Science.gov

Sample records for acquired myasthenia gravis

  1. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease that causes weakness in the muscles under your control. It happens because ... problem in communication between your nerves and muscles. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease. Your body's own ...

  2. Myasthenia gravis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - myasthenia gravis ... The following organizations provide information on myasthenia gravis : Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America -- www.myasthenia.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/myasthenia_ ...

  3. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Myasthenia Gravis Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  4. [Myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Schodrowski, J; Seipelt, M; Adibi-Sedeh, I; Eienbröker, C; Tackenberg, B

    2016-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease, which leads to load-dependent weakness of voluntary skeletal muscles with recovery of function after resting. The disease is caused by autoantibodies directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) leading to a reduction of neuromuscular transmission. Muscles and nerves are not affected. Disorders of the thymus play a role in the pathogenesis of AChR antibody-positive myasthenia. The clinical symptoms include exercise-induced fatigue either of the ocular muscles alone (ocular myasthenia) or striated skeletal muscle and the ocular, facial and bulbar musculature (generalized myasthenia). Treatment of myasthenia gravis involves administration of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors and immunosuppressive drugs. A myasthenic crisis is characterized by life-threatening complications with severe weakness, swallowing difficulties and respiratory failure, which requires intensive care treatment. PMID:27000188

  5. Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gravis (gMG). In the study, the primary efficacy endpoint of change from baseline in Myasthenia Gravis Activities ... significance. However, the first prospectively defined secondary efficacy endpoint of change from baseline in Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis ( ...

  6. Congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nizamani, Noor Bakht; Talpur, Khalid Iqbal; Memon, Mariya Nazish

    2013-07-01

    Congenital myasthenia gravis is caused by genetic mutations affecting neuromuscular transmission, characterized by muscle weakness usually starting in childhood. A two and a half years old male child presented with bilateral ptosis and hoarseness of voice. The symptoms progressed giving the clinical impression of congenital myasthenia gravis. A series of tests were done including Ice Pack Test, acetylcholine receptor antibody test, trial of steroids and finally neostigmine test which confirmed the diagnosis. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing congenital myasthenia gravis and highlights the potential benefits of neostigmine test in its diagnosis. PMID:23823963

  7. Treatment for Myasthenia Gravis (MG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are individualized There are many effective treatments for myasthenia gravis. Spontaneous improvement and even remission (although uncommon) ... Created by Kellen Interactive Web Design © copyright 2010 Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, Inc.

  8. Overview of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Yeeshu; Li, Yuebing

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an antibody-mediated disorder of neuromuscular transmission that is characterized by weakness and fatigue of voluntary muscles. Weakness may be ocular, bulbar, or generalized. Diagnostic evaluation of patients consists of bedside assessment, antibody testing, and electrophysiologic studies. Various therapeutic options are available, which consist of anticholinesterase inhibitors for symptomatic management, immunosuppressive agents as maintenance therapy, and thymectomy. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin are used in patients in crisis or those with rapidly worsening or refractory symptoms. In our article, we elaborate on key aspects of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic options for patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:24145588

  9. Assays for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, J.M.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for diagnosing myasthenia gravis. The process comprises the steps of preparing a complex of acetycholine receptor protein, toxin and a radioactive isotope, incubating the complex with a serum sample from a patient so as to join antibodies engendered in connection with myasthenia gravis to the complex, precipitating the complex joined with antibody with anti-immunoglobulin and measuring radioactivity, from the radioactive isotope, of the precipitated complex. The improvement is that the acetylcholine receptor protein is derived from cells of the TE671 Line.

  10. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Jayawant, Sandeep; Parr, Jeremy; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis in children can be generalized or ocular, and associated with antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or muscle-specific kinase, but it can be negative for those antibodies (seronegative). It needs to be distinguished from congenital myasthenic syndromes and other neuromuscular diseases. In the perinatal period, transient neonatal myasthenia and arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, due to maternal antibodies, need to be considered. Juvenile myasthenia is similar in presentation and treatment to that in adults. Here we present guidelines for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:23622368

  11. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.D.; Routh, A.; Hickman, B.T.; Douglas, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia.

  12. Thymomatous myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Pandit, L; Rao, S N

    1995-08-01

    Ten cases of thymoma associated myasthenia were seen in the last 7 years. They constitute 17.2% of all cases of Myasthenia gravis seen during the same period. Five of these patients presented in the third decade, all of them presenting with acute generalised Myasthenia (Osserman stage-III). Two patients presented with tumour related symptoms of chest pain, cough and dyspnea both of them having large, invasive and partially resectable tumours. Five patients underwent complete thymectomy and 3 patients underwent partial resection of tumour. Two patients underwent radiotherapy subsequently. Histologically, mixed lymphoepithelial tumours were common (70%). Tumour recurrence was seen in one patient. Two patients died, one in the post operative period. The surviving 8 patients followed up over 1-8 years remained in partial remission, on maintenance dose of steroids. The special problems related to thymomatous MG and practical approach to management are highlighted. PMID:8772974

  13. Vaccines against myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2007-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by antibodies to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) interfering with the neuromuscular transmission. Experimental autoimmune MG serves as an excellent animal model to study possible therapeutic modalities for MG. This review will focus on the different ways to turn off the autoimmune response to AChR, which results in suppression of myasthenia. This paper will describe the use of fragments or peptides derived from the AChR, antigen-presenting cells and anti-T cell receptor antibodies, and will discuss the underlying mechanisms of action. Finally, the authors propose new promising therapeutic prospects, including treatment based on the modulation of regulatory T cells, which have recently been found to be functionally defective in MG patients. PMID:16018742

  14. Myasthenia Gravis: Medical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zeldowicz, Ludmila R.; Buckler, William St. John

    1965-01-01

    The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is often difficult and calls for a broader use of pharmacological and electrodiagnostic tests. The decamethonium-edrophonium test, which has proved superior to other procedures for this purpose, is based on neurophysiological principles and depicts the behaviour of the neuromuscular junction. A state of resistance to depolarizing agents in the limited form of myasthenia and a state of a non-depolarizing (competitive) block in advanced cases has been shown. This test has demonstrated that the neuromuscular defect exists throughout the skeletal musculature, including muscles clinically unaffected. It produced no false-positive results either in normal or neurasthenic persons or in patients with neurological diseases with myasthenic symptoms. In a patient with botulism and in a patient with ocular palsies from brain-stem encephalitis the edrophonium test gave a false-positive result, while the decamethonium-edrophonium test was negative. Diagnosis, treatment and management of myasthenic emergencies are described. PMID:14323662

  15. Lymphocyte function in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, S; Kanaide, A; Itoyama, Y; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Mitogen-induced blastoid transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis was studied using a microplate culture technique and evaluated with 3H-thymidine incorporation. It was found that both phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen responses decreased significantly in patients with myasthenia gravis. In myasthenic crisis, indices of stimulation by phytohaemagglutination became very low. The autologous plasma neither inhibited nor facilitated mitogenic responses of lymphocytes. The decreased mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes suggests that part of the T lymphocyte function is subnormal in myasthenia. PMID:490180

  16. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics. PMID:25777761

  17. [Autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Masakatsu; Narita Masuda, Tomoko

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies (Abs). Generally, patients with MG are divided into 3 groups: (1) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG: 80%), (2) muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibody-positive MG (MuSK-MG: 5-10%), which are AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic proteins involved in AChR aggregation, and (3) double-seronegative MG. In 2011, autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) were identified in Japanese MG patients, and thereafter, have been reported in Germany and USA. We developed a simple technique termed Gaussia luciferase immunoprecipitation (GLIP) for detecting the antibodies to Lrp4. Our results showed that 9 generalized MG patients out of 300 without AChR Ab were positive for Lrp4 antibodies. These antibodies inhibit the binding of Lrp4 to its ligand and predominantly belong to the IgG1 subclass. In other studies, Lrp4 Ab-positive sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes, suggesting a pathogenic role in the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. Further understanding of the structure and function of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) through newly discovered autoantibodies may provide specific clinical information and treatment for MG. PMID:23568991

  18. Clinical electrophysiology in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Stalberg, E

    1980-01-01

    Effective diagnostic methods are of great importance in order to recognise myasthenic patients among those with muscle fatigability. Intracellular recordings are useful for research work within the field and for detailed description of the motor end-plate's physiology in the individual case. The method is not used for the routine diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The decrement of the electrical muscle response with nerve stimulation is the most commonly used method. The diagnostic yield is higher in proximal muscles, in warmed muscles, after exercise, and after ischaemia. A significant number of patients may be undiagnosed with this technique. The mechanical response with nerve stimulation shows the same type of decrement but also an abnormal response to long stimulation. The diagnostic value of this is under dispute. Single fibre ENG needs more patient cooperation than do these tests. The diagnostic yield is significantly higher. Some patients considered to have myasthenia gravis do not show any abnormalities with this technique, particularly those with the pure ocular form. Conventional EMG is not useful for the diagnosis of myasthenia, but may be indicated in these patients when concurrent nerve or muscle disease is in question. Tests for eye movement fatique have not proved useful. Stapedius reflex fatigability is demonstrated in about the same proportion of patients as have positive SFEMG findings. The technique is not uncomfortable for the patient and requires minimal cooperation. The general usefulness must be assessed by further routine use. Even with the advent of immunological tests, neurophysiological investigations are indispensable in helping establish the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Discrepancies between the results comparing electrophysiological and immunological tests may indicate that myasthenia gravis is a heterogenous entity within which subgroups may be identified. PMID:6249895

  19. Ocular myasthenia gravis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Venkatramani, Devendra V; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disease that affects the neuro-muscular junction resulting in classical symptoms of variable muscle weakness and fatigability. It is called the great masquerader owing to its varied clinical presentations. Very often, a patient of MG may present to the ophthalmologist given that a large proportion of patients with systemic myasthenia have ocular involvement either at presentation or during the later course of the disease. The treatment of ocular MG involves both the neurologist and ophthalmologist. Thus, the aim of this review was to highlight the current diagnosis, investigations, and treatment of ocular MG. PMID:25449931

  20. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  1. Myasthenia Gravis Medication Information Card (Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in Myasthenia Gravis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... possibility whenever a new medication is prescribed. For questions regarding medications, contact ... “Medications and Myasthenia Gravis (A Reference for Health Care Professionals.” www.myasthenia. ...

  2. [Therapeutic strategies against myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Nagane, Yuriko

    2013-05-01

    Many patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) still find it difficult to maintain daily activities due to chronic residual fatigability and long-term side effects of oral corticosteroids, since full remission is not common. Our analysis demonstrated that disease severity, oral corticosteroids, and depressive state are the major factors negatively associated with QOL, and that QOL of MM status patients taking < or = 5 mg prednisolne/day is identically good as that seen in CSR and is a target of treatment. In order to achieve early MM or better status with prednisolne < or = 5 mg/day, we advocate the early aggressive treatment strategy that can achieve early improvement by performing an aggressive therapy using combined treatment with plasmapheresis and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and then maintain an improved status using low-dose oral corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:23777099

  3. Congenital myasthenic syndromes and transient myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Anna; Szabó, Hajnalka; Gergev, Gyurgyinka; Karcagi, Veronika; Szabó, Nóra; Endreffy, Emoke; Túri, Sándor; Sztriha, László

    2013-05-30

    Hypotonia in the neonatal period and early infancy is a common clinical finding. It can be caused by various heterogeneous disorders of different origin which might lead to diagnostic difficulties. Disorders of the neuromuscular junction, such as congenital myasthenic syndromes and neonatal transient myasthenia gravis are among the aetiologies. We report on a case of congenital myasthenia caused by mutation in the long cytoplasmic loop of the epsilon subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and a neonate of a myasthenic mother diagnosed with transient myasthenia gravis. PMID:23909021

  4. [Myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Marouf, W; Sieb, J P

    2009-08-01

    Neuromuscular transmission is compromised in a variety of disorders due to immunological, toxic or congenital mechanisms. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most frequent among these disorders. In about 15% of cases, MG is associated with a second autoimmune disorder mainly seen in rheumatologists. Some of the drugs used in rheumatology can exacerbate MG or even trigger immunologically the occurrence of MG. In most MG patients, antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) are present, but around 10% have AChR antibodies that are only identified by novel methods, and up to 5% have muscle-specific kinase antibodies which define a different subgroup of myasthenia. Among those MG patients with anti-AChR antibodies, a number of clinical subtypes can be identified including early-onset MG (onset

  5. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  6. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis, immunotherapy and thymectomy in children.

    PubMed

    Ware, Tyson L; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a rare condition in children. Identifying antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor is helpful in making the diagnosis. However, seronegative cases do exist and need to be distinguished from congenital forms of myasthenia. There is little published experience to inform the judicious management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 12 cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children in the modern era of medical immunotherapy and thymectomy. PMID:21911294

  7. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Poornima A; Wadia, Pettarusp Murzban

    2016-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms) bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs) on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) at 2 Hz. While electrophysiology is an important tool in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, pathological EMG patterns do not exclude the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:27011638

  8. A sodium channel myotonia due to a novel SCN4A mutation accompanied by acquired autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Kokunai, Yosuke; Goto, Keigo; Kubota, Tomoya; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Sakoda, Saburo; Ibi, Tohru; Doyu, Manabu; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sahashi, Ko; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2012-06-21

    Mutations of the voltage gated sodium channel gene (SCN4A) are responsible for non-dystrophic myotonia including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, paramyotonia congenita, and sodium channel myotonia, as well as congenital myasthenic syndrome. In vitro functional analyses have demonstrated the non-dystrophic mutants to show a gain-of-function defect of the channel; a disruption of fast inactivation, an enhancement of activation, or both, while the myasthenic mutation presents a loss-of function defect. This report presents a case of non-dystrophic myotonia that is incidentally accompanied with acquired myasthenia. The patient presented a marked warm-up phenomenon of myotonia but the repeated short exercise test suggested mutations of the sodium channel. The genetic analysis identified a novel mutation, G1292D, of SCN4A. A functional study of the mutant channel revealed marked enhancement of activation and slight impairment of fast inactivation, which should induce muscle hyperexcitability. The effects of the alteration of channel function to the myasthenic symptoms were explored by using stimulation of repetitive depolarization pulses. A use-dependent channel inactivation was reduced in the mutant in comparison to normal channel, thus suggesting an opposing effect to myasthenia. PMID:22617007

  9. Juvenile myasthenia gravis: a paediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Finnis, Maria F; Jayawant, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease in which antibodies are directed against the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, resulting in muscle weakness and fatigability. Juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG) is a rare condition of childhood and has many clinical features that are distinct from adult MG. Prepubertal children in particular have a higher prevalence of isolated ocular symptoms, lower frequency of acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and a higher probability of achieving remission. Diagnosis in young children can be complicated by the need to differentiate from congenital myasthenic syndromes, which do not have an autoimmune basis. Treatment commonly includes anticholinesterases, corticosteroids with or without steroid-sparing agents, and newer immune modulating agents. Plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) are effective in preparation for surgery and in treatment of myasthenic crisis. Thymectomy increases remission rates. Diagnosis and management of children with JMG should take account of their developmental needs, natural history of the condition, and side-effect profiles of treatment options. PMID:22110902

  10. Myasthenia gravis treated with purified antithymocyte antiserum.

    PubMed

    Pirofsky, B; Reid, R H; Bardana, E J; Baker, R L

    1979-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of goat anti-human thymocyte antiserum globulin (ATG) was assessed in 10 patients with myasthenia gravis. All subjects had far-advanced, debilitating disease poorly responsive to anticholinesterase therapy. Prolonged, low-dose ATG therapy was used, with 1.0 to 2.6 gm ATG protein administered intramuscularly over a 28- to 73-day period. Therapeutic responses of varying degrees were noted in 8 of 10 patients. Completion of a course of ATG treatment and discontinuation of the drug did not lead to acute relapse. Follow-up examinations for over 5 years have been maintained. A mean remission period of approximately 2 years was observed. This therapy deserves further evaluation; subjects with progressive myasthenia gravis despite prior thymectomy may represent ideal candidates. PMID:311448

  11. Prediction of aspiration in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Wilma J; Wiebe, Samuel; Colton-Hudson, Angela; Moosa, Tas; Smith, Dean; Bach, David; Nicolle, Michael W

    2004-02-01

    Prediction of the risk of dysphagia and aspiration is important in the management of myasthenia gravis (MG). We assessed the ability of four bedside clinical tools to predict aspiration in 20 MG patients. Patients completed a self-directed questionnaire, underwent clinical neurological assessment and a bedside speech pathology assessment, and were assessed with the quantitative myasthenia gravis (QMG) score. The ability of these tools to predict aspiration was compared with the results of a modified barium swallow. Seven patients aspirated, 4 silently. The total self-directed questionnaire score, two specific questions on the self-directed questionnaire, the prediction based on clinical neurological assessment, and the QMG bulbar subset score all correlated with aspiration. The speech pathology prediction was highly sensitive but less specific. This pilot study shows that simple clinical tools can predict which MG patients are at risk of aspiration. PMID:14755491

  12. Emergency Management of Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and shoulders. • Keep a calm and peaceful atmosphere. • Support respirations if needed. SEVERE SWALLOWING DIFFICULTY Subjective ... secretions as needed. • Keep a calm and peaceful atmosphere. www.myasthenia.org 800.541.5454

  13. Epidemiology of myasthenia gravis in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Ari; Widdifield, Jessica; Katzberg, Hans D; Barnett, Carolina; Bril, Vera; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and prevalence estimates in myasthenia gravis have varied widely. Recent studies based on administrative health data have large sample sizes but lack rigorous validation of MG cases, and have not examined the North American population. Our aim was to explore trends in MG incidence and prevalence for the years 1996-2013 in the province of Ontario, Canada (population 13.5 million). We employed a previously validated algorithm to identify MG cases. Linking with census data allowed for the calculation of crude- and age/sex-standardized incidence and prevalence rates for the years 1996-2013. The regional distribution of MG cases throughout the province was examined. Mean age at the first myasthenia gravis encounter was 60.2 ± 17.1 years. In 2013, there were 3611 prevalent cases in Ontario, and the crude prevalence rate was 32.0/100,000 population. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence rates rose consistently over time from 16.3/100,000 (15.4-17.1) in 1996 to 26.3/100,000 (25.4-27.3) in 2013. Standardized incidence rates remained stable between 1996 (2.7/100,000; 95% CL 2.3-3.0) and 2013 (2.3/100,000; 2.1-2.6). Incidence was highest in younger women and older men, and geographic variation was evident throughout the province. In conclusion, this large epidemiological study shows rising myasthenia gravis prevalence with stable incidence over time, which is likely reflective of patients living longer, possibly due to improved disease treatment. Our findings provide accurate information on the Canadian epidemiology of myasthenia gravis and burden for health care resources planning for the province, respectively. PMID:26573434

  14. [Myasthenia gravis - optimal treatment and accurate diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Kerty, Emilia; Løseth, Sissel; Mygland, Åse; Tallaksen, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Around 700 people in Norway have myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease that affects neuromuscular transmission and results in fluctuating weakness in some muscles as its sole symptom. The diagnosis is based on typical symptoms and findings, detection of antibodies and neurophysiological examination. Symptomatic treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is generally effective, but most patients also require immunosuppressive drug treatment. Antigen-specific therapy is being tested in experimental disease models. PMID:27381787

  15. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Thymic Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kristin O; Beneck, Debra M; Dinkin, Marc J

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman with ptosis and diplopia was found to have myasthenia gravis (MG) associated with amyloidosis of the thymus gland. Systemic MG is frequently associated with thymomas or thymic hyperplasia but has only once previously been reported in association with amyloidosis of the thymus. This case demonstrates that isolated ocular MG rarely may also be associated with amyloidosis of the thymus. PMID:25822660

  16. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Sieb, J P

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides a thorough overview of the current advances in diagnosis and therapy of myasthenia gravis (MG). Nowadays the term 'myasthenia gravis' includes heterogeneous autoimmune diseases, with a postsynaptic defect of neuromuscular transmission as the common feature. Myasthenia gravis should be classified according to the antibody specificity [acetylcholine, muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), seronegative], thymus histology (thymitis, thymoma, atrophy), age at onset (in children; aged less than or more than 50 years) and type of course (ocular or generalized). With optimal treatment, the prognosis is good in terms of daily functions, quality of life and survival. Symptomatic treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibition is usually combined with immunosuppression. Azathioprine still remains the first choice for long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Alternative immunosuppressive options to azathioprine include cyclosporin, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Rituximab is a promising new drug for severe generalized MG. Emerging therapy options include belimumab, eculizumab and the granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor. One pilot study on etanercept has given disappointing results. For decades, thymectomy has been performed in younger adults to improve non-paraneoplastic MG. However, controlled prospective studies on the suspected benefit of this surgical procedure are still lacking. In acute exacerbations, including myasthenic crisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption are similarly effective. PMID:24117026

  17. Myasthenia gravis and masticatory muscle myositis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Clooten, Jennifer K.; Woods, J. P.; Smith-Maxie, Laura L.

    2003-01-01

    A 21-month-old, castrated male Vizsla was presented for pelvic limb weakness, difficulty opening his mouth, ptyalism, voice change, and urinary incontinence. Myasthenia gravis and masticatory myositis were diagnosed. The unusual clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment, and case outcome are described, followed by a brief discussion of myasthenia gravis and masticatory myositis. PMID:12839242

  18. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  19. Seronegative Maternal Ocular Myasthenia Gravis and Delayed Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Johnson, Kendall; Hussain, Naveed; Campbell, Winston A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with fluctuating muscle weakness, divided into generalized and localized (ocular) forms. Maternal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cross the placenta and may cause transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (TNMG). We present a case of seronegative maternal ocular MG and delayed TNMG. Case A 29-year-old G3P1011 underwent cesarean birth of a male infant who developed oxygen desaturation requiring supplemental oxygen on day of life (DOL) 3. Based on the clinical course and after exclusion of other diagnoses, the infant was diagnosed with TNMG. Infant's condition improved spontaneously and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen and discharged home on DOL 12. Conclusion Infants born to mothers with seronegative localized (ocular) MG are also susceptible to TNMG which may be late in onset. PMID:26989568

  20. Treatment of myasthenia gravis: current practice and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Emma; Sanders, Donald B

    2002-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the best understood of the autoimmune diseases and a number of treatments are currently used to produce clinical improvement. However, due to the scarcity of evidence-based and comparative data, there is still no consensus on many therapeutic issues. Even a widely accepted treatment like thymectomy has never been proven effective by a well-designed trial. These are just some of the unanswered questions: What is the best treatment algorithm and safest long-term management of myasthenia gravis? What patients are likely to benefit from thymectomy? How long should myasthenia gravis patients be treated? Is it possible to discontinue immunotherapy once remission has been achieved? What are the risks associated with long-term immunosuppression? In this article, we review current therapeutic strategies and these unresolved questions about myasthenia gravis treatment. PMID:19810991

  1. Novel Complement Inhibitor Limits Severity of Experimentally Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Soltys, Jindrich; Kusner, Linda L.; Young, Andrew; Richmonds, Chelliah; Hatala, Denise; Gong, Bendi; Shanmugavel, Vaithesh; Kaminski, Henry J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Complement mediated injury of the neuromuscular junction is considered a primary disease mechanism in human myasthenia gravis and animal models of experimentally acquired myasthenia gravis (EAMG). We utilized active and passive models of EAMG to investigate the efficacy of a novel C5 complement inhibitor rEV576, recombinantly produced protein derived from tick saliva, in moderating disease severity. Methods Standardized disease severity assessment, serum complement hemolytic activity, serum cytotoxicity, acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody concentration, IgG subclassification, and C9 deposition at the neuromuscular junction were used to assess the effect of complement inhibition on EAMG induced by administration of AChR antibody or immunization with purified AChR. Results Administration of rEV576 in passive transfer EAMG limited disease severity as evidenced by 100% survival rate and a low disease severity score. In active EAMG, rats with severe and mild EAMG were protected from worsening of disease and had limited weight loss. Serum complement activity (CH50) in severe and mild EAMG was reduced to undetectable levels during treatment, and C9 deposition at the neuromuscular junction was reduced. Treatment with rEV576 resulted in reduction of toxicity of serum from severe and mild EAMG rats. Levels of total AChR IgG, and IgG2a antibodies were similar, but unexpectedly, the concentration of complement fixing IgG1 antibodies was lower in a group of rEV576-treated animals, suggesting an effect of rEV576 on cellular immunity. Interpretation Inhibition of complement significantly reduced weakness in two models of EAMG. C5 inhibition could prove to be of significant therapeutic value in human myasthenia gravis. PMID:19194881

  2. Ocular myasthenia gravis accompanied by anosmia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Zhou, Li; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) accompanied by anosmia. A 76-year-old man had idiopathic anosmia of 2-year duration. Four months before consultation, he began to have drooping in the right upper eyelid along with muscle soreness, distension, and pain in the nape. His tongue was dark-red with a thin and white coating; his pulse was wiry and slippery. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, eyelid drooping and anosmia are the main signs of liver constraint and spleen deficiency. In Western Medicine, the diagnosis was ocular MG and idiopathic anosmia. Our patient, along with the literature, suggests that anosmia may be an early symptom before MG. MG accompanied by anosmia could be a special subtype of MG according to antibody production and symptoms. PMID:26946629

  3. Myasthenia Gravis and the Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Christian

    1970-01-01

    Two disorders of neuromuscular transmission producing muscle weakness and easy fatigability which may confront the physician are myasthenia gravis and the myasthenic syndrome. The former has early symptoms and signs of oculobulbar and then extremity weakness with rapid decline of action potential and contractile strength with repetitive use and nerve-muscle stimulation. Anticholinesterases improve strength. The myasthenic syndrome has early symptoms and signs of pelvic girdle, pectoral girdle and proximal limb muscle weakness. This is worst when first starting to use or carry out nerve muscle stimulation in the rested muscles. It improves significantly for a time with use or on rapid stimulation, and then declines with continued activation. Deep tendon reflexes are sluggish or absent. Small cell carcinoma of the lung is often associated. Guanidine improves the strength. Other features and possible underlying mechanisms of the two disorders help to differentiate and treat them. PMID:5457513

  4. Protective molecular mimicry in experimental myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Im, Sin Hyeog; Barchan, Dora; Feferman, Tali; Raveh, Lily; Souroujon, Miriam C; Fuchs, Sara

    2002-05-01

    Protein databases were searched for microbial sequences that bear amino acid similarities with identified T- or B-cell epitopes within the human alpha-subunit of acetylcholine receptor (AChR). One peptide, derived from Haemophilus influenzae, exhibits 50% homology to an identified T-cell epitope of AChR alpha-subunit. This peptide was shown to have a protective effect in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Pretreatment of rats with the mimicry peptide attenuated the induction and progression of EAMG. These effects were accompanied by a reduced T-cell response to AChR, diminished IL-2, IL-12, IFN-gamma and IL-4 levels, as well as decreased humoral response to self-AChR. PMID:12020961

  5. Impaired regulatory B cells in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Rezania, Kourosh; Soliven, Betty

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory B cells (Bregs) attenuate the severity of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) in an interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent manner. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of human Bregs in MG focusing on CD19(+)CD1d(hi) CD5(+) and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) subsets. We found that MG patients exhibited a decrease in the frequency of both Breg subsets and IL-10 producing B cells within each subset, which correlated with disease severity. In addition, there was impaired suppression of Th1 polarization in MG. These findings, taken together with EAMG data, indicate that Bregs play an important role in regulating the severity of MG. PMID:27397074

  6. Myasthenia gravis: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Fine, Bianca M.; Milani, Monica; Kaminski, Henry J.

    2006-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune syndrome caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission, which results from the binding of autoantibodies to proteins involved in signaling at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). These proteins include the nicotinic AChR or, less frequently, a muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) involved in AChR clustering. Much is known about the mechanisms that maintain self tolerance and modulate anti-AChR Ab synthesis, AChR clustering, and AChR function as well as those that cause neuromuscular transmission failure upon Ab binding. This insight has led to the development of improved diagnostic methods and to the design of specific immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory treatments. PMID:17080188

  7. Pemphigus foliaceus exacerbated by radiation, in association with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Tracey N; Lieberman, Miriam R; Burris, Katy

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a sporadic autoimmune blistering disease of unknown etiology. The production of immunoglobulin G4 antibodies against desmoglein-1 is responsible for the clinical manifestation of PF. We present a case of a woman with a recent diagnosis of myasthenia gravis (MG), who was also recently treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer. The clinical exam, supported by biopsy and direct immunofluorescence, were consistent with PF. We present this case to increase the awareness of the potential exacerbation or induction of PF with radiation, and of the association of PF and myasthenia gravis. Only five prior cases of radiation-exacerbated or radiation-induced PF have been reported in the literature to date. Furthermore, the co-existence of the autoimmune entities of myasthenia gravis and PF has been reported in the literature in only 9 cases and was also noted in this patient. PMID:27136623

  8. Differential Diagnosis of Hallucinations in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Hizem, Yosr; Ben Djebara, Mouna; Kacem, Imen; Gargouri, Amina; Gouider, Riadh

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with comorbidity of myasthenia gravis and psychosis. Different diagnostic hypotheses based on a review of the literature are discussed. A protracted history of physical spousal abuse, patient symptoms, and results of different investigations allowed us to conclude that the patient had a form of posttraumatic stress disorder with secondary psychotic features. Psychosis due to myasthenia gravis is rarely seen, and it remains unclear what is the pathophysiology, if any, for such an association. The present case highlights the difficulties the physician faces in disentangling psychosis as a potential manifestation of myasthenia gravis itself versus being caused by a medical side effect of treatment, or psychosis due to a distinct co-occurring neurologic or psychiatric condition. PMID:24307978

  9. [Course and treatment of myasthenia gravis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Klehmet, J; Dudenhausen, J; Meisel, A

    2010-08-01

    Pregnancy and family planning issues are frequent concerns in the medical care of patients with myasthenia gravis since disease onset often coincides with the life period which is decisive in this respect. Although pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding represent special circumstances in these patients, they are not associated with higher risks of complications compared to normal pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period. Frequently asked questions regard the course of pregnancy as well as the impact of the disease and particularly medical treatment on pregnancy and the foetus or neonate. Great significance is attached to the mode of delivery since it is still widely accepted that patients with myasthenia gravis have to deliver per elective caesarean section. This paper gives an overview and provides a basis for the medical care and individual counselling of patients with myasthenia gravis who want to start a family or are already pregnant. PMID:20411231

  10. Myasthenia gravis and related disorders: Pathology and molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, James C; Richman, David P

    2015-04-01

    Disorders affecting the presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic portions of the neuromuscular junction arise from various mechanisms in children and adults, including acquired autoimmune or toxic processes as well as genetic mutations. Disorders include autoimmune myasthenia gravis associated with acetylcholine receptor, muscle specific kinase or Lrp4 antibodies, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, nerve terminal hyperexcitability syndromes, Guillain Barré syndrome, botulism, organophosphate poisoning and a number of congenital myasthenic syndromes. This review focuses on the various molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms of these disorders, characterization of which has been crucial to the development of treatment strategies specific for each pathogenic mechanism. In the future, further understanding of the underlying processes may lead to more effective and targeted therapies of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25486268

  11. T and B lymphocytes in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Itoyama, Y; Kawanami, S; Goto, I; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from seventeen non-thymectomized and nine thymectomized patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and thirteen healthy controls were examined for the presence of surface markers characteristic of T and B lymphocytes by rosette formation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). T cells were identified by their capacity to spontaneously form rosettes with SRBCs. The percentage of B lymphocytes was determined by the erythrocyte antibody complement (EAC) rosette-forming test. The EAC complex was prepared with either whole rabbit anti-SRBC serum or with the IgM fraction of rabbit anti-SRBC serum. The two kind of erythrocyte complement rosette-forming cells (EAC-RFC) are designated erythrocyte-haemolysin-complement RFC (EA(H)C-RFC), and erythrocyte-IgM-complement RFC (EA(M)C-RFC). The percentage of total lymphocytes and T cells was not altered in MG patients. The percentage of 'active' T cells, which have been considered to be more actively involved in cellular immunity, was also similar in MG patients and controls. A significant increase in EA(H)C-RFC occurred in both thymectomized and non-thymectomized MG patients, while in B cells detected by EA(M)C-RFC no alterations were found. The increase in EA(H)C-RFC in lymphocytes from MG patients may be due to an increase in the 19S antibody-forming B lymphocytes or to an increase in T cells which have Fc receptors on their surface. PMID:315844

  12. [Determination of prognostic factors in surgical treatment of myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Schnorrer, M; Hraska, V; Spalek, P; Cársky, S

    1999-05-01

    The authors evaluated, using statistical analysis, the importance of prognostic factors in patients subjected to thymectomy on account of myasthenia gravis. The results revealed a better prognosis of the disease, if the history was less than 6 months, preoperative treatment less than 1.5 years, a histological finding of thymus hyperplasia, second clinical stage according to Ossermann and the patients age below 30 years. From the statistical analysis ensues that the prognosis of myasthenia gravis is more favourable when the case-history is shorter as a result of rapid diagnosis and when preoperative treatment is reduced to a minimum. PMID:10510623

  13. Myasthenia Gravis Presentation After a Cervical Laminectomy With Fusion.

    PubMed

    Deters, Darlene; Fowler, Stephanie L; Orozco, Raymundo; Smith, Patrick R; Spurlock, Shelby; Blackmon, Darlene; Thomas, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disorder that causes skeletal muscle weakness. Typically, myasthenia gravis affects the ocular, bulbar, neck, proximal limbs, and respiratory muscles. Although the presentation is typically observed with complaints of vision and bulbar symptoms such as diplopia, dystonia, and dysphagia, this article presents a case study of an elderly man with a history of increasing upper extremity weakness with complaints of worsening hand dexterity and intermittent episodes of expressive aphasia. After cervical laminectomy with fusion, this gentleman was admitted to the medical intensive care unit, in a complete myasthenic crisis. PMID:27258955

  14. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Aline Mansueto; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Luiz Sergio Mageste; da Silva Freitas, Denise; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Kummer, Arthur; Lemos, Stella Maris Aguiar; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale and 2) to investigate the quality of life of Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis and its determinants. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 69 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent neurological evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale showed high internal consistency and good concurrent validity with the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and its subscales. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis included the current status of myasthenia gravis as assessed by the Myasthenia Gravis Composite, the current prednisone dose and the levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale is a valid instrument. Symptom severity, prednisone dosage and anxiety and depression levels impact the quality of life of patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:27464292

  15. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  16. Autoantibodies to agrin in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Chengyong; Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A; Lisak, Robert P; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  17. Ocular myasthenia gravis after D-penicillamine administration.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L J; Lesser, R L; Merikangas, J R; Silverman, J P

    1989-01-01

    A 68-year-old black woman who was put on D-penicillamine therapy (250-500 mg per day, total dose 15 g) for rheumatoid arthritis developed ocular myasthenia gravis. Two weeks after she discontinued D-penicillamine her signs and symptoms cleared with no other treatment. Review of previous cases and possible immunological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:2692700

  18. The effect of cholinesterase inhibitors of SFEMG in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Massey, J M; Sanders, D B; Howard, J F

    1989-02-01

    We report four patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) in whom single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) jitter measurements were normal in some muslces while they were taking pyridostigmine and became abnormal 2-14 days after the medication was discontinued. When the abnormality of neuromuscular transmission in MG is mild, cholinesterase inhibitors may mask the findings of increased jitter on SFEMG. PMID:2540433

  19. Double seronegative myasthenia gravis with antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Many aspects of autoimmune diseases are not completely understood, particularly when they occur in association, which suggests a common pathogenetic mechanism. Case presentation We report a case of a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom myasthenia gravis developed years later. She tested negative for both antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor and against muscle-specific receptor tyrosine-kinase, but had typical decremental responses at the repetitive nerve stimulation testing, so that a generalized myasthenia gravis was diagnosed. Her thromboplastin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were high, anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies were slightly elevated, as a manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome. She had a good clinical response when treated with a combination of pyridostigmine, prednisone and azathioprine. Conclusions Many patients with myasthenia gravis test positive for a large variety of auto-antibodies, testifying of an immune dysregulation, and some display mild T-cell lymphopenia associated with hypergammaglobulinemia and B-cell hyper-reactivity. Both of these mechanisms could explain the occurrence of another autoimmune condition, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, but further studies are necessary to shed light on this matter. Clinicians should be aware that patients with an autoimmune diagnosis such as antiphospholipid syndrome who develop signs and neurological symptoms suggestive of myasthenia gravis are at risk and should prompt an emergent evaluation by a specialist. PMID:24380508

  20. Sensory aspects in myasthenia gravis: A translational approach.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Leon-Ariza, Juan S; Prada, Diddier; Leon-Ariza, Daniel S; Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis is a paradigmatic muscle disorder characterized by abnormal fatigue and muscle weakness that worsens with activities and improves with rest. Clinical and research studies done on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have advanced our knowledge of the muscle involvement in myasthenia. Current views still state that sensory deficits are not "features of myasthenia gravis". This article discusses the gap that exists on sensory neural transmission in myasthenia that has remained after >300years of research in this neurological disorder. We outline the neurobiological characteristics of sensory and motor synapses, reinterpret the nanocholinergic commonalities that exist in both sensory and motor pathways, discuss the clinical findings on altered sensory pathways in myasthenia, and propose a novel way to score anomalies resulting from multineuronal inability associated sensory troubles due to eugenic nanocholinergic instability and autoimmunity. This medicine-based evidence could serve as a template to further identify novel targets for studying new medications that may offer a better therapeutic benefit in both sensory and motor dysfunction for patients. Importantly, this review may help to re-orient current practices in myasthenia. PMID:27538668

  1. Multidisciplinary treatment for prepubertal juvenile myasthenia gravis with crisis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yusuke; Inoue, Masayoshi; Nabatame, Shin; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    The management of juvenile myasthenia gravis (MG) remains controversial. We report herein the case of a 12-year-old girl with prepubertal juvenile MG with respiratory crisis who underwent thymectomy following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The patient initially developed progressively worsening fatigability, eyelid ptosis, and diplopia, followed by worsening generalized weakness, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Even after i.v. immunoglobulin, the patient presented with rapid onset of severe dyspnea requiring respiratory support with mechanical ventilation and was graded as Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class V. After a course of i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy, successful control of respiratory crisis was achieved, and trans-sternal thymectomy was performed. Partial remission was achieved postoperatively with oral pyridostigmine without immunosuppressive agents such as steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for 18 months after thymectomy. Early thymectomy following induction methylprednisolone pulse therapy might be a treatment option for prepubertal juvenile MG with severe respiratory crisis. PMID:27324449

  2. Myasthenia gravis on the Dutch antilles: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Holtsema, H; Mourik, J; Rico, R E; Falconi, J R; Kuks, J B; Oosterhuis, H J

    2000-12-01

    We carried out an epidemiological study on the prevalence and annual incidence of myasthenia gravis on tropical islands Curaçao and Aruba in the period 1980-1995. Twenty-one patients (seven men and 14 women) were identified. The point prevalence increased from 29 per million in 1980 to about 70 per million in 1990-1995; the annual incidence over the total period was 4.7 per million. The female:male ratio was 2:1; purely ocular cases (2/21) comprised 9.5% and thymomas (4/21), 19%. These data are in accordance with most other epidemiological studies in non-tropical areas. No other studies on myasthenia gravis in tropical areas have been reported. PMID:11154803

  3. Thymic carcinoma in myasthenia gravis developing years after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D; Miller, Robert G; Katz, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    We report two patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) who underwent thymectomy but developed thymic carcinoma years after the initial surgery. In one patient, the initial thymic pathology was normal, whereas the other had an encapsulated benign thymoma that was found only on pathological assessment. These cases demonstrate that MG may occur as part of a "new" paraneoplastic syndrome even after thymectomy. The late appearance of metastatic thymoma raises questions about monitoring for these patients. PMID:19533649

  4. Specific Immunotherapy of Experimental Myasthenia Gravis by A Novel Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Objective Myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases, in which autoantibodies bind to and cause loss of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. To develop a specific immunotherapy of MG, we treated rats with ongoing EAMG by intraperitoneal injection of bacterially-expressed human muscle AChR constructs. Methods Rats with ongoing EAMG received intraperitoneal treatment with the constructs weekly for 5 weeks beginning after the acute phase. Autoantibody concentration, subclassification, and specificity were analyzed to address underlying therapeutic mechanism. Results EAMG was specifically suppressed by diverting autoantibody production away from pathologically relevant specificities directed at epitopes on the extracellular surface of muscle AChRs toward pathologically irrelevant epitopes on the cytoplasmic domain. A mixture of subunit cytoplasmic domains was more effective than a mixture containing both extracellular and cytoplasmic domains or than only the extracellular domain of α1 subunits. Interpretation Therapy using only cytoplasmic domains, which lack pathologically relevant epitopes, avoids the potential liability of boosting the pathological response. Use of a mixture of bacterially-expressed human muscle AChR cytoplasmic domains for antigen-specific immunosuppression of myasthenia gravis has the potential to be specific, robust, and safe. PMID:20437579

  5. MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis: questions from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Donald B; Juel, Vern C

    2008-09-15

    Clinical vignettes are presented of five patients with MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis, each of which demonstrates a diagnostic or therapeutic issue that is unique to or characteristic of this condition. Consideration of these issues leads to questions, many of which are unanswered at this time, about the immunopathology and management of this subset of myasthenia gravis. PMID:18684517

  6. [Surgical treatment of myasthenia gravis in children].

