of antibacterial flavonoids, named balsacones N-U, featuring multiple cinnamyl chains on the flavan skeleton. The structures of these compounds, isolated as racemates, were determined using extensive 1D and 2D NMR analysis in tandem with HRMS. Balsacones N-U along with previously isolated balsacones A-M were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several of the tested balsacones were potent anti-MRSA agents showing MIC values in the low micromolar range. Structure-activity relationships study highlighted some important parameters involved in the antibacterial activity of balsacones such as the presence of cinnamyl and cinnamoyl chains at the C-3 and C-8 positions of the flavan skeleton, respectively. These results suggest that balsacones could represent a potential novel class of naturally occurring anti-MRSA agents. PMID:27436809

  8. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-bo; Liu, Yan-chen; Kang, Jia-rui; Chu, Zheng-yun; Yin, Kai-lin; Ding, Ling-yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-xin; Yin, Yi-nan; Liu, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yue-dan

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases. PMID:27103062

  9. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices. PMID:26899567

  10. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  11. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda W; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who experienced vancomycin therapy failure but who were successfully treated with ceftaroline fosamil. Case 1 involves an 8-year-old Hispanic male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA bacteremia, thigh abscess, and osteomyelitis. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in septic shock. Case 2 involves an 8-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA sepsis, right arm abscess, and osteomyelitis. We were able to successfully treat both patients with CA-MRSA sepsis and invasive infection-who failed vancomycin therapy-with ceftaroline fosamil with no adverse efiects. Despite the positive outcome in both pediatric patients, clinical trials with ceftaroline fosamil are needed to further support its use in pediatric patients.

  12. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in school children of Pokhara.

    PubMed

    Rijal, K R; Pahari, N; Shrestha, B K; Nepal, A K; Paudel, B; Mahato, P; Skalko-Basnet, N

    2008-09-01

    Present study was carried out to find out the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in school children of Pokhara city in western, Nepal. A total of 184 randomly selected children younger than 15 years were included in the study. Nasal swabs collected were subjected to standard bacteriological culture. S. aureus isolates were identified by mannitol fermentation, coagulase positivity and DNase positivity. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed on muller-hinton agar (MHA) by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Out of total 184 nasal swabs, S. aureus was isolated in 31.0% (n=57). Among the isolates, 35.1% (n=20) were from male children whereas 64.9% (n=37) were from female. There was no significant sex difference in colonization of S. aureus. Out of 57 isolates, 56.1% (n=32) were MRSA. MRSA isolates indicated relatively high rate of resistance to antibiotic cloxacillin (68.7%) followed by ofloxacin (40.6%), tetracycline (15.6%), erythromycin (9.4%), ciprofloxacin (6.2%) and vancomycin (3.1%).This study showed a high prevalence of MRSA carriage in school children indicating the spread of MRSA in the community.

  13. SLPW: A Virulent Bacteriophage Targeting Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus In vitro and In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaofei; Zheng, Panpan; Ji, Wenhui; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Sun, Jianhe

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a Gram-positive pathogen causing a variety of infections in humans and animals. Extensive use of antibiotics has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As an alternative antibacterial agent against drug-resistant S. aureus, a lytic phage, designated SLPW, was isolated from fecal sewage in a pig farm. The SLPW was morphologically classified under Podoviridae and contains a double-stranded DNA genome. The genome of SLPW was 17,861 bp (29.35% G+C) containing 20 open reading frames and lacked regions encoding lysogeny-related integrase gene and cI repressor gene. Phage SLPW showed a broad host range and high efficiency of plating against various types of S. aureus. One-step growth curve showed a short latency period (10 min) and a long lytic period (120 min). Phage SLPW remained stable under a wide range of temperatures or pH and was almost unaffected in chloroform or ultraviolet light. Further, it efficiently lysed MRSA strains in vitro and in vivo. Intraperitoneal phage administration at 1 h post-infection cured the mice and reduced the bacterial expression of inflammatory cytokines in mice. Specifically, the phage SLPW displayed a wide antibacterial spectrum. It was therapeutically effective against intra-abdominal infection in mice harboring different multilocus sequence typing (MLST) types of S. aureus strains. Therefore, phage SLPW is a potential therapeutic agent against MRSA infections. PMID:27379064

