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Sample records for acquired myasthenia gravis

  1. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease that causes weakness in the muscles under your control. It happens because of ... problem in communication between your nerves and muscles. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease. Your body's own immune ...

  2. Myasthenia gravis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - myasthenia gravis ... The following organizations provide information on myasthenia gravis : Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America -- www.myasthenia.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/myasthenia_gravis/ ...

  3. Myasthenia gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases, it is linked to tumors of the thymus (an organ of the immune system). Myasthenia gravis ... directly into the bloodstream. Surgery to remove the thymus (thymectomy) may result in permanent remission or less ...

  4. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Myasthenia Gravis Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  5. [Myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Schodrowski, J; Seipelt, M; Adibi-Sedeh, I; Eienbröker, C; Tackenberg, B

    2016-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease, which leads to load-dependent weakness of voluntary skeletal muscles with recovery of function after resting. The disease is caused by autoantibodies directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) leading to a reduction of neuromuscular transmission. Muscles and nerves are not affected. Disorders of the thymus play a role in the pathogenesis of AChR antibody-positive myasthenia. The clinical symptoms include exercise-induced fatigue either of the ocular muscles alone (ocular myasthenia) or striated skeletal muscle and the ocular, facial and bulbar musculature (generalized myasthenia). Treatment of myasthenia gravis involves administration of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors and immunosuppressive drugs. A myasthenic crisis is characterized by life-threatening complications with severe weakness, swallowing difficulties and respiratory failure, which requires intensive care treatment. PMID:27000188

  6. Myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Juel, Vern C; Massey, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare, autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder. Contemporary prevalence rates approach 1/5,000. MG presents with painless, fluctuating, fatigable weakness involving specific muscle groups. Ocular weakness with asymmetric ptosis and binocular diplopia is the most typical initial presentation, while early or isolated oropharyngeal or limb weakness is less common. The course is variable, and most patients with initial ocular weakness develop bulbar or limb weakness within three years of initial symptom onset. MG results from antibody-mediated, T cell-dependent immunologic attack on the endplate region of the postsynaptic membrane. In patients with fatigable muscle weakness, the diagnosis of MG is supported by: 1. pharmacologic testing with edrophonium chloride that elicits unequivocal improvement in strength; 2. electrophysiologic testing with repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) studies and/or single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) that demonstrates a primary postsynaptic neuromuscular junctional disorder; and 3. serologic demonstration of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) or muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies. Differential diagnosis includes congenital myasthenic syndromes, Lambert Eaton syndrome, botulism, organophosphate intoxication, mitochondrial disorders involving progressive external ophthalmoplegia, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), motor neuron disease, and brainstem ischemia. Treatment must be individualized, and may include symptomatic treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and immune modulation with corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Rapid, temporary improvement may be achieved for myasthenic crises and exacerbations with plasma exchange (PEX) or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Owing to improved diagnostic testing, immunotherapy, and intensive care, the contemporary prognosis is favorable with less than five percent mortality and nearly normal

  7. Early-onset acquired myasthenia gravis secondary to anti-muscle-specific kinase autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Gokben, Sarenur; Serdaroglu, Gul; Akcay, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is rarely seen during infancy. Similar to adults, 85% to 90% of generalized pediatric myasthenia gravis cases have acetylcholine receptor antibodies. Approximately 30% of the remaining cases have antibodies against muscle-specific kinase. Information on the clinical course, treatment alternatives, and prognosis of pediatric muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis is limited because of the small number of cases. Here, we present a 14-month-old girl with muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis as one of the youngest patients described so far in the literature.

  8. Assays for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, J.M.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for diagnosing myasthenia gravis. The process comprises the steps of preparing a complex of acetycholine receptor protein, toxin and a radioactive isotope, incubating the complex with a serum sample from a patient so as to join antibodies engendered in connection with myasthenia gravis to the complex, precipitating the complex joined with antibody with anti-immunoglobulin and measuring radioactivity, from the radioactive isotope, of the precipitated complex. The improvement is that the acetylcholine receptor protein is derived from cells of the TE671 Line.

  9. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.D.; Routh, A.; Hickman, B.T.; Douglas, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia.

  10. Myasthenia Gravis: Medical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zeldowicz, Ludmila R.; Buckler, William St. John

    1965-01-01

    The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is often difficult and calls for a broader use of pharmacological and electrodiagnostic tests. The decamethonium-edrophonium test, which has proved superior to other procedures for this purpose, is based on neurophysiological principles and depicts the behaviour of the neuromuscular junction. A state of resistance to depolarizing agents in the limited form of myasthenia and a state of a non-depolarizing (competitive) block in advanced cases has been shown. This test has demonstrated that the neuromuscular defect exists throughout the skeletal musculature, including muscles clinically unaffected. It produced no false-positive results either in normal or neurasthenic persons or in patients with neurological diseases with myasthenic symptoms. In a patient with botulism and in a patient with ocular palsies from brain-stem encephalitis the edrophonium test gave a false-positive result, while the decamethonium-edrophonium test was negative. Diagnosis, treatment and management of myasthenic emergencies are described. PMID:14323662

  11. Arthritis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Aarli, J A; Milde, E J; Thunold, S

    1975-11-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis developed clinical signs of arthropathy. In two patients, the symptoms were due to a deforming rheumatoid arthritis and the myasthenic symptoms appeared as a transitory phase during the course of the disease. Muscle antibodies of IgG class were demonstrated with sera from both patients. Autoreactivity between muscle antibodies and rheumatoid factor was detected in one patient. Both patients died from sudden cardiac failure. Necropsy was performed in one and revealed a spotty myocardial necrosis. One patient had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Two patients had mild articular symptoms with indices of multivisceral disease and serological findings indicating a systemic lupus erythematous. One patient had classical ankylosing spondylitis, and one, unspecified arthropathy.

  12. Lymphocyte function in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, S; Kanaide, A; Itoyama, Y; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Mitogen-induced blastoid transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis was studied using a microplate culture technique and evaluated with 3H-thymidine incorporation. It was found that both phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen responses decreased significantly in patients with myasthenia gravis. In myasthenic crisis, indices of stimulation by phytohaemagglutination became very low. The autologous plasma neither inhibited nor facilitated mitogenic responses of lymphocytes. The decreased mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes suggests that part of the T lymphocyte function is subnormal in myasthenia. PMID:490180

  13. Statins can induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gale, Jesse; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-02-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins, are commonly prescribed for prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. A rare side effect of statin medication is the induction of autoimmune illnesses, including myasthenia gravis (myasthenia). Here we present two patients with seropositive myasthenia that developed 4 weeks after initiation of atorvastatin, increasing the total reported patients to seven. Reviewing recent literature we highlight the connections between statins, auto-immunity and myasthenia. Statins may favour T-cell phenotypes that reduce cell-mediated immunity but could increase antibody-mediated humoral immunity.

  14. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  15. Myasthenia gravis occurring in twins

    PubMed Central

    Namba, T.; Shapiro, M. S.; Brunner, N. G.; Grob, D.

    1971-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis in one member each of two sets of twins is described. A 17 year old girl developed generalized myasthenia gravis at the age of 14 years, while her monozygotic twin sister has remained in good health during a three year period of observation. Another patient was a 19 year old woman with the onset of generalized myasthenia gravis at the age of 11 years, and her dizygotic twin sister has been in good health. Myasthenia gravis has been described in 13 sets of monozygotic twins, seven sets of dizygotic twins, and one set of twins with undetermined zygosity. Both members of twins were affected in five sets of monozygotic twins and one set of twins with undetermined zygosity, and only one twin was affected in the remaining sets of twins. Occurrence of myasthenia gravis in both members of monozygotic twins and in none of dizygotic twins, and frequent familial occurrence of the disease suggest the role of a genetic factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:5122380

  16. Myasthenia gravis and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Bernd Volker; Valero-Burgos, Encarna; Costa, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of a runner with myasthenia gravis who completed an ultra endurance event. Myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disease that usually results in skeletal muscle weakness, which worsens with exercise and strenuous aerobic exercise, is generally contraindicated. Our runner completed a 220-km, 5-day ultramarathon and presented with various symptoms including muscular skeletal weakness, cramps, generalized fatigue, unintelligible speech, involuntary eye and mouth movements, problems swallowing, food lodging in his throat, and problems breathing. Risk factors identified for exacerbations are running in extreme temperatures, prolonged runs (especially a distance of 30 km or more), running uphill, lack of sleep, and stress. The medical team was in the novel situation to look after a runner with myasthenia gravis and needed to be aware of the patient's condition, symptoms, and risk factors to safely care for him.

  17. [Autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Masakatsu; Narita Masuda, Tomoko

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies (Abs). Generally, patients with MG are divided into 3 groups: (1) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG: 80%), (2) muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibody-positive MG (MuSK-MG: 5-10%), which are AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic proteins involved in AChR aggregation, and (3) double-seronegative MG. In 2011, autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) were identified in Japanese MG patients, and thereafter, have been reported in Germany and USA. We developed a simple technique termed Gaussia luciferase immunoprecipitation (GLIP) for detecting the antibodies to Lrp4. Our results showed that 9 generalized MG patients out of 300 without AChR Ab were positive for Lrp4 antibodies. These antibodies inhibit the binding of Lrp4 to its ligand and predominantly belong to the IgG1 subclass. In other studies, Lrp4 Ab-positive sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes, suggesting a pathogenic role in the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. Further understanding of the structure and function of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) through newly discovered autoantibodies may provide specific clinical information and treatment for MG. PMID:23568991

  18. Clinical electrophysiology in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Stalberg, E

    1980-01-01

    Effective diagnostic methods are of great importance in order to recognise myasthenic patients among those with muscle fatigability. Intracellular recordings are useful for research work within the field and for detailed description of the motor end-plate's physiology in the individual case. The method is not used for the routine diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The decrement of the electrical muscle response with nerve stimulation is the most commonly used method. The diagnostic yield is higher in proximal muscles, in warmed muscles, after exercise, and after ischaemia. A significant number of patients may be undiagnosed with this technique. The mechanical response with nerve stimulation shows the same type of decrement but also an abnormal response to long stimulation. The diagnostic value of this is under dispute. Single fibre ENG needs more patient cooperation than do these tests. The diagnostic yield is significantly higher. Some patients considered to have myasthenia gravis do not show any abnormalities with this technique, particularly those with the pure ocular form. Conventional EMG is not useful for the diagnosis of myasthenia, but may be indicated in these patients when concurrent nerve or muscle disease is in question. Tests for eye movement fatique have not proved useful. Stapedius reflex fatigability is demonstrated in about the same proportion of patients as have positive SFEMG findings. The technique is not uncomfortable for the patient and requires minimal cooperation. The general usefulness must be assessed by further routine use. Even with the advent of immunological tests, neurophysiological investigations are indispensable in helping establish the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Discrepancies between the results comparing electrophysiological and immunological tests may indicate that myasthenia gravis is a heterogenous entity within which subgroups may be identified. PMID:6249895

  19. Isolated laryngeal myasthenia gravis for 26 years.

    PubMed

    Renard, Dimitri; Hedayat, Amir; Gagnard, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Laryngeal myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare variant of myasthenia gravis. A vast portion of patients with initial laryngeal myasthenia gravis develop involvement of ocular and/or extra-ocular muscles during the years after symptom onset although a minority of laryngeal myasthenia gravis patients continues to have isolated laryngeal muscle involvement for several years. We present a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodic isolated dysphonia (associated with diffuse bilateral vocal cord paresis on laryngoscopy) since the age of 32. Dysphonia became permanent since 6 months. A diagnosis of laryngeal myasthenia gravis was made based on abnormal single-fiber electromyography and spectacular response to pyridostigmine treatment. Repetitive nerve stimulation was normal and anti-acetylcholine receptor and anti-muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were absent. This case shows that laryngeal myasthenia gravis can be isolated during 26 years of follow-up. We propose that even when myasthenia gravis seems unlikely as underlying mechanism of isolated dysphonia (because of lack of antibodies, normal repetitive nerve stimulation, and absence of extra-laryngeal involvement after years of follow-up), single-fiber electromyography should be performed and myasthenia gravis treatment should be tried.

  20. Perioperative evaluation of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Alexander; Congedo, Elisabetta; Aceto, Paola; Sicuranza, Rossella; Chinè, Elisabetta; Caliandro, Francesca; De Cosmo, Germano

    2007-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the prototype of antibody mediated autoimmune disease and results from the production of autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of the neuromuscular synapse. Adequate preoperative evaluation of the myasthenic patient must be carried out carefully. Age, sex, onset and duration of the disease as well as the presence of thymoma may determine the response to thymectomy. Specific attention should be paid to voluntary and respiratory muscle strength. The preoperative preparation of MG patients is essential for the success of surgery. It depends on the severity of clinical status and changes if myasthenic patients receive anticholinesterase therapy. Myasthenic patients may have little respiratory reserve, and hence depressant drugs for preoperative premedication should be used with caution and avoided in patients with bulbar symptoms. The anaesthetic management of myasthenic patient must be individualized in according to the severity of the disease and the type of surgery required. The use of regional or local anaesthesia seems warranted whenever possible. General anaesthesia can be performed safely when patient is optimally prepared and neuromuscular transmission is adequately monitored during and after surgery. Adequate postoperative pain control, pulmonary toilet, and avoidance of drugs that interfere with neuromuscular transmission will facilitate tracheal extubation. Myasthenia gravis is a disease with many implications for the safe administration of anaesthesia. The potential for respiratory compromise in these patients requires the anaesthesiologist to be familiar with the underlying disease state, as well as the interaction of anaesthetic and non-anaesthetic drugs with MG.

  1. [Therapeutic strategies against myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Nagane, Yuriko

    2013-05-01

    Many patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) still find it difficult to maintain daily activities due to chronic residual fatigability and long-term side effects of oral corticosteroids, since full remission is not common. Our analysis demonstrated that disease severity, oral corticosteroids, and depressive state are the major factors negatively associated with QOL, and that QOL of MM status patients taking < or = 5 mg prednisolne/day is identically good as that seen in CSR and is a target of treatment. In order to achieve early MM or better status with prednisolne < or = 5 mg/day, we advocate the early aggressive treatment strategy that can achieve early improvement by performing an aggressive therapy using combined treatment with plasmapheresis and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and then maintain an improved status using low-dose oral corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:23777099

  2. Myasthenia gravis: subgroup classification and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2015-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by muscle weakness and fatigue, is B-cell mediated, and is associated with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase (MUSK), lipoprotein-related protein 4 (LRP4), or agrin in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Patients with myasthenia gravis should be classified into subgroups to help with therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Subgroups based on serum antibodies and clinical features include early-onset, late-onset, thymoma, MUSK, LRP4, antibody-negative, and ocular forms of myasthenia gravis. Agrin-associated myasthenia gravis might emerge as a new entity. The prognosis is good with optimum symptomatic, immunosuppressive, and supportive treatment. Pyridostigmine is the preferred symptomatic treatment, and for patients who do not adequately respond to symptomatic therapy, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and thymectomy are first-line immunosuppressive treatments. Additional immunomodulatory drugs are emerging, but therapeutic decisions are hampered by the scarcity of controlled studies. Long-term drug treatment is essential for most patients and must be tailored to the particular form of myasthenia gravis.

  3. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  4. Reversible man-in-the-barrel syndrome in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Poornima A; Wadia, Pettarusp Murzban

    2016-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MBS) is an uncommon presentation due to bilateral, predominantly proximal muscle weakness that has not been described to be associated with myasthenia gravis. We describe a case of myasthenia gravis presenting as MBS. Additionally, he had significant wasting of the deltoids bilaterally with fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) at rest and brief duration (3-6 ms) bi/triphasic motor unit potentials (MUPs) on submaximal effort apart from a decremental response on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) at 2 Hz. While electrophysiology is an important tool in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, pathological EMG patterns do not exclude the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. PMID:27011638

  5. Emergency Management of Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and shoulders. • Keep a calm and peaceful atmosphere. • Support respirations if needed. SEVERE SWALLOWING DIFFICULTY Subjective ... secretions as needed. • Keep a calm and peaceful atmosphere. www.myasthenia.org 800.541.5454

  6. Psychosocial aspects in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Wolfgang

    2007-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis patients usually present with fluctuating, asymmetrical stress-dependent weakness in the absence of other neurological disturbances. In weak patients psychopathological disturbances are frequently reported and misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder. The question to what extent psychiatric symptoms are involved in MG is still open. The case report presented here shows exemplary that psychopathological disturbances in exacerbated myasthenic patients are temporary and completely reversible after adequate somatic therapy.

  7. Epidemiology of myasthenia gravis in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Ari; Widdifield, Jessica; Katzberg, Hans D; Barnett, Carolina; Bril, Vera; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and prevalence estimates in myasthenia gravis have varied widely. Recent studies based on administrative health data have large sample sizes but lack rigorous validation of MG cases, and have not examined the North American population. Our aim was to explore trends in MG incidence and prevalence for the years 1996-2013 in the province of Ontario, Canada (population 13.5 million). We employed a previously validated algorithm to identify MG cases. Linking with census data allowed for the calculation of crude- and age/sex-standardized incidence and prevalence rates for the years 1996-2013. The regional distribution of MG cases throughout the province was examined. Mean age at the first myasthenia gravis encounter was 60.2 ± 17.1 years. In 2013, there were 3611 prevalent cases in Ontario, and the crude prevalence rate was 32.0/100,000 population. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence rates rose consistently over time from 16.3/100,000 (15.4-17.1) in 1996 to 26.3/100,000 (25.4-27.3) in 2013. Standardized incidence rates remained stable between 1996 (2.7/100,000; 95% CL 2.3-3.0) and 2013 (2.3/100,000; 2.1-2.6). Incidence was highest in younger women and older men, and geographic variation was evident throughout the province. In conclusion, this large epidemiological study shows rising myasthenia gravis prevalence with stable incidence over time, which is likely reflective of patients living longer, possibly due to improved disease treatment. Our findings provide accurate information on the Canadian epidemiology of myasthenia gravis and burden for health care resources planning for the province, respectively.

  8. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Sieb, J P

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides a thorough overview of the current advances in diagnosis and therapy of myasthenia gravis (MG). Nowadays the term 'myasthenia gravis' includes heterogeneous autoimmune diseases, with a postsynaptic defect of neuromuscular transmission as the common feature. Myasthenia gravis should be classified according to the antibody specificity [acetylcholine, muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), seronegative], thymus histology (thymitis, thymoma, atrophy), age at onset (in children; aged less than or more than 50 years) and type of course (ocular or generalized). With optimal treatment, the prognosis is good in terms of daily functions, quality of life and survival. Symptomatic treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibition is usually combined with immunosuppression. Azathioprine still remains the first choice for long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Alternative immunosuppressive options to azathioprine include cyclosporin, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Rituximab is a promising new drug for severe generalized MG. Emerging therapy options include belimumab, eculizumab and the granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor. One pilot study on etanercept has given disappointing results. For decades, thymectomy has been performed in younger adults to improve non-paraneoplastic MG. However, controlled prospective studies on the suspected benefit of this surgical procedure are still lacking. In acute exacerbations, including myasthenic crisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption are similarly effective.

  9. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Sieb, J P

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a thorough overview of the current advances in diagnosis and therapy of myasthenia gravis (MG). Nowadays the term ‘myasthenia gravis’ includes heterogeneous autoimmune diseases, with a postsynaptic defect of neuromuscular transmission as the common feature. Myasthenia gravis should be classified according to the antibody specificity [acetylcholine, muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), seronegative], thymus histology (thymitis, thymoma, atrophy), age at onset (in children; aged less than or more than 50 years) and type of course (ocular or generalized). With optimal treatment, the prognosis is good in terms of daily functions, quality of life and survival. Symptomatic treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibition is usually combined with immunosuppression. Azathioprine still remains the first choice for long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Alternative immunosuppressive options to azathioprine include cyclosporin, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Rituximab is a promising new drug for severe generalized MG. Emerging therapy options include belimumab, eculizumab and the granulocyte– macrophage colony-stimulating factor. One pilot study on etanercept has given disappointing results. For decades, thymectomy has been performed in younger adults to improve non-paraneoplastic MG. However, controlled prospective studies on the suspected benefit of this surgical procedure are still lacking. In acute exacerbations, including myasthenic crisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption are similarly effective. PMID:24117026

  10. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Goluszko, Elzbieta; Huda, Ruksana; Tuzun, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T cell-dependent antibody-mediated autoimmune neuromuscular disease. Antibodies to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) destroy the AChR, thus leading to defective neuromuscular transmission of electrical impulse and to muscle weakness. This unit is a practical guide to the induction and evaluation of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) in the mouse, the animal model for MG. Protocols are provided for the extraction and purification of AChR from the electric organs of Torpedo californica, or eel. The purified receptor is used as an immunogen to induce autoimmunity to AChR, thus causing EAMG. The defect in neuromuscular transmission can also be measured quantitatively by electromyography. In addition, EAMG is frequently characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to AChR, which are measured by radioimmunoassay and by a marked antibody-mediated reduction in the number of muscle AChRs. AChR extracted from mouse muscle is used in measuring serum antibody levels and for quantifying muscle AChR content. Another hallmark of the disease is complement and IgG deposits located at the neuromuscular junction, which can be visualized by immunofluorescence techniques. PMID:18432738

  11. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  12. Seronegative Maternal Ocular Myasthenia Gravis and Delayed Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Johnson, Kendall; Hussain, Naveed; Campbell, Winston A

    2016-03-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with fluctuating muscle weakness, divided into generalized and localized (ocular) forms. Maternal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cross the placenta and may cause transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (TNMG). We present a case of seronegative maternal ocular MG and delayed TNMG. Case A 29-year-old G3P1011 underwent cesarean birth of a male infant who developed oxygen desaturation requiring supplemental oxygen on day of life (DOL) 3. Based on the clinical course and after exclusion of other diagnoses, the infant was diagnosed with TNMG. Infant's condition improved spontaneously and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen and discharged home on DOL 12. Conclusion Infants born to mothers with seronegative localized (ocular) MG are also susceptible to TNMG which may be late in onset.

  13. Seronegative Maternal Ocular Myasthenia Gravis and Delayed Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Johnson, Kendall; Hussain, Naveed; Campbell, Winston A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with fluctuating muscle weakness, divided into generalized and localized (ocular) forms. Maternal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cross the placenta and may cause transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (TNMG). We present a case of seronegative maternal ocular MG and delayed TNMG. Case A 29-year-old G3P1011 underwent cesarean birth of a male infant who developed oxygen desaturation requiring supplemental oxygen on day of life (DOL) 3. Based on the clinical course and after exclusion of other diagnoses, the infant was diagnosed with TNMG. Infant's condition improved spontaneously and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen and discharged home on DOL 12. Conclusion Infants born to mothers with seronegative localized (ocular) MG are also susceptible to TNMG which may be late in onset. PMID:26989568

  14. New diagnosis myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, John; Balson, Ian Frank; Dennis, Alicia T

    2015-02-26

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease of neuromuscular transmission resulting in fatigable skeletal muscle weakness. Preeclampsia is a multisystem disease of pregnancy which is characterised by hypertension and involvement of one or more organ systems. Both diseases are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality for mother and fetus. The occurrence of both preeclampsia and myasthenia gravis in pregnancy is very rare, and conflicts arise when considering the optimal management of each disease.We present a case of a parturient who was newly diagnosed with both myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Myasthenia treatment was started with prednisolone and pyridostigmine, and delivery was by caesarean section at 37 weeks gestation under spinal anaesthesia. Postnatally, the patient developed worsening of myasthenia and preeclampsia symptoms. We consider the anaesthetic implications for both diseases and describe our approach for the management of this case.

  15. Familial autoimmune myasthenia gravis with different pathogenetic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, C; Arancio, O; Evoli, A; Rocca, B; Bartoccioni, E; de Grandis, D; Tonali, P

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of familial myasthenia gravis are reported. One patient is a typical case of autoimmune myasthenia with positive anti acetylcholine receptor antibodies, while in the second patient the impairment of neuromuscular transmission is likely to be due to antibodies directed against determinants other than the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:3225607

  16. Neurogenic muscle involvement in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Hans; Bethlem, Jaap

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made into the occurrence of muscular atrophy and muscular pathology in a series of 170 patients with myasthenia gravis. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Of the 148 patients with generalized myasthenia gravis, 14 showed local muscular atrophies. Of 10 biopsies from atrophic muscles, eight showed neurogenic changes, with or without lymphocytic infiltrations. One biopsy showed lymphocytic infiltrations only, and one showed type II-fibre atrophy (Table 1). No relationship was demonstrable between the presence of clilnical muscular atrophy and age, sex, duration of the disease, severity of the disease, presence of a thymoma, or drug resistant ophthalmoplegia. (2) In this group of patients 61 biopsies were examined from 46 individuals; 40 of these biopsies were taken from the quadriceps muscle. A thymoma was present in 17 patients. Examination disclosed neurogenic changes in 17 biopsies, lymphocytic infiltrates in 21, and myositis in one biopsy (Table 2). A distinct correlation was established between the presence of a thymoma and lymphocytic infiltrates, but none was demonstrable between thymoma and neurogenic changes (Table 3). (3) An enzyme-histochemical study was carried out in 35 cases, including 12 with neurogenic changes. A normal differentiation of type I- and type II-fibres was observed in eight instances, type grouping of type II-fibres in three, and type II-fibre atrophy in two cases. (4) In 21 patients and 19 controls, the smallest mean diameter was determined in the quadriceps muscle. Both type I- and type II-fibres proved to have a smaller mean diameter in the female patients than in the controls. In the male patients this could not be proven. (5) Of the eight patients who had died without disorders of ventilation, 90 muscle specimens were examined postmortem. Four of these patients had a thymoma. Lymphocytic infiltrations, found in 32 biopsy specimens, were mostly observed in the presence of a thymoma. Neurogenic changes

  17. An update on laboratory diagnosis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Oger, Joel; Frykman, Hans

    2015-09-20

    This review describes the state of the art for the use of laboratory testing in myasthenia gravis. The review brings a detailed description of the different clinical forms of auto-immune myasthenia and of the Lambert Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS). They stress the differences between the different forms of acquired (auto-immune) myasthenia. Then they present a summary of the different antibodies found in the disease. They insist on the advantage of the RIPA assay to measure antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor. They stress the different types of contribution of each of these antibodies to the clinical diagnosis. They also describe the methods to measure each of the specific antibodies that have recently permitted to split the diagnosis: Abs to omega-conotoxin receptor in Lambert Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), abs to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR) in MG, Abs to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) in Ab negative MG, and Abs to low molecular weight receptor related low-density lipo protein-4 (LRP-4). They also broach over the striated antibodies, less frequent and clinically less useful such as anti-titin, -ryanodine, -agrin and -rapsyn. This represent a 360° view of the field as presented in Toronto in October 2014.

  18. Differential diagnosis of hallucinations in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ouanes, Sami; Hizem, Yosr; Ben Djebara, Mouna; Kacem, Imen; Gargouri, Amina; Gouider, Riadh

    2013-09-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with comorbidity of myasthenia gravis and psychosis. Different diagnostic hypotheses based on a review of the literature are discussed. A protracted history of physical spousal abuse, patient symptoms, and results of different investigations allowed us to conclude that the patient had a form of posttraumatic stress disorder with secondary psychotic features. Psychosis due to myasthenia gravis is rarely seen, and it remains unclear what is the pathophysiology, if any, for such an association. The present case highlights the difficulties the physician faces in disentangling psychosis as a potential manifestation of myasthenia gravis itself versus being caused by a medical side effect of treatment, or psychosis due to a distinct co-occurring neurologic or psychiatric condition.

  19. Myasthenia gravis and related disorders: Pathology and molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, James C; Richman, David P

    2015-04-01

    Disorders affecting the presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic portions of the neuromuscular junction arise from various mechanisms in children and adults, including acquired autoimmune or toxic processes as well as genetic mutations. Disorders include autoimmune myasthenia gravis associated with acetylcholine receptor, muscle specific kinase or Lrp4 antibodies, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, nerve terminal hyperexcitability syndromes, Guillain Barré syndrome, botulism, organophosphate poisoning and a number of congenital myasthenic syndromes. This review focuses on the various molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms of these disorders, characterization of which has been crucial to the development of treatment strategies specific for each pathogenic mechanism. In the future, further understanding of the underlying processes may lead to more effective and targeted therapies of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  20. T and B lymphocytes in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Itoyama, Y; Kawanami, S; Goto, I; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from seventeen non-thymectomized and nine thymectomized patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and thirteen healthy controls were examined for the presence of surface markers characteristic of T and B lymphocytes by rosette formation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). T cells were identified by their capacity to spontaneously form rosettes with SRBCs. The percentage of B lymphocytes was determined by the erythrocyte antibody complement (EAC) rosette-forming test. The EAC complex was prepared with either whole rabbit anti-SRBC serum or with the IgM fraction of rabbit anti-SRBC serum. The two kind of erythrocyte complement rosette-forming cells (EAC-RFC) are designated erythrocyte-haemolysin-complement RFC (EA(H)C-RFC), and erythrocyte-IgM-complement RFC (EA(M)C-RFC). The percentage of total lymphocytes and T cells was not altered in MG patients. The percentage of 'active' T cells, which have been considered to be more actively involved in cellular immunity, was also similar in MG patients and controls. A significant increase in EA(H)C-RFC occurred in both thymectomized and non-thymectomized MG patients, while in B cells detected by EA(M)C-RFC no alterations were found. The increase in EA(H)C-RFC in lymphocytes from MG patients may be due to an increase in the 19S antibody-forming B lymphocytes or to an increase in T cells which have Fc receptors on their surface. PMID:315844

  1. RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN ALABAMA

    PubMed Central

    OH, SHIN J.; MORGAN, MARLA B.; LU, LIANG; HATANAKA, YUKI; HEMMI, SHOJI; YOUNG, ANGELA; CLAUSSEN, GWENDOLYN C.

    2010-01-01

    Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features were compared in 235 white and African-American (AA) patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Neuromuscular Disease Clinic from May 2003 to January 2008. Seventy nine percent of patients were white. Acetylcholine receptor antibody was positive in 71% of white patients and in 59% of AA. In patients with seronegative generalized MG, the rate of positive muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibody (MuSK-Ab) was significantly higher in AA than it was in whites (50% in AA vs. 17% in whites). Ocular MG was seronegative in 75% of AA patients. In AA, MG occurred earlier and more frequently in females, whereas, in whites, disease onset was later and more common in males. Another significant difference was a higher percentage of abnormality on repetitive nerve stimulation in AA. There was also a tendency for more severe forms of MG in AA. There are racial differences in MG between whites and AA in Alabama. These racial differences highlight the need to study biological factors in the pathogenesis of MG and to assess different approaches in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19127534

  2. Antibodies in myasthenia gravis and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; McConville, John; Farrugia, Maria Elena; Bowen, John; Plested, Paul; Tang, Teresa; Evoli, Amelia; Matthews, Ian; Sims, Gary; Dalton, Paolo; Jacobson, Leslie; Polizzi, Agata; Blaes, Frans; Lang, Bethan; Beeson, David; Willcox, Nick; Newsom-Davis, John; Hoch, Werner

    2003-09-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are present in around 85% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) as measured by the conventional radioimmunoprecipitation assay. Antibodies that block the fetal form of the AChR are occasionally present in mothers who develop MG after pregnancy, especially in those whose babies are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. The antibodies cross the placenta and block neuromuscular transmission, leading to joint deformities and often stillbirth. In these mothers, antibodies made in the thymus are mainly specific for fetal AChR and show restricted germline origins, suggesting a highly mutated clonal response; subsequent spread to involve adult AChR could explain development of maternal MG in those cases who first present after pregnancy. In the 15% of "seronegative" MG patients without AChR antibodies (SNMG), there are serum factors that increase AChR phosphorylation and reduce AChR function, probably acting via a different membrane receptor. These factors are not IgG and could be IgM or even non-Ig serum proteins. In a proportion of SNMG patients, however, IgG antibodies to the muscle-specific kinase, MuSK, are present. These antibodies are not found in AChR antibody-positive MG and are predominantly IgG4. MuSK antibody positivity appears to be associated with more severe bulbar disease that can be difficult to treat effectively.

  3. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Aline Mansueto; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Luiz Sergio Mageste; da Silva Freitas, Denise; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Kummer, Arthur; Lemos, Stella Maris Aguiar; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale and 2) to investigate the quality of life of Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis and its determinants. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 69 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent neurological evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale showed high internal consistency and good concurrent validity with the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and its subscales. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis included the current status of myasthenia gravis as assessed by the Myasthenia Gravis Composite, the current prednisone dose and the levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale is a valid instrument. Symptom severity, prednisone dosage and anxiety and depression levels impact the quality of life of patients with myasthenia gravis. PMID:27464292

  4. Myasthenia gravis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M.I.; Coutinho, E.; Lana-Peixoto, M.; Apostolos, S.; Waters, P.; Sato, D.; Melamud, L.; Marta, M.; Graham, A.; Spillane, J.; Villa, A.M.; Callegaro, D.; Santos, E.; da Silva, A. Martins; Jarius, S.; Howard, R.; Nakashima, I.; Giovannoni, G.; Buckley, C.; Hilton-Jones, D.; Vincent, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe 16 patients with a coincidence of 2 rare diseases: aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab)–mediated neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (AQP4-NMOSD) and acetylcholine receptor antibody (AChR-Ab)–mediated myasthenia gravis (AChR-MG). Methods: The clinical details and antibody results of 16 patients with AChR-MG and AQP4-NMOSD were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All had early-onset AChR-MG, the majority with mild generalized disease, and a high proportion achieved remission. Fifteen were female; 11 were Caucasian. In 14/16, the MG preceded NMOSD (median interval: 16 years) and 11 of these had had a thymectomy although 1 only after NMOSD onset. In 4/5 patients tested, AQP4-Abs were detectable between 4 and 16 years prior to disease onset, including 2 patients with detectable AQP4-Abs prior to thymectomy. AChR-Abs decreased and the AQP4-Ab levels increased over time in concordance with the relevant disease. AChR-Abs were detectable at NMOSD onset in the one sample available from 1 of the 2 patients with NMOSD before MG. Conclusions: Although both conditions are rare, the association of MG and NMOSD occurs much more frequently than by chance and the MG appears to follow a benign course. AChR-Abs or AQP4-Abs may be present years before onset of the relevant disease and the antibody titers against AQP4 and AChR tend to change in opposite directions. Although most cases had MG prior to NMOSD onset, and had undergone thymectomy, NMOSD can occur first and in patients who have not had their thymus removed. PMID:22551731

  5. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  6. Autoantibodies to agrin in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Chengyong; Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A; Lisak, Robert P; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  7. Ocular myasthenia gravis after D-penicillamine administration.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L J; Lesser, R L; Merikangas, J R; Silverman, J P

    1989-01-01

    A 68-year-old black woman who was put on D-penicillamine therapy (250-500 mg per day, total dose 15 g) for rheumatoid arthritis developed ocular myasthenia gravis. Two weeks after she discontinued D-penicillamine her signs and symptoms cleared with no other treatment. Review of previous cases and possible immunological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:2692700

  8. Myasthenia gravis: Association of British Neurologists' management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Jon; Farrugia, Maria E; Maddison, Paul; Hill, Marguerite; Leite, M Isabel; Hilton-Jones, David

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction for which many therapies were developed before the era of evidence based medicine. The basic principles of treatment are well known, however, patients continue to receive suboptimal treatment as a result of which a myasthenia gravis guidelines group was established under the aegis of The Association of British Neurologists. These guidelines attempt to steer a path between evidence-based practice where available, and established best practice where evidence is unavailable. Where there is insufficient evidence or a choice of options, the guidelines invite the clinician to seek the opinion of a myasthenia expert. The guidelines support clinicians not just in using the right treatments in the right order, but in optimising the use of well-known therapeutic agents. Clinical practice can be audited against these guidelines.

  9. Double seronegative myasthenia gravis with antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Many aspects of autoimmune diseases are not completely understood, particularly when they occur in association, which suggests a common pathogenetic mechanism. Case presentation We report a case of a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom myasthenia gravis developed years later. She tested negative for both antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor and against muscle-specific receptor tyrosine-kinase, but had typical decremental responses at the repetitive nerve stimulation testing, so that a generalized myasthenia gravis was diagnosed. Her thromboplastin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were high, anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies were slightly elevated, as a manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome. She had a good clinical response when treated with a combination of pyridostigmine, prednisone and azathioprine. Conclusions Many patients with myasthenia gravis test positive for a large variety of auto-antibodies, testifying of an immune dysregulation, and some display mild T-cell lymphopenia associated with hypergammaglobulinemia and B-cell hyper-reactivity. Both of these mechanisms could explain the occurrence of another autoimmune condition, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, but further studies are necessary to shed light on this matter. Clinicians should be aware that patients with an autoimmune diagnosis such as antiphospholipid syndrome who develop signs and neurological symptoms suggestive of myasthenia gravis are at risk and should prompt an emergent evaluation by a specialist. PMID:24380508

  10. Sensory aspects in myasthenia gravis: A translational approach.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Leon-Ariza, Juan S; Prada, Diddier; Leon-Ariza, Daniel S; Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis is a paradigmatic muscle disorder characterized by abnormal fatigue and muscle weakness that worsens with activities and improves with rest. Clinical and research studies done on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have advanced our knowledge of the muscle involvement in myasthenia. Current views still state that sensory deficits are not "features of myasthenia gravis". This article discusses the gap that exists on sensory neural transmission in myasthenia that has remained after >300years of research in this neurological disorder. We outline the neurobiological characteristics of sensory and motor synapses, reinterpret the nanocholinergic commonalities that exist in both sensory and motor pathways, discuss the clinical findings on altered sensory pathways in myasthenia, and propose a novel way to score anomalies resulting from multineuronal inability associated sensory troubles due to eugenic nanocholinergic instability and autoimmunity. This medicine-based evidence could serve as a template to further identify novel targets for studying new medications that may offer a better therapeutic benefit in both sensory and motor dysfunction for patients. Importantly, this review may help to re-orient current practices in myasthenia.

  11. Sensory aspects in myasthenia gravis: A translational approach.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Leon-Ariza, Juan S; Prada, Diddier; Leon-Ariza, Daniel S; Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis is a paradigmatic muscle disorder characterized by abnormal fatigue and muscle weakness that worsens with activities and improves with rest. Clinical and research studies done on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have advanced our knowledge of the muscle involvement in myasthenia. Current views still state that sensory deficits are not "features of myasthenia gravis". This article discusses the gap that exists on sensory neural transmission in myasthenia that has remained after >300years of research in this neurological disorder. We outline the neurobiological characteristics of sensory and motor synapses, reinterpret the nanocholinergic commonalities that exist in both sensory and motor pathways, discuss the clinical findings on altered sensory pathways in myasthenia, and propose a novel way to score anomalies resulting from multineuronal inability associated sensory troubles due to eugenic nanocholinergic instability and autoimmunity. This medicine-based evidence could serve as a template to further identify novel targets for studying new medications that may offer a better therapeutic benefit in both sensory and motor dysfunction for patients. Importantly, this review may help to re-orient current practices in myasthenia. PMID:27538668

  12. Response to thymectomy in Chinese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Kay, R; Lam, S; Wong, K S; Wang, A; Ho, J

    1994-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed in 48 patients between 1985 and 1991 in this Chinese community. Thymectomy was performed on 36 patients and the mean postoperative follow-up period was 49 months. Significant improvement was seen in 72% of the thymectomised patients, with 33% achieving complete remission. Patients with mild generalised myasthenia at presentation or those found to have thymic hyperplasia had the best prognosis. Patients with more severe symptoms or those with an underlying thymoma also responded favourably. Only patients with ocular myasthenia or those with a normal or atrophic thymus gland had no more than an even chance of gaining significant improvement. Although previous reports suggested a high prevalence of ocular myasthenia and of thymoma among Chinese myasthenic patients, the present study has found no evidence that they respond differently to thymectomy than their Western counterparts.

  13. [The history of myasthenia gravis. Men and ideas.

    PubMed

    Mimenza-Alvarado, A; Tellez-Zenteno, Jf; Garcia-Ramos, G; Estañol, B

    2007-06-28

    The first description of a patient with myasthenia gravis was done by Thomas Willis (1621-1675). He was an eminent professor of natural history at Oxford University who also described the arteries of the brain and made the first precise drawings of it. At the present time myasthenia gravis is considered one of the most well described autoimmune diseases with great advances in its diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment. In this review we summarize the most important events and ideas in the history of this disease since the original description by Willis; mention the most important clinicians, anatomists and physiologists that were concerned with its understanding and make reference of some the most recent advances in its diagnosis and treatment and finally discuss some present controversies. Neurología 2007;22(0):0-0.

  14. Myasthenia gravis: new therapeutic approaches based on pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard A

    2013-10-15

    Over the past 40 years Dr. Robert Lisak has made important contributions to our understanding of the pathophysiology and therapy of myasthenia gravis. This review will touch upon some of his work as it discusses current therapies and the potential for new treatments based on the evolving knowledge of the underlying basis of the disease. The recognition of different immune mechanisms that can cause the phenotype that we acknowledge as myasthenia gravis coincides with the introduction of monoclonal antibodies and other new therapies that can target specific aspects of the disease. This has raised our hopes for treatments that will have less side effects and be more effective. In some cases these hopes have been realized. In other instances, the situation remains a "work in progress". Dr. Lisak's work and teachings remain cogent to our modern approach to this classic immunologic disease.