    PubMed

    Iudin, Ia B; Kogan, O G; Prokopenko, Iu D; Klepikov, I I; Vusik, G V; Fedorov, K K; Ivanov, V V; Diupin, V A; Merzeniuk, O S

    1989-11-01

    The article deals with the treatment of myasthenia in 33 children whose ages ranged from 3 to 15 years. Myasthenia of moderate severity was diagnosed in 14, severe in 15, and extremely severe in 2 children. To make a precise diagnosis, loading, neostigmine methylsulfate, cold, and D-tubocurarine tests were conducted. Thymectomy was performed in 32 patients. The operation was carried out through a T-shaped sternotomy approach. Thymogenic myasthenia was verified in 31 patients and thymomogenic only in one patient. There were no fatal outcomes. The late-term results were studied in 12 patients in follow-up periods of 3 to 6 years. Adaptational activity of the patients, anticholinesterase agents and the results of stimulant electric myography served as the criterion in appraising the late-term results. Modern diagnostic methods and surgical intervention ensure a favourable result in 75% of patients. PMID:2615272

  7. Myasthenia gravis, a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, S

    1995-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder of autoimmune origin. Most patients have antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) that interfere with neuromuscular transmission. MG is a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease in which the autoantigen, AChR, is well characterized. However, several questions remain unanswered. Why is AChR, which is present in the thymus, not tolerized? Why does the anti-AChR antibody titre not correlate with clinical manifestations, and why do some patients not have such antibodies? What genetic elements are involved in disease susceptibility? How is the expression of AChR regulated after its attack by autoantibodies? Could MG patients benefit from new immunomodulatory treatments? At the IVth EuroMyasthenia meeting, held in Versailles in April 1994, almost 200 researchers and physicians met to discuss the pathophysiology and treatment of myasthenia gravis and to provide answers to some of these questions. The sessions covered immunological, genetic and clinical aspects of MG. PMID:7612144

  8. Treatment of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis using papain

    PubMed Central

    Poulas, K; Tsouloufis, T; Tzartos, S J

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-mediated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss at the neuromuscular junction, the main cause of the symptoms of myasthenia gravis, is induced by bivalent or multivalent antibodies. Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) can be induced very efficiently in rats by administration of intact MoAbs directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the AChR, but not by their monovalent Fab fragments. We tested whether papain, which has been used therapeutically in autoimmune and other diseases, is capable of preventing EAMG by in vivo cleavage of the circulating anti-AChR antibodies into Fab fragments. EAMG was induced in 4-week-old female Lewis rats by i.p. injection of anti-MIR mAb35. A total of 0·75 mg of papain was given as one or three injections 3–7 h after MoAb injection. The mAb35 + papain-treated animals developed mild weakness during the first 30 h and subsequently recovered, while all animals that received only mAb35 developed severe myasthenic symptoms and died within 24–30 h. Animals treated only with papain showed no apparent side effects for up to 2 months. Serum anti-AChR levels in mAb35 + papain-treated rats decreased within a few hours, whereas in non-papain-treated rats they remained high for at least 30 h. Muscle AChR in mAb35 + papain-treated animals was partially protected from antibody-mediated degradation. These results show that treatment of rats with papain can prevent passively transferred EAMG without any apparent harm to the animals, and suggest a potential therapeutic use for proteolytic enzymes in myasthenia gravis. PMID:10792389

  9. Myasthenia gravis and thymic neoplasms: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common mediastinal tumor. They have varied presentation ranging from asymptomatic incidental mediastinal masses to locally extensive tumor with compressive symptoms and distant metastases. They have frequent association with various paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). The most common PNS associated with thymoma is myasthenia gravis (MG). Patients of thymoma with MG have a favourable outcome due to early disclosure of the disease. Histologically they are classified into five subtypes and Masaoka-Koga staging system is used for staging. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy play an important role along with anti-myasthenia drugs. This review would like to highlight the association of thymoma with MG and associated clinical and therapeutic issues. PMID:26677446

  10. Effectiveness of steroid treatment in myasthenia gravis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cosi, V; Citterio, A; Lombardi, M; Piccolo, G; Romani, A; Erbetta, A

    1991-07-01

    The records of 142 patients with generalized autoimmune myasthenia gravis who had been treated with steroids as the single immunosuppressive agent, collected at regular intervals, were employed for a retrospective evaluation. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed after 24 months; the data from the 6th and 12th months were also considered. After 24 months, 63.4% of the whole sample had improved (33.8% were in clinical or pharmacological remission); 13.4% were unchanged or had worsened and 22.3% had moved to a different immunosuppressive treatment. The rate of positive outcome was higher in patients over the age of 40 at disease onset. PMID:1927259

  11. Myasthenia gravis: determinants for independent ventilation after transsternal thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Younger, D S; Braun, N M; Jaretzki, A; Penn, A S; Lovelace, R E

    1984-03-01

    We evaluated the respiratory function of 32 patients with myasthenia gravis who had transsternal thymectomy. Preoperative clinical, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle pressure data were submitted to stepwise logistic regression analysis to identify preoperative factors that correlated with duration of supported ventilation after surgery. Ten patients (31%) had postoperative supported ventilation for more than 3 days. The duration of ventilatory support correlated most closely with maximal static expiratory pressure (r = 0.714, p less than 0.001). Expiratory weakness, by reducing cough efficacy, seems to be the main determinant that predicts need for longer postoperative supported ventilation. PMID:6538272

  12. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  13. The value of computed tomography in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Muhm, J.R.; Sheedy, P.F. II; Unni, K.K.; Bernatz, P.E.; Hermann, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In a 5 year study, 19 patients with myasthenia gravis were studied by computed tomography (CT) and underwent thymectomy. CT was accurate in detecting the nine true thymic masses but could not differentiate thymomas from nonthymomatous masses, including thymic cysts. No thymoma was found in a patient under 25 years of age. In one case, the 18 sec scanner could not differentiate a large gland from a thymoma. In eight cases, glands with histologic thymic hyperplasia and histologically normal thymus appeared to be similar and could not be differentiated by CT.

  14. Acupuncture anesthesia in thymectomy on myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Dong, S T; Nguyen, V T; Nguyen, V T; Vu, T A; Pham, M H

    1988-01-01

    Thymectomy is often successful as treatment for the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. One complication of the operation on such patients is respiratory difficulty especially post-operatively, due to interference with the already disturbed transmission of signals along damaged nerve-endings. Acupuncture anesthesia offers a solution to that problem. In this series of 90 patients, the results of operation under conventional general anesthesia were compared with those under acupuncture anesthesia. It was found that patients in the latter group suffered fewer complications. PMID:2898196

  15. Myasthenia gravis mimicking stroke: a case series with sudden onset dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Giopato, Federico; Piatti, Maria Luisa; Rigamonti, Andrea; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by fluctuating fatigue of skeletal muscles, often involving extrinsic ocular or bulbar districts. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly is an under-recognized condition, sometimes confused with cerebrovascular disease. Here we present a case series of myasthenia patients which onset was characterized by sudden dysarthria, clearly raising this diagnostic dilemma. In the workout of sudden onset isolated dysarthria, MG should be always considered. In fact, even if myasthenia is a rare condition, lacunar stroke only with this clinical presentation is also unusual, and significant risks may arise (e.g., unexpected myasthenic crisis). PMID:25648108

  16. The Myotonic Plot Thickens: Electrical Myotonia in Antimuscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Marcus; Karakis, Ioannis; Harrison, Taylor B.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical myotonia is known to occur in a number of inherited and acquired disorders including myotonic dystrophies, channelopathies, and metabolic, toxic, and inflammatory myopathies. Yet, electrical myotonia in myasthenia gravis associated with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) has not been previously reported. We describe two such patients, both of whom had a typical presentation of proximal muscle weakness with respiratory failure in the context of a significant electrodecrement in repetitive nerve stimulation. In both cases, concentric needle examination revealed electrical myotonia combined with myopathic motor unit morphology and early recruitment. These findings suggest that MuSK myasthenia should be included within the differential diagnosis of disorders with electrical myotonia. PMID:26770848

  17. International consensus guidance for management of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Gil I.; Benatar, Michael; Evoli, Amelia; Gilhus, Nils E.; Illa, Isabel; Kuntz, Nancy; Massey, Janice M.; Melms, Arthur; Murai, Hiroyuki; Nicolle, Michael; Palace, Jacqueline; Richman, David P.; Verschuuren, Jan; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop formal consensus-based guidance for the management of myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: In October 2013, the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America appointed a Task Force to develop treatment guidance for MG, and a panel of 15 international experts was convened. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness methodology was used to develop consensus guidance statements. Definitions were developed for goals of treatment, minimal manifestations, remission, ocular MG, impending crisis, crisis, and refractory MG. An in-person panel meeting then determined 7 treatment topics to be addressed. Initial guidance statements were developed from literature summaries. Three rounds of anonymous e-mail votes were used to attain consensus on guidance statements modified on the basis of panel input. Results: Guidance statements were developed for symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatments, IV immunoglobulin and plasma exchange, management of impending and manifest myasthenic crisis, thymectomy, juvenile MG, MG associated with antibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase, and MG in pregnancy. Conclusion: This is an international formal consensus of MG experts intended to be a guide for clinicians caring for patients with MG worldwide. PMID:27358333

  18. Sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Oliveira, Ezequiel; Nacif, Sergio R; Alves Pereira, Nixon; Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jéssica Julioti; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; Cavalcante, Valéria; Santos Oliveira, Claudia; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Acary Sousa Bulle; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This systematic review evaluated the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myasthenia gravis and clarified the role of physiotherapy. [Subjects and Methods] We followed the PRISMA declaration criteria. The evaluation was performed in accordance with the STROBE statement for observational and cross-sectional studies and the CONSORT checklist for clinical trials. Searches were followed by hand on MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciELO, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. [Results] Our searches yielded a total of 36 studies published between 1970 and 2014. The number of patients involved ranged from 9-490. Of the 36 studies, 19 articles were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Therefore, 17 observational, cross-sectional, or clinical studies assessing the quality of sleep and prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis were eligible for our review. [Conclusion] Some studies of patients with MG show that patients with MG are associated with poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, presence of restless syndrome, and a higher incidence of SDB, while other studies do not report such associations. Therefore, given the current inconclusive evidence and limited literature, further study of sleep disturbances in patients with MG is needed. PMID:26180370

  19. Sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Oliveira, Ezequiel; Nacif, Sergio R.; Alves Pereira, Nixon; Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jéssica Julioti; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; Cavalcante, Valéria; Santos Oliveira, Claudia; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Acary Sousa Bulle; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This systematic review evaluated the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myasthenia gravis and clarified the role of physiotherapy. [Subjects and Methods] We followed the PRISMA declaration criteria. The evaluation was performed in accordance with the STROBE statement for observational and cross-sectional studies and the CONSORT checklist for clinical trials. Searches were followed by hand on MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciELO, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. [Results] Our searches yielded a total of 36 studies published between 1970 and 2014. The number of patients involved ranged from 9–490. Of the 36 studies, 19 articles were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Therefore, 17 observational, cross-sectional, or clinical studies assessing the quality of sleep and prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis were eligible for our review. [Conclusion] Some studies of patients with MG show that patients with MG are associated with poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, presence of restless syndrome, and a higher incidence of SDB, while other studies do not report such associations. Therefore, given the current inconclusive evidence and limited literature, further study of sleep disturbances in patients with MG is needed. PMID:26180370

  20. Strategies for Treating Autoimmunity Novel Insights from Experimental Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N.; Sheng, Jiarong; Li, Liangcheng; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2009-01-01

    Current treatments for myasthenia gravis (MG) rely upon the administration of immunosuppressive agents which result in global, nonspecific attenuation of the immune response. An alternative approach would be to attempt to design therapies that specifically dampen autoreactivity without affecting general immunity. Recently, dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to possess potent capabilities to tolerize T cells in an antigen-specific manner. We have observed that the selective activation of particular subsets of DCs utilizing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) had profound effects on the induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Specifically, treatment with GM-CSF effectively suppressed the induction of EAMG and down-modulated anti-AChR T cell and pathogenic antibody responses. These effects were associated with the activation of tolerogenic DCs, the enhanced production of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, and the mobilization of.CD4+ CD2S+ and FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We have further shown that GM-CSF effectively ameliorates clinical disease severity in mice with active, ongoing EAMG. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the selective activation of particular DC subsets in vivo using pharmacologic agents, like GM-CSF, can suppress ongoing anti-AChR immune responses by mobilizing antigen-specific Tregs capable of suppressing autoimmune MG. PMID:18567878

  1. Curcumin ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by diverse immune cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Li, Heng; Zhang, Min; Yue, Long-Tao; Wang, Cong-Cong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Ying; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-07-28

    Curcumin is a traditional Asian medicine with diverse immunomodulatory properties used therapeutically in the treatment of many autoimmune diseases. However, the effects of curcumin on myasthenia gravis (MG) remain undefined. Here we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of curcumin in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Our results demonstrated that curcumin ameliorated the clinical scores of EAMG, suppressed the expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) and MHC class II, down-regulated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α) and up-regulated the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, shifted the balance from Th1/Th17 toward Th2/Treg, and increased the numbers of NKR-P1(+) cells (natural killer cell receptor protein 1 positive cells, including NK and NKT cells). Moreover, the administration of curcumin promoted the differentiation of B cells into a subset of B10 cells, increased the anti-R97-166 peptide IgG1 levels and decreased the relative affinity indexes of anti-R97-116 peptide IgG. In summary, curcumin effectively ameliorate EAMG, indicating that curcumin may be a potential candidate therapeutic agent for MG. PMID:27181511

  2. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  3. Treatment of experimental myasthenia gravis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, S.; Blum, J.E.; McIntosh, K.R.; Order, S.; Drachman, D.B.

    1988-07-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been reported to be effective in the immunosuppressive treatment of certain human and experimental autoimmune disorders. We have investigated the effects of TLI in Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) produced by immunization with purified torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The radiation is given in 17 divided fractions of 200 rad each, and nonlymphoid tissues are protected by lead shielding. This technique suppresses the immune system, while minimizing side effects, and permits the repopulation of the immune system by the patient's own bone marrow cells. Our results show that TLI treatment completely prevented the primary antibody response to immunization with torpedo AChR, it rapidly abolished the ongoing antibody response in established EAMG, and it suppressed the secondary (anamnestic) response to a boost of AChR. No EAMG animals died during TLI treatment, compared with six control animals that died of EAMG. TLI produces powerful and prompt immunosuppression and may eventually prove useful in the treatment of refractory human myasthenia gravis.

  4. Anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis with prolonged remission.

    PubMed

    Bouwyn, Jean Paul; Magnier, Patrick; Bédat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Ahtoy, Patrick; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a rare disorder of neuromuscular transmission affecting preferentially bulbar, neck and respiratory muscles. We report the case of a 22-year-old man who presented with diplopia on lateral gaze to both sides, facial diplegia, nasal dysarthria and dysphagia. Repetitive nerve stimulation of the trapezius and orbicularis oculi muscles showed amplitude decrements of 19% and 41% respectively supporting the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. MUsK antibodies were positive. Corticosteroids were introduced and then tapered and discontinued at 6 months after initiation. The patient remained in remission and asymptomatic for 4 years without ongoing treatment or prior treatment with rituximab after this first relapse of MuSK-MG. MuSK- MG is considered a hard-to-treat condition and patients generally remain dependent on immunosuppression or prior treatment with rituximab. Our observation highlights that patients with MuSK-MG can have a benign course and that continued immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy may not always be required. PMID:27161384

  5. Development of myasthenia gravis after interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G; Morales, G; Aréchaga, O; Gállego, J

    1999-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) alpha is now used in the treatment of some malignant diseases and chronic viral hepatitis. There have been several reports of development of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases or the deterioration of preexisting disorders in patients under treatment. We enclose a case of myasthenia gravis (MG) which developed after six weeks of treatment as fluctuating bilateral ptosis, intermittent diplopia, and mild weakness of limb and neck muscles. A test dose of edrophonium chloride was administered, resulting in improved muscle strength. Elevated anti acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody titer was found. Single fiber electromyography showed an increased jitter from extensor digitorum communis, frequently accompanied by transmission blocking. Repetitive electric 3 Hz stimulation of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, revealed an abnormal decrement of 28% in compound motor action potential. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and the patient was given pyridostigmine, immunoglobulines and prednisone with benefit. Six months latter he developed an acute myasthenic crisis with severe respiratory failure and high anti AChR antibody titer. IFN-alpha can induce MG or simply manifests a preexisting subclinical disease, but otherwise its therapeutic efficacy in MG has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. Autoimmune mechanisms, as the release of different cytokines as IFN, by immunocompetent cells, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both MG and chronic active hepatitis. Autoantibody production against postsynaptic membrane structures by IFN-alpha could be the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:10207675

  6. Myasthenia Gravis Development and Crisis Subsequent to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  7. Association of myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kisabay, Aysin; Sari, Ummu Serpil; Boyaci, Recep; Batum, Melike; Yilmaz, Hikmet; Selcuki, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of neuromuscular junction due to auto-immune destruction of the acetylcholine receptors. Behçet's disease, on the other hand, is a multisystemic vascular-inflammatory disease. Both conditions are not common in the general population although their association has not been reported in the literature. We wanted to present our patient who developed clinical course of myasthenia gravis following discontinuation of medications due to complications of corticosteroid for Behçet's disease. It was observed that clinical findings of myasthenia gravis recovered following restarting steroid treatment and he did not experience attacks of both conditions. Although Myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease are distinct entities clinically as well as in terms of pathogenesis, they share common physiopathological features and their treatment is based on their common features. PMID:27375145

  8. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis for Meningioma Surgery - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V K; Agrawal, S; Ahmed, M; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of great challenge to the anesthesiologist, because it affects the neuromuscular junction. Anesthetic management involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. This case report documents the safe use of fentanyl, propofol and sevoflurane combination guided by bispectral index, without the use of muscle relaxants in a patient with myasthenia gravis who presented for meningioma surgery. PMID:26620756

  9. Unusual association of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myasthenia gravis: A dysregulation of the adaptive immune system?

    PubMed

    Del Mar Amador, Maria; Vandenberghe, Nadia; Berhoune, Nawel; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Gronier, Sophie; Delmont, Emilien; Desnuelle, Claude; Cintas, Pascal; Pittion, Sophie; Louis, Sarah; Demeret, Sophie; Lenglet, Timothée; Meininger, Vincent; Salachas, François; Pradat, Pierre-François; Bruneteau, Gaëlle

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting neuromuscular junctions that has been associated with a small increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we describe a retrospective series of seven cases with a concomitant diagnosis of ALS and myasthenia gravis, collected among the 18 French reference centers for ALS in a twelve year period. After careful review, only six patients strictly met the diagnostic criteria for both ALS and myasthenia gravis. In these patients, limb onset of ALS was reported in five (83%) cases. Localization of myasthenia gravis initial symptoms was ocular in three (50%) cases, generalized in two (33%) and bulbar in one (17%). Median delay between onset of the two conditions was 19 months (6-319 months). Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies testing was positive in all cases. All patients were treated with riluzole and one had an associated immune-mediated disease. In the one last ALS case, the final diagnosis was false-positivity for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. The co-occurrence of ALS and myasthenia gravis is rare and requires strict diagnostic criteria. Its demonstration needs thoughtful interpretation of electrophysiological results and exclusion of false positivity for myasthenia gravis antibody testing in some ALS cases. This association may be triggered by a dysfunction of adaptive immunity. PMID:27102004

  10. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis and dysautonomia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gajanayake, I; Niessen, S J M; Cherubini, G B; Shelton, G D

    2008-11-01

    A two-year-old male entire border collie dog was evaluated for a short history of mixed bowel diarrhoea, coughing, vomiting and stranguria. Physical examination revealed dyspnoea with increased ventral lung sounds and a flaccidly distended bladder. Neurological examination revealed poor pupillary light reflexes, an absent gag reflex and a poor anal tone. Thoracic radiography was consistent with megaoesophagus and aspiration pneumonia. Clinicopathological testing revealed an elevated muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody titre. The dog was euthanased because of clinical deterioration. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected immediately post-mortem revealed macrophagic pleocytosis. Post-mortem histopathological examination was consistent with dysautonomia. This is the first report of coexisting autoimmune myasthenia gravis and dysautonomia in a non-human species. The concomitant diseases may suggest a common immunopathological aetiology. PMID:18684149

  11. Unusual clinical behaviour of thymoma with recurrent myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Keditsu, Keduovinuo K; Karimundackal, George; Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Pramesh, C S

    2012-06-01

    A 58-year old man with thymoma and myasthenia gravis (MG) had undergone thymectomy 8 years ago with histopathologically confirmed non-invasive WHO-type AB thymoma. After 5 years of complete remission, symptoms of MG resurfaced, and a recurrent anterior mediastinal mass was detected for which he received radiotherapy. He presented to us 3 years later with productive cough and exertional dyspnoea; the positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan revealed a metabolically active pulmonary nodule in the right lung as the only site of disease for which a right lower lobectomy was done. Microscopy established an intrapulmonary WHO-type B2 thymoma and the patient is currently asymptomatic on steroids, anticholinesterase and immunosuppressant therapy. We discuss the variable and unpredictable course of thymomas; the possibility of transformation into more aggressive types with each recurrence, association with recurrent MG post-thymectomy and presentation several years later with metastatic disease. PMID:22378319

  12. Myasthenia gravis and invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases.

    PubMed

    Koç, Filiz; Yerdelen, Deniz; Sarica, Yakup

    2003-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease. Approximately 15% of patients with MG have thymoma. Approximately 30% to 40% of them are invasive. A 26-year-old man was admitted with cough and difficulty breathing. He had transsternal thymectomy resulting from MG accompanied by thymoma 6 years previously. Thorax computerized tomography (CT) scans showed metastases to the extra-mediastinum. Diagnosis of invasive thymoma was made by CT-guided biopsy. A PAC regimen (cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide) and radiotherapy were added to MG treatment. Ten months later, he presented again with headache, weakness, and difficulty swallowing. We determined that he had intracranial multiple metastases. He was hospitalized. Cerebral multiple metastases were evaluated as inoperable. However, he died of transtentorial herniation after 1 month. This MG case accompanied by invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases is discussed. PMID:19078711

  13. Myasthenia gravis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A pathogenic overlap.

    PubMed

    Gotaas, Håvard Torvik; Skeie, Geir Olve; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to examine potential joint disease mechanisms for myasthenia gravis (MG) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through the examination of long-term patient cohorts for comorbidity. Recent studies support early involvement of the neuromuscular junction in ALS patients with subsequent degeneration of motor neurons. Medical records at Haukeland University Hospital from 1987 to 2012 were examined for International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes for MG and ALS. Sera were re-tested for antibodies to acetylcholine receptor, titin, MuSK and GM1. We report one patient with both MG and ALS, and another 3 patients with suggestive evidence of both conditions. This is far more than expected from prevalence and incidence figures in this area if the disorders were unrelated. Our data suggest that immunological mechanisms in the neuromuscular junction are relevant in ALS pathogenesis. Attention should be given to possible therapeutic targets in the neuromuscular junction and muscle in ALS patients. PMID:27102003

  14. Elderly-onset familial myasthenia gravis in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Hirunagi, Tomoki; Tsujikawa, Koyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mano, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) occasionally occurs in a family, but elderly-onset (≥65 years) familial MG has been rarely reported. We here report the case of two siblings with elderly-onset MG (mean onset age: 72.5 years) and present the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles (HLA-A, -B, -DR) of their family. Both patients developed generalized MG with elevated serum acetylcholine receptor antibody titers at their seventies. Of six siblings, the two patients and one unaffected sibling shared the same HLA haplotypes. Our study indicates that elderly-onset MG can occur in a family and that familial occurrence of MG may be related to certain HLA alleles. PMID:27132121

  15. The search for new antigenic targets in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Judith; Belaya, Katsiaryna; Zoltowska, Katarzyna; Koneczny, Inga; Maxwell, Susan; Jacobson, Leslie; Leite, Maria Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Vincent, Angela; Beeson, David

    2012-12-01

    Around 80% of myasthenia gravis patients have antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor, and 0-60% of the remaining patients have antibodies against the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase, MuSK. Another recently identified antigen is low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4). To improve the existing assays and widen the search for new antigenic targets, we have employed cell-based assays in which candidate target proteins are expressed on the cell surface of transfected cells and probed with patient sera. These assays, combined with use of myotube cultures to explore the effects of the antibodies, enable us to begin to identify new antigenic targets and test antibody pathogenicity in vitro. PMID:23278587

  16. Animal models of myasthenia gravis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Renato; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Consonni, Alessandra; Baggi, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by the immune attack of the neuromuscular junction. Antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) induce receptor degradation, complement cascade activation, and postsynaptic membrane destruction, resulting in functional reduction in AChR availability. Besides anti-AChR antibodies, other autoantibodies are known to play pathogenic roles in MG. The experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) models have been of great help over the years in understanding the pathophysiological role of specific autoantibodies and T helper lymphocytes and in suggesting new therapies for prevention and modulation of the ongoing disease. EAMG can be induced in mice and rats of susceptible strains that show clinical symptoms mimicking the human disease. EAMG models are helpful for studying both the muscle and the immune compartments to evaluate new treatment perspectives. In this review, we concentrate on recent findings on EAMG models, focusing on their utility and limitations. PMID:27019601

  17. Extracorporeal Immunoglobulin Elimination for the Treatment of Severe Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Blaha, M.; Pit'ha, J.; Blaha, V.; Lanska, M.; Maly, J.; Filip, S.; Langrova, H.

    2010-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder leading to fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. Rarely, long-term stabilization is not possible through the use of thymectomy or any known drug therapy. We present our experience with extracorporeal immunoglobulin (Ig) elimination by immunoadsorption (adsorbers with human Ig antibodies). Acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChRAs) were measured during long-term monitoring (4.7 ± 2.9 years; range 1.1–8.0). A total of 474 samples (232 pairs) were analyzed, and a drop in AChRA levels was observed (P = .025). The clinical status of patients improved and stabilized. Roughly 6.8% of patients experienced clinically irrelevant side effects. The method of Ig elimination by extracorporeal immunoadsorption (IA) is a clinical application of the recent biotechnological advances. It offers an effective and safe therapy for severe MG even when the disease is resistant to standard therapy. PMID:20300435

  18. Neuromyelitis optica and myasthenia gravis in a young Nigerian girl.

    PubMed

    Balarabe, Salisu Abdullahi; Adamu, Mohammad Dantani; Watila, Musa Mamman; Jiya, Nma

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are rare autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of the two disorders, although rare, has been documented. This is a case report of a 16-year-old student who presented with recurrent episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis, 8 years after diagnosis of MG. She presented with visual impairment, relapsing and remitting weakness, numbness and paraesthesia of her lower limbs, with bladder and bowel incontinence. Her examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy, spastic paraparesis of the lower limbs and patchy sensory loss up to thoracic level (T4-5). She had a positive acetylcholine receptor antibody, a positive aquaporin-4 antibody and chest CT finding of thymic enlargement. We therefore confirmed the previous diagnosis of MG and performed a recent diagnosis of background NMO. A high index of suspicion is needed to make a diagnosis of this rare coexistence of NMO and MG in resource-limited settings such as Nigeria. PMID:26338241

  19. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Myasthenia Gravis: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Chogtu, Bharti; Malik, Daliparty Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fibrosing lung condition with high morbidity and mortality, accounting for about 25% of the cases of interstitial lung diseases. It usually has a progressive course resulting in death due to respiratory failure. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease, caused by antibody mediated activity against acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. It is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. Extensive literature search did not reveal any case report of an association between these two conditions. Here we present a case of a patient with IPF who also developed MG. The diagnosis of IPF was based on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) of the lung and that of MG was based on clinical criteria and electrophysiological testing. The case was successfully managed. PMID:27190866

  20. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Myasthenia Gravis: An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Chogtu, Bharti; Malik, Daliparty Vasudev; Magazine, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fibrosing lung condition with high morbidity and mortality, accounting for about 25% of the cases of interstitial lung diseases. It usually has a progressive course resulting in death due to respiratory failure. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease, caused by antibody mediated activity against acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. It is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. Extensive literature search did not reveal any case report of an association between these two conditions. Here we present a case of a patient with IPF who also developed MG. The diagnosis of IPF was based on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) of the lung and that of MG was based on clinical criteria and electrophysiological testing. The case was successfully managed. PMID:27190866

  1. Genetic basis of myasthenia gravis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Miller, Ariel

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against proteins of the postsynaptic membrane in the neuromuscular junction. The estimated number of MG patients is steadily increasing, and it had more than doubled in the last 20 years. Monozygotic MG twin concordance is estimated to be about 35% supporting the central role of environmental factors in MG etiology. Epigenetics, presume to be the mechanistic link between environmental and genetic risk factors in disease development, provides support for specific microRNAs associated with MG. Genetic studies have mainly pointed at specific HLA alleles implicated in MG susceptibility, however recently both TNFAIP3-interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) and tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22) were indicated to be associated with MG in a GWAS study. A gender bias was observed for SNPs in the HLA-locus, suggesting female-specific alleles have an increase risk for MG. Moreover, sex hormones play a pivotal role in the gender bias in autoimmunity in general and in MG in particular. Hence the genetic basis of gender bias might be highly pertinent to MG and deserves further characterization. Pathway-based analyses that combine information across multiple genes into a limited number of molecular networks have been found to be a powerful approach. Both regulatory T-cell (Treg) differentiation and NF-κB signaling pathway have been shown to have relevance to MG pathophysiology. Hence studies centered around two pathways might be a fruitful approach to identify additional polymorphisms associated with myasthenia gravis. PMID:24361103

  2. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic evaluation of childhood myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHI-XIAO; XU, KAI-LI; XIONG, HUI

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics, classification and treatment of childhood myasthenia gravis (MG) and address the prognosis through follow-up. The clinical data of 135 children with MG were grouped according to clinical type and therapeutic drugs, retrospectively analyzed and prospectively monitored. Of the 135 MG patients, 85.2% had type I (ocular type), with only 4.2% progressing to systemic MG; 13.4% had type II (general type); and 1.5% had type III (fulminating type). Relapse occurred in 46.1% of the 102 patients that were followed up. The positive rate for the primary acetylcholine receptor antibody was 40.19%, without significant differences among clinical subtypes. The positive rate of the repetitive nerve stimulation frequency test by electromyography was 37.97%. Decreased expression of CD4+, CD8+, or CD3+ was present in 71% of the patients. Thymic hyperplasia was present in 5.93% of the patients, while 1.48% had thymoma. Steroid treatment was effective in the majority of the patients. Ocular type MG was common in this cohort of patients. The incidence and mortality of myasthenia crisis were low, the presence of concurrent thymoma was rare and only a limited number of children developed neurological sequelae. PMID:25780436

  3. Caudal epidural anesthesia for a 2-year old child with congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Calişkan, Esra; Koçum, Aysu; Sener, Mesut; Bozdoğan, Nesrin; Ariboğan, Aniş

    2008-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. Anesthetists have a special interest in myasthenia gravis because of its interaction with various anesthetic agents. Unlike adult myasthenic patients; very little report has been written about the anesthetic management in children, other than in relation to thymectomy. Although the use of caudal anesthesia in pediatric patients is common, have not seen any report concerning its use in a myasthenic child. In this case report, we represented a 2 year-old boy was performed caudal anesthesia for orchiopexy operation. He had presented difficulty in breathing, generalized weakness and droopy eyes due to congenital myasthenia gravis. In the operating room, following the routine monitoring, the patient was sedated with intravenous 1mg midazolam and 10 mg ketamine. Then caudal block was performed. 17 minutes later from the local anesthetic injection; operation was started and lasted 45 minutes. The patient did not require intraoperative supplemental analgesia and postoperative course was uneventful. Specific attention should be paid to voluntary and respiratory muscle strength in myasthenia gravis patients. Caudal anesthesia allowed airway control of myasthenia gravis patients without endotracheal intubations and muscle relaxant. In conclusion, we think that caudal anesthetic technique may be considered as a safe and suitable for the myasthenic child and it may represent a valid alternative to general anesthesia for these patients. PMID:19117157

  4. Fusion protein of single-chain variable domain fragments for treatment of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fangfang; Meng, Fanping; Jin, Quanxin; Sun, Changyuan; Li, Yingxin; Li, Honghua; Jin, Songzhu

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable domain fragment (scFv) 637 is an antigen-specific scFv of myasthenia gravis. In this study, scFv and human serum albumin genes were conjugated and the fusion protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. The affinity of scFv-human serum albumin fusion protein to bind to acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of human intercostal muscles was detected by immunofluorescence staining. The ability of the fusion protein to block myasthenia gravis patient sera binding to acetylcholine receptors and its stability in healthy serum were measured by competitive ELISA. The results showed that the inhibition rate was 2.0-77.4%, and the stability of fusion protein in static healthy sera was about 3 days. This approach suggests the scFv-human serum albumin is a potential candidate for specific immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis. PMID:25206900

  5. Myasthenia gravis: a careful perioperative anesthetic management of coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Michał; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Stachurska, Katarzyna; Fijałkowska, Anna; Stążka, Janusz

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, even hazardous cardiac surgery can be performed on patients with autoimmune diseases like myasthenia gravis. It requires a sensitive perioperative anesthetic approach especially in relation to nondepolarizing muscle relaxant administration. Myasthenic patients produce antibodies against the end-plate acetylcholine receptors causing muscle weakness and sensitivity to nondepolarizing muscle relaxants that could lead to respiratory failure. Perioperative nurse care is critical for uncomplicated course of treatment; therefore, apprehension of surgical procedure should be helpful on an everyday basis. We describe successful management without any pulmonary complications of two patients with myasthenia gravis undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. In addition, antiacetylcholine receptor antibodies concentrations were evaluated during treatment time. In conclusion, we have found that reduced titrated doses of cisatracurium may be safely used in patients with myasthenia gravis undergoing cardiac surgery without anesthesia and respiratory-related complications. PMID:25943997

  6. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  7. Subcostal thoracoscopic extended thymectomy for patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Ou, Zhu-An; Liao, Ming; Xuan, Yiwen; Su, Kai; Xu, En-Wu; Xiao, Haiping; Peng, Xiufan; Zhang, Zhuohua; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Extended thymectomy is indicated for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) when drug-resistance or dependence is seen. We have employed a technique for subcostal thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (STET) on patients with MG. Methods Clinical data of 15 eligible patients who underwent STET in our department from February 2015 to November 2015 by the same surgical team were retrospectively analyzed. The operation time, blood loss, duration of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage periods were concerned. Results All the surgeries were finished successfully without conversion to sternotomy. Mean operation time was 157.53±40.31 min (range, 73–275 min). Mean blood loss was 56.33±7.07 mL (range, 10–200 mL). Mean pleural drainage volume in the first 24 hours was 72.67±17.68 mL (range, 0–250 mL). Mean postoperative thoracic drainage periods were 1.20±0.71 days (range, 0–3 days). Mean duration of postoperative hospital stay was 6.13±0.71 days (range, 3–22 days). Conclusions This procedure showed satisfactory results for patients with MG. Moreover, the STET approach is more easily for surgeons to fully reveal the bilateral phrenic nerve and the upper thymic poles. We believe that STET is a satisfactory procedure for performing extended thymectomy in well selected patients. PMID:27076946

  8. Complications of radiologic contrast in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Mehrizi, Mehyar; Pascuzzi, Robert M

    2014-09-01

    Use of older contrast agents during radiologic imaging in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) has been associated with increased myasthenic symptoms and adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The effects of newer contrast agents have not been determined. A retrospective review of imaging safety in MG was conducted. Three hundred fifty-four imaging studies were analyzed. Procedures included 189 computed tomography (CT) images with and 106 without intravenous (IV) contrast and 42 magnetic resonance images (MRIs) with and 17 without contrast. In 108 patients for whom there was formal documentation of presence or absence of an immediate adverse response, only 1 who received CT IV contrast had an ADR (rate 0.93%). No ADRs or weakness were reported in patients who received MRI IV contrast. Our data suggest there is no significant immediate increased risk of myasthenic weakness with the use of modern radiologic contrast agents. The rate of ADRs in MG patients who receive CT IV contrast is now very low (0.93%). PMID:24677227

  9. Treatment of myasthenia gravis with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Cosi, V; Lombardi, M; Piccolo, G; Erbetta, A

    1991-08-01

    We treated 37 patients affected by autoimmune generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) with high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin (HDIVIg), 400 mg/kg per day on 5 consecutive days. A one-degree improvement of Oosterhuis global clinical classification of myasthenic severity (OGCCMS), the disappearance of bulbar involvement or both were recorded 12 days after the beginning of the treatment in 70.3% of the patients and persisted up to 60 days in 58.7%. A two-degree improvement of OGCCMS was recorded in 54.1% of the patients and it was maintained up to 60 days in 37.8%. The percentage of improvement did not significantly differ between patients entering the treatment in a long-standing, drug-refractory stationary phase of the illness (n = 26) and patients who received HDIVIg in an acute phase of MG (n = 11). None of the patients experienced side effects. Our data indicates that HDIVIg is an interesting, virtually riskless therapeutic choice for MG patients, and allows the planning of a controlled trial versus plasma-exchange. PMID:1950455

  10. Myasthenia gravis - autoantibody characteristics and their implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Skeie, Geir Olve; Romi, Fredrik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies that target the neuromuscular junction, leading to muscle weakness and fatigability. Currently available treatments for the disease include symptomatic pharmacological treatment, immunomodulatory drugs, plasma exchange, thymectomy and supportive therapies. Different autoantibody patterns and clinical manifestations characterize different subgroups of the disease: early-onset MG, late-onset MG, thymoma MG, muscle-specific kinase MG, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 MG, seronegative MG, and ocular MG. These subtypes differ in terms of clinical characteristics, disease pathogenesis, prognosis and response to therapies. Patients would, therefore, benefit from treatment that is tailored to their disease subgroup, as well as other possible disease biomarkers, such as antibodies against cytoplasmic muscle proteins. Here, we discuss the different MG subtypes, the sensitivity and specificity of the various antibodies involved in MG for distinguishing between these subtypes, and the value of antibody assays in guiding optimal therapy. An understanding of these elements should be useful in determining how to adapt existing therapies to the requirements of each patient. PMID:27103470

  11. Changes in inflammatory cytokine networks in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kanai, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Oda, Fumiko; Himuro, Keiichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmunological inflammatory disorder of the neuromuscular junction. Inflammation could be a key player for understanding the pathogenesis of MG. We measured the serum levels of 24 inflammatory cytokines in 43 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG and 25 healthy controls. In patients with MG, serum levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), IL-19, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly increased as compared with controls (p < 0.05). Among them, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly decreased after treatment (p < 0.05). In clinical subtype analyses, APRIL and IL-20 were increased in patients with late-onset MG and IL-28A levels were increased in patients with thymoma-associated MG compared with healthy controls (p < 0.01). The results of the present study demonstrate both anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines are upregulated in MG, reflecting the importance of cytokine-mediated inflammation and its regulation in MG pathophysiology. PMID:27172995

  12. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  13. Changes in inflammatory cytokine networks in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kanai, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Oda, Fumiko; Himuro, Keiichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmunological inflammatory disorder of the neuromuscular junction. Inflammation could be a key player for understanding the pathogenesis of MG. We measured the serum levels of 24 inflammatory cytokines in 43 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG and 25 healthy controls. In patients with MG, serum levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), IL-19, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly increased as compared with controls (p < 0.05). Among them, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly decreased after treatment (p < 0.05). In clinical subtype analyses, APRIL and IL-20 were increased in patients with late-onset MG and IL-28A levels were increased in patients with thymoma-associated MG compared with healthy controls (p < 0.01). The results of the present study demonstrate both anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines are upregulated in MG, reflecting the importance of cytokine-mediated inflammation and its regulation in MG pathophysiology. PMID:27172995

  14. A study of the utility of azathioprine metabolite testing in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rae, William; Burke, Georgina; Pinto, Ashwin

    2016-04-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterised by fatigable voluntary skeletal muscle weakness. The underlying pathogenesis is complex involving adaptive autoimmune responses. Azathioprine remains a first line broad acting immunosuppressant for MG. Due to varied clinical responses to azathioprine we aimed to investigate the relationship between azathioprine metabolites and symptom control. Mild correlations between Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score (QMG) vs. 6-thioguanine nucleotides (R=-0.317 p=0.186) and QMG vs. lymphocyte count (R=0.402 p=0.08) were found. Azathioprine metabolite measurement should be considered in MG patients with; pancytopenia, deranged liver function or recurrent infections. PMID:27049566

  15. Immunological relationship between acetylcholine receptor and thymus: a possible significance in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Aharonov, A; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Abramsky, O; Fuchs, S

    1975-01-01

    A defined immunological cross-reaction was observed between acetylcholine receptor fraction from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, and two calf thymus fractions. The cross-reaction was demonstrated on the cellular level by means of the lymphocyte transformation technique, and on the humoral level, by means of the microcomplement fixation assay. In the human disease myasthenia gravis both acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction and the thymus are affected, probably by an autoimmune mechanism. The immunological cross-reaction between acetylcholine receptor and thymic components may explain the association between endplate and thymus disorders in myasthenia gravis. PMID:1055418

  16. Diagnosis of Tensilon-Negative Ocular Myasthenia Gravis By Daily Selfie.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Elan L; Botelho, James V; Horton, Jonathan C

    2016-09-01

    The initial symptoms of myasthenia gravis are usually ptosis and diplopia. The diagnosis is often confirmed by testing for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies or by observing the effects of intravenous edrophonium (Tensilon) injection. However, these standard tests may be negative in patients with isolated ocular findings. We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with negative serologic and Tensilon testing. She was asked to photograph herself daily. The resulting sequence of daily selfies captured striking fluctuations in her ocular alignment and ptosis. Daily selfies may be a useful strategy for confirming the clinical diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis. PMID:27529328

  17. Future perspectives in target-specific immunotherapies of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-11-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by complement-fixing antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChR); antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper (Th) 17+ cells are essential in antibody production. Target-specific therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed against antibodies, B cells, complement and molecules associated with T cell signaling. Even though the progress in the immunopathogenesis of the disease probably exceeds any other autoimmune disorder, MG is still treated with traditional drugs or procedures that exert a non-antigen specific immunosuppression or immunomodulation. Novel biological agents currently on the market, directed against the following molecular pathways, are relevant and specific therapeutic targets that can be tested in MG: (a) T cell intracellular signaling molecules, such as anti-CD52, anti-interleukin (IL) 2 receptors, anti- costimulatory molecules, and anti-Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK3) that block the intracellular cascade associated with T-cell activation; (b) B cells and their trophic factors, directed against key B-cell molecules; (c) complement C3 or C5, intercepting the destructive effect of complement-fixing antibodies; (d) cytokines and cytokine receptors, such as those targeting IL-6 which promotes antibody production and IL-17, or the p40 subunit of IL-12/1L-23 that affect regulatory T cells; and (e) T and B cell transmigration molecules associated with lymphocyte egress from the lymphoid organs. All drugs against these molecular pathways require testing in controlled trials, although some have already been tried in small case series. Construction of recombinant AChR antibodies that block binding of the pathogenic antibodies, thereby eliminating complement and antibody-depended-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are additional novel molecular tools that require exploration in experimental MG. PMID:26600875

  18. Tacrolimus for myasthenia gravis: a clinical study of 212 patients.

    PubMed

    Ponseti, José M; Gamez, Josep; Azem, Jamal; López-Cano, Manuel; Vilallonga, Ramón; Armengol, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Tacrolimus is a macrolide T cell immunomodulator that is used in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients to affect muscle contraction (ryanodine receptor by modulating intracellular calcium-release channels and increasing muscular strength), glucocorticoid receptors (increasing intracellular concentration of steroids and blocking the steroid export mechanism), and an increase in T cell apoptosis. In this study, we report the results of low-dose tacrolimus (0.1 mg/kg/day) treatment in 212 MG patients. There were 110 thymectomized, cyclosporine- and prednisone-dependent patients; 68 thymectomized patients who started tacrolimus early postoperatively (24 h after operation); and 34 patients over 60 years old with nonthymomatous generalized MG or in whom thymectomy was contraindicated. The mean follow-up time was 49.3 +/- 18.1 months. Muscular strength showed an increase of 23% after 1 month of treatment and 29% at the end of the study. The acetylcholine receptor antibodies decreased significantly from a mean of 33.5 nmol/L at base line to 7.8 nmol/L at the final visit. In the thymectomy group with combined prednisone and tacrolimus stratified by histology of the thymus, the mean probability to attain complete stable remission at 5 years was 80.8% in patients with hyperplasia, 48.1% in thymic involution, and 9.3% in patients with thymoma. In 4.9% of patients, tacrolimus was withdrawn because of major adverse effects. Our results suggest that a low dose of tacrolimus is effective for MG and could be included to the armamentarium for this autoimmune disease. The present results should be interpreted considering the limitations of a retrospective clinical study. Confirmation of these results in randomized studies is desirable. PMID:18096852