  14. Activity of the streptogramin antibiotic etamycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Haste, Nina M.; Perera, Varahenage; Maloney, Katherine N.; Tran, Dan N.; Jensen, Paul; Fenical, William; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The alarming rise of hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA- and CA-MRSA) infections has prompted a desperate search for novel antibiotics. We discovered the streptogramin antibiotic, etamycin, for the first time from a newly discovered marine actinomycete and characterized its activity against a panel of HA- and CA-MRSA strains. Etamycin was extracted and purified from a previously uncharacterized marine-derived actinomycete, designated strain CNS-575, as a three-rotamer species as determined by two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Etamycin demonstrated potent activity against hospital- and community-associated strains of MRSA in microbroth dilution assays, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) as low as 1 – 2 mg/L against HA- and CA-MRSA strains. Furthermore, etamycin was also active against other Gram-positive and several Gram-negative pathogens and was found to be non-cytotoxic at concentrations more than 20-fold above the MIC. Etamycin displayed favorable time-kill kinetics compared to the first-line MRSA antibiotic, vancomycin, and also conferred significant protection from mortality in a murine model of systemic lethal MRSA infection. These data emphasize the utility of the marine environment as a relatively untapped source of antibiotics against major drug-resistant human pathogens. These studies will also guide future isolation and preclinical development of depsipeptide anti-MRSA compounds from marine-derived actinomycetes. PMID:20339399

  15. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Chandni; Villanueva, Daphne-Dominique; Lalani, Ishan; Eng, Margaret; Kang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies. PMID:27092283

  16. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in clinical specimens from cystic fibrosis patients by use of chromogenic selective agar.

    PubMed

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues; Antunes, Ana Lúcia Souza; Bonfanti, Jéssica Weiss; Pinto, Jaqueline Becker; Roesch, Eliane Wurdig; Rodrigues, Diógenes; Dias, Cícero Armídio Gomes

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the use of a chromogenic selective medium (MRSA ID) as a useful tool for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patient samples. Fifty-four MRSA isolates were detected by MRSA ID, while only 24/54 (44%) (odds ratio [OR], 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63 to 4.76) were detected by conventional methods. A chromogenic selective medium for MRSA detection may improve its surveillance in CF patients.

  17. Use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pape, John; Wadlin, Jill; Nachamkin, Irving

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD) to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) directly upon subculture from positive blood culture bottles. There were 124 MRSA isolates recovered from blood cultures in the study. BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium was highly sensitive (97.6% [121/124] at 18 to 24 h of incubation and 100% [124/124] at 48 h) and 99.9% specific for identifying MRSA from positive blood cultures. PMID:16825383

  18. Darwinolide, a New Diterpene Scaffold That Inhibits Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm from the Antarctic Sponge Dendrilla membranosa.

    PubMed

    von Salm, Jacqueline L; Witowski, Christopher G; Fleeman, Renee M; McClintock, James B; Amsler, Charles D; Shaw, Lindsey N; Baker, Bill J

    2016-06-01

    A new rearranged spongian diterpene, darwinolide, has been isolated from the Antarctic Dendroceratid sponge Dendrilla membranosa. Characterized on the basis of spectroscopic and crystallographic analysis, the central seven-membered ring is hypothesized to originate from a ring-expansion of a spongian precursor. Darwinolide displays 4-fold selectivity against the biofilm phase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared to the planktonic phase and may provide a scaffold for the development of therapeutics for this difficult to treat infection.

  19. Darwinolide, a New Diterpene Scaffold That Inhibits Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm from the Antarctic Sponge Dendrilla membranosa

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A new rearranged spongian diterpene, darwinolide, has been isolated from the Antarctic Dendroceratid sponge Dendrilla membranosa. Characterized on the basis of spectroscopic and crystallographic analysis, the central seven-membered ring is hypothesized to originate from a ring-expansion of a spongian precursor. Darwinolide displays 4-fold selectivity against the biofilm phase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared to the planktonic phase and may provide a scaffold for the development of therapeutics for this difficult to treat infection. PMID:27175857

  20. Species and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) diversity among methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci isolated from pigs.

    PubMed

    Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Vandendriessche, Stien; Crombé, Florence; Dispas, Marc; Denis, Olivier; Hermans, Katleen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    While methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 is known to be widespread in pig farms, few studies have investigated the species diversity and SCCmec types of methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus staphylococci (MRNAS) residing in the nose of pigs. We examined nasal swab samples of 200 pigs originating from 10 Belgian pig farms previously found positive for MRSA ST398. Suspected staphylococcal isolates were subjected to a 16S rRNA-mecA-nuc PCR. Confirmed MRNAS were genotypically identified to the species level and investigated with a SCCmec typing PCR. MRNAS (n=72) were detected on all 10 farms and were carried by 29.5% of the pigs. Seven MRNAS species were found: Staphylococcus epidermidis (38.9%), Staphylococcus sciuri (18.1%), Staphylococcus pasteuri (18.1%), Staphylococcus rostri (12.5%), Staphylococcus warneri (8.3%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (2.7%) and Staphylococcus hominis (1.4%). SCCmec cassettes were of type IVa (29.2%), type IVc (25%), type III (22.2%), type V (5.6%) or could not be assigned to any of the known types (NT types) (18.1%). Five distinct NT types were found. The predominance of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) in our samples is remarkable, as MRSE is mainly associated with humans. The finding of three different SCCmec elements (IVa, V, NT type 1) in MRNAS that also prevail or predominate in MRSA ST398 shows that MRNAS might be an important SCCmec reservoir for MRSA in pigs. Yet, the occurrence of multiple other SCCmec types illustrates that further studies are required to understand the presence and spread of SCCmec in methicillin-resistant staphylococci from animals.