  15. Multidisciplinary treatment for prepubertal juvenile myasthenia gravis with crisis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yusuke; Inoue, Masayoshi; Nabatame, Shin; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    The management of juvenile myasthenia gravis (MG) remains controversial. We report herein the case of a 12-year-old girl with prepubertal juvenile MG with respiratory crisis who underwent thymectomy following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The patient initially developed progressively worsening fatigability, eyelid ptosis, and diplopia, followed by worsening generalized weakness, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Even after i.v. immunoglobulin, the patient presented with rapid onset of severe dyspnea requiring respiratory support with mechanical ventilation and was graded as Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class V. After a course of i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy, successful control of respiratory crisis was achieved, and trans-sternal thymectomy was performed. Partial remission was achieved postoperatively with oral pyridostigmine without immunosuppressive agents such as steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for 18 months after thymectomy. Early thymectomy following induction methylprednisolone pulse therapy might be a treatment option for prepubertal juvenile MG with severe respiratory crisis. PMID:27324449

  16. Multidisciplinary treatment for prepubertal juvenile myasthenia gravis with crisis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yusuke; Inoue, Masayoshi; Nabatame, Shin; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    The management of juvenile myasthenia gravis (MG) remains controversial. We report herein the case of a 12-year-old girl with prepubertal juvenile MG with respiratory crisis who underwent thymectomy following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The patient initially developed progressively worsening fatigability, eyelid ptosis, and diplopia, followed by worsening generalized weakness, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Even after i.v. immunoglobulin, the patient presented with rapid onset of severe dyspnea requiring respiratory support with mechanical ventilation and was graded as Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class V. After a course of i.v. methylprednisolone pulse therapy, successful control of respiratory crisis was achieved, and trans-sternal thymectomy was performed. Partial remission was achieved postoperatively with oral pyridostigmine without immunosuppressive agents such as steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for 18 months after thymectomy. Early thymectomy following induction methylprednisolone pulse therapy might be a treatment option for prepubertal juvenile MG with severe respiratory crisis.

  17. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (p<0.01). Eighteen (60%) patients had ptosis, six (20%) of whom had bilateral ptosis. Diagnosing myasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected.

  18. Myasthenia gravis developing in an HIV-negative patient with Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Mascolo, Maria; Bandettini di Poggio, Monica; Caponnetto, Claudia; Pardini, Matteo

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission caused by autoimmune mechanisms. We reported a possible association between seropositive myasthenia gravis and Kaposi's sarcoma in a HIV-negative subject and the observed interactions between the treatment regimen for these two conditions. A 62-year-old man came to our attention for ocular myasthenia gravis. He suffered from a classic form of Kaposi's sarcoma since about 1 year. When myasthenic symptoms worsened, the patient was started on prednisone and azathioprine. The patient had a significant worsening of Kaposi's sarcoma, so prednisone and azathioprine were reduced and he was treated with vinblastine, with improvement both in dermatologic than in neurological symptomatology. We propose some considerations: the potential correlation between Kaposi's sarcoma and myasthenia gravis through immunological mechanism; myasthenia gravis as a paraneoplastic manifestation of Kaposi's sarcoma, and the role of an antitumoral agent as a treatment for both the conditions.

  19. Diagnostic and clinical classification of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Frenkian-Cuvelier, Mélinée; Eymard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is characterized by muscle weakness and abnormal fatigability. It is an autoimmune disease caused by the presence of antibodies against components of the muscle membrane localized at the neuromuscular junction. In most cases, the autoantibodies are against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Recently, other targets have been described such as the MuSK protein (muscle-specific kinase) or the LRP4 (lipoprotein related protein 4). Myasthenia gravis can be classified according to the profile of the autoantibodies, the location of the affected muscles (ocular versus generalized), the age of onset of symptoms and thymic abnormalities. The disease generally begins with ocular symptoms (ptosis and/or diplopia) and extends to other muscles in 80% of cases. Other features that characterize MG include the following: variability, effort induced worsening, successive periods of exacerbation during the course of the disease, severity dependent on respiratory and swallowing impairment (if rapid worsening occurs, a myasthenic crisis is suspected), and an association with thymoma in 20% of patients and with other autoimmune diseases such as hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease. The diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the benefit of the cholinesterase inhibitors, the detection of specific autoantibodies (anti-AChR, anti-MuSK or anti-LRP4), and significant decrement evidenced by electrophysiological tests. In this review, we briefly describe the history and epidemiology of the disease and the diagnostic and clinical classification. The neonatal form of myasthenia is explained, and finally we discuss the main difficulties of diagnosis.

  20. A Genome-wide Association Study of Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Pliner, Hannah A.; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A.; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W.; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J.; Sanders, Donald B.; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M.; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F.; Koopman, Wilma J.; Nicolle, Michael W.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M.; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We calculated P values for association between 8114394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0 × 10−8 was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. RESULTS In the over all case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P = 3.98 × 10−8; odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25–1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P = 1.08 × 10−8; odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02 – 2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.60 × 10−9; odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29–1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.32 × 10−12; odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44–1.68) and the other was detected

  1. The value of computed tomography in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Muhm, J.R.; Sheedy, P.F. II; Unni, K.K.; Bernatz, P.E.; Hermann, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In a 5 year study, 19 patients with myasthenia gravis were studied by computed tomography (CT) and underwent thymectomy. CT was accurate in detecting the nine true thymic masses but could not differentiate thymomas from nonthymomatous masses, including thymic cysts. No thymoma was found in a patient under 25 years of age. In one case, the 18 sec scanner could not differentiate a large gland from a thymoma. In eight cases, glands with histologic thymic hyperplasia and histologically normal thymus appeared to be similar and could not be differentiated by CT.

  2. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  3. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  4. Muscle-specific kinase antibody associated myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heidarzadeh, Zeinab; Mousavi, Seyyed-Asadollah; Ostovan, Vahid Reza; Nafissi, Shahriar

    2014-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare complication of bone marrow transplantation and graft versus host disease. We report a 30-year-old woman presented with oculobulbar and proximal limb weakness after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Also, she developed graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplantation. Investigations led to the diagnosis of muscle specific kinase antibody related myasthenia gravis. There have been only two case reports of muscle specific kinase antibody positive myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation in the literature, but none of the previously reported cases had graft versus host disease.

  5. Myasthenia gravis with presynaptic neurophysiological signs: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alboini, Paolo Emilio; Damato, Valentina; Iorio, Raffaele; Luigetti, Marco; Evoli, Amelia

    2015-08-01

    The distinction between myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is based on clinical, neurophysiological and immunological features. We hereby report two cases with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and neurophysiological features consistent with a pre-synaptic neuromuscular transmission defect. Both patients had increased anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres and showed a good response to cholinesterase inhibitors, along with a >100% facilitation of the compound muscle action potential on electrophysiological studies. We provide a review of English literature studies on co-existing features of myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and discuss diagnostic controversies.

  6. International consensus guidance for management of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Gil I.; Benatar, Michael; Evoli, Amelia; Gilhus, Nils E.; Illa, Isabel; Kuntz, Nancy; Massey, Janice M.; Melms, Arthur; Murai, Hiroyuki; Nicolle, Michael; Palace, Jacqueline; Richman, David P.; Verschuuren, Jan; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop formal consensus-based guidance for the management of myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: In October 2013, the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America appointed a Task Force to develop treatment guidance for MG, and a panel of 15 international experts was convened. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness methodology was used to develop consensus guidance statements. Definitions were developed for goals of treatment, minimal manifestations, remission, ocular MG, impending crisis, crisis, and refractory MG. An in-person panel meeting then determined 7 treatment topics to be addressed. Initial guidance statements were developed from literature summaries. Three rounds of anonymous e-mail votes were used to attain consensus on guidance statements modified on the basis of panel input. Results: Guidance statements were developed for symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatments, IV immunoglobulin and plasma exchange, management of impending and manifest myasthenic crisis, thymectomy, juvenile MG, MG associated with antibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase, and MG in pregnancy. Conclusion: This is an international formal consensus of MG experts intended to be a guide for clinicians caring for patients with MG worldwide. PMID:27358333

  7. Myasthenia Gravis Development and Crisis Subsequent to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  8. Sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Oliveira, Ezequiel; Nacif, Sergio R.; Alves Pereira, Nixon; Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jéssica Julioti; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; Cavalcante, Valéria; Santos Oliveira, Claudia; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Acary Sousa Bulle; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This systematic review evaluated the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myasthenia gravis and clarified the role of physiotherapy. [Subjects and Methods] We followed the PRISMA declaration criteria. The evaluation was performed in accordance with the STROBE statement for observational and cross-sectional studies and the CONSORT checklist for clinical trials. Searches were followed by hand on MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciELO, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. [Results] Our searches yielded a total of 36 studies published between 1970 and 2014. The number of patients involved ranged from 9–490. Of the 36 studies, 19 articles were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Therefore, 17 observational, cross-sectional, or clinical studies assessing the quality of sleep and prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis were eligible for our review. [Conclusion] Some studies of patients with MG show that patients with MG are associated with poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, presence of restless syndrome, and a higher incidence of SDB, while other studies do not report such associations. Therefore, given the current inconclusive evidence and limited literature, further study of sleep disturbances in patients with MG is needed. PMID:26180370

  9. The immunological effects of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Scadding, G K; Thomas, H C; Havard, C W

    1979-01-01

    Thymus-derived (T) lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and cellular immune function have been studied in ten patients with myasthenia gravis and in fifteen different myasthenic patients more than 10 years after thymectomy. The results were compared with those of a normal control population. The non-thymectomized myasthenic patients had normal T lymphocyte concentrations measured by rosetting with native sheep red cells. These patients also showed normal sensitization and recall of delayed hypersensitivity, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) induced lymphocyte transformation and antibody-assisted (K cell) cytotoxicity; however, PHA-induced cytotoxicity was markedly reduced (P less than 0.001). The thymectomized group exhibited a lower mean percentage and absolute number of E-rosette-forming cells, which returned toward normal after in vitro treatment with thymosin. PHA-induced lymphocyte cytotoxicity, however, was normal in the patients who had undergone thymectomy, as were lymphocyte transformation, antibody-assisted cytotoxicity and sensitization to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB); there was a decrease in recall of established delayed hypersensitivity. Adult thymectomy in man, therefore, produces a partial and dissociated decrease in T cell responses and it is unlikely that the beneficial effect of this operation in myasthenia gravis is related to immunosuppression. PMID:314366

  10. Antigen-specific immunotherapeutic vaccine for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2014-11-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are caused by Ab-mediated autoimmune responses to muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) that impair neuromuscular transmission, thereby causing muscle weakness. Previously, we discovered that i.p. injection of a therapeutic vaccine consisting of bacterially expressed cytoplasmic domains of human AChR subunits reduced the development of chronic EAMG in rats. In this article, we show that immunization with the therapeutic vaccine in adjuvants does not induce EAMG and, thus, is safe. The potency and efficacy of the therapeutic vaccine were greatly increased by s.c. administration of repeated low doses in IFA. Onset of chronic EAMG could be prevented. Established chronic EAMG could be rapidly reversed, modeling therapy of chronic MG. Therapy reduced pathological Abs assayed by immune precipitation of a main immunogenic region chimera. Successfully treated rats exhibited long-term resistance to reinduction of EAMG, suggesting a lasting cure of MG. A long-term effect of therapy was to change the isotype of the pathogenic Ab response from IgG2b, which fixes complement, to IgG1, which does not. Prevention and reversal of chronic EAMG was not caused by the isotype switch, but the isotype switch may contribute to resistance to reinduction of EAMG. Immunization with AChR cytoplasmic domains in adjuvant is promising as a safe, Ag-specific, potent, effective, rapidly acting, and long-lasting therapeutic approach to MG. PMID:25288571

  11. Treatment of experimental myasthenia gravis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, S.; Blum, J.E.; McIntosh, K.R.; Order, S.; Drachman, D.B.

    1988-07-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been reported to be effective in the immunosuppressive treatment of certain human and experimental autoimmune disorders. We have investigated the effects of TLI in Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) produced by immunization with purified torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The radiation is given in 17 divided fractions of 200 rad each, and nonlymphoid tissues are protected by lead shielding. This technique suppresses the immune system, while minimizing side effects, and permits the repopulation of the immune system by the patient's own bone marrow cells. Our results show that TLI treatment completely prevented the primary antibody response to immunization with torpedo AChR, it rapidly abolished the ongoing antibody response in established EAMG, and it suppressed the secondary (anamnestic) response to a boost of AChR. No EAMG animals died during TLI treatment, compared with six control animals that died of EAMG. TLI produces powerful and prompt immunosuppression and may eventually prove useful in the treatment of refractory human myasthenia gravis.

  12. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  13. Sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Oliveira, Ezequiel; Nacif, Sergio R; Alves Pereira, Nixon; Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jéssica Julioti; Perez, Eduardo Araújo; Cavalcante, Valéria; Santos Oliveira, Claudia; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Acary Sousa Bulle; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This systematic review evaluated the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myasthenia gravis and clarified the role of physiotherapy. [Subjects and Methods] We followed the PRISMA declaration criteria. The evaluation was performed in accordance with the STROBE statement for observational and cross-sectional studies and the CONSORT checklist for clinical trials. Searches were followed by hand on MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciELO, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. [Results] Our searches yielded a total of 36 studies published between 1970 and 2014. The number of patients involved ranged from 9-490. Of the 36 studies, 19 articles were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Therefore, 17 observational, cross-sectional, or clinical studies assessing the quality of sleep and prevalence of sleep disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis were eligible for our review. [Conclusion] Some studies of patients with MG show that patients with MG are associated with poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, presence of restless syndrome, and a higher incidence of SDB, while other studies do not report such associations. Therefore, given the current inconclusive evidence and limited literature, further study of sleep disturbances in patients with MG is needed.

  14. Myasthenia gravis development and crisis subsequent to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  15. The Myotonic Plot Thickens: Electrical Myotonia in Antimuscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Marcus; Karakis, Ioannis; Harrison, Taylor B.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical myotonia is known to occur in a number of inherited and acquired disorders including myotonic dystrophies, channelopathies, and metabolic, toxic, and inflammatory myopathies. Yet, electrical myotonia in myasthenia gravis associated with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) has not been previously reported. We describe two such patients, both of whom had a typical presentation of proximal muscle weakness with respiratory failure in the context of a significant electrodecrement in repetitive nerve stimulation. In both cases, concentric needle examination revealed electrical myotonia combined with myopathic motor unit morphology and early recruitment. These findings suggest that MuSK myasthenia should be included within the differential diagnosis of disorders with electrical myotonia. PMID:26770848

  16. Development and validation of the Myasthenia Gravis Impairment Index

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Vera; Kapral, Moira; Kulkarni, Abhaya; Davis, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to develop a measure of myasthenia gravis impairment using a previously developed framework and to evaluate reliability and validity, specifically face, content, and construct validity. Methods: The first draft of the Myasthenia Gravis Impairment Index (MGII) included examination items from available measures enriched with newly developed, patient-reported items, modified after patient input. International neuromuscular specialists evaluated face and content validity via an e-mail survey. Test–retest reliability was assessed in stable patients at a 3-week interval and interrater reliability was evaluated in the same day. Construct validity was assessed through correlations between the MGII and other measures and by comparing scores in different patient groups. Results: The first draft was assessed by 18 patients, and 72 specialists answered the survey. The second draft had 7 examination and 22 patient-reported items. Field testing included 200 patients, with 54 patients completing the reliability studies. Test–retest reliability of the total score was good (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.79–0.94), as was interrater reliability of the examination component (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.79–0.94). The MGII correlated well with comparison measures, with higher correlations with the MG–activities of daily living (r = 0.91) and MG-specific quality of life 15-item scale (r = 0.78). When assessing different patient groups, the scores followed expected patterns. Conclusions: The MGII was developed using a patient-centered framework of myasthenia-related impairments and incorporating patient input throughout the development process. It is reliable in an outpatient setting and has demonstrated construct validity. Responsiveness studies are under way. PMID:27402891

  17. The emerging role of tacrolimus in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Marissa L.; Vanderman, Adam J.; Brown, Jamie N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe and evaluate the available evidence assessing the role of tacrolimus in the management of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Data sources: A literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to September 2014) and EMBASE (1947 to September 2014) was performed using the terms ‘tacrolimus’ and ‘myasthenia gravis’. Citations of retrieved articles were examined for relevance. Study selection and data extraction: The search was limited to prospective clinical trials focused on clinical outcomes in patients with generalized MG. Case reports, retrospective evaluations and non-English articles were excluded. Data synthesis: A total of 12 studies met inclusion criteria, of which seven articles evaluated tacrolimus in steroid-dependent patients and two examined the utility of tacrolimus in patients failing corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Other studies evaluated early initiation of tacrolimus after thymectomy, effectiveness of tacrolimus in de novo MG and the effectiveness of tacrolimus post-thymectomy in thymoma patients versus nonthymoma. A total of eight trials showed statistically significant improvements in quantitative MG score (QMGS) and postintervention status criteria – Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (PSC-MGFA). Of the trials examining steroid reduction with tacrolimus, two reported high rates of complete withdrawal; however, the most robust trial was unable to detect a difference in mean steroid dose. Long-term effects of tacrolimus (up to 5 years) were assessed in eight trials, which consistently showed positive effects on QMGS or reduction in adjunct therapies. Conclusions: There is limited yet promising information to suggest a beneficial role for tacrolimus in reducing QMGS and corticosteroid burden in patients with refractory symptoms or new-onset MG. Long-term use appears to be safe in this population. PMID:25922621

  18. Association of myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kisabay, Aysin; Sari, Ummu Serpil; Boyaci, Recep; Batum, Melike; Yilmaz, Hikmet; Selcuki, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of neuromuscular junction due to auto-immune destruction of the acetylcholine receptors. Behçet's disease, on the other hand, is a multisystemic vascular-inflammatory disease. Both conditions are not common in the general population although their association has not been reported in the literature. We wanted to present our patient who developed clinical course of myasthenia gravis following discontinuation of medications due to complications of corticosteroid for Behçet's disease. It was observed that clinical findings of myasthenia gravis recovered following restarting steroid treatment and he did not experience attacks of both conditions. Although Myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease are distinct entities clinically as well as in terms of pathogenesis, they share common physiopathological features and their treatment is based on their common features.

  19. Double trouble (McArdle's disease and myasthenia gravis): how can exercise help?

    PubMed

    Lucia, Alejandro; Maté-Muñoz, José L; Pérez, Margarita; Foster, Carl; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Arenas, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    We report a 29-year-old patient with McArdle's disease and myasthenia gravis. She had been debilitated with McArdle's disease since childhood (with marked rhabdomyolysis) and was obese. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed at 24 years of age. After 3 months of aerobic exercise training, her exercise capacity increased significantly and she regained the ability to live independently. We conclude that even patients with profound neuromuscular diseases may benefit from carefully prescribed exercise training.

  20. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis for Meningioma Surgery - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V K; Agrawal, S; Ahmed, M; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of great challenge to the anesthesiologist, because it affects the neuromuscular junction. Anesthetic management involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. This case report documents the safe use of fentanyl, propofol and sevoflurane combination guided by bispectral index, without the use of muscle relaxants in a patient with myasthenia gravis who presented for meningioma surgery. PMID:26620756

  1. Unusual association of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myasthenia gravis: A dysregulation of the adaptive immune system?

    PubMed

    Del Mar Amador, Maria; Vandenberghe, Nadia; Berhoune, Nawel; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Gronier, Sophie; Delmont, Emilien; Desnuelle, Claude; Cintas, Pascal; Pittion, Sophie; Louis, Sarah; Demeret, Sophie; Lenglet, Timothée; Meininger, Vincent; Salachas, François; Pradat, Pierre-François; Bruneteau, Gaëlle

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting neuromuscular junctions that has been associated with a small increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we describe a retrospective series of seven cases with a concomitant diagnosis of ALS and myasthenia gravis, collected among the 18 French reference centers for ALS in a twelve year period. After careful review, only six patients strictly met the diagnostic criteria for both ALS and myasthenia gravis. In these patients, limb onset of ALS was reported in five (83%) cases. Localization of myasthenia gravis initial symptoms was ocular in three (50%) cases, generalized in two (33%) and bulbar in one (17%). Median delay between onset of the two conditions was 19 months (6-319 months). Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies testing was positive in all cases. All patients were treated with riluzole and one had an associated immune-mediated disease. In the one last ALS case, the final diagnosis was false-positivity for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. The co-occurrence of ALS and myasthenia gravis is rare and requires strict diagnostic criteria. Its demonstration needs thoughtful interpretation of electrophysiological results and exclusion of false positivity for myasthenia gravis antibody testing in some ALS cases. This association may be triggered by a dysfunction of adaptive immunity.

  2. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.

  3. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibody-associated myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis induced by nivolumab in a patient with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Takushi; Sano, Tasuku; Kamijo, Fuminao; Saito, Nana; Miyake, Tomomi; Kodaira, Minori; Katoh, Nagaaki; Nishie, Kenichi; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Uhara, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We reported an 81-year-old woman with metastatic melanoma, in whom myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis developed after nivolumab monotherapy. The first symptom of myasthenia gravis was dyspnea. Ultrasonography detected hypokinesis of the bilateral diaphragm suggesting myasthenia gravis, although there was no abnormal finding of the lungs in computed tomography images. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies were low-titer positive in the preserved serum before administration of nivolumab, strongly suggesting that the myasthenia gravis was a nivolumab-related immune adverse event. Despite the remarkable clinical benefits of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced melanoma, it is important to recognize unexpected immune-related adverse events.

  4. Neuromyelitis optica and myasthenia gravis in a young Nigerian girl.

    PubMed

    Balarabe, Salisu Abdullahi; Adamu, Mohammad Dantani; Watila, Musa Mamman; Jiya, Nma

    2015-09-03

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are rare autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of the two disorders, although rare, has been documented. This is a case report of a 16-year-old student who presented with recurrent episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis, 8 years after diagnosis of MG. She presented with visual impairment, relapsing and remitting weakness, numbness and paraesthesia of her lower limbs, with bladder and bowel incontinence. Her examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy, spastic paraparesis of the lower limbs and patchy sensory loss up to thoracic level (T4-5). She had a positive acetylcholine receptor antibody, a positive aquaporin-4 antibody and chest CT finding of thymic enlargement. We therefore confirmed the previous diagnosis of MG and performed a recent diagnosis of background NMO. A high index of suspicion is needed to make a diagnosis of this rare coexistence of NMO and MG in resource-limited settings such as Nigeria.

  5. Animal models of myasthenia gravis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Renato; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Consonni, Alessandra; Baggi, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by the immune attack of the neuromuscular junction. Antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) induce receptor degradation, complement cascade activation, and postsynaptic membrane destruction, resulting in functional reduction in AChR availability. Besides anti-AChR antibodies, other autoantibodies are known to play pathogenic roles in MG. The experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) models have been of great help over the years in understanding the pathophysiological role of specific autoantibodies and T helper lymphocytes and in suggesting new therapies for prevention and modulation of the ongoing disease. EAMG can be induced in mice and rats of susceptible strains that show clinical symptoms mimicking the human disease. EAMG models are helpful for studying both the muscle and the immune compartments to evaluate new treatment perspectives. In this review, we concentrate on recent findings on EAMG models, focusing on their utility and limitations. PMID:27019601

  6. AMP-deaminase from thymus of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, I; Szydłowska, M; Szrok, S; Bakuła, S; Kaletha, K

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized clinically by skeletal muscle fatigue following the excessive exercise. Interestingly most of MG patients manifest parallely also some abnormalities of the thymus.AMP-deaminase (AMPD) from human thymus was not a subject of studies up to now. In this paper, mRNA expression and some physico-chemical and immunological properties of AMPD purified from the thymus of MG patients were described. Experiments performed identified the liver isozyme (AMPD2) as the main isoform of AMPD expressed in this organ. The activity of AMPD found in this organ was higher than in other human non-(skeletal) muscle tissues indicating on role the enzyme may play in supplying of guanylates required for the intensive multiplication of thymocytes.

  7. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Myasthenia Gravis: An Unusual Association.

    PubMed

    Chogtu, Bharti; Malik, Daliparty Vasudev; Magazine, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fibrosing lung condition with high morbidity and mortality, accounting for about 25% of the cases of interstitial lung diseases. It usually has a progressive course resulting in death due to respiratory failure. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease, caused by antibody mediated activity against acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. It is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. Extensive literature search did not reveal any case report of an association between these two conditions. Here we present a case of a patient with IPF who also developed MG. The diagnosis of IPF was based on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) of the lung and that of MG was based on clinical criteria and electrophysiological testing. The case was successfully managed. PMID:27190866

  8. Altered isotope charge distribution of acetylcholine neurotransmitter and Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Bayri, A; Unal, S; Altin, S; Bulut, F; Dayanc, B E

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a central neurotransmitter that is used for signal transmission among neurons. For signal transmission in neurons, a neurotransmitter must bind to its receptor in order to produce an action potential. It is known that in Myasthenia Gravis (MG) cases, autoantibodies could block this binding. In the future, the treatment of MG could be achieved via modulation of molecular interaction between ACh and acetylcholine receptor (AChR). This study suggests that if an atom on a ligand (i.e. a neurotransmitter) is replaced with its isotope, it may cause charge redistribution such as that the binding between ligand and its receptor may be improved. Hence suggesting that with replacement of atoms with their isotopes in any biologically important ligand could alter its affinity towards its corresponding receptor, which would have a wide array of applications in medicine.

  9. Neuromyelitis optica and myasthenia gravis in a young Nigerian girl.

    PubMed

    Balarabe, Salisu Abdullahi; Adamu, Mohammad Dantani; Watila, Musa Mamman; Jiya, Nma

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are rare autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of the two disorders, although rare, has been documented. This is a case report of a 16-year-old student who presented with recurrent episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis, 8 years after diagnosis of MG. She presented with visual impairment, relapsing and remitting weakness, numbness and paraesthesia of her lower limbs, with bladder and bowel incontinence. Her examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy, spastic paraparesis of the lower limbs and patchy sensory loss up to thoracic level (T4-5). She had a positive acetylcholine receptor antibody, a positive aquaporin-4 antibody and chest CT finding of thymic enlargement. We therefore confirmed the previous diagnosis of MG and performed a recent diagnosis of background NMO. A high index of suspicion is needed to make a diagnosis of this rare coexistence of NMO and MG in resource-limited settings such as Nigeria. PMID:26338241

  10. AChR-specific immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by muscle fatigability. In most cases, it is mediated by autoantibodies targeting muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is an animal model for MG, which is usually induced by immunization with AChR purified from fish electric organ. Pathological autoantibodies to AChRs are directed at the extracellular surface, especially the main immunogenic region (MIR). Current treatments for MG can help many but not all patients. Antigen-specific immunosuppressive therapy for MG that specifically suppresses the autoimmune response without affecting the entire immune system and avoids side effects of general immunosuppression is currently unavailable. Early attempts at antigen-specific immunosuppression for EAMG using AChR extracellular domain sequences that form epitopes for pathological autoantibodies risked provoking autoimmunity rather than suppressing it. We discovered a novel approach to specific immunosuppression of EAMG with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of bacterially-expressed human AChR cytoplasmic domains, which has the potential to specifically suppress MG without danger of causing exacerbation. This approach prevents development of chronic EAMG when initiated immediately after the acute phase of EAMG, and rapidly reverses established chronic EAMG when started during the chronic phase of EAMG. Successfully treated rats exhibited long-term resistance to re-induction of EAMG. In this review we also discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the therapy works. Vaccination with AChR cytoplasmic domains in adjuvant is promising as a safe, antigen-specific, potent, effective, rapidly acting, and long lasting approach to therapy of MG.

  11. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic evaluation of childhood myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHI-XIAO; XU, KAI-LI; XIONG, HUI

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics, classification and treatment of childhood myasthenia gravis (MG) and address the prognosis through follow-up. The clinical data of 135 children with MG were grouped according to clinical type and therapeutic drugs, retrospectively analyzed and prospectively monitored. Of the 135 MG patients, 85.2% had type I (ocular type), with only 4.2% progressing to systemic MG; 13.4% had type II (general type); and 1.5% had type III (fulminating type). Relapse occurred in 46.1% of the 102 patients that were followed up. The positive rate for the primary acetylcholine receptor antibody was 40.19%, without significant differences among clinical subtypes. The positive rate of the repetitive nerve stimulation frequency test by electromyography was 37.97%. Decreased expression of CD4+, CD8+, or CD3+ was present in 71% of the patients. Thymic hyperplasia was present in 5.93% of the patients, while 1.48% had thymoma. Steroid treatment was effective in the majority of the patients. Ocular type MG was common in this cohort of patients. The incidence and mortality of myasthenia crisis were low, the presence of concurrent thymoma was rare and only a limited number of children developed neurological sequelae. PMID:25780436

  12. Myasthenia crisis following percutaneous coronary intervention in a patient with late onset myasthenia gravis: successful treatment of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Singh, Ajit Pal; Srinivas, B C; Manjunath, C N

    2013-07-01

    A 70-year-old female, known case of late onset myasthenia gravis for last 1 year was admitted with effort angina. Coronary angiogram revealed presence of significant lesion in the proximal part of right coronary artery. She had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention. Following angioplasty she developed recurrent ventricular tachycardia and respiratory distress. She developed myasthenia crisis and was put on ventilator. She had undergone through plasmapheresis thrice as anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titres were very high. Medline search revealed no previous report of similar case. We are reporting the first case where myasthenia crisis was triggered by percutaneous coronary intervention and was treated successfully.

  13. Treatment of pyridostigmine-induced AV block with hyoscyamine in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gehi, Anil; Benatar, Michael; Langberg, Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the nervous system typically mediated by antibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. Treatment of myasthenia gravis frequently involves the use of cholinesterase inhibitors such as pyridostigmine. Treatment with these agents has been associated with bradycardia and syncope requiring pacemaker implantation. We report a case of a 60-year-old man with a 1-year history of myasthenia gravis treated with pyridostigmine who presented with syncope due to high degree AV block. Before committing the patient to a permanent pacemaker, a trial of medical therapy with hyoscyamine was attempted. Hyoscyamine is a muscarinic antagonist commonly used to block cholinergic side effects associated with pyridostigmine without reducing its efficacy at the neuromuscular junction. Treatment with hyoscyamine resulted in complete resolution of AV block, thereby avoiding pacemaker implantation.

  14. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: implications for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, I; Blakely, B T; Pavlath, G K; Travis, M; Blau, H M

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. We show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. Our results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also to a direct effect on muscle. We propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications. Images PMID:2236023

  15. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  16. Video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yim, A P; Kay, R L; Ho, J K

    1995-11-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) provides a new approach to thymectomy. From June 1993 to December 1994, we performed a total of eight thymectomies for myasthenia gravis (MG). There were four male and four female patients with ages ranging from 9 to 76 years. Three of the eight patients had associated thymoma. We believe that complete thymectomy was accomplished in all cases by examination of the thymic bed and resected specimen. There was no mortality or intraoperative complications. The median postoperative hospital stay was 5 days (range, 2 to 37 days). One patient required ventilatory support postoperatively. Clinical improvement was observed in all patients after a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 2 to 21 months). Compared with a comparable historical group of patients with MG who underwent transsternal thymectomy, the VATS group was associated with significantly less analgesic requirement and shortened hospital stay. We conclude that VAT thymectomy is technically feasible and is associated with a favorable postoperative course compared with the transsternal approach. We believe that complete thymectomy can be achieved by this approach. Further investigation with long-term follow-up is needed to further clarify the role of VAT thymectomy in thoracic surgery.

  17. Changes in inflammatory cytokine networks in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kanai, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Oda, Fumiko; Himuro, Keiichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmunological inflammatory disorder of the neuromuscular junction. Inflammation could be a key player for understanding the pathogenesis of MG. We measured the serum levels of 24 inflammatory cytokines in 43 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG and 25 healthy controls. In patients with MG, serum levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), IL-19, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly increased as compared with controls (p < 0.05). Among them, IL-20, IL-28A and IL-35 were significantly decreased after treatment (p < 0.05). In clinical subtype analyses, APRIL and IL-20 were increased in patients with late-onset MG and IL-28A levels were increased in patients with thymoma-associated MG compared with healthy controls (p < 0.01). The results of the present study demonstrate both anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines are upregulated in MG, reflecting the importance of cytokine-mediated inflammation and its regulation in MG pathophysiology. PMID:27172995

  18. Phase II trial of methotrexate in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; He, Jianghua; Herbelin, Laura; Dimachkie, Mazen; Barohn, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Prednisone is a frequently used treatment for myasthenia gravis (MG) but it has numerous side effects. Methotrexate is a selective inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase and lymphocyte proliferation and is an effective immuosuppressive medication for autoimmune diseases. Given the negative results of the mycophenolate mofetil study, search for an effective immunosuppressant drug therapy is ongoing. The objective is to determine if oral methotrexate is safe and effective for MG patients who take prednisone. We have initiated a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial of methotrexate versus placebo in patients taking at least 10 mg/day of prednisone at enrollment. The methotrexate dose is increased to 20 mg and the prednisone dose is adjusted per protocol during the study. Clinical and laboratory evaluations are performed monthly for 12 months, with the primary efficacy measure being the nine-month prednisone area under the curve (AUC) from months 3 to 12. Secondary outcome measures include MG outcomes, quality of life measures, and a polyglutamation biomarker assay. A total of 18 U.S. sites and 2 Canadian sites are participating, with 48 screened cases, 42 enrolled, with 19 still active in the study.

  19. Phase II trial of methotrexate in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; He, Jianghua; Herbelin, Laura; Dimachkie, Mazen; Barohn, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Prednisone is a frequently used treatment for myasthenia gravis (MG) but it has numerous side effects. Methotrexate is a selective inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase and lymphocyte proliferation and is an effective immuosuppressive medication for autoimmune diseases. Given the negative results of the mycophenolate mofetil study, search for an effective immunosuppressant drug therapy is ongoing. The objective is to determine if oral methotrexate is safe and effective for MG patients who take prednisone. We have initiated a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial of methotrexate versus placebo in patients taking at least 10 mg/day of prednisone at enrollment. The methotrexate dose is increased to 20 mg and the prednisone dose is adjusted per protocol during the study. Clinical and laboratory evaluations are performed monthly for 12 months, with the primary efficacy measure being the nine-month prednisone area under the curve (AUC) from months 3 to 12. Secondary outcome measures include MG outcomes, quality of life measures, and a polyglutamation biomarker assay. A total of 18 U.S. sites and 2 Canadian sites are participating, with 48 screened cases, 42 enrolled, with 19 still active in the study. PMID:23278574

  20. Dendritic cells in hyperplastic thymuses from patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Yuriko; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Obara, Daiji; Yamagata, Munehisa; Tohgi, Hideo

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the hyperplastic myasthenia gravis (MG) thymus, we studied the frequency and distribution of three mature DC phenotypes (CD83(+)CD11c(+), CD86(+)CD11c(+), and HLA-DR(+)CD11c(+)) in samples from patients with MG whose symptoms dramatically improved following thymectomy and in non-MG control thymuses. In hyperplastic MG thymuses, mature DCs were much more numerous in nonmedullary areas, such as the subcapsular/outer cortex; around the germinal centers; and in extralobular connective tissue, particularly around blood vessels. Mature DCs strongly coexpressed CD44 and appeared to be components of a CD44-highly positive (CD44(high)) cell population migrating from the vascular system. Furthermore, in the hyperplastic MG thymus, the expression of secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC) markedly increased especially around extralobular blood vessels, where the CD44(high) cell population accumulated. These findings suggest that DCs may migrate into the hyperplastic thymus from the vascular system via mechanisms that involve CD44 and SLC. DCs may present self-antigens, thereby promoting the priming and/or boosting of potentially autoreactive T cells against the acetylcholine receptor.

  1. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  2. Diagnosis of Tensilon-Negative Ocular Myasthenia Gravis By Daily Selfie.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Elan L; Botelho, James V; Horton, Jonathan C

    2016-09-01

    The initial symptoms of myasthenia gravis are usually ptosis and diplopia. The diagnosis is often confirmed by testing for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies or by observing the effects of intravenous edrophonium (Tensilon) injection. However, these standard tests may be negative in patients with isolated ocular findings. We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with negative serologic and Tensilon testing. She was asked to photograph herself daily. The resulting sequence of daily selfies captured striking fluctuations in her ocular alignment and ptosis. Daily selfies may be a useful strategy for confirming the clinical diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis.

  3. A study of the utility of azathioprine metabolite testing in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rae, William; Burke, Georgina; Pinto, Ashwin

    2016-04-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterised by fatigable voluntary skeletal muscle weakness. The underlying pathogenesis is complex involving adaptive autoimmune responses. Azathioprine remains a first line broad acting immunosuppressant for MG. Due to varied clinical responses to azathioprine we aimed to investigate the relationship between azathioprine metabolites and symptom control. Mild correlations between Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score (QMG) vs. 6-thioguanine nucleotides (R=-0.317 p=0.186) and QMG vs. lymphocyte count (R=0.402 p=0.08) were found. Azathioprine metabolite measurement should be considered in MG patients with; pancytopenia, deranged liver function or recurrent infections.

  4. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    PubMed

    Kusner, Linda L; Ciesielski, Michael J; Marx, Alexander; Kaminski, Henry J; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  5. Future perspectives in target-specific immunotherapies of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by complement-fixing antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChR); antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper (Th) 17+ cells are essential in antibody production. Target-specific therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed against antibodies, B cells, complement and molecules associated with T cell signaling. Even though the progress in the immunopathogenesis of the disease probably exceeds any other autoimmune disorder, MG is still treated with traditional drugs or procedures that exert a non-antigen specific immunosuppression or immunomodulation. Novel biological agents currently on the market, directed against the following molecular pathways, are relevant and specific therapeutic targets that can be tested in MG: (a) T cell intracellular signaling molecules, such as anti-CD52, anti-interleukin (IL) 2 receptors, anti- costimulatory molecules, and anti-Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK3) that block the intracellular cascade associated with T-cell activation; (b) B cells and their trophic factors, directed against key B-cell molecules; (c) complement C3 or C5, intercepting the destructive effect of complement-fixing antibodies; (d) cytokines and cytokine receptors, such as those targeting IL-6 which promotes antibody production and IL-17, or the p40 subunit of IL-12/1L-23 that affect regulatory T cells; and (e) T and B cell transmigration molecules associated with lymphocyte egress from the lymphoid organs. All drugs against these molecular pathways require testing in controlled trials, although some have already been tried in small case series. Construction of recombinant AChR antibodies that block binding of the pathogenic antibodies, thereby eliminating complement and antibody-depended-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are additional novel molecular tools that require exploration in experimental MG. PMID:26600875

  6. Future perspectives in target-specific immunotherapies of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-11-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by complement-fixing antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChR); antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper (Th) 17+ cells are essential in antibody production. Target-specific therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed against antibodies, B cells, complement and molecules associated with T cell signaling. Even though the progress in the immunopathogenesis of the disease probably exceeds any other autoimmune disorder, MG is still treated with traditional drugs or procedures that exert a non-antigen specific immunosuppression or immunomodulation. Novel biological agents currently on the market, directed against the following molecular pathways, are relevant and specific therapeutic targets that can be tested in MG: (a) T cell intracellular signaling molecules, such as anti-CD52, anti-interleukin (IL) 2 receptors, anti- costimulatory molecules, and anti-Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK3) that block the intracellular cascade associated with T-cell activation; (b) B cells and their trophic factors, directed against key B-cell molecules; (c) complement C3 or C5, intercepting the destructive effect of complement-fixing antibodies; (d) cytokines and cytokine receptors, such as those targeting IL-6 which promotes antibody production and IL-17, or the p40 subunit of IL-12/1L-23 that affect regulatory T cells; and (e) T and B cell transmigration molecules associated with lymphocyte egress from the lymphoid organs. All drugs against these molecular pathways require testing in controlled trials, although some have already been tried in small case series. Construction of recombinant AChR antibodies that block binding of the pathogenic antibodies, thereby eliminating complement and antibody-depended-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are additional novel molecular tools that require exploration in experimental MG.