  19. Future perspectives in target-specific immunotherapies of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by complement-fixing antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChR); antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper (Th) 17+ cells are essential in antibody production. Target-specific therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed against antibodies, B cells, complement and molecules associated with T cell signaling. Even though the progress in the immunopathogenesis of the disease probably exceeds any other autoimmune disorder, MG is still treated with traditional drugs or procedures that exert a non-antigen specific immunosuppression or immunomodulation. Novel biological agents currently on the market, directed against the following molecular pathways, are relevant and specific therapeutic targets that can be tested in MG: (a) T cell intracellular signaling molecules, such as anti-CD52, anti-interleukin (IL) 2 receptors, anti- costimulatory molecules, and anti-Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK3) that block the intracellular cascade associated with T-cell activation; (b) B cells and their trophic factors, directed against key B-cell molecules; (c) complement C3 or C5, intercepting the destructive effect of complement-fixing antibodies; (d) cytokines and cytokine receptors, such as those targeting IL-6 which promotes antibody production and IL-17, or the p40 subunit of IL-12/1L-23 that affect regulatory T cells; and (e) T and B cell transmigration molecules associated with lymphocyte egress from the lymphoid organs. All drugs against these molecular pathways require testing in controlled trials, although some have already been tried in small case series. Construction of recombinant AChR antibodies that block binding of the pathogenic antibodies, thereby eliminating complement and antibody-depended-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are additional novel molecular tools that require exploration in experimental MG. PMID:26600875

  20. An unexpected difficult intubation in a patient with myasthenia gravis undergoing video-assisted transcervical thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Nadia; Celestre, Chiara; Borrata, Francesco; Migliore, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Although there are different methods to evaluate predictive parameters of difficult intubation in apparently normal patients, sometimes this event is unpredictable.We herein report a clinical case of difficult intubation during anaesthesia for video-assisted thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis. PMID:23749836

  1. Algaemia due to Prototheca wickerhamii in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Mohabeer, A J; Kaplan, P J; Southern, P M; Gander, R M

    1997-01-01

    Prototheca wickerhamii is a rare cause of systemic infection in humans. While some cases occur in previously healthy individuals, others are associated with a variety of preexisting diseases. Here we present, for the first time, a case of P. wickerhamii algaemia in a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B. PMID:9399541

  2. Disability and Functional Profiles of Patients with Myasthenia Gravis Measured with ICF Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonardi, Matilde; Raggi, Alberto; Antozzi, Carlo; Confalonieri, Paolo; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Mantegazza, Renato

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe functional profiles of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and the relationships among symptoms, activities and environmental factors (EF), by using WHO's International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF). Patients were consecutively enrolled at the Besta Institute of Milan, Italy.…

  3. Inhibitory effect of alpha-fetoprotein on the binding of myasthenia gravis antibody to acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, T; Beyth, Y; Abramsky, O

    1980-01-01

    The binding of myasthenia gravis antibody acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) as measured in vitro by Radioimmunoassay with 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), can be blocked by amniotic fluid, maternal serum, and umbilical cord serum. This inhibitory effect is due to alpha-fetoprotein present in high concentrations in amniotic fluid and serum, as shown by: (i) selective removal of several components from amniotic fluid and serum; (ii) selective addition of different components present in amniotic fluid and serum, including alpha-fetoprotein, to be radioimmunoassay; (iii) correlation between the inhibitory effect of both amniotic fluid and serum and between the amounts of alpha-fetoprotein they contain; (iv) blocking of the alpha-fetoprotein in vitro suggests a similar effect in vivo in pregnant women with myasthenia gravis. This effect may explain in part the variability in the development of neonatal myasthenia gravis in the babies, due to transplacental transfer of maternal anti-AcChoR antibody, only after delivery and only in the minority of the cases. It also may explain the appearnace of remissions in females with myasthenia gravis during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Similar phenomena observed during pregnancy in other autoimmune and immunopathogenic diseases also might be attributed to activity of alpha-fetoprotein. PMID:6158053

  4. Single fibre electromyographic studies in myasthenia gravis with repetitive nerve stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M S; Stålberg, E

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for repetitive stimulation studies in myasthenia gravis using submaximal stimulation and single muscle fibre recording techniques. It was found that there were no impulse blockings due to neuromuscular transmission factors in normal subjects with 2 Hz stimulation, although there was a decrease or increase in the number of potentials which was caused by axonal stimulation factors. In myasthenia gravis a pathological picture was obtained, consisting of impulse blockings and facilitation at this rate in all of the eight patients studied, even those with only the ocular form of myasthenia and without surface decrement in the ADM. This technique allows study of both the minimally involved motor endplates and those with pronounced neuromuscular disturbances. Images PMID:1159439

  5. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Myasthenia Gravis: A Review of the Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballal, Megana; Straker, Tracey

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis, a disorder of neuromuscular transmission, presents a unique challenge to the perioperative anesthetic management of morbidly obese patients. This report describes the case of a 27-year-old morbidly obese woman with a past medical history significant for myasthenia gravis and fatty liver disease undergoing bariatric surgery. Anesthesia was induced with intravenous agents and maintained with an inhalational and balanced intravenous technique. The nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker Cisatracurium was chosen so that no reversal agents were given. Neostigmine was not used to antagonize the effects of Cisatracurium. The goal of this approach was to reduce the risk of complications such as postoperative mechanical ventilation. The anesthetic and surgical techniques used resulted in an uneventful hospital course. Therefore, we can minimize perioperative risks and complications by adjusting the anesthetic plan based on the patient's physiology and comorbidities as well as the pharmacology of the drugs. PMID:26294914

  6. Myasthenia gravis and congenital myasthenic syndromes in dogs and cats: A history and mini-review.

    PubMed

    Shelton, G Diane

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission in which muscle weakness results from an autoantibody mediated depletion of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Myasthenia gravis occurs spontaneously in dogs and cats, and as in human MG, an autoimmune response against nicotinic AChRs has been demonstrated and autoantibodies against AChRs implicated in the pathogenesis. While both species are affected with MG, there are distinct differences in clinical presentations and frequency of spontaneous remission. Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are hereditary disorders of neuromuscular transmission resulting in structural or functional defects of the neuromuscular junction. The clinical presentation and pathogenesis of a CMS in Jack Russell terriers was first described in the 1970's and 1980s and has since been reported in a few other breeds. Mutations have been reported in CHRNE, COLQ and CHAT in canine CMS. A form of COLQ deficient CMS has recently been reported in cats. PMID:27080328

  7. New onset of myasthenia gravis 10 years after proton beam therapy for thymoma.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-Ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Kikuchi, Yoshinao; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Igaki, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-05-01

    A 36-year-old woman underwent proton beam therapy for encapsulated type B1 thymoma for curative intent at 66 GyE. Radiographically partial response was achieved. Although the tumor size had been stable since that time, she developed systemic myasthenia gravis 10 years after the proton therapy. Extended thymectomy was performed. There were no adhesions between the tumor and the pericardium, and there were no adhesions also between the tumor and the sternum, probably due to the favor of Bragg peak effect. Extensive hyalinization with small foci of viable tumor cells showing degenerated type A-like morphology was observed in the resected tumor. Whether the viable cells represented recurrence with degenerative changes or de novo tumor formation was unable to be determined, and whether the viable cells were responsible for the onset of myasthenia gravis remained unclear. PMID:25301055

  8. Association of HLA-Bw46DR9 combination with juvenile myasthenia gravis in Chinese.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W H; Chiu, H C; Hseih, R P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and fifty two Chinese patients with myasthenia gravis in Taiwan were investigated for HLA-A, B, C and DR/DQ typing. HLA-Bw46 and DR9 frequencies were significantly increased in patients compared with the control group, and there was a decrease in DR3. Further analysis between different subgroups of patients showed Bw46 and DR9 were more significantly increased in the juvenile group than in the adult group. No single HLA allele was associated with either clinical type or thymic pathology, but there was an excess of BW46DR9 combination in both juvenile and ocular type patients. The Chinese population with myasthenia gravis is characterised by earlier age at onset, more ocular forms and less clinically severe illness than in whites, and these characteristics indicate a special subgroup that correlates with the strong Bw46DR9 association. PMID:8482958

  9. Memory in myasthenia gravis: neuropsychological tests of central cholinergic function before and after effective immunologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Glennerster, A; Palace, J; Warburton, D; Oxbury, S; Newsom-Davis, J

    1996-04-01

    There are reports of central cholinergic deficits in myasthenia gravis (MG) describing impaired performance on a variety of tests of memory with varying benefits from plasmapheresis. We tested 11 patients with symptomatic MG at the start of a trial of immunosuppressive treatment (prednisolone plus azathioprine or placebo) and again when in remission. The tests included the Logical Memory and Design Reproduction parts of the Wechsler Memory Scale, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Peterson-Peterson task, and an auditory vigilance task. Muscle strength improved significantly over the period of treatment, but overall performance on tests of memory or attention did not. These results fail to substantiate reports of functionally significant and reversible central deficits in myasthenia gravis. PMID:8780106

  10. Muscle-Specific Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (MuSK) Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Rebecca L; Gooch, Clifton L

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is the prototypic, antibody-mediated neuromuscular disease and is characterized by a decrease in the number of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) within the muscle end plate zone of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although the pathophysiology of AChR-mediated myasthenia gravis has been extensively studied over the last 40 years since its original description by Patrick and Lindstrom (Science 180:871-872, 1973), less is known about the much more recently described muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) antibody-mediated MG. MuSK-MG has features clinically distinct from Ach-R MG, as well as a different pattern of response to treatment and a unique immunopathogenesis. PMID:27170368

  11. Myasthenia gravis as a 'stroke mimic'--it's all in the history.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Saiffuddin; Ul-Haq, Mian Ayaz; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-12-01

    An 85-year-old man presented to hospital as an emergency having difficulties with swallowing and speech. In the emergency department, he was assessed as having acute onset dysphagia and dysarthria in keeping with an acute stroke. Subsequently, it became apparent that although the symptoms were indeed of relatively acute onset, there was a clear description by the patient of fatigability and diurnal variation, prompting a working clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The patient followed a turbulent clinical course, and interpretation of investigation results proved not to be straightforward in the acute setting. Myasthenia gravis is an uncommon disorder but it is more common in the elderly. This case provides key learning points, particularly highlighting the value of prompt, accurate clinical assessment and the importance of adhering to the clinical diagnostic formulation. PMID:25468851

  12. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Therapy in the Chronic Management of Myasthenia Gravis: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, P. R.; Pringle, C. E.; Cameron, W.; Cowan, J.; Chardon, J. Warman

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin therapy has become a major treatment option in several autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. For patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been used for both crisis and chronic management. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulins (SCIg), which offer the advantage of home administration, may be a practical and effective option in chronic management of MG. We analyzed clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction in nine cases of chronic disabling MG who were either transitioned to, or started de novo on SCIg. Methods and Findings This was a retrospective cohort study for the period of 2015–2016, with a mean follow-up period of 6.8 months after initiation of SCIg. All patients with MG treated with SCIg at the Ottawa Hospital, a large Canadian tertiary hospital with subspecialty expertise in neuromuscular disorders were included, regardless of MG severity, clinical subtype and antibody status. The primary outcome was MG disease activity after SCIg initiation. This outcome was measured by 1) the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) clinical classification, and 2) subjective scales of disease activity including the Myasthenia Gravis activities of daily living profile (MG-ADL), Myasthenia Gravis Quality-of-life (MG-QOL 15), Visual Analog (VA) satisfaction scale. We also assessed any requirement for emergency department visits or hospitalizations. Safety outcomes included any SCIg related complication. All patients were stable or improved for MGFA class after SCIg initiation. Statistically significant improvements were documented in the MG-ADL, MG-QOL and VAS scales. There were no exacerbations after switching therapy and no severe SCIg related complications. Conclusions SCIg may be a beneficial therapy in the chronic management of MG, with favorable clinical outcome and patient satisfaction results. PMID:27490101

  13. [Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin in a patient with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, M; Caiffi, S; De Franceschi, T; Dodero, C; Durante, R; Faletti, P; Rebuttato, A; Schivo, A; Tassara, R

    2002-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin commonly seen in the elderly on the head, neck and extremities, with a predisposition for local regional and distant spreading. A case of Merkel cell carcinoma occurred in a woman treated with immunosuppressive therapy for myasthenia gravis, is described and the possibility of a link between the immunosuppressive and/or oncogenic therapy and this tumor is suggested. PMID:12094153

  14. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications.

    PubMed

    Papachatzakis, Y; Tseliou, E; Tatouli, I; Dialoupi, I; Michas, F; Papadopoulou, E; Kousouris, D; Kontogiannis, S; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  15. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Papachatzakis, Y.; Tatouli, I.; Dialoupi, I.; Michas, F.; Papadopoulou, E.; Kousouris, D.; Dimopoulos, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  16. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  17. Successful treatment of severe myasthenia gravis developed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with plasma exchange and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Sag, Erdal; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Kesici, Selman; Bayrakci, Benan; Ayvaz, Deniz C; Tezcan, Ilhan; Yalnızoglu, Dilek; Uckan, Duygu

    2014-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is among the rare complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is usually associated with chronic GVHD. Herein, we report a 2-year and 10 months of age female with Griscelli syndrome, who developed severe myasthenia gravis at post-transplant +22nd month and required respiratory support with mechanical ventilation. She was unresponsive to cyclosporine A, methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and mycophenolate mofetil and the symptoms could only be controlled after plasma exchange and subsequent use of rituximab, in addition to cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil maintenance. She is currently asymptomatic on the 6th month of follow-up. PMID:24307660

  18. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, William D; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms. PMID:27408701

  19. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William D.; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms. PMID:27408701

  20. Cholinergic neuromuscular hyperactivity in patients with myasthenia gravis seropositive for MuSK antibody.

    PubMed

    Punga, Anna Rostedt; Flink, Roland; Askmark, Håkan; Stålberg, Erik V

    2006-07-01

    A 75-year-old man with severe oculobulbar myasthenia gravis (MG) treated with acetylcholine esterase inhibitors (AChEIs) was found to have muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies. Neurophysiological examination displayed extra repetitive discharges after the compound motor action potential (CMAP) at low-frequency stimulation, possibly triggered by AChEI. This indicates an abnormal sensitivity to acetylcholine in patients with MuSK antibodies and may be a useful indicator of the adverse effect of AChEI treatment in these patients. PMID:16453324

  1. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and myasthenia gravis, associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifang; Deng, Hui; Mao, Mei

    2016-08-01

    Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) is an autoimmune blistering disease associated with neoplasms. The disease is most commonly of lymphoproliferative origin and presents high mortality. We describe a patient with PNP and myasthenia gravis associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma, as well as the response to rituximab. PMID:27525088

  2. [Reversal of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block with sugammadex in a patient with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Erisa; Nitahara, Keiichi; Sugi, Yasuyuki; Katori, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Akiko; Higa, Kazuo

    2013-08-01

    We report a patient with myasthenia gravis whose rocuronium induced neuromuscular block was reversed with sugammadex. A 26-year-old man, 175 cm and 76 kg, with myasthenia gravis, was scheduled for extended thymectomy under general anesthesia. An epidural catheter was inserted at the T5-6 interspace before induction of general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and remifentanil. Rocuronium was given in divided doses to obtain > 95% neuromuscular block to intubate the trachea. The ED50 and ED95 of rocuronium for this patient were 0.18 mg x kg(-1) and 0.39 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The values were similar to the ED50 and ED95 of rocuronium for normal patients. General anesthesia was maintained with propofol and remifentanil. Additional doses of rocuronium were given intermittently. Sugammadex, 2 mg x kg(-1), was given at the end of the surgery. The train-of-four ratio reached 93% 105 sec later. His postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:23984578

  3. Serum uric acid levels in patients with myasthenia gravis are inversely correlated with disability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dehao; Weng, Yiyun; Lin, Haihua; Xie, Feiyan; Yin, Fang; Lou, Kangliang; Zhou, Xuan; Han, Yixiang; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid (UA), the final product of purine metabolism, has been reported to be reduced in patients with various neurological disorders and is considered to be a possible indicator for monitoring the disability and progression of multiple sclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether there is a close relationship between UA and myasthenia gravis (MG), or whether UA is primarily deficient or secondarily reduced because of its peroxynitrite scavenging activity. We investigated the correlation between serum UA levels and the clinical characteristics of MG. We assessed 338 serum UA levels obtained in 135 patients with MG, 47 patients with multiple sclerosis, and 156 healthy controls. In addition, we compared serum UA levels when MG patients were stratified according to disease activity and classifications performed by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, age of onset, duration, and thymus histology (by means of MRI or computed tomography). MG patients had significantly lower serum UA levels than the controls (P<0.001). Moreover, UA levels in patients with MG were inversely correlated with disease activity and disease progression (P=0.013). However, UA levels did not correlate significantly with disease duration, age of onset, and thymus histology. Our findings suggest that serum level of UA was reduced in patients with MG and serum UA might be considered a surrogate biomarker of MG disability and progression. PMID:26836463

  4. 317 Myasthenia Gravis and Asthma, Relationship between Two Different Disorders of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease caused by absence of neuromuscular transmission due to antibodies directed against the nicotinic AChR located at the neuromuscular junction. The main symptoms include muscle weakness in the affected muscles, which is worse after its use. Diagnosis is made upon clinical manifestations and finding of IgG. Only 80 to 90% of patients with generalized disease are positive to these antibodies, and 30 to 50% with ophthalmologic manifestations. Other immunological alteration found in these patients is an overexpression of the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23). Asthma is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, wheezing and chest tightness caused by inflammation and a reversible contraction of bronchial smooth muscle. Immunologically is associated with a Th2 cytokine profile, mainly Il-4, Il-5, Il-13 and an increased IgE. Methods Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent an altered response of the immune system. Here we discuss the case of a patient who presented with an allergic disease at first then years later developed an autoimmune disease. Results Our patient had been diagnosed with persistent allergic rhinitis and asthma since 1992. He had been treated with inhaled corticosteroids, bronchodilators, intranasal corticosteroids, antihistamines and specific immunotherapy with control of symptoms. In June 2010 he noticed diplopia, palpebral ptosis and muscle weakness in upper extremities diagnosed with Myastenia gravis and started treatment with piridostigmine with adequate control of muscular symptoms. No thymoma was identified. Conclusions It has been noted the possible relationship between allergic and autoimmune diseases since in both there is an alteration in the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. In this patient, we found the association between asthma and 19 years later the development of myasthenia gravis. Some of the explanations for this kind of association is the expression of CD23 in myasthenia

  5. Major motor-functional determinants associated with poor self-reported health-related quality of life in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Cioncoloni, David; Casali, Stefania; Ginanneschi, Federica; Carone, Marisa; Veronica, Boni; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder in which disabling muscle weakness may affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to investigate which common motor-functional deficits and corresponding severity are most determinant of poor HRQoL in these patients. In 41 patients, the dichotomized first item of the Italian Myasthenia Gravis Questionnaire (IMGQ), categorizing patients who report "good" and "poor" HRQoL, was chosen as dependent-outcome variable. All items composing the myasthenia gravis-specific scale (MG-ADL), i.e. talking, chewing, swallowing, breathing, impairment of ability to brush teeth or comb hair, impairment of ability to rise from chair, double vision, and eyelid droop were acquired as independent variables and dichotomized. Stepwise backward LR multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. In addition, the main characteristics of patients were compared. MG-ADL items "chewing" ≥1, i.e. "fatigue chewing solid food", and "breathing" ≥2, i.e. "shortness of breath at rest" proved to be significant determinants. Higher dose of corticosteroid therapy was significantly (p = 0.027; r s  = -0.35), correlated with poor HRQoL. At diagnosis, a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) from the abductor pollicis brevis was significantly more frequent in patients with poor HRQoL. In conclusion, impaired "chewing" and "breathing" functions indicate the need for careful planning of rehabilitation, re-education and patient management. Moreover, decremental response to RNS at diagnosis may identify patients at risk for poor HRQoL. PMID:27038315

  6. The mechanism of acetylcholine receptor in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis and the role of HSP90 molecular chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongbo; Chen, Siqia; Liao, Juan; Chen, Xiaopu; Xu, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As an autoimmune disease, myasthenia gravis is caused by the dysfunction of neural transmission. Acetylcholine is known to exert its function after entering into synaptic cleft through binding onto postsynaptic membrane. The role of acetylcholine in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis, however, remains unknown. A total of 38 myasthenia gravis patients and 27 healthy controls were included in this study for the detection of the expression of MuSK using immunofluorescent method. Expression of both MuSK and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by Western blot, followed by the correlation analysis between heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and IL-6 which were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In myasthenia gravis patients, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine at the postsynaptic membrane. Such accumulation of MuSK, however, did not occur in normal people. Meanwhile we also observed elevated expression of IL-6 in myasthenia gravis patients (p<0.05). ELISA assay showed higher expression of HSP90 in patients. Further signaling pathway screening revealed the activation of IL-6-mediated pathways including STAT3 and SPH2. In conclusion, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine in myasthenia gravis patients, with elevated expression. HSP90 in disease people can activate IL-6 mediated signaling pathways. PMID:27186300

  7. Nivolumab for the treatment of malignant melanoma in a patient with pre-existing myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Osamu; Yokota, Kenji; Atsuta, Naoki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Akiyama, Masashi; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 79-year-old man with lymph node recurrence of malignant melanoma received nivolumab, an anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody. He had pre-existing ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) and a continued small amount of corticosteroid. Grade 3 creatine phosphokinase elevation appeared after two doses of nivolumab, and the treatment was postponed until it improved to grade 1. After three doses of nivolumab, he experienced diplopia and facial muscle weakness which were consistent with an acute exacerbation of MG, and the symptoms relieved without additional treatment for MG. He achieved shrinkage of metastasis after ten doses of nivolumab. Although a case who died due to MG after administration of nivolumab was reported recently, pre-existing MG is considered not to be always a contraindication of nivolumab. PMID:27019533

  8. [Onset of myasthenia gravis in primary care. Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission involving the production of autoantibodies directed against skeletal muscle receptors, in most cases of acetylcholine. Clinically it is characterized by the appearance of muscle weakness after prolonged activity, which tends to recover after a period of rest, or administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. It is a relatively rare disease, although the prevalence has increased by improved diagnosis and increased longevity of the population. The diagnosis can be based on evidence after it is suspected using pharmacological, immunological or electrophysiology tests. Treatment can be divided into: symptomatic, short term and long term. We report the case of a patient who complained of diplopia, this muscle weakness being the most common initial symptom of the disease. PMID:24095170

  9. [A case of myasthenia gravis with transient taste disorders followed by aplastic anemia after thymectomy].

    PubMed

    Osada, Osamu; Iwasaki, Akira; Nakahashi, Hirotaka; Kim, Yoshitora; Kaneko, Kou

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of taste disorders in March 2014. He exhibited cervical muscle weakness and left eye ptosis, which responded to Tensilon test, and was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). He developed aspiration pneumonia and myasthenic crisis, which was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroid pulse therapy. All symptoms disappeared. Oral administration of prednisolone and tacrolimus was started. Chest CT revealed thymoma and extended thymectomy was performed in May 2014. In December 2014, seven months after the thymectomy, hematological examination showed pancytopenia including severe neutropenia. We diagnosed his illness as aplastic anemia (AA). Cyclosporine therapy with transfusion was administerd and led to reticulocyte count recovery. Since May 2015, hemoglobin recovery reached a blood transfusion free period. To our knowledge, this is the first case report with the patient supposed of relationship among taste disorders, AA and thymoma-associated MG. PMID:26876109

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin-induced hemolytic anemia after thoracoscopic thymectomy for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Hisashi; Sunkara, Rajitha; Chi, Dorcas Doja; Keogh, Deirdre; Gaissert, Henning

    2014-06-01

    A 24-year-old woman underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for Osserman IIB myasthenia gravis (MG). In preparation for thymectomy, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was administered 1 week before the surgical procedure. After uneventful thoracoscopic thymectomy, the postoperative hemoglobin value decreased from 12.1 mg/dL to 8.2 mg/dL. A diagnosis of IVIG-associated hemolytic anemia was made based on a peripheral smear with numerous spherocytes, a positive direct antiglobulin test result, and increased reticulocyte count. Hemoglobin levels after IVIG administration should be monitored closely before and after elective surgical procedures to identify severe anemia. Transfusion of type-matched blood should be avoided and risk factors understood. PMID:24882299

  11. Rapid Return of Spontaneous Respiration after General Anesthesia with Sugammadex in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Raing Kyu; Kim, Soon Yul

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis causes weakness and fatigue of the skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles. When immobile surgical fields are needed, neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are often administered to block muscle activity, leading to an immobile surgical field and respiratory arrest. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are administered to reverse the muscle block, promoting spontaneous respiration for patient recovery. If immobile surgical fields are required in myasthenic patient operations, NMBAs should be administered. However, recovery from NMBAs using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors might be delayed in myasthenic patients due to their intake of medicines that already inhibit cholinesterase, resulting in a delay in spontaneous respiration. Sugammadex is a recently introduced medicine that reverses muscle blocks through a different mechanism from acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and can be administered to facilitate the return of spontaneous respiration in myasthenic patients. Our experience of the rapid return to spontaneous respiration of a myasthenic patient with Sugammadex is reported in this paper. PMID:27358839

  12. The psychosocial impact of ptosis as a symptom of Myasthenia Gravis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Richards, Hollie Sarah; Jenkinson, Elizabeth; Rumsey, Nichola; Harrad, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of ptosis as a symptom of Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Participants were recruited from a MG patient group on Facebook. 166 participants answered a series of open ended questions examining the impact of ptosis, and responses were analysed using Inductive Thematic Analysis, which revealed four main themes. The first highlighted the extent to which ptosis impacted negatively on psychosocial functioning. The second related to ways in which ptosis can be framed in a positive way, eg, as a believable symptom. The final two themes revealed the complex inter-relationships between functional and appearance-related impacts, and a desire from many participants for health care professionals to provide more support directly related to their ptosis. This study suggests that ptosis impacts in ways not currently recognized in literature and practice. PMID:24832459

  13. ROCK inhibitor abolishes the antibody response in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Cong-Cong; Li, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Peng; Yue, Long-Tao; Miao, Shuai; Dou, Ying-Chun; Li, Yan-Bin; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway serves as molecular switches in many biological processes including the immune response. ROCK inhibitors lead to amelioration of some autoimmune diseases. The present study was designed to define whether a selective ROCK inhibitor, fasudil, was effective in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Here we found fasudil effectively attenuated the development of ongoing EAMG. Fasudil abolished the antibody production and function by decreasing follicular helper T cells and CD19(+) B cells, especially germinal center B cells. Moreover, fasudil reduced the expression of CD80 on lymph node mononuclear cells. These findings suggest the inhibition of ROCK might be a potential therapeutic strategy for antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27168379

  14. Autoantibody profile and clinical characteristics in a cohort of Chinese adult myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Li, Hai-Feng; Skeie, Geir Olve; Romi, Fredrik; Hao, Hong-Jun; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneity. Antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), titin and ryanodine receptor (RyR) were examined in 437 adult Chinese MG patients. The AChR, MuSK, titin and RyR antibodies were found in 82.2%, 2.3%, 28.4% and 23.8% of all patients. Autoantibody profiles vary among different MG subgroups. Thymoma MG patients had high frequencies of AChR (99.2%), titin (50.8%) and RyR antibodies (46.9%). The titin and RyR antibodies also showed high frequencies in late onset patients (54.4% and 33.3%, respectively). These two antibodies may indicate an underlying thymoma when combined. The patients with titin and RyR antibodies tend to have more severe disease and worse outcome, and may need more active immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:27609275

  15. Role of tolerogen conformation in induction of oral tolerance in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2000-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that oral or nasal administration of recombinant fragments of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) prevents the induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppresses ongoing EAMG in rats. We have now studied the role of spatial conformation of these recombinant fragments in determining their tolerogenicity. Two fragments corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit and differing in conformation were tested: Halpha1-205 expressed with no fusion partner and Halpha1-210 fused to thioredoxin (Trx), and designated Trx-Halpha1-210. The conformational similarity of the fragments to intact AChR was assessed by their reactivity with alpha-bungarotoxin and with anti-AChR mAbs, specific for conformation-dependent epitopes. Oral administration of the more native fragment, Trx-Halpha1-210, at the acute phase of disease led to exacerbation of EAMG, accompanied by an elevation of AChR-specific humoral and cellular reactivity, increased levels of Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12), decreased levels of Th2 (IL-10)- or Th3 (TGF-beta)-type cytokines, and higher expression of costimulatory factors (CD28, CTLA4, B7-1, B7-2, CD40L, and CD40). On the other hand, oral administration of the less native fragments Halpha1-205 or denatured Trx-Halpha1-210 suppressed ongoing EAMG and led to opposite changes in the immunological parameters. It thus seems that native conformation of AChR-derived fragments renders them immunogenic and immunopathogenic and therefore not suitable for treatment of myasthenia gravis. Conformation of tolerogens should therefore be given careful attention when considering oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:11034361

  16. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T.; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D.; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1−/− BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency. PMID:25867470

  17. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:24962817

  18. Serum Metabolomic Response of Myasthenia Gravis Patients to Chronic Prednisone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Cheema, Amrita; Kaminski, Henry J.; Kusner, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Prednisone is often used for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases but they suffer from variable therapeutic responses and significant adverse effects. Serum biological markers that are modulated by chronic corticosteroid use have not been identified. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder caused by antibodies directed against proteins present at the post-synaptic surface of neuromuscular junction resulting in weakness. The patients with myasthenia gravis are primarily treated with prednisone. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of serum collected from patients prior to and after 12 weeks of prednisone treatment during a clinical trial. Our aim was to identify metabolites that may be treatment responsive and be evaluated in future studies as potential biomarkers of efficacy or adverse effects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electro-spray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry was used to obtain comparative metabolomic and lipidomic profile. Untargeted metabolic profiling of serum showed a clear distinction between pre- and post- treatment groups. Chronic prednisone treatment caused upregulation of membrane associated glycerophospholipids: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, 1, 2-diacyl-sn glycerol 3 phosphate and 1-Acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Arachidonic acid (AA) and AA derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids such as 18-carboxy dinor leukotriene B4 and 15 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids were reduced. Perturbations in amino acid, carbohydrate, vitamin and lipid metabolism were observed. Chronic prednisone treatment caused increase in membrane associated glycerophospholipids, which may be associated with certain adverse effects. Decrease of AA and AA derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids demonstrate that immunosuppression by corticosteroid is via suppression of pro-inflammatory pathways. The study identified metabolomic fingerprints that can now be validated as prednisone

  19. Myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and toxic multinodular goiter. A case report.

    PubMed

    lonescu, Lidia; Stefănescu, Cipriana; Dănilă, R; Trifescu, Irina; Savin, M; Dragomir, C; Ferariu, D; Vulpoi, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Adequate antithyroid drug treatment or surgery usually generates remission of myasthenia gravis (MG) in patients with thymus hyperplasia associated with Graves' hyperthyroidism. The case of a 46-year-old woman diagnosed with MG based on the clinical picture, anticholinesterase drug test and positive electromyography (EMG) is presented. The cervico-thoracic computer tomography revealed a compressive nodular goiter and normal antero-superior mediastinum and led to the diagnosis of MG secondary to the hyperthyroidism. An uneventful total thyroidectomy was performed, but postoperatively the MG symptoms worsened. TC99m tetrofosmin scintigraphy revealed an area of hyperfixation in the antero-inferior mediastinum, suggestive for thymoma, as confirmed by a repeated thoracic CT scan. Following a longitudinal sternotomy, a well incapsulated tumor of approximately 6/5 cm located in the antero-inferior mediastinum was found and an extensive thymomectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged 9 days later with complete remission of myasthenia. The pathology report of the specimen revealed a mixt thymoma or AB thymoma after Muller-Hermelink and WHO classification, with invasive capsular foci corresponding to Masaoka II stadium. In conclusion, scintigraphy proved to be useful in the diagnosis and decision making of a thymoma. PMID:23077950

  20. Ocular myasthenia gravis. A critical review of clinical and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Sommer, N; Melms, A; Weller, M; Dichgans, J

    1993-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is probably the best studied autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction, subsequently leading to abnormal fatigability and weakness of skeletal muscle. Extraocular muscle weakness with droopy eyelids and double vision is present in about 90% of MG patients, being the initial complaint in about 50%. In approximately 20% of the patients the disease will always be confined to the extraocular muscles. The single most important diagnostic test is the detection of serum antibodies against AChR which is positive in 90% of patients with generalized MG, but only in 65% with purely ocular MG. Electromyographic studies and the Tensilon test are of diagnostic value in clear-cut cases, but may be equivocal in purely ocular myasthenia, especially the latter not rarely producing false-positive results. Treatment response to corticosteroids and anti-cholinesterase agents is satisfactory in many patients with ocular MG, however other immunosuppressive drugs may also be needed. Pathogenetically relevant steps of the underlying autoimmune process have been elucidated during the last few years; nevertheless a number of questions remain open, especially what starts off the autoimmune process, and why are eye muscles so frequently involved in MG? PMID:8156854

  1. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:26504451

  2. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    PubMed Central

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  3. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:26504451

  4. The role of muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and mystery of MuSK myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Vincent, Angela

    2014-01-01

    MuSK myasthenia gravis is a rare, severe autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction, only identified in 2001, with unclear pathogenic mechanisms. In this review we describe the clinical aspects that distinguish MuSK MG from AChR MG, review what is known about the role of MuSK in the development and function of the neuromuscular junction, and discuss the data that address how the antibodies to MuSK lead to neuromuscular transmission failure. PMID:23458718

  5. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to weakness of the muscles that control eye movements, unstable or waddling gait, a change in facial ... neurological examinations. The physician looks for impairment of eye movements or muscle weakness without any changes in the ...

  6. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms are trouble with eye and eyelid movement, facial expression and swallowing. But it can also affect other muscles. The weakness gets worse with activity, and better with rest. There are medicines to ...

  7. Myasthenia gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing assistance with a ventilator . A procedure called plasmapheresis may also be used to help end the ... is free of antibodies, or with other fluids. Plasmapheresis may also help reduce symptoms for 4 to ...

  8. Myasthenia gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and other medicines have not worked well. Crisis situations are attacks of weakness of the breathing ... may also be used to help end the crisis. This procedure involves removing the clear part of ...

  9. Comparative effects of plasma exchange and pyridostigmine on respiratory muscle strength and breathing pattern in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Goti, P.; Spinelli, A.; Marconi, G.; Duranti, R.; Gigliotti, F.; Pizzi, A.; Scano, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pyridostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase antagonist, is useful in improving respiratory function in patients with myasthenia gravis. More recently, plasma exchange has been employed in myasthenia gravis because it acts presumably by removal of circulating antibodies against acetylcholine receptors. Surprisingly, comparative data on the effects of pyridostigmine and plasma exchange on lung volumes, respiratory muscle strength, and ventilatory control system in patients with myasthenia gravis are lacking. METHODS--Nine consecutive patients with grade IIb myasthenia gravis were studied under control conditions and after a therapeutic dose of pyridostigmine. In a second study the patients were re-evaluated a few days after a cycle of plasma exchange, before taking pyridostigmine. In each subject pulmonary volumes, inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) muscle force, and respiratory muscle strength, calculated as average MIP and MEP as percentages of their predicted values, were measured. The ventilatory control system was evaluated in terms of volume (tidal volume, VT) and time (inspiratory time, TI, and total time, TTOT) components of the respiratory cycle. Mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI)--that is, the "driving"--and TI/TTOT--that is, the "timing"--components of ventilation were also measured. RESULTS--In each patient treatment relieved weakness and tiredness, and dyspnoea grade was reduced with plasma exchange. Following treatment, vital capacity (VC) increased on average by 9.7% with pyridostigmine and by 14% with plasma exchange, and MIP increased by 18% and 26%, respectively. In addition, with plasma exchange but not with pyridostigmine forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) increased by 16% and MEP increased by 24.5%, while functional residual capacity (FRC) decreased a little (6.8%). The change in respiratory muscle strength was related to change in VC (r2 = 0.48). With plasma exchange, VT increased by 18.6% and VT/TI increased by 13.5%, while

  10. Suppression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by autologous T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Aricha, Revital; Reuveni, Debby; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of regulatory T (Treg) cells have been employed effectively for suppression of several animal models for autoimmune diseases. In order to employ Treg cell therapy in patients, it is necessary to generate Treg cells from the patient's own cells (autologous) that would be able to suppress effectively the disease in vivo, upon their reintroduction to the patient. Towards this objective, we report in the present study on a protocol for a successful immune-regulation of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) by ex vivo--generated autologous Treg cells. For this protocol bone marrow (BM) cells, are first cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, giving rise to a population of CD11c(+)MHCII(+)CD45RA(+)CD8(-) DCs (BMDCs). Splenic CD4(+) T cells are then co-cultured with the differentiated BM cells and expand to 90% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. In vitro assay exhibits a similar dose dependent manner in the suppression of T effector cells proliferation between Treg cells obtained from either healthy or sick donors. In addition, both Treg cells inhibit similarly the secretion of IFN-γ from activated splenocytes. Administration of 1 × 10(6) ex-vivo generated Treg cells, I.V, to EAMG rats, modulates the disease following a single treatment, given 3 days or 3 weeks after disease induction. Similar disease inhibition was achieved when CD4 cells were taken from either healthy or sick donors. The disease suppression was accompanied by reduced levels of total AChR specific antibodies in the serum. Moreover, due to the polyclonality of the described Treg cell, we have examined whether this treatment approach could be also employed for the treatment of other autoimmune diseases involving Treg cells. Indeed, we demonstrated that the ex-vivo generated autologous Treg cells suppress Adjuvant Arthritis (AA) in rats. This study opens the way for the application of induced autologous Treg cell therapy for myasthenia gravis, as well as for other human autoimmune diseases

  11. Recombinant IgG2a Fc (M0451) Multimers Effectively Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Sheng, Jian Rong; Li, Liangcheng; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Meriggioli, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by target-specific pathogenic antibodies directed toward postsynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) proteins, most commonly the skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). In MG, high-affinity anti-AChR Abs binding to the NMJ lead to loss of functional AChRs, culminating in neuromuscular transmission failure and myasthenic symptoms. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) has broad therapeutic application in the treatment of a range of autoimmune diseases, including MG, although its mechanism of action is not clear. Recently, the anti-inflammatory and anti-autoimmune activities of IVIg have been attributed to the IgG Fc domains. Soluble immune aggregates bearing intact Fc fragments have been shown to be effective treatment for a number of autoimmune disorders in mice, and fully recombinant multimeric Fc molecules have been shown to be effective in treating collagen-induced arthritis, murine immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and experimental inflammatory neuritis. In this study, a murine model of MG (EAMG) was used to study the effectiveness of this novel recombinant polyvalent IgG2a Fc (M045) in treating established myasthenia, with a direct comparison to treatment with IVIg. M045 treatment had profound effects on the clinical course of EAMG, accompanied by down-modulation of pathogenic antibody responses. These effects were associated with reduced B cell activation and T cell proliferative responses to AChR, an expansion in the population of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, and enhanced production of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10. Treatment was at least as effective as IVIg in suppressing EAMG, even at doses 25–30 fold lower. Multimeric Fc molecules offer the advantages of being recombinant, homogenous, available in unlimited quantity, free of risk from infection and effective at significantly reduced protein loads, and may represent a viable therapeutic alternative to polyclonal IVIg. PMID:24388113

  12. Ocular myasthenia gravis: treatment successes and failures in patients with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kupersmith, Mark J

    2009-08-01

    We previously reported that prednisone reduced the frequency of generalized myasthenia (GMG) and controlled diplopia without major adverse effects at 2 years in patients with ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG). Questions remain as to whether study subjects had long-standing disease, biasing results towards a steroid benefit, and if prednisone merely delayed GMG onset. Here, we performed a record review of a referral neuro-ophthalmology service OMG database for patients who were followed-up for > or =4 years or until GMG developed. We studied the effect of prednisone on GMG incidence and control of ocular symptoms. Generally, patients with diplopia were recommended for prednisone therapy. Most remained on daily 2.5-10 mg for diplopia control. We compared the results for prednisone-treated and "untreated" (pyridostigmine only) patients. Of 87 patients, 55 were in the prednisone-treated and 32 were in the untreated groups. GMG developed in 7 (13%) of the prednisone-treated (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.22-0.76) and in 16 (50%) of the untreated (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.68-4.60) patients. After OMG onset, GMG developed at a mean 5.8 and 0.22 years in prednisone and untreated groups. Diplopia was present at the last exam in 27% of the prednisone-treated (mean 7.2 years) and in 57% of the untreated (mean 4.6 years) OMG patients. For 48 prednisone-treated patients who did not develop GMG, OMG treatment failure occurred in 13. Thus, prednisone delays the onset of GMG and has sustained benefit in reducing the incidence of GMG and controlling diplopia. Without prednisone, GMG develops in 50% of OMG patients, typically within 1 year. PMID:19377863

  13. Azathioprine as a single immunosuppressive drug in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Cosi, V; Lombardi, M; Erbetta, A; Piccolo, G

    1993-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated results obtained from azathioprine (AZA) treatment on a selected sample of 40 patients affected by autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG). Patients received AZA as a single immunosuppressive drug for at least 2 years. Twenty out of 40 patients received also a one-month course of cyclophosphamide (CP) before starting AZA. All patients started immunosuppressive treatment out of myasthenic crisis. After 3, 12 and 24 months of AZA treatment, 82.5%, 92.5% and 97.5% of the patients respectively showed improvement in functional state, disappearance of bulbar involvement, or both. The impressive percentage of short-term positive results did not seem influenced by pre-treatment by CP. Side effects included only minor and transitory gastrointestinal symptoms and reversible cytopenia. Although the patient population was either particularly suitable for AZA treatment or candidate to a better response, our data suggest that AZA might also have good short term effects in a subgroup of MG patients. PMID:8328322

  14. Comparison of outcomes after extended thymectomy for myasthenia gravis: bilateral thoracoscopic approach versus sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Akio; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive thymectomy procedures have been proposed for nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis. However, few reports stressed that the lower invasiveness or cosmetic benefits also evaluated the rationale of a thymectomy, which is performed to remove as much thymic tissue as possible. We retrospectively reviewed 30 consecutive patients who underwent a bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) and compared the results with those of 26 patients who underwent a transsternal extended thymectomy (TSET) to determine the amount of removed thymic tissue and clinical prognosis. The amount of blood loss during the operation for VATET (median 60 mL; range nearly 0 to 940 mL) was significantly lower as compared with that of TSET. The median weight of removed thymic tissue (37.0 g; 18.3 to 100.0 g) and remission rates (1 y: 12.5%; 3 y: 30.8%; 4 y: 44.4%) of VATET were comparable with those of TSET. The VATET group had a similar amount of thymo-fatty tissue removed and feasible clinical outcomes as compared with the TSET group, indicating that VATET provides a proper balance between less invasiveness and radical capability. PMID:20027081