  1. Vancomycin-intermediate livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398/t9538 from swine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Dutra, Mauricio C; Moreno, Marina; Ferreira, Thais SP; da Silva, Givago FR; Matajira, Carlos EC; Silva, Ana Paula S; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been mainly related with pig farming, in Europe and North America, with the ST398 as the most commonly identified type of LA-MRSA. Here we present the draft genome of the first vancomycin-intermediate MRSA ST398/t9538 isolated from a swine presenting exudative epidermitis in Brazil. PMID:27759766

  2. Use of the cobas 4800 system for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Moure, Raquel; Cañizares, Ángeles; Muíño, María; Lobato, Margarita; Fernández, Ana; Rodríguez, María; Gude, Maria José; Tomás, Maria; Bou, Germán

    2016-01-01

    The new cobas® Cdiff and cobas® MRSA/SA tests were compared with conventional methods for the rapid detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The final concordance between cobas Cdiff Test and GDH/toxin gene screening was 97.62% and between cobas MRSA/SA Test and chromogenic culture, 91.30%, respectively. PMID:26611812

  3. A model for evaluating topical antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in superficial murine wounds.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Renick, Paul J; Tetens, Shannon P; Carson, Dennis L

    2012-08-01

    A wound biofilm model was created by adapting a superficial infection model. Partial-thickness murine wounds were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dense biofilm communities developed at the wound surface after 24 h as demonstrated by microscopy and quantitative microbiology. Common topical antimicrobial agents had reduced efficacy when treatment was initiated 24 h after inoculation compared to 4 h after inoculation. This model provides a rapid in vivo test for new agents to treat wound biofilm infections.

  4. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from a Brazilian neonatal care unit.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Vivian Carolina; Azevedo, Milena Borgo; Iorio, Natalia Lopes Pontes; Amorim, Efigênia de Lourdes Teixeira; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2014-10-01

    To characterize 46 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from Brazilian neonates, we investigated their SCCmec type, susceptibility and clonality. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus were the prevalent species. SCCmec types III or IV were detected in 53.3% S. epidermidis, whereas 63.6% S. haemolyticus were nontypeable. Despite the diversity, specific clones carried specific SCCmec elements, highlighting that effective typing can help in epidemiological analysis. PMID:25037043

  5. Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Austrian companion animals and horses.

    PubMed

    Loncaric, Igor; Künzel, Frank; Licka, Theresia; Simhofer, Hubert; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance, resistance gene patterns and genetic relatedness of a collection of Austrian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from companion animals and horses. A total of 89 non-repetitive MRSA isolates collected during routine veterinary microbiological examinations from April 2004 to the end of 2012, and one isolate from 2013 were used for this study. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Isolates were genotyped by spa typing, two multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analyses (MLVA) analyses, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PCR targeting Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) was performed using PCR assays. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed. Five sequence types (STs-ST398, ST254, ST22, ST5 and ST1), SCCmec types II, IVa, V, and non-type-abele, 8 spa-types (t003, t011, t036, t127, t386, t1348, and t4450), and two isolates could not be assigned, 21 MLVA-14Orsay types Multiplex-PCR MLVA (mMLVA) displayed 17 different MLVA types. The present study is the most comprehensive dealing with MRSA from Austrian companion animals and horses. The results confirm that MRSA ST398 is present in a wide range of animal species and is predominant especially in horses. In other companion animals it is unclear whether the infections with the different MRSA isolates investigated in the present study truly represents a rare phenomenon or may be an emerging problem in companion animals.