  7. Myasthenia Gravis during the Course of Neuromyelitis Optica.

    PubMed

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Dehghani, Alireza; Abtahi, Mohammad-Ali; Akbari, Mojtaba; Tabrizi, Nasim; Goodarzi, Tannaz

    2011-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that has been thought to be a severe subtype of multiple sclerosis for a long time. The discovery of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody as a highly specific marker responsible for the pathogenesis of NMO, not only has made a revolutionary pace in establishing a serologic distinction between the two diseases, but it has also classified NMO as an antibody-mediated disorder. Similarly, myasthenia gravis (MG) is a well-known antibody-mediated disorder. In this report, we describe the case of a middle-aged female patient who experienced definite MG with an unclear clinical picture of chronic demyelinating disease that initially reflected the diagnosis of MS, but further imaging and paraclinical workup (e.g. positive AQP4 antibody test) revealed NMO. The coexistence of NMO and MG is previously described. However, this is the first case with NMO symptoms preceding the onset of MG. Of note, the development of MG occurred after a 2-year period of interferon β-1b (IFN β-1b) administration. This calls the question to mind of whether in our case MG is induced by the administration of interferon, instead of an original pathogenic link between MG and NMO. In other words, immunomodulatory treatments can slip the immunity towards T-helper II predominant pathways that can trigger MG. However, if we assume that such an explanation (i.e. increased susceptibility to autoantibody-mediated disorders) is true, our case can be considered the first case of NMO who developed MG following IFN β-1b treatment. PMID:22125527

  8. Algaemia due to Prototheca wickerhamii in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Mohabeer, A J; Kaplan, P J; Southern, P M; Gander, R M

    1997-01-01

    Prototheca wickerhamii is a rare cause of systemic infection in humans. While some cases occur in previously healthy individuals, others are associated with a variety of preexisting diseases. Here we present, for the first time, a case of P. wickerhamii algaemia in a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B. PMID:9399541

  9. Inhibitory effect of alpha-fetoprotein on the binding of myasthenia gravis antibody to acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, T; Beyth, Y; Abramsky, O

    1980-01-01

    The binding of myasthenia gravis antibody acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) as measured in vitro by Radioimmunoassay with 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), can be blocked by amniotic fluid, maternal serum, and umbilical cord serum. This inhibitory effect is due to alpha-fetoprotein present in high concentrations in amniotic fluid and serum, as shown by: (i) selective removal of several components from amniotic fluid and serum; (ii) selective addition of different components present in amniotic fluid and serum, including alpha-fetoprotein, to be radioimmunoassay; (iii) correlation between the inhibitory effect of both amniotic fluid and serum and between the amounts of alpha-fetoprotein they contain; (iv) blocking of the alpha-fetoprotein in vitro suggests a similar effect in vivo in pregnant women with myasthenia gravis. This effect may explain in part the variability in the development of neonatal myasthenia gravis in the babies, due to transplacental transfer of maternal anti-AcChoR antibody, only after delivery and only in the minority of the cases. It also may explain the appearnace of remissions in females with myasthenia gravis during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Similar phenomena observed during pregnancy in other autoimmune and immunopathogenic diseases also might be attributed to activity of alpha-fetoprotein. PMID:6158053

  10. Disability and Functional Profiles of Patients with Myasthenia Gravis Measured with ICF Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonardi, Matilde; Raggi, Alberto; Antozzi, Carlo; Confalonieri, Paolo; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Mantegazza, Renato

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe functional profiles of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and the relationships among symptoms, activities and environmental factors (EF), by using WHO's International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF). Patients were consecutively enrolled at the Besta Institute of Milan, Italy.…

  11. An unexpected difficult intubation in a patient with myasthenia gravis undergoing video-assisted transcervical thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Nadia; Celestre, Chiara; Borrata, Francesco; Migliore, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Although there are different methods to evaluate predictive parameters of difficult intubation in apparently normal patients, sometimes this event is unpredictable.We herein report a clinical case of difficult intubation during anaesthesia for video-assisted thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis. PMID:23749836

  12. Use of lipid-lowering medications in myasthenia gravis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ragbourne, Sophie C; Crook, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) who developed worsening of his condition after starting ezetimibe. We review the literature concerning lipid-modifying medications and MG. The use of bile acid sequestrant agents may have a place in the lipid management of MG patients because they did not seem to cause muscle-related side effects or worsening of MG.

  13. Quality of life in 188 patients with myasthenia gravis in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Min; Guo, Jun; Ma, Shan; Fan, Lingling; Wang, Xianni; Li, Chuan; Guo, Peng; Wang, Jie; Li, Hongzeng; Li, Zhuyi

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a kind of chronic autoimmune disease which can weaken patients' motor function and, furthermore, produce negative impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The primary purpose of this research was to evaluate factors that might affect the HRQoL of MG patients. A cross-sectional clinical research was carried out including 188 successive patients with MG. Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) classification and Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) score were applied to assess the severity of the disease. The Medical Outcome Survey 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to estimate the HRQoL. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) were utilized to measure the depression and anxiety symptom. Factors may influence the HRQoL of MG patients include age, educational level, occupation, the situation of the thymus, the type of MG and generalized myasthenia gravis (GMG), the severity of the disease and the psychological disorder. Higher QMG and HARS scores were two significant factors that can prognosticate lower Physical Composite Score (PCS) and Mental Composite Score (MCS), while older age was just a significant factor which has prognostic value for lower PCS. The results of this research may have a potential guiding significance for the clinical treatment strategy and improve the quality of life in patients with MG consequently. In addition to the treatment of physical symptoms, the psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression should be concerned as well.

  14. Two patients with co-morbid myasthenia gravis in a Brazilian cohort of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Francisco de A A; de Oliveira, Gisele R; Araújo, Davi F; Souza, Marcellus Henrique Loiola Ponte; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa Campelo; Thomas, Florian P

    2014-11-01

    Co-morbid auto-immune disorders may affect 0.2% of the population. We present the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of 2 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and myasthenia gravis from a Brazilian cohort of 218 inflammatory bowel disease patients. Patient 1: A 40year-old man was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis at age 37 and underwent total colectomy 3years later. After prednisone was tapered, he experienced a clinical relapse and was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. He then developed quadriparesis, bilateral ptosis, dysphagia and dysarthria. Patient 2: A 41year-old woman (diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis at age 35) developed speech impairment and ptosis. On both patients, symptoms quickly progressed over few weeks. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and confirmed by abnormal repetitive nerve stimulation and elevated anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers. Pyridostigmine and prednisone successfully treated both patients. Myasthenia gravis prevalence over 9years was 0.9%. Myasthenia gravis clinical course was not significantly modified by inflammatory bowel disease relapses and should be suspected with new onset weakness.

  15. Refractory myasthenia gravis – clinical profile, comorbidities and response to rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sepehrar, Mona; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Settikere Nataraju, Aravinda; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody mediated autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. A proportion of myasthenia gravis patients are classified as refractory due to non responsiveness to conventional treatment. This retrospective study was done to evaluate clinical profile, epidemiological, laboratory, and features of patients with MG and mode of management using rituximab and complications. Methods: Data of myasthenia gravis patients admitted or presented to outpatient department (previous medical records) with MG between January 2008 and January 2016 were included. A total of 512 patients fulfilled the clinical and diagnostic criteria of myasthenia gravis of which 76 patients met the diagnostic certainty for refractory myasthenia gravis and were evaluated. Results: Out of 76 refractory MG patients, 53 (69.73%) patients fulfilled all the three defined criteria. The median age of onset of the refractory MG group was 36 years with a range of 27–53 years. In our study 25 patients (32.89%) belonged to the age group of 21–30 years. Anti-MuSK antibodies were positive in 8 non-refractory MG patients (2.06%) and 36 refractory MG patients (47.36%). Mean HbA1C was found to be 8.6±2.33. The dose of administered prednisone decreased by a mean of 59.7% (p=3.3x10–8) to 94.6% (p=2.2x10–14) after the third cycle of rituximab treatment. Conclusion: The refractory MG patients are most commonly female with an early age of onset, anti-MuSK antibodies, and thymomas. Refractory MG patients have higher prevalence and poor control (HbA1C >8%) of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia probably due to increased steroid usage. Rituximab is very efficient in treatment of refractory MG with adverse effects being low. PMID:27790079

  16. Clinical features of myasthenia gravis in southern China: a retrospective review of 2,154 cases over 22 years.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Liu, W B; Men, L N; Feng, H Y; Li, Y; Luo, C M; Qiu, L

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the study are to study the clinical features of myasthenia gravis in southern China. A retrospective study was carried out on all patients who were diagnosed with myasthenia gravis at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University during 1987-2009. Of the 2,154 myasthenia gravis patients, the gender ratio (male:female) was 1:1.15. The median age at onset was 18 years. There was a single peak distribution of age at onset, and 44.8 % were children (≤ 14 years) at first onset. 1,766 patients (82.0 %) only had ocular symptoms at onset. 1,451 patients (67.4 %) were classified as Osserman grade I. 250 unselected patients received anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies test, in which only 51.2 % were positive. Computed tomography scan/magnetic resonance Imaging of chest were done in 1,354 patients, of which 899 patients (66.4 %) had thymic hyperplasia and 201(14.8 %) had thymoma. There were 150 patients (7.0 %) with myasthenia gravis combined with other autoimmune diseases, in which hyperthyroidism was most common (84 %). 189 (8.8 %) patients experienced 267 episodes of crisis. The rate of family myasthenia gravis was 1.6 % (35/2,154). In conclusion, the clinical features and demography of myasthenia gravis patients in this study are significantly different from prior studies on other regions and ethnic groups.

  17. T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma and myasthenia gravis in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Allan, K; Masters, N; Rivers, S; Berry, K; Routh, A; Lamm, C

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae.

  18. T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma and myasthenia gravis in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Allan, K; Masters, N; Rivers, S; Berry, K; Routh, A; Lamm, C

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  19. Myasthenia gravis as a 'stroke mimic'--it's all in the history.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Saiffuddin; Ul-Haq, Mian Ayaz; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-12-01

    An 85-year-old man presented to hospital as an emergency having difficulties with swallowing and speech. In the emergency department, he was assessed as having acute onset dysphagia and dysarthria in keeping with an acute stroke. Subsequently, it became apparent that although the symptoms were indeed of relatively acute onset, there was a clear description by the patient of fatigability and diurnal variation, prompting a working clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The patient followed a turbulent clinical course, and interpretation of investigation results proved not to be straightforward in the acute setting. Myasthenia gravis is an uncommon disorder but it is more common in the elderly. This case provides key learning points, particularly highlighting the value of prompt, accurate clinical assessment and the importance of adhering to the clinical diagnostic formulation.

  20. [Myasthenia gravis in Santo Tomás Hospital 1990-1997].

    PubMed

    Frago, G; Gracia, F; Chang, E; Andrade Alegre, R

    1998-09-01

    Myasthenia Gravis is an infrequent disease. Diagnosis and treatment must be done early to avoid high morbidity that can compromise patients lives. Nine cases were identified during the eight year 1990-1997 at the Santo Tomas Hospital of Panama city but one had to be excluded because he refused treatment. Most of the patients (7/8) had symptoms for more than 3 months. The diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis requires a high index of suspicion and the clinical impressión must be confirmed by various diagnostic studies that include the edrophonium test, the repetitive stimulation test, the therapeutic test with pyridostigmine, the determination of acetylcholine anti-receptor antibodies and a CT Scan of the thorax. Medical treatment consists mainly of anticholinesterase agents and surgical treatment consists of thymectomy by means of an extended transternal ablation. Operative results were excellent, seven out of eight improved.

  1. Anti-MuSK-positive myasthenia gravis diagnosed during pregnancy: new challenges for an old disease?

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Raquel; Monteiro, Pitorra; Matos, Anabela; Santos Silva, Isabel

    2015-01-05

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting predominantly women in their reproductive age. The course of the disease during pregnancy is unpredictable, although it is more difficult to manage earlier in the gestation. Myasthenia gravis with antibodies against the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (anti-MuSK) has been described as a subtype of disease with more localised clinical features and a poorer response to treatment than acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR)-positive patients. Few cases have been reported in pregnant women, with deliveries being performed mainly by caesarean section. We report a successful case of vaginal delivery and describe our experience providing the first review of the management of this subtype of disease during pregnancy.

  2. Association of HLA-Bw46DR9 combination with juvenile myasthenia gravis in Chinese.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W H; Chiu, H C; Hseih, R P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and fifty two Chinese patients with myasthenia gravis in Taiwan were investigated for HLA-A, B, C and DR/DQ typing. HLA-Bw46 and DR9 frequencies were significantly increased in patients compared with the control group, and there was a decrease in DR3. Further analysis between different subgroups of patients showed Bw46 and DR9 were more significantly increased in the juvenile group than in the adult group. No single HLA allele was associated with either clinical type or thymic pathology, but there was an excess of BW46DR9 combination in both juvenile and ocular type patients. The Chinese population with myasthenia gravis is characterised by earlier age at onset, more ocular forms and less clinically severe illness than in whites, and these characteristics indicate a special subgroup that correlates with the strong Bw46DR9 association. PMID:8482958

  3. Prolonged Dyspnea after Interscalene Block: Attributed to Undiagnosed Addison's Disease and Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Kiser, Casey J.; Mendenhall, Shaun D.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a patient who had a series of daily interscalene nerve blocks to treat pain following a shoulder manipulation for postsurgical stiffness. She experienced acute respiratory compromise that persisted for many weeks. All typical and unusual causes of these symptoms were ruled out. Her treating pulmonologist theorized that the ipsilateral carotid body had been injured. However, it was subsequently determined that the constellation of symptoms and their prolonged duration were best explained by a poor stress response from Addison's disease coupled with exacerbation of early onset myasthenia gravis. This patient's case is not a typical reaction to interscalene nerve blocks, and thus preoperative testing would not be recommended for myasthenia gravis or Addison's disease without underlying suspicion. We describe this report to inform physicians to consider a workup for these diagnoses if a typical workup rules out all usual causes of complications from an interscalene block. PMID:21687552

  4. Myasthenia gravis as a 'stroke mimic'--it's all in the history.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Saiffuddin; Ul-Haq, Mian Ayaz; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-12-01

    An 85-year-old man presented to hospital as an emergency having difficulties with swallowing and speech. In the emergency department, he was assessed as having acute onset dysphagia and dysarthria in keeping with an acute stroke. Subsequently, it became apparent that although the symptoms were indeed of relatively acute onset, there was a clear description by the patient of fatigability and diurnal variation, prompting a working clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The patient followed a turbulent clinical course, and interpretation of investigation results proved not to be straightforward in the acute setting. Myasthenia gravis is an uncommon disorder but it is more common in the elderly. This case provides key learning points, particularly highlighting the value of prompt, accurate clinical assessment and the importance of adhering to the clinical diagnostic formulation. PMID:25468851

  5. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Therapy in the Chronic Management of Myasthenia Gravis: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, P. R.; Pringle, C. E.; Cameron, W.; Cowan, J.; Chardon, J. Warman

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin therapy has become a major treatment option in several autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. For patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been used for both crisis and chronic management. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulins (SCIg), which offer the advantage of home administration, may be a practical and effective option in chronic management of MG. We analyzed clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction in nine cases of chronic disabling MG who were either transitioned to, or started de novo on SCIg. Methods and Findings This was a retrospective cohort study for the period of 2015–2016, with a mean follow-up period of 6.8 months after initiation of SCIg. All patients with MG treated with SCIg at the Ottawa Hospital, a large Canadian tertiary hospital with subspecialty expertise in neuromuscular disorders were included, regardless of MG severity, clinical subtype and antibody status. The primary outcome was MG disease activity after SCIg initiation. This outcome was measured by 1) the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) clinical classification, and 2) subjective scales of disease activity including the Myasthenia Gravis activities of daily living profile (MG-ADL), Myasthenia Gravis Quality-of-life (MG-QOL 15), Visual Analog (VA) satisfaction scale. We also assessed any requirement for emergency department visits or hospitalizations. Safety outcomes included any SCIg related complication. All patients were stable or improved for MGFA class after SCIg initiation. Statistically significant improvements were documented in the MG-ADL, MG-QOL and VAS scales. There were no exacerbations after switching therapy and no severe SCIg related complications. Conclusions SCIg may be a beneficial therapy in the chronic management of MG, with favorable clinical outcome and patient satisfaction results. PMID:27490101

  6. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications.

    PubMed

    Papachatzakis, Y; Tseliou, E; Tatouli, I; Dialoupi, I; Michas, F; Papadopoulou, E; Kousouris, D; Kontogiannis, S; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  7. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Papachatzakis, Y.; Tatouli, I.; Dialoupi, I.; Michas, F.; Papadopoulou, E.; Kousouris, D.; Dimopoulos, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia.

  8. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Papachatzakis, Y.; Tatouli, I.; Dialoupi, I.; Michas, F.; Papadopoulou, E.; Kousouris, D.; Dimopoulos, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  9. Is thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis of any benefit?

    PubMed

    Diaz, Andres; Black, Edward; Dunning, Joel

    2014-03-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was if thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis was of any benefit? Overall, 137 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The outcome variables were similar in all of the papers, including complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacological remission, age at presentation, gender, duration of symptoms, preoperative classification (Oosterhius, Osserman or myasthenia gravis Foundation of America (MGFA)), thymic pathology, preoperative medications (steroids, immunosuppressants), mortality and morbidity. We conclude that evidence-based reviews have shown that relative rates of thymectomy patients compared with non-thymectomy patients attaining outcome indicate that the former group of patients is more likely to achieve medication-free remission, become asymptomatic and clinically improve (54%, P < 0.01), particularly patients with severe and generalized symptoms (P = 0.007). Patients with generalized myasthenia gravis showed 11% stronger association with favourable outcomes after thymectomy. Some studies show early remission rates (RRs), as early as 6 months post-thymectomy, of 44%. Overall, the reported remission rate for non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis is between 38 and 72% up to 10 years of follow-up. Among these patients, those with thymic hyperplasia show the best complete stable remission rates (42%, P < 0.04) in the majority of studies. Age showed variability across the studies and the cut-off was also different among them. Overall age < 45 years showed a higher probability of achieving complete stable remission during follow-up (81% benefit rate (BR), P < 0.02). Pharmacological improvement is reported between 6 and 42

  10. Worsening of myasthenia gravis after administration of injectable long-acting risperidone for treatment of schizophrenia; first case report and a call for caution.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ismail, Ismail Ibrahim; John, John K; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to autoantibodies affecting the neuromuscular junction. Co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and schizophrenia is very rare and raises a challenge in management of both diseases. Antipsychotic drugs exhibit anticholinergic side effects and have the potentials of worsening myasthenia. Long-acting risperidone is an injectable atypical antipsychotic drug that has not been previously reported to worsen myasthenia gravis in literature. We report the first case report of worsening of myasthenia after receiving long-acting risperidone injection for schizophrenia in a 29-year-old female with both diseases. She started to have worsening 2 weeks following the first injection and her symptoms persisted despite receiving plasma exchange. This could be explained by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. We recommend that long-acting risperidone should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, and clinicians must be aware of the potential risks of this therapy. PMID:27012182

  11. Worsening of myasthenia gravis after administration of injectable long-acting risperidone for treatment of schizophrenia; first case report and a call for caution.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ismail, Ismail Ibrahim; John, John K; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to autoantibodies affecting the neuromuscular junction. Co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and schizophrenia is very rare and raises a challenge in management of both diseases. Antipsychotic drugs exhibit anticholinergic side effects and have the potentials of worsening myasthenia. Long-acting risperidone is an injectable atypical antipsychotic drug that has not been previously reported to worsen myasthenia gravis in literature. We report the first case report of worsening of myasthenia after receiving long-acting risperidone injection for schizophrenia in a 29-year-old female with both diseases. She started to have worsening 2 weeks following the first injection and her symptoms persisted despite receiving plasma exchange. This could be explained by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. We recommend that long-acting risperidone should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, and clinicians must be aware of the potential risks of this therapy.

  12. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  13. The contribution of Dr. Mary Walker towards myasthenia gravis and periodic paralysis whilst working in poor law hospitals in London.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D

    2005-06-01

    Dr. Mary Walker discovered in 1934 that physostigmine and Prostigmin temporarily restored muscle function in patients with myasthenia gravis. In the next five years, Dr. Walker and colleagues provided clinical evidence for the weakness of myasthenia gravis being caused by a "disturbance of transmission of excitation from motor nerve to voluntary muscle presumably caused by a deficiency of acetylcholine. Physostigmine (or Prostigmin) compensated for the lack of acetylcholine by delaying its destruction." Dr. Walker and colleagues also described the association between familial periodic paralysis and hypokalaemia.

  14. Prophylactic effect of probiotics on the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Chae, Chang-Suk; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are live bacteria that confer health benefits to the host physiology. Although protective role of probiotics have been reported in diverse diseases, no information is available whether probiotics can modulate neuromuscular immune disorders. We have recently demonstrated that IRT5 probiotics, a mixture of 5 probiotics, could suppress diverse experimental disorders in mice model. In this study we further investigated whether IRT5 probiotics could modulate the progression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T cell dependent antibody mediated autoimmune disorder in which acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction is the major auto-antigen. Oral administration of IRT5 probiotics significantly reduced clinical symptoms of EAMG such as weight loss, body trembling and grip strength. Prophylactic effect of IRT5 probiotics on EMAG is mediated by down-regulation of effector function of AChR-reactive T cells and B cells. Administration of IRT5 probiotics decreased AChR-reactive lymphocyte proliferation, anti-AChR reactive IgG levels and inflammatory cytokine levels such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17. Down-regulation of inflammatory mediators in AChR-reactive lymphocytes by IRT5 probiotics is mediated by the generation of regulatory dendritic cells (rDCs) that express increased levels of IL-10, TGF-β, arginase 1 and aldh1a2. Furthermore, DCs isolated from IRT5 probiotics-fed group effectively converted CD4(+) T cells into CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells compared with control DCs. Our data suggest that IRT5 probiotics could be applicable to modulate antibody mediated autoimmune diseases including myasthenia gravis.

  15. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William D.; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms. PMID:27408701

  16. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, William D; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms. PMID:27408701

  17. Absence of cellular hypersensitivity to muscle and thymic antigens in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Behan, W M; Behan, P O; Simpson, J A

    1975-01-01

    Humoral antibodies to skeletal muscle and its components and to thymus have been demonstrated in the sera of patients with myasthenia gravis. A role for cellular hypersensitivity to similar antigens in the pathogenesis of the disease has been suggested by some reports of the presence of cellular immunity. A detailed immunological study using muscle and thymic antigens, including those prepared from the patients' own tissues, failed to confirm these findings. It is suggested that previous reports of cellular hypersensitivity represent the demonstration of an epiphenomenon. PMID:1206412

  18. Thymus and Myasthenia Gravis: what can we learn from DNA microarrays?

    PubMed

    Cizeron-Clairac, Géraldine; Le Panse, Rozen; Frenkian-Cuvelier, Mélinée; Meraouna, Amel; Truffault, Frédérique; Bismuth, Jacky; Mussot, Sacha; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2008-09-15

    This review is dedicated to John Newsom-Davis, who was an exceptional colleague and friend, always exchanging ideas with respect and consideration. We shall not forget his involvement and passion in search for the truth on the role of thymectomy in the management of Myasthenia Gravis (MG). In this short review, we shall summarize what we learnt from DNA microarrays applied to MG thymus. We shall focus on three main comparisons of the thymic transcriptomes: 1) highly hyperplastic MG patients versus non-MG adults; 2) corticosteroid-treated versus untreated seropositive MG patients; and 3) seronegative versus seropositive MG patients.

  19. Clinical findings in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis: a U.S. experience.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Wolfe, Gil I; Nations, Sharon; Trivedi, Jaya; Barohn, Richard J; Herbelin, Laura; McVey, April; Dimachkie, Mazen; Kissel, John; Walsh, Ronan; Amato, Anthony; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Hungs, Marcel; Chui, Luis; Goldstein, Jonathan; Novella, Steven; Burns, Ted; Phillips, Lawrence; Claussen, Gwendolyn; Young, Angela; Bertorini, Tulio; Oh, Shin

    2010-03-01

    We performed a retrospective chart review on 53 muscle-specific kinase antibody (MuSK-Ab)-positive myasthenia gravis (MG) patients at nine university-based centers in the U.S. Of these, 66% were Caucasian, 85% were women, and age of onset was 9-79 years. Twenty-seven patients were nonresponsive to anticholinesterase therapy. Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America improvement status was achieved in 53% patients on corticosteroids, 51% with plasma exchange, and in 20% on intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Thymectomy was beneficial in 7/18 patients at 3 years. Long-term (> or =3 years) outcome was very favorable in 58% of patients who achieved remission and/or minimal manifestation status. Overall, 73% improved. There was one MG-related death. This survey reinforces several cardinal features of MuSK-Ab-positive MG, including prominent bulbar involvement and anticholinesterase nonresponsiveness. Facial or tongue atrophy was rare. Most patients respond favorably to immunotherapy. The best clinical response was to corticosteroids and plasma exchange, and the poorest response was to IVIG. Long-term outcome is favorable in about 60% of cases.

  20. Do associated auto-antibodies influence the outcome of myasthenia gravis after thymectomy?

    PubMed

    Keijzers, Marlies; Damoiseaux, Jan; Vigneron, Alain; Bodart, Nicolas; Kessels, Alfons; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Hochstenbag, Monique; Maessen, Jos; De Baets, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular autoimmune disease, where antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor destroy this receptor. The role of thymectomy in the treatment of MG remains controversial. Because of the frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, we hypothesized that patients with multiple autoantibodies (autoAbs) might have a lower chance of reaching complete stable remission after thymectomy. We analyzed sera of 85 MG patients who underwent a thymectomy between April 2004 and December 2012. We used four different immunodot kits (D-Tek, Mons, Belgium): ANA25 Quantrix, Synthetase 10 Diver, Myositis 7 Diver and Liver 10 profile Diver, all automatized on the BlueDiver Instrument (D-Tek). The Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) postintervention status was used to determine the outcome after thymectomy. AutoAbs other than anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies were detected in 29.4% of the patients of whom 16.5% clinically had a second autoimmune disease. In none of the seronegative patients other autoAbs were detected. No significant difference was observed in the 3-years remission rate after thymectomy in patients with or without antibodies other than anti-AChR antibodies. Although these autoAbs do not predict outcome in our MG patient cohort, screening for multiple autoAbs in MG patients might be warranted to identify patients with additional autoimmune diseases.

  1. 317 Myasthenia Gravis and Asthma, Relationship between Two Different Disorders of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease caused by absence of neuromuscular transmission due to antibodies directed against the nicotinic AChR located at the neuromuscular junction. The main symptoms include muscle weakness in the affected muscles, which is worse after its use. Diagnosis is made upon clinical manifestations and finding of IgG. Only 80 to 90% of patients with generalized disease are positive to these antibodies, and 30 to 50% with ophthalmologic manifestations. Other immunological alteration found in these patients is an overexpression of the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23). Asthma is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, wheezing and chest tightness caused by inflammation and a reversible contraction of bronchial smooth muscle. Immunologically is associated with a Th2 cytokine profile, mainly Il-4, Il-5, Il-13 and an increased IgE. Methods Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent an altered response of the immune system. Here we discuss the case of a patient who presented with an allergic disease at first then years later developed an autoimmune disease. Results Our patient had been diagnosed with persistent allergic rhinitis and asthma since 1992. He had been treated with inhaled corticosteroids, bronchodilators, intranasal corticosteroids, antihistamines and specific immunotherapy with control of symptoms. In June 2010 he noticed diplopia, palpebral ptosis and muscle weakness in upper extremities diagnosed with Myastenia gravis and started treatment with piridostigmine with adequate control of muscular symptoms. No thymoma was identified. Conclusions It has been noted the possible relationship between allergic and autoimmune diseases since in both there is an alteration in the regulatory mechanisms of the immune system. In this patient, we found the association between asthma and 19 years later the development of myasthenia gravis. Some of the explanations for this kind of association is the expression of CD23 in myasthenia

  2. Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (EAMG): from immunochemical characterization to therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sara; Aricha, Revital; Reuveni, Debby; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2014-11-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease. In high percentage of patients there are autoantibodies to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) that attack AChR on muscle cells at the neuromuscular junction, resulting in muscle weakness. Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (EAMG) is an experimental model disease for MG. EAMG is induced in several animal species by immunization with acetylcholine receptor (AChR), usually isolated from the electric organ of electric fish, which is a rich source for this antigen. Our lab has been involved for several decades in research of AChR and of EAMG. The availability of an experimental autoimmune disease that mimics in many aspects the human disease, provides an excellent model system for elucidating the immunological nature and origin of MG, for studying various existing treatment modalities and for attempting the development of novel treatment approaches. In this review in honor of Michael Sela and Ruth Arnon, we report first on our early pioneering contributions to research on EAMG. These include the induction of EAMG in several animal species, early attempts for antigen-specific treatment for EAMG, elicitation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies and anti-idiotypic antibodies, measuring humoral and cellular AChR-specific immune responses in MG patient and more. In the second part of the review we discuss more recent studies from our lab towards developing and testing novel treatment approaches for myasthenia. These include antigen-dependent treatments aimed at specifically abrogating the humoral and cellular anti-AChR responses, as well as immunomodulatory approaches that could be used either alone, or in conjunction with antigen-specific treatments, or alternatively, serve as steroid-sparing agents.

  3. The mechanism of acetylcholine receptor in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis and the role of HSP90 molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongbo; Chen, Siqia; Liao, Juan; Chen, Xiaopu; Xu, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As an autoimmune disease, myasthenia gravis is caused by the dysfunction of neural transmission. Acetylcholine is known to exert its function after entering into synaptic cleft through binding onto postsynaptic membrane. The role of acetylcholine in binding MuSK in myasthenia gravis, however, remains unknown. A total of 38 myasthenia gravis patients and 27 healthy controls were included in this study for the detection of the expression of MuSK using immunofluorescent method. Expression of both MuSK and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by Western blot, followed by the correlation analysis between heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and IL-6 which were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In myasthenia gravis patients, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine at the postsynaptic membrane. Such accumulation of MuSK, however, did not occur in normal people. Meanwhile we also observed elevated expression of IL-6 in myasthenia gravis patients (p<0.05). ELISA assay showed higher expression of HSP90 in patients. Further signaling pathway screening revealed the activation of IL-6-mediated pathways including STAT3 and SPH2. In conclusion, MuSK was co-localized with acetylcholine in myasthenia gravis patients, with elevated expression. HSP90 in disease people can activate IL-6 mediated signaling pathways.

  4. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia gravis in vitro and in vivo: the Guided Missile strategy.

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Adams, R N; Miagkov, A; Lu, Y; Juon, H-S; Drachman, D B

    2012-10-15

    Current immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis (MG) is often effective, but entails risks of infection and neoplasia. The "Guided Missile" strategy described here is designed to target and eliminate the individual's unique AChR-specific T cell repertoire, without otherwise interfering with the immune system. We genetically engineered dendritic cells to present AChR epitopes and simultaneously express Fas ligand in an ongoing EAMG model. In both in vitro and in vivo experiments, these engineered cells specifically killed AChR-responsive T cells without otherwise damaging the immune system. AChR antibodies were markedly reduced in the treated mice. Translation of this method to treat human MG is possible. PMID:22769060

  5. Patients with ocular symptoms referred for electrodiagnosis: how many of them suffer from myasthenia gravis?

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Pappas, V; Kokotis, P; Zouvelou, V; Karandreas, N

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was the diagnosis of patients with isolated ocular manifestations (ptosis and/or diplopia) referred for electrophysiological evaluation to the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a University Neurological Department. Examination was performed either in inpatient status or in outpatient basis. We analyzed the clinical, electrophysiological and other laboratory data in 79 subjects. Myasthenia gravis (MG) was diagnosed in 38 %, 45.6 % in other diseases (Graves disease, blepharospasm, IIId cranial verve palsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke, etc.), while in 16.5 %, the cause remained unidentified. Symptoms fluctuation was significantly more frequent in the myasthenic patients, compared to patients with other diseases. The presence of both diplopia and ptosis are more likely due to MG rather than other pathology.

  6. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG. PMID:26825889

  7. [Onset of myasthenia gravis in primary care. Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission involving the production of autoantibodies directed against skeletal muscle receptors, in most cases of acetylcholine. Clinically it is characterized by the appearance of muscle weakness after prolonged activity, which tends to recover after a period of rest, or administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. It is a relatively rare disease, although the prevalence has increased by improved diagnosis and increased longevity of the population. The diagnosis can be based on evidence after it is suspected using pharmacological, immunological or electrophysiology tests. Treatment can be divided into: symptomatic, short term and long term. We report the case of a patient who complained of diplopia, this muscle weakness being the most common initial symptom of the disease.

  8. The psychosocial impact of ptosis as a symptom of Myasthenia Gravis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Richards, Hollie Sarah; Jenkinson, Elizabeth; Rumsey, Nichola; Harrad, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of ptosis as a symptom of Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Participants were recruited from a MG patient group on Facebook. 166 participants answered a series of open ended questions examining the impact of ptosis, and responses were analysed using Inductive Thematic Analysis, which revealed four main themes. The first highlighted the extent to which ptosis impacted negatively on psychosocial functioning. The second related to ways in which ptosis can be framed in a positive way, eg, as a believable symptom. The final two themes revealed the complex inter-relationships between functional and appearance-related impacts, and a desire from many participants for health care professionals to provide more support directly related to their ptosis. This study suggests that ptosis impacts in ways not currently recognized in literature and practice. PMID:24832459

  9. Longitudinal epitope mapping in MuSK myasthenia gravis: implications for disease severity.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Vink, Anna-Fleur D; Niks, Erik H; Westhuis, Ruben H; van Zwet, Erik W; de Meel, Robert H; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Kuks, Jan B; Klooster, Rinse; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Evoli, Amelia; Illa, Isabel; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2016-02-15

    Muscle weakness in MuSK myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused predominantly by IgG4 antibodies which block MuSK signalling and destabilize neuromuscular junctions. We determined whether the binding pattern of MuSK IgG4 antibodies change throughout the disease course ("epitope spreading"), and affect disease severity or treatment responsiveness. We mapped the MuSK epitopes of 255 longitudinal serum samples of 53 unique MuSK MG patients from three independent cohorts with ELISA. Antibodies against the MuSK Iglike-1 domain determine disease severity. Epitope spreading outside this domain did not contribute to disease severity nor to pyridostigmine responsiveness. This provides a rationale for epitope specific treatment strategies.

  10. Elevated plasma interleukin-17A in a subgroup of Myasthenia Gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanchen; Li, Hai-feng; Jiang, Bin; Li, Yao; Kaminski, Henry J; Kusner, Linda L

    2016-02-01

    To better define the role of IL-17A in myasthenia gravis (MG), we assessed plasma concentrations in 69 adult patients with MG prior to initiation of immunosuppression and monitored their clinical course for the subsequent 2years with quantitative MG scores (QMGS) and Osserman classification. IL-17A was higher among patients than healthy control subjects. Early-onset women without thymoma had greater elevations of IL-17A. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the absence of thymoma rather than women gender or early-onset was the significant determinant associated with IL-17A elevation. Elevated IL-17A levels were associated with more severe MG. In summary, IL-17A has role in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of patients with early-onset women with MG with greater disease severity who are most likely to have thymic hyperplasia. This subgroup may be a target for IL-17 treatments, which are under development.

  11. Remarkably increased resistin levels in anti-AChR antibody-positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Qi; Wang, Rong; Li, Ting; Li, Xin; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Li

    2015-06-15

    Resistin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. To investigate serum resistin levels in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and determine if there are associations between resistin levels and disease severity, we measured serum resistin levels in 102 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG). We further analyzed associations between serum resistin levels and clinical variables in patients with MG. Our findings demonstrate that serum resistin levels are elevated in patients with AChR-generalized MG and AChR-MG with thymoma and are correlated with disease severity. Resistin has potential as a useful serum biomarker for inflammation in AChR-MG.

  12. Autoantibody profile and clinical characteristics in a cohort of Chinese adult myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Li, Hai-Feng; Skeie, Geir Olve; Romi, Fredrik; Hao, Hong-Jun; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneity. Antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), titin and ryanodine receptor (RyR) were examined in 437 adult Chinese MG patients. The AChR, MuSK, titin and RyR antibodies were found in 82.2%, 2.3%, 28.4% and 23.8% of all patients. Autoantibody profiles vary among different MG subgroups. Thymoma MG patients had high frequencies of AChR (99.2%), titin (50.8%) and RyR antibodies (46.9%). The titin and RyR antibodies also showed high frequencies in late onset patients (54.4% and 33.3%, respectively). These two antibodies may indicate an underlying thymoma when combined. The patients with titin and RyR antibodies tend to have more severe disease and worse outcome, and may need more active immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:27609275

  13. MuSK autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis detected by cell based assay--A multinational study.

    PubMed

    Tsonis, A I; Zisimopoulou, P; Lazaridis, K; Tzartos, J; Matsigkou, E; Zouvelou, V; Mantegazza, R; Antozzi, C; Andreetta, F; Evoli, A; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Durmus, H; Brenner, T; Vaknin, A; Berrih-Aknin, S; Behin, A; Sharshar, T; De Baets, M; Losen, M; Martinez-Martinez, P; Kleopa, K A; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Kyriakides, T; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Szczudlik, P; Szyluk, B; Lavrnic, D; Basta, I; Peric, S; Tallaksen, C; Maniaol, A; Casasnovas Pons, C; Pitha, J; Jakubíkova, M; Hanisch, F; Tzartos, S J

    2015-07-15

    Seronegative myasthenia gravis (MG) presents a serious gap in MG diagnosis and understanding. We applied a cell based assay (CBA) for the detection of muscle specific kinase (MuSK) antibodies undetectable by radioimmunoassay. We tested 633 triple-seronegative MG patients' sera from 13 countries, detecting 13% as positive. MuSK antibodies were found, at significantly lower frequencies, in 1.9% of healthy controls and 5.1% of other neuroimmune disease patients, including multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The clinical data of the newly diagnosed MuSK-MG patients are presented. 27% of ocular seronegative patients were MuSK antibody positive. Moreover, 23% had thymic hyperplasia suggesting that thymic abnormalities are more common than believed.

  14. Concomitant myasthenia gravis and macroprolactinoma: the immunomodulatory role of prolactin and its potential therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Harris, S M; Leong, H M C; Chowdhury, R; Ellis, C; Brennan, John; Scobie, I N

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence attests to the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary endocrine axis (HPA) in the maintenance of normal immunocompetence. The immune and neuroendocrine systems are integrally linked and coordinated with bidirectional communication maintaining immune balance. Any disturbance of the normal function of the HPA may significantly alter native immunocompetence and therefore be associated with the development of disorders which have a clearly established autoimmune basis. Molecular and functional evidence shows prolactin, produced by the anterior pituitary, to be a cytokine, exerting its effect via both paracrine and endocrine mechanisms [1]. Its involvement in the activation of multiple immune responses may adversely upregulate certain autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) has long been recognized as an autoimmune disorder. In this mini review, we present the coterminous presentation of MG and prolactin-secreting macroadenoma. We review published cases in the world literature, discuss pathological mechanism, and consider future targeted therapies.

  15. Variable ptosis after botulinum toxin type a injection with positive ice test mimicking ocular myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Alaraj, Ahmad M; Oystreck, Darren T; Bosley, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    We describe a patient who received cosmetic botulinum toxin type A injections to the brow and subsequently developed unilateral ptosis that was variable during examination and was transiently improved after the ice pack test. Ptosis gradually resolved spontaneously over approximately 3 months. This is the third patient to have variable ptosis documented after botulinum toxin type A injection to the brow and the second to have a positive ice test. The ice test is not completely specific for myasthenia gravis but may, at times, improve ptosis resulting from other defects at the neuromuscular junction. Wound botulism now is much more common because of illicit drug use, and the ice test also might be positive in this setting.

  16. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-04-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1(-/-) BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency. PMID:25867470

  17. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-04-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1(-/-) BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency.

  18. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis.

  19. Preoperative risk factors for prolonged postoperative ventilation following thymectomy in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Weihua; Yu, Tao; Longhini, Federico; Jiang, Xiaogan; Qin, Xuemei; Jin, Xiaoju

    2015-01-01

    Adequate preoperative evaluation and preparation for surgery are required to prevent prolonged mechanical ventilation after thymectomy, and facilitate the recovery of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The objective of this study was to identify the preoperative risk factors for extubation failure after thymectomy in patients with MG. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 61 patients with MG who underwent extended thymectomy. Several factors were evaluated including patients’ demographic data, preoperative medical therapies, medical history, and comorbidities. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of late extubation after thymectomy for MG. Results: Fourteen patients (22.95%) required breathing support after anesthesia or endotracheal re-intubation within 48 h. Univariate analysis illustrated that the quantitative MG (QMG) grade (odds ratio [OR] = 1.368, P = 0.000), preoperative muscle strength (OR = 0.279, P = 0.000), use of pyridostigmine (OR = 1.011, P = 0.024) and prednisone (OR = 1.059, P = 0.022), preoperative lung function (OR = 4.875, P = 0.016), low preoperative cholinesterase levels (OR = 0.999, P = 0.014), impaired preoperative swallowing muscle activity (OR = 7.619, P = 0.003), and positivity for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (OR = 14.143, P = 0.001) were significant predictors of prolonged postoperative intubation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the QMG score (OR = 3.408, P = 0.000) and Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) classification (OR = 28.683, P = 0.002) were independent risk factors for prolonged postoperative intubation. Conclusion: The preoperative MGFA clinical classification and QMG score were independent risk factors for prolonged postoperative intubation in patients with MG. PMID:26550357

  20. The susceptibility of Aire(-/-) mice to experimental myasthenia gravis involves alterations in regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Aricha, Revital; Feferman, Tali; Scott, Hamish S; Souroujon, Miriam C; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Fuchs, Sara

    2011-02-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire) is involved in the prevention of autoimmunity by promoting thymic expression of tissue restricted antigens which leads to elimination of self-reactive T cells. We found that Aire knockout (KO) mice as well as mouse strains that are susceptible to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) have lower thymic expression of acetylcholine receptor (AChR- the main autoantigen in MG), compared to wild type (WT) mice and EAMG-resistant mouse strains, respectively. We demonstrated that Aire KO mice have a significant and reproducible lower frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ cells and a higher expression of Th17 markers in their thymus, compared to wild type (WT) mice. These findings led us to expect that Aire KO mice would display increased susceptibility to EAMG. Surprisingly, when EAMG was induced in young (2 month-old) mice, EAMG was milder in Aire KO than in WT mice for several weeks until the age of about 5 months. However, when EAMG was induced in relatively aged (6 month-old) mice, Aire KO mice presented higher disease severity than WT controls. This age-related change in susceptibility to EAMG correlated with an elevated proportion of Treg cells in the spleens of young but not old KO, compared to WT mice, suggesting a role for peripheral Treg cells in the course of disease. Our observations point to a possible link between Aire and Treg cells and suggest an involvement for both in the pathogenesis of myasthenia.