  15. [Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in rats].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Xia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Jun; Wang, Ji-Ming; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Xin-Jun; Ma, Feng-Xia; Yang, Shao-Guang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-06-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UCMSC) transplantation has been widely used in the treatment of a variety of diseases due to their advantages such as abundant resources, low immunogenicity and large ex vivo expansion capacity. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of UCMSC on experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) rats. The distribution of human-derived cells was observed by immunofluorescence method, the effect of MSC on B-cell in situ-secreted antibodies was assayed by ELISPOT, the secreted IFN-γ level was detected by using Transwell test. The results showed that UCMSC were able to migrate to inflammation region and lymph nudes, moreover human-derived cells could be detected in medulla zone of lymph nudes. In vitro in situ detection of AchR specific antibody secretion revealed that the full contact of MSC with lymphnode-derived lymphocytes could effectively inhibit production of AchR antibody. Transwell test indicated that the direct contact of UCMSC with CD4 T cells could effectively decrease production of IFN-γ, which modulated the unbalance between Th1/Th2 to a certain extent. It is concluded that UCMSC can regulate the immune system by direct cell-cell contact or/and release of cytokines, which bring a new insight into knowledge about MSC-based therapy for EAMG. PMID:21729563

  16. Genetic heterogeneity within the HLA region in three distinct clinical subgroups of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hughes, Travis; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Durmus, Hacer; Adler, Adam; Alahgholi-Hajibehzad, Mahdi; Aysal, Fikret; Yentür, Sibel P; Akalin, Mehmet Ali; Dogan, Oner; Marx, Alexander; Gülsen-Parman, Yesim; Oflazer, Piraye; Deymeer, Feza; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to investigate genetic susceptibility to early-onset and late-onset anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis (EOMG and LOMG) and anti-muscle specific kinase antibody positive MG (MuSK-MG) at genome-wide level in a single population. Using a custom-designed array and imputing additional variants and the classical HLA alleles in 398 patients, we detected distinct associations. In EOMG, rs113519545 in the HLA class I region (OR=5.71 [3.77-8.66], P=2.24×10(-16)), HLA-B*08:01 (OR=7.04 [3.95-12.52], P=3.34×10(-11)) and HLA-C*07:01 (OR=2.74 [1.97-3.81], P=2.07(-9)), in LOMG, rs111256513 in the HLA class II region (OR=2.22 [1.59-3.09], P=2.48×10(-6)) and in MuSK-MG, an intronic variant within HLA-DQB1 (rs68081734, OR=5.86, P=2.25×10(-14)) and HLA-DQB1*05:02 (OR=8.56, P=6.88×10(-13)) revealed the most significant associations for genome-wide significance. Differential genetic susceptibility within the HLA to EOMG, LOMG and MuSK-MG has been established in a population from Turkey. PMID:27181991

  17. Myasthenia gravis with muscle specific kinase antibodies mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Niks, Erik H; Klooster, Rinse; de Visser, Marianne; Kuks, Jan B; Veldink, Jan H; Klarenbeek, Pim; Van Damme, Philip; de Baets, Marc H; van der Maarel, Silvère M; van den Berg, Leonard H; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2016-06-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG) is hallmarked by the predominant involvement of bulbar muscles and muscle atrophy. This might mimic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presenting with bulbar weakness. We encountered four cases of MuSK MG patients with an initial misdiagnosis of ALS. We analyzed the clinical data of the four misdiagnosed MuSK MG patients, and investigated the presence of MuSK autoantibodies in a group of 256 Dutch bulbar-onset ALS patients using a recombinant MuSK ELISA and a standard MuSK radioimmunorecipitation assay. Clues for changing the diagnosis were slow progression, clinical improvement, development of diplopia and absence of signs of upper motor neuron involvement. No cases of MuSK MG were identified among a group of 256 bulbar ALS patients diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria. A misdiagnosis of ALS in patients with MuSK MG is rare. We recommend to carefully consider the diagnosis of MuSK MG in patients presenting with bulbar weakness without clear signs of upper motor neuron dysfunction. PMID:27133662

  18. [Intractable Myasthenia Gravis Accompanied with Thymoma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Oyamatsu, Yoshinori; Narita, Kunio; Nakayama, Masato; Maeda, Shoki

    2016-09-01

    A 46-year-old female visited a hospital due to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and then her chest computed tomography revealed an abnormal shadow in the upper mediastinum. Four months later,she complained muscle weakness with her limbs, dysphagia, and ptosis of her eyelids. Total thymectomy was performed through a median sternotomy for mass lesion, which was pathologically proven to be type B1 thymoma. Postoperative myasthenia gravis (MG) crisis, which led to respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, developed and laboratory tests showed elevated serum anti-AChR Ab(130 nmol/l), antinuclear antibody( ×640 serum dilution, speckled pattern) and anti-RNP Ab(129.2 U/ml). For MG crisis, steroid pulse therapy, immunosuppressive therapy and immuno absorption were performed, and she successfully weaned from mechanical ventilaton on 41 post operative day (POD). Some factors such as inapparent mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Anti RNP antibody were thought to be a cause for having any difficulty in MG treatment in the present case. PMID:27586323

  19. Diagnosis of Ocular Myasthenia Gravis by means of tracking eye parameters.

    PubMed

    Azri, Muhammad; Young, Stephanie; Lin, Hazel; Tan, Clement; Yang, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Ptosis of the eyelids is a common condition with a myriad of causes. Its management depends on the underlying cause, which can be challenging to diagnose in some cases. Current diagnosis methods include serum antibodies, tensilon test, and electromyography (EMG). Each has its own set of limitations such as invasiveness and lack of sensitivity. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a Portable Realtime Infrared Lids, Iris and Blink (PRILIB) monitoring system, with a long-term goal to improve clinical diagnosis of ptosis. In this paper, we present the algorithms to detect and analyze eye parameters and report experimental results. From experiments conducted on normal volunteers and myasthenic patients, we found 1. Partial blinks happen when Ocular Myasthenia Gravis (OMG) patients are tired or engaged in an activity; 2. Blink rate is significantly higher for OMG patients due to failure to blink fully; 3. There are noticeably more fluctuations of palpebral aperture of OMG patients due to rising and falling of the eyelid height. These experimental findings suggest new diagnostic features for OMG patients and have implications for disease management. PMID:25570244

  20. Thymectomy for myasthenia gravis: outcome of treatment in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Torres, M I; Danguilan, J L

    1998-08-01

    The clinical records of 24 of the 31 patients who underwent thymectomy for myasthenia gravis from January 1991 to December 1995 were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 36.5 years, with a male : female ratio of 1 : 5. The average duration of symptoms prior to consultation was 16.6 months. Most of the patients presented diplopia with clinical stage IIA prior to surgery. The most common procedure utilized was thymectomy via a median sternotomy under general anesthesia-epidural anesthesia. Five of the 24 patients (21%) were immediately extubated postoperatively while 19 remained intubated, with 12 patients attached to a ventilator. Extubation ranged from the first postoperative day up to more than two weeks postoperatively. The average length of ICU stay was 8.1 days and the average length of hospital stay was 31.1 days. The most common morbidity was pneumonia (38%). One patient had a brief reactive psychosis and another patient had phrenic nerve injury which manifested 2 weeks postoperatively. The average length of follow-up was 14.8 months and the mean follow-up period was 24.5 months. There was a general trend of decrease in the dose of medication. However, there was an increase in the medication in 3 patients with 2 showing clinical improvement. PMID:9738120

  1. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  2. Collagen Q--a potential target for autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zoltowska Katarzyna, Marta; Belaya, Katsiaryna; Leite, Maria; Patrick, Waters; Vincent, Angela; Beeson, David

    2015-01-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies targeting proteins expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In most cases the targets are acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK), or occasionally low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), but there is still a group of patients, often called seronegative MG (SNMG), with unknown antibody targets. One potential target is collagen Q (COLQ), which is restricted to the NMJ and is crucial for anchoring the NMJ-specific form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). 415 serum samples with a clinical diagnosis of MG and 43 control samples were screened for the presence of COLQ autoantibodies using a cell-based assay (CBA) with HEK293 cells overexpressing COLQ at the cell surface. COLQ antibodies were detected in 12/415 MG sera and in one/43 control samples. Five of the COLQ-Ab+individuals were also positive for AChR-Abs and 2 for MuSK-Abs. Although the COLQ antibodies were only present at low frequency, and did not differ significantly from the small control cohort, further studies could address whether they modify the clinical presentation or the benefits of anti-cholinesterase therapy. PMID:25577314

  3. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  4. Novel CXCL13 transgenic mouse: inflammation drives pathogenic effect of CXCL13 in experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julia Miriam; Robinet, Marieke; Aricha, Revital; Cufi, Perrine; Villeret, Bérengère; Lantner, Frida; Shachar, Idit; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal overexpression of CXCL13 is observed in many inflamed tissues and in particular in autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disease mainly mediated by anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies. Thymic hyperplasia characterized by ectopic germinal centers (GCs) is a common feature in MG and is correlated with high levels of anti-AChR antibodies. We previously showed that the B-cell chemoattractant, CXCL13 is overexpressed by thymic epithelial cells in MG patients. We hypothesized that abnormal CXCL13 expression by the thymic epithelium triggered B-cell recruitment in MG. We therefore created a novel transgenic (Tg) mouse with a keratin 5 driven CXCL13 expression. The thymus of Tg mice overexpressed CXCL13 but did not trigger B-cell recruitment. However, in inflammatory conditions, induced by Poly(I:C), B cells strongly migrated to the thymus. Tg mice were also more susceptible to experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) with stronger clinical signs, higher titers of anti-AChR antibodies, increased thymic B cells, and the development of germinal center-like structures. Consequently, this mouse model finally mimics the thymic pathology observed in human MG. Our data also demonstrated that inflammation is mandatory to reveal CXCL13 ability to recruit B cells and to induce tertiary lymphoid organ development. PMID:26771137

  5. Thymus involvement in myasthenia gravis: Epidemiological and clinical impacts of different self-tolerance breakdown mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karni, Arnon; Asmail, Ali; Drory, Vivian E; Kolb, Hadar; Kesler, Anat

    2016-09-15

    The reasons for the abrogation of self-immunological tolerance in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be different between those with concomitant thymic hyperplasia or thymoma, and those with no evidence of thymic involvement. We conducted a retrospective observational case series study to investigate the epidemiology as well as the clinical, serologic, and electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of individuals diagnosed as having MG. We found that the average age at MG onset of patients with either thymic hyperplasia or thymoma was much younger (by ~20years) than that of MG patients without thymic involvement. Thymic hyperplasia was more common in females than males. There were no differences in the rates of ocular MG vs. generalized MG among those three study groups. There were also no group differences in the rates of neuromuscular junction disfunction, as observed on EMG or by the results of serology tests for acetyl choline receptor antibody. Interestingly, only patients without thymic involvement had other autoimmune diseases, and most of them were females. The patients with other coexisting autoimmune disease had a similar age at MG onset as the other patients with no thymic involvement. These results shed light on the impact of epidemiological and clinical factors that result from different mechanisms of self-immunological tolerance breakdown that occurs in MG. PMID:27609276

  6. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Secondary Antiphospholipid Syndrome after Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Rada; Plavsic, Aleksandra; Peric-Popadic, Aleksandra; Raskovic, Sanvila; Bogic, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are autoimmune diseases that show some similarities: a higher incidence in young women, relapsing-remitting course and positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). However, they are two different clinical syndromes, which can coexist or precede each other. Thymectomy is a therapeutic option for patients with severe MG or thymoma. There are many cases of SLE after thymectomy described in the literature, so the question arises whether thymectomy predisposes patients to SLE and what are imunopathogenetic mechanisms behind this process. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed with SLE and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) 28 years after thymectomy for MG. Clinical picture of SLE was characterized by cutaneous and articular manifestations, polyserositis, lupus nephritis and immunological parameters showed positive ANA, anti-ds-DNA, excessive consumption of complement components, positive cryoglobulins. Clinical and laboratory immunological parameters for the diagnosis of secondary APS where also present. The patient was initially treated with glucocorticoids followed by mycophenolate mofetil. During one year follow-up patient was in a stable remission of SLE. CONCLUSION: Thymectomy for MG may predispose SLE development in some patients. Further studies are needed to better understand the connection between these two autoimmune diseases.

  7. Phenotypic and functional characterization of T cells from patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarian, F; Pino, M; Ofosu-Appiah, W; Grob, D

    1990-01-01

    A study of cell surface phenotypes of PBL of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that their T cells had a significantly higher percentage of 4B4+ T cells (the helper/inducer subset) than age- and sex-matched controls. The PBL of MG patients proliferated significantly higher than those of normal subjects (NS) in response to the purified alpha chain of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Anti-AChR antibody was present in sera of 88% of MG and none of the NS. The PBL B cells from MG only, when cultured with autologous T cells and stimulated with either pokeweed mitogen (69%), or AChR-alpha chain (38%), secreted antibody to AChR-alpha chain, whereas T and B cells alone secreted no antibody. T cells from PBL of MG patients were more readily cloned than T cells of NS, by limiting dilution, in the presence of recombinant IL-2 and in the absence of AChR-alpha chain. About 50% of T cell clones from MG patients, compared to none from NS, proliferated to AChR-alpha chain. This response was HLA-DR restricted. MG T cell clones did not display significant cytotoxic activity, as compared to control T cell clones. Our results indicate that in MG, 4B4+ regulatory T cells play their role in the pathogenesis of MG, not by cytotoxicity, but more likely by their ability to stimulate specific antibody production by B cells. Images PMID:1979338

  8. [Current status and future prospects of therapy for myasthenia gravis: considering thymectomy].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroaki; Iwasa, Kazuo; Takamori, Masaharu

    2011-07-01

    The benefits of thymectomy in non-thymomatous patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) remain controversial. The first detailed case of thymectomy in a patient with MG was reported in 1939, following which many cases were published. In 2000, Gronseth and Barohn reported the first meta-analysis of the effectiveness of thymectomy in MG patients without thymoma. They reviewed 28 papers systematically and reached these conclusions: (1) The benefit of thymectomy in non-thymomatous autoimmune MG has not been conclusively established, and (2) a well-designed controlled trial is essential. Following this report, Newsom-Davis et al. designed a thymectomy trial for non-thymomatous MG patients receiving prednisone (the MGTX study). Their study compared extended trans-sternal thymectomy (ETTX) combined with prednisone and prednisone alone groups with the aim to answer 3 questions: (1) Is the former more effective in improving myasthenic weakness? (2) Does the former require a lower total dose of prednisone, and thus decrease the likelihood of concurrent and long-term toxic effects? (3) Does the former enhance patients' quality of life by reducing adverse events and symptoms associated with the therapy? Currently, 67 centers, including our institute, are involved in this study. In total, 106 patients have been enrolled (the recruitment goal is 150). The patients are scheduled for a 5-year follow-up. The MGTX study will offer new information on the role of thymectomy in improving the quality of life of patients with MG. PMID:21747143

  9. A reliability study of impairment and disability scales for myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Romani, Alfredo; Piccolo, Giovanni; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Versino, Maurizio; Cosi, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    The authors developed two scales to be adopted for the evaluation of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. The first scale (MG impairment scale) is based on objective patient evaluation and on patients' responses to standardized questions relating to the functioning of specific muscle groups. It consists of 13 items exploring strength and 10 items exploring fatigability. The second scale (MG disability scale) evaluates disability in those everyday activities that are often impaired in MG patients. Test-retest reliability of each item and of the global score (sum of single item scores) was assessed by the weighted K statistic and by the intraclass correlation coefficient. Reliability was invariably 'substantial', and for single items 'almost perfect' for the MG impairment scale, and invariably 'almost perfect' for the MG disability scale. The internal structure of the MG impairment scale was explored by means of the principal component analysis. This analysis resulted in three main (rotated) factors, which loaded respectively onto 'ocular', 'spinal' and 'bulbar' functions. For these factors, we report factor score coefficients that can be used to compute single patients' scores, which in turn may be used in further analyses, particularly for follow-up studies. We also report the results of an analysis of the correlations between the two scales. The MG impairment and the MG disability scales are proposed for application in both clinical and research settings. PMID:12549719

  10. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  11. Late Onset Myasthenia Gravis Is Associated with HLA DRB1*15:01 in the Norwegian Population

    PubMed Central

    Maniaol, Angelina H.; Elsais, Ahmed; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; Owe, Jone F.; Viken, Marte K.; Sæther, Hanne; Flåm, Siri T.; Bråthen, Geir; Kampman, Margitta T.; Midgard, Rune; Christensen, Marte; Rognerud, Anna; Kerty, Emilia; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acquired myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare antibody-mediated autoimmune disease caused by impaired neuromuscular transmission, leading to abnormal muscle fatigability. The aetiology is complex, including genetic risk factors of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex and unknown environmental factors. Although associations between the HLA complex and MG are well established, not all involved components of the HLA predisposition to this heterogeneous disease have been revealed. Well-powered and comprehensive HLA analyses of subgroups in MG are warranted, especially in late onset MG. Methodology/Principal Findings This case-control association study is of a large population-based Norwegian cohort of 369 MG patients and 651 healthy controls. We performed comprehensive genotyping of four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1) and showed that the DRB1*15:01 allele conferred the strongest risk in late onset MG (LOMG; onset ≥60years) (OR 2.38, pc7.4×10−5). DRB1*13:01 was found to be a protective allele for both early onset MG (EOMG) and LOMG (OR 0.31, pc 4.71×10−4), a finding not previously described. No significant association was found to the DRB1*07:01 allele (pnc = 0.18) in a subset of nonthymomatous anti-titin antibody positive LOMG as reported by others. HLA-B*08 was mapped to give the strongest contribution to EOMG, supporting previous studies. Conclusion The results from this study provide important new information concerning the susceptibility of HLA alleles in Caucasian MG, with highlights on DRB1*15:01 as being a major risk allele in LOMG. PMID:22590574

  12. Mechanism of nasal tolerance induced by a recombinant fragment of acetylcholine receptor for treatment of experimental myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    2000-11-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen in myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG). Here we analyze the mechanisms involved in suppression of ongoing EAMG in rats by nasal administration of a recombinant fragment from the human AChR alpha-subunit. We demonstrate that such a fragment, expressed without a fusion partner, confers nasal tolerance that can be adoptively transferred. Our observations suggest that the underlying mechanism of this nasal tolerance is active suppression involving a shift from a Th1 to a Th2/Th3-regulated AChR-specific response which may be mediated by down regulation of costimulatory factors. PMID:11063834

  13. Thymectomy Cures Diabetes Mellitus and Ameliorates Myasthenia Gravis in a Patient with Thymus Hyperplasia and Hyperthyroidism: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shiyun; Zhang, Yao; Cui, Youbin; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a devastating autoimmune disease that involves the acetylcholine receptor (AchR) in the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. It is not uncommon for MG to accompany with other autoimmune diseases and complicate with multiple organ dysfunction. Here, we report on an 18-year-old female patient with a rare case of MG concomitant with thymus hyperplasia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperthyroidism. After full excision of the hyperplastic thymus gland, the patient's muscle weakness was greatly improved and her blood glucose level was restored to normal at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:26884666

  14. Therapeutic target of memory B cells depletion helps to tailor administration frequency of rituximab in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Christine; Bourg, Véronique; Bresch, Saskia; Cohen, Mikael; Rosenthal-Allieri, Maria Alessandra; Desnuelle, Claude; Ticchioni, Michel

    2016-09-15

    Rituximab (RTX) has demonstrated efficacy in limiting relapses in myasthenia gravis (MG). We investigated the interest of CD27+ memory B cell monitoring in patients as a biological marker of clinical relapse. Twenty-four patients have been treated with RTX (375mg/m(2)/week-month as an induction treatment). Maintenance treatment consisted with either systematic treatment every 3months or only when CD27+ memory B cells were detectable. After the induction treatment, the mean infusions were 1.3/year compared with 4/year. We suggest that RTX administration frequency can be decreased safely by monitoring the re-emerging CD27+ memory B cells. PMID:27609279

  15. Rituximab in refractory myasthenia gravis: a prospective, open-label study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dustin; Phan, Cecile; Johnston, Wendy S; Siddiqi, Zaeem A

    2016-07-01

    We examined the clinical effectiveness of rituximab in fourteen patients with refractory myasthenia gravis (MG). Manual muscle testing (MMT) score was recorded at baseline and followed during the course of the study. Steroid dose, frequency of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, and plasma exchange (PLEX) were also monitored throughout the duration of the study. All patients responded dramatically to rituximab, as measured by a change in MMT score, prednisone dose, or the frequency of IVIG infusions or PLEX. Rituximab appears safe and effective for the treatment of refractory MG. It should be considered as a therapeutic option in refractory patients. PMID:27386504

  16. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  17. Coexistent autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy and myasthenia gravis associated with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Black, Bonnie K; Raj, Satish R; Donofrio, Peter; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man with non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent radiation, chemotherapy with carbotaxol and paclitaxel, and left upper lobe removal 2 years prior to evaluation. He was referred for disabling orthostatic hypotension (113/69 mm Hg supine and 66/47 mm Hg standing after 10 minutes) without a compensatory heart rate increase (57 to 59 beats per minute), fatigue, and constipation with episodes of ileus. Clinical examination showed mild ptosis bilaterally, fatiguable neck flexor weakness, and hip flexor weakness. Blood pressure response to Valsalva maneuver was abnormal with an absence of phase 4 overshoot and a Valsalva heart rate ratio of 1.04. Plasma norepinephrine level was low (79 pg/ml supine, 330 pg/ml standing). Single-fiber electromyography of the right extensor digitorum communis revealed normal mean consecutive difference (jitter) but several pairs exceeded a jitter of 100 mus. Antibodies against muscle acetylcholine receptor [(AChR) 0.66 nmol/L, normal <0.02 nmol/L] and ganglionic AChR (0.34 nmol/L, normal <0.02 nmol/L) were present. Treatment with plasma exchange normalized responses to standing posture (105/68 supine to 118/82 mm Hg standing, 66 to 79 beats per minute), to Valsalva (normal blood pressure overshoot, hazard ratio 1.47), norepinephrine (194 pg/ml supine, 763 pg/ml standing), and jitter measurements. We conclude that autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy and myasthenia gravis can coexist and suggest that the latter should be excluded in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy who complain of fatigue that shows improvement with non-supine rest. PMID:19882640

  18. Evaluation of the Quality of Guidelines for Myasthenia Gravis with the AGREE II Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenchang; Guo, Jia; Su, Gang; Li, Jiong; Wu, Hua; Xie, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners in making decisions about appropriate healthcare in specific clinical circumstances. The methodological quality of CPGs for myasthenia gravis (MG) are unclear. Objective To critically evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs for MG using AGREE II instrument. Method A systematical search strategy on PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) was performed on September 20th 2013. All guidelines related to MG were evaluated with AGREE II. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. Results A total of 15 CPGs for MG met the inclusion criteria (12 CPGs in English, 3 CPGs in Chinese). The overall agreement among reviews was moderate or high (ICC >0.70). The mean scores (mean ± SD) for al six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (60.93% ±16.62%), stakeholder involvement (40.93% ±20.04%), rigor of development (37.22% ±30.46%), clarity of presentation (64.26% ±16.36%), applicability (28.19% ±20.56%) and editorial independence (27.78% ±28.28%). Compared with non-evidence-based CPGs, evidence-based CPGs had statistically significant higher quality scores for all AGREE II domains (P<0.05). All domain scores appear slightly higher for CPGs published after AGREE II instrument development and validation (P>0.05). The quality scores of CPGs developed by NGC/AAN were higher than the quality scores of CPGs developed by other organizations for all domains. The difference was statistically significant for all domains with the exception of clarity of presentation (P = 0.07). Conclusions The qualities of CPGs on MG were generally acceptable with several flaws. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers, particularly in China. PMID:25402504

  19. Expression of acetylcholine receptor genes in human thymic epithelial cells: implications for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Wakkach, A; Guyon, T; Bruand, C; Tzartos, S; Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1996-10-15

    The intrathymic presence of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is controversial, and the nature of the cell(s) expressing it is unclear. We thus analyzed the molecular expression of muscle AChR in human thymi. mRNA studies indicated that the two isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) of the alpha-subunit were present in thymic extracts and in cultured thymic epithelial cells (TEC), while expression in thymocytes was low and not consistently detectable. The amount of mRNA coding for the alpha-subunit, evaluated by means of quantitative PCR, was about 20 times less in TEC than in muscle, and was similar in TEC from normal subjects and from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The beta- and epsilon-subunits present in adult AChR were also expressed in TEC (but not in thymocytes), while the embryonic subunit (gamma) was absent. In TEC cultures, the AChR alpha- and epsilon-subunit mRNA levels were down-regulated by forskolin, as also observed in the TE671 rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, suggesting similar regulation of AChR subunits in thymus and muscle. Protein expression was evidenced on TEC (but not on thymocytes), by Western blotting as well as by immunofluorescence, thus demonstrating AChR expression on human thymic epithelial cells. There was no difference in the expression of AChR between TEC from MG patients and controls, meaning that the expression of AChR subunits alone is not sufficient to explain the onset of MG. PMID:8871679

  20. Seropositivity for West Nile Virus Antibodies in Patients Affected by Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Marilena; Cofano, Pietro; Lobreglio, Giambattista

    2016-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal muscles. Specific auto-antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) are present in the majority of MG patients, although the main cause behind its development still remains unclear. Recently MG development following West Nile virus (WNV) infection has been described in patients without any earlier evidence of MG. It is known that infectious agents trigger immune response and occasionally initiate autoimmune disease. WNV, the causative agent of both benign illness and neuroinvasive disease, has become endemic in many countries in all continents. Methods In the present study, 29 patients (15 males and 14 females, 19 - 78 years old) with confirmed diagnosis of MG and elevated levels of AChR autoantibodies were screened for the presence of serum anti-WNV antibodies and compared to a similar population affected by different autoimmune diseases. Indirect immunofluorescent antibody technique was used to evaluate the reaction of patients’ sera on cells infected by WNV. Results Positive fluorescent signals for anti-WNV IgG were obtained in 17% of MG patients, although no clinical manifestations related to WNV infection were reported. These results are in agreement with previous data and appear of great interest in the understanding of the pathogenic autoimmune mechanisms at the bases of MG development. Conclusion As already observed in other human autoimmune diseases, pathogen-triggered autoimmunity could be involved in MG by breaking immunological self-tolerance through possible mechanisms of molecular mimicry between virus proteins and AChR subunits. In predisposed individuals, WNV infection could also represent an additional risk factor to initiate MG. PMID:26858791

  1. Validation of the MG-DIS: a disability assessment for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Leonardi, Matilde; Schiavolin, Silvia; Antozzi, Carlo; Brenna, Greta; Maggi, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed to present the validation of the myasthenia gravis disability assessment (MG-DIS), a MG-specific patient-reported disability outcome measure. Consecutive MG patients were enrolled, followed-up for 12 months and administered the SF-36, the WHO disability assessment schedule (WHODAS 2.0) and the preliminary 31-item MG-DIS addressing impairments and activity limitations. Factor structure and metric properties were assessed. In total, 109 patients were enrolled: 76 were females, mean age 50, mean MG duration 10.4 years, 86 were AChR-positive. The MG-DIS was reduced to 20 items, explaining 70.6 % of the original questionnaire variance, four subscales (generalized impairment-related problems; bulbar function-related problems; mental health and fatigue-related problems; vision-related problems) and an overall disability index. The MG-DIS has good metric properties (Cronbach's alpha ranging between .808 and .930), is stable, showed to be more sensitive than the WHODAS 2.0 and SF-36 to detect group differences and longitudinal changes and was well correlated with the MG-composite (.642). The MG-DIS includes items representing ocular, generalized, bulbar and respiratory symptoms, and is therefore well-built around MG-specific features. MG-DIS can be used in clinical trials as well as in observational or epidemiological studies to characterize patients' disability level and address the amount of improvement in disability. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of a shorter disability scale. PMID:26931109

  2. Microenvironments in the normal thymus and the thymus in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Bofill, M.; Janossy, G.; Willcox, N.; Chilosi, M.; Trejdosiewicz, L. K.; Newsom-Davis, J.

    1985-01-01

    The disposition of epithelial cells and extracellular matrix, in the thymus of 8 cases of myasthenia gravis (MG) and in controls (over a wide age range) was studied. In the controls, the subcapsular epithelium was strongly Leu-7-positive in the fetus, negative in childhood, and positive again in adults. Another antibody, RFD4, also labeled the subcapsular epithelium in childhood and adults, but not fetal samples. The samples from MG cases showed the same staining pattern as adult control samples. The medullary epithelium was also RFD4+, and at all ages. The most striking changes in the advanced cases of MG were the unusual arrangement and hypertrophic appearance of medullary epithelial cell areas, separated by laminin-positive basement membranes from the alternating multiple bands of peripheral lymph-node-like areas. The latter had regions resembling the paracortex of lymph nodes as well as germinal centers (GCs). The T-cell zones contained heavy deposits of fibronectin. These T-cell zones were unique to the thymus in MG and were absent in the two normal thymic samples with isolated GCs. In MG the laminin-containing basement membrane, which separated the medullary epithelial and peripheral lymph-node-like areas, was fenestrated at circumscribed points closest to the GCs, thus apparently permitting communication among the medullary epithelium, the T-cell zones, the GCs and the associated antigen-presenting cells. Large numbers of interdigitating cells and some lymphocytes of cortical thymocyte phenotype were also found at these special sites, where opportunities for autosensitization may persist in MG. Images Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3874554

  3. Guidelines for pre-clinical animal and cellular models of MuSK-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W D; Christadoss, P; Losen, M; Punga, A R; Shigemoto, K; Verschuuren, J; Vincent, A

    2015-08-01

    Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies are the hallmark of a form of myasthenia gravis (MG) that can challenge the neurologist and the experimentalist. The clinical disease can be difficult to treat effectively. MuSK autoantibodies affect the neuromuscular junction in several ways. When added to muscle cells in culture, MuSK antibodies disperse acetylcholine receptor clusters. Experimental animals actively immunized with MuSK develop MuSK autoantibodies and muscle weakness. Weakness is associated with reduced postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor numbers, reduced amplitudes of miniature endplate potentials and endplate potentials, and failure of neuromuscular transmission. Similar impairments have been found in mice injected with IgG from MG patients positive for MuSK autoantibody (MuSK-MG). The active and passive models have begun to reveal the mechanisms by which MuSK antibodies disrupt synaptic function at the neuromuscular junction, and should be valuable in developing therapies for MuSK-MG. However, translation into new and improved treatments for patients requires procedures that are not too cumbersome but suitable for examining different aspects of MuSK function and the effects of potential therapies. Study design, conduct and analysis should be carefully considered and transparently reported. Here we review what has been learnt from animal and culture models of MuSK-MG, and offer guidelines for experimental design and conduct of studies, including sample size determination, randomization, outcome parameters and precautions for objective data analysis. These principles may also be relevant to the increasing number of other antibody-mediated diseases that are now recognized. PMID:25542979

  4. VAV1 and BAFF, via NFκB pathway, are genetic risk factors for myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Harbo, Hanne F; Bernasconi, Pia; Poulas, Konstantinos; Ginzburg, Elizabeta; Cavalcante, Paola; Colleoni, Lara; Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Truffault, Frédérique; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Pöschel, Simone; Zagoriti, Zoi; Maniaol, Angelina; Lie, Benedicte A; Bernard, Isabelle; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Illes, Zsolt; Casasnovas Pons, Carlos; Melms, Arthur; Tzartos, Socrates; Willcox, Nicholas; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify novel genetic loci that predispose to early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG) applying a two-stage association study, exploration, and replication strategy. Methods Thirty-four loci and one confirmation loci, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRA, were selected as candidate genes by team members of groups involved in different research aspects of MG. In the exploration step, these candidate genes were genotyped in 384 EOMG and 384 matched controls and significant difference in allele frequency were found in eight genes. In the replication step, eight candidate genes and one confirmation loci were genotyped in 1177 EOMG patients and 814 controls, from nine European centres. Results Allele frequency differences were found in four novel loci: CD86, AKAP12, VAV1, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and these differences were consistent in all nine cohorts. Haplotype trend test supported the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls. In addition, allele frequency difference in female versus male patients at HLA-DRA and TNF-α loci were observed. Interpretation The genetic associations to EOMG outside the HLA complex are novel and of interest as VAV1 is a key signal transducer essential for T- and B-cell activation, and BAFF is a cytokine that plays important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of B-cells. Moreover, we noted striking epistasis between the predisposing VAV1 and BAFF haplotypes; they conferred a greater risk in combination than alone. These, and CD86, share the same signaling pathway, namely nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), thus implicating dysregulation of proinflammatory signaling in predisposition to EOMG. PMID:25356403

  5. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Fotiou, Dimitris; Tsiptsios, Dimitris; Orologas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate with neurophysiological and neuropsychological methods such as pupillometry, cognitive test and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) the hypothesis of Central Nervous System (CNS) cholinergic involvement in patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Methods Thirty-two patients (32) with MG and a mean age of 51.1 ± 17.2 volunteered to participate in this investigation, while thirty-three (33) healthy subjects with a mean age of 50.2 ± 14.8 served as controls. All subjects underwent pupillometric measurements and performed the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) and HAM-D. The pupillometric indices studied were: 1) latency for the onset of constriction (T1), 2) maximum constriction velocity (VCmax) and 3) maximum constriction acceleration (ACmax). Results T1 was found significantly increased by 21.7% (p < 0.05) in MG patients as compared to healthy subjects. Conversely, VCmax and ACmax were significantly decreased in MG patients by 33.3% (p < 0.05) and 43.5% (p < 0.05) respectively, as opposed to healthy subjects. Additionally, MG patients showed significantly decreased score in WMS by 41.6% (p < 0.05) as compared to healthy controls. No significant difference was found for HAM-D between the two groups. Conclusions VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26672759

  6. [Concurrence of myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroiditis and eosinophilia in a patient with type B1 thymoma].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Manabu; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Shinde, Akiyo; Satoi, Hitoshi; Makino, Fumi; Kanda, Masutarou; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    We presented a 43-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed weakness of all extremities and difficulty in swallowing and drooping of eyelids, characterized by easy fatigability at the end of December, 2005. On general physical examination, she had moderate goiter. No cervical lymphadenopathy, cardiac murmur, or skin rash was noted. Neurologically, she had blepharoptosis, more on the right, only in the upright position with easy fatigability and marked weakness in the neck flexor, trunk, and all limb muscles much more proximally than distally. She had neither muscular atrophy nor upper motor neuron sign. Laboratory data showed slight leukocytosis with eosinophilia (up to 31%), and serum creatine kinase was markedly increased to over 2,000 IU/l. TSH receptor antibody (11.9%) and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (46.6 nmol/L) were also increased. Edrophonium test was positive. Electrophysiologically, muscle evoked potentials by repetitive motor nerve stimulation showed 13% and 50% waning in abductor pollicis brevis and deltoid muscle, respectively, at low frequency and no waxing at high frequency. Needle EMG showed fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in proximal muscles. Polymyositis was diagnosed by muscle biopsy which showed infiltration of lymphocytes in the endomysium and around non-necrotic muscle fibers. Upper arm muscle MRI showed multifocal high signal intensity lesions on T2-weighted images which were likely related to myositis. This finding is atypical for polymyositis. X-ray and CT of chest showed a mass lesion in the left pulmonary hilum, which was histologically diagnosed as type B1 thymoma. Thus, the present case had myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroidititis and eosinophilia associated with type B1 thymoma. After the thymectomy, corticosteroid administration and immunoadsorption therapy, clinical symptoms and all laboratory abnormalities markedly improved. PMID:17710886

  7. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  8. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai-peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-feng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  9. Response to suxamethonium during propofol-fentanyl-N2O/O2 anaesthesia in a patient with active myasthenia gravis receiving long-term anticholinesterase therapy.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L E; Robertson, E N; Booij, L H

    1994-06-01

    We describe the effect of repeated suxamethonium doses during propofol-fentanyl-N2O/O2 anaesthesia in a 29-year-old woman with active myasthenia gravis receiving chronic pyridostigmine therapy. Despite adequate pre-operative pseudocholinesterase activity, suxamethonium resistance occurred. Neither bradycardia nor residual neuromuscular block were seen after repeated doses of suxamethonium. PMID:8017595

  10. Suppression of experimental myasthenia gravis, a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease, by blockade of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Maiti, P K; Raveh, L; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2001-10-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and IL-12-driven Th1 phenotype polarization. Increased expression of IL-18 has been observed in several autoimmune diseases. In this study we have analyzed the role of IL-18 in an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease and elucidated the mechanisms involved in disease suppression mediated by blockade of IL-18, using experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) as a model. EAMG is a T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune disease in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. Th1- and Th2-type responses are both implicated in EAMG development. We show that treatment by anti-IL-18 during ongoing EAMG suppresses disease progression. The protective effect can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients and is mediated by increased levels of the immunosuppressive Th3-type cytokine TGF-beta and decreased AChR-specific Th1-type cellular responses. Suppression of EAMG is accompanied by down-regulation of the costimulatory factor CD40L and up-regulation of CTLA-4, a key negative immunomodulator. Our results suggest that IL-18 blockade may potentially be applied for immunointervention in myasthenia gravis. PMID:11641240

  11. Severe congenital myasthenia gravis of the presynaptic type with choline acetyltransferase mutation in a Chinese infant with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wai L; Lam, Ching W; Fung, Lai W E; Hon, Kam L E; Ng, Pak C

    2009-01-01

    We report a severe case of congenital myasthenia gravis in a Chinese newborn who presented with complete ptosis, severe hypotonia, dysphagia and respiratory insufficiency with recurrent apnea that required mechanical ventilatory support since birth. Routine neurophysiologic studies, including the 3-Hz repetitive stimulation test and electromyogram were normal. Neostigmine and edrophonium tests were also negative. However, decremental response to 3-Hz stimulation became apparent after depleting the muscles with trains of 10-Hz stimuli for 10 min. The infant was subsequently confirmed to have heterozygous mutations in the choline acetyltransferase genes, p.T553N and p.S704P. Both missense mutations are novel mutations. The child remained on positive pressure ventilation at 3 years of age despite treatment with high-dose anticholinesterase. This case highlights the difficulty of making an early diagnosis based on clinical presentation and routine electrophysiologic tests, especially when neonatologists are not familiar with this condition. Further, as there are different genetic defects causing different types of congenital myasthenia gravis, anticholinesterase therapy may be beneficial to some but detrimental to others. Therefore, the exact molecular diagnosis is an important guide to therapy. A high index of suspicion coupled with extended electrodiagnostic tests in clinically suspected patients will ensure the selection of appropriate genetic molecular study for confirming the diagnosis. PMID:18797171

  12. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K.; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Brömme, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II–associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of αβ-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology. PMID:12925692

  13. Evidence of enhanced recombinant interleukin-2 sensitivity in thymic lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis: possible role in autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Levasseur, P; Binet, J P; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1989-09-01

    We evaluated the activation state of thymic lymphocytes in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) by cytofluorographic analysis of CD25 expression and by testing their sensitivity to recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) in the absence of any known previous stimulation. We detected no phenotypic signs of activation in fresh MG thymic lymphocyte suspensions, while functional signs of activation were reflected in a significantly higher sensitivity to rIL-2 in MG patients than in controls. The responses to rIL-2 were time- and dose-dependent, were inhibited by a blocking anti-IL-2 receptor antibody, and were associated with an increase in CD25+ T cells in both patients and controls. The T cells with functional signs of previous activation may represent autoreactive cells involved in the autoimmune process and confirm thymus gland hyperactivity in MG. These cells could result from primary autosensitization against the thymic acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-like molecule or from altered migration of peripheral activated cells into an abnormal thymic environment. Our results also provide a clue for understanding the effect of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis. PMID:2808688

  14. MuSK induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis does not require IgG1 antibody to MuSK.

    PubMed

    Küçükerden, Melike; Huda, Ruksana; Tüzün, Erdem; Yılmaz, Abdullah; Skriapa, Lamprini; Trakas, Nikos; Strait, Richard T; Finkelman, Fred D; Kabadayı, Sevil; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2016-06-15

    Sera of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with muscle-specific receptor kinase-antibody (MuSK-Ab) predominantly display the non-complement fixing IgG4 isotype. Similarly, mouse IgG1, which is the analog of human IgG4, is the predominant isotype in mice with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by MuSK immunization. The present study was performed to determine whether IgG1 anti-MuSK antibody is required for immunized mice to develop EAMG. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between clinical severity of EAMG and levels of MuSK-binding IgG1+, IgG2+ and IgG3+ peripheral blood B cells in MuSK-immunized wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, MuSK-immunized IgG1 knockout (KO) and WT mice showed similar EAMG severity, serum MuSK-Ab levels, muscle acetylcholine receptor concentrations, neuromuscular junction immunoglobulin and complement deposit ratios. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant anti-MuSK isotypes in WT and IgG1 KO mice, respectively. These observations demonstrate that non-IgG1 isotypes can mediate MuSK-EAMG pathogenesis. PMID:27235354

  15. Modulation of the anti-acetylcholine receptor response and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by recombinant fragments of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Asher, O; Tzartos, S J; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1998-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder of man caused by a humoral response to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Most of the antibodies in MG and in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are directed to the extracellular portion of the AChR alpha subunit, and within it, primarily to the main immunogenic region (MIR). We have cloned and expressed recombinant fragments, corresponding to the entire extracellular domain of the AChR alpha subunit (H alpha1-210), and to portions of it that encompass either the MIR (H alpha1-121) or the ligand binding site of AChR (H alpha122-210), and studied their ability to interfere with the immunopathological anti-AChR response in vitro and in vivo. All fragments were expressed as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase. Fragments H alpha1-121 and H alpha1-210 protected AChR in TE671 cells against accelerated degradation induced by the anti-MIR monoclonal antibody (mAb)198 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, these fragments had a similar effect on the antigenic modulation of AChR by other anti-MIR mAb and by polyclonal rat anti-AChR antibodies. Fragments H alpha1-121 and H alpha1-210 were also able to modulate in vivo muscle AChR loss and development of clinical symptoms of EAMG, passively transferred to rats by mAb 198. Fragment H alpha122-210 did not have such a protective activity. Our results suggest that the appropriate recombinant fragments of the human AChR may be employed in the future for antigen-specific therapy of myasthenia. PMID:9521072

  16. Effects of the ß2-adrenoceptor agonist, albuterol, in a mouse model of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Tse, Nigel; Reddel, Stephen W; Phillips, William D

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, albuterol, has been reported beneficial in treating several forms of congenital myasthenia. Here, for the first time, we examined the potential benefit of albuterol in a mouse model of anti-Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 15 daily injections of IgG from anti-MuSK positive patients, which resulted in whole-body weakness. At neuromuscular junctions in the tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles the autoantibodies caused loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors, and reduced the amplitudes of the endplate potential and spontaneous miniature endplate potential in the diaphragm muscle. Treatment with albuterol (8 mg/kg/day) during the two-week anti-MuSK injection series reduced the degree of weakness and weight loss, compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, the compound muscle action potential recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle displayed a decremental response in anti-MuSK-injected mice whether treated with albuterol or vehicle. Ongoing albuterol treatment did not increase endplate potential amplitudes compared to vehicle-treated mice nor did it prevent the loss of acetylcholine receptors from motor endplates. On the other hand, albuterol treatment significantly reduced the degree of fragmentation of endplate acetylcholine receptor clusters and increased the extent to which the remaining receptor clusters were covered by synaptophysin-stained nerve terminals. The results provide the first evidence that short-term albuterol treatment can ameliorate weakness in a robust mouse model of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. The results also demonstrate that it is possible for albuterol treatment to reduce whole-body weakness without necessarily reversing myasthenic impairment to the structure and function of the neuromuscular junction. PMID:24505322

  17. Effects of the ß2-Adrenoceptor Agonist, Albuterol, in a Mouse Model of Anti-MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Tse, Nigel; Reddel, Stephen W.; Phillips, William D.