  6. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Brazilian Dairy Farms and Identification of Novel Sequence Types.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C J B; Tiao, N; de Sousa, F G C; de Moura, J F P; Santos Filho, L; Gebreyes, W A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic diversity and anti-microbial resistance among staphylococci of dairy herds that originated from Paraiba State, north-eastern Brazil, a region where such studies are rare. Milk samples (n = 552) were collected from 15 dairy farms. Isolates were evaluated for anti-microbial susceptibility by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Confirmation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was performed using multiplex PCR targeting mecA and nuc genes in addition to phenotypic assay based on PBP-2a latex agglutination. Clonal relatedness of isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genotyping. Staphylococci were detected in 269 (49%) of the samples. Among these, 65 (24%) were S. aureus. The remaining 204 isolates were either coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 188; 70%) or coagulase positive other than S. aureus (n = 16; 6%). Staphylococci were cultured in seven (35%) of the 20 hand swab samples, from which five isolates were S. aureus. The isolates were most commonly resistant against penicillin (43%), ampicillin (38%) and oxacillin (27%). The gene mecA was detected in 21 S. aureus from milk and in one isolate from a milker's hand. None of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin. PFGE findings showed high clonal diversity among the isolates. Based on MLST, we identified a total of 11 different sequence types (STs 1, 5, 6, 83, 97, 126, 1583, 1622, 1623, 1624 and 1625) with four novel STs (ST1622-ST1625). The findings show that MRSA is prevalent in milk from semi-extensive dairy cows in north-eastern Brazil, and further investigation on its extent in various types of milk production systems and the farm-to-table continuum is warranted.

  7. Chlorhexidine and mupirocin susceptibilities in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bacteraemia and nasal colonisation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gallego, Irene; Infiesta, Lucia; Viedma, Esther; Perez-Montarelo, Dafne; Chaves, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Chlorhexidine and mupirocin have been increasingly used in healthcare facilities to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of chlorhexidine and mupirocin resistance in MRSA from invasive infections and colonisation. MRSA isolates obtained from blood and nasal samples between 2012 and 2014 were analysed. Susceptibility to mupirocin was determined by disk diffusion and Etest and susceptibility to chlorhexidine by broth microdilution. The presence of mupA and qac (A/B and C) genes was investigated by PCR. Molecular typing was performed in high-level mupirocin-resistant (HLMR) isolates. Mupirocin resistance was identified in 15.6% of blood isolates (10.9% HLMR) and 15.1% of nasal isolates (12.0% HLMR). Presence of the mupA gene was confirmed in all HLMR isolates. For blood isolates, chlorhexidine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from ≤0.125 to 4mg/L and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) from ≤0.125 to 8mg/L. In nasal isolates, chlorhexidine MICs and MBCs ranged from ≤0.125 to 2mg/L. The qacA/B gene was detected in 2.2% of MRSA isolates (chlorhexidine MIC range 0.25-2mg/L) and the qacC gene in 8.2% (chlorhexidine MIC range ≤0.125-1mg/L). The prevalence of qacC was 18.9% in HLMR isolates and 3.6% in mupirocin-susceptible isolates (P=0.009). Most of the HLMR isolates (97.1%) belonged to ST125 clone. These results suggest that chlorhexidine has a higher potential to prevent infections caused by MRSA. In contrast, mupirocin treatment should be used cautiously to avoid the spread of HLMR MRSA. PMID:27436397

  8. Antibacterial synergy between rosmarinic acid and antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ekambaram, Sanmuga Priya; Perumal, Senthamil Selvan; Balakrishnan, Ajay; Marappan, Nathiya; Gajendran, Sabari Srinivasan; Viswanathan, Vinodhini

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: Medicinal plants have ability to resist microorganisms by synthesizing secondary metabolites such as phenols. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a phenylpropanoid widely distributed in plants and well known as therapeutic and cosmetic agent. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is resistant to all kinds of β-lactams, threatens even most potent antibiotics. To improve the efficiency of antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria and to reduce the antibiotic dose, the antibacterial activity and the synergistic effect of RA with standard antibiotics against S. aureus and MRSA was investigated. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activity of RA against S. aureus and a clinical isolate of MRSA was evaluated by agar well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of RA was determined by broth dilution method. Synergism of RA with various antibiotics against S. aureus and MRSA was studied by broth checkerboard method and time-kill kinetic assay. Effect of RA on microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMM’s) of S. aureus and MRSA was studied using sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: MIC of RA was found to be 0.8 and 10 mg/ml against S. aureus and MRSA, respectively. RA was synergistic with vancomycin, ofloxacin, and amoxicillin against S. aureus and only with vancomycin against MRSA. The time-kill analysis revealed that synergistic combinations were a more effective than individual antibiotics. MSCRAMM’s protein expression of S. aureus and MRSA was markedly suppressed by RA + vancomycin combination rather than RA alone. Conclusion: The synergistic effects of RA with antibiotics were observed against S. aureus and MRSA. RA showed inhibitory effect on the surface proteins MSCRAMM’s. Even though RA was shown to exhibit a synergistic effect with antibiotics, the MIC was found to be higher. Thus, further studies on increasing the efficacy of RA can develop it