  1. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    PubMed Central

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  2. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  3. The role of muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and mystery of MuSK myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Vincent, Angela

    2014-01-01

    MuSK myasthenia gravis is a rare, severe autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction, only identified in 2001, with unclear pathogenic mechanisms. In this review we describe the clinical aspects that distinguish MuSK MG from AChR MG, review what is known about the role of MuSK in the development and function of the neuromuscular junction, and discuss the data that address how the antibodies to MuSK lead to neuromuscular transmission failure. PMID:23458718

  4. Sevoflurane and thoracic epidural anesthesia for trans-sternal thymectomy in a child with juvenile myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Valluvan; Kumar, Kaushal; Rai, Amit; Baidya, Dalim Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Literature on anesthetic management of juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG) for thymectomy is limited. Recently, use of inhalational agents and total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanyl has been reported. All these techniques individually or in combination have been tried to avoid the use of muscle relaxant. We report successful use of sevoflurane as sole anesthetic agent for intubation and in combination with thoracic epidural anesthesia for intraoperative anesthetic management in a 5-year-old child with JMG. PMID:24803774

  5. Radioligand-binding assay reveals distinct autoantibody preferences for type I interferons in APS I and myasthenia gravis subgroups.

    PubMed

    Hapnes, Liv; Willcox, Nick; Oftedal, Bergithe E V; Owe, Jone F; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Meager, Anthony; Husebye, Eystein S; Wolff, Anette S Bøe

    2012-04-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) or acquired thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (MG) surprisingly share several common features, including defective expression of the transcription factor AIRE and autoantibodies against type I interferons. Here, we have adapted and validated the radioligand-binding assay we recently developed against (35)S-Met-interferon-ω, for rapid and specific screening for autoantibodies against interferons-α2 and -α8. We then investigated their potential for diagnosis and for predicting clinical manifestations in patients with APS I and different subgroups of MG. Autoantibodies against interferons-ω, -α2, and -α8 occurred more often in patients with APS I (100%) and MG with thymoma (73%) than in late-onset MG (39%) and early-onset MG (5%). These autoantibodies showed preferences for interferon-ω in APS I and for the interferon-αs in MG, hinting at thymic aberrations in both groups. The exact profile of type I interferon antibodies may indicate MG subtype and may hint at thymoma recurrence.

  6. Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to weakness of the muscles that control eye movements, unstable or waddling gait, a change in facial ... neurological examinations. The physician looks for impairment of eye movements or muscle weakness without any changes in the ...

  7. [Intractable Myasthenia Gravis Accompanied with Thymoma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Oyamatsu, Yoshinori; Narita, Kunio; Nakayama, Masato; Maeda, Shoki

    2016-09-01

    A 46-year-old female visited a hospital due to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and then her chest computed tomography revealed an abnormal shadow in the upper mediastinum. Four months later,she complained muscle weakness with her limbs, dysphagia, and ptosis of her eyelids. Total thymectomy was performed through a median sternotomy for mass lesion, which was pathologically proven to be type B1 thymoma. Postoperative myasthenia gravis (MG) crisis, which led to respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, developed and laboratory tests showed elevated serum anti-AChR Ab(130 nmol/l), antinuclear antibody( ×640 serum dilution, speckled pattern) and anti-RNP Ab(129.2 U/ml). For MG crisis, steroid pulse therapy, immunosuppressive therapy and immuno absorption were performed, and she successfully weaned from mechanical ventilaton on 41 post operative day (POD). Some factors such as inapparent mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Anti RNP antibody were thought to be a cause for having any difficulty in MG treatment in the present case. PMID:27586323

  8. Thymus involvement in myasthenia gravis: Epidemiological and clinical impacts of different self-tolerance breakdown mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karni, Arnon; Asmail, Ali; Drory, Vivian E; Kolb, Hadar; Kesler, Anat

    2016-09-15

    The reasons for the abrogation of self-immunological tolerance in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be different between those with concomitant thymic hyperplasia or thymoma, and those with no evidence of thymic involvement. We conducted a retrospective observational case series study to investigate the epidemiology as well as the clinical, serologic, and electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of individuals diagnosed as having MG. We found that the average age at MG onset of patients with either thymic hyperplasia or thymoma was much younger (by ~20years) than that of MG patients without thymic involvement. Thymic hyperplasia was more common in females than males. There were no differences in the rates of ocular MG vs. generalized MG among those three study groups. There were also no group differences in the rates of neuromuscular junction disfunction, as observed on EMG or by the results of serology tests for acetyl choline receptor antibody. Interestingly, only patients without thymic involvement had other autoimmune diseases, and most of them were females. The patients with other coexisting autoimmune disease had a similar age at MG onset as the other patients with no thymic involvement. These results shed light on the impact of epidemiological and clinical factors that result from different mechanisms of self-immunological tolerance breakdown that occurs in MG. PMID:27609276

  9. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Secondary Antiphospholipid Syndrome after Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Rada; Plavsic, Aleksandra; Peric-Popadic, Aleksandra; Raskovic, Sanvila; Bogic, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are autoimmune diseases that show some similarities: a higher incidence in young women, relapsing-remitting course and positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). However, they are two different clinical syndromes, which can coexist or precede each other. Thymectomy is a therapeutic option for patients with severe MG or thymoma. There are many cases of SLE after thymectomy described in the literature, so the question arises whether thymectomy predisposes patients to SLE and what are imunopathogenetic mechanisms behind this process. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed with SLE and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) 28 years after thymectomy for MG. Clinical picture of SLE was characterized by cutaneous and articular manifestations, polyserositis, lupus nephritis and immunological parameters showed positive ANA, anti-ds-DNA, excessive consumption of complement components, positive cryoglobulins. Clinical and laboratory immunological parameters for the diagnosis of secondary APS where also present. The patient was initially treated with glucocorticoids followed by mycophenolate mofetil. During one year follow-up patient was in a stable remission of SLE. CONCLUSION: Thymectomy for MG may predispose SLE development in some patients. Further studies are needed to better understand the connection between these two autoimmune diseases. PMID:27275267

  11. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia gravis in vitro: the "guided missile" strategy.

    PubMed

    Wu, J M; Wu, B; Miagkov, A; Adams, R N; Drachman, D B

    2001-03-15

    We describe a strategy for specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis (MG) based on genetic engineering of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to present the autoantigen acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and express the "warhead" Fas ligand (FasL). For transduction of APCs we prepared recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus vectors carrying the following three gene constructs: (i) AChR fused to LAMP1 to present AChR and target AChR-specific T cells; (ii) FasL to eliminate the targeted T cells; and (iii) truncated FADD to protect APCs from self-destruction by FasL. The engineered APCs effectively expressed the genes of interest and killed AChR-specific T cells in culture by the Fas/FasL pathway. T cells specific for an unrelated antigen were spared. Our in vitro demonstration that engineered APCs target and kill antigen-specific T cells represents a promising novel strategy for specific immunotherapy of MG and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:11333146

  12. Thymic pathologies in myasthenia gravis: a preoperative assessment of CAT scan and nuclear based imaging.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Berit; Kellner, Juliane; Jordan, Karin; Bähre, Manfred; Behrmann, Curd; Zierz, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Precise diagnostic work up of a suspected thymic pathology in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is very important for potential surgical implications and further disease course. In this study the diagnostic value of combined preoperative radiological (CAT scan) and nuclear based imaging (octreotide and thallium scintigraphy) in patients with MG was evaluated. Twenty four patients were included. Histopathology revealed thymoma in nine patients, thymic carcinoma (TC) in one patient, lymphofollicular hyperplasia in seven patients, and involuted thymus in another seven patients. Diagnostic sensitivity for detecting thymoma/TC was 80 % in CAT scan as well as in somatostatin scintigraphy; the combination of both procedures reached 90 %. However, the diagnostic specifity to exclude thymoma in CAT scan was 100 % and in octreotide scintigraphy 85.7 %. Semiquantitative octreotide uptake significantly correlated with histological grading of thymoma/TC (r = 0.764) and histological proliferation rate Ki67 (r = 0.894). Thallium scintigraphy was positive only in one out of four thymoma cases. In this study, somatostatin scintigraphy has been shown to be a useful additional diagnostic technique in detecting thymic malignancies in patients with MG. These results might be especially helpful in patients with late onset MG as these patients are in general no candidates for thymectomy. PMID:26810725

  13. Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis: A 10-year Review of Cases at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Muhammed, Julieana; Chen, Chui Yin; Wan Hitam, Wan Hazabbah; Ghazali, Mohamad Ziyadi

    2016-01-01

    Background A thymectomy is considered effective for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Although a few studies have described the role of a thymectomy in the treatment of MG in Asians countries, there are no published data on the application of this surgical approach for MG in Malaysia. We aimed to describe the clinical outcomes of MG patients who underwent a thymectomy and the factors affecting these outcomes. Methods This was a retrospective study involving 16 patients with MG who underwent a thymectomy at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) from January 2002 until December 2012, with a follow-up period ranging from 3–120 months. Results The study consisted of 16 patients aged 22–78 years, 10 of whom were males. The overall remission/improvement rate was 87.5%, and the rate of clinical outcomes classified as unchanged/worsened was 12.5%. Thymomamatous or non-thymomamatous MG, histology features, Osserman stage and the duration of follow-up were not significant prognostic factors. Post-operative mortality was 6.2% (1 of 16 patients died of septic shock). Conclusion A thymectomy seems to be an effective treatment for MG, with low surgical morbidity. Patients with a lower Osserman stage and those with/without thymomas had favourable outcomes.

  14. [Clinical-electroneuromyographic and immunologic aspects of myasthenia gravis with anti-musk antibodies].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular autoimmune disorder caused by autoaggression directed to different antigenic goals of peripherial neuromotor apparatus. Approximately 80% of patients have detectable serum antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (ACHR). About 10-15% of the MG patients do not have ACHR - antibodies. This form is called seronegative (SN) MG. IN 35% of SN patients antibodies against muscle - specific fyrozine kinase (MUSK) is clearly observed. According to modern data, SN MG patients are resistant against traditional pathogenetic therapy of MG. In order to develop the strategy of timely and adequate treatment of SN MUSK positive MG, we decided to build up differential diagnostic criteriums for this form of MG. For this purpose we analyzed clinical - electroneuromyographic (ENMG), immunologic and pharmacological data of 9 SN MUSK positive MG patients. The specific clinical patterns for SN positive MG was not revealed. The analogical clinic - ENMG and pharmacological signs were observed in seropositive MG. Accordingly, antibodies do not determine the peculiarity of this desease. Therefore, the revelation of the antibodies has not only diagnostic value; it also defines the expediency of pathogenetic therapy of MG. PMID:25214270

  15. Current Treatment, Emerging Translational Therapies, and New Therapeutic Targets for Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Jeffrey T; Soni, Madhu; Meriggioli, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease associated with the production of autoantibodies against 1) the skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor; 2) muscle-specific kinase, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for the maintenance of neuromuscular synapses; 3) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, an important molecular binding partner for muscle-specific kinase; and 4) other muscle endplate proteins. In addition to the profile of autoantibodies, MG may be classified according the location of the affected muscles (ocular vs generalized), the age of symptom onset, and the nature of thymic pathology. Immunopathologic events leading to the production of autoantibodies differ in the various disease subtypes. Advances in our knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of the subtypes of MG will allow for directed utilization of the ever-growing repertoire of therapeutic agents that target distinct nodes in the immune pathway relevant to the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune disease. In this review, we examine the pathogenesis of MG subtypes, current treatment options, and emerging new treatments and therapeutic targets. PMID:26510558

  16. Silencing of Dok-7 in Adult Rat Muscle Increases Susceptibility to Passive Transfer Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Stevens, Jo A A; Mané-Damas, Marina; Molenaar, Peter; Duimel, Hans; Verheyen, Fons; Cossins, Judith; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies that target proteins at the neuromuscular junction, primarily the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and the muscle-specific kinase. Because downstream of kinase 7 (Dok-7) is essential for the full activation of muscle-specific kinase and consequently for dense clustering of AChRs, we hypothesized that reduced levels of Dok-7 increase the susceptibility to passive transfer MG. To test this hypothesis, Dok-7 expression was reduced by transfecting shRNA-coding plasmids into the tibialis anterior muscle of adult rats by in vivo electroporation. Subclinical MG was subsequently induced with a low dose of anti-AChR monoclonal antibody 35. Neuromuscular transmission was significantly impaired in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated legs compared with the contralateral control legs, which correlated with a reduction of AChR protein levels at the neuromuscular junction (approximately 25%) in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated muscles, compared with contralateral control muscles. These results suggest that a reduced expression of Dok-7 may play a role in the susceptibility to passive transfer MG, by rendering AChR clusters less resistant to the autoantibody attack. PMID:27658713

  17. Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis: A 10-year Review of Cases at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Muhammed, Julieana; Chen, Chui Yin; Wan Hitam, Wan Hazabbah; Ghazali, Mohamad Ziyadi

    2016-01-01

    Background A thymectomy is considered effective for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Although a few studies have described the role of a thymectomy in the treatment of MG in Asians countries, there are no published data on the application of this surgical approach for MG in Malaysia. We aimed to describe the clinical outcomes of MG patients who underwent a thymectomy and the factors affecting these outcomes. Methods This was a retrospective study involving 16 patients with MG who underwent a thymectomy at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) from January 2002 until December 2012, with a follow-up period ranging from 3–120 months. Results The study consisted of 16 patients aged 22–78 years, 10 of whom were males. The overall remission/improvement rate was 87.5%, and the rate of clinical outcomes classified as unchanged/worsened was 12.5%. Thymomamatous or non-thymomamatous MG, histology features, Osserman stage and the duration of follow-up were not significant prognostic factors. Post-operative mortality was 6.2% (1 of 16 patients died of septic shock). Conclusion A thymectomy seems to be an effective treatment for MG, with low surgical morbidity. Patients with a lower Osserman stage and those with/without thymomas had favourable outcomes. PMID:27660548

  18. Experiences of living with myasthenia gravis: a qualitative study with Taiwanese people.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu Tai; Shih, Fu Jin; Hayter, Mark; Hou, Chang Chiu; Yeh, Jiann Horng

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an auto-immune, neuromuscular disorder, which presents with symptoms of fluctuating muscle fatigue because of a dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction. This study explores the illness experience of patients with MG, their experiences of illness, its challenges, and their coping and support strategies. In-depth interviews were undertaken with nine participants with MG (six for a generalized type of MG, three for ocular type). Data were subjected to inductive content and thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from MG patients with associated subthemes. They were "perceptions of MG," "challenges of MG, "social support," and "adapting and adjusting to MG." The study reveals the way in which individuals respond to and cope with their diagnosis. The importance of social and peer support is a key factor as well as the development of psychological strategies to live with MG. The recognition that there was a need to recognize the role of Western medicine in controlling their disease was also an important finding. PMID:23422699

  19. Actuarial analysis of the occurrence of remissions following thymectomy for myasthenia gravis in 400 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Durelli, L; Maggi, G; Casadio, C; Ferri, R; Rendine, S; Bergamini, L

    1991-01-01

    The role of thymectomy in the treatment of myasthenia gravis (MG) was analysed in 400 patients affected with generalised MG operated on between 1974-83, and prospectively followed up for five years after surgery. The occurrence of stable remission (SR) (that is, complete clinical drug-free remission that remains stable for all the subsequent follow up) was the endpoint of survival analyses and the distribution of SR time (SRT, that is, the interval from thymectomy to the occurrence of SR) was assessed by actuarial and Cox multivariate analyses. SRT distribution after surgery showed a slow progressive increase of cumulative SR rate that could both be ascribed to a delayed effect of thymectomy as well as reflect the natural history of MG, itself characterised by an increasing probability of spontaneous remission with time. SRT distribution was similar after stratification for all variables studied except when patients without thymoma were stratified for the need for immunosuppressive treatment in addition to thymectomy. Patients without thymoma who did not require additional immunosuppressive therapy (n = 130) had the highest SR rate occurring in the two years after thymectomy, and differed from patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs who showed the highest SR rate five years after surgery. Actuarial analysis has therefore identified a subgroup of patients where SR, occurring in the first years after surgery, is more likely to be ascribed to thymectomy than merely reflect the natural course of the disease. PMID:1865202

  20. Thymus involvement in myasthenia gravis: Epidemiological and clinical impacts of different self-tolerance breakdown mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karni, Arnon; Asmail, Ali; Drory, Vivian E; Kolb, Hadar; Kesler, Anat

    2016-09-15

    The reasons for the abrogation of self-immunological tolerance in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be different between those with concomitant thymic hyperplasia or thymoma, and those with no evidence of thymic involvement. We conducted a retrospective observational case series study to investigate the epidemiology as well as the clinical, serologic, and electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of individuals diagnosed as having MG. We found that the average age at MG onset of patients with either thymic hyperplasia or thymoma was much younger (by ~20years) than that of MG patients without thymic involvement. Thymic hyperplasia was more common in females than males. There were no differences in the rates of ocular MG vs. generalized MG among those three study groups. There were also no group differences in the rates of neuromuscular junction disfunction, as observed on EMG or by the results of serology tests for acetyl choline receptor antibody. Interestingly, only patients without thymic involvement had other autoimmune diseases, and most of them were females. The patients with other coexisting autoimmune disease had a similar age at MG onset as the other patients with no thymic involvement. These results shed light on the impact of epidemiological and clinical factors that result from different mechanisms of self-immunological tolerance breakdown that occurs in MG.

  1. Thymic pathologies in myasthenia gravis: a preoperative assessment of CAT scan and nuclear based imaging.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Berit; Kellner, Juliane; Jordan, Karin; Bähre, Manfred; Behrmann, Curd; Zierz, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Precise diagnostic work up of a suspected thymic pathology in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is very important for potential surgical implications and further disease course. In this study the diagnostic value of combined preoperative radiological (CAT scan) and nuclear based imaging (octreotide and thallium scintigraphy) in patients with MG was evaluated. Twenty four patients were included. Histopathology revealed thymoma in nine patients, thymic carcinoma (TC) in one patient, lymphofollicular hyperplasia in seven patients, and involuted thymus in another seven patients. Diagnostic sensitivity for detecting thymoma/TC was 80 % in CAT scan as well as in somatostatin scintigraphy; the combination of both procedures reached 90 %. However, the diagnostic specifity to exclude thymoma in CAT scan was 100 % and in octreotide scintigraphy 85.7 %. Semiquantitative octreotide uptake significantly correlated with histological grading of thymoma/TC (r = 0.764) and histological proliferation rate Ki67 (r = 0.894). Thallium scintigraphy was positive only in one out of four thymoma cases. In this study, somatostatin scintigraphy has been shown to be a useful additional diagnostic technique in detecting thymic malignancies in patients with MG. These results might be especially helpful in patients with late onset MG as these patients are in general no candidates for thymectomy.

  2. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  3. B cells produce less IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Parman, Yeşim G; Direskeneli, Haner; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-06-01

    B cells from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with autoantibodies (Aab) against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) or with no detectable Aab were investigated as cytokine producing cells in this study. B cells were evaluated for memory phenotypes and expressions of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12A. Induced productions of IL-10, IL-6, IL-12p40, TNF-α and LT from isolated B cells in vitro were measured by immunoassays. MG patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment had higher proportions of memory B cells compared with healthy controls and untreated patients. With CD40 stimulation MG patients produced significantly lower levels of IL-10, IL-6. With CD40 and B cell receptor stimulation of B cells, TNF-α production also decreased in addition to these cytokines. The lower levels of these cytokine productions were not related to treatment. Our results confirm a disturbance of B cell subpopulations in MG subgroups on immunosuppressive treatment. B cell derived IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α are down-regulated in MG, irrespective of different antibody productions. Ineffective cytokine production by B cells may be a susceptibility factor in dysregulation of autoimmune Aab production.

  4. Titin antibodies in "seronegative" myasthenia gravis--A new role for an old antigen.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, C; Lazaridis, K; Zouvelou, V; Tzartos, J; Mantegazza, R; Antozzi, C; Andreetta, F; Evoli, A; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Durmus, H; Brenner, T; Vaknin, A; Berrih-Aknin, S; Behin, A; Sharshar, T; De Baets, M; Losen, M; Martinez-Martinez, P; Kleopa, K A; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Kyriakides, T; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Szczudlik, P; Szyluk, B; Lavrnic, D; Basta, I; Peric, S; Tallaksen, C; Maniaol, A; Gilhus, N E; Casasnovas Pons, C; Pitha, J; Jakubíkova, M; Hanisch, F; Bogomolovas, J; Labeit, D; Labeit, S; Tzartos, S J

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by antibodies targeting the neuromuscular junction of skeletal muscles. Triple-seronegative MG (tSN-MG, without detectable AChR, MuSK and LRP4 antibodies), which accounts for ~10% of MG patients, presents a serious gap in MG diagnosis and complicates differential diagnosis of similar disorders. Several AChR antibody positive patients (AChR-MG) also have antibodies against titin, usually detected by ELISA. We have developed a very sensitive radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) for titin antibodies, by which many previously negative samples were found positive, including several from tSN-MG patients. The validity of the RIPA results was confirmed by western blots. Using this RIPA we screened 667 MG sera from 13 countries; as expected, AChR-MG patients had the highest frequency of titin antibodies (40.9%), while MuSK-MG and LRP4-MG patients were positive in 14.6% and 16.4% respectively. Most importantly, 13.4% (50/372) of the tSN-MG patients were also titin antibody positive. None of the 121 healthy controls or the 90 myopathy patients, and only 3.6% (7/193) of other neurological disease patients were positive. We thus propose that the present titin antibody RIPA is a useful tool for serological MG diagnosis of tSN patients.

  5. Diagnosis of Ocular Myasthenia Gravis by means of tracking eye parameters.

    PubMed

    Azri, Muhammad; Young, Stephanie; Lin, Hazel; Tan, Clement; Yang, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Ptosis of the eyelids is a common condition with a myriad of causes. Its management depends on the underlying cause, which can be challenging to diagnose in some cases. Current diagnosis methods include serum antibodies, tensilon test, and electromyography (EMG). Each has its own set of limitations such as invasiveness and lack of sensitivity. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a Portable Realtime Infrared Lids, Iris and Blink (PRILIB) monitoring system, with a long-term goal to improve clinical diagnosis of ptosis. In this paper, we present the algorithms to detect and analyze eye parameters and report experimental results. From experiments conducted on normal volunteers and myasthenic patients, we found 1. Partial blinks happen when Ocular Myasthenia Gravis (OMG) patients are tired or engaged in an activity; 2. Blink rate is significantly higher for OMG patients due to failure to blink fully; 3. There are noticeably more fluctuations of palpebral aperture of OMG patients due to rising and falling of the eyelid height. These experimental findings suggest new diagnostic features for OMG patients and have implications for disease management. PMID:25570244

  6. Socioeconomic burden of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, myasthenia gravis and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schepelmann, Karsten; Winter, Yaroslav; Spottke, Annika E; Claus, Detlef; Grothe, Christoph; Schröder, Rolf; Heuss, Dieter; Vielhaber, Stefan; Mylius, Veit; Kiefer, Reinhard; Schrank, Bertold; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Dodel, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are chronic devastating diseases. The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to evaluate the socioeconomic impact of three NMDs in Germany. Patients (n = 107) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), myasthenia gravis (MG) or facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) were recruited consecutively in seven centers in Germany. The health-economic data were collected using a "bottom-up" approach consisting of comprehensive questionnaires and patient diaries. Costs were evaluated from the societal perspective in 2009 Euros (EUR). Total annual costs from the societal perspective were EUR 36,380 (95% CI 27,090-47,970) per patient in ALS, EUR 26,240 (95% CI 17,770-37,940) in FSHD and EUR 14,950 (95% CI 10,470-21,730) in MG. The main components of costs were the expenditures of health insurance and the loss of productivity of patients and their caregivers. The following independent cost-driving factors were identified: disease severity, assistance in activities of daily living (ADL), dementia and younger age in ALS, disease severity in FSHD and assistance in ADL, disease severity and assistance in ADL in MG. The socioeconomic burden of NMDs in Germany is considerable. Further studies evaluating both the health-economic and clinical effects of NMD treatment as well as disease management programs and benchmarking activities are necessary. PMID:19629566

  7. Comparison of outcomes after extended thymectomy for myasthenia gravis: bilateral thoracoscopic approach versus sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Akio; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive thymectomy procedures have been proposed for nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis. However, few reports stressed that the lower invasiveness or cosmetic benefits also evaluated the rationale of a thymectomy, which is performed to remove as much thymic tissue as possible. We retrospectively reviewed 30 consecutive patients who underwent a bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) and compared the results with those of 26 patients who underwent a transsternal extended thymectomy (TSET) to determine the amount of removed thymic tissue and clinical prognosis. The amount of blood loss during the operation for VATET (median 60 mL; range nearly 0 to 940 mL) was significantly lower as compared with that of TSET. The median weight of removed thymic tissue (37.0 g; 18.3 to 100.0 g) and remission rates (1 y: 12.5%; 3 y: 30.8%; 4 y: 44.4%) of VATET were comparable with those of TSET. The VATET group had a similar amount of thymo-fatty tissue removed and feasible clinical outcomes as compared with the TSET group, indicating that VATET provides a proper balance between less invasiveness and radical capability. PMID:20027081

  8. Stimulated single-fiber EMG of the frontalis and orbicularis oculi muscles in ocular myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Valls-Canals, J; Povedano, M; Montero, J; Pradas, J

    2003-10-01

    We performed single-fiber electromyography by axonal stimulation (stimulated SFEMG) of the frontalis and orbicularis oculi muscles of 20 patients with ocular myasthenia gravis (OM) and 46 controls. In controls, mean consecutive differences (MCD) ranged from 5 to 55 micros (average, 14.7 +/- 2.8 micros) in the frontalis and from 4 to 56 micros (average, 12.56 +/- 2.19 micros) in orbicularis oculi. The mean MCD of individual muscle potentials (MPs) was 14.6 +/- 6.8 micros in frontalis and 12.68 +/- 6.10 micros in orbicularis oculi. In the OM patients, the mean MCD was 43.85 +/- 25.18 micros in the frontalis and 69.85 +/- 29.55 micros in orbicularis oculi (P < 0.0001), and the number of MPs with altered MCD was 7.15 +/- 4.66 (range, 1-18) and 12.65 +/- 4.90 (range, 6-21), respectively (P < 0.0001). We conclude that stimulated SFEMG of the orbicularis oculi muscle is more sensitive for the diagnosis of OM than of the frontalis muscle.

  9. Effects of General-epidural Anaesthesia on Haemodynamics in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X-Z; Wei, C-W; Wang, H-Y; Ge, Y-H; Chen, J; Wang, J; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The current study aims to explore the effects of general-epidural anaesthesia (GEA) on the perioperative haemodynamics in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), as well as their extubation time. Methods: A total of 42 MG patients (Ossermann I–II b types) receiving elective total thymectomy were randomized into GEA (n = 20) and general anaesthesia alone (GA; n = 22) groups. Changes in their mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded before anesthesia and at the time of intubation, skin incision, sternotomy and extubation. Dosages of general anaesthetics during time unit and the time of extubation and complete recovery from the ending of the operation were also recorded. Results: After anaesthesia, both groups displayed increased MAPs and HRs, with those in the GA group significantly higher than those in the GEA group (p < 0.05). The total consumption of general anaesthetics in the GA group was markedly higher than that in the GEA group (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The GEA group had shorter postoperative extubation and recovery time than the GA group (p < 0.01). General-epidural anaesthesia stabilizes perioperative haemodynamics, reduces the consumption of general anaesthetics and shortens extubation time. It is a feasible and ideal anaesthetic method at present. PMID:26360681

  10. MiR-15a contributes abnormal immune response in myasthenia gravis by targeting CXCL10.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Run-Qi; Hu, Bo; Luo, Meng-Chuan; Zeng, Qiu-Ming; Zhou, Hao; Huang, Kun; Dong, Xiao-Hua; Luo, Yue-Bei; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Huan

    2016-03-01

    MiR-15a is likely to be associated with autoimmunity. Here, we aimed to examine the expression of miR-15 cluster in PBMCs from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients and investigate the potential roles of miR-15a in MG. We found that the expression of all miR-15 cluster was decreased in MG, furthermore, miR-15a levels in ocular MG (oMG) were much lower, while CXCL10 production was increased in MG. We display that CXCL10 was a functional target gene of miR-15a in MG. Increasing miR-15a expression could reduce CXCL10 expression and alleviate the abnormal T cells activation in immune response, while decreasing miR-15a expression could activate immune response abnormally. Moreover, miR-15a expression was significantly decreased after stimulation, and prednisone treatment could upregulate miR-15a expression in steroid-responsive MG patients. Take together, our data suggest that decreased miR-15a expression facilitates proinflammatory cytokines production and contributes to immune response at least in part via regulating CXCL10 expression in MG.

  11. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  12. Collagen Q--a potential target for autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zoltowska Katarzyna, Marta; Belaya, Katsiaryna; Leite, Maria; Patrick, Waters; Vincent, Angela; Beeson, David

    2015-01-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies targeting proteins expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In most cases the targets are acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK), or occasionally low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), but there is still a group of patients, often called seronegative MG (SNMG), with unknown antibody targets. One potential target is collagen Q (COLQ), which is restricted to the NMJ and is crucial for anchoring the NMJ-specific form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). 415 serum samples with a clinical diagnosis of MG and 43 control samples were screened for the presence of COLQ autoantibodies using a cell-based assay (CBA) with HEK293 cells overexpressing COLQ at the cell surface. COLQ antibodies were detected in 12/415 MG sera and in one/43 control samples. Five of the COLQ-Ab+individuals were also positive for AChR-Abs and 2 for MuSK-Abs. Although the COLQ antibodies were only present at low frequency, and did not differ significantly from the small control cohort, further studies could address whether they modify the clinical presentation or the benefits of anti-cholinesterase therapy. PMID:25577314

  13. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  14. Experimental myasthenia gravis in Aire-deficient mice: a link between Aire and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Aricha, Revital; Feferman, Tali; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2012-12-01

    Aire (autoimmune regulator) has a key role in the establishment of tolerance to autoantigens. Aire(-/-) mice present decreased thymic expression of AChR, significantly lower frequencies of regulatory T (T(reg)) cells, and higher expression of Th17 markers, compared to controls. We therefore predicted that Aire(-/-) mice would be more susceptible to induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). However, when EAMG was induced in young mice, Aire(-/-) mice presented a milder disease that wild-type (WT) controls. In contrast, when EAMG was induced in older mice, Aire(-/-) mice were more severely affected than WT mice. The relative resistance to EAMG in young Aire(-/-) mice correlated with increased numbers of T(reg) cells in their spleens compared to young controls. A similar age-related susceptibility was also observed when EAE was induced in Aire(-/-) mice, suggesting an age-related link among Aire, disease susceptibility, and peripheral T(reg) cells that may be a general feature of autoimmunity.

  15. Late Onset Myasthenia Gravis Is Associated with HLA DRB1*15:01 in the Norwegian Population

    PubMed Central

    Maniaol, Angelina H.; Elsais, Ahmed; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; Owe, Jone F.; Viken, Marte K.; Sæther, Hanne; Flåm, Siri T.; Bråthen, Geir; Kampman, Margitta T.; Midgard, Rune; Christensen, Marte; Rognerud, Anna; Kerty, Emilia; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acquired myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare antibody-mediated autoimmune disease caused by impaired neuromuscular transmission, leading to abnormal muscle fatigability. The aetiology is complex, including genetic risk factors of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex and unknown environmental factors. Although associations between the HLA complex and MG are well established, not all involved components of the HLA predisposition to this heterogeneous disease have been revealed. Well-powered and comprehensive HLA analyses of subgroups in MG are warranted, especially in late onset MG. Methodology/Principal Findings This case-control association study is of a large population-based Norwegian cohort of 369 MG patients and 651 healthy controls. We performed comprehensive genotyping of four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1) and showed that the DRB1*15:01 allele conferred the strongest risk in late onset MG (LOMG; onset ≥60years) (OR 2.38, pc7.4×10−5). DRB1*13:01 was found to be a protective allele for both early onset MG (EOMG) and LOMG (OR 0.31, pc 4.71×10−4), a finding not previously described. No significant association was found to the DRB1*07:01 allele (pnc = 0.18) in a subset of nonthymomatous anti-titin antibody positive LOMG as reported by others. HLA-B*08 was mapped to give the strongest contribution to EOMG, supporting previous studies. Conclusion The results from this study provide important new information concerning the susceptibility of HLA alleles in Caucasian MG, with highlights on DRB1*15:01 as being a major risk allele in LOMG. PMID:22590574

  16. Thymectomy Cures Diabetes Mellitus and Ameliorates Myasthenia Gravis in a Patient with Thymus Hyperplasia and Hyperthyroidism: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shiyun; Zhang, Yao; Cui, Youbin; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a devastating autoimmune disease that involves the acetylcholine receptor (AchR) in the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. It is not uncommon for MG to accompany with other autoimmune diseases and complicate with multiple organ dysfunction. Here, we report on an 18-year-old female patient with a rare case of MG concomitant with thymus hyperplasia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperthyroidism. After full excision of the hyperplastic thymus gland, the patient's muscle weakness was greatly improved and her blood glucose level was restored to normal at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:26884666

  17. Therapeutic target of memory B cells depletion helps to tailor administration frequency of rituximab in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Christine; Bourg, Véronique; Bresch, Saskia; Cohen, Mikael; Rosenthal-Allieri, Maria Alessandra; Desnuelle, Claude; Ticchioni, Michel

    2016-09-15

    Rituximab (RTX) has demonstrated efficacy in limiting relapses in myasthenia gravis (MG). We investigated the interest of CD27+ memory B cell monitoring in patients as a biological marker of clinical relapse. Twenty-four patients have been treated with RTX (375mg/m(2)/week-month as an induction treatment). Maintenance treatment consisted with either systematic treatment every 3months or only when CD27+ memory B cells were detectable. After the induction treatment, the mean infusions were 1.3/year compared with 4/year. We suggest that RTX administration frequency can be decreased safely by monitoring the re-emerging CD27+ memory B cells. PMID:27609279

  18. A systematic review of population based epidemiological studies in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim was to collate all myasthenia gravis (MG) epidemiological studies including AChR MG and MuSK MG specific studies. To synthesize data on incidence rate (IR), prevalence rate (PR) and mortality rate (MR) of the condition and investigate the influence of environmental and technical factors on any trends or variation observed. Methods Studies were identified using multiple sources and meta-analysis performed to calculate pooled estimates for IR, PR and MR. Results 55 studies performed between 1950 and 2007 were included, representing 1.7 billion population-years. For All MG estimated pooled IR (eIR): 5.3 per million person-years (C.I.:4.4, 6.1), range: 1.7 to 21.3; estimated pooled PR: 77.7 per million persons (C.I.:64.0, 94.3), range 15 to 179; MR range 0.1 to 0.9 per millions person-years. AChR MG eIR: 7.3 (C.I.:5.5, 7.8), range: 4.3 to 18.0; MuSK MG IR range: 0.1 to 0.32. However marked variation persisted between populations studied with similar methodology and in similar areas. Conclusions We report marked variation in observed frequencies of MG. We show evidence of increasing frequency of MG with year of study and improved study quality. This probably reflects improved case ascertainment. But other factors must also influence disease onset resulting in the observed variation in IR across geographically and genetically similar populations. PMID:20565885

  19. Guidelines for pre-clinical animal and cellular models of MuSK-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W D; Christadoss, P; Losen, M; Punga, A R; Shigemoto, K; Verschuuren, J; Vincent, A

    2015-08-01

    Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies are the hallmark of a form of myasthenia gravis (MG) that can challenge the neurologist and the experimentalist. The clinical disease can be difficult to treat effectively. MuSK autoantibodies affect the neuromuscular junction in several ways. When added to muscle cells in culture, MuSK antibodies disperse acetylcholine receptor clusters. Experimental animals actively immunized with MuSK develop MuSK autoantibodies and muscle weakness. Weakness is associated with reduced postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor numbers, reduced amplitudes of miniature endplate potentials and endplate potentials, and failure of neuromuscular transmission. Similar impairments have been found in mice injected with IgG from MG patients positive for MuSK autoantibody (MuSK-MG). The active and passive models have begun to reveal the mechanisms by which MuSK antibodies disrupt synaptic function at the neuromuscular junction, and should be valuable in developing therapies for MuSK-MG. However, translation into new and improved treatments for patients requires procedures that are not too cumbersome but suitable for examining different aspects of MuSK function and the effects of potential therapies. Study design, conduct and analysis should be carefully considered and transparently reported. Here we review what has been learnt from animal and culture models of MuSK-MG, and offer guidelines for experimental design and conduct of studies, including sample size determination, randomization, outcome parameters and precautions for objective data analysis. These principles may also be relevant to the increasing number of other antibody-mediated diseases that are now recognized.

  20. Intravenous flurbiprofen for post-thymectomy pain relief in patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Post-thymectomy pain in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients can inhibit breathing and coughing. Inappropriate usage of analgesics may exacerbate respiratory inhibition and even cause myasthenic crisis. Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to control moderate postoperative pain and is not associated with respiratory inhibition. We hypothesized that flurbiprofen may provide post-thymectomy pain relief without increasing the risk of complications in MG patients. Methods Two hundred MG patients underwent extended thymectomy from March 2006 to December 2010 and were randomly allocated to a flurbiprofen group (110 patients, 50 mg intravenous flurbiprofen axetil) or a control group (90 patients, 100 mg intramuscular tramadol) as postoperative analgesia. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulse oximetry (SpO2), and adverse effects were recorded before and up to 24 h after drug administration. Results There were no significant differences in the preoperative clinical characteristics of the flurbiprofen and control (tramadol) groups. Both flurbiprofen and tramadol significantly alleviated post-thymectomy pain (p < 0.05 for both), but patients in flurbiprofen group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at 0.5 h, 2 h, 4 h, and 8 h after surgery (p < 0.05 for all times). There were no significant post-thymectomy changes of heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial blood pressure, or SpO2 in either group at all time points. Conclusions Post-thymectomy intravenous administration of flurbiprofen axetil provides safe and effective analgesia for MG patients. PMID:23020939

  1. Myopathy, muscle atrophy and tongue lipid composition in MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Ana V; Bačić, Goran G; Daković, Marko Ž; Lavrnić, Slobodan Đ; Rakočević Stojanović, Vidosava M; Basta, Ivana Z; Lavrnić, Dragana V

    2015-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) associated with anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies differs in many aspects from typical presentation of acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-positive MG. Myopathy and muscle atrophy are observed in MuSK-positive MG patients, unlike AChR-positive patients with MG. That is why the aim of this study was to assess the presence of myopathy and muscle atrophy as well as the tongue lipid composition in our cohort of MuSK-positive MG patients. Clinical examination, electromyography (EMG) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in 31 MuSK-positive and 28 AChR-positive MG patients. Myopathic EMG was more frequent in MuSK compared to AChR MG patients. In AChR MG patients, myopathic EMG in facial muscles was more frequent after long-term corticosteroid treatment, which was not the case with MuSK-positive MG patients. Facial and/or tongue muscle atrophy was registered in 23 % of MuSK MG patients. Longer disease duration was observed in patients with clinical signs of tongue and/or facial muscle atrophy compared to those with normal tongue muscle. Intramyocellular lipid deposition in the tongue was present in 85.2 % of MuSK and 20 % of AChR MG patients. Female MuSK MG patients had more frequently electrophysiological signs of myopathy on the facial muscles and signs of intramyocellular lipid deposition in the tongue, compared to male patients with MuSK-positive MG. Myopathy, muscle atrophy and intramyocellular lipid deposition in the tongue are more frequent in MuSK-positive compared to AChR-positive MG patients.

  2. A novel infection- and inflammation-associated molecular signature in peripheral blood of myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Barzago, Claudia; Lum, Josephine; Cavalcante, Paola; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar Gopalan; Faggiani, Elisa; Camera, Giorgia; Bonanno, Silvia; Andreetta, Francesca; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mori, Lucia; Zolezzi, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T-cell dependent autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction, characterised by muscle weakness and fatigability. Autoimmunity is thought to initiate in the thymus of acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-positive MG patients; however, the molecular mechanisms linking intra-thymic MG pathogenesis with autoreactivity via the circulation to the muscle target organ are poorly understood. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we compared the transcriptional profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AChR-early onset MG (AChR-EOMG) patients with healthy controls: 178 coding transcripts and 229 long non-coding RNAs, including 11 pre-miRNAs, were differentially expressed. Among the 178 coding transcripts, 128 were annotated of which 17% were associated with the 'infectious disease' functional category and 46% with 'inflammatory disease' and 'inflammatory response-associated' categories. Validation of selected transcripts by qPCR indicated that of the infectious disease-related transcripts, ETF1, NFKB2, PLK3, and PPP1R15A were upregulated, whereas CLC and IL4 were downregulated in AChR-EOMG patients; in the 'inflammatory' categories, ABCA1, FUS, and RELB were upregulated, suggesting a contribution of these molecules to immunological dysfunctions in MG. Data selection and validation were also based on predicted microRNA-mRNA interactions. We found that miR-612, miR-3654, and miR-3651 were increased, whereas miR-612-putative AKAp12 and HRH4 targets and the miR-3651-putative CRISP3 target were downregulated in AChR-EOMG, also suggesting altered immunoregulation. Our findings reveal a novel peripheral molecular signature in AChR-EOMG, reflecting a critical involvement of inflammatory- and infectious disease-related immune responses in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27387891

  3. A novel infection- and inflammation-associated molecular signature in peripheral blood of myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Barzago, Claudia; Lum, Josephine; Cavalcante, Paola; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar Gopalan; Faggiani, Elisa; Camera, Giorgia; Bonanno, Silvia; Andreetta, Francesca; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mori, Lucia; Zolezzi, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T-cell dependent autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction, characterised by muscle weakness and fatigability. Autoimmunity is thought to initiate in the thymus of acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-positive MG patients; however, the molecular mechanisms linking intra-thymic MG pathogenesis with autoreactivity via the circulation to the muscle target organ are poorly understood. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we compared the transcriptional profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AChR-early onset MG (AChR-EOMG) patients with healthy controls: 178 coding transcripts and 229 long non-coding RNAs, including 11 pre-miRNAs, were differentially expressed. Among the 178 coding transcripts, 128 were annotated of which 17% were associated with the 'infectious disease' functional category and 46% with 'inflammatory disease' and 'inflammatory response-associated' categories. Validation of selected transcripts by qPCR indicated that of the infectious disease-related transcripts, ETF1, NFKB2, PLK3, and PPP1R15A were upregulated, whereas CLC and IL4 were downregulated in AChR-EOMG patients; in the 'inflammatory' categories, ABCA1, FUS, and RELB were upregulated, suggesting a contribution of these molecules to immunological dysfunctions in MG. Data selection and validation were also based on predicted microRNA-mRNA interactions. We found that miR-612, miR-3654, and miR-3651 were increased, whereas miR-612-putative AKAp12 and HRH4 targets and the miR-3651-putative CRISP3 target were downregulated in AChR-EOMG, also suggesting altered immunoregulation. Our findings reveal a novel peripheral molecular signature in AChR-EOMG, reflecting a critical involvement of inflammatory- and infectious disease-related immune responses in disease pathogenesis.