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, albuterol, has been reported beneficial in treating several forms of congenital myasthenia. Here, for the first time, we examined the potential benefit of albuterol in a mouse model of anti-Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 15 daily injections of IgG from anti-MuSK positive patients, which resulted in whole-body weakness. At neuromuscular junctions in the tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles the autoantibodies caused loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors, and reduced the amplitudes of the endplate potential and spontaneous miniature endplate potential in the diaphragm muscle. Treatment with albuterol (8 mg/kg/day) during the two-week anti-MuSK injection series reduced the degree of weakness and weight loss, compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, the compound muscle action potential recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle displayed a decremental response in anti-MuSK-injected mice whether treated with albuterol or vehicle. Ongoing albuterol treatment did not increase endplate potential amplitudes compared to vehicle-treated mice nor did it prevent the loss of acetylcholine receptors from motor endplates. On the other hand, albuterol treatment significantly reduced the degree of fragmentation of endplate acetylcholine receptor clusters and increased the extent to which the remaining receptor clusters were covered by synaptophysin-stained nerve terminals. The results provide the first evidence that short-term albuterol treatment can ameliorate weakness in a robust mouse model of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. The results also demonstrate that it is possible for albuterol treatment to reduce whole-body weakness without necessarily reversing myasthenic impairment to the structure and function of the neuromuscular junction. PMID:24505322

  18. Myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma affects survival rate following extended thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHEFENG; CUI, YOUBIN; JIA, RUI; XUE, LEI; LIANG, HUAGANG

    2016-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common adult tumors in the anterior mediastinal compartment, and a significant amount of thymomas are complicated by myasthenia gravis (MG). Extended thymectomy (ET) is the primary treatment method for thymomas and is used to completely resect possible ectopic thymus to avoid recurrence. Studies on the effect of MG in thymoma patients following ET are limited. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the presence of MG affects the prognosis of patients with thymoma. The present study consisted of 104 patients with thymoma that underwent ET; 61 men (58.7%) and 43 women (41.3%) (mean age, 54.6 years). In total, 38 patients had MG (36.5%). MG was most frequently observed in World Health Organization (WHO) classification type B2 thymoma compared with other types of thymoma. During the 5-year follow-up period, 11 patients succumbed to a recurrence of thymoma or respiratory failure due to MG. The overall 5-year survival rate in patients without MG or with MG was 89.1 and 76.0%, respectively. The overall survival (OS) rate in patients with Masaoka stages I + II and III + IV was 90.0 and 68.0%, respectively. The OS rate in patients with WHO type A + AB + B1 and type B2 + B3 was 96.9 and 76.8%, respectively. The patients with MG (P=0.026), Masaoka stages III + IV (P=0.008) and WHO type B2 + B3 (P=0.032) had a poorer prognosis compared with patients without these characteristics. Furthermore, multivariate analysis by Cox regression revealed that age [P=0.032; relative risk (RR)=1.097; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.097–1.192] and MG (P=0.042; RR=0.167; 95% CI=0.037–0.940) significantly affected OS rate. In summary, ET is a reliable method for the treatment of thymoma. Long-term survival is expected for patients at early Masaoka stages, and for patients without MG. The prognosis of patients with thymomas with MG is poorer compared with patients without MG. The present findings provide useful information for the future management of

  19. Immunodominant regions for T helper-cell sensitization on the human nicotinic receptor alpha subunit in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Protti, M P; Manfredi, A A; Straub, C; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1990-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis an autoimmune response against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) occurs. The alpha subunit of the AChR contains both the epitope(s) that dominates the antibody response (main immunogenic region) and epitopes involved in T helper cell sensitization. In this study, overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to the complete AChR alpha-subunit sequence were used to propagate polyclonal AChR-specific T helper cell lines from four myasthenic patients of different HLA types. Response of the T helper lines to the individual peptides was studied. Four immunodominant sequence segments were identified--i.e., residues 48-67, 101-120, 304-322, and 419-437. These regions did not include residues known to form the main immunogenic region or the cholinergic binding site, and they frequently contained sequence motifs that have been proposed to be related to T-epitope formation. Images PMID:2145582

  20. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases. PMID:27263226

  1. Application of digital technology in the prosthodontic management of a patient with myasthenia gravis: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Jekki, Rami; Richardson, Paul M; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2016-05-01

    Application of digital technology in the treatment of a patient with myasthenia gravis and an excessively resorbed mandibular residual alveolar ridge is presented. The patient requested replacement of worn maxillary and mandibular prostheses. Treatment involved fabricating a new maxillary complete denture that was similar in appearance to the one being replaced and rebasing the existing and clinically acceptable mandibular fixed framework. The interim phase of treatment involved fabricating a mandibular milled prosthesis similar in morphology to the existing fixed complete denture with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing technology. This facilitated conversion of an interim prosthesis by using an orientation device and eliminated the need for the patient to adapt to an interim removable complete denture. PMID:26775246

  2. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. Isolated from Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Lesions in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Yong, Lee K; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Sutton, Deanna A; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Lindner, Jonathan R; Fan, Hongxin; Sanders, Carmita; Guarro, Josep

    2015-09-01

    Exophiala species are capable of causing cutaneous and subcutaneous infections in immunocompromised patients. An Exophiala isolate was cultured from a biopsy specimen of a lesion on the forearm of a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient also had lesions on the palm and distal aspects of the hand, which were successfully treated with a long-term course of itraconazole. A detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the isolate was undertaken. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and portions of the β-tubulin and translation elongation factor 1-alpha genes indicated that the isolate was a novel species closely related to but genetically distinct from species within the Exophiala spinifera clade; the name Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. is proposed. Morphologically, E. polymorpha most closely resembles E. xenobiotica but it differs in possessing phialides bearing prominent, wide collarettes, and it does not produce chlamydospores. PMID:26085612

  3. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. Isolated from Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Lesions in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Lee K.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Lindner, Jonathan R.; Fan, Hongxin; Sanders, Carmita; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Exophiala species are capable of causing cutaneous and subcutaneous infections in immunocompromised patients. An Exophiala isolate was cultured from a biopsy specimen of a lesion on the forearm of a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient also had lesions on the palm and distal aspects of the hand, which were successfully treated with a long-term course of itraconazole. A detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the isolate was undertaken. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and portions of the β-tubulin and translation elongation factor 1-alpha genes indicated that the isolate was a novel species closely related to but genetically distinct from species within the Exophiala spinifera clade; the name Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. is proposed. Morphologically, E. polymorpha most closely resembles E. xenobiotica but it differs in possessing phialides bearing prominent, wide collarettes, and it does not produce chlamydospores. PMID:26085612

  4. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  5. Disease specific enrichment of circulating let-7 family microRNA in MuSK+ myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Punga, Tanel; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Lewandowska, Marta; Damato, Valentina; Evoli, Amelia; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with antibodies against the muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK+) have predominantly involvement of cranio-bulbar muscles and do not display thymus pathology, as do acetylcholine receptor antibody seropositive (AChR+) MG patients. In search of novel biomarkers for MuSK+ MG, we evaluated circulating serum microRNAs. Four analyzed microRNAs were specifically elevated in MuSK+ MG patient serum samples: let-7a-5p, let-7f-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-423-5p. The circulating microRNA profile in MuSK+ MG differs from the profile previously observed in the serum of AChR+ MG, thus indicating the etiological difference between these two entities. We propose that the identified microRNAs could serve as potential serum biomarkers for MuSK+ MG. PMID:26943954

  6. Pure red cell aplasia associated with malignant thymoma, myasthenia gravis, polyclonal large granular lymphocytosis and clonal thymic T cell expansion.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, S I; Schofield, K P; Sivakumaran, M; Short, M; Pumphrey, R S

    1994-01-01

    A case with the triad of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), myasthenia gravis, and malignant thymoma is reported. There was a clonal proliferation of T cells within the thymoma, as demonstrated by a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement. However, despite a large granular lymphocytosis, clonality could not be shown in the peripheral blood either before or after thymectomy. There was no evidence of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 7 (HTLV1) infection. It is postulated that the clonal thymic T cell population secreted cytokine(s), which stimulated the polyclonal proliferation of large granular lymphocytes, which in turn suppressed erythropoiesis. Thymectomy removed the stimulus to the large granular lymphocytes and hence there was a resurgence of erythropoiesis. Images PMID:8089232

  7. CD1dhiCD5+ B cells Expanded by GM-CSF in Vivo Suppress Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1dhiCD5+ B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low dose granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells and B10 cells. In vitro co-culture studies revealed that CD1dhiCD5+ B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. On the other hand, CD1dhiCD5+ B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells to mice could prevent disease as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insights into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. PMID:25135828

  8. Myasthenia gravis: a long term follow‐up study of Swedish patients with specific reference to thymic histology

    PubMed Central

    Tsinzerling, Natalie; Lefvert, Ann‐Kari; Matell, Georg; Pirskanen‐Matell, Ritva

    2007-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. The majority of patients show abnormal thymic histology. Setting The study was performed at the Myasthenia Gravis Centre, Karolinska University Hospital, and at the Immunological Research Laboratory, Centre for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Patients and methods Information was collected retrospectively from 1956 and prospectively from 1975 on clinical data, concomitant diseases, concentration of serum acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR‐abs), immunosuppressive treatment (IS) and response to it, in 537 patients of whom 326 were thymectomised. Follow‐up time was 1.5–50 years. Results Age at onset of MG increased from a median age of 24 years before 1975 to a median age of 61 years after 2000. Thymoma was found in 65, hyperplasia (HPL) in 185 and a normal thymus in 76 patients. The trans‐sternal surgical approach for thymectomy was used in 255 patients (78%). In five patients with thymoma, MG appeared after thymectomy. Of 537 patients, 466 (87%) had circulating AChR‐abs. IS was given to 300 (56%) patients, mostly those with thymoma (85%). In total, 441 patients (82%) showed an improvement. One‐third of patients with HPL, a quarter of those with thymoma, one‐fifth of those with a normal thymus and one‐seventh of those not operated on went into remission. Conclusion The prognosis for the majority of patients with MG is favourable, irrespective of thymic histology. The cause may be the use of immunomodulating therapy. PMID:17353257

  9. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  10. [A case of radiation-related pneumonia and bilateral tension pneumothorax after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation for thymoma with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Etsuko; Nakayama, Masayuki; Bando, Masashi; Endo, Shunsuke; Hironaka, Mitsugu; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2010-08-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a 2-month history of progressive cough and dyspnea. He had undergone thymectomy for thymoma with myasthenia gravis. Adjuvant radiation of 50 Gy had been performed until 6 months before the symptoms developed. Chest computed tomography showed infiltrative findings even outside the irradiated area. We diagnosed radiation-related pneumonia, and 30 mg per day prednisolone was initiated. On the final day, he developed bilateral tension pneumothorax. After chest tube drainage, the right S5 bulla was resected with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The right pneumothorax caused the bilateral tension pneumothorax, because the right and left thoracic cavity communicated in the anterior mediastinum after thymectomy. We should be aware of the risk of bilateral tension pneumothorax following radiation-related pneumonia after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation in patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:20803975

  11. In vitro proliferative responses and antibody titers specific to human acetylcholine receptor synthetic peptides in patients with myasthenia gravis and relation to HLA class II genes.

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, S; Brautbar, C; Steinman, L; Abramsky, O; Rothbard, J; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S; Mozes, E

    1988-01-01

    To investigate which parts of the acetylcholine receptor are involved in the initiation and development of myasthenia gravis (MG), peptides representing different sequences of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit were synthesized. These peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate T cells of myasthenic patients and healthy control patients in proliferation assays and to bind to sera antibodies. Three of eight peptides discriminated significantly between the two groups in the proliferation assay, as well as in their ability to bind to serum antibodies. HLA-DR3 and DR5 were associated with proliferative responses to specific AChR peptides in the group of myasthenics. Acetylcholine receptor epitopes that might play a specific role in myasthenia gravis thus were demonstrated. PMID:2461962

  12. Collagen Q is a key player for developing rational therapy for congenital myasthenia and for dissecting the mechanisms of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Kawakami, Yu; Ohtsuka, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ) in the form of asymmetric AChE (AChE/ColQ). We exploited the proprietary NMJ-targeting signals of ColQ to treat congenital myasthenia and to explore the mechanisms of autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG). Mutations in COLQ cause congenital endplate AChE deficiency (CEAD). First, a single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq−/− mice normalized motor functions, synaptic transmission, and partly the NMJ ultrastructure. Additionally, injection of purified recombinant AChE/ColQ protein complex into gluteus maximus accumulated AChE in non-injected forelimbs. Second, MuSK antibody-positive MG accounts for 5-15 % of MG. In vitro overlay of AChE/ColQ to muscle sections of Colq−/− mice, as well as in vitro plate-binding of MuSK to ColQ, revealed thatMuSK-IgG blocks binding of ColQ to MuSK in a dose-dependent manner. Passive transfer of MuSK-IgG to wild-type mice markedly reduced the size and intensity of ColQ signals at NMJs. MuSK-IgG thus interferes with binding of ColQ to MuSK. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of specific binding of ColQ to NMJ enabled us to ameliorate devastating myasthenic symptoms of Colq−/− mice and also to reveal underlying mechanisms of anti-MuSK-MG. PMID:24234034

  13. Molecular mimicry and myasthenia gravis. An autoantigenic site of the acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit that has biologic activity and reacts immunochemically with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schwimmbeck, P L; Dyrberg, T; Drachman, D B; Oldstone, M B

    1989-01-01

    The large majority of patients with the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis characteristically have detectable antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). We used synthetic peptides to identify antibodies in sera of myasthenia gravis patients reactive with the human acetylcholine receptor (HuAChR) alpha-subunit, residues 160-167. Affinity purification of these antibodies, using the HuAChR alpha-subunit 157-170 peptide immobilized on thiopropyl-Sepharose, yielded IgG antibodies that bound to the native AChR and inhibited the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The HuAChR alpha-subunit 160-167 peptide demonstrated specific immunological cross-reactivity with a shared homologous domain on herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, residues 286-293, by both binding and inhibition studies. Thus, HuAChR alpha-subunit, residues 160-167, elicits antibodies in myasthenic patients that binds to the native AChR protein and is capable of eliciting a biologic effect. Immunologic cross-reactivity of this "self" epitope with herpes simplex virus suggest that this virus may be associated with the initiation of some cases of myasthenia. Images PMID:2551924

  14. Selective response to rituximab in a young child with MuSK-associated myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Iyadurai, Stanley J; Connolly, Anne; Zaidman, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Neuromuscular junction disorders in children are either genetic, such as congenital myasthenic syndrome, or autoimmune with circulating antibodies most commonly against acetylcholine receptors. There is limited experience recognizing and treating children with myasthenia associated with muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies. We report a seven-year-old child with intermittent esotropia since age 3 months, and two years of progressive and severe diplopia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial weakness. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies and genetic testing for congenital myasthenic syndrome were negative. Muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were significantly elevated. Ophthalmoplegia and bulbar weakness were refractory to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, corticosteroids and IVIg but completely resolved following treatment with rituximab. Her neurologic examination remained normal at the most recent follow-up, 15 months after initiation of rituximab. Children with MuSK myasthenia, like adults, can respond to rituximab despite long standing disease and failure to improve on other immunosuppressant medications. PMID:25998611

  15. Incidence and Prevalence of Myasthenia Gravis in Korea: A Population-Based Study Using the National Health Insurance Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su-Yeon; Lee, Jin Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There have been a few national population-based epidemiological studies of myasthenia gravis (MG) with wide variation of incidence and prevalence rates worldwide. Herein we report the first nationwide population-based epidemiological study of MG in Korea. Methods We attempted to estimate the incidence and prevalence rates of MG using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database for 2010 to 2013. Cases with MG were defined as those having claim records with a principal diagnosis of MG and the prescription of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or immunosuppressive agents including corticosteroids and azathioprine within 2 years after the diagnosis. The year 2010 was set as a washout period, such that patients were defined as incident cases if their first records of MG were observed in 2011. Results In 2011 there were 1,236 incident cases, and the standardized incidence rate was 2.44 per 100,000 person-years. The standardized prevalence rates were 9.67 and 10.66 per 100,000 persons in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The incidence and prevalence rates peaked in the elderly population aged 60 to 69 years for both sexes. Conclusions This is one of the largest national population-based epidemiological studies of MG, and it has confirmed the high incidence and prevalence rates of MG in the elderly population of South Korea. PMID:27165426

  16. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  17. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  18. Oral administration of an immunodominant T-cell epitope downregulates Th1/Th2 cytokines and prevents experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Baggi, Fulvio; Andreetta, Francesca; Caspani, Elisabetta; Milani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Mantegazza, Renato; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Antozzi, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    The mucosal administration of the native antigen or peptide fragments corresponding to immunodominant regions is effective in preventing or treating several T cell–dependent models of autoimmune disease. No data are yet available on oral tolerance with immunodominant T-cell peptides in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), an animal model of B cell–dependent disease. We report that oral administration of the T-cell epitope α146-162 of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (TAChR) α-subunit suppressed T-cell responses to AChR and ameliorated the disease in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. Protection from EAMG was associated with reduced serum Ab’s to mouse AChR and reduced AChR loss in muscle. The effect of Tα146-162 feeding was specific; treatment with a control peptide did not affect EAMG manifestations. The protective effect induced by peptide Tα146-162 was mediated by reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10 by TAChR-reactive cells, suggesting T-cell anergy. TGF-β–secreting Th3 cells did not seem to be involved in tolerance induction. We therefore demonstrate that feeding a single immunodominant epitope can prevent an Ab-mediated experimental model of autoimmune disease. PMID:10545527

  19. [Recent advance in research for myasthenia gravis, in relation to various antibodies affecting synaptic structure and function].

    PubMed

    Takamori, Masaharu

    2009-11-01

    Autoantibodies impair acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in myasthenia gravis (MG) and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS). (1) Some of MG and LEMS patients are "seronegative" for respective antibodies or modified by antibodies that recognize other proteins than AChR and VGCC such as MuSK, AChR allosteric site, membrane Na+ channel and ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) in MG, and synaptotagmin-1 in LEMS. (2) Autoimmune responses affect the proteins participating in the mechanisms to compensate for synaptic disorders on the basis of presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis provided by VGCC and non-VGCC (receptor-operated TRPCs): they act as enhancers of Ca(2+) -mediated ACh release via phospholipase C signaling pathways including M1-type presynaptic muscarinic AChR, neurotrophin receptor (TrkB), and fast-mode of synaptic vesicle recycling. (3) The pathophysiology contributive to contractile fatigue in MG includes RyR1 and also TRPC3. The TRPC3 also forms a complex with STIM1 and Orail to make up for Ca2+ after sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release. The prevalent detection of anti-TRPC3 antibodies in MG with thymoma could affect muscle contractile machineries in addition to anti-RyR1-induced affection. (4) When one faces "seronegative" MG, one should be cautious to conformation-specific antibodies and also congenital myasthenic syndromes. PMID:20030211

  20. Clinical features, pathogenesis, and treatment of myasthenia gravis: a supplement to the Guidelines of the German Neurological Society.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Nico; Ruck, Tobias; Fuhr, Peter; Gold, Ralf; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Marx, Alexander; Melms, Arthur; Tackenberg, Björn; Schalke, Berthold; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Zimprich, Fritz; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune antibody-mediated disorder of neuromuscular synaptic transmission. The clinical hallmark of MG consists of fluctuating fatigability and weakness affecting ocular, bulbar and (proximal) limb skeletal muscle groups. MG may either occur as an autoimmune disease with distinct immunogenetic characteristics or as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with tumors of the thymus. Impairment of central thymic and peripheral self-tolerance mechanisms in both cases is thought to favor an autoimmune CD4(+) T cell-mediated B cell activation and synthesis of pathogenic high-affinity autoantibodies of either the IgG1 and 3 or IgG4 subclass. These autoantibodies bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR) itself, or muscle-specific tyrosine-kinase (MuSK), lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) and agrin involved in clustering of AchRs within the postsynaptic membrane and structural maintenance of the neuromuscular synapse. This results in disturbance of neuromuscular transmission and thus clinical manifestation of the disease. Emphasizing evidence from clinical trials, we provide an updated overview on immunopathogenesis, and derived current and future treatment strategies for MG divided into: (a) symptomatic treatments facilitating neuromuscular transmission, (b) antibody-depleting treatments, and PMID:26886206

  1. Myopathic changes detected by quantitative electromyography in patients with MuSK and AChR positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ana; Basta, Ivana; Stojanovic, Vidosava Rakocevic; Stevic, Zorica; Peric, Stojan; Lavrnic, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Myopathic changes are frequent a electrophysiological finding in patients with muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) positive myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to explore the importance of quantitative electromyography (EMG) in the detection of myopathic changes in MuSK MG patients. Classical and quantitative EMG were performed in 31 MuSK and 28 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) positive MG patients, matched by sex, age, disease duration and severity. Classical EMG revealed the presence of myopathic changes more frequently in MuSK MG compared to AChR MG patients, especially in the facial muscles. Quantitative EMG registered myopathic lesions more frequently than classical EMG, but the frequency was similar between MuSK and AChR MG patients. Quantitative EMG revealed myopathic changes in the majority of both MuSK and AChR positive MG patients. This examination is sensitive, but it cannot be used to differentiate between MG patients belonging to the different disease groups. It should not be used in isolation. Rather, it should complement classical EMG in the detection of myopathic changes. PMID:26778359

  2. Preoperative Anxiety in Patients With Myasthenia Gravis and Risk for Myasthenic Crisis After Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A CONSORT Study.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianyong; Su, Chunhua; Lun, Xueping; Liu, Weibing; Yang, Weiling; Zhong, Beilong; Zhu, Haoshuai; Lei, Yiyan; Luo, Honghe; Chen, Zhenguang

    2016-03-01

    A thymectomy can ameliorate the symptoms of myasthenia gravis (MG) and prevent the progression of ocular MG (OMG) to generalized MG (GMG). However, postoperative myasthenic crisis (POMC) is a serious post-thymectomy complication. Preoperative anxiety (POA) is common but typically neglected in MG patients. The association of POA with POMC has not yet been examined.From June 2007 to December 2013, 541 cases of MG were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (Guangzhou, China). All cases underwent extended transsternal thymectomy (ETT). The clinical and pathological characteristics of these patients, including POA and POMC, were analyzed.A total of 179 patients experienced POA and 67 patients experienced POMC. Patients with POA were more likely to have POMC, a thymoma, and an ectopic thymus. Univariate analysis showed that POMC correlated with POA, presence of an ectopic thymus, dose of pyridostigmine bromide (PYR), presence of a thymoma, MGFA stage, preoperative myasthenic crisis, and postoperative pneumonia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for POMC were POA, preoperative myasthenic crisis, higher dose of PYR, and postoperative pneumonia.Our results suggest that clinicians should consider the risk factors for POMC-especially preoperative anxiety-before performing a thymectomy in patients with MG. PMID:26962777

  3. Blood Transcriptome Profiling in Myasthenia Gravis Patients to Assess Disease Activity: A Pilot RNA-seq Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kee Hong; Jung, Junghee; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by exertional weakness. There is no biomarker to reflect disease activity and guide treatment decision. Here, we reported a pilot blood transcriptome study using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that identified differences of 5 samples in active status and 5 in remission from 8 different patients and 2 patients provided samples for both active and remission phase. We found a total of 28 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) possibly related to disease activity (23 up-regulated and 5 down-regulated). The DEGs were enriched for the cell motion and cell migration processes in which included were ICAM1, CCL3, S100P and GAB2. The apoptosis and cell death pathway was also significantly enriched, which includes NFKBIA, ZC3H12A, TNFAIP3, and PPP1R15A. Our result suggests that transcript abundance profiles of the genes involved in cell trafficking and apoptosis may be a molecular signature of the disease activity in MG patients. PMID:26924932

  4. Enhancement of noradrenergic neural transmission: an effective therapy of myasthenia gravis: a report on 52 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Pardey-Maldonado, B; John, E; Jimenez, V; Orozco, B; Baez, S; Lechin, M E

    2000-01-01

    Neurochemical, neuroautonomic and neuropharmacological assessments carried out on all our myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that they presented a neural sympathetic deficit plus excessive adrenal-sympathetic activity. These abnormalities were registered during the basal (supine-resting) state, as well as after several stress tests (orthostasis, exercise, oral glucose and buspirone). In addition, MG patients showed increased levels of free-serotonin (f5HT) in the plasma, supposedly associated with the increased platelet aggregability which we found in all MG patients. As the above trio of neurochemical disorders (low noradrenergic-activity + high adrenergic-activity + increased f-5HT plasma levels) is known to favor Th-1 immunosuppression + Th-2 predominance, we outlined a neuropharmacological strategy for reverting the above neurochemical disorder. This treatment provoked sudden (acute), and late sustained improvements. Acute effects have been attributed to the increase of alpha-1 activity at the spinal motoneuron level. Late improvements always paralleled a significant normalization of immunological disorders. Complete normalization was registered only in non-thymectomized MG patients. PMID:11508327

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Late-Onset Myasthenia Gravis: Confirmation of TNFRSF11A and Identification of ZBTB10 and Three Distinct HLA Associations

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F; Alkhairy, Omar K; Lee, Annette T; Lamb, Janine A; Sussman, Jon; Pirskanen-Matell, Ritva; Piehl, Fredrik; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Szczudlik, Piotr; McKee, David; Maniaol, Angelina H; Harbo, Hanne F; Lie, Benedicte A; Melms, Arthur; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Willcox, Nicholas; Gregersen, Peter K; Hammarstrom, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetics of late-onset myasthenia gravis (LOMG), we conducted a genome-wide association study imputation of >6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 532 LOMG cases (anti–acetylcholine receptor [AChR] antibody positive; onset age ≥50 years) and 2,128 controls matched for sex and population substructure. The data confirm reported TNFRSF11A associations (rs4574025, P = 3.9 × 10−7, odds ratio [OR] 1.42) and identify a novel candidate gene, ZBTB10, achieving genome-wide significance (rs6998967, P = 8.9 × 10−10, OR 0.53). Several other SNPs showed suggestive significance including rs2476601 (P = 6.5 × 10−6, OR 1.62) encoding the PTPN22 R620W variant noted in early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG) and other autoimmune diseases. In contrast, EOMG-associated SNPs in TNIP1 showed no association in LOMG, nor did other loci suggested for EOMG. Many SNPs within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region showed strong associations in LOMG, but with smaller effect sizes than in EOMG (highest OR ~2 versus ~6 in EOMG). Moreover, the strongest associations were in opposite directions from EOMG, including an OR of 0.54 for DQA1*05:01 in LOMG (P = 5.9 × 10−12) versus 2.82 in EOMG (P = 3.86 × 10−45). Association and conditioning studies for the MHC region showed three distinct and largely independent association peaks for LOMG corresponding to (a) MHC class II (highest attenuation when conditioning on DQA1), (b) HLA-A and (c) MHC class III SNPs. Conditioning studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) amino acid residues also suggest potential functional correlates. Together, these findings emphasize the value of subgrouping myasthenia gravis patients for clinical and basic investigations and imply distinct predisposing mechanisms in LOMG. PMID:26562150

  6. Stable Expression of Human Muscle-Specific Kinase in HEp-2 M4 Cells for Automatic Immunofluorescence Diagnostics of Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    George, Sandra; Paulick, Silvia; Knütter, Ilka; Röber, Nadja; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Conrad, Karsten; Küpper, Jan-Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) belongs to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex which is targeted by pathogenic autoantibodies causing Myasthenia gravis. While up to 95% of patients with generalized Myasthenia gravis were shown to be positive for acetylcholine receptor-specific autoantibodies, up to 70% of the remaining patients develop autoantibodies against MuSK. Discrimination of the autoantibody specificity is important for therapy of Myasthenia gravis. Recently, the new automatic fluorescence assessment platform AKLIDES has been developed for immunofluorescence-based diagnostics of autoimmune diseases. In order to establish an AKLIDES procedure for the detection of MuSK-specific autoantibodies (anti-MuSK), we developed a recombinant HEp-2 cell clone expressing the human MuSK cDNA. Here we show at the mRNA and protein level that the cell clone HEp-2 M4 stably expresses human MuSK. We provide evidence for a localization of MuSK at the cell membrane. Using cell clone HEp-2 M4 on the AKLIDES system, we investigated 34 patient sera that were previously tested anti-MuSK positive by radioimmunoassay as positive controls. As negative controls, we tested 29 acetylcholine receptor-positive but MuSK-negative patient sera, 30 amytrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient sera and 45 blood donors. HEp-2 M4 cells revealed a high specificity for the detection of MuSK autoantibodies from 25 patient sera assessed by a specific pattern on HEp-2 M4 cells. By using appropriate cell culture additives, the fraction of cells stained positive with anti-MuSK containing sera can be increased from 2–16% to 10–48%, depending on the serum. In conclusion, we provide data showing that the novel recombinant cell line HEp-2 M4 can be used to screen for anti-MuSK with the automatic AKLIDES system. PMID:24416182

  7. Specific binding of collagen Q to the neuromuscular junction is exploited to cure congenital myasthenia and to explore bases of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Kawakami, Yu; Krejci, Eric; Engel, Andrew G

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ) in the form of asymmetric AChE (AChE/ColQ). The C-terminal domain of ColQ binds to MuSK, the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase, that mediates a signal for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering at the NMJ. ColQ also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans including perlecan. Congenital defects of ColQ cause endplate AChE deficiency. A single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq-/- mice rescued motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of NMJ. We also injected AAV1-COLQ-IRES-EGFP to the left tibialis anterior and observed colocalization of AChE/ColQ at all the examined NMJs of the non-injected limbs. Additionally, injection of purified recombinant AChE/ColQ protein complex into gluteus maximus accumulated AChE in non-injected forelimbs. These observations suggest that the tissue-targeting signal of ColQ can be exploited to specifically deliver the transgene product to the target tissue. MuSK antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (MG) accounts for 5-15% of autoimmune MG. As AChR deficiency is typically mild and as cholinesterase inhibitors are generally ineffective or worsen myasthenic symptoms, we asked if the patient's MuSK-IgG interferes with binding of ColQ to MuSK. In vitro overlay of AChE/ColQ to muscle sections of Colq-/- mice revealed that MuSK-IgG blocks binding of ColQ to the NMJ. In vitro plate-binding of MuSK to ColQ disclosed that MuSK-IgG exerts a dose-dependent block of MuSK-ColQ interaction. In addition, passive transfer of MuSK-IgG to mice reduced the size and density of ColQ to ∼10% of controls and had a lesser effect on the sizes and densities of AChR and MuSK. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of specific binding of ColQ to the NMJ enabled us to ameliorate devastating myasthenic symptoms of Colq-/- mice and to reveal bases of

  8. Specific binding of collagen Q to the neuromuscular junction is exploited to cure congenital myasthenia and to explore bases of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Kawakami, Yu; Krejci, Eric; Engel, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ) in the form of asymmetric AChE (AChE/ColQ). The C-terminal domain of ColQ binds to MuSK, the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase, that mediates a signal for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering at the NMJ. ColQ also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans including perlecan. Congenital defects of ColQ cause endplate AChE deficiency. A single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq−/− mice rescued motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of NMJ. We also injected AAV1-COLQ-IRES-EGFP to the left tibialis anterior and observed colocalization of AChE/ColQ at all the examined NMJs of the non-injected limbs. Additionally, injection of purified recombinant AChE/ColQ protein complex into gluteus maximus accumulated AChE in non-injected forelimbs. These observations suggest that the tissue-targeting signal of ColQ can be exploited to specifically deliver the transgene product to the target tissue. MuSK antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (MG) accounts for 5–15% of autoimmune MG. As AChR deficiency is typically mild and as cholinesterase inhibitors are generally ineffective or worsen myasthenic symptoms, we asked if the patient's MuSK-IgG interferes with binding of ColQ to MuSK. In vitro overlay of AChE/ColQ to muscle sections of Colq−/− mice revealed that MuSK-IgG blocks binding of ColQ to the NMJ. In vitro plate-binding of MuSK to ColQ disclosed that MuSK-IgG exerts a dose-dependent block of MuSK-ColQ interaction. In addition, passive transfer of MuSK-IgG to mice reduced the size and density of ColQ to ~10% of controls and had a lesser effect on the sizes and densities of AChR and MuSK. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of specific binding of ColQ to the NMJ enabled us to ameliorate devastating myasthenic symptoms of Colq−/− mice and to reveal

  9. [A case of myasthenia gravis with invasive thymoma associated with diffuse panbronchiolitis, alopecia, dysgeusia, cholangitis and myositis].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Risa; Shibuya, Hideki; Hideyama, Takuto; Shiio, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of diplopia, ptosis, and dysphagia that had begun three years previously. He was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) and invasive thymoma and treated with corticosteroid, thymectomy, and radiation therapy. Ten years after the thymectomy, computed tomography (CT) showed metastasis of the thymoma in the left lower lobe of the lung. Two years after this recurrence, when the patient was 55, respiratory symptoms such as wheezing, persistent cough, and dyspnea appeared. Chronic sinusitis, diffuse centrilobular opacities on CT, and positivity for HLA-B54 led to a diagnosis of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). Despite treatment with clarithromycin, the respiratory symptoms worsened. The patient developed alopecia and body hair loss at the age of 56 followed by dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis with positivity for anti-Kv1.4 antibodies. Although treatment with an increased dose of corticosteroid improved hair loss, dysgeusia, cholangitis, and myositis, he died of progression of DPB and serious respiratory infection at the age of 58. In this case, various autoimmune disorders occurred together with MG as complications of thymoma. Although alopecia, dysgeusia, and myositis are already known as complications of MG associated with thymoma, cholangitis is not well-recognized since there have been few reports suggesting a causal relationship between cholangitis and thymoma. Furthermore, DPB caused by immunodeficiency and respiratory tract hypersensitivity associated with thymoma and HLA-B54, respectively, is the distinctive feature of our case. Neurologists should be aware that various organs can be damaged directly and indirectly by abnormal T cells from thymoma in patients with MG. PMID:25283823

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Myasthenia Gravis with Thymoma and Thymic Hyperplasia Undergoing Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nazarbaghi, Surena; Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Arjmand, Nasim; Rezaei, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients, it has remained controversial as to whether this procedure is of a similar efficacy and clinical outcome among MG patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Aim: We sought to determine the long-term clinical outcomes of MG patients who received extended transsternal thymectomy associated with pyridostigmine and prednisolone postoperatively. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from January 1999 to December 2013, MG patients who underwent thymectomy were followed up. Out of 41 MG patients admitted in our center, 25 patients had undergone thymectomy adjunctive to pyridostigmine and prednisolone therapy postoperatively. The primary endpoints included improvement in individual diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysarthria, dyspnea, and limb weakness. In addition, according to the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) criteria, response to therapy was defined as complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacologic remission (PR), and minimal manifestation (MM) as secondary endpoints. Results: Majority of the patients were male (60%) and the mean age of the patients was 32.2 ± 13.9 years. Fifteen (60%) and 10 patients (40%) had thymoma and thymic hyperplasia, respectively. All the patients were followed up during a mean period of of 86.9 ± 50.3 months (minimum 10 months and maximum 168 months). The rates of CSR, PR, and MM were comparable between the thymoma and thymic hyperplasia groups (P = 0.584). Based on the Kaplan Meier analysis, the probabilities of CSR, PR, and MM were not significantly different between patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Conclusion: The extended transsternal thymectomy, along with the postoperative regimen of pyridostigmine and prednisolone was associated with a high rate of clinical improvement among MG patients with thymoma or thymic hyperplasia. PMID:26713298

  11. Altered Active Zones, Vesicle Pools, Nerve Terminal Conductivity, and Morphology during Experimental MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG. PMID:25438154

  12. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  13. Higher risk of myasthenia gravis in patients with thyroid and allergic diseases: a national population-based study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Kuo, Huang-Tsung; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Chen, Yen-Kung; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of myasthenia gravis (MG) in patients with allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease in a large cohort representing 99% of the population in Taiwan. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database were used to conduct retrospective analyses. The study comprised 1689 adult patients with MG who were 4-fold frequency matched to those without MG by sex, age, and assigned the same index year. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease and MG. An increased subsequent risk of MG was observed in the patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC), allergic rhinitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and Graves disease. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were 1.93 (1.71-2.18), 1.26 (1.09-1.45), 2.87 (1.18-6.97), and 3.97 (2.71-5.83), respectively. The aORs increased from 1.63 (1.43-1.85) in a patient with only 1 allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease to 2.09 (1.75-2.49) in a patient with 2 thyroid or allergic diseases to 2.82 (2.19-3.64) in a patient with ≥3 thyroid or allergic diseases. MG was associated with the cumulative effect of concurrent allergic and autoimmune thyroid disease with combined AC and Hashimoto thyroiditis representing the highest risk (aOR = 15.62 [2.88-87.71]). This population-based case-control study demonstrates the association between allergic or autoimmune thyroid disease and the risk of MG. The highest risk of subsequent MG was associated with combined AC and Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26020387

  14. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Souroujon, M C; Im, S H; Antozzi, C; Fuchs, S

    1999-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the alpha-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG. PMID:10393952

  15. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: Nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor α-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barchan, Dora; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Antozzi, Carlo; Fuchs, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the α-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG. PMID:10393952

  16. Standardization of the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model by immunization of rats with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptors — Recommendations for methods and experimental designs

    PubMed Central

    Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Molenaar, Peter C.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates; Brenner, Talma; Duan, Rui-Sheng; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon; Kusner, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is characterized by a chronic, fatigable weakness of voluntary muscles. The production of autoantibodies involves the dysregulation of T cells which provide the environment for the development of autoreactive B cells. The symptoms are caused by destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and degradation of the AChR by IgG autoantibodies, predominantly of the G1 and G3 subclasses. Active immunization of animals with AChR from mammalian muscles, AChR from Torpedo or Electrophorus electric organs, and recombinant or synthetic AChR fragments generates a chronic model of MG, termed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). This model covers cellular mechanisms involved in the immune response against the AChR, e.g. antigen presentation, T cell-help and regulation, B cell selection and differentiation into plasma cells. Our aim is to define standard operation procedures and recommendations for the rat EAMG model using purified AChR from the Torpedo californica electric organ, in order to facilitate more rapid translation of preclinical proof of concept or efficacy studies into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. PMID:25796590

  17. Thymic abnormalities: antigen or antibody? Response to thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Penn, A S; Jaretzki, A; Wolff, M; Chang, H W; Tennyson, V

    1981-01-01

    The therapeutic value of thymectomy for myasthenia is still questioned although it retains an important place among management modalities that strive for sustained remission. Questions derive from uncertainty as to appropriate timing, variable extent of resection and quantitation of response. Forty-seven patients, followed one to seven years, underwent an extended transsternal or combined transcervical-transsternal procedure with anterior mediastinal exenteration. Sixteen have been in complete remission from six months to six years, four are asymptomatic on occasional pyridostigmine and eight are significantly improved. Evaluation of thymic pathology (hyperplasic, involuted areas, and thymoma) included a search for thymic myoid cells by fluorescence cytochemistry. Antibodies to acetylcholine receptor present in 38 of 43, decreased post-operatively to normal in four, by 50% to 80% in 14, by 20 to 50% in three and were unchanged in 14. Most remissions occurred in young women with noninvoluted hyperplastic glands and variably high anti-AChR titers which dropped toward normal in seven of 15. These results encourage us to utilize this procedure routinely. PMID:6951500

  18. MYASTHENIA GRAVIS—Problems in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Christian; Rose, Augustus S.

    1957-01-01

    The possibility of myasthenia gravis must be considered in patients persistently complaining of weakness and fatigue. There may be many difficulties and pitfalls in differentiating myasthenia gravis from other disorders in which muscular weakness is a common complaint. Observation of a group of 36 patients with myasthenia gravis, and another group of 30 cases involving the differential diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, led to a conclusion that a physician should apply criteria carefully before arriving at a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and instituting drug therapy, since nonmyasthenics may frequently respond with subjective improvement temporarily following administration of cholinergic drugs. Myasthenia gravis may be a more common disorder than was suspected in the past. PMID:13489495

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery versus sternotomy in thymectomy for thymoma and myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Thymectomy involves the removal of all the soft tissue in the pre-vascular plane of the anterior mediastinum between the two phrenic nerves. Surgical success in controlling myasthenia and the most important factor influencing survival in patients with thymoma depends on complete clearance of thymic tissue. Currently there is a perception that the open (median sternotomy) approach offers better visualisation of the thymic tissue. This perceived advantage is thought to justify the invasive nature of the procedure associated with increased morbidity. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for thymectomy has evolved significantly over the last decade, including bilateral and unilateral VATS (either left or right) approaches. The laterality of the approach remains largely on surgeon preferences, with the decision influenced by their experience and training. VATS offers superior illumination and magnification, particularly with the availability of advanced cameras with variable angles that provide better exposure and lighting of the operative field. The use of three-dimensional-operating imaging has also revolutionised the VATS technique. VATS thymectomy is a superior and radical technique in minimising access trauma and removing all thymic tissue that may be scattered in the anterior mediastinum and cervical fat. Other advantages of VATS include less intraoperative blood loss, early removal of chest drains, less requirement for blood products, decreased inflammatory cytokine response, shorter hospital stay and superior cosmesis. There is also a decreased risk of respiratory and cardiac related complications compared to the open (sternotomy) technique. Furthermore, no significant difference has been found in long-term complications and survival rate between VATS and open approaches. Subsequently, the VATS approach should be encouraged as more surgeons are adopting the minimally invasive practice as routine. PMID:26904429

  20. A single-blinded trial of methotrexate versus azathioprine as steroid-sparing agents in generalized myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Long-term immunosuppression is often required in myasthenia gravis (MG). There are no published trials using methotrexate (MTX) in MG. The steroid-sparing efficacy of azathioprine (AZA) has been demonstrated after 18-months of starting therapy. However, AZA is considered expensive in Africa. We evaluated the steroid-sparing efficacy of MTX (17.5 mg weekly) compared with AZA (2.5 mg/kg daily) in subjects recently diagnosed with generalized MG by assessing their average monthly prednisone requirements. Methods The primary outcome was the average daily prednisone requirement by month between the two groups. Prednisone was given at the lowest dose to manage MG symptoms and adjusted as required according to protocol. Single-blinded assessments were performed 3-monthly for 2-years to determine the quantitative MG score and the MG activities of daily living score in order to determine those with minimal manifestations of MG. Results Thirty-one subjects (AZA n = 15; MTX n = 16) satisfied the inclusion criteria but only 24 were randomized. Baseline characteristics were similar. There was no difference between the AZA- and MTX-groups in respect of prednisone dosing (apart from months 10 and 12), in quantitative MG Score improvement, proportions in sustained remission, frequencies of MG relapses, or adverse reactions and/or withdrawals. The MTX-group received lower prednisone doses between month 10 (p = 0.047) and month 12 (p = 0.039). At month 12 the prednisone dose per kilogram bodyweight in the MTX-group (0.15 mg/kg) was half that of the AZA-group (0.31 mg/kg)(p = 0.019). Conclusions This study provides evidence that in patients with generalized MG methotrexate is an effective steroid-sparing agent 10 months after treatment initiation. Our data suggests that in generalized MG methotrexate has similar efficacy and tolerability to azathioprine and may be the drug of choice in financially constrained health systems. Trial registration SANCTR:DOH-27-0411-2436 PMID

  1. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Durmus, Hacer; Poulas, Kostas; Yentur, Sibel P.; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Tzartos, Socrates; Marx, Alexander; Tuzun, Erdem; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG) is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab) to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th) 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients

  2. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Durmus, Hacer; Poulas, Kostas; Yentur, Sibel P; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Tzartos, Socrates; Marx, Alexander; Tuzun, Erdem; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG) is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab) to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th) 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients

  3. Innate immunity in myasthenia gravis thymus: pathogenic effects of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling on autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Marolda, Roberta; Franzi, Sara; Cappelletti, Cristina; Giardina, Carmelo; Motta, Teresio; Baggi, Fulvio; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Cavalcante, Paola

    2014-08-01

    The thymus is the main site of immune sensitization to AChR in myasthenia gravis (MG). In our previous studies we demonstrated that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is over-expressed in MG thymuses, suggesting its involvement in altering the thymic microenvironment and favoring autosensitization and autoimmunity maintenance processes, via an effect on local chemokine/cytokine network. Here, we investigated whether TLR4 signaling may favor abnormal cell recruitment in MG thymus via CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines known to dictate immune cell trafficking in inflamed organs by binding CCR4. We also investigated whether TLR4 activation may contribute to immunodysregulation, via the production of Th17-related cytokines, known to alter effector T cell (Teff)/regulatory T cell (Treg) balance. We found that CCL17, CCL22 and CCR4 were expressed at higher levels in MG compared to normal thymuses. The two chemokines were mainly detected around medullary Hassall's corpuscles (HCs), co-localizing with TLR4(+) thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and CCR4(+) dendritic cells (DCs), that were present in higher number in MG thymuses compared to controls. TLR4 stimulation in MG TECs increased CCL17 and CCL22 expression and induced the production of Th17-related cytokines. Then, to study the effect of TLR4-stimulated TECs on immune cell interactions and Teff activation, we generated an in-vitro imaging model by co-culturing CD4(+) Th1/Th17 AChR-specific T cells, naïve CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs, DCs and TECs from Lewis rats. We observed that TLR4 stimulation led to a more pronounced Teff activatory status, suggesting that TLR4 signaling in MG thymic milieu may affect cell-to-cell interactions, favoring autoreactive T-cell activation. Altogether our findings suggest a role for TLR4 signaling in driving DC recruitment in MG thymus via CCL17 and CCL22, and in generating an inflammatory response that might compromise Treg function, favoring autoreactive T-cell pathogenic responses. PMID:24397961

  4. Guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of the acetylcholine receptor--specific passive transfer myasthenia gravis model-Recommendations for methods and experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Kusner, Linda L; Losen, Mario; Vincent, Angela; Lindstrom, Jon; Tzartos, Socrates; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2015-08-01

    Antibodies against the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) are the most common cause of myasthenia gravis (MG). Passive transfer of AChR antibodies from MG patients into animals reproduces key features of human disease, including antigenic modulation of the AChR, complement-mediated damage of the neuromuscular junction, and muscle weakness. Similarly, AChR antibodies generated by active immunization in experimental autoimmune MG models can subsequently be passively transferred to other animals and induce weakness. The passive transfer model is useful to test therapeutic strategies aimed at the effector mechanism of the autoantibodies. Here we summarize published and unpublished experience using the AChR passive transfer MG model in mice, rats and rhesus monkeys, and give recommendations for the design of preclinical studies in order to facilitate translation of positive and negative results to improve MG therapies. PMID:25743217

  5. Life-threatening misdiagnosis of bulbar onset myasthenia gravis as a motor neuron disease: How much can one rely on exaggerated deep tendon reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Keivan; Ansari, Behnaz; Okhovat, Ali Asghar

    2015-01-01

    The autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG), can mimic a variety of neurological disorders leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. On occasions, misdiagnosis of MG could lead to unnecessary therapeutic interventions. We report the case of a 50 year-old man, in whom MG was mistaken for motor neuron disease (MND). Subsequently, correct diagnosis and optimal management resulted in saving his life and significant improvement in his functional status. We discuss the importance of considering MG as one of the potential differential diagnoses among cases of new onset or recurrent unexplained bulbar symptoms, despite exaggerated deep tendon reflexes. Also, a literature review on the misdiagnosis of MG and the potential pitfalls in MG diagnosis are discussed. PMID:25802827

  6. Individual germinal centres of myasthenia gravis human thymuses contain polyclonal activated B cells that express all the Vh and Vk families.