  9. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Brazilian Dairy Farms and Identification of Novel Sequence Types.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C J B; Tiao, N; de Sousa, F G C; de Moura, J F P; Santos Filho, L; Gebreyes, W A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic diversity and anti-microbial resistance among staphylococci of dairy herds that originated from Paraiba State, north-eastern Brazil, a region where such studies are rare. Milk samples (n = 552) were collected from 15 dairy farms. Isolates were evaluated for anti-microbial susceptibility by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Confirmation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was performed using multiplex PCR targeting mecA and nuc genes in addition to phenotypic assay based on PBP-2a latex agglutination. Clonal relatedness of isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genotyping. Staphylococci were detected in 269 (49%) of the samples. Among these, 65 (24%) were S. aureus. The remaining 204 isolates were either coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 188; 70%) or coagulase positive other than S. aureus (n = 16; 6%). Staphylococci were cultured in seven (35%) of the 20 hand swab samples, from which five isolates were S. aureus. The isolates were most commonly resistant against penicillin (43%), ampicillin (38%) and oxacillin (27%). The gene mecA was detected in 21 S. aureus from milk and in one isolate from a milker's hand. None of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin. PFGE findings showed high clonal diversity among the isolates. Based on MLST, we identified a total of 11 different sequence types (STs 1, 5, 6, 83, 97, 126, 1583, 1622, 1623, 1624 and 1625) with four novel STs (ST1622-ST1625). The findings show that MRSA is prevalent in milk from semi-extensive dairy cows in north-eastern Brazil, and further investigation on its extent in various types of milk production systems and the farm-to-table continuum is warranted. PMID:26178302

  10. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Ote, Isabelle; Misawa, Naoaki; Mainil, Jacques G

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in a collection of S. pseudintermedius strains isolated from dogs and cats with dermatitis in Japan and to compare their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Clonal relationships were determined by pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Biofilm formation assay was performed using safranin staining in microplates. Three virulence genes coding for S. intermedius exfoliative toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (siet, lukS-PV and lukF-PV) were searched for in a collection of strains. Antimicrobial resistance against 15 antibiotics was studied by a disc diffusion method. Twenty-seven MRSP were isolated. According to PFGE results the isolates were not closely related except for a few strains. MLST showed that the strains belonged to five groups, ST71 and ST26 being the two most prevalent. Three types of SCCmec (II, II-III and V) were identified. All isolates were siet-positive but PVL-negative. Most strains (except for two) produced strong biofilm in tryptic soy broth with glucose. Seventy-eight percent of the isolates were resistant or intermediate to twelve or more antibiotics. Our study demonstrates that the ST71 lineage is widespread in Japan and that ST26 could represent an emerging lineage. Moreover, most of our strains are capable of forming strong biofilm and possess siet gene, two virulence characteristics that probably help the bacteria to persist and spread. Finally, our MRSP strains show a strong resistance profile to antibiotics commonly used in veterinary medicine.

  11. Identification and characterization of potential drug targets by subtractive genome analyses of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Reaz; Saeed, Kiran

    2014-02-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes serious infections in humans and becomes resistant to a number of antibiotics. Due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains, there is an essential need to develop novel drug targets to address the challenge of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In current study, the idea was to utilize the available genome or proteome in a subtractive genome analyses protocol to identify drug targets within two of the MRSA types, i.e., MRSA ST398 and MRSA 252. Recently, the use of subtractive genomic approaches helped in the identification and characterization of novel drug targets of a number of pathogens. Our protocol involved a similarity search between pathogen and host, essentiality study using the database of essential genes, metabolic functional association study using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database (KEGG), cellular membrane localization analysis and Drug Bank database. Functional family characterizations of the identified non homologous hypothetical essential proteins were done by SVMProt server. Druggability potential of each of the identified drug targets was also evaluated by Drug Bank database. Moreover, metabolic pathway analysis of the identified druggable essential proteins with KEGG revealed that the identified proteins are participating in unique and essential metabolic pathways amongst MRSA strains. In short, the complete proteome analyses by the use of advanced computational tools, databases and servers resulted in identification and characterization of few nonhomologous/hypothetical and essential proteins which are not homologous to the host genome. Therefore, these non-homologous essential targets ensure the survival of the pathogen and hence can be targeted for drug discovery.

  12. Identification and methicillin