  4. Tissue plasminogen activator involvement in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis: aggravation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Mizrachi, Tehila; Wald-Altman, Shane; Al-Roof Higazi, Abd; Brenner, Talma

    2014-08-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a component of the PA/plasmin system, is elevated in inflammatory areas and plays a role in inflammatory neurological disorders. In the present study we explored the involvement of tPA and the potential immunomodulatory activity of tPA in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Mice deficient in tPA (tPA(-/-)) present with a markedly more severe disease than wild type EAMG mice. In an attempt to treat EAMG with an 18aa peptide derived from the PA system inhibitor (PAI-1), designed to tether out the endogenous inhibitor, a significant suppression of disease severity was demonstrated. The more severe disease in tPA(-/-) mice was accompanied by a higher level of anti-AChR antibodies and increased expression of B-cell markers. In view of the essential role of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) in B-cell maturation, the expression of BAFF family components was tested. An increase in BAFF and BAFF receptor was observed in EAMG tPA(-/-) mice, whereas BCMA expression was reduced, consistent with the increased level of pathogenic antibodies and the more severe disease. Given the importance of T regulatory cells (Tregs) in EAMG, they were evaluated and their number was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice, in which EAMG was aggravated, whereas following PAI-1dp treatment, Tregs were replenished and the disease was ameliorated. The results show the involvement of tPA in EAMG, implying a protective role for tPA in EAMG pathogenesis. The amelioration of EAMG by PAI-1dp treatment suggests that the PA system may be considered a potential site for therapeutic intervention in neuroimmune diseases.

  5. Health-related quality of life in ALS, myasthenia gravis and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Winter, Yaroslav; Schepelmann, Karsten; Spottke, Annika E; Claus, Detlef; Grothe, Christoph; Schröder, Rolf; Heuss, Dieter; Vielhaber, Stefan; Tackenberg, Björn; Mylius, Veit; Reese, Jens-Peter; Kiefer, Reinhard; Schrank, Bertold; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Dodel, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are rare diseases with a chronic and debilitating course. Unfortunately, data on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in neuromuscular diseases are limited. The objective of this multicentre cross-sectional study was to compare the HRQoL in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and myasthenia gravis (MG) and to identify the determinants of the HRQoL in these diseases. We recruited 91 consecutive outpatients with ALS (n = 37), FSHD (n = 17) or MG (n = 37) in seven specialized German health centres. The HRQoL was determined using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D). Independent predictors of the HRQoL were identified using multiple regression analysis. The HRQoL in all domains of the SF-36, except for bodily pain, was significantly reduced. The domains related to physical health (physical functioning, physical role) were most affected. The EQ-5D-index score was most reduced in ALS (0.54) and least reduced in MG (0.89). Independent predictors of a reduced HRQoL were disease severity and depression in ALS, and disease severity, depression, older age and increased body-mass index in MG. The patterns of HRQoL-impairment in neuromuscular disorders share some common features, such as a more pronounced reduction in the HRQoL related to physical health, but there are a number of disease-specific features that should be considered in outcomes of clinical trials and treatment guidelines. In addition to the treatment of motor symptoms, greater attention should be paid to the treatment of depression, which was found to be among the independent predictors of the HRQoL in ALS and MG. PMID:20383521

  6. VAV1 and BAFF, via NFκB pathway, are genetic risk factors for myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Harbo, Hanne F; Bernasconi, Pia; Poulas, Konstantinos; Ginzburg, Elizabeta; Cavalcante, Paola; Colleoni, Lara; Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Truffault, Frédérique; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Pöschel, Simone; Zagoriti, Zoi; Maniaol, Angelina; Lie, Benedicte A; Bernard, Isabelle; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Illes, Zsolt; Casasnovas Pons, Carlos; Melms, Arthur; Tzartos, Socrates; Willcox, Nicholas; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify novel genetic loci that predispose to early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG) applying a two-stage association study, exploration, and replication strategy. Methods Thirty-four loci and one confirmation loci, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRA, were selected as candidate genes by team members of groups involved in different research aspects of MG. In the exploration step, these candidate genes were genotyped in 384 EOMG and 384 matched controls and significant difference in allele frequency were found in eight genes. In the replication step, eight candidate genes and one confirmation loci were genotyped in 1177 EOMG patients and 814 controls, from nine European centres. Results Allele frequency differences were found in four novel loci: CD86, AKAP12, VAV1, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and these differences were consistent in all nine cohorts. Haplotype trend test supported the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls. In addition, allele frequency difference in female versus male patients at HLA-DRA and TNF-α loci were observed. Interpretation The genetic associations to EOMG outside the HLA complex are novel and of interest as VAV1 is a key signal transducer essential for T- and B-cell activation, and BAFF is a cytokine that plays important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of B-cells. Moreover, we noted striking epistasis between the predisposing VAV1 and BAFF haplotypes; they conferred a greater risk in combination than alone. These, and CD86, share the same signaling pathway, namely nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), thus implicating dysregulation of proinflammatory signaling in predisposition to EOMG. PMID:25356403

  7. Evaluation of the Quality of Guidelines for Myasthenia Gravis with the AGREE II Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenchang; Guo, Jia; Su, Gang; Li, Jiong; Wu, Hua; Xie, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners in making decisions about appropriate healthcare in specific clinical circumstances. The methodological quality of CPGs for myasthenia gravis (MG) are unclear. Objective To critically evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs for MG using AGREE II instrument. Method A systematical search strategy on PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM) was performed on September 20th 2013. All guidelines related to MG were evaluated with AGREE II. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. Results A total of 15 CPGs for MG met the inclusion criteria (12 CPGs in English, 3 CPGs in Chinese). The overall agreement among reviews was moderate or high (ICC >0.70). The mean scores (mean ± SD) for al six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (60.93% ±16.62%), stakeholder involvement (40.93% ±20.04%), rigor of development (37.22% ±30.46%), clarity of presentation (64.26% ±16.36%), applicability (28.19% ±20.56%) and editorial independence (27.78% ±28.28%). Compared with non-evidence-based CPGs, evidence-based CPGs had statistically significant higher quality scores for all AGREE II domains (P<0.05). All domain scores appear slightly higher for CPGs published after AGREE II instrument development and validation (P>0.05). The quality scores of CPGs developed by NGC/AAN were higher than the quality scores of CPGs developed by other organizations for all domains. The difference was statistically significant for all domains with the exception of clarity of presentation (P = 0.07). Conclusions The qualities of CPGs on MG were generally acceptable with several flaws. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers, particularly in China. PMID:25402504

  8. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  9. Resolution of severe obstructive sleep apnea after treatment of anti-muscle kinase receptor-positive myasthenia gravis despite 60-pound weight gain.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Michael; Singas, Effie; Zleik, Bashar; Greenberg, Harly

    2014-07-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be caused by reduced pharyngeal dilator muscle activity. We report a patient with anti-muscle kinase receptor MG with severe OSA and hypoventilation that resolved upon successful treatment of MG despite a 60-lb weight gain.

  10. Guidelines for standard preclinical experiments in the mouse model of myasthenia gravis induced by acetylcholine receptor immunization.

    PubMed

    Tuzun, Erdem; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Brenner, Talma; Kusner, Linda L; Le Panse, Rozen; Yang, Huan; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by generalized muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) dysfunction brought by acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies in most cases. Although steroids and other immunosuppressants are effectively used for treatment of MG, these medications often cause severe side effects and a complete remission cannot be obtained in many cases. For pre-clinical evaluation of more effective and less toxic treatment methods for MG, the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by Torpedo AChR immunization has become one of the standard animal models. Although numerous compounds have been recently proposed for MG mostly by using the active immunization EAMG model, only a few have been proven to be effective in MG patients. The variability in the experimental design, immunization methods and outcome measurements of pre-clinical EAMG studies make it difficult to interpret the published reports and assess the potential for application to MG patients. In an effort to standardize the active immunization EAMG model, we propose standard procedures for animal care conditions, sampling and randomization of mice, experimental design and outcome measures. Utilization of these standard procedures might improve the power of pre-clinical EAMG experiments and increase the chances for identifying promising novel treatment methods that can be effectively translated into clinical trials for MG. PMID:25697844

  11. Distinguishing Myasthenia Exacerbation from Severe Preeclampsia: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Pooja; Joshi, Bharti; Aggarwal, Neelam; Suri, Vanita; Bhagat, Hement

    2015-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an acquired, autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by voluntary muscle weakness. Pregnant patients may have disease exacerbation, respiratory failure, crisis, adverse drug reaction, surprisingly enough remission at any trimester or postnatal period. Concurrence of myasthenia gravis with severe preeclampsia is a dreadful condition raising diagnostic and management issues. We hereby discuss a case of myasthenic woman who developed severe preeclampsia during pregnancy and presented in last trimester with clinical features mimicking signs of impending eclampsia. Keeping in mind the history of myasthenia gravis, urgent neurology review taken and diagnosis of myasthenic exacerbation was entertained. She responded well to injection neostigmine and in this way inadvertent use of magnesium sulphate was avoided.

  12. Effects of the ß2-Adrenoceptor Agonist, Albuterol, in a Mouse Model of Anti-MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Tse, Nigel; Reddel, Stephen W.; Phillips, William D.

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, albuterol, has been reported beneficial in treating several forms of congenital myasthenia. Here, for the first time, we examined the potential benefit of albuterol in a mouse model of anti-Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 15 daily injections of IgG from anti-MuSK positive patients, which resulted in whole-body weakness. At neuromuscular junctions in the tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles the autoantibodies caused loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors, and reduced the amplitudes of the endplate potential and spontaneous miniature endplate potential in the diaphragm muscle. Treatment with albuterol (8 mg/kg/day) during the two-week anti-MuSK injection series reduced the degree of weakness and weight loss, compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, the compound muscle action potential recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle displayed a decremental response in anti-MuSK-injected mice whether treated with albuterol or vehicle. Ongoing albuterol treatment did not increase endplate potential amplitudes compared to vehicle-treated mice nor did it prevent the loss of acetylcholine receptors from motor endplates. On the other hand, albuterol treatment significantly reduced the degree of fragmentation of endplate acetylcholine receptor clusters and increased the extent to which the remaining receptor clusters were covered by synaptophysin-stained nerve terminals. The results provide the first evidence that short-term albuterol treatment can ameliorate weakness in a robust mouse model of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. The results also demonstrate that it is possible for albuterol treatment to reduce whole-body weakness without necessarily reversing myasthenic impairment to the structure and function of the neuromuscular junction. PMID:24505322

  13. Left- and right-sided video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy exhibit similar effects on myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xuan; Gan, Xiangfeng; Chen, Baishen; Shen, Zhuojian; Wang, Minghui; Zhang, Huizhong; Xu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background Unilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) thymectomy features less operative trauma, improved cosmesis, and similar efficiency compared with transsternal (TS) thymectomy for treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Unilateral VATS thymectomy can be easily performed from either side of the thorax, because thymus is located in the middle of mediastinum. Nevertheless, the side that provides better outcomes remains controversial. This study presents our experience on treatments for MG and reveals the differences between the unilateral VATS thymectomy performed on each side. Methods Eighty-one consecutive patients with MG who underwent TS or VATS thymectomy on either side between January 2003 and December 2012 were enrolled in the study. Clinicopathologic data and surgical outcomes were retrospectively analyzed and compared among different surgical approaches. Results TS thymectomy was administered in 50 patients, whereas unilateral VATS approaches were performed on the remaining 31 patients, 15 on the left side and 16 on the right side. The VATS group exhibited a significantly shorter surgery duration (P<0.001), less intraoperative blood loss (P=0.009), shorter postoperative hospital stay (P=0.025), smaller thoracic drainage volume (P=0.033), shorter thoracic drainage duration (P=0.006), and less postoperative complications (P<0.001) compared with the TS group. However, disease remission rates did not significantly differ among the groups (P=0.988). The left-sided group exhibited considerably longer thoracic drainage duration than the right-sided group (P=0.041). Moreover, surgical time (P=0.736), intraoperative blood loss (P=0.281), postoperative hospital stay (P=0.599), thoracic drainage volume (P=0.571), postoperative complications (P=0.742) and therapeutic effect (P=1.000) did not significantly differ among the groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that the ocular type of MG is the only independent factor for clinical remission (P=0

  14. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. Isolated from Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Lesions in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Lee K.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Lindner, Jonathan R.; Fan, Hongxin; Sanders, Carmita; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Exophiala species are capable of causing cutaneous and subcutaneous infections in immunocompromised patients. An Exophiala isolate was cultured from a biopsy specimen of a lesion on the forearm of a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient also had lesions on the palm and distal aspects of the hand, which were successfully treated with a long-term course of itraconazole. A detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the isolate was undertaken. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and portions of the β-tubulin and translation elongation factor 1-alpha genes indicated that the isolate was a novel species closely related to but genetically distinct from species within the Exophiala spinifera clade; the name Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. is proposed. Morphologically, E. polymorpha most closely resembles E. xenobiotica but it differs in possessing phialides bearing prominent, wide collarettes, and it does not produce chlamydospores. PMID:26085612

  15. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases. PMID:27263226

  16. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases.

  17. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. Isolated from Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Lesions in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Yong, Lee K; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Sutton, Deanna A; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Lindner, Jonathan R; Fan, Hongxin; Sanders, Carmita; Guarro, Josep

    2015-09-01

    Exophiala species are capable of causing cutaneous and subcutaneous infections in immunocompromised patients. An Exophiala isolate was cultured from a biopsy specimen of a lesion on the forearm of a patient with myasthenia gravis. The patient also had lesions on the palm and distal aspects of the hand, which were successfully treated with a long-term course of itraconazole. A detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the isolate was undertaken. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and portions of the β-tubulin and translation elongation factor 1-alpha genes indicated that the isolate was a novel species closely related to but genetically distinct from species within the Exophiala spinifera clade; the name Exophiala polymorpha sp. nov. is proposed. Morphologically, E. polymorpha most closely resembles E. xenobiotica but it differs in possessing phialides bearing prominent, wide collarettes, and it does not produce chlamydospores. PMID:26085612

  18. Influence of human myasthenia gravis thymus on the differentiation of human cord blood stem cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Ru; Liu, Ping Ping; Xuan, Xiao Yan; Guan, Sha Sha; Du, Ying; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Qing Yong

    2014-02-01

    The normal thymus contributes to T lymphocytes differentiation and induction of tolerance to self-antigens. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by abnormal thymic hyperplasia. To assess the potential influence of MG-thymus on the differentiation of T lymphocytes differentiation, we used the MG-thymus transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice model to evaluate the human cord blood stem cells differentiation. Thymus fragments from MG patient and human cord blood stem cells were transplanted into SCID mice successively. SCID mice were observed to develop sustained human T lymphocytes and a functional anti-tumor immune. The levels of various T cell subsets in SCID mice with MG-thymus were different from that of control group. Among that, the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was significant lower in SCID mice with MG-thymus. The deficiency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells seens to contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.

  19. Disease specific enrichment of circulating let-7 family microRNA in MuSK+ myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Punga, Tanel; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Lewandowska, Marta; Damato, Valentina; Evoli, Amelia; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with antibodies against the muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK+) have predominantly involvement of cranio-bulbar muscles and do not display thymus pathology, as do acetylcholine receptor antibody seropositive (AChR+) MG patients. In search of novel biomarkers for MuSK+ MG, we evaluated circulating serum microRNAs. Four analyzed microRNAs were specifically elevated in MuSK+ MG patient serum samples: let-7a-5p, let-7f-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-423-5p. The circulating microRNA profile in MuSK+ MG differs from the profile previously observed in the serum of AChR+ MG, thus indicating the etiological difference between these two entities. We propose that the identified microRNAs could serve as potential serum biomarkers for MuSK+ MG. PMID:26943954

  20. Disease specific enrichment of circulating let-7 family microRNA in MuSK+ myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Punga, Tanel; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Lewandowska, Marta; Damato, Valentina; Evoli, Amelia; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with antibodies against the muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK+) have predominantly involvement of cranio-bulbar muscles and do not display thymus pathology, as do acetylcholine receptor antibody seropositive (AChR+) MG patients. In search of novel biomarkers for MuSK+ MG, we evaluated circulating serum microRNAs. Four analyzed microRNAs were specifically elevated in MuSK+ MG patient serum samples: let-7a-5p, let-7f-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-423-5p. The circulating microRNA profile in MuSK+ MG differs from the profile previously observed in the serum of AChR+ MG, thus indicating the etiological difference between these two entities. We propose that the identified microRNAs could serve as potential serum biomarkers for MuSK+ MG.

  1. Treatment of myasthenia gravis with dropped head: a report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Michihiro; Hashimoto, Takao; Isobe, Takashi; Sato, Hiromasa; Doden, Tadashi; Nakano, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    We report two patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) who showed dropped head as an early myasthenic manifestation. They had elevated anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and showed improvement of the symptoms after intravenous injection of edorophonium chloride. One patient had thymoma and developed myasthenic crisis two weeks after thymectomy. The patient recovered from the crisis after a combination of immunoadsorption plasmapheresis (IAPP) and initiation of steroid and tacrolimus. The other patient without thymoma initiated treatment with steroid, tacrolimus and IAPP and showed complete recovery one month later. Dropped head in MG can recover well with immunosuppression therapy using steroid, and IAPP is helpful in getting a rapid improvement of dropped head as well as recovery from myasthenic crisis. When we consider treatment for MG with dropped head, we should take into account that MG of this type can develop myasthenic crisis and use the same treatment strategy as that for generalized MG.

  2. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  3. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  4. In vitro proliferative responses and antibody titers specific to human acetylcholine receptor synthetic peptides in patients with myasthenia gravis and relation to HLA class II genes.

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, S; Brautbar, C; Steinman, L; Abramsky, O; Rothbard, J; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S; Mozes, E

    1988-01-01

    To investigate which parts of the acetylcholine receptor are involved in the initiation and development of myasthenia gravis (MG), peptides representing different sequences of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit were synthesized. These peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate T cells of myasthenic patients and healthy control patients in proliferation assays and to bind to sera antibodies. Three of eight peptides discriminated significantly between the two groups in the proliferation assay, as well as in their ability to bind to serum antibodies. HLA-DR3 and DR5 were associated with proliferative responses to specific AChR peptides in the group of myasthenics. Acetylcholine receptor epitopes that might play a specific role in myasthenia gravis thus were demonstrated. PMID:2461962

  5. Ocular myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor ϵ subunit immunization in HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Saini, Shamsher S; Wang, Jun; Li, Jing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Huda, Ruksana; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-12-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) are preferentially involved in myasthenia gravis (MG) and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive MG patients may occasionally present with isolated ocular symptoms. Although experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by whole AChR immunization closely mimics clinical and immunopathological aspects of MG, EOM are usually not affected. We have previously developed an EAMG model, which imitates EOM symptoms of MG by immunization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic mice with α or γ-subunits of human AChR (H-AChR). To investigate the significance of the ϵ-subunit in ocular MG, we immunized HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with recombinant H-AChR ϵ-subunit expressed in Escherichia coli. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice showed significantly higher clinical ocular and generalized MG severity scores and lower grip strength values than HLA-DQ8 mice. H-AChR ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had higher serum anti-AChR antibody (IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgM) levels, neuromuscular junction IgG and complement deposit percentages than ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Control mice immunized with E. coli extract or complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) did not show clinical and immunopathological features of ocular and generalized EAMG. Lymph node cells of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 mice showed significantly higher proliferative responses than those of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 mice, crude E. coli extract-immunized and CFA-immunized transgenic mice. Our results indicate that the human AChR ϵ-subunit is capable of inducing myasthenic muscle weakness. Diversity of the autoimmune responses displayed by mice expressing different HLA class II molecules suggests that the interplay between HLA class II alleles and AChR subunits might have a profound impact on the clinical course of MG.

  6. [Administration of sugammadex to a patient with myasthenia gravis with fade of the train-of-four ratio].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ami; Sasakawa, Tomoki; Hasegawa, Naoyoshi; Takahata, Osamu; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    A 50-year-old man (weight 87 kg, height 171 cm) with myasthenia gravis (MG) was scheduled for extended thymectomy under general anesthesia. His preanesthetic train-of-four ratio (T4/T1) was 59%. The first twitch of the train-of-four (T1) was 130% after calibration. We administered rocuronium 10 mg (0.11 mg x kg(-1)) for tracheal intubation. Maximal suppression was achieved in 50 seconds. During the operation, we did continuous infusion of rocuronium to maintain T1 at 10%. We discontinued rocuronium infusion before the end of surgery. In patients with MG, deep levels of neuromuscular block can be achieved with less rocuronium. We hypothesized that the requirement of sugammadex in a patient with MG is less than that in normal patients. Therefore, we administered 0.5 mg x kg(-1) of sugammadex. After 5 min, T4/T1 had reached 54%, but T1 had not reached the control value; therefore, we administered additional 1.5 m x kg(-1) of sugammadex. Subsequently, T1 reached 120%. Patients with MG with fade on T4/T1 require a full dose of sugammadex, identical to the dose administered to normal patients.

  7. Inflammation and Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Are Common Features of Myasthenia Gravis Thymus: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Paola; Maggi, Lorenzo; Colleoni, Lara; Caldara, Rosa; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The thymus plays a major role in myasthenia gravis (MG). Our recent finding of a persistent Epstein-Barr (EBV) virus infection in some MG thymuses, combined with data showing that the thymus is in a proinflammatory state in most patients, supports a viral contribution to the pathogenesis of MG. Aim of this study was to gain further evidence for intrathymic chronic inflammation and EBV infection in MG patients. Transcriptional profiling by low density array and real-time PCR showed overexpression of genes involved in inflammatory and immune response in MG thymuses. Real-time PCR for EBV genome, latent (EBER1, EBNA1, LMP1) and lytic (BZLF1) transcripts, and immunohistochemistry for LMP1 and BZLF1 proteins confirmed an active intrathymic EBV infection, further supporting the hypothesis that EBV might contribute to onset or perpetuation of the autoimmune response in MG. Altogether, our results support a role of inflammation and EBV infection as pathogenic features of MG thymus. PMID:21961056

  8. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  9. Enhancement of noradrenergic neural transmission: an effective therapy of myasthenia gravis: a report on 52 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Pardey-Maldonado, B; John, E; Jimenez, V; Orozco, B; Baez, S; Lechin, M E

    2000-01-01

    Neurochemical, neuroautonomic and neuropharmacological assessments carried out on all our myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that they presented a neural sympathetic deficit plus excessive adrenal-sympathetic activity. These abnormalities were registered during the basal (supine-resting) state, as well as after several stress tests (orthostasis, exercise, oral glucose and buspirone). In addition, MG patients showed increased levels of free-serotonin (f5HT) in the plasma, supposedly associated with the increased platelet aggregability which we found in all MG patients. As the above trio of neurochemical disorders (low noradrenergic-activity + high adrenergic-activity + increased f-5HT plasma levels) is known to favor Th-1 immunosuppression + Th-2 predominance, we outlined a neuropharmacological strategy for reverting the above neurochemical disorder. This treatment provoked sudden (acute), and late sustained improvements. Acute effects have been attributed to the increase of alpha-1 activity at the spinal motoneuron level. Late improvements always paralleled a significant normalization of immunological disorders. Complete normalization was registered only in non-thymectomized MG patients. PMID:11508327

  10. IL-10 derived from CD1dhiCD5⁺ B cells regulates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2015-12-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. In our previous study, adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells expanded in vivo by GM-CSF prevented and suppressed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The goal of this study was to further examine the role and mechanism of IL-10 in the regulatory function of B10 cells in EAMG. We found that only IL-10 competent CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells sorted from WT mice, but not IL-10 deficient CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells exhibited regulatory function in vitro and in vivo. Adoptive transfer of IL-10 competent CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells led to higher frequency of Tregs and B10 cells, and low levels of proinflammatory cytokines and autoantibody production. We conclude that IL-10 production within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells plays an important role in immune regulation of EAMG. PMID:26616882

  11. Concomitant presentation of Anderson-Tawil syndrome and myasthenia gravis in an adult patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rui; Ji, Ruirui; Zou, Wenxin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Hu; Penney, Daniel James; Luo, Jin Jun; Fan, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is an autosomal dominant, multisystem channelopathy characterized by periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias and distinctive dysmorphic facial or skeletal features. The disorder displays marked intrafamilial variability and incomplete penetrance. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder that demonstrates progressive fatigability, in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at neuromuscular junctions is the primary autoantigen. The present study reports a rare case of a 31-year-old woman with a history of morbid obesity and periodic weakness, who presented with hemodynamic instability, cardiogenic shock and facial anomalies. Laboratory results revealed hypokalemia and an elevated anti-AChR antibody expression levels. Electrocardiography demonstrated prolonged QT-interval, ST-elevation, and subsequent third-degree atrioventricular block. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis, horizontal diplopia, dysarthria and generalized weakness. No mutations in the potassium channel inwardly rectifying subfamily J member 2 gene were detected in the present case. The patient was treated with oral potassium supplementation and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (pyridostigmine), after which the symptoms were improved. To the best of our knowledge, the present case report was the first to describe concomitant presentation of both ATS and MG, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. PMID:27698745

  12. Biologics and other novel approaches as new therapeutic options in myasthenia gravis: a view to the future.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by complement-fixing antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells), Th17 cells, and recognition of AChR epitopes by CD4(+) T cells are fundamental. Novel biological agents now in the offing, offer the potential for specific treatment options in MG by targeting the following: (1) T cell intracellular signaling pathways, costimulation, and transduction molecules; (2) B cells, against CD20 molecules, or the B cell trophic factors BAFF and APRIL; (3) complement, against C5 that intercepts the formation of MAC; (4) cytokines and cytokine receptors targeting interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and the Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK)1 and JAK3; and (5) cellular adhesion and T cell migration molecules. Reengineering of pathogenic antibodies (i.e., molecular decoys) by constructing recombinant antibodies that block the complement binding of the pathogenic AChR antibodies is an additional approach. The promising therapeutic profile of these agents should be weighted against excessive cost and rare complications necessitating the need for controlled trials to secure efficacy and balance benefit against risks. PMID:23252891

  13. Myopathic changes detected by quantitative electromyography in patients with MuSK and AChR positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ana; Basta, Ivana; Stojanovic, Vidosava Rakocevic; Stevic, Zorica; Peric, Stojan; Lavrnic, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Myopathic changes are frequent a electrophysiological finding in patients with muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) positive myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to explore the importance of quantitative electromyography (EMG) in the detection of myopathic changes in MuSK MG patients. Classical and quantitative EMG were performed in 31 MuSK and 28 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) positive MG patients, matched by sex, age, disease duration and severity. Classical EMG revealed the presence of myopathic changes more frequently in MuSK MG compared to AChR MG patients, especially in the facial muscles. Quantitative EMG registered myopathic lesions more frequently than classical EMG, but the frequency was similar between MuSK and AChR MG patients. Quantitative EMG revealed myopathic changes in the majority of both MuSK and AChR positive MG patients. This examination is sensitive, but it cannot be used to differentiate between MG patients belonging to the different disease groups. It should not be used in isolation. Rather, it should complement classical EMG in the detection of myopathic changes.

  14. Biologics and other novel approaches as new therapeutic options in myasthenia gravis: a view to the future.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by complement-fixing antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells), Th17 cells, and recognition of AChR epitopes by CD4(+) T cells are fundamental. Novel biological agents now in the offing, offer the potential for specific treatment options in MG by targeting the following: (1) T cell intracellular signaling pathways, costimulation, and transduction molecules; (2) B cells, against CD20 molecules, or the B cell trophic factors BAFF and APRIL; (3) complement, against C5 that intercepts the formation of MAC; (4) cytokines and cytokine receptors targeting interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and the Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK)1 and JAK3; and (5) cellular adhesion and T cell migration molecules. Reengineering of pathogenic antibodies (i.e., molecular decoys) by constructing recombinant antibodies that block the complement binding of the pathogenic AChR antibodies is an additional approach. The promising therapeutic profile of these agents should be weighted against excessive cost and rare complications necessitating the need for controlled trials to secure efficacy and balance benefit against risks.

  15. Concomitant presentation of Anderson-Tawil syndrome and myasthenia gravis in an adult patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rui; Ji, Ruirui; Zou, Wenxin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Hu; Penney, Daniel James; Luo, Jin Jun; Fan, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is an autosomal dominant, multisystem channelopathy characterized by periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias and distinctive dysmorphic facial or skeletal features. The disorder displays marked intrafamilial variability and incomplete penetrance. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder that demonstrates progressive fatigability, in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at neuromuscular junctions is the primary autoantigen. The present study reports a rare case of a 31-year-old woman with a history of morbid obesity and periodic weakness, who presented with hemodynamic instability, cardiogenic shock and facial anomalies. Laboratory results revealed hypokalemia and an elevated anti-AChR antibody expression levels. Electrocardiography demonstrated prolonged QT-interval, ST-elevation, and subsequent third-degree atrioventricular block. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis, horizontal diplopia, dysarthria and generalized weakness. No mutations in the potassium channel inwardly rectifying subfamily J member 2 gene were detected in the present case. The patient was treated with oral potassium supplementation and an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (pyridostigmine), after which the symptoms were improved. To the best of our knowledge, the present case report was the first to describe concomitant presentation of both ATS and MG, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

  16. Blood Transcriptome Profiling in Myasthenia Gravis Patients to Assess Disease Activity: A Pilot RNA-seq Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kee Hong; Jung, Junghee; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by exertional weakness. There is no biomarker to reflect disease activity and guide treatment decision. Here, we reported a pilot blood transcriptome study using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that identified differences of 5 samples in active status and 5 in remission from 8 different patients and 2 patients provided samples for both active and remission phase. We found a total of 28 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) possibly related to disease activity (23 up-regulated and 5 down-regulated). The DEGs were enriched for the cell motion and cell migration processes in which included were ICAM1, CCL3, S100P and GAB2. The apoptosis and cell death pathway was also significantly enriched, which includes NFKBIA, ZC3H12A, TNFAIP3, and PPP1R15A. Our result suggests that transcript abundance profiles of the genes involved in cell trafficking and apoptosis may be a molecular signature of the disease activity in MG patients. PMID:26924932

  17. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  18. Specific binding of collagen Q to the neuromuscular junction is exploited to cure congenital myasthenia and to explore bases of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Kawakami, Yu; Krejci, Eric; Engel, Andrew G

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ) in the form of asymmetric AChE (AChE/ColQ). The C-terminal domain of ColQ binds to MuSK, the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase, that mediates a signal for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering at the NMJ. ColQ also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans including perlecan. Congenital defects of ColQ cause endplate AChE deficiency. A single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq-/- mice rescued motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of NMJ. We also injected AAV1-COLQ-IRES-EGFP to the left tibialis anterior and observed colocalization of AChE/ColQ at all the examined NMJs of the non-injected limbs. Additionally, injection of purified recombinant AChE/ColQ protein complex into gluteus maximus accumulated AChE in non-injected forelimbs. These observations suggest that the tissue-targeting signal of ColQ can be exploited to specifically deliver the transgene product to the target tissue. MuSK antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (MG) accounts for 5-15% of autoimmune MG. As AChR deficiency is typically mild and as cholinesterase inhibitors are generally ineffective or worsen myasthenic symptoms, we asked if the patient's MuSK-IgG interferes with binding of ColQ to MuSK. In vitro overlay of AChE/ColQ to muscle sections of Colq-/- mice revealed that MuSK-IgG blocks binding of ColQ to the NMJ. In vitro plate-binding of MuSK to ColQ disclosed that MuSK-IgG exerts a dose-dependent block of MuSK-ColQ interaction. In addition, passive transfer of MuSK-IgG to mice reduced the size and density of ColQ to ∼10% of controls and had a lesser effect on the sizes and densities of AChR and MuSK. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of specific binding of ColQ to the NMJ enabled us to ameliorate devastating myasthenic symptoms of Colq-/- mice and to reveal bases of

  19. Specific binding of collagen Q to the neuromuscular junction is exploited to cure congenital myasthenia and to explore bases of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Kawakami, Yu; Krejci, Eric; Engel, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ) in the form of asymmetric AChE (AChE/ColQ). The C-terminal domain of ColQ binds to MuSK, the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase, that mediates a signal for acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering at the NMJ. ColQ also binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans including perlecan. Congenital defects of ColQ cause endplate AChE deficiency. A single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq−/− mice rescued motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of NMJ. We also injected AAV1-COLQ-IRES-EGFP to the left tibialis anterior and observed colocalization of AChE/ColQ at all the examined NMJs of the non-injected limbs. Additionally, injection of purified recombinant AChE/ColQ protein complex into gluteus maximus accumulated AChE in non-injected forelimbs. These observations suggest that the tissue-targeting signal of ColQ can be exploited to specifically deliver the transgene product to the target tissue. MuSK antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (MG) accounts for 5–15% of autoimmune MG. As AChR deficiency is typically mild and as cholinesterase inhibitors are generally ineffective or worsen myasthenic symptoms, we asked if the patient's MuSK-IgG interferes with binding of ColQ to MuSK. In vitro overlay of AChE/ColQ to muscle sections of Colq−/− mice revealed that MuSK-IgG blocks binding of ColQ to the NMJ. In vitro plate-binding of MuSK to ColQ disclosed that MuSK-IgG exerts a dose-dependent block of MuSK-ColQ interaction. In addition, passive transfer of MuSK-IgG to mice reduced the size and density of ColQ to ~10% of controls and had a lesser effect on the sizes and densities of AChR and MuSK. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of specific binding of ColQ to the NMJ enabled us to ameliorate devastating myasthenic symptoms of Colq−/− mice and to reveal

  20. Augmentation of Circulating Follicular Helper T Cells and Their Impact on Autoreactive B Cells in Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cun-Jin; Gong, Ye; Zhu, Wenli; Qi, Yuan; Yang, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Ying; Chang, Guoqiang; Li, Yujing; Shi, Samuel; Wood, Kristofer; Ladha, Shafeeq; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Qiang; Yan, Yaping

    2016-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic humoral immunity-mediated autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction characterized by muscle weakness. Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells may be the key Th cell subset that promotes MG development, as their major function is helping B cell activation and Ab production. Aberrance of thymus-derived Tfh cells might be implicated in autoimmune diseases including MG; just how circulating Tfh cells, especially those from patients with a normal thymus, contribute to MG pathogenesis remains to be uncovered. In this article, we characterize a population of circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) Tfh cells in ocular and generalized MG patients without thymic abnormalities and demonstrate that the circulating Tfh cells are significantly enriched in generalized MG patients but not in ocular MG patients compared with healthy subjects, whereas a proportion of follicular regulatory T cells decreased in MG patients. In addition, the frequency of plasma cells and B cells was higher and the serum levels of IL-6/IL-21 were also elevated in these MG patients. The activated Tfh1 and Tfh17 in Tfh cells are the major source for IL-21 production in MG patients. A strong correlation between Tfh cells and the plasma cell frequency and anti-acetylcholine receptor Ab titers was evident in generalized MG patients. In particular, we found that Tfh cells derived from MG patients promoted B cells to produce Abs in an IL-21 signaling-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that circulating Tfh cells may act on autoreactive B cells and thus contribute to the development of MG in patients without thymic abnormalities. PMID:27543617

  1. Clonal heterogeneity of thymic B cells from early-onset myasthenia gravis patients with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Vrolix, Kathleen; Fraussen, Judith; Losen, Mario; Stevens, Jo; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Molenaar, Peter C; Somers, Veerle; Bracho, Maria Alma; Le Panse, Rozen; Stinissen, Piet; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Maessen, Jos G; Van Garsse, Leen; Buurman, Wim A; Tzartos, Socrates J; De Baets, Marc H; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) is considered as a prototypic autoimmune disease. The thymus is important in the pathophysiology of the disease since thymus hyperplasia is a characteristic of early-onset AChR-MG and patients often improve after thymectomy. We hypothesized that thymic B cell and antibody repertoires of AChR-MG patients differ intrinsically from those of control individuals. Using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus and Toll-like receptor 9 activation, we isolated and characterized monoclonal B cell lines from 5 MG patients and 8 controls. Only 2 of 570 immortalized B cell clones from MG patients produced antibodies against the AChR (both clones were from the same patient), suggesting that AChR-specific B cells are not enriched in the thymus. Surprisingly, many B cell lines from both AChR-MG and control thymus samples displayed reactivity against striated muscle proteins. Striational antibodies were produced by 15% of B cell clones from AChR-MG versus 6% in control thymus. The IgVH gene sequence analysis showed remarkable similarities, concerning VH family gene distribution, mutation frequency and CDR3 composition, between B cells of AChR-MG patients and controls. MG patients showed clear evidence of clonal B cell expansion in contrast to controls. In this latter aspect, MG resembles multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, but differs from systemic lupus erythematosus. Our results support an antigen driven immune response in the MG thymus, but the paucity of AChR-specific B cells, in combination with the observed polyclonal expansions suggest a more diverse immune response than expected.

  2. Altered Active Zones, Vesicle Pools, Nerve Terminal Conductivity, and Morphology during Experimental MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG. PMID:25438154

  3. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  4. [Premature birth in patient with cervix incompetence and history of myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Maximiliano; Troncoso, Miguel; Vallejos, Joaquin; Ponce, Sebastian; Villablanca, Nelson; Melita, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    Cervical incompetence it's a dilatation of the cervix during the third trimester of pregnancy that ends with the interruption of it. The incidence in Chile is about 0.1-2% of the total pregnancies and it's one of the causes of preterm birth. A 34 years old pregnant patient. Timectomized at age 18 to treat her miastenia gravis, previously trated with medication, had 4 previous preterm labours all of them under 25 weeks and vaginal births. All fetuses died postpartum. A cerclage was made during the third, fourth and fifth pregnancies. She didn't present hypertension during the gestation and no cervical diameter under 15mm. Since the fourth gestation the following tests are taken: Antifosfolipidic antibodies, APTT,PT. All the results are either normal or negative. Microbial cultures were negative. No amniocentesis was made. A McDonald cervical cerclage was made during pregnancies number 3, 4 and 5 on the 16th week to delay the labor. Also oral micronized progesterone, on a 400mg/24 hours dosis, was administered to avoid preterm birth. On the 24th week the pharmacological treatment started including Intramuscular Betamethasone, 12 mg/24 hours (2 doses), to induce lung maturity on the fetus. It is thought that the administration of progesterone could have improved the situation of the patient, because it acts as a labour repressants. The use of cerclage could have helped, but the factors that may influence the effectiveness of this method are unknown. Perhaps there is some immunologic factor associated with the miastenia gravis that alters the normal course of pregnancy.