    PubMed Central

    Guigou, V; Emilie, D; Berrih-Aknin, S; Fumoux, F; Fougereau, M; Schiff, C

    1991-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we analysed the immunoglobulin repertoire expressed by the B cells present in myasthenia gravis thymuses from four patients. B cells, mostly in activated state, were clustered in germinal centres, in which multiple isotypes were identified. A majority of cells expressed IgG as compared with IgM, with a roughly similar contribution of kappa and lambda chains. Hybridization with the six VH and the 4 VK human family probes was observed in serial sections, providing additional evidence that individual germinal centres were polyclonal. The thymic B cell repertoire closely reflected the VH and the VK family usage of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes with the preferential utilization of VH3, VK1 and VK3. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1899630

  7. The CD45 77C/G allele is not associated with myasthenia gravis - a reassessment of the potential role of CD45 in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The G allele of the CD45 77C/G SNP (rs17612648), which has previously been suggested to be associated with autoimmune disorders, was genotyped in 446 Swedish myasthenia gravis (MG) patients and 2303 matched controls. Results There was no association between the polymorphism and patient group as a whole (p = 0.199), nor with clinical subgroups. Our results add to a growing number of studies unable to find association between the 77C/G polymorphism and autoimmune disorders. One control sample, from an adult blood donor, was homozygous for the G allele, yet negative for a panel of auto-antibodies, representing the first homozygous individual studied in this respect. Conclusions The 77C/G mutation does not predispose to MG, and its role in autoimmunity may have to be re-evaluated. PMID:21067564

  8. The clinical absolute and relative scoring system-a quantitative scale measuring myasthenia gravis severity and outcome used in the traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chao; Gao, Bu-Lang; Yang, Hong-Qi; Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by autoantigen against the nicotine acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. With modern treatment facilities, the treatment effect and outcome for MG has been greatly improved with MG and non-MG patients enjoying the same life expectancy. Many classifications of disease distribution and severity have been set up and tested all over the world, mainly in the western world. However, the absolute and relative scoring system for evaluating the severity and treatment effect of MG in China where traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years has not been introduced worldwide. The TCM has achieved a great success in the treatment of MG in the country with a huge population. This article serves to introduce this scoring system to the world. PMID:25440379

  9. Regulation of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit variants in human myasthenia gravis. Quantification of steady-state levels of messenger RNA in muscle biopsy using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Guyon, T; Levasseur, P; Truffault, F; Cottin, C; Gaud, C; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1994-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies that attack the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the decrease in AChR levels at the neuromuscular junction, we investigated the regulation of AChR expression by analyzing mRNA of the two AChR alpha subunit isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) in muscle samples from myasthenic patients relative to controls. We applied a quantitative method based on reverse transcription of total RNA followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using an internal standard we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. An increased expression of mRNA coding for the alpha subunit of the AChR isoforms was observed in severely affected patients (P < 0.003 versus controls) but not in moderately affected patients, independently of the anti-AChR antibody titer. Study of mRNA precursor levels indicates a higher expression in severely affected patients compared to controls, suggesting an enhanced rate of transcription of the message coding for the alpha subunit isoforms in these patients. We have also reported that mRNA encoding both isoforms are expressed at an approximate 1:1 ratio in controls and in patients. We have thus identified a new biological parameter correlated with disease severity, and provide evidence of a compensatory mechanism to balance the loss of AChR in human myasthenia gravis, which is probably triggered only above a certain degree of AChR loss. Images PMID:8040257

  10. Flow Cytofluorimetric Analysis of Anti-LRP4 (LDL Receptor-Related Protein 4) Autoantibodies in Italian Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Mariapaola; Scuderi, Flavia; Samengo, Daniela; Saltelli, Giorgia; Maiuri, Maria Teresa; Shen, Chengyong; Mei, Lin; Sabatelli, Mario; Pani, Giovambattista; Antonini, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia; Bartoccioni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease in which 90% of patients have autoantibodies against the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), while autoantibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) have been detected in half (5%) of the remaining 10%. Recently, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), identified as the agrin receptor, has been recognized as a third autoimmune target in a significant portion of the double sero-negative (dSN) myasthenic individuals, with variable frequency depending on different methods and origin countries of the tested population. There is also convincing experimental evidence that anti-LRP4 autoantibodies may cause MG. Methods The aim of this study was to test the presence and diagnostic significance of anti-LRP4 autoantibodies in an Italian population of 101 myasthenic patients (55 dSN, 23 AChR positive and 23 MuSK positive), 45 healthy blood donors and 40 patients with other neurological diseases as controls. All sera were analyzed by a cell-based antigen assay employing LRP4-transfected HEK293T cells, along with a flow cytofluorimetric detection system. Results We found a 14.5% (8/55) frequency of positivity in the dSN-MG group and a 13% frequency of co-occurrence (3/23) in both AChR and MuSK positive patients; moreover, we report a younger female prevalence with a mild form of disease in LRP4-positive dSN-MG individuals. Conclusion Our data confirm LRP4 as a new autoimmune target, supporting the value of including anti-LRP4 antibodies in further studies on Myasthenia gravis. PMID:26284792

  11. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis: Comparison of anti-nicotinic acetyl choline receptor antibodies, repetitive nerve stimulation and Neostigmine tests at a tertiary neuro care centre in India, a ten year study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shripad A; Bokoliya, Suresh C; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B

    2016-03-15

    Anti-nicotinic AChR antibodies (Anti-nAChR antibodies), Repetitive Nerve Stimulation (RNS) and Neostigmine test are used for diagnosis of myasthenia gravis (MG). We compared their diagnostic agreement in a cohort of 486 MG patients over a period of ten years. Anti-nAChR antibodies, RNS and Neostigmine test showed positivity of 57.36%, 51.78%, and 93.4% respectively in ocular myasthenia and 93.77%, 82.35%, and 97.92% respectively in generalized myasthenia group. Neostigmine test showed higher positivity than anti-nAChR antibodies and RNS test in both groups. A marginal to fair agreement was observed between these tests highlighting their significance in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:26943963

  12. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... involved. However, this is not completely understood. One hypothesis is that patients may simply notice eye weakness ... in other muscle groups in the body. Another hypothesis is that the eye and eyelid muscles are ...

  13. Myasthenia Gravis Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plasmapheresis (PLAZ-muh-FUR-uh-suhss) or plasma exchange. This procedure removes abnormal antibodies from the blood. ... above — in particular, intravenous immune globulin and plasma exchange — can reverse the severe weakness of a myasthenic ...

  14. Myasthenia Gravis Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of those with MG who have an enlarged thymus gland and indicate a significantly increased likelihood of the ... chest CT (computed tomography)—to detect an enlarged thymus gland or thymoma. A brain and eye orbit MRI ( ...

  15. Nutrition and Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and to improve their lives through programs of patient services, public information, medical research, professional education, advocacy and patient care. This publication is intended to provide the ...

  16. Employees with Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of America, 2001). MG and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is MG a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  17. Ephedrine as add-on therapy for patients with myasthenia gravis: protocol for a series of randomised, placebo-controlled n-of-1 trials

    PubMed Central

    Vrinten, Charlotte; Lipka, Alexander F; van Zwet, Erik W; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; Cornel, Martina C; Kuijpers, Marja R; Hekster, Yechiel A; Weinreich, Stephanie S; Verschuuren, Jan J G M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis (MG), a rare neuromuscular disease, is often initially treated using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Patients who do not respond adequately depend on the use of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive medication, but these may have serious side effects. Clinical observations suggest that ephedrine can diminish, postpone or even prevent the need for immunosuppressive therapy when added to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or low-dose prednisone. In the Netherlands, ephedrine is not licensed for MG nor is reimbursement guaranteed. MG is a rare condition, and ephedrine might be indicated only in a subset of patients. Thus, randomised controlled trials comparing large groups are difficult to conduct. We, therefore, aim to aggregate data from a small series of n-of-1 trials (also known as single patient trials) to assess the effect of ephedrine as add-on treatment for MG. Methods and analysis Single-centre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised, multiple crossover n-of-1 studies in 4 adult patients with generalised MG who show inadequate improvement on pyridostigmine and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Each n-of-1 trial has 3 cycles of two 5-day intervention periods. Treatment: 25 mg ephedrine or placebo, twice daily. Main outcome measure: Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) test. Statistical analysis: fixed effects linear model for QMG for all patients combined. Secondary outcome measures: Clinical: effects on MG-Composite and MG-Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) scales; QMG at individual level; adverse events. Acceptability of trial design: number of patients eligible and enrolled; number of treatment cycles completed; patients’ and caregivers’ experiences. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of Leiden University Medical Center, No. P14.108. Results of the trial will be reported in a peer-reviewed publication. Regulatory stakeholders will comment on the suitability of the trial

  18. Congenital myasthenic syndrome due to mutation in CHRNE gene with clinical worsening and thymic hyperplasia attributed to association with autoimmune-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ernestina; Moreira, Isabel; Coutinho, Ester; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lopes, Carlos; Lopes Lima, José; Leite, M Isabel

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to mutation in CHRNE with symptoms since the age of 4; mild to moderate fatigable weakness involved mainly ocular, bulbar and limb muscles; functional impact of the disease in their development and physical activity was modest. By the age of 34, the patient experienced gradual worsening of fatigue with dyspnoea and pronounced limb weakness, requiring significant increase of pyridostigmine. Further, a remarkable and sustained clinical improvement followed thymectomy with hyperplastic thymus. Despite of the absence of detectable antibodies to acetyl-choline receptor (AChR) (including clustered-AChR), muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 antibodies in the serum obtained nine years after thymectomy, the clinical, genetic and histological features are in keeping with the extremely rare association of two rare neuromuscular junction disorders - CMS and myasthenia gravis (MG). The inexistence of other conditions that could potentially associate with thymic hyperplasia also supports the diagnosis of MG. PMID:26363966

  19. Estimation of the success rate of anesthetic management for thymectomy in patients with myasthenia gravis treated without muscle relaxants: a retrospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshihito; Moriyama, Satoru; Aoki, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Saya; Tomita, Maiko; Kojima, Taiki; Mori, Yukiko; Takeuchi, Naoko; So, Min-Hye; Yano, Motoki; Sobue, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Although maintaining anesthesia for myasthenia gravis (MG) with minimal muscle relaxants (MR) is common, the success rate of anesthetic management for MG without MR is not clear. We therefore retrospectively examined the success rate of anesthetic management for MG without MR among 66 consecutive cases of thymectomy for MG performed at our hospital between January 2004 and April 2010, before approval of using sugammadex. A total of 60 patients (90.9 %) were treated without MR (N group). Among the 60 cases, 17 (28.3 %) patients were not extubated in the operating room due to postoperative respiratory depression or other reasons. Therefore, the success rate of anesthetic management for thymectomy in patients with MG without treating MR was 71.7 % (43/60) [95 % confident interval (CI): 65.9-77.5 %]. The reasons for using MR included coughing at intubation in one case, bucking during surgery in two cases, and MR was considered to be safer by the attending anesthesiologist in three cases. The number of cases of impossible extubation requiring ventilation on that day was three in the N group and none in the R group. Finally, the success rate of anesthetic management for MG without MR was estimated to be 71.1 % (95 % CI: 65.9-77.5 %). PMID:25796520

  20. Deficits in Endogenous Adenosine Formation by Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase/CD73 Impair Neuromuscular Transmission and Immune Competence in Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Costa, Ana; Guerra-Gomes, Sónia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    AMP dephosphorylation via ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 is the rate limiting step to generate extracellular adenosine (ADO) from released adenine nucleotides. ADO, via A2A receptors (A2ARs), is a potent modulator of neuromuscular and immunological responses. The pivotal role of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73, in controlling extracellular ADO formation, prompted us to investigate its role in a rat model of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Results show that CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells express lower amounts of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 as compared to controls. Reduction of endogenous ADO formation might explain why proliferation of CD4+ T cells failed upon blocking A2A receptors activation with ZM241385 or adenosine deaminase in EAMG animals. Deficits in ADO also contribute to neuromuscular transmission failure in EAMG rats. Rehabilitation of A2AR-mediated immune suppression and facilitation of transmitter release were observed by incubating the cells with the nucleoside precursor, AMP. These findings, together with the characteristic increase in serum adenosine deaminase activity of MG patients, strengthen our hypothesis that the adenosinergic pathway may be dysfunctional in EAMG. Given that endogenous ADO formation is balanced by ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 activity and that A2ARs exert a dual role to restore use-dependent neurocompetence and immune suppression in myasthenics, we hypothesize that stimulation of the two mechanisms may have therapeutic potential in MG. PMID:25691808

  1. Epitopes on the beta subunit of human muscle acetylcholine receptor recognized by CD4+ cells of myasthenia gravis patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Moiola, L; Karachunski, P; Protti, M P; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the sequence regions of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) beta subunit forming epitopes recognized by T helper cells in myasthenia gravis (MG), using overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, which screened the sequence of the AChR beta subunit. Since CD4+ lymphocytes from MG patients' blood did not respond to the peptides, we attempted propagation of beta subunit-specific T lines from six MG patients and seven healthy controls by cycles of stimulation of blood lymphocytes with the pooled peptides corresponding to the beta subunit sequence. CD4+ T lines were obtained from four patients and three controls. They secreted IL-2, not IL-4, suggesting that they comprised T helper type 1 cells. The T lines from MG patients could be propagated for several months. Three lines were tested with purified bovine muscle AChR and cross-reacted well with this antigen. All T lines were tested with the individual synthetic peptides present in the pool corresponding to the beta subunit sequence. Several beta subunit peptide sequences were recognized. Each line had an individual pattern of peptides recognition, but three sequence regions (peptides beta 181-200, beta 271-290, and the overlapping peptides beta 316-335 and beta 331-350) were recognized by most MG lines. The beta subunit-specific T lines from controls could be propagated for < 5 wk. Each line recognized several peptides, which frequently included the immunodominant regions listed above. Images PMID:7510715

  2. An acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit promoter confers intrathymic expression in transgenic mice. Implications for tolerance of a transgenic self-antigen and for autoreactivity in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Salmon, A M; Bruand, C; Cardona, A; Changeux, J P; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1998-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease targeting the skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although the autoantigen is present in the thymus, it is not tolerated in MG patients. In addition, the nature of the cell bearing the autoantigen is controversial. To approach these questions, we used two lineages of transgenic mice in which the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene is under the control of a 842-bp (Tg1) or a 3300-bp promoter fragment (Tg2) of the chick muscle alpha subunit AChR gene. In addition to expression in muscle cells, thymic expression was observed in both mouse lines (mainly in myoid cells in Tg1 and myoid cells and epithelial cells in Tg2). After challenge with beta-gal, Tg1 mice produced Th2-dependent anti-beta-gal antibodies, while Tg2 mice were almost unresponsive. By contrast, in a proliferation assay both Tg lines were unresponsive to beta-gal. Cells from Tg1 mice produce Th2-dependent cytokine whereas cells from Tg2 mice were nonproducing in response to beta-gal. These data indicate that the level of expression in Tg1 mice could be sufficient to induce tolerance of Th1 cells but not of Th2 cells, while both populations are tolerated in Tg2 mice. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that AChR expression is not sufficiently abundant in MG thymus to induce a full tolerance. PMID:9616205

  3. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in HEp-2 cells for immunodetection of autoantibody specificities in sera from Myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    George, S; Noack, M; Vanek, M; Rentzsch, J; Röber, N; Conrad, K; Roggenbuck, D; Küpper, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of pathogenic autoantibodies mostly targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The AChR is composed of two alpha subunits and one subunit of each beta, delta and gamma (fetal AChR), or epsilon (adult AChR), respectively. Serological diagnostics is commonly done by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Here we used an indirect immunofluorescence assay with MG patient sera on transiently transfected HEp-2 cells expressing selected components of the AChR. Our data show that already 12 out of 13 MG patient sera showed autoantibody binding to HEp-2 cells transfected to express the alpha subunit solely. Interestingly, 11 out of 13 patient sera reacted positive with cells transfected to reconstitute the complete fetal AChR, but only 6 out of 13 sera showed positive signals with cells expressing the components of adult AChR. Moreover, there was no strict correlation of the serum concentration required to obtain clear-cut fluorescence signals to the antibody titer as measured by RIA. It will be an interesting topic to further investigate if the optimal serum dilution for indirect immunofluorescence as well as the autoantibody binding preferences to defined AChR subunits and to the adult versus the fetal receptor variant could provide additional predictive value in MG diagnostics. PMID:26410878

  4. The Association of PTPN22 R620W Polymorphism Is Stronger with Late-Onset AChR-Myasthenia Gravis in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Gizem A.; Coşkun, Ayse N.; Yılmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Gülsen-Parman, Yeşim; Aysal, Fikret; Disci, Rian; Direskeneli, Haner; Marx, Alexander; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2014-01-01

    A functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the PTPN22 gene encoding a protein tyrosine phosphatase has been associated with autoimmune disorders including myasthenia gravis (MG). As the PTPN22 R620W polymorphism has a wide variation of allele frequencies among different populations, this polymorphism was investigated in MG in Turkey. An emphasis is put on MG subgroups according to autoantibody (Abs) production and presence of thymoma. DNA samples from 416 patients with clinically diagnosed generalized MG (231 with Abs to acetylcholine receptor, AChR-MG), 53 with Abs to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK-MG), 55 patients with no detectable Abs (SN-MG), 77 patients with thymoma (TAMG) and 293 healthy controls (HC) were genotyped for the SNP (PTPN22 R620W, C1858T, rs2476601). The PTPN22 T allele was increased in AChR-MG patients (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5, 95%CI: 1.2–5.1). The association was stronger in late disease-onset AChR (LOMG, OR: 3.1, 95%CI: 1.2–8.2). MuSK-MG, SN-MG and TAMG groups did not carry the variant allele more frequently than the HC. In contrast to findings in other autoimmune diseases, the distribution of the PTPN22 polymorphism in this population provides a susceptibility marker for AChR-MG. The strongest association is detected in patients with LOMG. PMID:25119822

  5. Myasthenia Gravis and the Tops and Bottoms of AChRs Antigenic Structure of the MIR and Specific Immunosuppression of EAMG Using AChR Cytoplasmic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Jon; Luo, Jie; Kuryatov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The main immunogenic region (MIR), against which half or more of the autoantibodies to acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in myasthenia gravis (MG) or experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) are directed, is located at the extracellular end of α1 subunits. Rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the MIR efficiently compete with MG patient autoantibodies for binding to human muscle AChRs. Antibodies bound to the MIR do not interfere with cholinergic ligand binding or AChR function, but target complement and trigger antigenic modulation. Rat mAbs to the MIR also bind to human ganglionic AChR α3 subunits, but MG patient antibodies do not. By making chimeras of α1 subunits with α7 subunits or ACh binding protein, the structure of the MIR and its functional effects are being investigated. Many mAbs to the MIR bind only to the native conformation of α1 subunits because they bind to sequences that are adjacent only in the native structure. The MIR epitopes recognized by these mAbs are not recognized by most patient antibodies whose epitopes must be nearby. The presence of the MIR epitopes in α1/α7 chimeras greatly promotes AChR expression and sensitivity to activation. EAMG can be suppressed by treatment with denatured, bacterially expressed mixtures of extracellular and cytoplasmic domains of human α1, β1, γ, δ, and ε subunits. A mixture of only the cytoplasmic domains not only avoids the potential liability of provoking formation antibodies to pathologically significant epitopes on the extracellular surface, but also potently suppresses the development of EAMG. PMID:18567851

  6. Blockade of CD40 ligand suppresses chronic experimental myasthenia gravis by down-regulation of Th1 differentiation and up-regulation of CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Maiti, P K; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    2001-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) are T cell-dependent Ab-mediated autoimmune disorders, in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. Th1-type cells and costimulatory factors such as CD40 ligand (CD40L) contribute to disease pathogenesis by producing proinflammatory cytokines and by activating autoreactive B cells. In this study we demonstrate the capacity of CD40L blockade to modulate EAMG, and analyze the mechanism underlying this disease suppression. Anti-CD40L Abs given to rats at the chronic stage of EAMG suppress the clinical progression of the autoimmune process and lead to a decrease in the AChR-specific humoral response and delayed-type hypersensitivity. The cytokine profile of treated rats suggests that the underlying mechanism involves down-regulation of AChR-specific Th1-regulated responses with no significant effect on Th2- and Th3-regulated AChR-specific responses. EAMG suppression is also accompanied by a significant up-regulation of CTLA-4, whereas a series of costimulatory factors remain unchanged. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from anti-CD40L-treated rats does not protect recipient rats against subsequently induced EAMG. Thus it seems that the suppressed progression of chronic EAMG by anti-CD40L treatment does not induce a switch from Th1 to Th2/Th3 regulation of the AChR-specific immune response and does not induce generation of regulatory cells. The ability of anti-CD40L treatment to suppress ongoing chronic EAMG suggests that blockade of CD40L may serve as a potential approach for the immunotherapy of MG and other Ab-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:11359850

  7. HLA genotypes in Turkish patients with myasthenia gravis: comparison with multiple sclerosis patients on the basis of clinical subtypes and demographic features.

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Berril; Ozakbas, Serkan; Oktem, Mehmet Ali; Gedizlioglu, Muhtesem; Coker, Isil; Genc, Ahmet; Idiman, Egemen

    2004-07-01

    The nature and intensity of the association of myasthenia gravis (MG) with distinct human leukocyte antigens (HLA) haplotypes differ between ethnic populations. The aims of the present study were to examine the relationship between HLA class I and II haplotypes and MG; to show the HLA associations with various MG subsets; and to investigate the association between MG and clinical subgroups of multiple sclerosis (MS) regarding HLA haplotypes. A total of 66 patients with MG were enrolled onto the study. The mean age at onset was 42.01 years. A total of 122 clinically definite MS patients and 188 healthy subjects were examined as control groups. The present study clearly showed associations with HLA-DR3, -B8, -A1, and -A2 in MG. In patients with early-onset MG, associations with HLA-DR3, -B8, and -A2 were stronger. When compared with MS, in the MG group, there was still a strong association with -B8, -DR3, and -A1. In subgroup analysis, there was no difference between MG and primary progressive MS patients. On the basis of the presence of anti-AChR antibodies, there was a statistically significant association with HLA-DR3. On the basis of presence of thymoma, no HLA allele showed clear associations in MG patients with thymoma. This is the first study to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and MG in the Turkish population and to compare MG with another autoimmune disease, MS, on the basis of the HLA haplotypes. Further investigations with a larger population are required to explain this finding. PMID:15301866

  8. Myf5 and Myogenin in the development of thymic myoid cells - Implications for a murine in vivo model of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Simon-Keller, Katja; Küffer, Stefan; Ströbel, Philipp; Braun, Thomas; Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by autoantibodies against the neuromuscular junction of striated muscle. Most MG patients have autoreactive T- and B-cells directed to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To achieve immunologic tolerance, developing thymocytes are normally eliminated after recognition of self-antigen-derived peptides. Presentation of muscle-specific antigens is likely achieved through two pathways: on medullary thymic epithelial cells and on medullary dendritic cells cross-presenting peptides derived from a unique population of thymic myoid cells (TMC). Decades ago, it has been hypothesized that TMC play a key role in the induction of immunological tolerance towards skeletal muscle antigens. However, an experimental model to address this postulate has not been available. To generate such a model, we tested the hypothesis that the development of TMC depends on myogenic regulatory factors. To this end, we utilized Myf5-deficient mice, which lack the first wave of muscle cells but form normal skeletal muscles later during development, and Myogenin-deficient mice, which fail to form differentiated myofibers. We demonstrate for the first time that Myf5- and Myogenin-deficient mice showed a partial or complete, respectively, loss of TMC in an otherwise regularly structured thymus. To overcome early postnatal lethality of muscle-deficient, Myogenin-knockout mice we transplanted Myogenin-deficient fetal thymuses into Foxn1(nu/nu) mice that lack their own thymus anlage. We found that the transplants are functional but lack TMC. In combination with established immunization strategies (utilizing AChR or Titin), this model should enable us in the future testing the hypothesis that TMC play an indispensable role in the development of central tolerance towards striated muscle antigens. PMID:26708556

  9. Patient autoantibodies deplete postsynaptic muscle-specific kinase leading to disassembly of the ACh receptor scaffold and myasthenia gravis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cole, R N; Ghazanfari, N; Ngo, S T; Gervásio, O L; Reddel, S W; Phillips, W D

    2010-09-01

    The postsynaptic muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) coordinates formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) during embryonic development. Here we have studied the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon the NMJ in adult mice. Daily injections of IgG from four MuSK autoantibody-positive myasthenia gravis patients (MuSK IgG; 45 mg day(1)i.p. for 14 days) caused reductions in postsynaptic ACh receptor (AChR) packing as assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). IgG from the patients with the highest titres of MuSK autoantibodies caused large (51-73%) reductions in postsynaptic MuSK staining (cf. control mice; P < 0.01) and muscle weakness. Among mice injected for 14 days with control and MuSK patient IgGs, the residual level of MuSK correlated with the degree of impairment of postsynaptic AChR packing. However, the loss of postsynaptic MuSK preceded this impairment of postsynaptic AChR. When added to cultured C2 muscle cells the MuSK autoantibodies caused tyrosine phosphorylation of MuSK and the AChR beta-subunit, and internalization of MuSK from the plasma membrane. The results suggest a pathogenic mechanism in which MuSK autoantibodies rapidly deplete MuSK from the postsynaptic membrane leading to progressive dispersal of postsynaptic AChRs. Moreover, maintenance of postsynaptic AChR packing at the adult NMJ would appear to depend upon physical engagement of MuSK with the AChR scaffold, notwithstanding activation of the MuSK-rapsyn system of AChR clustering. PMID:20603331

  10. IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells contribute to the loss of B-cell tolerance in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Hanne; Pelz, Andreas; Saxena, Abhishek; Losen, Mario; Meisel, Andreas; Thiel, Andreas; Kohler, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    The role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-mediated diseases is unclear. Here, we assessed the contribution of Th17 cells to the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by repetitive immunizations with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (tAChR). We show that a significant fraction of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells is producing IL-17. IL-17(ko) mice developed fewer or no EAMG symptoms, although the frequencies of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells secreting IL-2, IFN-γ, or IL-21, and the percentage of FoxP3(+) Treg cells were similar to WT mice. Even though the total anti-tAChR antibody levels were equal, the complement fixating IgG2b subtype was reduced in IL-17(ko) as compared to WT mice. Most importantly, pathogenic anti-murine AChR antibodies were significantly lower in IL-17(ko) mice. Furthermore, we confirmed the role of Th17 cells in EAMG pathogenesis by the reconstitution of TCR β/δ(ko) mice with WT or IL-17(ko) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, we show that the level of IgG2b and the loss of B-cell tolerance, which results in pathogenic anti-murine AChR-specific antibodies, are dependent on IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we describe here for the first time how Th17 cells are involved in the induction of classical antibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:25676041

  11. The potential role of cell surface complement regulators and circulating CD4+ CD25+ T-cells in the development of autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoon, Mohamed Nasreldin Thabit; Fattouh, Mona; El-din, Asmaa Nasr; Elnady, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-lymphocytes (T-regs) and regulators of complement activity (RCA) involving CD55 and CD59 play an important role in the prevention of autoimmune diseases. However, their role in the pathogenesis of human autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the frequency of peripheral blood T-regs and CD4+ T-helper (T-helper) cells and the red blood cells (RBCs) level of expression of CD55 and CD59 in MG patients. Methods Fourteen patients with MG in neurology outpatient clinics of Sohag University Hospital and Sohag General Hospital from March 2014 to December 2014, and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in this case-control study. We did flowcytometric assessments of the percentage of peripheral T-regs and T-helper cells and the level of expression of CD55 and CD59 on RBCs in the peripheral blood of patients and controls. Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of peripheral blood T-regs and T-regs/T-helper cell ratio in the MG patients group. Moreover, the level of expression of CD55, CD59, and dual expression of CD55/CD59 on RBCs were statistically significantly lower in MG patients than those of healthy controls. However, regression analysis indicated that there was no significant correlation between all the measured parameters and disease duration or staging. Conclusion Functional defects in the T-regs and RCA may play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune MG and their functional modulation may represent an alternative therapeutic strategy for MG treatment. PMID:26955441

  12. Slow-binding inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by an alkylammonium derivative of 6-methyluracil: mechanism and possible advantages for myasthenia gravis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kharlamova, Alexandra D; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Petrov, Konstantin A; Kots, Ekaterina D; Nachon, Florian; Villard-Wandhammer, Marielle; Zueva, Irina V; Krejci, Eric; Reznik, Vladimir S; Zobov, Vladimir V; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Masson, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of human AChE (acetylcholinesterase) and BChE (butyrylcholinesterase) by an alkylammonium derivative of 6-methyluracil, C-547, a potential drug for the treatment of MG (myasthenia gravis) was studied. Kinetic analysis of AChE inhibition showed that C-547 is a slow-binding inhibitor of type B, i.e. after formation of the initial enzyme·inhibitor complex (Ki=140 pM), an induced-fit step allows establishment of the final complex (Ki*=22 pM). The estimated koff is low, 0.05 min(-1) On the other hand, reversible inhibition of human BChE is a fast-binding process of mixed-type (Ki=1.77 μM; Ki'=3.17 μM). The crystal structure of mouse AChE complexed with C-547 was solved at 3.13 Å resolution. The complex is stabilized by cation-π, stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations of the binding/dissociation processes of C-547 and C-35 (a non-charged analogue) to mouse and human AChEs were performed. Molecular modelling on mouse and human AChE showed that the slow step results from an enzyme conformational change that allows C-547 to cross the bottleneck in the active-site gorge, followed by formation of tight complex, as observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the related non-charged compound C-35 is not a slow-binding inhibitor. It does not cross the bottleneck because it is not sensitive to the electrostatic driving force to reach the bottom of the gorge. Thus C-547 is one of the most potent and selective reversible inhibitors of AChE with a long residence time, τ=20 min, longer than for other reversible inhibitors used in the treatment of MG. This makes C-547 a promising drug for the treatment of this disease. PMID:26929400

  13. Increased expression of Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 in myasthenia gravis thymus characterized by active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Galbardi, Barbara; Franzi, Sara; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Barzago, Claudia; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Kapetis, Dimos; Andreetta, Francesca; Biasiucci, Amelia; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-04-01

    Considerable data implicate the thymus as the main site of autosensitization to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis (MG), a B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction. We recently demonstrated an active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the thymus of MG patients, suggesting that EBV might contribute to the onset or maintenance of the autoimmune response within MG thymus, because of its ability to activate and immortalize autoreactive B cells. EBV has been reported to elicit and modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune responses, which are known to favor B-cell dysfunction and autoimmunity. Aim of this study was to investigate whether EBV infection is associated with altered expression of TLR7 and TLR9 in MG thymus. By real-time PCR, we found that TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA levels were significantly higher in EBV-positive MG compared to EBV-negative normal thymuses. By confocal microscopy, high expression levels of TLR7 and TLR9 proteins were observed in B cells and plasma cells of MG thymic germinal centers (GCs) and lymphoid infiltrates, where the two receptors co-localized with EBV antigens. An increased frequency of Ki67-positive proliferating B cells was found in MG thymuses, where we also detected proliferating cells expressing TLR7, TLR9 and EBV antigens, thus supporting the idea that EBV-associated TLR7/9 signaling may promote abnormal B-cell activation and proliferation. Along with B cells and plasma cells, thymic epithelium, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages exhibited enhanced TLR7 and TLR9 expression in MG thymus; TLR7 was also increased in thymic myeloid dendritic cells and its transcriptional levels positively correlated with those of interferon (IFN)-β. We suggested that TLR7/9 signaling may be involved in antiviral type I IFN production and long-term inflammation in EBV-infected MG thymuses. Our overall findings indicate that EBV-driven TLR7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune

  14. Myasthenia Gravis—Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Christian; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Keesey, John C.; Mulder, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    An edited summary of an Interdepartmental Conference arranged by the Department of Medicine of the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles. The Director of Conferences is William M. Pardridge, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Current findings indicate that autoimmune myasthenia gravis is an acquired immune complex disorder of neuromuscular transmission in voluntary striated muscle. There is a break in immunologic tolerance leading to blocking and degradation of acetylcholine receptors, together with widening of the synaptic cleft associated with partial destruction, simplification and shortening of the postjunctional membrane. Thymic hyperplasia and thymoma may be present. A decremental response to nerve-muscle stimulation, blocking and jitter on single-fiber electromyography and circulating antibodies to acetylcholine receptor are detectable in most patients with generalized weakness. Although the cause of this abnormal immunologic mechanism remains to be discovered, anticholinesterases, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, plasmapheresis or thymectomy (individually or in combination) provide control and better prognosis in most patients. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3895751

  15. Expression of a highly antigenic and native-like folded extracellular domain of the human α1 subunit of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, suitable for use in antigen specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Zouridakis, Marios; Douris, Vassilis; Georgostathi, Assimina; Kalamida, Dimitra; Sotiriadis, Alexandros; Poulas, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the expression of the extracellular domain of the human α1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in lepidopteran insect cells (i-α1-ECD) and its suitability for use in antigen-specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Compared to the previously expressed protein in P. pastoris (y-α1-ECD), i-α1-ECD had a 2-fold increased expression yield, bound anti-nAChR monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from MG patients two to several-fold more efficiently and resulted in a secondary structure closer to that of the crystal structure of mouse α1-ECD. Our results indicate that i-α1-ECD is an improved protein for use in antigen-specific MG therapeutic strategies. PMID:24376846

  16. Clinical aspects of myasthenia explained.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Palace, Jackie; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2010-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndromes are diseases of the neuromuscular junction. Autoantibodies and toxins to or mutations in one of the synaptic proteins are the main causes of dysfunction. Myasthenic phenotypes can be classified according to the basic aetiological mechanisms or divided depending on the clinical phenotype. PMID:20380587

  17. Genetics Home Reference: myasthenia gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AChR); in others, the antibodies attack a related protein called muscle-specific kinase (MuSK). In both cases, the abnormal antibodies lead to a reduction of available AChR. The AChR protein is critical for signaling between nerve and muscle ...

  18. Myasthenia Gravis (MG): Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... for use only when other drugs fail. Myasthenic crisis Especially in people with bulbar or respiratory symptoms, ... can sometimes worsen to the point of myasthenic crisis , an extreme episode of weakness that culminates in ...

  19. Decreased microRNA miR-181c expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with elevated serum levels of IL-7 and IL-17 in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Guo, Mingfeng; Xin, Ning; Shao, Zhen; Zhang, Xiuying; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Jing; Zheng, Shuangshuang; Fu, Linlin; Wang, YuZhong; Zhou, Dongmei; Chen, Hao; Huang, Yan; Dong, Ruiguo; Xiao, Chenghua; Liu, Yonghai; Geng, Deqin

    2016-08-01

    miR-181c is a newly identified negative regulator of immune cell activation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of miR-181c in myasthenia gravis (MG). miR-181c showed significant downregulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from MG patients compared with healthy controls, with lower expression in generalized patients than in ocular ones. MG patients also had increased serum IL-7 and IL-17 levels. Additionally, serum IL-7 level presents a positive correlation with the serum IL-17 level. miR-181c levels were negatively correlated with serum levels of IL-7 and IL-17 in either generalized patients or ocular patients. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that miR-181c could directly bind to the 3'-UTR of interleukin-7. Forced expression of miR-181c led to decreased IL-7 and IL-17 release in cultured PBMCs, while depletion of miR-181c increased the secretion of these two proinflammatory cytokines. The results from our study suggested for the first time that miR-181c was able to negatively regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-7 and IL-17 in MG patients, and it is a novel potential therapeutic target for MG. PMID:25962782

  20. [Directions for use of corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors against generalized myasthenia gravis: therapeutic strategies that can lead to early improvements and veer away from high-dose oral corticosteroids].

    PubMed

    Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Nagane, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    The advent of effective immune treatment has meant that myasthenia gravis (MG) is most often not lethal. However, many MG patients still find it difficult to maintain daily activities due to chronic residual fatigability and long-term side effects of medication, since full remission without immune treatment is not common. Our analysis demonstrated that disease severity, dose of oral corticosteroids, and depressive state are the major independent factors negatively associated with self-reported QOL (MG-QOL15-J score). It is noteworthy that oral corticosteroid, the first-line agent for MG, is negatively associated with patients' QOL. When the analysis took into account MGFA postintervention status and dose of oral prednisolne (PSL), the MG-QOL15-J score of MM status patients taking ≤ 5 mg PSL per day is identically low (i.e., just as good QOL) as that seen in CSR and is a target of treatment. In order to veer away from high-dose oral corticosteroids and to achieve early MM or better status with PSL ≤ 5 mg/day, we advocate the early aggressive treatment strategy that can achieve early improvement by performing an aggressive therapy using combined treatment with plasmapheresis and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and then maintain an improved clinical status using low-dose oral corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine microemulsion and tacrolimus). The early stages of MG are susceptible to treatment with calcineurin inhibitors. When using cyclosporine microemulsion for MG, blood concentrations 2 h after administration (C2) correlate with clinical improvement and immediately before administration (C0) with side effects (increased serum creatinine and/or hypertension). Monitoring of C2 and C0 levels is useful to estimate efficacy and safety of the drug. PMID:23196511

  1. [Myasthenia, from the internist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Eymard, B

    2014-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease due to specific antibodies inducing a neuromuscular transmission defect causing muscle fatigability. If onset of the disease may be at any age, myasthenia gravis concerns mostly young adults, in majority females. The disease characteristic features are the following: ocular symptoms (ptosis or diplopia) as main initial manifestation, extension to other muscles in 80 % of the cases, variability of the deficit, effort induced worsening, successive periods of exacerbation during the disease course, severity depending on respiratory and swallowing impairment (if rapid worsening, a myasthenic crisis is to be suspected), association with thymoma in 20 % of patients and with other various autoimmune diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease. Diagnosis relies on the clinical features, improvement with cholinesterase inhibitors, detection of specific autoantibodies (anti-AChR or anti-MuSK), and significant decrement evidenced by electrophysiological tests. The points concerning specifically the internist have been highlighted in this article: diagnostic traps, associated autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory myopathies that may mimic myasthenia gravis, adverse effects of medications commonly used in internal medicine, some of them inducing myasthenic syndromes. The treatment is well codified: the treatment is well codified: (1) respect of adverse drugs contra-indications, systematically use of cholinesterase inhibitors, (2) thymectomy if thymoma completed with radiotherapy if malignant, (3) corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agent in severe or disabling form, (4) intensive care unit monitoring, plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins for patients with myasthenic crisis. PMID:24112993

  2. Myasthenia Gravis: Tests and Diagnostic Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affiliations Foundation Focus Newsletter E-Update Test & Diagnostic methods In addition to a complete medical and neurological ... How can I help? About MGFA Test & Diagnostic methods Treatment for MG FAQ's Upcoming Events Spring 2016 ...

  3. An investigation of experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S. F.; Brennan, J. L.; McLeod, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    Guinea-pigs were immunized with antigen prepared from calf thymus and muscle, and from guinea-pig thymus, and rats were immunized with antigen prepared from rat thymus and rat muscle. There was an increased incidence of delayed hypersensitivity and circulating thymus antibodies in the immunized guinea-pigs and an increased incidence of thymitis in the immunized guinea-pigs and rats. However, when compared with control animals, there was no electrophysiological evidence of impairment of neuromuscular transmission in the immunized animals. Images PMID:4328884

  4. Immune Globulin Intravenous: Myasthenia Gravis (Acute Exacerbation).

    PubMed

    Generali, Joyce A; Cada, Dennis J

    2015-10-01

    This Hospital Pharmacy feature is extracted from Off-Label Drug Facts, a publication available from Wolters Kluwer Health. Off-Label Drug Facts is a practitioner-oriented resource for information about specific drug uses that are unapproved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This new guide to the literature enables the health care professional or clinician to quickly identify published studies on off-label uses and determine if a specific use is rational in a patient care scenario. References direct the reader to the full literature for more comprehensive information before patient care decisions are made. Direct questions or comments regarding Off-Label Drug Uses to jgeneral@ku.edu. PMID:26912917

  5. Myasthenia Gravis: Drugs to be Avoided

    MedlinePlus

    ... explanation) on this drug in MG patients. • The fluoroquinolones , including Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin – commonly prescribed antibiotics that ... drugs that carry black box warnings include the fluoroquinolones (e.g. Ciprofloxacin , Levafloxacin ; see above) and Telethromycin ( ...

  6. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care. A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C. In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  7. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care.A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C.In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  8. Animal models of antimuscle specific kinase myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Richman, David P.; Nishi, Kayoko; Ferns, Michael J.; Schnier, Joachim; Pytel, Peter; Maselli, Ricardo A.; Agius, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Antimuscle specific kinase (anti-MuSK) myasthenia (AMM) differs from antiacetylcholine receptor myasthenia gravis in exhibiting more focal muscle involvement (neck, shoulder, facial, and bulbar muscles) with wasting of the involved, primarily axial, muscles. AMM is not associated with thymic hyperplasia and responds poorly to anticholinesterase treatment. Animal models of AMM have been induced in rabbits, mice, and rats by immunization with purified xenogeneic MuSK ectodomain, and by passive transfer of large quantities of purified serum IgG from AMM patients into mice. The models have confirmed the pathogenic role of the MuSK antibodies in AMM and have demonstrated the involvement of both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the neuromuscular junction. The observations in this human disease and its animal models demonstrate the role of MuSK not only in the formation of this synapse but also in its maintenance. PMID:23252909

  9. [Acquired von Willebrand's disease in the course of severe primary hypothyroidism in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3].

    PubMed

    Lubińska, Monika; Swiatkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Kazimierska, Ewa; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 20-year old female, who had been followed because of von Willebrand disease (vWD) was presented in this paper . She had a past history of menorrhagia and bleeding after dental procedures and the activity of von Willebrand factor (vWF) was decreased. Because of suggestive clinical features, the workup for hypothyroidism was performed and the patient was found to have severe hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto thyroiditis. After the institution of replacement therapy with levothyroxine, von Willebrand factor activity returned to normal range and symptoms of von Willebrand disease disappeared. Based on these findings, the diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AvWS) due to hypothyroidism was made. The development of myasthenia led to the final diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 (APS) with myasthenia gravis and vitiligo. PMID:18335399

  10. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  11. Myasthenia and related disorders of the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Jennifer; Beeson, David J; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of transmission at the neuromuscular junction has increased greatly in recent years. We now recognise a wide variety of autoimmune and genetic diseases that affect this specialised synapse, causing muscle weakness and fatigue. These disorders greatly affect quality of life and rarely can be fatal. Myasthenia gravis is the most common disorder and is most commonly caused by autoantibodies targeting postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors. Antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) are detected in a variable proportion of the remainder. Treatment is symptomatic and immunomodulatory. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is caused by antibodies to presynaptic calcium channels, and approximately 50% of cases are paraneoplastic, most often related to small cell carcinoma of the lung. Botulism is an acquired disorder caused by neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, impairing acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft. In addition, several rare congenital myasthenic syndromes have been identified, caused by inherited defects in presynaptic, synaptic basal lamina and postsynaptic proteins necessary for neuromuscular transmission. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:20547629

  12. Therapeutic gymnastics in comprehensive treatment of patients with generalized myasthenia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapelovich, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of therapeutic gymnastics was used for patients with mayasthenia gravis to control the consequences of hypodynamia induced by the myasthenic process. It is concluded that during myasthenia, the severity of the disease is due to the affection of the cross striated musculature. The most life threatening are the disorders in respiration and swallowing, that can be intensified by forced stay in bed and immobility. It is also concluded that the use of therapeutic gymnastics in patients which myasthenia promotes efficient presurgical preparation, and in the post surgical period; prevention of pulmonary complications and normalization of respiration. Therapeutic gymnastics with regard to the severity and localization of the myasthenic disorders must be a component part of the presurgical preparation and postsurgical management of patients with generalized myasthenia.

  13. [Localization of binding sites in rat muscles and brain for cobra neurotoxin and serum immunoglobulins from patients with myasthenia].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V A; Vladeeva, N V; Lobzin, V S; Paniukov, A N

    1986-09-01

    Using the immunohistochemical technique, it was revealed that serum immunoglobulins of patients with myasthenia gravis (Ig) were irreversibly attached to the myoneuronal connections of the rat intercostal muscles like the marker of the nicotin cholinireceptors--the cobra venom neurotoxin (CT). In addition, Ig differs from CT in the binding to nervous cells of the claustrum and diencephalon reticular formation and with certain cells of the nucleus caudatus and hemispheric cerebral cortex. It is suggested that the autoimmune processes in patients with myasthenia gravis do not only involve myoneuronal connection but also participate in central mechanisms of the disease genesis. PMID:3756323

  14. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sin-Hyeog; Barchan, Dora; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR α-subunit (Hα1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Hα1-205–induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1723–1730 (1999). PMID:10606626

  15. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1999-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit (Halpha1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Halpha1-205-induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. PMID:10606626

  16. Association of a wide invasive malignant thymoma with myastenia gravis and primary hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid adenoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Lolli, Ivan; Troccoli, Giuseppe; Resta, Francesco; Sabbà, Carlo; Ruggieri, Nadia; Tafaro, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    There are few cases described in the world literature reporting an association of thymoma (with myasthenia gravis or not) with hyperparathyroidism. In these cases the hyperparathyroidism was due to the presence of an adenoma or hyperplasic parathyroid tissue either in the cervical region or in an ectopic intrathymic location.(12345) In other cases the syndrome of hypercalcemia was due to the secretion of parathyroid-related protein (PTHRP) (6) or parathyroid hormone (PTH) (7) by the thymoma itself. We report the first case, at the best of our knowledge, of a wide invasive malignant thymoma (type B3), associated with myasthenia gravis and hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma. PMID:16873103

  17. Obstetric and anesthetic management of severe congenital myasthenia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Terblanche, Nico; Maxwell, Cynthia; Keunen, Johannes; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2008-10-01

    The congenital myasthenia syndromes form a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by defective neuromuscular transmission. Although they have muscle fatigability in common with the acquired immune myasthenia syndrome, there are important pathophysiological, diagnostic, management and progression pattern differences between them. We report the management of a 28-yr-old patient with longstanding congenital myasthenia syndromes, who underwent an elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Muscle imbalance plus weakness-related scoliosis and chronic respiratory failure complicated her management. Ultrasonography was used to facilitate the spinal anesthetic. Intraoperative noninvasive positive pressure ventilation maintained lung volumes effectively and prevented deterioration in respiratory function. PMID:18806046

  18. Precision medicine in myasthenia graves: begin from the data precision

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Xie, Yanchen; Hao, Hong-Jun; Sun, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypic autoimmune disease with overt clinical and immunological heterogeneity. The data of MG is far from individually precise now, partially due to the rarity and heterogeneity of this disease. In this review, we provide the basic insights of MG data precision, including onset age, presenting symptoms, generalization, thymus status, pathogenic autoantibodies, muscle involvement, severity and response to treatment based on references and our previous studies. Subgroups and quantitative traits of MG are discussed in the sense of data precision. The role of disease registries and scientific bases of precise analysis are also discussed to ensure better collection and analysis of MG data. PMID:27127759

  19. [Myasthenia in an epileptic patient].

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, P

    1996-01-01

    The author described a case of myasthenia and epilepsy in a female aged 36 years. The relationship between myasthenia and epilepsy was discussed. The additional factor which made the diagnosis difficult is bilateral deafness. PMID:9148180

  20. Mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor loss in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Drachman, D B; Adams, R N; Stanley, E F; Pestronk, A

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental abnormality affecting the neuromuscular junctions of myasthenic patients is a reduction of available AChRs, due to an autoimmune attack directed against the receptors. Antibodies to AChR are present in most patients, and there is evidence that they have a predominant pathogenic role in the disease, aided by complement. The mechanism of antibody action involves acceleration of the rate of degradation of AChRs, attributable to cross-linking of the receptors. In addition, antibodies may block AChRs, and may participate in producing destructive changes, perhaps in conjunction with complement. The possibility that cell-mediated mechanisms may play a role in the autoimmune responses of some myasthenic patients remains to be explored. Although the target of the autoimmune attack in myasthenic patients is probably always the acetylcholine receptors, it is not yet clear which of these immune mechanisms are most important. It is likely that the relative role of each mechanism varies from patient to patient. One of the goals of future research will be to identify the relative importance of each of these mechanisms in the individual patient, and to tailor specific immunotherapeutic measures to the abnormalities found. PMID:6249894

  1. Therapeutic plasma exchange in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Dyar, Kelly L

    2013-01-01

    Tom was an interesting combination of a patient requiring both renal placement therapy and TPE. Because there are available through the inpatient dialysis unit, it provided an opportunity to educate Tom on apheresis treatments as well as treatment options for chronic disease. Discussion with Tom during these treatments revealed that he wanted to retain as much autonomy and responsibility for his care as possible. Collaboration with the nephrologists and neurologist, as well as the outpatient infusion center, allowed Tom to schedule treatments before he experienced a myasthenic crisis but also hospitalization, which could increase his risk of infection. The time he spent receiving the TPE treatments was a unique and wonderful opportunity to answer all of Tom's questions about treatment modalities and allowed nursing staff to advocate fully for his wishes. At the time of this writing, Tom has remained free of myasthenic symptoms and has not required TPE treatments for over two years. PMID:24579400

  2. Factors that determine the severity of experimental myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Drachman, D B; McIntosh, K R; Yang, B

    1998-05-13

    Based on our current information, the robust differences in responses of B6 and bm12 mice after immunization with AChR are as follows: (1) The AChR-specific T cell repertoires are strikingly different. The epitope specificities, as well as the rearranged TCR alpha and beta chains and their CDR3 domains, are virtually nonoverlapping in the two strains of mice. (2) The AChR antibody responses are quantitatively different, both to Torpedo AChR and to the autoantigen--mouse AChR. (3) The isotype distribution of AChR antibodies favors IgG2b in B6 mice, but not in bm12 mice. (4) The clinical manifestations of EAMG are qualitatively and quantitatively different in the two strains. These considerations have led to the following scheme, illustrated diagrammatically in FIGURE 2, to explain the differences in EAMG in B6 and bm12 mice: (1) The MHC Class II of B6 mice binds the alpha 146-162 peptide of Torpedo AChR with high affinity, while the genetically altered MHC Class II of bm12 mice does not, as previously suggested (see FIGURE 2). (2) The alpha 146-162/MHC Class II complex occurs only in B6 mice and interacts with T cells having appropriate TCRs, resulting in their stimulation and expansion. Although T cells of appropriate specificity are also available in the bm12 strain, the relevant peptide/MHC Class II complex is not present. Therefore, very few T cells with specificity for alpha 146-162 are stimulated, and those that are stimulated have different TCRs. T cells with specificity for other AChR peptides are also present and expanded in both strains of mice, but they have less influence on the outcome of the immune response. (3) The alpha 146-162-specific T cells of B6 mice, in turn, interact strongly with AChR-specific B cells of B6 mice. These B cells present the same epitope/MHC Class II complex as the APCs and therefore interact well with the alpha 146-162-specific T cells (FIGURE 2). Thus, T cells of this specificity appear to provide more efficient help for AChR antibody production than T cells with specificity for other Torpedo AChR epitopes. This results in production of greater amounts of AChR antibodies, including a critical subset that cross-reacts with autologous mouse AChR. The higher autoantibody levels contribute to the greater susceptibility to EAMG and to the greater severity of manifestations in the B6 strain compared with the bm12 strain. (4) There is a bias in B6 mice toward the production of AChR antibodies of IgG2b isotype. We suggest that T cells specific for alpha 146-162 may contribute to this isotype bias. The IgG2b antibodies appear to have particularly potent "myasthenogenic" effects in rats and mice. (5) Finally, it should be emphasized that these differences in immunological and clinical aspects of EAMG in B6 and bm12 mice are relative rather than absolute. T cells that respond to AChR epitopes other than alpha 146-162 can also provide help for AChR antibody production, albeit less potent. In a sense, this model represents a special case of molecular mimicry. In this case, the source of the foreign antigenic molecule is injection rather than the more usual route of infection. The antigen (Torpedo AChR) is one that these mice would never naturally encounter, and the critical amino acid (lysine 155) of the key epitope (alpha 146-162) is present only in the AChR of electric organs of electric fish and not in the AChR of mice, chickens, cows, or humans. The important point is that a detail of the structure of the foreign antigen--that is, a particular peptide of Torpedo AChR--can determine the severity of an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease, depending on how it interacts with a detail of the structure of the MHC Class II molecule and, in turn, on how the peptide/MHC Class II complex interacts with the available T cell repertoire. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9668247

  3. Myasthenia Gravis, Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome & Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... In most cases of MG, the immune system origins of MG have gradually unfolded, targets the acetylcholine ... is a rare autoimmune disease whose symptoms and origins are some- what similar to those of MG. ...

  4. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

    PubMed

    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  5. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Beef with gravy and gravy with beef... Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and “Gravy with Beef” shall not be made with beef which, in the aggregate for each lot contains more than...

  6. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beef with gravy and gravy with beef... Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and “Gravy with Beef” shall not be made with beef which, in the aggregate for each lot contains more than...

  7. Membranous nephropathy, leiomyoma and autoimmune myasthenia: more than a coincidence?

    PubMed

    Calviño, Jesus; Adeva, Magdalena; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus

    2012-12-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) has been associated with several infectious, immunological and malignant conditions, but had only rarely been reported with malignant and other immune disorders in the same patient. We describe the case of a 56-year-old male with MN who was also diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), myasthenia gravis (MG) and thymic hyperplasia. Thus, we report here for the first time the coincidence of these conditions in the same patient. There was a recurrence of nephrotic syndrome without impairment of renal function 5 years after removal of the GIST (3 years after thymectomy). The possible basis for the relationship between these diseases is discussed, and some common genetic and immune physiopathological pathways are hypothesized. PMID:26069802

  8. Membranous nephropathy, leiomyoma and autoimmune myasthenia: more than a coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Jesus; Adeva, Magdalena; Sobrido, Maria-Jesus

    2012-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) has been associated with several infectious, immunological and malignant conditions, but had only rarely been reported with malignant and other immune disorders in the same patient. We describe the case of a 56-year-old male with MN who was also diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), myasthenia gravis (MG) and thymic hyperplasia. Thus, we report here for the first time the coincidence of these conditions in the same patient. There was a recurrence of nephrotic syndrome without impairment of renal function 5 years after removal of the GIST (3 years after thymectomy). The possible basis for the relationship between these diseases is discussed, and some common genetic and immune physiopathological pathways are hypothesized. PMID:26069802

  9. Myasthenia in pregnancy: best practice guidelines from a U.K. multispecialty working group.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Fiona; Dhanjal, Mandish; Hill, Marguerite; James, Natalie; Jungbluth, Heinz; Kyle, Pippa; O'Sullivan, Geraldine; Palace, Jacqueline; Robb, Stephanie; Williamson, Catherine; Hilton-Jones, David; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    A national U.K. workshop to discuss practical clinical management issues related to pregnancy in women with myasthenia gravis was held in May 2011. The purpose was to develop recommendations to guide general neurologists and obstetricians and facilitate best practice before, during and after pregnancy. The main conclusions were (1) planning should be instituted well in advance of any potential pregnancy to allow time for myasthenic status and drug optimisation; (2) multidisciplinary liaison through the involvement of relevant specialists should occur throughout pregnancy, during delivery and in the neonatal period; (3) provided that their myasthenia is under good control before pregnancy, the majority of women can be reassured that it will remain stable throughout pregnancy and the postpartum months; (4) spontaneous vaginal delivery should be the aim and actively encouraged; (5) those with severe myasthenic weakness need careful, multidisciplinary management with prompt access to specialist advice and facilities; (6) newborn babies born to myasthenic mothers are at risk of transient myasthenic weakness, even if the mother's myasthenia is well-controlled, and should have rapid access to neonatal high-dependency support. PMID:23757420

  10. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-05-15

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft. PMID:23440963

  11. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft. PMID:23440963

  12. Current approach to seronegative myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Argov, Zohar

    2011-01-01

    The group of patients with weakness or fatigue who have electrophysiological evidence of neuromuscular transmission defects, but no antibodies against either acetyl choline receptor or muscle specific kinase, need special evaluation and therapeutic consideration. Such seronegative patients may have low affinity antibodies but may also be late onset of a congenital myasthenic syndrome. This review discuss the practical approach toward the condition of seronegative myasthenia. PMID:20852878

  13. Computed tomography of the anterior mediastinum in myasthemia gravis: a radiologic-pathologic correlative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, G.T.; Bein, M.E.; Mancuso, A.A.; Keesey, J.C.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wong, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the mediastinum were correlated with pathologic findings of the thymus following thymectomy in 57 patients with myasthenia gravis. Based on the patient's age and the overall morphology of the anterior mediastinum, CT scans were assigned one of four grades in an attempt to predict thymus pathologic findings. Using this grading, 14 of 16 cases of thymoma were suspected or definitely diagnosed. One of the two cases not diagnosed on CT was a microscopic tumor. There were no false-positive diagnoses in 11 cases graded as definitely thymoma. We conclude that thymoma can be sensitively diagnosed in patients older than 40 years of age. However, thymoma cannot be predicted with a high level of confidence in patients younger than 40 because of the difficulty in differentiating normal thymus or hyperplasia from thymoma. Recommendations for the use of CT in the preoperative evaluation of myasthenic patients are presented.

  14. Seropositive myasthenia and autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy: cross reactivity or subclinical disease?

    PubMed

    Miglis, Mitchell G; Racela, Rikki; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-10-28

    Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are both autoimmune channelopathies mediated by antibodies directed against nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. While both diseases target acetylcholine receptors, skeletal muscle and ganglionic receptor subtypes have key immunologic and genetic distinctions, and reports of patients with both AAG and MG are rare. We report a patient with antibody-confirmed AAG and elevated levels of ACh binding antibodies that did not meet clinical or electrodiagnostic criteria for MG. We presume that his skeletal muscle nAChR seropositivity was a false positive, perhaps due to the cross reactivity of the patient's ganglionic nAChR antibodies with skeletal nAChR subtypes. PMID:21745762

  15. Two simultaneous autoimmune processes in a patient presenting with respiratory insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Lauren; Hamor, Paul; Bleasel, Jane; Corte, Tamera

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including dermatomyositis, are uncommon acquired autoimmune diseases, sometimes associated with interstitial lung disease. Myasthenia gravis, a separate autoimmune disorder involving the neuromuscular junction, has some overlapping clinical features but has only rarely been reported to occur simultaneously within the same patient. Here we present the first reported case of concomitant dermatomyositis, myasthenia gravis, and interstitial lung disease. PMID:25473554

  16. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  17. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  18. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  19. Status of the thymectomy trial for nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis patients receiving prednisone.

    PubMed

    Newsom-Davis, John; Cutter, Gary; Wolfe, Gil I; Kaminski, Henry J; Jaretzki, Alfred; Minisman, Greg; Aban, Inmaculada; Conwit, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The primary study [MGTX] aims to answer three questions: does extended transsternal thymectomy combined with the prednisone protocol, when compared with the prednisone protocol alone: (1) result in a greater improvement in myasthenic weakness, (2) result in a lower total dose of prednisone, thus decreasing the likelihood of concurrent and long-term toxic effects, (3) enhance the quality of life by reducing adverse events and symptoms associated with the therapies? Inclusion criteria are MGFA Class 2, 3, or 4; acetylcholine receptor antibody positive; age at least 18.0 years and <60.0 years; MG history of <3 years. Patients can be prednisone naïve or not. The National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke awarded funding for MGTX in September 2005, and NIH awarded funding for the ancillary Biomarkers study (BioMG) in February 2006. Diverse regulatory obstacles have been encountered in this international study, but we now have a total of over 70 centers in 22 countries (North America, South America, Europe, Australasia, South Africa) either actively recruiting or at various levels of readiness. PMID:18567886

  20. Spontaneous remission in canine myasthenia gravis: implications for assessing human MG therapies.

    PubMed

    Shelton, G D; Lindstrom, J M

    2001-12-11

    The natural course of autoimmune canine MG was determined in 53 dogs with muscular weakness and a positive acetylcholine receptor antibody titer. Dogs were treated with anticholinesterase therapy, without immunosuppression. Spontaneous clinical and immunologic remission occurred in 47 of 53 dogs within an average of 6.4 months. Neoplasia was identified in the six dogs that did not spontaneously remit. This study questions the value of using canine MG in studies designed to assess the effect of immunotherapies. PMID:11739846

  1. Acute Severe Animal Model of Muscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia: Combined Postsynaptic and Presynaptic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Richman, David P.; Nishi, Kayoko; Morell, Stuart W.; Chang, Jolene Mi; Ferns, Michael J.; Wollmann, Robert L.; Maselli, Ricardo A.; Schnier, Joachim; Agius, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the pathogenesis of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia, a newly described severe form of myasthenia gravis associated with MuSK antibodies, characterized by focal muscle weakness and wasting, and absence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies; also to determine whether antibodies to MuSK, a crucial protein in the formation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) during development, can induce disease in the mature NMJ. Design/Methods Lewis rats were immunized with a single injection of a newly discovered splicing variant of MuSK, MuSK 60, which has been demonstrated to be expressed primarily in the mature NMJ. Animals were assessed clinically, serologically and by repetitive stimulation of median nerve. Muscle tissue was examined immunohistochemically and by electron microscopy. Results Animals immunized with 100ug of MuSK 60 develop severe progressive weakness, starting at day 16, with 100% mortality by day 27. The weakness is associated with high MuSK antibody titers, weight loss, axial muscle wasting and decrementing compound muscle action potentials. Light and electron microscopy demonstrate fragmented NMJs with varying degrees of postsynaptic muscle endplate destruction along with abnormal nerve terminals, lack of registration between endplates and nerve terminals, local axon sprouting and extrajunctional dispersion of cholinesterase activity. Conclusions These findings: 1) support the role of MuSK antibodies in the human disease; 2) demonstrate the role of MuSK, not only in the development of the NMJ, but also in the maintenance of the mature synapse; and 3) demonstrate involvement in this disease of both pre- and post-synaptic components of the NMJ. PMID:22158720

  2. Vegetables, Soups, Sauces, Gravies and Beverages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on vegetables, soups, sauces, gravies, and beverages is designed to increase Marine Corps cooks' effectiveness as food handlers, using the proper techniques in the preparation of these items. Introductory materials include specific information for…

  3. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis-tensilon ... Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions. ... The test helps: Diagnose myasthenia gravis Tell the difference between ... conditions Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase ...

  4. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  5. Things to Consider If You Have MG and Are Thinking about Getting Pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis and optimal care of individuals affected by myasthenia gravis and closely related disorders and to improve their ... the authors, but not necessarily those of the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA). Any reference to a ...

  6. Eyelid drooping

    MedlinePlus

    ... around or behind the eye Diabetes Horner syndrome Myasthenia gravis Stroke Swelling in the eyelid, such as ... performed include: Slit-lamp examination Tension test for myasthenia gravis Visual field testing

  7. Eyelid drooping

    MedlinePlus

    ... around or behind the eye Diabetes Horner syndrome Myasthenia gravis Stroke Swelling in the eyelid, such as ... performed include: Slit-lamp examination Tension test for myasthenia gravis Visual field testing Treatment If a disease ...

  8. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage

  9. Passive and active immunization models of MuSK-Ab positive myasthenia: electrophysiological evidence for pre and postsynaptic defects.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Stuart; Jacobson, Leslie; Waters, Patrick; Cossins, Judith; Jacob, Saiju; Leite, M Isabel; Webster, Richard; Vincent, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies directed against the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction protein, muscle specific kinase (MuSK) are found in a small proportion of generalized myasthenia gravis (MuSK-MG) patients. MuSK is a receptor tyrosine kinase which is essential for clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction, but the mechanisms by which MuSK antibodies (MuSK-Abs) affect neuromuscular transmission are not clear. Experimental models of MuSK-MG have been described but there have been no detailed electrophysiological studies and no comparisons between the MuSK-MG and the typical form with AChR-Abs (AChR-MG). Here we studied the electrophysiology of neuromuscular transmission after immunization against MuSK compared with immunization against AChR, and also after passive transfer of IgG from MuSK-MG or AChR-MG patients. Overt clinical weakness was observed in 6/10 MuSK-immunized and 3/9 AChR-immunized mice but not in those injected with patients' IgG. Miniature endplate potentials (MEPPS) were reduced in all weak mice consistent with the reduction in postsynaptic AChRs that was found. However, whereas there was an increase in the quantal release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the weak AChR-immunized mice, no such increase was found in the weak MuSK-immunized mice. Similar trends were found after the passive transfer of purified IgG antibodies from MuSK-MG or AChR-MG patients. Preliminary results showed that MuSK expression was considerably higher at the neuromuscular junctions of the masseter (facial) than in the gastrocnemius (leg) with no reduction in MuSK immunostaining at the neuromuscular junctions. Overall, these results suggest that MuSK antibodies act in at least two ways. Firstly by indirectly affecting MuSK's ability to maintain the high density of AChRs and secondly by interfering with a compensatory presynaptic mechanism that regulates quantal release and helps to preserve neuromuscular function. These results raise questions about how MuSK is

  10. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  11. Myasthenic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  12. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  13. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  14. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  15. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  16. Gravi-sensing microorganisms as model systems for gravity sensing in eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, C.; Richter, P.; Lebert, M.; Häder, D.-P.

    2001-08-01

    Gravi-sensing in single cells and multicellular organisms is a very active field of investigation. Similarities between gravity sensing mechanisms in uni- and multicellular eukaryotes make single cells ideal model systems for the understanding of gravity responses on the cellular and molecular level with far fetching significance for other systems. This article gives a short overview about gravi-sensing in plants (Arabidopsis, Chara) as well as the ciliates Loxodes and Paramecium and concentrates on gravitaxis research in the single cellular flagellate, Euglena gracilis. Experiments revealed the involvement of cAMP, Ca2+ specific mechanosensitive channels and membrane potential in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. Future perspectives for the use of motile, photosynthetic and other unicellular microorganisms for space applications e.g. for oxygen supply in life support systems or research on the origin of life are discussed.

  17. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  18. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Petrini, P

    1999-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a syndrome that has clinical and laboratory features similar to hereditary vWD. In contrast to the latter it occurs in patients without a family history of previous bleeding tendency. PMID:23401904

  19. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Nichols, William L

    2002-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a relatively rare acquired bleeding disorder that usually occurs in elderly patients, in whom its recognition may be delayed. Patients usually present predominantly with mucocutaneous bleeding, with no previous history of bleeding abnormalities and no clinically meaningful family history. Various underlying diseases have been associated with AvWD, most commonly hematoproliferative disorders, including monoclonal gammopathies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and myeloproliferative disorders. The pathogenesis of AvWD remains incompletely understood but includes autoantibodies directed against the von Willebrand factor (vWF), leading to a more rapid clearance from the circulation or interference with its function, adsorption of vWF by tumor cells, and nonimmunologic mechanisms of destruction. Laboratory evaluation usually reveals a pattern of prolonged bleeding time and decreased levels of vWF antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity, and factor VIII coagulant activity consistent with a diagnosis of vWD. Acquired vWD is distinguished from the congenital form by age at presentation, absence of a personal and family history of bleeding disorders, and, often, presence of a hematoproliferative or autoimmune disorder. The severity of the bleeding varies considerably among patients. Therapeutic options include desmopressin and certain factor VIII concentrates that also contain vWF. Successful treatment of the associated illness can reverse the clinical and laboratory manifestations. Intravenous immunoglobulins have also shown some efficacy in the management of AvWD, especially cases associated with monoclonal gammopathies. Awareness of AvWD is essential for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:11838652

  20. [Acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare, but probably underestimated, bleeding disorder that mimics the congenital form of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. AVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The main pathogenic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:16913181

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital myasthenic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy Resources (2 links) Muscular Dystrophy Association Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America: Congenital Myasthenia GeneReviews (1 link) ... for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with ...

  2. Electromyography

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a number of disorders, including muscular dystrophy ) Myasthenia gravis Peripheral neuropathy Polymyositis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatic ... Mononeuritis multiplex Mononeuropathy Multiple system atrophy Muscular dystrophy Myasthenia ... neuropathy Polymyositis - adult Radial nerve dysfunction ...

  3. Effects of nisin and temperature on survival, growth, and enterotoxin production characteristics of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus in beef gravy.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R; Clavero, M R; Jaquette, C B

    1997-05-01

    The presence of psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus in ready-to-serve meats and meat products that have not been subjected to sterilization treatment is a public health concern. A study was undertaken to determine the survival, growth, and diarrheal enterotoxin production characteristics of four strains of psychrotrophic B. cereus in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and beef gravy as affected by temperature and supplementation with nisin. A portion of unheated vegetative cells from 24-h BHI broth cultures was sensitive to nisin as evidenced by an inability to form colonies on BHI agar containing 10 micrograms of nisin/ml. Heat-stressed cells exhibited increased sensitivity to nisin. At concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml, nisin was lethal to B. cereus, the effect being more pronounced in BHI broth than in beef gravy. The inhibitory effect of nisin (1 microgram/ml) was greater on vegetative cells than on spores inoculated into beef gravy and was more pronounced at 8 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Nisin, at a concentration of 5 or 50 micrograms/ml, inhibited growth in gravy inoculated with vegetative cells and stored at 8 or 15 degrees C, respectively, for 14 days. Growth of vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus after an initial period of inhibition is attributed to loss of activity of nisin. One of two test strains produced diarrheal enterotoxin in gravy stored at 8 or 15 degrees C within 9 or 3 days, respectively. Enterotoxin production was inhibited in gravy supplemented with 1 microgram of nisin/ml and stored at 8 degrees C for 14 days; 5 micrograms of nisin/ml was required for inhibition at 15 degrees C. Enterotoxin was not detected in gravy in which less than 5.85 log10 CFU of B. cereus/ml had grown. Results indicate that as little as 1 microgram of nisin/ml may be effective in inhibiting or retarding growth of and diarrheal enterotoxin production by vegetative cells and spores of psychrotrophic B. cereus in beef gravy at 8 degrees C, a

  4. Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles Myasthenia gravis affects 60,000 Americans, but removal ... gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have ...

  5. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    ... spine) Stroke MUSCLE DISEASES Becker muscular dystrophy Dermatomyositis Muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) Myotonic dystrophy POISONING Botulism Poisoning ( insecticides , nerve gas) Shellfish poisoning OTHER Anemia Myasthenia gravis Polio

  6. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  8. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  9. [ICU acquired neuromyopathy].

    PubMed

    Gueret, G; Guillouet, M; Vermeersch, V; Guillard, E; Talarmin, H; Nguyen, B-V; Rannou, F; Giroux-Metges, M-A; Pennec, J-P; Ozier, Y

    2013-09-01

    ICU acquired neuromyopathy (IANM) is the most frequent neurological pathology observed in ICU. Nerve and muscle defects are merged with neuromuscular junction abnormalities. Its physiopathology is complex. The aim is probably the redistribution of nutriments and metabolism towards defense against sepsis. The main risk factors are sepsis, its severity and its duration of evolution. IANM is usually diagnosed in view of difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation, but electrophysiology may allow an earlier diagnosis. There is no curative therapy, but early treatment of sepsis, glycemic control as well as early physiotherapy may decrease its incidence. The outcomes of IANM are an increase in morbi-mortality and possibly long-lasting neuromuscular abnormalities as far as tetraplegia. PMID:23958176

  10. Bacteriological survey of frozen meat and gravy produced at establishments under federal inspection.

    PubMed

    Surkiewicz, B F; Harris, M E; Johnston, R W

    1973-10-01

    During visits to 34 federally inspected establishments producing frozen meat and gravy, 541 production line samples and 535 finished product units were collected for bacteriological analyses. It was found that more than 70% of the sets of finished product (10 units/set) produced under good manufacturing practices had: (i) four or fewer coliform-positive units, (ii) two or fewer Escherichia coli-positive units, (iii) three or fewer Staphylococcus aureus-positive units, and (iv) an aerobic plate count of fewer than 50,000/g (geometric mean of 10 units). All finished product units were negative for salmonellae. PMID:4584595

  11. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  12. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  13. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  14. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acquired person is the pre-acquisition ultimate parent entity of the entity. (ii) The value of an... directors of B. A is deemed to be acquiring all of the assets of B as a result. (g) Transfers of patent... transfer of patent rights covered by this paragraph constitutes an asset acquisition; and (3) Patent...

  15. Efficacy of terbutaline in familial limb girdle myasthenia: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Zeyaur Rahman; Sivadasan, Ajith; Alexander, Mathew; Patil, Anil Kumar B.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are frequently misdiagnosed due to their wide clinical heterogeneity. Molecular defects in various end-plate associated proteins are being identified. Better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype correlations can help evolve newer therapeutic targets. We present a report of two siblings with familial limb girdle myasthenia who showed significant objective clinical improvement after initiation of terbutaline. The possible mechanism of action and utility of terbutaline in the setting of CMS are described. Terbutaline is a potential treatment option in certain subtypes of CMS refractory to conventional medicines. However, long-term follow-up is required to determine the overall efficacy and safety profile. PMID:23956565

  16. Efficacy of terbutaline in familial limb girdle myasthenia: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Azad, Zeyaur Rahman; Sivadasan, Ajith; Alexander, Mathew; Patil, Anil Kumar B

    2013-04-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are frequently misdiagnosed due to their wide clinical heterogeneity. Molecular defects in various end-plate associated proteins are being identified. Better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype correlations can help evolve newer therapeutic targets. We present a report of two siblings with familial limb girdle myasthenia who showed significant objective clinical improvement after initiation of terbutaline. The possible mechanism of action and utility of terbutaline in the setting of CMS are described. Terbutaline is a potential treatment option in certain subtypes of CMS refractory to conventional medicines. However, long-term follow-up is required to determine the overall efficacy and safety profile. PMID:23956565

  17. Children Acquire Emotion Categories Gradually

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widen, Sherri C.; Russell, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Some accounts imply that basic-level emotion categories are acquired early and quickly, whereas others imply that they are acquired later and more gradually. Our study examined this question for fear, happiness, sadness, and anger in the context of children's categorization of emotional facial expressions. Children (N=168, 2-5 years) first labeled…

  18. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  19. Thermal inactivation of ileal loop-reactive Clostridium perfringens type A strains in phosphate buffer and beef gravy.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J G; Peeler, J T; Twedt, R M

    1977-01-01

    The thermal resistance of spore crops produced from each of two ileal loop-reactive strains of Clostridium perfringens type A was determined in two suspending vehicles consisting of 0.067 M (pH 7.0) phosphate buffer and a commercial beef gravy. D115.6 values obtained in buffer and enumerated after pretreatment with sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate and recovery in plating medium containing lysozyme were two- to threefold greater than those obtained without this treatment. D115.6 values obtained with beef gravy were less than those obtained in buffer with or without lysozyme; however, the D98.9 and D104.4 values were 1.3 to 2 times greater than those obtained in buffer with lysozyme. The z values were within the ranges reported by previous investigators. PMID:199113

  20. Expression of gibberellin 3 beta-hydroxylase gene in a gravi-response mutant, weeping Japanese flowering cherry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugano, Mami; Nakagawa, Yuriko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Teruko

    2004-01-01

    Expressions of the gibberellin biosynthesis gene were investigated in a normal upright type and a gravi-response mutant, a weeping type of Japanese flowering cherry (Prunus spachiana), that is unable to support its own weight and elongates downward. A segment of the gibberellin 3 beta-hydroxylase cDNA of Prunus spachiana (Ps3ox), which is responsible for active gibberellin synthesis, was amplified by using real-time RT-PCR. The content of Ps3ox mRNA in the weeping type was much greater than that in the upright type, while the endogenous gibberellin level was much higher in the elongating zone of the weeping type. These results suggest that the amount and distribution of synthesized gibberellin regulate secondary xylem formation, and the unbalanced distribution of gibberellin affects the gravi-response of the Prunus tree.

  1. Congenital Myasthenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells and muscles. Most involve the activities of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that allow neurons to relay information from one cell to the next. For neurotransmitters to be effective, the nerve cell must release ...

  2. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  3. A Unified Model of Shoot Tropism in Plants: Photo-, Gravi- and Propio-ception

    PubMed Central

    Bastien, Renaud; Douady, Stéphane; Moulia, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Land plants rely mainly on gravitropism and phototropism to control their posture and spatial orientation. In natural conditions, these two major tropisms act concurrently to create a photogravitropic equilibrium in the responsive organ. Recently, a parsimonious model was developed that accurately predicted the complete gravitropic and proprioceptive control over the movement of different organs in different species in response to gravitational stimuli. Here we show that the framework of this unifying graviproprioceptive model can be readily extended to include phototropism. The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism results in an alignment of the apical part of the organ toward a photogravitropic set-point angle. This angle is determined by a combination of the two directional stimuli, gravity and light, weighted by the ratio between the gravi- and photo-sensitivities of the plant organ. In the model, two dimensionless numbers, the graviproprioceptive number B and the photograviceptive number M, control the dynamics and the shapes of the movement. The extended model agrees well with two sets of detailed quantitative data on photogravitropic equilibrium in oat coleoptiles. It is demonstrated that the influence of light intensity I can be included in the model in a power-law-dependent relationship M(I). The numbers B and M and the related photograviceptive number D are all quantitative genetic traits that can be measured in a straightforward manner, opening the way to the phenotyping of molecular and mechanical aspects of shoot tropism. PMID:25692607

  4. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  5. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  6. Biological system development for GraviSat: A new platform for studying photosynthesis and microalgae in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Erich D.; Bebout, Brad M.; Tan, Ming X.; Selch, Florian; Ricco, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    Microalgae have great potential to be used as part of a regenerative life support system and to facilitate in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on long-duration human space missions. Little is currently known, however, about microalgal responses to the space environment over long (months) or even short (hours to days) time scales. We describe here the development of biological support subsystems for a prototype "3U" (i.e., three conjoined 10-cm cubes) nanosatellite, called GraviSat, designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of space microgravity and the radiation environment on microalgae and other microorganisms. The GraviSat project comprises the co-development of biological handling-and-support technologies with implementation of integrated measurement hardware for photosynthetic efficiency and physiological activity in support of long-duration (3-12 months) space missions. It supports sample replication in a fully autonomous system that will grow and analyze microalgal cultures in 120 μL wells around the circumference of a microfluidic polymer disc; the cultures will be launched while in stasis, then grown in orbit. The disc spins at different rotational velocities to generate a range of artificial gravity levels in space, from microgravity to multiples of Earth gravity. Development of the biological support technologies for GraviSat comprised the screening of more than twenty microalgal strains for various physical, metabolic and biochemical attributes that support prolonged growth in a microfluidic disc, as well as the capacity for reversible metabolic stasis. Hardware development included that necessary to facilitate accurate and precise measurements of physical parameters by optical methods (pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry) and electrochemical sensors (ion-sensitive microelectrodes). Nearly all microalgal strains were biocompatible with nanosatellite materials; however, microalgal growth was rapidly inhibited (∼1 week) within sealed

  7. Mutant SNAP25B causes myasthenia, cortical hyperexcitability, ataxia, and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Brengman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify and characterize the molecular basis of a syndrome associated with myasthenia, cortical hyperexcitability, cerebellar ataxia, and intellectual disability. Methods: We performed in vitro microelectrode studies of neuromuscular transmission, performed exome and Sanger sequencing, and analyzed functional consequences of the identified mutation in expression studies. Results: Neuromuscular transmission at patient endplates was compromised by reduced evoked quantal release. Exome sequencing identified a dominant de novo variant, p.Ile67Asn, in SNAP25B, a SNARE protein essential for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles from nerve terminals and of dense-core vesicles from endocrine cells. Ca2+-triggered exocytosis is initiated when synaptobrevin attached to synaptic vesicles (v-SNARE) assembles with SNAP25B and syntaxin anchored in the presynaptic membrane (t-SNAREs) into an α-helical coiled-coil held together by hydrophobic interactions. Pathogenicity of the Ile67Asn mutation was confirmed by 2 measures. First, the Ca2+ triggered fusion of liposomes incorporating v-SNARE with liposomes containing t-SNAREs was hindered when t-SNAREs harbored the mutant SNAP25B moiety. Second, depolarization of bovine chromaffin cells transfected with mutant SNAP25B or with mutant plus wild-type SNAP25B markedly reduced depolarization-evoked exocytosis compared with wild-type transfected cells. Conclusion: Ile67Asn variant in SNAP25B is pathogenic because it inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We attribute the deleterious effects of the mutation to disruption of the hydrophobic α-helical coiled-coil structure of the SNARE complex by replacement of a highly hydrophobic isoleucine by a strongly hydrophilic asparagine. PMID:25381298

  8. Effects of nifedipine on gravi-dependent germination of moss spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorkavtsiv, O. Y.; Demkiv, O. T.