  5. Standardization of the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model by immunization of rats with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptors--Recommendations for methods and experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Molenaar, Peter C; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates; Brenner, Talma; Duan, Rui-Sheng; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon; Kusner, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is characterized by a chronic, fatigable weakness of voluntary muscles. The production of autoantibodies involves the dysregulation of T cells which provide the environment for the development of autoreactive B cells. The symptoms are caused by destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and degradation of the AChR by IgG autoantibodies, predominantly of the G1 and G3 subclasses. Active immunization of animals with AChR from mammalian muscles, AChR from Torpedo or Electrophorus electric organs, and recombinant or synthetic AChR fragments generates a chronic model of MG, termed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). This model covers cellular mechanisms involved in the immune response against the AChR, e.g. antigen presentation, T cell-help and regulation, B cell selection and differentiation into plasma cells. Our aim is to define standard operation procedures and recommendations for the rat EAMG model using purified AChR from the Torpedo californica electric organ, in order to facilitate more rapid translation of preclinical proof of concept or efficacy studies into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. PMID:25796590

  6. A comprehensive analysis of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of anti-LRP4 in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zisimopoulou, P; Evangelakou, P; Tzartos, J; Lazaridis, K; Zouvelou, V; Mantegazza, R; Antozzi, C; Andreetta, F; Evoli, A; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Durmus, H; Brenner, T; Vaknin, A; Berrih-Aknin, S; Frenkian Cuvelier, M; Stojkovic, T; DeBaets, M; Losen, M; Martinez-Martinez, P; Kleopa, K A; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Kyriakides, T; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Szczudlik, P; Szyluk, B; Lavrnic, D; Basta, I; Peric, S; Tallaksen, C; Maniaol, A; Tzartos, S J

    2014-08-01

    Double-seronegative myasthenia gravis (dSN-MG, without detectable AChR and MuSK antibodies) presents a serious gap in MG diagnosis and understanding. Recently, autoantibodies against the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) have been identified in several dSN-MG sera, but with dramatic frequency variation (∼2-50%). We have developed a cell based assay (CBA) based on human LRP4 expressing HEK293 cells, for the reliable and efficient detection of LRP4 antibodies. We have screened about 800 MG patient sera from 10 countries for LRP4 antibodies. The overall frequency of LRP4-MG in the dSN-MG group (635 patients) was 18.7% but with variations among different populations (range 7-32.7%). Interestingly, we also identified double positive sera: 8/107 anti-AChR positive and 10/67 anti-MuSK positive sera also had detectable LRP4 antibodies, predominantly originating from only two of the participating groups. No LRP4 antibodies were identified in sera from 56 healthy controls tested, while 4/110 from patients with other neuroimmune diseases were positive. The clinical data, when available, for the LRP4-MG patients were then studied. At disease onset symptoms were mild (81% had MGFA grade I or II), with some identified thymic changes (32% hyperplasia, none with thymoma). On the other hand, double positive patients (AChR/LRP4-MG and MuSK/LRP4-MG) had more severe symptoms at onset compared with any single positive MG subgroup. Contrary to MuSK-MG, 27% of ocular dSN-MG patients were LRP4 antibody positive. Similarly, contrary to MuSK antibodies, which are predominantly of the IgG4 subtype, LRP4 antibodies were predominantly of the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes. The prevalence was higher in women than in men (female/male ratio 2.5/1), with an average disease onset at ages 33.4 for females and 41.9 for males. Overall, the response of LRP4-MG patients to treatment was similar to published responses of AChR-MG rather than to MuSK-MG patients.

  7. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Durmus, Hacer; Poulas, Kostas; Yentur, Sibel P.; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Tzartos, Socrates; Marx, Alexander; Tuzun, Erdem; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG) is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab) to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th) 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients

  8. Distinguishing Myasthenia Exacerbation from Severe Preeclampsia: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pooja; Aggarwal, Neelam; Suri, Vanita; Bhagat, Hement

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an acquired, autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by voluntary muscle weakness. Pregnant patients may have disease exacerbation, respiratory failure, crisis, adverse drug reaction, surprisingly enough remission at any trimester or postnatal period. Concurrence of myasthenia gravis with severe preeclampsia is a dreadful condition raising diagnostic and management issues. We hereby discuss a case of myasthenic woman who developed severe preeclampsia during pregnancy and presented in last trimester with clinical features mimicking signs of impending eclampsia. Keeping in mind the history of myasthenia gravis, urgent neurology review taken and diagnosis of myasthenic exacerbation was entertained. She responded well to injection neostigmine and in this way inadvertent use of magnesium sulphate was avoided. PMID:26436003

  9. “Why do I always see double?” A misdiagnosed case of ocular myasthenia gravis for 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Yousuf, Uduman Ali; Yashodhara, B M; Thanigasalam, Thevi; Ting, Heng Siang

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with diplopia and partial ptosis for 10 years. It was non-progressive in nature, despite inadequate medical attention the patient received from non-specialists/general practitioners. He did not have fatigability or diurnal variation in weakness and was clinically stable without exacerbations of disease for a decade. He did not have features of Graves's disease, oculopharyngeal dystrophy, cranial nerve paralysis, polymyositis and stroke. The possibility of an atypical presentation of myasthenia gravis (MG) was considered and the patient was evaluated. Ice pack test was negative, Cogan's lid twitch (CLT) test was positive and high titres of acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR Ab) suggestive of MG were found. He was treated accordingly with a very good response. PMID:24792021

  10. Life-threatening misdiagnosis of bulbar onset myasthenia gravis as a motor neuron disease: How much can one rely on exaggerated deep tendon reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Keivan; Ansari, Behnaz; Okhovat, Ali Asghar

    2015-01-01

    The autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG), can mimic a variety of neurological disorders leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. On occasions, misdiagnosis of MG could lead to unnecessary therapeutic interventions. We report the case of a 50 year-old man, in whom MG was mistaken for motor neuron disease (MND). Subsequently, correct diagnosis and optimal management resulted in saving his life and significant improvement in his functional status. We discuss the importance of considering MG as one of the potential differential diagnoses among cases of new onset or recurrent unexplained bulbar symptoms, despite exaggerated deep tendon reflexes. Also, a literature review on the misdiagnosis of MG and the potential pitfalls in MG diagnosis are discussed. PMID:25802827

  11. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis.

  12. Flow Cytofluorimetric Analysis of Anti-LRP4 (LDL Receptor-Related Protein 4) Autoantibodies in Italian Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Mariapaola; Scuderi, Flavia; Samengo, Daniela; Saltelli, Giorgia; Maiuri, Maria Teresa; Shen, Chengyong; Mei, Lin; Sabatelli, Mario; Pani, Giovambattista; Antonini, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia; Bartoccioni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease in which 90% of patients have autoantibodies against the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), while autoantibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) have been detected in half (5%) of the remaining 10%. Recently, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), identified as the agrin receptor, has been recognized as a third autoimmune target in a significant portion of the double sero-negative (dSN) myasthenic individuals, with variable frequency depending on different methods and origin countries of the tested population. There is also convincing experimental evidence that anti-LRP4 autoantibodies may cause MG. Methods The aim of this study was to test the presence and diagnostic significance of anti-LRP4 autoantibodies in an Italian population of 101 myasthenic patients (55 dSN, 23 AChR positive and 23 MuSK positive), 45 healthy blood donors and 40 patients with other neurological diseases as controls. All sera were analyzed by a cell-based antigen assay employing LRP4-transfected HEK293T cells, along with a flow cytofluorimetric detection system. Results We found a 14.5% (8/55) frequency of positivity in the dSN-MG group and a 13% frequency of co-occurrence (3/23) in both AChR and MuSK positive patients; moreover, we report a younger female prevalence with a mild form of disease in LRP4-positive dSN-MG individuals. Conclusion Our data confirm LRP4 as a new autoimmune target, supporting the value of including anti-LRP4 antibodies in further studies on Myasthenia gravis. PMID:26284792

  13. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis: Comparison of anti-nicotinic acetyl choline receptor antibodies, repetitive nerve stimulation and Neostigmine tests at a tertiary neuro care centre in India, a ten year study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shripad A; Bokoliya, Suresh C; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B

    2016-03-15

    Anti-nicotinic AChR antibodies (Anti-nAChR antibodies), Repetitive Nerve Stimulation (RNS) and Neostigmine test are used for diagnosis of myasthenia gravis (MG). We compared their diagnostic agreement in a cohort of 486 MG patients over a period of ten years. Anti-nAChR antibodies, RNS and Neostigmine test showed positivity of 57.36%, 51.78%, and 93.4% respectively in ocular myasthenia and 93.77%, 82.35%, and 97.92% respectively in generalized myasthenia group. Neostigmine test showed higher positivity than anti-nAChR antibodies and RNS test in both groups. A marginal to fair agreement was observed between these tests highlighting their significance in the diagnosis of the disease.

  14. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... involved. However, this is not completely understood. One hypothesis is that patients may simply notice eye weakness ... in other muscle groups in the body. Another hypothesis is that the eye and eyelid muscles are ...

  15. Myasthenia Gravis Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of those with MG who have an enlarged thymus gland and indicate a significantly increased likelihood of the ... chest CT (computed tomography)—to detect an enlarged thymus gland or thymoma. A brain and eye orbit MRI ( ...

  16. Nutrition and Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and to improve their lives through programs of patient services, public information, medical research, professional education, advocacy and patient care. This publication is intended to provide the ...

  17. Myasthenia Gravis Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plasmapheresis (PLAZ-muh-FUR-uh-suhss) or plasma exchange. This procedure removes abnormal antibodies from the blood. ... above — in particular, intravenous immune globulin and plasma exchange — can reverse the severe weakness of a myasthenic ...

  18. Employees with Myasthenia Gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of America, 2001). MG and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is MG a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  19. Ephedrine as add-on therapy for patients with myasthenia gravis: protocol for a series of randomised, placebo-controlled n-of-1 trials

    PubMed Central

    Vrinten, Charlotte; Lipka, Alexander F; van Zwet, Erik W; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; Cornel, Martina C; Kuijpers, Marja R; Hekster, Yechiel A; Weinreich, Stephanie S; Verschuuren, Jan J G M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis (MG), a rare neuromuscular disease, is often initially treated using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Patients who do not respond adequately depend on the use of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive medication, but these may have serious side effects. Clinical observations suggest that ephedrine can diminish, postpone or even prevent the need for immunosuppressive therapy when added to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or low-dose prednisone. In the Netherlands, ephedrine is not licensed for MG nor is reimbursement guaranteed. MG is a rare condition, and ephedrine might be indicated only in a subset of patients. Thus, randomised controlled trials comparing large groups are difficult to conduct. We, therefore, aim to aggregate data from a small series of n-of-1 trials (also known as single patient trials) to assess the effect of ephedrine as add-on treatment for MG. Methods and analysis Single-centre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised, multiple crossover n-of-1 studies in 4 adult patients with generalised MG who show inadequate improvement on pyridostigmine and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Each n-of-1 trial has 3 cycles of two 5-day intervention periods. Treatment: 25 mg ephedrine or placebo, twice daily. Main outcome measure: Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) test. Statistical analysis: fixed effects linear model for QMG for all patients combined. Secondary outcome measures: Clinical: effects on MG-Composite and MG-Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) scales; QMG at individual level; adverse events. Acceptability of trial design: number of patients eligible and enrolled; number of treatment cycles completed; patients’ and caregivers’ experiences. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of Leiden University Medical Center, No. P14.108. Results of the trial will be reported in a peer-reviewed publication. Regulatory stakeholders will comment on the suitability of the trial

  20. Congenital myasthenic syndrome due to mutation in CHRNE gene with clinical worsening and thymic hyperplasia attributed to association with autoimmune-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ernestina; Moreira, Isabel; Coutinho, Ester; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lopes, Carlos; Lopes Lima, José; Leite, M Isabel

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to mutation in CHRNE with symptoms since the age of 4; mild to moderate fatigable weakness involved mainly ocular, bulbar and limb muscles; functional impact of the disease in their development and physical activity was modest. By the age of 34, the patient experienced gradual worsening of fatigue with dyspnoea and pronounced limb weakness, requiring significant increase of pyridostigmine. Further, a remarkable and sustained clinical improvement followed thymectomy with hyperplastic thymus. Despite of the absence of detectable antibodies to acetyl-choline receptor (AChR) (including clustered-AChR), muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 antibodies in the serum obtained nine years after thymectomy, the clinical, genetic and histological features are in keeping with the extremely rare association of two rare neuromuscular junction disorders - CMS and myasthenia gravis (MG). The inexistence of other conditions that could potentially associate with thymic hyperplasia also supports the diagnosis of MG. PMID:26363966

  1. A case of anterior mediastinitis and bilateral multiple lung abscesses occurring after trans-subxiphoid video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy for thymoma with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanlu; Geng, Yingcai; Zheng, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with an acute episode of chest pain, progressive cough and fever. She underwent trans-subxiphoid video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (TsVATET) for thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG) 9 days ago. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed anterior mediastinal oedema, and infiltrative findings involved bilateral lung. Physical examination revealed the subxiphoid wound suppuration. We diagnosed subxiphoid incision infection, anterior mediastinitis and concomitant bilateral pneumonia. Using antibiotics intravenously combined with anterior mediastinum irrigation and drainage, she felt well but bilateral multiple lung abscesses were discovered on the 12th day of hospitalisation. After conservative treatment with antibiotics and wound care, the recovery was satisfactory and she discharged home. In our experience, because the subxiphoid incision, the anterior mediastinum and the bilateral thoracic cavity communicated directly after TsVATET, we should be aware of the risk of anterior mediastinitis, the infection of bilateral pleural cavity, pneumonia and multiple lung abscesses following subxiphoid incision infection. PMID:27747038

  2. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M; Bajic, V B; Prince, S

    2009-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198C>G SNP (odds ratio=8.6; P=0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5′-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198C>G SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. PMID:19675582

  3. Myf5 and Myogenin in the development of thymic myoid cells - Implications for a murine in vivo model of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Simon-Keller, Katja; Küffer, Stefan; Ströbel, Philipp; Braun, Thomas; Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by autoantibodies against the neuromuscular junction of striated muscle. Most MG patients have autoreactive T- and B-cells directed to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To achieve immunologic tolerance, developing thymocytes are normally eliminated after recognition of self-antigen-derived peptides. Presentation of muscle-specific antigens is likely achieved through two pathways: on medullary thymic epithelial cells and on medullary dendritic cells cross-presenting peptides derived from a unique population of thymic myoid cells (TMC). Decades ago, it has been hypothesized that TMC play a key role in the induction of immunological tolerance towards skeletal muscle antigens. However, an experimental model to address this postulate has not been available. To generate such a model, we tested the hypothesis that the development of TMC depends on myogenic regulatory factors. To this end, we utilized Myf5-deficient mice, which lack the first wave of muscle cells but form normal skeletal muscles later during development, and Myogenin-deficient mice, which fail to form differentiated myofibers. We demonstrate for the first time that Myf5- and Myogenin-deficient mice showed a partial or complete, respectively, loss of TMC in an otherwise regularly structured thymus. To overcome early postnatal lethality of muscle-deficient, Myogenin-knockout mice we transplanted Myogenin-deficient fetal thymuses into Foxn1(nu/nu) mice that lack their own thymus anlage. We found that the transplants are functional but lack TMC. In combination with established immunization strategies (utilizing AChR or Titin), this model should enable us in the future testing the hypothesis that TMC play an indispensable role in the development of central tolerance towards striated muscle antigens. PMID:26708556

  4. Clinical Significance of Repetitive Compound Muscle Action Potentials in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis: A Predictor for Cholinergic Side Effects of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Eun; Kim, Yool-hee; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are widely used to treat myasthenia gravis (MG). Although AChEIs are usually tolerated well, some MG patients suffer from side effects. Furthermore, a small proportion of MG patients show cholinergic hypersensitivity and cannot tolerate AChEIs. Because repetitive compound muscle action potentials (R-CMAPs) are an electrophysiologic feature of cholinergic neuromuscular hyperactivity, we investigated the clinical characteristics of MG patients with R-CMAPs to identify their clinical usefulness in therapeutic decision-making. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records and electrodiagnostic findings of MG patients who underwent electrodiagnostic studies and diagnostic neostigmine testing (NT). Results Among 71 MG patients, 9 could not tolerate oral pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and 17 experienced side effects of PB. R-CMAPs developed in 24 patients after NT. The highest daily dose of PB was lower in the patients with R-CMAPs (240 mg/day vs. 480 mg/day, p<0.001). The frequencies of PB intolerance and side effects were higher in the patients with R-CMAPs than in those without R-CMAPs [37.5% vs. 0% (p<0.001) and 45.8% vs. 12.8% (p=0.002), respectively]. The MG Foundation of America postintervention status did not differ significantly between MG patients with and without R-CMAPs, and the response to immunotherapy was also good in both groups. Conclusions Side effects of and intolerance to AChEIs are more common in MG patients with R-CMAPs than in those without R-CMAPs. AChEIs should be used carefully in MG patients with R-CMAPs. The presence of R-CMAPs after NT may be a good indicator of the risks of PB side effects and intolerance.

  5. The association of systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: a series of 17 cases, with a special focus on hydroxychloroquine use and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, M; Saadoun, D; Eymard, B; Leroux, G; Haroche, J; Le Thi Huong, D; De Gennes, C; Chapelon, C; Benveniste, O; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Amoura, Z; Piette, J C; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2012-07-01

    The coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and myasthenia gravis (MG) is rarely reported, and most of the published studies are case reports. Hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial agent, is an essential treatment in patients with SLE but special caution is recommended when used in MG patients. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, laboratory findings, and outcome of 17 patients with both diseases with a special focus regarding hydroxychloroquine use and with a review of the literature. All patients were women. The mean age at MG onset and SLE diagnosis was 34.5 [14-64] and 37.8 [18-72] years, respectively. The presenting symptoms of MG were limb weakness (94%), ocular (88%) and bulbar involvement (53%). Autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor were positive in 94% of cases. The main manifestations of SLE included arthritis (88%), cytopenias (53%) and skin rash (41%). Treatment of SLE required hydroxychloroquine (94%), steroids (47%) and immunosuppressive drugs (18%). Among eight patients (47%) who developed MG after initiation of hydroxychloroquine, the question of induction of MG by hydroxychloroquine was raised in one patient. On the other hand, an exacerbation of myasthenic symptoms was only seen in one of the eight patients who received hydroxychloroquine after the diagnosis of MG. Including our cases, we reviewed a total of 70 patients with SLE and MG. Compared with a large series of 1,000 unselected SLE patients, those with associated MG were older, had lower incidence of cutaneous, renal, and neurological manifestations, and higher frequency of anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. In conclusion, the clinical pattern of patients with SLE and MG seems to be characterized by a less severe course of SLE and higher frequency of antiphospholipid antibodies. Hydroxychloroquine treatment appears to be safe in this setting. PMID:22160434

  6. IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells contribute to the loss of B-cell tolerance in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Hanne; Pelz, Andreas; Saxena, Abhishek; Losen, Mario; Meisel, Andreas; Thiel, Andreas; Kohler, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    The role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-mediated diseases is unclear. Here, we assessed the contribution of Th17 cells to the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by repetitive immunizations with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (tAChR). We show that a significant fraction of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells is producing IL-17. IL-17(ko) mice developed fewer or no EAMG symptoms, although the frequencies of tAChR-specific CD4(+) T cells secreting IL-2, IFN-γ, or IL-21, and the percentage of FoxP3(+) Treg cells were similar to WT mice. Even though the total anti-tAChR antibody levels were equal, the complement fixating IgG2b subtype was reduced in IL-17(ko) as compared to WT mice. Most importantly, pathogenic anti-murine AChR antibodies were significantly lower in IL-17(ko) mice. Furthermore, we confirmed the role of Th17 cells in EAMG pathogenesis by the reconstitution of TCR β/δ(ko) mice with WT or IL-17(ko) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, we show that the level of IgG2b and the loss of B-cell tolerance, which results in pathogenic anti-murine AChR-specific antibodies, are dependent on IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we describe here for the first time how Th17 cells are involved in the induction of classical antibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:25676041

  7. Myf5 and Myogenin in the development of thymic myoid cells - Implications for a murine in vivo model of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Simon-Keller, Katja; Küffer, Stefan; Ströbel, Philipp; Braun, Thomas; Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by autoantibodies against the neuromuscular junction of striated muscle. Most MG patients have autoreactive T- and B-cells directed to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To achieve immunologic tolerance, developing thymocytes are normally eliminated after recognition of self-antigen-derived peptides. Presentation of muscle-specific antigens is likely achieved through two pathways: on medullary thymic epithelial cells and on medullary dendritic cells cross-presenting peptides derived from a unique population of thymic myoid cells (TMC). Decades ago, it has been hypothesized that TMC play a key role in the induction of immunological tolerance towards skeletal muscle antigens. However, an experimental model to address this postulate has not been available. To generate such a model, we tested the hypothesis that the development of TMC depends on myogenic regulatory factors. To this end, we utilized Myf5-deficient mice, which lack the first wave of muscle cells but form normal skeletal muscles later during development, and Myogenin-deficient mice, which fail to form differentiated myofibers. We demonstrate for the first time that Myf5- and Myogenin-deficient mice showed a partial or complete, respectively, loss of TMC in an otherwise regularly structured thymus. To overcome early postnatal lethality of muscle-deficient, Myogenin-knockout mice we transplanted Myogenin-deficient fetal thymuses into Foxn1(nu/nu) mice that lack their own thymus anlage. We found that the transplants are functional but lack TMC. In combination with established immunization strategies (utilizing AChR or Titin), this model should enable us in the future testing the hypothesis that TMC play an indispensable role in the development of central tolerance towards striated muscle antigens.

  8. Increased expression of Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 in myasthenia gravis thymus characterized by active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paola; Galbardi, Barbara; Franzi, Sara; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Barzago, Claudia; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Kapetis, Dimos; Andreetta, Francesca; Biasiucci, Amelia; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-04-01

    Considerable data implicate the thymus as the main site of autosensitization to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis (MG), a B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction. We recently demonstrated an active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the thymus of MG patients, suggesting that EBV might contribute to the onset or maintenance of the autoimmune response within MG thymus, because of its ability to activate and immortalize autoreactive B cells. EBV has been reported to elicit and modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune responses, which are known to favor B-cell dysfunction and autoimmunity. Aim of this study was to investigate whether EBV infection is associated with altered expression of TLR7 and TLR9 in MG thymus. By real-time PCR, we found that TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA levels were significantly higher in EBV-positive MG compared to EBV-negative normal thymuses. By confocal microscopy, high expression levels of TLR7 and TLR9 proteins were observed in B cells and plasma cells of MG thymic germinal centers (GCs) and lymphoid infiltrates, where the two receptors co-localized with EBV antigens. An increased frequency of Ki67-positive proliferating B cells was found in MG thymuses, where we also detected proliferating cells expressing TLR7, TLR9 and EBV antigens, thus supporting the idea that EBV-associated TLR7/9 signaling may promote abnormal B-cell activation and proliferation. Along with B cells and plasma cells, thymic epithelium, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages exhibited enhanced TLR7 and TLR9 expression in MG thymus; TLR7 was also increased in thymic myeloid dendritic cells and its transcriptional levels positively correlated with those of interferon (IFN)-β. We suggested that TLR7/9 signaling may be involved in antiviral type I IFN production and long-term inflammation in EBV-infected MG thymuses. Our overall findings indicate that EBV-driven TLR7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune

  9. Expression of a highly antigenic and native-like folded extracellular domain of the human α1 subunit of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, suitable for use in antigen specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Zouridakis, Marios; Douris, Vassilis; Georgostathi, Assimina; Kalamida, Dimitra; Sotiriadis, Alexandros; Poulas, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the expression of the extracellular domain of the human α1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in lepidopteran insect cells (i-α1-ECD) and its suitability for use in antigen-specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Compared to the previously expressed protein in P. pastoris (y-α1-ECD), i-α1-ECD had a 2-fold increased expression yield, bound anti-nAChR monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from MG patients two to several-fold more efficiently and resulted in a secondary structure closer to that of the crystal structure of mouse α1-ECD. Our results indicate that i-α1-ECD is an improved protein for use in antigen-specific MG therapeutic strategies. PMID:24376846

  10. Suppression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in IL-10 gene-disrupted mice is associated with reduced B cells and serum cytotoxicity on mouse cell line expressing AChR.

    PubMed

    Poussin, M A; Goluszko, E; Hughes, T K; Duchicella, S I; Christadoss, P

    2000-11-01

    To analyze the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) pathogenesis, we induced clinical EAMG in C57BL/6 and IL-10 gene-knockout (KO) mice. IL-10 KO mice had a lower incidence and severity of EAMG, with less muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss. AChR-immunized IL-10 KO mice showed a significantly higher AChR-specific proliferative response, altered cytokine response, lower number of class II-positive cells and B-cells, but a greater CD5(+)CD19(+) population than C57BL/6 mice. The lower clinical incidence in IL-10 KO could be explained not by a reduction of the quantity, but by a possible difference in the pathogenicity of anti-AChR antibodies.

  11. Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... where parents can share their concerns, their triumphs, information and ideas. Take a look by searching MG Parents, or click here. Research News -- MG Vaccine? New Targets? New Diagnostics? The MGFA reached out to Dr. Jon Lindstrom, whose work, ... New Research Funding Announcement Transformative Research ...

  12. Myasthenia Gravis (MG): Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... for use only when other drugs fail. Myasthenic crisis Especially in people with bulbar or respiratory symptoms, ... can sometimes worsen to the point of myasthenic crisis , an extreme episode of weakness that culminates in ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: myasthenia gravis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AChR); in others, the antibodies attack a related protein called muscle-specific kinase (MuSK). In both cases, the abnormal antibodies lead to a reduction of available AChR. The AChR protein is critical for signaling between nerve and muscle ...

  14. [Directions for use of corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors against generalized myasthenia gravis: therapeutic strategies that can lead to early improvements and veer away from high-dose oral corticosteroids].

    PubMed

    Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Nagane, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    The advent of effective immune treatment has meant that myasthenia gravis (MG) is most often not lethal. However, many MG patients still find it difficult to maintain daily activities due to chronic residual fatigability and long-term side effects of medication, since full remission without immune treatment is not common. Our analysis demonstrated that disease severity, dose of oral corticosteroids, and depressive state are the major independent factors negatively associated with self-reported QOL (MG-QOL15-J score). It is noteworthy that oral corticosteroid, the first-line agent for MG, is negatively associated with patients' QOL. When the analysis took into account MGFA postintervention status and dose of oral prednisolne (PSL), the MG-QOL15-J score of MM status patients taking ≤ 5 mg PSL per day is identically low (i.e., just as good QOL) as that seen in CSR and is a target of treatment. In order to veer away from high-dose oral corticosteroids and to achieve early MM or better status with PSL ≤ 5 mg/day, we advocate the early aggressive treatment strategy that can achieve early improvement by performing an aggressive therapy using combined treatment with plasmapheresis and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and then maintain an improved clinical status using low-dose oral corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine microemulsion and tacrolimus). The early stages of MG are susceptible to treatment with calcineurin inhibitors. When using cyclosporine microemulsion for MG, blood concentrations 2 h after administration (C2) correlate with clinical improvement and immediately before administration (C0) with side effects (increased serum creatinine and/or hypertension). Monitoring of C2 and C0 levels is useful to estimate efficacy and safety of the drug. PMID:23196511

  15. Myasthenia Gravis: Tests and Diagnostic Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affiliations Foundation Focus Newsletter E-Update Test & Diagnostic methods In addition to a complete medical and neurological ... How can I help? About MGFA Test & Diagnostic methods Treatment for MG FAQ's Upcoming Events Spring 2016 ...

  16. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care.A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C.In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  17. Animal models of antimuscle specific kinase myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Richman, David P.; Nishi, Kayoko; Ferns, Michael J.; Schnier, Joachim; Pytel, Peter; Maselli, Ricardo A.; Agius, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Antimuscle specific kinase (anti-MuSK) myasthenia (AMM) differs from antiacetylcholine receptor myasthenia gravis in exhibiting more focal muscle involvement (neck, shoulder, facial, and bulbar muscles) with wasting of the involved, primarily axial, muscles. AMM is not associated with thymic hyperplasia and responds poorly to anticholinesterase treatment. Animal models of AMM have been induced in rabbits, mice, and rats by immunization with purified xenogeneic MuSK ectodomain, and by passive transfer of large quantities of purified serum IgG from AMM patients into mice. The models have confirmed the pathogenic role of the MuSK antibodies in AMM and have demonstrated the involvement of both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the neuromuscular junction. The observations in this human disease and its animal models demonstrate the role of MuSK not only in the formation of this synapse but also in its maintenance. PMID:23252909

  18. Ice test in diagnosis of ocular myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Quddus, M A; Rahman, H Z; Ali, Z M; Khan, O S; Aftabuddin, M

    2013-10-01

    This observational, non-control, non equivalent pretest and post test descriptive study was carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from June 2009 to December 2009 to compare the efficacy of ice test and repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) in diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis. Ten patients with fluctuating ptosis (4 male and 6 female) who were suspected of having ocular myasthenia were included in the study. Male and female ratio in the study was 2:3. The mean age of the patients was 28.1 years. Positive response to pyridostigmine was taken as confirmation of ocular myasthenia. A piece of ice (2cm × 1cm) was placed over the upper eyelid for 2 minutes and the vertical eye lid fissure height was noted before and after the application of ice. Repetitive nerve stimulation was performed in the same subjects subsequently. Results of two tests were compared. Eight patients shows good (>2mm) elevation of eyelid with ice and three patients had abnormal RNS. In conclusion, ice test appears as more sensitive clinical test to detect ocular myasthenia than RNS test.

  19. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  20. Therapeutic gymnastics in comprehensive treatment of patients with generalized myasthenia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapelovich, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of therapeutic gymnastics was used for patients with mayasthenia gravis to control the consequences of hypodynamia induced by the myasthenic process. It is concluded that during myasthenia, the severity of the disease is due to the affection of the cross striated musculature. The most life threatening are the disorders in respiration and swallowing, that can be intensified by forced stay in bed and immobility. It is also concluded that the use of therapeutic gymnastics in patients which myasthenia promotes efficient presurgical preparation, and in the post surgical period; prevention of pulmonary complications and normalization of respiration. Therapeutic gymnastics with regard to the severity and localization of the myasthenic disorders must be a component part of the presurgical preparation and postsurgical management of patients with generalized myasthenia.

  1. Quality of life in purely ocular myasthenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since there has been no conclusive evidence regarding the treatment of ocular myasthenia, treatment guidelines were recently issued by the European Federation of Neurological Societies/European Neurological Society (EFNS/ENS). However, the therapeutic outcomes concerning the quality-of-life (QOL) of patients with ocular myasthenia are not yet fully understood. Methods We investigated the therapeutic outcomes of patients with purely ocular myasthenia in a multicenter cross-sectional survey in Japan. To evaluate the severity of ocular symptoms, we used the ocular-quantitative MG (QMG) score advocated by Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America. We used the Japanese translated version of the MG-QOL15, a self-appraised scoring system. Results Of 607 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with an observation-duration of illness ≥ 2 years, the cases of 123 patients (20%) were limited to ocular muscles (purely ocular myasthenia). During the entire clinical course, 81 patients experienced both ptosis and diplopia, 36 had ptosis alone, and six had diplopia alone. Acetyl-cholinesterase inhibitors and prednisolone were used in 98 and 52 patients, respectively. Treatment improved ocular symptoms, with the mean reduction in ocular-QMG score of 2.3 ± 1.8 points. However, 47 patients (38%) failed to gain minimal manifestation or a better status. Patients with unfavorable outcomes also self-reported severe QOL impairment. Multivariate analyses showed that the pretreatment ocular-QMG score was associated with unfavorable outcomes, but not associated with the patient’s QOL. Conclusion A treatment strategy designed in accord with a patient's ocular presentation must be considered in order to improve ocular symptoms and the patient's QOL. PMID:24996227

  2. [Localization of binding sites in rat muscles and brain for cobra neurotoxin and serum immunoglobulins from patients with myasthenia].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V A; Vladeeva, N V; Lobzin, V S; Paniukov, A N

    1986-09-01

    Using the immunohistochemical technique, it was revealed that serum immunoglobulins of patients with myasthenia gravis (Ig) were irreversibly attached to the myoneuronal connections of the rat intercostal muscles like the marker of the nicotin cholinireceptors--the cobra venom neurotoxin (CT). In addition, Ig differs from CT in the binding to nervous cells of the claustrum and diencephalon reticular formation and with certain cells of the nucleus caudatus and hemispheric cerebral cortex. It is suggested that the autoimmune processes in patients with myasthenia gravis do not only involve myoneuronal connection but also participate in central mechanisms of the disease genesis. PMID:3756323

  3. Animal models of antimuscle-specific kinase myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Richman, David P; Nishi, Kayoko; Ferns, Michael J; Schnier, Joachim; Pytel, Peter; Maselli, Ricardo A; Agius, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Antimuscle-specific kinase (anti-MuSK) myasthenia (AMM) differs from antiacetylcholine receptor myasthenia gravis in exhibiting more focal muscle involvement (neck, shoulder, facial, and bulbar muscles) with wasting of the involved, primarily axial, muscles. AMM is not associated with thymic hyperplasia and responds poorly to anticholinesterase treatment. Animal models of AMM have been induced in rabbits, mice, and rats by immunization with purified xenogeneic MuSK ectodomain, and by passive transfer of large quantities of purified serum IgG from AMM patients into mice. The models have confirmed the pathogenic role of the MuSK antibodies in AMM and have demonstrated the involvement of both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the neuromuscular junction. The observations in this human disease and its animal models demonstrate the role of MuSK not only in the formation of this synapse but also in its maintenance.

  4. Precision medicine in myasthenia graves: begin from the data precision

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Xie, Yanchen; Hao, Hong-Jun; Sun, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypic autoimmune disease with overt clinical and immunological heterogeneity. The data of MG is far from individually precise now, partially due to the rarity and heterogeneity of this disease. In this review, we provide the basic insights of MG data precision, including onset age, presenting symptoms, generalization, thymus status, pathogenic autoantibodies, muscle involvement, severity and response to treatment based on references and our previous studies. Subgroups and quantitative traits of MG are discussed in the sense of data precision. The role of disease registries and scientific bases of precise analysis are also discussed to ensure better collection and analysis of MG data. PMID:27127759

  5. Dermatomyositis and myastenia gravis: An uncommon association with therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Méndez Perles, Clara; Barbadillo, Carmen; Godoy, Hildegarda; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The association of dermatomyositis with myasthenia gravis (MG) is uncommon, having been reported so far in only 26 cases. We report the case of a 69 year-old man diagnosed with MG two years ago and currently treated with piridostigmyne. The patient developed acute proximal weakness, shoulder pain and elevated creatine-kinase (CK). He also developed generalized facial erythema and Gottron's papules. Laboratory tests showed positive antinuclear and anti-Mi2 antibodies. Further analysis confirmed CK levels above 1000 U/l. The clinical management of the patient and the therapeutic implications derived from the coexistence of both entities are discusssed.

  6. Mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor loss in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Drachman, D B; Adams, R N; Stanley, E F; Pestronk, A

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental abnormality affecting the neuromuscular junctions of myasthenic patients is a reduction of available AChRs, due to an autoimmune attack directed against the receptors. Antibodies to AChR are present in most patients, and there is evidence that they have a predominant pathogenic role in the disease, aided by complement. The mechanism of antibody action involves acceleration of the rate of degradation of AChRs, attributable to cross-linking of the receptors. In addition, antibodies may block AChRs, and may participate in producing destructive changes, perhaps in conjunction with complement. The possibility that cell-mediated mechanisms may play a role in the autoimmune responses of some myasthenic patients remains to be explored. Although the target of the autoimmune attack in myasthenic patients is probably always the acetylcholine receptors, it is not yet clear which of these immune mechanisms are most important. It is likely that the relative role of each mechanism varies from patient to patient. One of the goals of future research will be to identify the relative importance of each of these mechanisms in the individual patient, and to tailor specific immunotherapeutic measures to the abnormalities found. PMID:6249894

  7. Myasthenia Gravis, Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome & Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... In most cases of MG, the immune system origins of MG have gradually unfolded, targets the acetylcholine ... is a rare autoimmune disease whose symptoms and origins are some- what similar to those of MG. ...

  8. Thymoma complicated by acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Gay, Carl M; William, William N; Wang, Sa A; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2014-11-01

    Although the association of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and aplastic anemia with thymoma is well-known, acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT) is not a recognized paraneoplastic manifestation of thymoma. This report discusses a patient with recurrent thymoma complicated by myasthenia gravis, PRCA, and AAMT. Both PRCA and AAMT are diagnosed after a thymoma recurrence, 11 years after complete resection of the initial tumor and 9 months after chemotherapy for the relapsed disease. Both PRCA and AAMT responded to immunosuppression with cyclosporine, corticosteroid, and an abbreviated course of antithymocyte globulin, achieving a very good erythroid response and a complete remission for AAMT, suggesting that AAMT, although extremely rare, can be an immune-mediated paraneoplastic manifestation of thymoma.

  9. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

    PubMed

    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  10. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

    PubMed

    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  11. Progressive bilateral ophthalmoparesis--a case of simultaneous autoimmunity: balancing Graves' ophthalmoparesis and ocular myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Carlo; Venu, Maya

    2016-01-04

    A 44-year-old woman with no medical history presented with a 1-year history of horizontal diplopia, bilateral exophthalmos and progressive asymmetrical ophthalmoparesis, with no pupillary dysfunction or ptosis. Within 3 months of her initial presentation, she noticed paresis of right eye abduction, followed after 1 month with paresis of left eye abduction. Initial investigations revealed positive antiperoxidase antibodies for Graves' disease and positive AChR for myasthenia gravis. MRI of the brain showed increased intensity in bilateral inferior rectus muscles and CT of the chest showed thymic hyperplasia. Treatment with carbimazole and pyridostigmine was started, with complete resolution after 1 month.

  12. An Adult Patient with Ocular Myasthenia and Unusually Long Spontaneous Remission

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashel, Jasem; Rashad, Hanaa M.; Rousseff, Rossen T.

    2014-01-01

    A male patient developed ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) at the age of 33. He was anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR Ab) negative. He received cholinesterase blocker for 5 months and went into a complete clinical remission that lasted untreated for 17 years. He relapsed recently with ocular symptoms only. He is now anti-AChR Ab positive and SFEMG is abnormal in a facial muscle. The patient is controlled with steroids. He had one of the longest spontaneous remissions reported in the natural history of MG, particularly unusual for an adult with the disease. PMID:24822137

  13. Thymus involution in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grody, W W; Fligiel, S; Naeim, F

    1985-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, predominantly affecting homosexual males and other high-risk groups and characterized by profound alterations in T-lymphocyte function. The authors have examined thymus tissue from 14 patients who died of AIDS and compared the results with findings in five control groups: healthy age-matched controls, elderly individuals, patients with chronic or debilitating illnesses other than AIDS, infants with conditions causing "stress atrophy," and patients with myasthenia gravis. The AIDS group included 11 homosexual males, 1 Haitian, 1 homosexual who was also a drug abuser, and a 10-month-old infant believed to have contracted AIDS following blood transfusion. All the AIDS cases showed marked thymus involution with severe depletion of both lymphocytes and epithelial elements. The latter component consisted primarily of thin cords and nests of primitive-appearing epithelial cells that could be defined by positive immunohistochemical staining for keratin. Many cases showed a variable plasma cell infiltration, and the majority exhibited distinct vascular changes in the form of hyalinization and/or onion-skin patterns, primarily in the adventitia. Most striking of all was the marked paucity of Hassall's corpuscles; four patients had none at all, while in the other ten patients all the Hassall's corpuscles were calcified. These changes were far more extensive than those seen in any of the control groups, which retained most of their complement of Hassall's corpuscles even in the face of marked overall involution. The physiologic function of Hassall's corpuscles is not known, but recent immunohistochemical studies have implicated them in the synthesis of "facteur thymique serique" (FTS, thymulin) and other thymic hormones known to play a role in regulating T-helper and suppressor cell activity. It is conceivable that the extensive destruction of Hassall's corpuscles observed in

  14. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft. PMID:23440963

  15. Computed tomography of the anterior mediastinum in myasthemia gravis: a radiologic-pathologic correlative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, G.T.; Bein, M.E.; Mancuso, A.A.; Keesey, J.C.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wong, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the mediastinum were correlated with pathologic findings of the thymus following thymectomy in 57 patients with myasthenia gravis. Based on the patient's age and the overall morphology of the anterior mediastinum, CT scans were assigned one of four grades in an attempt to predict thymus pathologic findings. Using this grading, 14 of 16 cases of thymoma were suspected or definitely diagnosed. One of the two cases not diagnosed on CT was a microscopic tumor. There were no false-positive diagnoses in 11 cases graded as definitely thymoma. We conclude that thymoma can be sensitively diagnosed in patients older than 40 years of age. However, thymoma cannot be predicted with a high level of confidence in patients younger than 40 because of the difficulty in differentiating normal thymus or hyperplasia from thymoma. Recommendations for the use of CT in the preoperative evaluation of myasthenic patients are presented.

  16. Two simultaneous autoimmune processes in a patient presenting with respiratory insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Lauren; Hamor, Paul; Bleasel, Jane; Corte, Tamera

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including dermatomyositis, are uncommon acquired autoimmune diseases, sometimes associated with interstitial lung disease. Myasthenia gravis, a separate autoimmune disorder involving the neuromuscular junction, has some overlapping clinical features but has only rarely been reported to occur simultaneously within the same patient. Here we present the first reported case of concomitant dermatomyositis, myasthenia gravis, and interstitial lung disease. PMID:25473554

  17. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  18. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  19. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  20. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  1. [Validation of the ice pack test in ophthalmoparesis due to myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Antunez, Ángel G; García-Ramos, Guillermo; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno; Juárez-Flores, Alejandra

    2013-11-01

    Introduccion. La miastenia grave es una enfermedad autoinmune de la union neuromuscular que se presenta clinicamente como debilidad fluctuante de los musculos estriados, como los de la region ocular (miastenia ocular). Objetivo. Demostrar que la sensibilidad y la especificidad de la prueba de hielo son altas en el diagnostico diferencial de la oftalmoparesia y ptosis palpebral por miastenia grave y miastenia ocular. Sujetos y metodos. Estudio observacional, analitico, no aleatorizado, de una muestra de 43 sujetos, 21 con miastenia grave y 22 controles. A todos los pacientes se les aplico un guante con hielo sobre sus parpados superiores afectados durante dos minutos, despues de los cuales se evaluo el grado de mejoria de la ptosis palpebral y la oftalmoparesia. Todos tenian estudio de estimulacion nerviosa repetitiva. Resultados. Se analizaron 36 pacientes, 18 con miastenia grave u ocular y 18 controles. Todos presentaron ptosis palpebral y solo 20 de ellos oftalmoparesia. La prueba de hielo para la oftalmoparesia mostro una sensibilidad del 83%, especificidad del 100%, valor predictivo positivo (VPP) del 100% y valor predictivo negativo (VPN) del 80% en el diagnostico de la miastenia grave. Para la ptosis palpebral, se determino una sensibilidad del 89%, especificidad del 100%, VPP del 100% y VPN del 90%. Para la estimulacion nerviosa repetitiva se calculo una sensibilidad del 61%, especificidad del 83%, VPP del 79% y VPN del 68%. Conclusion. La prueba de hielo es sencilla, segura, economica, rapida y fiable para utilizarse de rutina en pacientes con sospecha de ptosis u oftalmoparesia por miastenia grave, ya que tiene una alta validez, seguridad y reproducibilidad como prueba diagnostica.

  2. Higgs decays and brane gravi-vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Liu Boyang; Love, S. T.; Xiong, C.; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2008-10-01

    Higgs boson decays in flexible brane world models with stable, massive gravi-vectors are considered. Such vectors couple bilinearly to the standard model fields through either the standard model energy-momentum tensor, the weak hypercharge field strength, or the Higgs scalar. The role of the coupling involving the extrinsic curvature is highlighted. It is found that within the presently allowed parameter space, the decay rate of the Higgs into two gravi-vectors (which would appear as an invisible Higgs decay) can be comparable to the rate for any of the standard model decay modes.

  3. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis-tensilon ... Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions. ... The test helps: Diagnose myasthenia gravis Tell the difference ... conditions Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase drugs ...

  4. Stimulated single fiber EMG of the frontalis muscle in the diagnosis of ocular myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Valls-Canals, J; Montero, J; Pradas, J

    2000-05-01

    We performed single fiber electromyography by axonal stimulation (SFEMG-AS) of the frontalis muscle of 16 patients with ocular myasthenia gravis (OM) and 33 controls. In the controls, values of mean consecutive differences (MCD) ranged from 5 to 55 micros (average, 14.7 +/- 2.8 micros) and mean MCD of individual MPs was 14. 6 +/- 6.8 micros. All the OM patients showed abnormal SFEMG-AS jitter before prostigmine was administered (mean MCD: 49.19 +/- 21. 82 micros, percentage of blocks: 20.97 +/- 18.53). Twenty or 30 min after prostigmine had been administered, we saw a significant improvement in jitter: mean MCD was 36.38 +/- 22.49 micros (P = 0. 005), and percentage of blocks was 10.16 +/- 18.87 (P = 0.008). The method was well tolerated. We conclude that SFEMG-AS of the frontalis muscle is a sensitive technique for the diagnosis of OM and is easy to carry out.

  5. Acquired lymphangiectasis.

    PubMed

    Celis, A V; Gaughf, C N; Sangueza, O P; Gourdin, F W

    1999-01-01

    Acquired lymphangiectasis is a dilatation of lymphatic vessels that can result as a complication of surgical intervention and radiation therapy for malignancy. Acquired lymphangiectasis shares clinical and histologic features with the congenital lesion, lymphangioma circumscriptum. Diagnosis and treatment of these vesiculo-bullous lesions is important because they may be associated with pain, chronic drainage, and cellulitis. We describe two patients who had these lesions after treatment for cancer and review the pertinent literature. Although a number of treatment options are available, we have found CO2 laser ablation particularly effective. PMID:9932832

  6. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  7. [Analysis of the association of ABO blood groups and Rhesus factor with myasthenia].

    PubMed

    Gekht, B M; Agafonov, B V; Tsuman, V G; Shagal, D I; Sidorova, O P; Nalivkin, A E

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of ABO blood groups and rhesus factor was studied in patients with myasthenia as compared with the control. There was a statistically significant association of the diseases with the rhesus-negative phenotype and that of generalized myasthenia concurrent with thymoma with the B (III) blood group. The examination revealed no other determinants of the significant association with the disease. The values of a disease risk were obtained for persons having myasthenia-associated signs. It is concluded that the Rh-negative phenotype shows a 1.3-fold increase in the risk of the disease as compared with those having Rh-positive persons.

  8. 3,4-Diaminopyridine in the treatment of congenital (hereditary) myasthenia.

    PubMed Central

    Palace, J; Wiles, C M; Newsom-Davis, J

    1991-01-01

    Congenital or hereditary myasthenia describes a heterogeneous group of disorders in which the immune system is not implicated. Treatment has previously depended on anticholinesterase medication. The effectiveness of 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), a preparation that enhances acetylcholine release from motor nerve terminals, has been evaluated using a series of standardised strength measures. Sixteen patients (aged seven to 47 years) were studied in an open prospective trial, and four of them in a double blind crossover trial; existing anticholinesterase medication was continued. For the group as a whole, there was a highly significant increase in muscle strength (p less than 0.001; n = 16). In individual paired comparisons, 13 out of 16 showed significant improvement in the open trial and four out of four in the blind crossover trial. In conclusion, 3,4-DAP, either alone or combined with anticholinesterase medication, may be a useful additional treatment in congenital myasthenia. PMID:1783919

  9. Auricular acupuncture to resolve the exacerbations in ocular myasthenia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Crestati, Francesco; Shaladi, Ali; Preteroti, Salvatore; Tartari, Stefano

    2007-09-01

    Ocular myasthenia is a neuromuscular autoimmune disorder in which the clinical symptoms are restricted to the external ocular muscles with either ptosis or diplopia, or both. The condition may follow a relapsing and remitting course. Conventional therapy consists of anticholinergic drugs, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants. We report a case in which auricular acupuncture was used as an adjunct to pharmacological treatment. The time course of the response suggests that acupuncture appeared to help resolve the current relapse. PMID:17906603

  10. Gravi-sensing microorganisms as model systems for gravity sensing in eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, C.; Richter, P.; Lebert, M.; Häder, D.-P.

    2001-08-01

    Gravi-sensing in single cells and multicellular organisms is a very active field of investigation. Similarities between gravity sensing mechanisms in uni- and multicellular eukaryotes make single cells ideal model systems for the understanding of gravity responses on the cellular and molecular level with far fetching significance for other systems. This article gives a short overview about gravi-sensing in plants (Arabidopsis, Chara) as well as the ciliates Loxodes and Paramecium and concentrates on gravitaxis research in the single cellular flagellate, Euglena gracilis. Experiments revealed the involvement of cAMP, Ca2+ specific mechanosensitive channels and membrane potential in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. Future perspectives for the use of motile, photosynthetic and other unicellular microorganisms for space applications e.g. for oxygen supply in life support systems or research on the origin of life are discussed.

  11. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  12. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  13. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  14. [Acquired haemophilia (acquired factor VIII inhibitor)].

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, José M; Duboscq, Cristina; Fondevila, Carlos; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia is a rare disorder. The clinical picture ranges from mild ecchymosis and anaemia to life threatening bleeding in up to 20% of patients. The disease is produced by an antibody against Factor VIII and it usually occurs in the elderly, with no previous history of a bleeding disorder. It can be associated to an underlying condition such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, drugs or pregnancy. It has a typical laboratory pattern with isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that fails to correct upon mixing tests with normal plasma and low levels of factor VIII. Treatment recommendations are based on controlling the acute bleeding episodes with either bypassing agent, recombinant activated factor VII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and eradication of the antibody with immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. Paraneoplastic disorders in thymoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Evoli, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancy is often associated with paraneoplastic neurological diseases (PNDs) and recognition of these disorders is important for physicians who treat these patients. The most common thymoma-associated PNDs are myasthenia gravis, acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), encephalitis, Morvan's syndrome, and myositis. Diagnosis of these disorders is complex but often aided by testing for specific autoantibodies, including those to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) for myasthenia gravis and to Caspr2, protein of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, in patients with acquired neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome, or encephalitis. Patients who manifest these disorders should be screened for thymoma at diagnosis, and worsening of these PNDs may be associated with recurrent thymoma. These disorders can cause profound disability but usually respond to immunotherapy, and often improve with thymoma treatment. Close cooperation among a team of specialists is required to properly care for these patients. PMID:25396312

  16. Effects of nisin and temperature on survival, growth, and enterotoxin production characteristics of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus in beef gravy.

    PubMed Central

    Beuchat, L R; Clavero, M R; Jaquette, C B

    1997-01-01

    The presence of psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus in ready-to-serve meats and meat products that have not been subjected to sterilization treatment is a public health concern. A study was undertaken to determine the survival, growth, and diarrheal enterotoxin production characteristics of four strains of psychrotrophic B. cereus in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and beef gravy as affected by temperature and supplementation with nisin. A portion of unheated vegetative cells from 24-h BHI broth cultures was sensitive to nisin as evidenced by an inability to form colonies on BHI agar containing 10 micrograms of nisin/ml. Heat-stressed cells exhibited increased sensitivity to nisin. At concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml, nisin was lethal to B. cereus, the effect being more pronounced in BHI broth than in beef gravy. The inhibitory effect of nisin (1 microgram/ml) was greater on vegetative cells than on spores inoculated into beef gravy and was more pronounced at 8 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Nisin, at a concentration of 5 or 50 micrograms/ml, inhibited growth in gravy inoculated with vegetative cells and stored at 8 or 15 degrees C, respectively, for 14 days. Growth of vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus after an initial period of inhibition is attributed to loss of activity of nisin. One of two test strains produced diarrheal enterotoxin in gravy stored at 8 or 15 degrees C within 9 or 3 days, respectively. Enterotoxin production was inhibited in gravy supplemented with 1 microgram of nisin/ml and stored at 8 degrees C for 14 days; 5 micrograms of nisin/ml was required for inhibition at 15 degrees C. Enterotoxin was not detected in gravy in which less than 5.85 log10 CFU of B. cereus/ml had grown. Results indicate that as little as 1 microgram of nisin/ml may be effective in inhibiting or retarding growth of and diarrheal enterotoxin production by vegetative cells and spores of psychrotrophic B. cereus in beef gravy at 8 degrees C, a

  17. Effects of nisin and temperature on survival, growth, and enterotoxin production characteristics of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus in beef gravy.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R; Clavero, M R; Jaquette, C B

    1997-05-01

    The presence of psychrotrophic enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus in ready-to-serve meats and meat products that have not been subjected to sterilization treatment is a public health concern. A study was undertaken to determine the survival, growth, and diarrheal enterotoxin production characteristics of four strains of psychrotrophic B. cereus in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and beef gravy as affected by temperature and supplementation with nisin. A portion of unheated vegetative cells from 24-h BHI broth cultures was sensitive to nisin as evidenced by an inability to form colonies on BHI agar containing 10 micrograms of nisin/ml. Heat-stressed cells exhibited increased sensitivity to nisin. At concentrations as low as 1 microgram/ml, nisin was lethal to B. cereus, the effect being more pronounced in BHI broth than in beef gravy. The inhibitory effect of nisin (1 microgram/ml) was greater on vegetative cells than on spores inoculated into beef gravy and was more pronounced at 8 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Nisin, at a concentration of 5 or 50 micrograms/ml, inhibited growth in gravy inoculated with vegetative cells and stored at 8 or 15 degrees C, respectively, for 14 days. Growth of vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus after an initial period of inhibition is attributed to loss of activity of nisin. One of two test strains produced diarrheal enterotoxin in gravy stored at 8 or 15 degrees C within 9 or 3 days, respectively. Enterotoxin production was inhibited in gravy supplemented with 1 microgram of nisin/ml and stored at 8 degrees C for 14 days; 5 micrograms of nisin/ml was required for inhibition at 15 degrees C. Enterotoxin was not detected in gravy in which less than 5.85 log10 CFU of B. cereus/ml had grown. Results indicate that as little as 1 microgram of nisin/ml may be effective in inhibiting or retarding growth of and diarrheal enterotoxin production by vegetative cells and spores of psychrotrophic B. cereus in beef gravy at 8 degrees C, a

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  19. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  1. [Changes of the thymus gland in patients operated for myasthenia in dependence on the blood grouping and Rh-factor].

    PubMed

    Peliukhovskiĭ, S V

    2006-02-01

    In 1974-2001 yrs there were examined 250 patients with various forms of myasthenia, of them in 95 (38%) the dependence of thymus gland changes from the blood grouping and Rh-factor presence was studied. The blood group in 39 (41%) of patients was A (II) Rh+ and in 22% - 0 (I).

  2. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Prina, Elena; Ranzani, Otavio T; Torres, Antoni

    2015-09-12

    Community-acquired pneumonia causes great mortality and morbidity and high costs worldwide. Empirical selection of antibiotic treatment is the cornerstone of management of patients with pneumonia. To reduce the misuse of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, and side-effects, an empirical, effective, and individualised antibiotic treatment is needed. Follow-up after the start of antibiotic treatment is also important, and management should include early shifts to oral antibiotics, stewardship according to the microbiological results, and short-duration antibiotic treatment that accounts for the clinical stability criteria. New approaches for fast clinical (lung ultrasound) and microbiological (molecular biology) diagnoses are promising. Community-acquired pneumonia is associated with early and late mortality and increased rates of cardiovascular events. Studies are needed that focus on the long-term management of pneumonia.

  4. Systemic Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Upon infection with necrotizing pathogens many plants develop an enhanced resistance to further pathogen attack also in the uninoculated organs. This type of enhanced resistance is referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the SAR state, plants are primed (sensitized) to more quickly and more effectively activate defense responses the second time they encounter pathogen attack. Since SAR depends on the ability to access past experience, acquired disease resistance is a paradigm for the existence of a form of “plant memory”. Although the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of the 20th century, major progress in the understanding of SAR was made over the past sixteen years. This review covers the current knowledge of molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms that are associated with SAR. PMID:19521483

  5. Acquired methemoglobinemia revisited.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Larry; Will, John

    2010-10-01

    Dentistry has two medications in its pain management armamentarium that may cause the potentially life-threatening disorder methemoglobinemia. The first medications are the topical local anesthetics benzocaine and prilocaine. The second medication is the injectable local anesthetic prilocaine. Acquired methemoglobinemia remains a source of morbidity and mortality in dental and medical patients despite the fact that it is better understood now than it was even a decade ago. It is in the interest of all dental patients that their treating dentists review this disorder. The safety of dental patients mandates professional awareness.

  6. Efficacy of terbutaline in familial limb girdle myasthenia: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Zeyaur Rahman; Sivadasan, Ajith; Alexander, Mathew; Patil, Anil Kumar B.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are frequently misdiagnosed due to their wide clinical heterogeneity. Molecular defects in various end-plate associated proteins are being identified. Better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype correlations can help evolve newer therapeutic targets. We present a report of two siblings with familial limb girdle myasthenia who showed significant objective clinical improvement after initiation of terbutaline. The possible mechanism of action and utility of terbutaline in the setting of CMS are described. Terbutaline is a potential treatment option in certain subtypes of CMS refractory to conventional medicines. However, long-term follow-up is required to determine the overall efficacy and safety profile. PMID:23956565

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  8. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  9. Cholera gravis associated with acute renal failure in a traveler from Haiti to the United States.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Corcho, Andrés; Pinsker, Richard W; Sarkar, Samir; Bagheri, Farshad; Patel, Mahendra C; Lam, Pablo; González, Argentina

    2012-09-01

    Cholera is a gastroenteric disease caused by epidemic or pandemic Vibrio cholerae which still is responsible for over 100,000 annual deaths worldwide. Since October 2010, Haiti experienced a cholera outbreak affecting more than 300,000 persons. Few imported cases related to the Haitian epidemic have been reported so far in the United States and Canada. We presented a patient who developed cholera gravis soon after arrival at New York City from Haiti. The patient needed admission to an Intensive Care Unit, for vigorous intravenous hydration, antibiotic therapy, and hemodialysis due to refractory oliguric renal failure. The patient was discharged the day 6 after admission and V. cholerae O1 was isolated from the stool culture. Cholera can be a life-threatening disease; early recognition based on travel history and clinical features is the corner stone for successful management. PMID:23137437

  10. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  11. Effects of Viscosity on the Gravi-kinesis Responses of Swimming Paramecia Studied Using Manetic Force Buoyancy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Valles, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that paramecia exhibit negative gravi-kinesis. They exert a stronger propulsive force when swimming up than when swimming down. This behavior is very surprising since it suggests they sense their tiny apparent weight of only ~ 80pN. In an effort to understand the mechanism of this sensing, we are testing how the viscosity of the swimming medium influences their gravi-kinetic response. We employ the technique of magnetic force buoyancy variation to simulate different effective gravity levels on swimming Paramecia. We are analyzing their swimming response employing a phenomenological model that relates the parameters describing their helical trajectories to the beating of their cilia. This work was supported by NSF PHY0750360 and at the NHMFL by NSF DMR-0084173

  12. Expression of gibberellin 3 beta-hydroxylase gene in a gravi-response mutant, weeping Japanese flowering cherry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugano, Mami; Nakagawa, Yuriko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Teruko

    2004-01-01

    Expressions of the gibberellin biosynthesis gene were investigated in a normal upright type and a gravi-response mutant, a weeping type of Japanese flowering cherry (Prunus spachiana), that is unable to support its own weight and elongates downward. A segment of the gibberellin 3 beta-hydroxylase cDNA of Prunus spachiana (Ps3ox), which is responsible for active gibberellin synthesis, was amplified by using real-time RT-PCR. The content of Ps3ox mRNA in the weeping type was much greater than that in the upright type, while the endogenous gibberellin level was much higher in the elongating zone of the weeping type. These results suggest that the amount and distribution of synthesized gibberellin regulate secondary xylem formation, and the unbalanced distribution of gibberellin affects the gravi-response of the Prunus tree.

  13. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2 Acquiring... each holds half of V's shares. Therefore, A and B each control V (see § 801.1(b)), and V is included...” are acquiring persons. (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of § 801.12, the...

  14. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2 Acquiring... each holds half of V's shares. Therefore, A and B each control V (see § 801.1(b)), and V is included...” are acquiring persons. (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of § 801.12, the...

  15. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...” are acquiring persons. (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of § 801.12, the person(s.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a... to be carried out by merging Y into X, a wholly-owned subsidiary of A, with X surviving, and...

  16. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...” are acquiring persons. (b) Except as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of § 801.12, the person(s.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a... to be carried out by merging Y into X, a wholly-owned subsidiary of A, with X surviving, and...

  17. Loss of MUNC13-1 function causes microcephaly, cortical hyperexcitability, and fatal myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Shen, Xin-Ming; Milone, Margherita; Harper, C. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the molecular basis of a fatal syndrome of microcephaly, cortical hyperexcitability, and myasthenia. Methods: We performed clinical and in vitro microelectrode studies of neuromuscular transmission, examined neuromuscular junctions cytochemically and by electron microscopy (EM), and searched for mutations by Sanger and exome sequencing. Results: Neuromuscular transmission was severely compromised by marked depletion of the readily releasable pool of quanta, but the probability of quantal release was normal. Cytochemical and EM studies revealed normal endplate architecture. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in the N-terminal domain of MUNC13-1 (UNC13A) truncating the protein after 101 residues. Conclusions: Loss of Munc13-1 function predicts that syntaxin 1B is consigned to a nonfunctional closed state; this inhibits cholinergic transmission at the neuromuscular junction and glutamatergic transmission in the brain. Inactivation of syntaxin 1B likely accounts for the patient's cortical hyperexcitability because mutations of syntaxin 1B cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy, haploinsufficiency of the STX1B is associated with myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and antisense knockdown of stx1b in zebrafish larvae elicits epileptiform discharges. A very recent publication also shows that syntaxin 1B has a separate obligatory role for maintenance of developing and mature neurons and illustrates impaired brain development in syntaxin 1A/1B double knockout mice. We therefore attribute our patient's microcephaly to the truncating homozygous Munc13-1 mutation that consigns syntaxin 1B to a permanently closed nonfunctional state akin to a knockout.

  18. Acquiring and Organizing Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lare, Gary A.

    This book addresses two areas of need in a curriculum materials center--where to find curriculum materials for acquisition and how to organize these materials for efficient and effective access once they are acquired. The book is arranged in two parts: "Acquiring and Organizing the Collection" and "Resources." The book brings together many…

  19. A Unified Model of Shoot Tropism in Plants: Photo-, Gravi- and Propio-ception

    PubMed Central

    Bastien, Renaud; Douady, Stéphane; Moulia, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Land plants rely mainly on gravitropism and phototropism to control their posture and spatial orientation. In natural conditions, these two major tropisms act concurrently to create a photogravitropic equilibrium in the responsive organ. Recently, a parsimonious model was developed that accurately predicted the complete gravitropic and proprioceptive control over the movement of different organs in different species in response to gravitational stimuli. Here we show that the framework of this unifying graviproprioceptive model can be readily extended to include phototropism. The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism results in an alignment of the apical part of the organ toward a photogravitropic set-point angle. This angle is determined by a combination of the two directional stimuli, gravity and light, weighted by the ratio between the gravi- and photo-sensitivities of the plant organ. In the model, two dimensionless numbers, the graviproprioceptive number B and the photograviceptive number M, control the dynamics and the shapes of the movement. The extended model agrees well with two sets of detailed quantitative data on photogravitropic equilibrium in oat coleoptiles. It is demonstrated that the influence of light intensity I can be included in the model in a power-law-dependent relationship M(I). The numbers B and M and the related photograviceptive number D are all quantitative genetic traits that can be measured in a straightforward manner, opening the way to the phenotyping of molecular and mechanical aspects of shoot tropism. PMID:25692607

  20. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  1. Loss of MUNC13-1 function causes microcephaly, cortical hyperexcitability, and fatal myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Shen, Xin-Ming; Milone, Margherita; Harper, C. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the molecular basis of a fatal syndrome of microcephaly, cortical hyperexcitability, and myasthenia. Methods: We performed clinical and in vitro microelectrode studies of neuromuscular transmission, examined neuromuscular junctions cytochemically and by electron microscopy (EM), and searched for mutations by Sanger and exome sequencing. Results: Neuromuscular transmission was severely compromised by marked depletion of the readily releasable pool of quanta, but the probability of quantal release was normal. Cytochemical and EM studies revealed normal endplate architecture. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in the N-terminal domain of MUNC13-1 (UNC13A) truncating the protein after 101 residues. Conclusions: Loss of Munc13-1 function predicts that syntaxin 1B is consigned to a nonfunctional closed state; this inhibits cholinergic transmission at the neuromuscular junction and glutamatergic transmission in the brain. Inactivation of syntaxin 1B likely accounts for the patient's cortical hyperexcitability because mutations of syntaxin 1B cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy, haploinsufficiency of the STX1B is associated with myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and antisense knockdown of stx1b in zebrafish larvae elicits epileptiform discharges. A very recent publication also shows that syntaxin 1B has a separate obligatory role for maintenance of developing and mature neurons and illustrates impaired brain development in syntaxin 1A/1B double knockout mice. We therefore attribute our patient's microcephaly to the truncating homozygous Munc13-1 mutation that consigns syntaxin 1B to a permanently closed nonfunctional state akin to a knockout. PMID:27648472

  2. Biological system development for GraviSat: A new platform for studying photosynthesis and microalgae in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Erich D.; Bebout, Brad M.; Tan, Ming X.; Selch, Florian; Ricco, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    Microalgae have great potential to be used as part of a regenerative life support system and to facilitate in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on long-duration human space missions. Little is currently known, however, about microalgal responses to the space environment over long (months) or even short (hours to days) time scales. We describe here the development of biological support subsystems for a prototype "3U" (i.e., three conjoined 10-cm cubes) nanosatellite, called GraviSat, designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of space microgravity and the radiation environment on microalgae and other microorganisms. The GraviSat project comprises the co-development of biological handling-and-support technologies with implementation of integrated measurement hardware for photosynthetic efficiency and physiological activity in support of long-duration (3-12 months) space missions. It supports sample replication in a fully autonomous system that will grow and analyze microalgal cultures in 120 μL wells around the circumference of a microfluidic polymer disc; the cultures will be launched while in stasis, then grown in orbit. The disc spins at different rotational velocities to generate a range of artificial gravity levels in space, from microgravity to multiples of Earth gravity. Development of the biological support technologies for GraviSat comprised the screening of more than twenty microalgal strains for various physical, metabolic and biochemical attributes that support prolonged growth in a microfluidic disc, as well as the capacity for reversible metabolic stasis. Hardware development included that necessary to facilitate accurate and precise measurements of physical parameters by optical methods (pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry) and electrochemical sensors (ion-sensitive microelectrodes). Nearly all microalgal strains were biocompatible with nanosatellite materials; however, microalgal growth was rapidly inhibited (∼1 week) within sealed

  3. Effects of nifedipine on gravi-dependent germination of moss spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorkavtsiv, O. Y.; Demkiv, O. T.

    % of spores cell filaments oriented parallely with respect to the gravity vector. Results shown suggest that the endogenic competency of a single-cell spore is necessary condition of gravi- induced initiation of polar axis the competency being realized with Ca2+ movement. The highest level of Ca2+ luminescence was at the bottom of spores. In other sites of the spores the Ca2+ luminescence was about 20-fold lower than at the site of Ca2+ influx. In the 24 h after formation of first outgrowth the new site of Ca2+ influx appeared at the opposite site of spore and the second outgrowth arised. Consequently during the period of gravi-dependent spore development the newly top Ca2+ influx was repeatedly established. The direction of the Ca2+ ions influx correlated with re-orientation of spores with respect to the gravity vector. It is known that the nifedipine partially inhibits polar axis formation (Chatterjee et al., 2000) the latter being formed under the influence Ca2+ gradient (Cove, 2000). Thus, our results confirm that the fast change of Ca2+ influx probably is one of the earliest cell-level responses induced by gravity and it plays a key role in guiding polar events of germinating spores. This research was supported by NASA grant NN-09 (R).

  4. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  5. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of...

  6. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of...

  7. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of...

  8. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of...

  9. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  10. Emotional attention in acquired prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Peelen, Marius V; Lucas, Nadia; Mayer, Eugene; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2009-09-01

    The present study investigated whether emotionally expressive faces guide attention and modulate fMRI activity in fusiform gyrus in acquired prosopagnosia. Patient PS, a pure case of acquired prosopagnosia with intact right middle fusiform gyrus, performed two behavioral experiments and a functional imaging experiment to address these questions. In a visual search task involving face stimuli, PS was faster to select the target face when it was expressing fear or happiness as compared to when it was emotionally neutral. In a change detection task, PS detected significantly more changes when the changed face was fearful as compared to when it was neutral. Finally, an fMRI experiment showed enhanced activation to emotionally expressive faces and bodies in right fusiform gyrus. In addition, PS showed normal body-selective activation in right fusiform gyrus, partially overlapping the fusiform face area. Together these behavioral and neuroimaging results show that attention was preferentially allocated to emotional faces in patient PS, as observed in healthy subjects. We conclude that systems involved in the emotional guidance of attention by facial expression can function normally in acquired prosopagnosia, and can thus be dissociated from systems involved in face identification.

  11. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  12. Acquired Hearing Loss in Children.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2015-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common congenital sensory impairment. According to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2001 to 2008, 20.3% of subjects aged greater than or equal to 12 had unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. The World Health Organization notes that, worldwide, there are 360 million people with disabling hearing loss, with 50% preventable. Although many hearing losses are acquired, many others are manifestations of preexisting conditions. The purpose of a pediatric hearing evaluation is to identify the degree and type of hearing loss and etiology and to outline a comprehensive strategy that supports language and social development and communication.

  13. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  14. Malaria acquired in Haiti - 2010.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti, which borders the Dominican Republic on the island of Hispaniola. The earthquake's epicenter was 10 miles west of the Haiti capital city of Port-au-Prince (estimated population: 2 million). According to the Haitian government, approximately 200,000 persons were killed, and 500,000 were left homeless. Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection is endemic in Haiti, and the principal mosquito vector is Anopheles albimanus, which frequently bites outdoors. Thus, displaced persons living outdoors or in temporary shelters and thousands of emergency responders in Haiti are at substantial risk for malaria. During January 12-February 25, CDC received reports of 11 laboratory-confirmed cases of P. falciparum malaria acquired in Haiti. Patients included seven U.S. residents who were emergency responders, three Haitian residents, and one U.S. traveler. This report summarizes the 11 cases and provides chemoprophylactic and additional preventive recommendations to minimize the risk for acquiring malaria for persons traveling to Haiti.

  15. Eyelid ptosis from sympathetic nerve dysfunction mistaken as myopathy: a simple test to identify this condition

    PubMed Central

    Tomelleri, G; Vattemi, G; Filosto, M; Tonin, P

    2007-01-01

    Acquired isolated unilateral or bilateral blepharoptosis has many aetiologies. When the pupils are normal, a myasthenic syndrome or myopathy has to be ruled out. If the tests for myasthenia gravis are negative, the next step is to perform a muscle biopsy to establish a diagnosis. Muscle examination may show a mitochondrial disorder, non‐specific abnormalities or be quite normal. We identified three patients, who had previously undergone various investigations, including a muscle biopsy, whose lid ptosis disappeared using eye drops containing naphazoline nitrate, a sympathomimetic drug, thus suggesting partial Horner's syndrome. We emphasise the usefulness of this simple and cheap test before performing more traumatic and expensive investigations. PMID:17287241

  16. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which income statements are required, the smaller reporting company has acquired... acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...

  17. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression.

  18. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  19. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  20. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  1. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  2. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  3. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of liabilities, a merger or consolidation, or any similar transaction....

  4. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction.

  5. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26542044

  6. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series. PMID:27432685

  7. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis.

  8. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  9. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  10. GRAVI-2 space experiment: investigating statoliths displacement and location effects on early stages of gravity perception pathways in lentil roots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizet, François; Eche, Brigitte; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Badel, Eric; Legue, Valerie; Brunel, Nicole; Label, Philippe; Gérard, Joëlle

    2016-07-01

    The plants ability to orient their growth with respect to external stimuli such as gravity is a key factor for survival and acclimation to their environment. Belowground, plant roots modulate their growth towards gravity, allowing soil exploration and uptake of water and nutrients. In roots, gravity sensing cells called statocytes are located in the center of the root cap. Statocytes contain starch-filled plastids denser than the cytoplasm, which sedimentation along the direction of gravity is widely accepted as being involved into early stages of gravity perception (the starch-statolith hypothesis; Sack, 1991). Root gravitropism following statoliths displacement is based on auxin redistribution in the root apex, inducing differential growth between the root upward and downward sides. However at the cell scale, the chain of transduction starting from statoliths displacement and leading to auxin redistribution remains poorly documented. Signaling molecules such as calcium, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate are serious candidates previously shown to be involved within minutes before modification of the expression of auxin-related genes (Morita, 2010; Sato et al., 2015). Here, we observe and quantify statoliths displacements and locations at various levels of gravity to investigate two hypothesis: (i) Are contacts between statoliths and the endoplasmic reticulum necessary to induce gravitropism? (ii) Are very low displacements of statoliths sufficient to initiate transduction pathways such as the calcium's one? These questionings have led to an experiment called GRAVI-2 which took place aboard the ISS in 2014. During the experiment, lentil roots were grown in the European modular cultivation system for several hours in microgravity and were then submitted to short high gravity stimulus (5 and 15 minutes at 2 g) before the return to Earth for analyses. Ongoing cytological measurements will reveal the effects of statoliths

  11. Eyelid lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other circulatory disorders Thyroid problems such as hypothyroidism and Graves disease After the Procedure You can ... Read More Diabetes Eyelid drooping Facelift Graves disease Hypothyroidism Myasthenia gravis Ptosis - infants and children Update Date ...

  12. Quinidine Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications for seizures, sleep, or an infection; and vitamins.tell your doctor if you have an infection or have or have ever had myasthenia gravis; heart, kidney, or liver disease; or muscle weakness.tell your doctor if you ...

  13. Study of an Intervention to Improve Problem List Accuracy and Use

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-30

    Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity; Asthma; COPD; Breast Cancer; Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Diabetes; Glaucoma; Hemophilia; Hypertension; Hyperthyroidism; Hypothyroidism; Myasthenia Gravis; Osteoporosis; Osteopenia; Renal Failure; Renal Insufficiency; Sickle Cell Disease; Stroke

  14. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of thymus and fat tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gui C.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Reid, V.; Steinglass, K.; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Jacobowitz, Larry; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of the human thymus gland and surrounding mediastinal fat were measured to evaluate this approach in distinguishing between thymus and fat tissues during therapeutic surgery for myasthenia gravis disease.

  15. Neuromuscular Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like ... and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia gravis ...

  16. [The study of dynamics of clinical and molecular phenotypes in the generalized form of myasthenia with optimized and combined treatment].

    PubMed

    Drozd, O A; Efremov, V V; Romantsov, M G; Sarvilina, I V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was the research of clinical and molecular phenotypes in the generalized form of myasthenia with optimized treantment, which includes the application of basic mode of the treatment and meglumine sodium succinate, and also the combined mode of the treatment, which includes the mode of the treatment and meglumine sodium succinate and ozonotherapy. The most epressed improvement of indicators of the clinical and neurologic status (the eliminaton of motoring breakdown, eye movement disrders, the weaknesses of mimic, respiratory and chewing muscles, bulbar syndrome, the doubling in eye and ptosis, pharyngeal violations and increase in volume of movement of eyes) was observed in the group of patients receiving the combined therapy. The reduction of the epressiveness of the defeat of the neuromotor device and the decrement of the amplitude of the various degree of M-answer in patients with myasthenla is revealed in the application of the combined therapy in the comparison with the application of the basic and optimized therapy. For the first time we have investigaed the dynamics of the intensity of the expression of specfic peptides and proteins in blood serum in patients with the application of basic therapy, reamberin and ozonotherapy, which have allowed to open the new mechanisms of the efficiency ofthe combined therapy of the disease.

  17. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  18. Case Report of Thymoma Tumor Reduction Following Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Yu, Qitao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For thymoma, multidisciplinary antitumor strategy is composed of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Meanwhile, ∼20% to 25% of patients with thymoma have myasthenia gravis and plasmapheresis is recommended for thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. We report a case that a 40-year-old woman with thymoma experiencing tumor relapse after surgery showed significant response to plasmapheresis. This is the first case of thymoma responded to plasmapheresis, which may guide the study of the etiology and pathogenesis of thymoma. PMID:26632752

  19. In vivo Therapy with Monoclonal Anti-I-A Antibody Suppresses Immune Responses to Acetylcholine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldor, Matthew K.; Sriram, Subramaniam; McDevitt, Hugh O.; Steinman, Lawrence

    1983-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to I-A gene products of the immune response gene complex attenuates both humoral and cellular responses to acetylcholine receptor and appears to suppress clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. This demonstrates that use of antibodies against immune response gene products that are associated with susceptibility to disease may be feasible for therapy in autoimmune conditions such as myasthenia gravis.

  20. Acquired Surface Dyslexia: The Evidence from Hebrew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnboim, Smadar

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the symptoms of acquired surface dyslexia in Hebrew. Four acquired surface dyslexic adults were compared with eight normal second graders in terms of reading strategy. Homophones and homographs were a major source of difficulty for native Hebrew surface dyslexic readers; the normal second graders used a non-lexical strategy. (45…

  1. Potential disadvantages of using socially acquired information.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Valone, Thomas J; Templeton, Jennifer J

    2002-01-01

    The acquisition and use of socially acquired information is commonly assumed to be profitable. We challenge this assumption by exploring hypothetical scenarios where the use of such information either provides no benefit or can actually be costly. First, we show that the level of incompatibility between the acquisition of personal and socially acquired information will directly affect the extent to which the use of socially acquired information can be profitable. When these two sources of information cannot be acquired simultaneously, there may be no benefit to socially acquired information. Second, we assume that a solitary individual's behavioural decisions will be based on cues revealed by its own interactions with the environment. However, in many cases, for social animals the only socially acquired information available to individuals is the behavioural actions of others that expose their decisions, rather than the cues on which these decisions were based. We argue that in such a situation the use of socially acquired information can lead to informational cascades that sometimes result in sub-optimal behaviour. From this theory of informational cascades, we predict that when erroneous cascades are costly, individuals should pay attention only to socially generated cues and not behavioural decisions. We suggest three scenarios that might be examples of informational cascades in nature. PMID:12495513

  2. Acquired Brown's syndrome: an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Booth-Mason, S; Kyle, G M; Rossor, M; Bradbury, P

    1985-10-01

    A 62-year-old man with acquired Brown's syndrome is presented. This was due to an orbital metastatic deposit, a cause not previously reported. Other causes of this disorder and its treatment are discussed.

  3. Using Herbs and Spices/Preparing Sauces and Gravies. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.11. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with herbs and spices and the selection and preparation of sauces and gravies. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas:…

  4. Acquired bleeding disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The hemostatic balance changes with advancing age which may be due to factors such as platelet activation, increase of certain clotting factor proteins, slowing of the fibrinolytic system, and modification of the endothelium and blood flow. Generally, this predisposes the elderly to thrombosis rather than bleeding. It often necessitates antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, which can cause significant bleeding problems in an aging population. Additionally, changing renal function, modification in immune regulation, and a multitude of other disease processes, can give rise to acquired bleeding disorders. Bleeding can prove difficult to treat in a dynamic environment and in a population that may have underlying thrombotic risk factors.This article discusses some specific challenges of acquired bleeding arising in the elderly. The use of anticoagulation and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications is prevalent in the treatment of the elderly and predisposes them to increased bleeding risk as their physiology changes. When prescribing and monitoring these therapies, it is exceedingly important to weigh thrombotic versus bleeding risks. There are additional rare acquired bleeding disorders that predominantly affect the elderly. One of them is acquired hemophilia, which is an autoimmune disorder arising from antibodies against factor VIII. The treatment challenge rests in the use of hemostatic agents in a population that is already at increased risk for thrombotic complications. Another rare disorder of intensifying interest, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, has a multitude of etiologic mechanisms. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology is essential in making a treatment decision for this disorder.

  5. Acquired cutis laxa associated with cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Van; Dang, Phuoc Van; Bui, Duc Van; Mejbel, Haider; Mani, Divya Thomas; Smoller, Bruce Robert; Phung, Thuy Linh

    2015-07-01

    Cutis laxa is characterized by dramatic wrinkling of skin that is lacking in elasticity due to inherent defects in dermal elastic fibers. Cutis laxa can be caused by genetic and metabolic disorders. It can also be acquired, possibly resulting from inflammatory processes with destruction of elastic fibers. This report describes a 26-year old woman who developed acquired cutis laxa and cutaneous mastocytosis leading to premature aging. She represents a unique co-occurrence of these two separate disease entities. To our knowledge, there has been only one published case report of acquired cutis laxa occurring in association with urticaria pigmentosa in a 4-year old girl. Our case would be a second case that exhibits the coexistence of these two disorders in an adult female. PMID:26436968

  6. Congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sally Elizabeth; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B

    2015-11-01

    The diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infants requires an understanding of developmental haemostasis and the effect on laboratory testing. A systematic approach to bleeding in neonates will aid clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment, which may be caused by a wide variety of diseases. The clinical setting will help to direct the diagnostic pathway. This review will focus on the presentation and diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders, including platelet disorders. Current research in this field is ongoing, including investigation into neonatal platelets and their different functionalities, platelet transfusion thresholds and how changes in coagulation factors may be linked to other homeostatic mechanisms.

  7. A Case Of Bilateral Acquired Localized Lipoatrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıkulu, Osman; Yesilova, Yavuz; Aksoy, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is characterized by inflammation and tissue loss in fatty tissue. This disease may be congenital or acquired, primary or secondary. Secondary lipoatrophy develops with infections, collagen tissue diseases, tumors and drug injections. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old female patient who developed lipoatrophy following intramuscular steroid injection to both buttocks. PMID:27504088

  8. Mitral valve repair in acquired dextrocardia.

    PubMed

    Elmistekawy, Elsayed; Chan, Vincent; Hynes, Mark; Mesana, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Surgical correction of valvular heart disease in patients with dextrocardia is extremely rare. We report a surgical case of mitral valve repair in a patient with acquired dextrocardia. Successful mitral valve repair was performed through a right lateral thoracotomy. We describe our surgical strategy and summarize the literature.

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  10. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  11. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  12. Support Network Responses to Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chleboun, Steffany; Hux, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) affects social relationships; however, the ways social and support networks change and evolve as a result of brain injury is not well understood. This study explored ways in which survivors of ABI and members of their support networks perceive relationship changes as recovery extends into the long-term stage. Two…

  13. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  14. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  15. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  16. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  17. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  18. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  19. Neural Correlates of Acquired Color Category Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alexandra; Franklin, Anna; Holmes, Amanda; Drivonikou, Vicky G.; Ozgen, Emre; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Category training can induce category effects, whereby color discrimination of stimuli spanning a newly learned category boundary is enhanced relative to equivalently spaced stimuli from within the newly learned category (e.g., categorical perception). However, the underlying mechanisms of these acquired category effects are not fully understood.…

  20. Acquired undescended testis: putting the pieces together.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W M; Goede, J; van der Voort-Doedens, L M; Meijer, R W

    2012-02-01

    Acquired undescended testis is now a well-recognized disorder. It is seen in 1.5% of pre-pubertal boys and accounts for the 1-2% orchidopexy rate in older boys. Its pathogenesis remains largely unclear, but it may be caused by a fibrous remnant of the processus vaginalis. There is much controversy over its management, and the proper management awaits a randomized-controlled trial. Until now, follow-up data are available only for cases of spontaneous descent or pubertal orchidopexy. It is speculated that acquired undescended testis is in fact congenital and because of a short funiculus at birth, allowing a low-scrotal position early in life. However, as the boy grows, the testis might evolve into an undescended state. When testosterone surges at puberty, spontaneous descent occurs in three of every four cases.