    % of spores cell filaments oriented parallely with respect to the gravity vector. Results shown suggest that the endogenic competency of a single-cell spore is necessary condition of gravi- induced initiation of polar axis the competency being realized with Ca2+ movement. The highest level of Ca2+ luminescence was at the bottom of spores. In other sites of the spores the Ca2+ luminescence was about 20-fold lower than at the site of Ca2+ influx. In the 24 h after formation of first outgrowth the new site of Ca2+ influx appeared at the opposite site of spore and the second outgrowth arised. Consequently during the period of gravi-dependent spore development the newly top Ca2+ influx was repeatedly established. The direction of the Ca2+ ions influx correlated with re-orientation of spores with respect to the gravity vector. It is known that the nifedipine partially inhibits polar axis formation (Chatterjee et al., 2000) the latter being formed under the influence Ca2+ gradient (Cove, 2000). Thus, our results confirm that the fast change of Ca2+ influx probably is one of the earliest cell-level responses induced by gravity and it plays a key role in guiding polar events of germinating spores. This research was supported by NASA grant NN-09 (R).

  9. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  10. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods. PMID:24846635

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: neuroradiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W M; Brant-Zawadzki, M

    1983-11-01

    Central nervous system complications depicted by CT in ten patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are described. Three patients had multifocal intra-axial enhancing lesions representing atypical brain abscesses (two with toxoplasmosis, one with candidiasis). A fourth patient with multifocal "ring" lesions whose biopsy was interpreted as suggestive of toxoplasmosis responded poorly to treatment. Following his death three months later of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, autopsy revealed primary intracerebral immunoblastic lymphoma. One patient had Kaposi sarcoma involving the right frontal lobe (seen as an enhancing mass on the CT scan). CT findings in the remaining five patients revealed mild to moderate enlargement of cerebrospinal fluid spaces (including ventricles and basal cisternae) as a result of cryptococcal meningitis in three patients and "aseptic" meningitis in two. The two patients in whom early biopsy confirmed toxoplasmosis responded well to anti-infective therapy, resulting in dramatic clinical recoveries. PMID:6622693

  12. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood. PMID:17049474

  13. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  14. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  15. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  16. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  17. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  18. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    1987-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Medical Advisory Panel has developed recommendations to assist family planning associations in playing a more active role in the prevention and control of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Of primary importance is an effective program of information and education aimed at communicating the following facts: AIDS is a fatal disease for which there is no cure; AIDS is spread by sexual intercourse, contaminated blood, and contaminated needles; an infected woman can transmit AIDS to her fetus during pregnancy; a monogamous sexual relationship is the surest way to avoid AIDS infection; condom use is good protection; an infected person can look and feel well, yet still be able to transmit the AIDS virus; and AIDS is not spread by ordinary contact with an infected person. Family planning associations should include information on AIDS in all existing IEC projects, as well as develop new materials. Among the target audiences for IEC activities are family planning workers, family planning clients, and the general public including youth, teachers, parents, employers, and national leaders. Special attention should be given to high-risk groups such as homosexual and bisexual men, hemophiliacs, male and female prostitutes, clients of sexually transmitted disease clinics, people with many sexual partners, illegal users of intravenous drugs, and the sexual partners of those in any of these groups. Wide promotion of condom use is a priority activity for family planning organizations. PMID:12340977

  19. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26542044

  20. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  1. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  2. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  3. Surface Sampler Arm Acquiring Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Operation of the surface sampler in obtaining Martian soil for Viking 2's molecular analysis experiment last Saturday (September 25) was closely monitored by one of the Lander cameras because of the precision required in trenching the small area--8 by 9 inches-surrounded by rocks. Dubbed 'Bonneville Salt Flats,' the exposure of thin crust appeared unique in contrast with surrounding materials and became a prime target for organic analysis in spite of potential hazards. Large rock in foreground is 8 inches high. At left, the sampler scoop has touched the surface, missing the rock at upper left by a comfortable 6 inches, and the backhoe has penetrated the surface about one-half inch. The scoop was then pulled back to sample the desired point and (second photo) the backhoe furrowed the surface pulling a piece of thin crust toward the spacecraft. The initial touchdown and retraction sequence was used to avoid a collision between a rock in the shadow of the arm and a plate joining the arm and scoop. The rock was cleared by 2 to 3 inches. The third picture was taken 8 minutes after the scoop touched the surface and shows that the collector head has acquired a quantity of soil. With surface sampler withdrawn (right), the foot-long trench is seen between the rocks. The trench is three inches wide and about 1 1/2 to 2 inches deep. The scoop reached to within 3 inches of the rock at far end of trench. Penetration appears to have left a cavernous opening roofed by the crust and only about one inch of undisturbed crust separates the deformed surface and the rock.

  4. [Inflammatory myopathies. New concepts].

    PubMed

    López Longo, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Myopathies are diseases characterized by the primary affection of skeletal muscle. In general they present with muscle weakness, pain, contracture, paresthesias, rigidity, or fatigue. They can be hereditary, such as muscle dystrophies, congenital, myotonic, metabolic, and myasthenic, or acquired. Among the latter ones we include idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), toxic, endocrine, or infectious myopathies and myasthenia gravis. There is a current acceptance of considerable clinical and histopathological overlap among some muscle dystrophies and some IIM. However, the molecular profile is different and characteristic in each myopathy and the study into the patterns of expression of genes in the muscle can be useful in their differential diagnosis, including that of IIM. PMID:21794553

  5. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  6. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...

  7. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...

  8. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...

  9. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  10. Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula in infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Szold, A; Udassin, R; Seror, D; Mogle, P; Godfrey, S

    1991-06-01

    Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a rare entity in the pediatric age group. We report two pediatric patients with acquired TEF caused by shells of pistachio nuts. In both patients the primary operation did not resolve the problem and a second intervention for recurrent fistula was needed. The special nature of acquired TEF, particularly the one described herein, requires delayed surgical intervention and meticulous separation of the respiratory and alimentary tracts by an intercostal muscle flap. PMID:1941455

  11. Acquired stuttering due to recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katherine B; Turner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Acquired (neurogenic) stuttering is a rare phenomenon seen after cerebral infarction or brain injury. Aetiology of this symptom is unclear, but recent evidence supports that it is a disturbance in the left hemispheric neural network involving the interplay between the cortex and basal ganglia. We present the case of a patient who develops acquired stuttering after a recurrence of a right temporoparietal anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III). We also review other cases of acquired stuttering and known anatomical correlates. PMID:24252834

  12. Acquired Surface Dyslexia: The Evidence from Hebrew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnboim, Smadar

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the symptoms of acquired surface dyslexia in Hebrew. Four acquired surface dyslexic adults were compared with eight normal second graders in terms of reading strategy. Homophones and homographs were a major source of difficulty for native Hebrew surface dyslexic readers; the normal second graders used a non-lexical strategy. (45…

  13. Acquiring and Managing Electronic Journals. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Donnelyn; Yue, Paoshan

    Electronic journals are both a blessing and a curse for libraries. To be meaningful in the current information environment--to meet users' ever-increasing demands--libraries must acquire as many appropriate full text resources as possible, as quickly as possible, and make them easy to use. This Digest provides tips for acquiring and providing…

  14. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    PubMed Central

    Saritha, Mohanan; Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajesh, Nachiappa G

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn's disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient. PMID:23248371

  15. Acquired hemophilia masked by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kantor, R; Mayan, H; Puritz, L; Varon, D; Farfel, Z

    2000-03-01

    People without hemophilia but with autoantibodies specifically directed against the procoagulant activity of factor VIII are known to have acquired hemophilia. The bleeding diathesis in these patients is often severe and life-threatening. The definite laboratory diagnosis of this disorder includes demonstration of low factor VIII levels in plasma with a high titer of factor VIII inhibitors, but the initial suspicion for its presence should rise in view of a prolonged partial thromboblastin time (PTT) and a normal prothrombin time associated with an acquired bleeding disorder. Oral anticoagulant treatment is known to prolong PTT as well, and the merger of these 2 situations may cause delayed diagnosis of acquired hemophilia with devastating consequences. We describe here the first reported case of acquired hemophilia diagnosed in a patient treated with warfarin. In such patients prolonged PTT may be ascribed to warfarin therapy rather than to acquired hemophilia, thus causing a dangerous delay in diagnosis. PMID:10746834

  16. Study of an Intervention to Improve Problem List Accuracy and Use

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-30

    Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity; Asthma; COPD; Breast Cancer; Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Diabetes; Glaucoma; Hemophilia; Hypertension; Hyperthyroidism; Hypothyroidism; Myasthenia Gravis; Osteoporosis; Osteopenia; Renal Failure; Renal Insufficiency; Sickle Cell Disease; Stroke

  17. Oxybutynin

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not close properly before birth), or other nervous system conditions that affect the bladder muscles. Oxybutynin is ... the body); myasthenia gravis (a disorder of the nervous system that causes muscle weakness); fast or irregular heartbeat; ...

  18. Dextromethorphan and Quinidine

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called central nervous system agents. The way it works in the brain ... ever had myasthenia gravis (a disorder of the nervous system that causes muscle weakness), a history of street ...

  19. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of thymus and fat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gui C.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Reid, V.; Steinglass, K.; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Jacobowitz, Larry; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of the human thymus gland and surrounding mediastinal fat were measured to evaluate this approach in distinguishing between thymus and fat tissues during therapeutic surgery for myasthenia gravis disease.

  20. Eyelid lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other circulatory disorders Thyroid problems such as hypothyroidism and Graves disease After the Procedure You can ... Read More Diabetes Eyelid drooping Facelift Graves disease Hypothyroidism Myasthenia gravis Ptosis - infants and children Update Date ...

  1. Azithromycin

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lung infection that often affects people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)]. Azithromycin is in a class ... blood infection; heart failure; cystic fibrosis; AIDS or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; myasthenia gravis (a condition ...

  2. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia gravis Pernicious anemia Reactive arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Sjögren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Type I diabetes Symptoms Symptoms will vary based on the type ...

  3. Dysarthria - care

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness of the nervous system, such as myasthenia gravis Tips for communicating better Simple changes in the ... speaking. Give positive feedback for their effort. Ask questions in a way that they can answer you ...

  4. Pyridostigmine

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to decrease muscle weakness resulting from myasthenia gravis.This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ... else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.It is ...

  5. Muscle fatigue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... above your shoulders until they drop is one exercise that may be performed during the Tensilon test. In this test, the drug Tensilon is administered, and the response in the muscles are evaluated to help diagnose myasthenia gravis or ...

  6. GRAVI-2 space experiment: investigating statoliths displacement and location effects on early stages of gravity perception pathways in lentil roots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizet, François; Eche, Brigitte; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Badel, Eric; Legue, Valerie; Brunel, Nicole; Label, Philippe; Gérard, Joëlle

    2016-07-01

    The plants ability to orient their growth with respect to external stimuli such as gravity is a key factor for survival and acclimation to their environment. Belowground, plant roots modulate their growth towards gravity, allowing soil exploration and uptake of water and nutrients. In roots, gravity sensing cells called statocytes are located in the center of the root cap. Statocytes contain starch-filled plastids denser than the cytoplasm, which sedimentation along the direction of gravity is widely accepted as being involved into early stages of gravity perception (the starch-statolith hypothesis; Sack, 1991). Root gravitropism following statoliths displacement is based on auxin redistribution in the root apex, inducing differential growth between the root upward and downward sides. However at the cell scale, the chain of transduction starting from statoliths displacement and leading to auxin redistribution remains poorly documented. Signaling molecules such as calcium, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate are serious candidates previously shown to be involved within minutes before modification of the expression of auxin-related genes (Morita, 2010; Sato et al., 2015). Here, we observe and quantify statoliths displacements and locations at various levels of gravity to investigate two hypothesis: (i) Are contacts between statoliths and the endoplasmic reticulum necessary to induce gravitropism? (ii) Are very low displacements of statoliths sufficient to initiate transduction pathways such as the calcium's one? These questionings have led to an experiment called GRAVI-2 which took place aboard the ISS in 2014. During the experiment, lentil roots were grown in the European modular cultivation system for several hours in microgravity and were then submitted to short high gravity stimulus (5 and 15 minutes at 2 g) before the return to Earth for analyses. Ongoing cytological measurements will reveal the effects of statoliths

  7. Potential disadvantages of using socially acquired information.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Valone, Thomas J; Templeton, Jennifer J

    2002-01-01

    The acquisition and use of socially acquired information is commonly assumed to be profitable. We challenge this assumption by exploring hypothetical scenarios where the use of such information either provides no benefit or can actually be costly. First, we show that the level of incompatibility between the acquisition of personal and socially acquired information will directly affect the extent to which the use of socially acquired information can be profitable. When these two sources of information cannot be acquired simultaneously, there may be no benefit to socially acquired information. Second, we assume that a solitary individual's behavioural decisions will be based on cues revealed by its own interactions with the environment. However, in many cases, for social animals the only socially acquired information available to individuals is the behavioural actions of others that expose their decisions, rather than the cues on which these decisions were based. We argue that in such a situation the use of socially acquired information can lead to informational cascades that sometimes result in sub-optimal behaviour. From this theory of informational cascades, we predict that when erroneous cascades are costly, individuals should pay attention only to socially generated cues and not behavioural decisions. We suggest three scenarios that might be examples of informational cascades in nature. PMID:12495513

  8. Exome sequencing detection of two untranslated GFPT1 mutations in a family with limb-girdle myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Maselli, R A; Arredondo, J; Nguyen, J; Lara, M; Ng, F; Ngo, M; Pham, J M; Yi, Q; Stajich, J M; McDonald, K; Hauser, M A; Wollmann, R L

    2014-02-01

    The term 'limb-girdle myasthenia' (LGM) was first used to describe three siblings with proximal limb weakness without oculobulbar involvement, but with EMG decrement and responsiveness to anticholinesterase medication. We report here that exome sequencing in the proband of this family revealed several sequence variations in genes linked to proximal limb weakness. However, the only mutations that cosegregated with disease were an intronic IVS7-8A>G mutation and the previously reported 3'-UTR c.*22C>A mutation in GFPT1, a gene linked to LGM. A minigene assay showed that IVS7-8A>G activates an alternative splice acceptor that results in retention of the last seven nucleotides of intron 7 and a frameshift leading to a termination codon 13 nucleotides downstream from the new splice site. An anconeus muscle biopsy revealed mild reduction of the axon terminal size and postsynaptic fold simplification. The amplitudes of miniature endplate potentials and quantal release were also diminished. The DNA of the mildly affected father of the proband showed only the intronic mutation along with sequence variations in other genes potentially relevant to LGM. Thus, this study performed in the family originally described with LGM showed two GFPT1 untranslated mutations, which may cause disease by reducing GFPT1 expression and ultimately impairing protein glycosylation. PMID:23488891

  9. In vivo Therapy with Monoclonal Anti-I-A Antibody Suppresses Immune Responses to Acetylcholine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldor, Matthew K.; Sriram, Subramaniam; McDevitt, Hugh O.; Steinman, Lawrence

    1983-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to I-A gene products of the immune response gene complex attenuates both humoral and cellular responses to acetylcholine receptor and appears to suppress clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. This demonstrates that use of antibodies against immune response gene products that are associated with susceptibility to disease may be feasible for therapy in autoimmune conditions such as myasthenia gravis.

  10. Acquired cutis laxa associated with cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Van; Dang, Phuoc Van; Bui, Duc Van; Mejbel, Haider; Mani, Divya Thomas; Smoller, Bruce Robert; Phung, Thuy Linh

    2015-07-01

    Cutis laxa is characterized by dramatic wrinkling of skin that is lacking in elasticity due to inherent defects in dermal elastic fibers. Cutis laxa can be caused by genetic and metabolic disorders. It can also be acquired, possibly resulting from inflammatory processes with destruction of elastic fibers. This report describes a 26-year old woman who developed acquired cutis laxa and cutaneous mastocytosis leading to premature aging. She represents a unique co-occurrence of these two separate disease entities. To our knowledge, there has been only one published case report of acquired cutis laxa occurring in association with urticaria pigmentosa in a 4-year old girl. Our case would be a second case that exhibits the coexistence of these two disorders in an adult female. PMID:26436968

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  12. Culture-Negative Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis with Concomitant Septicemia Due to a Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae Biotype Gravis Isolate in a Patient with Multiple Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Lani Kai; Shimasaki, Teppei; Sae-Ow, Wichit; Whelen, A. Christian; O'Connor, Norman; Kim, Wesley; Young, Royden

    2013-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with a prosthetic mitral valve presented with a 3-day history of dizziness, subjective fever, and chills. Blood cultures were positive for a pleomorphic Gram-positive rod. Initial phenotypic testing could only support the identification of a Corynebacterium species. Nucleic acid sequencing (16S rRNA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were conclusive for Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Definitive phenotypic testing classified the strain as nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae biotype Gravis. PMID:24006007

  13. Ultrasound of Inherited vs. Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, Craig M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We compared features of nerve enlargement in inherited and acquired demyelinating neuropathies using ultrasound. Methods We measured median and ulnar nerve cross-sectional areas in proximal and distal regions in 128 children and adults with inherited (Charcot-Marie Tooth-1 (CMT-1) (n=35)) and acquired (Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) (n=55), Guillaine-Barre Syndrome (GBS) (n=21) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN) (n=17)) demyelinating neuropathies. We classified nerve enlargement by degree and number of regions affected. We defined patterns of nerve enlargement as: none- no enlargement; mild-nerves enlarged but never more than twice normal; regional- nerves normal at at least one region and enlarged more than twice normal at atleast one region; diffuse- nerves enlarged at all four regions with atleast one region more than twice normal size. Results Nerve enlargement was commonly diffuse (89%) and generally more than twice normal size in CMT-1, but not (p<0.001) in acquired disorders which mostly had either no, mild or regional nerve enlargement (CIDP (64%), GBS (95%), and MMN (100%)). In CIDP, subjects treated within three months of disease onset had less nerve enlargement than those treated later. Discussion Ultrasound identified patterns of diffuse nerve enlargement can be used to screen patients suspected of having CMT-1. Normal, mildly, or regionally enlarged nerves in demyelinating polyneuropathy suggests an acquired etiology. Early treatment in CIDP may impede nerve enlargement. PMID:24101129

  14. Acquiring a Second Language for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Virginia P.

    1995-01-01

    This report offers a conceptual model for use with language minority children who are entering a new school when they must acquire the language of the majority student population. The model has four development components or processes: sociocultural, linguistic, academic, and cognitive. These four components are described in detail. Research is…

  15. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  16. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  17. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  18. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  19. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  20. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  1. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  2. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN... possession of raisins by a handler at his packing or processing plant or at any other established receiving station operated by him: Provided, That a handler shall not be deemed to acquire any raisins...

  3. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 926.10 Section 926.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND...

  4. Acquiring Financial Management Software: A Prototyping Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John H.

    1990-01-01

    When the Smithsonian Institution recently acquired a new financial management system, the concept of prototyping was used throughout the process, but in a broader sense than in software development. It was used to refine requirements, establish software management techniques, test a logistical system, and implement and apply the package. (MSE)

  5. A Case Of Bilateral Acquired Localized Lipoatrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıkulu, Osman; Yesilova, Yavuz; Aksoy, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is characterized by inflammation and tissue loss in fatty tissue. This disease may be congenital or acquired, primary or secondary. Secondary lipoatrophy develops with infections, collagen tissue diseases, tumors and drug injections. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old female patient who developed lipoatrophy following intramuscular steroid injection to both buttocks. PMID:27504088

  6. Neural Correlates of Acquired Color Category Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alexandra; Franklin, Anna; Holmes, Amanda; Drivonikou, Vicky G.; Ozgen, Emre; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Category training can induce category effects, whereby color discrimination of stimuli spanning a newly learned category boundary is enhanced relative to equivalently spaced stimuli from within the newly learned category (e.g., categorical perception). However, the underlying mechanisms of these acquired category effects are not fully understood.…

  7. Acquired structural defects of the hair.

    PubMed

    Chetty, G N; Kamalam, A; Thambiah, A S

    1981-03-01

    Acquired hair shaft abnormalities resembling genetic trichorrhexis nodosa were seen in two patients. Selenium shampoo and bacterial infection with trichomycosis axillaris may have been the contributing factors. There is a possibility that strongyloides larvae caused trichonodosis in one patient. PMID:7216593

  8. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  9. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  10. Support Network Responses to Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chleboun, Steffany; Hux, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) affects social relationships; however, the ways social and support networks change and evolve as a result of brain injury is not well understood. This study explored ways in which survivors of ABI and members of their support networks perceive relationship changes as recovery extends into the long-term stage. Two…

  11. Diving of Great Shearwaters (Puffinus gravis) in Cold and Warm Water Regions of the South Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Ronconi, Robert A.; Ryan, Peter G.; Ropert-Coudert, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis), the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s) of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. Methodology/Principal Findings Time-depth recorders (TDRs) were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50%) dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C) water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C) water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. Conclusions/Significance General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving. PMID:21152089

  12. Using Herbs and Spices/Preparing Sauces and Gravies. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.11. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with herbs and spices and the selection and preparation of sauces and gravies. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas:…

  13. Current treatment options of acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar R; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Bumbasirević, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic acquired flatfoot is an important orthopaedic problem, due to progressive loss of whole foot function and the increasing problem of patient disability. It is a complex entity, involving the tibialis posterior tendon, ankle joint, hindfoot and midfoot. In most cases the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the root cause of acquired flat foot, but there are other contributors and many different factors have an influence. The clinical picture varies depending on the stage of the deformity, as well as the treatment approach. Initially soft tissue procedures, synoviectomy and augmentation of the PTT are advised. In stage 2, lateral column lengthening and calcaneal osteotomy, with soft tissue - tendon transfers (TA, FHL, FDL) are recommended. In stage 3 subtalar, double or triplearthodesis is preferable, while in stage 4 pantalar fusion is indicated. This article elaborates on the etiology, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment modalities. PMID:24669559

  14. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  15. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  16. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  17. [Pharmacogenetics of community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, S Sh; Molchanova, O V; Kirpichnikova, N V; Sukhotina, N V; Gorbach, A A

    2010-01-01

    The rate of acetylation of xenobiotics affects the course and prognosis of infectious diseases. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in RA-patients is lower than that in LA-ones. In order to ensure the best antimicrobial effect on the onset of the disease it is required to use regimens with the maximum permissible dose of antibacterial drugs in the regions where the rapid type prevails. PMID:21400754

  18. Domestically acquired fascioliasis in northern California.

    PubMed

    Weisenberg, Scott A; Perlada, David E

    2013-09-01

    Two cases of domestically acquired fascioliasis are reported. Patient One was a 63-year-old male who developed a febrile illness 2 months after eating watercress in Marin County. Patient Two was a 38-year-old male who had eaten watercress with Patient One, and also developed a febrile illness. Both patients had eosinophilia and liver lesions on imaging. Diagnosis was made by serology and treatment was with triclabendazole. PMID:23836562

  19. Domestically Acquired Fascioliasis in Northern California

    PubMed Central

    Weisenberg, Scott A.; Perlada, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of domestically acquired fascioliasis are reported. Patient One was a 63-year-old male who developed a febrile illness 2 months after eating watercress in Marin County. Patient Two was a 38-year-old male who had eaten watercress with Patient One, and also developed a febrile illness. Both patients had eosinophilia and liver lesions on imaging. Diagnosis was made by serology and treatment was with triclabendazole. PMID:23836562

  20. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica. PMID:23330977

  1. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  2. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  3. Acquired resistance to immunotherapy and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Smyth, Mark J; Snyder, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Advances in immunotherapy have resulted in remarkable clinical responses in some patients. However, one of the biggest challenges in cancer therapeutics is the development of resistant disease and disease progression on or after therapy. Given that many patients have now received various types of immunotherapy, we asked three scientists to give their views on the current evidence for whether acquired resistance to immunotherapy exists in patients and the future challenges posed by immunotherapy. PMID:26822578

  4. A case of basaloid follicular hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Go, Jae Wan; Oh, Hwa Eun; Cho, Han Kyoung; Kang, Won Hyoung; Ro, Byung In

    2010-05-01

    Basaloid follicular hamartoma (BFH), uncommon rare benign neoplasm connected to the adnexal structures, presents with multiple clinical manifestations that can develop into basal cell carcinoma. BFH may be congenital or acquired, and the congenital form can be further divided into the generalized and unilateral type, and the acquired form may present as localized and solitary lesions. Congenital, generalized BFH is associated with systemic diseases such as alopecia, cystic fibrosis, hypohidrosis, and myasthenia gravis. In contrast, sporadic cases are observed as unilateral or localized lesions. BFH shows thick cords and thin strands of anastomosing basaloid proliferations that arise from hair follicles and are enclosed by loose fibrous stroma. Here, we report a 70-year-old man with an acquired, solitary form of BFH. PMID:20548923

  5. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  6. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA), and pityriasis versicolor (PV). Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included. PMID:23619442

  7. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia. PMID:2132469

  8. Acquired scalp alopecia. Part II: A review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J R; Kossard, S

    1999-05-01

    The neutrophil-associated and infiltrative scarring alopecias are reviewed including folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, acne keloidalis and follicular degeneration syndrome. The management of acquired scalp alopecia is also reviewed including newer, promising therapies. More specific agents targeting components of the androgen system will make the treatment of androgenetic alopecia more rewarding. Similarly new immunomodulatory therapies show great promise for the lymphocyte-associated alopecias and include a new generation of macrolide immunosuppressives (tacrolimus, SDZ ASM 981, and SDZ 281-240), some of which appear to have good transcutaneous absorption. PMID:10333615

  9. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  10. Acquired haemophilia masked by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Vadikolia, C M; Riddell, A; Brooks, S; Yee, T T; Brown, S; Lee, C

    2007-02-01

    Acquired haemophilia is a rare phenomenon and prompt diagnosis is essential for successful treatment. Early laboratory detection could minimize its potentially devastating consequences and reduce mortality but when a masking element such as anticoagulant therapy is present, delay in diagnosis is not uncommon. A prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) may be falsely attributed to warfarin alone, particularly when it is associated with oral anticoagulant overdose. We describe two patients on treatment with warfarin who presented with a bleeding diathesis and disproportionately prolonged APTT, which led to the diagnosis of antibodies directed against factor VIII. PMID:17224010

  11. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  12. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder with laboratory findings similar to those for congenital von Willebrand disease (VWD). However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. aVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, most frequently in lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. Through an analysis of the more recent literature data, the pathophysiology and the clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:17133419

  13. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails.

    PubMed

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  14. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication. PMID:26541597

  15. Tetracycline resistance genes acquired at birth.

    PubMed

    Alicea-Serrano, Angela M; Contreras, Mónica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2013-06-01

    Newborns acquire their first microbiota at birth. Maternal vaginal or skin bacteria colonize newborns delivered vaginally or by C-section, respectively (Dominguez-Bello et al. 2010 #884). We aimed to determine differences in the presence of four tetracycline (tet) resistance genes, in the microbes of ten newborns and in the mouth and vagina of their mothers, at the time of birth. DNA was amplified by PCR with primers specific for [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)]. Maternal vaginas harbored all four tet resistance genes, but most commonly tet(M) and tet(O) (63 and 38 %, respectively). Genes coding for tet resistance differed by birth mode, with 50 % of vaginally delivered babies had tet(M) and tet(O) and 16 and 13 % of infants born by C-section had tet(O) and tet(W), respectively. Newborns acquire antibiotic resistance genes at birth, and the resistance gene profile varies by mode of delivery. PMID:23483141

  16. Surgery-associated acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Theodossiades, G; Tsevrenis, V; Nomikou, E; Dadiotis, L; Kontopoulou-Griva, I

    2001-11-01

    We present two patients who acquired factor VIII antibodies in the immediate postoperative period. One patient was receiving warfarin that was temporarily discontinued but reintroduced after the procedure. Preoperatively, none gave a history of bleeding, even with past surgeries, and both had normal coagulation tests. Within days of surgery, hemorrhage with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, low factor VIII levels, and demonstrable factor VIII antibodies were observed. For the patient who was receiving warfarin the severe bleeding was attributed, at the beginning, only to the high international normalized ratio (INR), which resulted in a fatal delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. We would like to raise awareness of surgery as a precipitating cause of acquired hemophilia, which is something to be considered with unusual postoperative bleeding. This syndrome is remarkable for its abrupt onset within days of surgery, severe bleeding but potential successful outcome with combined hemostatic control with recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa) and elimination of the antibody by immunosuppression. PMID:11757731

  17. Therapeutic approaches to acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Federici, A B

    2000-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare acquired bleeding disorder similar to the congenital von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings. Diagnosis of AVWS can be very difficult, with treatment normally taking an empirical form. Although more than 200 cases have been reported since 1968, no retrospective or prospective studies are available on AVWS. Recently, an International Registry on AVWS, gathering data directly from worldwide Departments of Haematology-Oncology and Haemophilia Centres, has been organised by a group working on behalf of the Subcommittee on VWF in the Scientific Standardisation Committee (SSC) of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). Information about an additional 211 AVWS patients is now available, with more detailed data on demography, type of haemorrhage, diagnostic tests for AVWS and management of bleeding episodes. The additional 211 AVWS cases are associated with lymphoproliferative (47%) or myeloproliferative (19%) disorders, cardiovascular diseases, neoplasia (7%) and other miscellaneous diseases (14%). Bleeding episodes of AVWS patients were managed by different compounds including desmopressin (22%), FVIII/VWF concentrates (26%) and high-dose immunoglobulin (10%), plasmapheresis (2%), steroids (5%) and immunosuppressive drugs (20%). Based on complied data, we can conclude that none of the therapeutic approaches proposed are 100% effective in all AVWS cases. Therefore, treatment must be customized for each patient according to the underlying disorder, as well as to the type and the severity of bleeding episode and must be targeted to each specific case. PMID:11060681

  18. Treatment of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budde, Ulrich; Scheppenheim, Sonja; Dittmer, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) accounts for 22% of patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor. Most patients with known pathophysiological mechanisms suffer from cardiovascular, myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. Less frequent associations are of autoimmune origin, due to hyperfibrinolysis, adsorption to tumor cells, reduced synthesis and prolonged circulation. The mechanisms leading to aVWS is hitherto not known in patients with liver and kidney diseases, drug use, glycogen storage disease, virus infections and at least 18 other disease entities. Diagnosis is complicated by the battery of tests needed, and their inherent rather low sensitivity and specificity for aVWS. Thus, even in acute bleeding situations it may take days until a firm diagnosis is settled and specific therapies can be initiated. The main aim is to shed more light onto this, compared with inherited von Willebrand disease, rare disease which affects at least 2-3% of the older population. PMID:26577336

  19. Processed pseudogenes acquired somatically during cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Susanna L; Shlien, Adam; Marshall, John; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Martincorena, Inigo; Tubio, Jose M C; Li, Yilong; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Yates, Lucy; Davies, Helen; Bolli, Niccolo; Bignell, Graham R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Teixeira, Vitor H; Raine, Keiran; O'Meara, Sarah; Dodoran, Maryam S; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Santarius, Thomas; Grundy, Richard G; Malkin, David; Greaves, Mel; Munshi, Nikhil; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Bowtell, David; Martin, Sancha; Larsimont, Denis; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Boussioutas, Alex; Taylor, Jack A; Hayes, Neil D; Janes, Sam M; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5' truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context. PMID:24714652

  20. ACECARD. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E.E.

    1996-09-01

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  1. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for helpmore » with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.« less

  2. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrian; Podlipnik, Sebastian; Burgos, Fernando; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Cogolludo, Eva; Gallego-Valdes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer's disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth. PMID:27073702

  3. How to divest acquired physician practices.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, P K

    1999-02-01

    When an integrated delivery system (IDS) determines it must divest itself of a previously acquired physician practice, it must manage the transaction with care. The IDS most likely will want to maintain a positive ongoing relationship with the physician practice, while avoiding concessions to the practice that could be construed as violations of state and Federal laws. Before proceeding, the IDS should evaluate the reasons for divesting the practice, assess legal issues involved in terminating contracts with the practice, decide how to deal with the practice's assets and office facilities, consider whether covenants not to compete should be enforced, ensure continued access to essential medical records, consider whether to incorporate a "non-disparagement" clause in the termination agreement, and determine what mutual general releases may be necessary. PMID:10345614

  4. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men. PMID:2996396

  5. Human temporal bone findings in acquired hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hald, J; Milroy, C M; Jensen, K D; Parving, A

    1991-11-01

    Histological studies of the auditory organ in patients with acquired hypothyroidism are scarce. Thus the aim of the present study was to examine the temporal bones and the brain in subjects with hypothyroidism. Four temporal bones and two brains from clinically and biochemically hypothyroid subjects were removed and evaluated by light microscopy determine to the morphological changes and deposition of neutral and acid glycosaminoglycans. An audiogram from one of the patients showed a sensorineural hearing loss, which could be ascribed to occupational noise exposure. The study revealed histological changes compatible with age and infectious disease. No accumulation of neutral or acid glycosaminoglycans could be demonstrated in the temporal bones, or in the brains. PMID:1761939

  6. [Merits of acquiring ISO15189 accreditation].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, an ISO15189 accreditation system was started in 2005. To date, 47 hospitals have been accredited. In this session, I will present the merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189 based on our experience. Our hospital has 263 beds. The Clinical Examination Section consists of 12 staff (including 5 part-time workers): 7 in change of sample examination and 5 in charge of physiological examination. The annual number of samples is approximately 150,000. Samples collected on health checkups account for 90%. To improve the quality and service, assessment by third persons has been positively utilized in our hospital. Accreditation regarding ISO9001, ISO14001, ISO27001, privacy mark, hospital function assessment, the functional assessment of "ningen-dock"/health checkup hospitals, labor/hygiene service function assessment, and ISO15189 has been acquired. Patients may not recognize ISO. So, it must be utilized, considering that the acquisition of accreditation is not a goal but a starting point. Furthermore, cost-performance should be improved to achieve utilization-related merits. It is important to not only acquire accreditation but also help clinical staff and patients become aware of some changes/merits. Patients may consult a hospital for the following reasons: confidence in the hospital, and the staffs kind/polite attitudes. Long-term management strategies should be established without pursuing only short-term profits. I will introduce several merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189. Initially, incidental conditions for bids and appeal points include accreditation regarding ISO15189. Our corporation has participated in some competitive bids regarding health checkup business. In some companies, the bid conditions included ISO acquisition. In our hospital, clinical trials have been positively carried out. For participation in trials, hospitals must pass an institutional examination. However, ISO acquisition facilitates the preparation of

  7. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Acquiring ownership and the attribution of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Palamar, Max; Le, Doan T; Friedman, Ori

    2012-08-01

    How is ownership established over non-owned things? We suggest that people may view ownership as a kind of credit given to agents responsible for making possession of a non-owned object possible. On this view, judgments about the establishment of ownership depend on attributions of responsibility. We report three experiments showing that people's judgments about the establishment of ownership are influenced by an agent's intent and control in bringing about an outcome, factors that also affect attributions of responsibility. These findings demonstrate that people do not just consider who was first to possess an object in judging who owns it, and are broadly consistent with the view that ownership is acquired through labor. The findings also suggest that rather than exclusively being the product of social conventions, judgments about the establishment of ownership over non-owned things also depend on the psychological processes underlying the attribution of responsibility. PMID:22591710

  9. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  10. Processed pseudogenes acquired somatically during cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Susanna L.; Shlien, Adam; Marshall, John; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P.; Martincorena, Inigo; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Li, Yilong; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Yates, Lucy; Davies, Helen; Bolli, Niccolo; Bignell, Graham R.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Teixeira, Vitor H.; Raine, Keiran; O’Meara, Sarah; Dodoran, Maryam S.; Teague, Jon W.; Butler, Adam P.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Santarius, Thomas; Grundy, Richard G.; Malkin, David; Greaves, Mel; Munshi, Nikhil; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Bowtell, David; Martin, Sancha; Larsimont, Denis; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Boussioutas, Alex; Taylor, Jack A.; Hayes, Neil D.; Janes, Sam M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J.; Provenzano, Elena; van de Vijver, Marc; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin; Pinder, Sarah; Mac Grogan, Gaetan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Larsimont, Denis; Grabau, Dorthe; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Ehinger, Anna; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; van Deurzen, C.H.M; Salgado, Roberto; Brock, Jane E.; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Giri, Dilip D.; Arnould, Laurent; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Treilleux, Isabelle; Caldas, Carlos; Chin, Suet-Feung; Fatima, Aquila; Thompson, Alastair M.; Stenhouse, Alasdair; Foekens, John; Martens, John; Sieuwerts, Anieta; Brinkman, Arjen; Stunnenberg, Henk; Span, Paul N.; Sweep, Fred; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Thomas, Gilles; Broeks, Annegein; Langerod, Anita; Aparicio, Samuel; Simpson, Peter T.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Erla Eyfjörd, Jórunn; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Jonasson, Jon G.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Wong, Bernice Huimin; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Hooijer, Gerrit K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5′ truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context. PMID:24714652

  11. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E. E.

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  12. Acquired methaemoglobinaemia related to phenazopyridine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh; Sattovia, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Methaemoglobin is an altered state of haemoglobin in which the ferrous ions of haeme are oxidised to the ferric state. This results in increased affinity to the bound oxygen and decreasing its availability to tissues. Most cases of methaemoglobinaemia are acquired, resulting from an increased methaemoglobin formation by various exogenous agents. The authors report an elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with a 1-month history of shortness of breath. Around the same time she had started using over-the-counter (OTC) phenazopyridine tablets for urinary symptoms. The patient was hypoxic and cyanotic; however, lacked evidence of hypoxaemia on the arterial blood gas. The presence of abnormal haemoglobin was suspected and confirmed by elevated levels of methaemoglobin. Phenazopyridine was proposed to be the likely aetiology of the methaemoglobinaemia, which the patient was not aware of. This case highlights the importance of always inquiring the OTC drug use especially in geriatric population. PMID:22987905

  13. Acquired methaemoglobinaemia related to phenazopyridine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Lokesh; Sattovia, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Methaemoglobin is an altered state of haemoglobin in which the ferrous ions of haeme are oxidised to the ferric state. This results in increased affinity to the bound oxygen and decreasing its availability to tissues. Most cases of methaemoglobinaemia are acquired, resulting from an increased methaemoglobin formation by various exogenous agents. The authors report an elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with a 1-month history of shortness of breath. Around the same time she had started using over-the-counter (OTC) phenazopyridine tablets for urinary symptoms. The patient was hypoxic and cyanotic; however, lacked evidence of hypoxaemia on the arterial blood gas. The presence of abnormal haemoglobin was suspected and confirmed by elevated levels of methaemoglobin. Phenazopyridine was proposed to be the likely aetiology of the methaemoglobinaemia, which the patient was not aware of. This case highlights the importance of always inquiring the OTC drug use especially in geriatric population. PMID:22987905

  14. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  15. Acquiring case adaptation knowledge: A hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, D.B.; Kinley, A.; Wilson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The ability of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems to apply cases to novel situations depends on their case adaptation knowledge. However, endowing CBR systems with adequate adaptation knowledge has proven to be a very difficult task. This paper describes a hybrid method for performing case adaptation, using a combination of rule-based and case-based reasoning. It shows how this approach provides a framework for acquiring flexible adaptation knowledge from experiences with autonomous adaptation and suggests its potential as a basis for acquisition of adaptation knowledge from interactive user guidance. It also presents initial experimental results examining the benefits of the approach and comparing the relative contributions of case learning and adaptation learning to reasoning performance.

  16. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore; Vestergaard, Martin; Rasmussen, Simon; Lund, Ole; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data. Methods We developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de-novo-sequenced isolates. Results When testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial species, with available phenotypes. Furthermore, ResFinder was evaluated on WGS chromosomes and plasmids of 30 isolates. Seven of these isolates were annotated to have antimicrobial resistance, and in all cases, annotations were compatible with the ResFinder results. Conclusions A web server providing a convenient way of identifying acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in completely sequenced isolates was created. ResFinder can be accessed at www.genomicepidemiology.org. ResFinder will continuously be updated as new resistance genes are identified. PMID:22782487

  17. Guidelines for prevention of hospital acquired infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Todi, Subhash; Myatra, SN; Samaddar, D. P.; Patil, Vijaya; Bhattacharya, Pradip Kumar; Ramasubban, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines, written for clinicians, contains evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of hospital acquired infections Hospital acquired infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity and provide challenge to clinicians. Measures of infection control include identifying patients at risk of nosocomial infections, observing hand hygiene, following standard precautions to reduce transmission and strategies to reduce VAP, CR-BSI, CAUTI. Environmental factors and architectural lay out also need to be emphasized upon. Infection prevention in special subsets of patients - burns patients, include identifying sources of organism, identification of organisms, isolation if required, antibiotic prophylaxis to be used selectively, early removal of necrotic tissue, prevention of tetanus, early nutrition and surveillance. Immunodeficient and Transplant recipients are at a higher risk of opportunistic infections. The post tranplant timetable is divided into three time periods for determining risk of infections. Room ventilation, cleaning and decontamination, protective clothing with care regarding food requires special consideration. Monitoring and Surveillance are prioritized depending upon the needs. Designated infection control teams should supervise the process and help in collection and compilation of data. Antibiotic Stewardship Recommendations include constituting a team, close coordination between teams, audit, formulary restriction, de-escalation, optimizing dosing, active use of information technology among other measure. The recommendations in these guidelines are intended to support, and not replace, good clinical judgment. The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of evidence supporting the recommendation, so that readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. PMID:24701065

  18. Infantile and acquired nystagmus in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ehrt, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Nystagmus is an involuntary, periodic eye movement caused by a slow drift of fixation which is followed by a fast refixation saccade (jerk nystagmus) or a slow movement back to fixation (pendular nystagmus). In childhood most cases are benign forms of nystagmus: idiopathic infantile, ocular or latent nystagmus. They arise at the age of 3 months, without oscillopsia and show the absence of the physiologic opto-kinetic nystagmus. A full ophthalmologic evaluation is all that is needed in most cases: albinism, macular or optic nerve hypoplasia and congenital retinal dystrophies are the most common forms of ocular nystagmus. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus can be hereditary, the most common and best analyzed form being a mutation of the FRMD7 gene on chromosome Xq26.2. The mutation shows a mild genotype-phenotype correlation. In all female carriers the opto-kinetic nystagmus is absent and half had mild nystagmus. Latent nystagmus is part of the infantile esotropia syndrome and shows the unique feature of change of direction when the fixing eye changes: it is always beating to the side of the fixing eye. There is no cure for infantile nystagmus but therapeutic options include magnifying visual aids or eye muscle surgery at the age of 6-8 y in patients with head turn. Less than 20% of childhood nystagmus are acquired and need further neurological and imaging work-up. Alarming signs and symptoms are: onset after the age of 4 months, oscillopsia, dissociated (asymmetric) nystagmus, preserved opto-kinetic nystagmus, afferent pupillary defect, papilloedema and neurological symptoms like vertigo and nausea. The most common cause is due to pathology of the anterior optic pathway (e.g. optic nerve gliomas). It shows the same clinical feature of dissociated nystagmus as spasmus nutans but has a higher frequency as in INO. Other forms of acquired nystagmus are due to brainstem, cerebellar or metabolic diseases. PMID:22459007

  19. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 1779.90 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.90 Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the...

  20. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 1779.90 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.90 Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the...