  1. Clinical laboratory data: acquire, analyze, communicate, liberate.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Elbehery, Ali H A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of portable healthcare devices, which can acquire and transmit medical data to remote experts would dramatically affect healthcare in areas with poor infrastructure. Smartphones, which feature touchscreen computer capabilities and sophisticated cameras, have become widely available with over billion units shipped in 2013. In the clinical laboratory, smartphones have recently brought the capabilities of key instruments such as spectrophotometers, fluorescence analyzers and microscopes into the palm of the hand. Several research groups have developed sensitive and low-cost smartphone-based diagnostic assay prototypes for testing cholesterol, albumin, vitamin D, tumor markers, and the detection of infectious agents. This review covers the use of smartphones to acquire, analyze, communicate, and liberate clinical laboratory data. Smartphones promise to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of healthcare offered in resource-limited areas.

  2. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  3. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota Jr., Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27777479

  4. [Acquired renal cysts in maintenance dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lie, B; Hust, W; Asgarzadeh, A; Mann, H

    1986-03-01

    Ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys of 111 patients on long term maintenance hemodialysis was performed. None of the patients had genuine polycystic kidney disease. In many patients acquired cysts were found. Frequency and volume of these cysts were the same on the right and left side. There was no correlation between the age of the patients and the number of cysts. There were no differences concerning sex and type of primary renal disease. There was a significant positive correlation between time on maintenance hemodialysis and number of cysts but no correlation between number of cysts and hemoglobin concentration. This is in contrast to data in the literature. Clinical relevance of acquired kidney cysts in dialysis patients concerns hematuria, retroperitoneal bleeding, kidney stone formation, septicemia and malignancy.

  5. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  6. Management options of acquired punctal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Amal A

    2013-08-01

    Punctal stenosis is a frequent source of patients referral to the otoplasty clinic and the search for a procedure that can permanently eliminate epiphora without disturbing the normal lacrimal system anatomy and physiology started centuries ago and continues today. The following article summarizes the reported procedures in the English literature in the acquired punctal stenosis with a description of techniques, success rates, and potential complications with the goal of identifying the most effective treatment strategy based on the current knowledge available.

  7. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  8. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica.

  9. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica. PMID:23330977

  10. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  11. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Chris G; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Serefoglu, Ege C; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-08-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE. PMID:27652216

  12. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Jannini, Emmanuele A.; Serefoglu, Ege C.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE. PMID:27652216

  13. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Jannini, Emmanuele A.; Serefoglu, Ege C.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE.

  14. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  15. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  16. Women and the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, Constance B.

    1988-01-01

    SPECIAL EDITOR'S NOTE: Constance B. Wofsy, MD, is Co-Director of AIDS Activities at San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, as well as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco; Assistant Chief, Infectious Diseases, San Francisco General Hospital; and Principal Investigator, Project AWARE (Association for Women's AIDS Research and Education). Although she was not able to contribute an article for WOMEN AND MEDICINE on this very important subject, she kindly agreed to an interview. Both physicians and nonphysicians were asked what questions they had about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women. Images PMID:3250110

  17. Acquired plate-like osteoma cutis.

    PubMed

    Vashi, Neelam; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi

    2011-10-15

    Plate-like osteoma cutis is a rare disorder that has been historically classified as a congenital syndrome. It has a possible relationship to a mutation in the gene (GNAS1) that encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein, which regulates adenyl cyclase activity. We report a case of extensive plaque-like masses on the scalp and face with no abnormalities in calcium or phosphate metabolism and no preceding inflammatory cutaneous conditions. With less than ten reported cases, to our knowledge, this is one the few cases of acquired plate-like osteoma cutis described in the literature.

  18. Psychological issues in acquired facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    The face is a vital component of one’s personality and body image. There are a vast number of variables that influence recovery and rehabilitation from acquired facial trauma many of which are psychological in nature. The present paper presents the various psychological issues one comes across in facial trauma patients. These may range from body image issues to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms accompanied by anxiety and depression. Issues related to facial and body image affecting social life and general quality of life are vital and the plastic surgeon should be aware of such issues and competent to deal with them in patients and families. PMID:21217982

  19. Triple arthrodesis for adult acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Alan R; Dix, Brian T; Richardson, Phillip E; Mendicino, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The primary goal of triple arthrodesis for stage III and IV adult acquired flatfoot is to obtain a well-aligned plantigrade foot that will support the ankle in optimal alignment. Ancillary procedures including posterior muscle group lengthening, medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy, medial column stabilization, peroneus brevis tenotomy, or transfer and harvest of regional bone graft are often necessary to achieve adequate realignment. Image intensification is helpful in confirming optimal realignment before fixation. Results of triple arthrodesis are enhanced with adequate preparation of joint surfaces, bone graft/orthobiologics, 2-point fixation of all 3 tritarsal joints, and a vertical heel position.

  20. Acquired progressive lymphangioma of the nipple

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Ayoubieh, Houriya; O'Brien, William; Billings, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with left nipple itch and discomfort. On physical examination she was found to have a 7 mm lesion. She underwent bilateral mammography and bilateral breast ultrasound which were normal. A punch biopsy of the lesion was performed in the office and the specimen submitted to pathology. Histopathological examination showed ectatic vascular spaces lined by flattened, cytologically bland endothelial cells dissecting the dermal collagen. Evident lymphatic valves were present within the vascular spaces confirming that the vessels were lymphatic in nature. The diagnosis of acquired progressive lymphangioma (benign lymphangioendothelioma) was rendered. PMID:25246470

  1. Acquired scalp alopecia. Part II: A review.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J R; Kossard, S

    1999-05-01

    The neutrophil-associated and infiltrative scarring alopecias are reviewed including folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, acne keloidalis and follicular degeneration syndrome. The management of acquired scalp alopecia is also reviewed including newer, promising therapies. More specific agents targeting components of the androgen system will make the treatment of androgenetic alopecia more rewarding. Similarly new immunomodulatory therapies show great promise for the lymphocyte-associated alopecias and include a new generation of macrolide immunosuppressives (tacrolimus, SDZ ASM 981, and SDZ 281-240), some of which appear to have good transcutaneous absorption. PMID:10333615

  2. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  3. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  4. AGU acquires Springer-Verlag Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU has acquired Springer-Verlag's (New York) Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series. This acquisition adds thirty-nine volumes to AGU's own Coastal and Estuarine Sciences book series.Coastal and estuarine science is a rapidly growing area of research driven in part by an increasing awareness of man's impact on the coastal zone, and the importance in understanding its delicate ecosystems. This area of study enhances AGU's initiatives in interdisciplinary research. Particular emphasis is being placed on understanding the complex interactions between the physical, geological, chemical, and biological aspects of marine science.

  5. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  6. [Acquired cystic renal disease. Association with hypernephroma].

    PubMed

    Comesaña, E; Pesqueira, D; Tardáguila, F; De la Fuente, A; Antón, I; Vidal, L; Zungri, E

    1992-02-01

    Emergence of multiple bilateral renal cysts observed in patients undergoing periodic haemodialysis is 40%. The pathology, known as Acquired Cystic Renal Disease (A.C.R.D.) presents a high association to renal cancer. Two cases of A.C.R.D. and their association with hypernephroma, one resulting in secondary retroperitoneal haemorrhage and the other in intracystic haemorrhage, are presented. Forms and diagnosis are analyzed, insisting upon the need of monitoring the patients in haemodialysis from the point of view of tumour emergence.

  7. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication.

  8. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication. PMID:26541597

  9. Eye movement correlates of acquired central dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Schattka, Kerstin I; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-08-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has been no research attempting to analyze both word-based viewing time measures and local fixation patterns in dyslexic readers. The goal of the study was to find out whether specific eye movement parameters reflect pathologically preferred segmental reading in contrast to lexical reading. We compared oral reading of single words of normal controls (n=11) with six aphasic participants (two cases of deep, surface and residual dyslexia each). Participants were asked to read aloud lines of target words differing in length and frequency. Segmental reading was characterized by deviant spatial distribution of saccadic landing positions with initial fixations located mainly at the beginning of the word, while lexical readers showed the normative 'preferred landing positions' left to the center of the words. Contrary to expectation, word length did not distinguish between segmental and lexical readers, while word frequency showed the expected effect for lexical readers only. Their mean fixation duration was already prolonged during first pass reading reflecting their attempts of immediate access to lexical information. After first pass reading, re-reading time was significantly increased in all participants with acquired central dyslexia due to their exceedingly higher monitoring demands for oral reading.

  10. Acquiring functional object knowledge through motor imagery?

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus; van Elk, Michiel; Bekkering, Harold

    2012-04-01

    A widely investigated question in the research on the acquisition of novel functional object representations is the role of the action system. Whereas most studies so far have investigated the role of active action training on the acquisition of object representation, we investigated whether people are able to acquire object representations by just imagining the use of novel objects, given that previous findings suggested that executed and imagined actions share a common representational format. To this end, participants trained the use of novel objects in a motor imagery condition. Training comprised the particular grip applied to the objects and the objects' typical end location. Subsequently, participants' object representations were assessed by means of an object detection task. The results show that participants responded slower when the novel objects were presented at functionally incorrect end locations, indicating that the participants had acquired functional knowledge about object use. Yet, there was no effect of correct versus incorrect grip. Altogether, the findings suggest that motor imagery can facilitate the acquisition of novel object representations, but point also to differences between first-hand action training and training by imagery.

  11. John Newsom-Davis: clinician-scientist and so much more

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    John Newsom-Davis was born in 1932 and died, aged 74, in 2007. After national service in the Royal Air Force, he read Natural Sciences at Cambridge. Following clinical studies at the Middlesex Hospital, he began research into respiratory neurophysiology with Tom Sears at the National Hospital, Queen Square, in London, and spent 1 year with Fred Plum at Cornell University in New York. After neurology specialist training at Queen Square, he became the director of the Batten Unit, continuing his interest in respiratory physiology. There he began to work on myasthenia gravis in collaboration with Ricardo Miledi at University College London and in 1978, after performing the first studies on plasma exchange in that disease, he established a myasthenia gravis research group at the Royal Free Hospital. There he investigated the role of the thymus in this disease and demonstrated an autoimmune basis for the Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome and ‘seronegative’ myasthenia. He was awarded the first Medical Research Council Clinical Research Professorship in 1979 but moved to Oxford in 1987 when he was elected Action Research Professor of Neurology. While at Oxford, he continued to run a very successful multidisciplinary group, researched further into the thymic abnormalities and cellular immunology of myasthenia, identified antibody-mediated mechanisms in acquired neuromyotonia, and began the molecular work that identified the genetic basis for many forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. Meanwhile, he was also involved in university and college governance and contributed widely to the Medical Research Council, government committees, research charities and the Association of British Neurologists. Among many honours, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991, appointed Commander of the British Empire in 1996 and made a Foreign Associate Member of the Institute of Medicine of the United States in 2001. Nearing and following retirement from Oxford, where he

  12. John Newsom-Davis: clinician-scientist and so much more.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela

    2011-12-01

    John Newsom-Davis was born in 1932 and died, aged 74, in 2007. After national service in the Royal Air Force, he read Natural Sciences at Cambridge. Following clinical studies at the Middlesex Hospital, he began research into respiratory neurophysiology with Tom Sears at the National Hospital, Queen Square, in London, and spent 1 year with Fred Plum at Cornell University in New York. After neurology specialist training at Queen Square, he became the director of the Batten Unit, continuing his interest in respiratory physiology. There he began to work on myasthenia gravis in collaboration with Ricardo Miledi at University College London and in 1978, after performing the first studies on plasma exchange in that disease, he established a myasthenia gravis research group at the Royal Free Hospital. There he investigated the role of the thymus in this disease and demonstrated an autoimmune basis for the Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome and 'seronegative' myasthenia. He was awarded the first Medical Research Council Clinical Research Professorship in 1979 but moved to Oxford in 1987 when he was elected Action Research Professor of Neurology. While at Oxford, he continued to run a very successful multidisciplinary group, researched further into the thymic abnormalities and cellular immunology of myasthenia, identified antibody-mediated mechanisms in acquired neuromyotonia, and began the molecular work that identified the genetic basis for many forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. Meanwhile, he was also involved in university and college governance and contributed widely to the Medical Research Council, government committees, research charities and the Association of British Neurologists. Among many honours, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1991, appointed Commander of the British Empire in 1996 and made a Foreign Associate Member of the Institute of Medicine of the United States in 2001. Nearing and following retirement from Oxford, where he continued to

  13. Dietary Patterns High in Red Meat, Potato, Gravy, and Butter Are Associated with Poor Cognitive Functioning but Not with Rate of Cognitive Decline in Very Old Adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Karen; Adamson, Ashley; Kirkwood, Thomas; Hill, Tom R; Siervo, Mario; Mathers, John C; Jagger, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthy dietary patterns (DPs) have been linked to better cognition and reduced risk of dementia in older adults, but their role in cognitive functioning and decline in the very old (aged ≥85 y) is unknown. Objective: We investigated the association between previously established DPs from the Newcastle 85+ Study and global and attention-specific cognition over 5 y. Methods: We followed up with 302 men and 489 women (1921 birth cohort from Northeast United Kingdom) for change in global cognition [measured by the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE)] over 5 y and attention (assessed by the cognitive drug research attention battery) over 3 y. We used 2-step clustering to derive DPs and mixed models to determine the relation between DPs and cognition in the presence of the dementia susceptibility gene. Results: Previously, we characterized 3 DPs that differed in intake of red meat, potato, gravy, and butter and varied with key health measures. When compared with participants in DP1 (high red meat) and DP3 (high butter), participants in DP2 (low meat) had higher SMMSE scores at baseline (P < 0.001) and follow-ups, and better initial attention (P < 0.05). Membership in DP1 and DP3 was associated with overall worse SMMSE scores (β = 0.09, P = 0.01 and β = 0.08, P = 0.02, respectively) than membership in DP2 after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, multimorbidity, and body mass index (BMI). Additional adjustment for apolipoprotein (apoE) ε4 genotype attenuated the association to nonsignificant in women but not in men in DP1 (β = 0.13, P = 0.02). Participants in DP1 and DP3 also had overall worse concentration (β = 0.04, P = 0.002 and β = 0.028, P = 0.03, respectively) and focused attention (β = 0.02, P = 0.01 and β = 0.02, P = 0.03, respectively), irrespective of apoE ε4 genotype, but similar rate of decline in all cognitive measures over time. Conclusion: DPs high in red meat, potato, gravy (DP1), or butter (DP3) were

  14. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  15. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  16. Acquiring case adaptation knowledge: A hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, D.B.; Kinley, A.; Wilson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The ability of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems to apply cases to novel situations depends on their case adaptation knowledge. However, endowing CBR systems with adequate adaptation knowledge has proven to be a very difficult task. This paper describes a hybrid method for performing case adaptation, using a combination of rule-based and case-based reasoning. It shows how this approach provides a framework for acquiring flexible adaptation knowledge from experiences with autonomous adaptation and suggests its potential as a basis for acquisition of adaptation knowledge from interactive user guidance. It also presents initial experimental results examining the benefits of the approach and comparing the relative contributions of case learning and adaptation learning to reasoning performance.

  17. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for helpmore » with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.« less

  18. Acquired alexia: lessons from successful treatment.

    PubMed

    Beeson, P M; Insalaco, D

    1998-11-01

    Two individuals with anomic aphasia and acquired alexia were each provided treatment for their reading impairment. Although reading of single words in isolation was fairly accurate, their text reading was slow and effortful, including functor substitutions and semantic errors. Prior to treatment, reading reaction times for single words showed grammatical class and word-length effects. Both patients responded positively to a treatment protocol that included two phases: (1) multiple oral rereading of text, and (2) reading phrase-formatted text that had increased spacing between phrasal clauses. Their reading rates for text improved while maintaining good comprehension. Following treatment, reading reaction times for single words showed the elimination of grammatical class and word-length effects, suggesting improved access to word forms, particularly functors.

  19. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E. E.

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  20. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  1. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  2. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  3. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  4. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Antihelper T cell autoantibody in acquired agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, A; Sicklick, M; Mehra, V; Rosen, F S; Levey, R H

    1981-01-01

    A patient with acquired agammaglobulinemia had an antihelper T cell factor that was identified as an immunoglobulin of the IgG class. The factor specifically bound to the TH2- T cell subset and, in the presence of complement, abolished the helper effect of normal T cells. The antihelper T cell antibody preceded by several years the appearance of suppressor TH2+Ia+ T cells, at which time the clinical course rapidly deteriorated. Plasmapheresis resulted in lymphocytosis and reappearance of a functionally intact helper T cell population. It did not affect the suppressor cells. Conversely, total thymectomy resulted in a temporary disappearance of the TH2+Ia+ suppressor cells, but did not decrease the levels of the autoantibody to helper T cells. Neither of these treatments reversed the state of agammaglobulinemia. PMID:6450224

  6. Acquired methaemoglobinaemia related to phenazopyridine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh; Sattovia, Stacy

    2012-09-17

    Methaemoglobin is an altered state of haemoglobin in which the ferrous ions of haeme are oxidised to the ferric state. This results in increased affinity to the bound oxygen and decreasing its availability to tissues. Most cases of methaemoglobinaemia are acquired, resulting from an increased methaemoglobin formation by various exogenous agents. The authors report an elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with a 1-month history of shortness of breath. Around the same time she had started using over-the-counter (OTC) phenazopyridine tablets for urinary symptoms. The patient was hypoxic and cyanotic; however, lacked evidence of hypoxaemia on the arterial blood gas. The presence of abnormal haemoglobin was suspected and confirmed by elevated levels of methaemoglobin. Phenazopyridine was proposed to be the likely aetiology of the methaemoglobinaemia, which the patient was not aware of. This case highlights the importance of always inquiring the OTC drug use especially in geriatric population.

  7. Acquired methaemoglobinaemia related to phenazopyridine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Lokesh; Sattovia, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Methaemoglobin is an altered state of haemoglobin in which the ferrous ions of haeme are oxidised to the ferric state. This results in increased affinity to the bound oxygen and decreasing its availability to tissues. Most cases of methaemoglobinaemia are acquired, resulting from an increased methaemoglobin formation by various exogenous agents. The authors report an elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with a 1-month history of shortness of breath. Around the same time she had started using over-the-counter (OTC) phenazopyridine tablets for urinary symptoms. The patient was hypoxic and cyanotic; however, lacked evidence of hypoxaemia on the arterial blood gas. The presence of abnormal haemoglobin was suspected and confirmed by elevated levels of methaemoglobin. Phenazopyridine was proposed to be the likely aetiology of the methaemoglobinaemia, which the patient was not aware of. This case highlights the importance of always inquiring the OTC drug use especially in geriatric population. PMID:22987905

  8. Multiple myeloma associated with acquired cutis laxa.

    PubMed

    Cho, S Y; Maguire, R F

    1980-08-01

    Acquired cutis laxa is a rare disorder characterized by diffuse laxity of the skin and loss of connective tissue support with involvement of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, pelvic organs, and aorta. The case report presented herein describes a forty-six year old woman with multiple myeloma and cutis laxa. Her history included several severe allergic reactions and the gradual development of lax skin, loss of connective tissue support throughout the body, and emphysema. At autopsy, multiple myeloma, diffuse laxity of the skin, and panacinar emphysema were found. The amount of elastic fiber in the skin, lungs, and aorta was decreased and showed abnormal fragmentation. Results of direct immunofluorescence study demonstrated IgG bound to dermal elastic fibers. Speculation regarding an immunologic etiology of the elastic tissue abnormality is presented herein.

  9. Guidelines for prevention of hospital acquired infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Todi, Subhash; Myatra, SN; Samaddar, D. P.; Patil, Vijaya; Bhattacharya, Pradip Kumar; Ramasubban, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines, written for clinicians, contains evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of hospital acquired infections Hospital acquired infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity and provide challenge to clinicians. Measures of infection control include identifying patients at risk of nosocomial infections, observing hand hygiene, following standard precautions to reduce transmission and strategies to reduce VAP, CR-BSI, CAUTI. Environmental factors and architectural lay out also need to be emphasized upon. Infection prevention in special subsets of patients - burns patients, include identifying sources of organism, identification of organisms, isolation if required, antibiotic prophylaxis to be used selectively, early removal of necrotic tissue, prevention of tetanus, early nutrition and surveillance. Immunodeficient and Transplant recipients are at a higher risk of opportunistic infections. The post tranplant timetable is divided into three time periods for determining risk of infections. Room ventilation, cleaning and decontamination, protective clothing with care regarding food requires special consideration. Monitoring and Surveillance are prioritized depending upon the needs. Designated infection control teams should supervise the process and help in collection and compilation of data. Antibiotic Stewardship Recommendations include constituting a team, close coordination between teams, audit, formulary restriction, de-escalation, optimizing dosing, active use of information technology among other measure. The recommendations in these guidelines are intended to support, and not replace, good clinical judgment. The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of evidence supporting the recommendation, so that readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. PMID:24701065

  10. Infantile and acquired nystagmus in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ehrt, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Nystagmus is an involuntary, periodic eye movement caused by a slow drift of fixation which is followed by a fast refixation saccade (jerk nystagmus) or a slow movement back to fixation (pendular nystagmus). In childhood most cases are benign forms of nystagmus: idiopathic infantile, ocular or latent nystagmus. They arise at the age of 3 months, without oscillopsia and show the absence of the physiologic opto-kinetic nystagmus. A full ophthalmologic evaluation is all that is needed in most cases: albinism, macular or optic nerve hypoplasia and congenital retinal dystrophies are the most common forms of ocular nystagmus. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus can be hereditary, the most common and best analyzed form being a mutation of the FRMD7 gene on chromosome Xq26.2. The mutation shows a mild genotype-phenotype correlation. In all female carriers the opto-kinetic nystagmus is absent and half had mild nystagmus. Latent nystagmus is part of the infantile esotropia syndrome and shows the unique feature of change of direction when the fixing eye changes: it is always beating to the side of the fixing eye. There is no cure for infantile nystagmus but therapeutic options include magnifying visual aids or eye muscle surgery at the age of 6-8 y in patients with head turn. Less than 20% of childhood nystagmus are acquired and need further neurological and imaging work-up. Alarming signs and symptoms are: onset after the age of 4 months, oscillopsia, dissociated (asymmetric) nystagmus, preserved opto-kinetic nystagmus, afferent pupillary defect, papilloedema and neurological symptoms like vertigo and nausea. The most common cause is due to pathology of the anterior optic pathway (e.g. optic nerve gliomas). It shows the same clinical feature of dissociated nystagmus as spasmus nutans but has a higher frequency as in INO. Other forms of acquired nystagmus are due to brainstem, cerebellar or metabolic diseases. PMID:22459007

  11. 48 CFR 970.4102 - Acquiring utility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acquiring utility services... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Acquisition of Utility Services 970.4102 Acquiring utility services....

  12. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of Land... of acquisition by the Bureau of Land Management, and are not subject to the requirements of § 4110.1....

  13. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  14. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  15. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  16. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  17. Preschoolers Acquire General Knowledge by Sharing in Pretense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Children acquire general knowledge about many kinds of things, but there are few known means by which this knowledge is acquired. In this article, it is proposed that children acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play. In Experiment 1, twenty-two 3- to 4-year-olds watched pretense in which a puppet represented a "nerp" (an unfamiliar…

  18. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 1779.90 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS § 1779.90 Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the...

  19. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a...

  20. 25 CFR 211.8 - Government employees cannot acquire leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TRIBAL LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT General § 211.8 Government employees cannot acquire leases. U.S. Government employees are prevented from acquiring leases or interests in leases by the provisions of 25 CFR... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Government employees cannot acquire leases. 211.8...

  1. 25 CFR 212.8 - Government employees cannot acquire leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ALLOTTED LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT General § 212.8 Government employees cannot acquire leases. U.S. Government employees are prevented from acquiring leases or interests in leases by the provisions of 25 CFR... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Government employees cannot acquire leases. 212.8...

  2. 25 CFR 212.8 - Government employees cannot acquire leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ALLOTTED LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT General § 212.8 Government employees cannot acquire leases. U.S. Government employees are prevented from acquiring leases or interests in leases by the provisions of 25 CFR... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government employees cannot acquire leases. 212.8...

  3. 25 CFR 211.8 - Government employees cannot acquire leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TRIBAL LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT General § 211.8 Government employees cannot acquire leases. U.S. Government employees are prevented from acquiring leases or interests in leases by the provisions of 25 CFR... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government employees cannot acquire leases. 211.8...

  4. Acquired prosopagnosia: structural basis and processing impairments.

    PubMed

    Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Pancaroglu, Raika; Barton, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models propose a hierarchy of parallel processing stages in face perception, and functional neuroimaging shows a network of regions involved in face processing. Reflecting this, acquired prosopagnosia is not a single entity but a family of disorders with different anatomic lesions and different functional deficits. One classic distinction is between an apperceptive variant, in which there is impaired perception of facial structure, and an associative/amnestic variant, in which perception is relatively intact, with subsequent problems matching perception to facial memories, because of either disconnection or loss of those memories. These disorders also have to be distinguished from people-specific amnesia, a multimodal impairment, and prosop-anomia, in which familiarity with faces is preserved but access to names is disrupted. These different disorders can be conceived as specific deficits at different processing stages in cognitive models, and suggests that these functional stages may have distinct neuroanatomic substrates. It remains to be seen whether a similar anatomic and functional variability is present in developmental prosopagnosia.

  5. Acquiring synaesthesia: insights from training studies

    PubMed Central

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Synaesthesia denotes a condition of remarkable individual differences in experience characterized by specific additional experiences in response to normal sensory input. Synaesthesia seems to (i) run in families which suggests a genetic component, (ii) is associated with marked structural and functional neural differences, and (iii) is usually reported to exist from early childhood. Hence, synaesthesia is generally regarded as a congenital phenomenon. However, most synaesthetic experiences are triggered by cultural artifacts (e.g., letters, musical sounds). Evidence exists to suggest that synaesthetic experiences are triggered by the conceptual representation of their inducer stimuli. Cases were identified for which the specific synaesthetic associations are related to prior experiences and large scale studies show that grapheme-color associations in synaesthesia are not completely random. Hence, a learning component is inherently involved in the development of specific synaesthetic associations. Researchers have hypothesized that associative learning is the critical mechanism. Recently, it has become of scientific and public interest if synaesthetic experiences may be acquired by means of associative training procedures and whether the gains of these trainings are associated with similar cognitive benefits as genuine synaesthetic experiences. In order to shed light on these issues and inform synaesthesia researchers and the general interested public alike, we provide a comprehensive literature review on developmental aspects of synaesthesia and specific training procedures in non-synaesthetes. Under the light of a clear working definition of synaesthesia, we come to the conclusion that synaesthesia can potentially be learned by the appropriate training. PMID:24624072

  6. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  7. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities.

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. PMID:24387877

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia: An overview.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Lionel A

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and is often misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated. Although it can be caused by a wide variety of micro-organisms, the pneumococcus, atypicals, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and certain Gram-negative rods are the usual pathogens encountered. The site-of-care decision is critical in determining the site and type of care as well as the extent of diagnostic workup. Antimicrobial therapy should be started as soon as possible particularly in those requiring admission to hospital, but typically the physician does not know with any degree of certainty the identity of the etiologic pathogen. A number of national guidelines have been published to help the physician with this choice. The initial drug(s) can be modified if necessary if the pathogen and its antimicrobial susceptibility pattern becomes known. Adjunctive therapy such as pressors and fluid replacement are of value and macrolides appear to help as well, likely secondary to their immunomodulatory effects. Recent data also suggest a role for steroids.

  11. [Severe community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Arancibia H, Francisco; Díaz P, Orlando

    2005-01-01

    Patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP) need continuous surveillance and monitoring at intensive care units (ICU), where they can receive specialized support as mechanical ventilation and/or hemodynamic support. Patients that require ICU admittance represent 10 to 30% of all patients interned because a pneumonia. In this category, high complication rate, prolonged hospital stay and high mortality rate are the rule. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria for severe pneumonia establishes the following main criteria: necessity of mechanical ventilation and presence of septic shock; minor criteria: systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, radiological multilobar involvement and PaO2/FiO2 < 250 mmHg. British Thoracic Society (BTS) criteria for severe CAP are: respiratory rate over 30 breaths/min, diastolic blood pressure under 60 mmHg, BUN > 20 mg/dl and mental confusion. In all patients with CAP it is recommended the evaluation of its severity at admission. This evaluation should be done in conjunction with an experienced physician, and if criteria for poor prognosis are met, an early admission to ICU is recommended. ATS and BTS modified criteria (CURB) are useful in this procedure. In severely ill patients with CAP it is recommended to perform the following microbiological analysis: sputum Gram stain and culture, blood culture, pleural fluid Gram stain and culture, if present and tapped, Legionella pneumophila urine antigen test, influenza A and B antigen detection tests (epidemic period: autumn and winter), and serology for atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae).

  12. Acquired Hemophilia A Successfully Treated with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA, besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with a normalization of clotting parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm., but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation parameters induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days. This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be established and warrants further investigation. PMID:25745551

  13. Acquired hemophilia a successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA, besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with a normalization of clotting parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm., but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation parameters induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days. This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be established and warrants further investigation. PMID:25745551

  14. Community-acquired Pneumonia and its Complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qiang; Shen, Kun-ling

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in developing and developed countries, and its incidence is highest among children less than 5-y-old. Over the last five years, several international and local guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of pediatric CAP, but there are still several major problems that need to be standardised. The aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the termination, epidemiology, microbiology and pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment, and complications of pediatric CAP. There still are many unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the difficulty to identify its etiological agents, the emergence of drug, and the lack of introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens in developing countries. More research is required in various areas (including therapy of atypical agents), and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination in order to reduce the incidence of the disease. PMID:25976616

  15. Salmonella acquires ferrous iron from haemophagocytic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2014-09-01

    Bacteria harbour both ferrous and ferric iron transporters. We now report that infection of macrophages and mice with a Salmonella enterica Typhimurium strain containing an inactivated feoB-encoded ferrous iron transporter results in increased bacterial replication, compared to infection with wild type. Inactivation of other cation transporters, SitABCD or MntH, did not increase bacterial replication. The feoB mutant strain does not have an intrinsically faster growth rate. Instead, increased replication correlated with increased expression in macrophages of the fepB-encoded bacterial ferric iron transporter and also required siderophores, which capture ferric iron. Co-infection of mice with wild type and a feoB mutant strain yielded a different outcome: FeoB is clearly required for tissue colonization. In co-infected primary mouse macrophages, FeoB is required for S. Typhimurium replication if the macrophages were IFNγ treated and contain phagocytosed erythrocytes, a model for haemophagocytosis. Haemophagocytes are macrophages that have engulfed erythrocytes and/or leucocytes and can harbour Salmonella in mice. These observations suggest that Salmonella acquires ferrous iron from haemophagocytic macrophages.

  16. [Acquired polycystic degeneration of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Kreisel-Büstgens, C; Büstgens, L; Graben, N

    1990-12-15

    Kidneys of patients with advanced renal insufficiency undergo polycystic transformation, described as acquired cystic degeneration (ACD). In 118 chronic dialysis patients clinical data were compared with sonographic findings of their 221 cirrhotic kidneys: 74 (63%) patients showed distinctly discernible renal cysts: 19 patients hat one single cyst, nine patients had two to eight cysts, 46 patients had more than eight cysts. Accordingly 39% of patients had ACD. Cystic transformation was of the same degree on both sides and in a few cases so marked that a formal discrimination to congenital cystic disease seemed impossible. Cystic degeneration was not influenced by patient's age, sex or underlying renal disease, but was dependent on the duration of both, renal disease and dialysis treatment. After eight years 71% of dialysis patients had ACD. In coincidence with cystic transformation the size of the kidneys apparently normalized and Hb-concentration rose from 8 to 10 g/dl. Complications were seen in six patients: two severe retroperitoneal bleedings and four hypernephroma were observed. The etiology of cystic transformation and its possible role as precancerosis are discussed.

  17. Marked hypotonia in an infant of a mother with Devic disease.

    PubMed

    Zifman, Eyal; Litmanovitz, Ita; Segal, Gil; Regev, Rivka; Watemberg, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    A full-term female neonate was born with severe hypotonia and weakness. Her mother had been treated for neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease) for 6 years. Her previous son, born 10 years earlier and before she developed the disease, also had marked hypotonia that gradually improved over several weeks. A suspicion of neonatal myasthenia gravis arose, as a search of the literature revealed the occasional detection of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in patients with Devic disease. A neostigmine test was mildly positive in the baby, but anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies were elevated. Aquaporin 4 antibodies typical of neuromyelitis optica were not detected in the infant. Because of clinical deterioration, intravenous immunoglobulin was administered with substantial improvement. Anti-acetylcholine antibodies were markedly elevated in the mother's serum, although she showed no clinical signs of myasthenia gravis. It is very likely that her previous baby also had unrecognized transient myasthenia gravis. PMID:20028941

  18. Acquired prosopagnosia abolishes the face inversion effect.

    PubMed

    Busigny, Thomas; Rossion, Bruno

    2010-09-01

    Individual faces are notoriously difficult to recognize when they are presented upside-down. Since acquired prosopagnosia (AP) has been associated with an impairment of expert face processes, a reduced or abolished face inversion effect (FIE) is expected in AP. However, previous studies have incongruently reported apparent normal effects of inversion, a decreased or abolished FIE, but also a surprisingly better performance for inverted faces for some patients. While these discrepant observations may be due to the variability of high-level processes impaired, a careful look at the literature rather suggests that the pattern of FIE in prosopagnosia has been obscured by a selection of patients with associated low-level defects and general visual recognition impairments, as well as trade-offs between accuracy and correct RT measures. Here we conducted an extensive investigation of upright and inverted face processing in a well-characterized case of face-selective AP, PS (Rossion et al., 2003). In 4 individual face discrimination experiments, PS did not present any inversion effect at all, taking into account all dependent measures of performance. However, she showed a small inversion cost for individualizing members of a category of non-face objects (cars), just like normal observers. A fifth experiment with personally familiar faces to recognize confirmed the lack of inversion effect for PS. Following the present report and a survey of the literature, we conclude that the FIE is generally absent, or at least clearly reduced following AP. We also suggest that the paradoxical superior performance for inverted faces observed in rare cases may be due to additional upper visual field defects rather than to high-level competing visual processes. These observations are entirely compatible with the view that AP is associated with a disruption of a process that is also abolished following inversion: the holistic representation of individual exemplars of the face class.

  19. Impact of lactobacilli on orally acquired listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Archambaud, Cristel; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Bécavin, Christophe; Laval, Laure; Lechat, Pierre; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier and disseminates within the host. Here, we report a unique comprehensive analysis of the impact of two Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-3689 and Lactobacillus casei BL23, on L. monocytogenes and orally acquired listeriosis in a gnotobiotic humanized mouse model. We first assessed the effect of treatment with each Lactobacillus on L. monocytogenes counts in host tissues and showed that each decreases L. monocytogenes systemic dissemination in orally inoculated mice. A whole genome intestinal transcriptomic analysis revealed that each Lactobacillus changes expression of a specific subset of genes during infection, with IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) being the most affected by both lactobacilli. We also examined microRNA (miR) expression and showed that three miRs (miR-192, miR-200b, and miR-215) are repressed during L. monocytogenes infection. Treatment with each Lactobacillus increased miR-192 expression, whereas only L. casei association increased miR-200b and miR-215 expression. Finally, we showed that treatment with each Lactobacillus significantly reshaped the L. monocytogenes transcriptome and up-regulated transcription of L. monocytogenes genes encoding enzymes allowing utilization of intestinal carbon and nitrogen sources in particular genes involved in propanediol and ethanolamine catabolism and cobalamin biosynthesis. Altogether, these data reveal that the modulation of L. monocytogenes infection by treatment with lactobacilli correlates with a decrease in host gene expression, in particular ISGs, miR regulation, and a dramatic reshaping of L. monocytogenes transcriptome. PMID:23012479

  20. [Clinical aspects of acquired antithrombin III deficiency].

    PubMed

    von Blohn, G; Hellstern, P; Köhler, M; Scheffler, P; Wenzel, E

    1986-02-01

    The significance of acquired antithrombin III (AT III) deficiency must be interpreted in close relation to the underlying disease process. In patients with acute or chronic liver impairment, the AT III activity is related to a decrease of procoagulatory factors, whereas, in protein loss syndromes such as nephrotic syndrome, the AT III indicates an increased risk of thromboembolic events. The effect of oral contraceptives (OC) on AT III levels in young healthy females (n = 30) was determined prospectively. AT III decreases during OC usage could not be related to the estrogen content of the examined oral contraceptives, and there was no parallel decrease of AT III activity and concentration in each type of OC. In a prospective study, the extent of AT III decrease was determined in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass operations (CPB) receiving different anticoagulant schedules during extracorporeal circulation (n = 49). There was no significant influence on the effectiveness of anticoagulation by the observed AT III decreases. AT III deficiency during CPB was primarily the result of hemodilution. However, the AT III kinetics were significantly influenced by the different protamin dosages and were not affected by the different heparin dosages. Correction of diminished AT III levels by substitution of AT III concentrates is beneficial in cases, in which an interruption of an enhanced coagulatory process such as disseminated intravascular coagulation is necessary or in patients requiring high dosage heparinization as in deep vein thrombosis. In those cases the quality of AT III correction correlates to the course of the disease. However, the potency of concentrates as well as the individual AT III recovery and half-life must be considered for an appropriate treatment with AT III substitution. PMID:3718407

  1. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE IN MOUSE TYPHOID

    PubMed Central

    Blanden, R. V.; Mackaness, G. B.; Collins, F. M.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments in vitro comparing normal mouse peritoneal macrophages with cells from Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice have shown that the "immune" macrophages have conspicuously enhanced microbicidal properties. Whereas normal macrophages could inactivate only 50 to 60% of intracellular S. typhimurium pretreated with immune serum, cells from infected animals killed virtually all ingested organisms and did so at an accelerated rate. Macrophages from Listeria monocytogenes-infected mice were shown to possess similarly enhanced microbicidal activity against S. typhimurium. Furthermore, the growth of S. typhimurium in the liver and spleen was more effectively restricted in Listeria-infected mice than in animals vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium, even though the Listeria-infected animals possessed no demonstrable cross-reacting antibody to S. typhimurium. The lack of resistance in the mice vaccinated with heat-killed organisms could not be attributed to any deficiency of humoral factors, since the serum from these animals was as effective at promoting phagocytosis and killing by macrophages as serum from actively infected (and demonstrably resistant) mice. Conversely, Salmonella-infected mice were totally resistant to intravenous challenge with L. monocytogenes. The level of resistance in individual animals was related to the numbers of residual Salmonellae remaining in the tissues; mice with heavier residual infections being the more resistant. Specific antiserum from mice vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium was found to be significantly protective only when the intraperitoneal route of challenge was employed. The foregoing studies have been interpreted to mean that enhancement of the microbicidal ability of macrophages is the mechanism of major importance in acquired resistance to S. typhimurium infection in mice. PMID:4958757

  2. Impact of lactobacilli on orally acquired listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Archambaud, Cristel; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Bécavin, Christophe; Laval, Laure; Lechat, Pierre; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier and disseminates within the host. Here, we report a unique comprehensive analysis of the impact of two Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-3689 and Lactobacillus casei BL23, on L. monocytogenes and orally acquired listeriosis in a gnotobiotic humanized mouse model. We first assessed the effect of treatment with each Lactobacillus on L. monocytogenes counts in host tissues and showed that each decreases L. monocytogenes systemic dissemination in orally inoculated mice. A whole genome intestinal transcriptomic analysis revealed that each Lactobacillus changes expression of a specific subset of genes during infection, with IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) being the most affected by both lactobacilli. We also examined microRNA (miR) expression and showed that three miRs (miR-192, miR-200b, and miR-215) are repressed during L. monocytogenes infection. Treatment with each Lactobacillus increased miR-192 expression, whereas only L. casei association increased miR-200b and miR-215 expression. Finally, we showed that treatment with each Lactobacillus significantly reshaped the L. monocytogenes transcriptome and up-regulated transcription of L. monocytogenes genes encoding enzymes allowing utilization of intestinal carbon and nitrogen sources in particular genes involved in propanediol and ethanolamine catabolism and cobalamin biosynthesis. Altogether, these data reveal that the modulation of L. monocytogenes infection by treatment with lactobacilli correlates with a decrease in host gene expression, in particular ISGs, miR regulation, and a dramatic reshaping of L. monocytogenes transcriptome. PMID:23012479

  3. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    PubMed

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  4. Ectopic Lymphoid Structures: Powerhouse of Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Nerviani, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) often develop at sites of inflammation in target tissues of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. ELS are characterized by the formation of organized T/B cells aggregates, which can acquire follicular dendritic cells network supporting an ectopic germinal center response. In this review, we shall summarize the mechanisms that regulate the formation of ELS in tertiary lymphoid organs, with particular emphasis on the role of lymphoid chemokines in both formation and maintenance of ELS, the role of emerging positive and negative regulators of ELS development and function, including T follicular helper cells and IL-27, respectively. Finally, we shall discuss the main functions of ELS in supporting the affinity maturation, clonal selection, and differentiation of autoreactive B cells contributing to the maintenance and perpetuation of humoral autoimmunity. PMID:27799933

  5. Origins of evolution: non-acquired characters dominates over acquired characters in changing environment.

    PubMed

    Gaucherel, Cédric; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2012-07-01

    Natural Selection is so ubiquitous that we never wonder how it appeared as the evolution rule driving Life. We usually wonder how Life appeared, and seldom do we make an explicit distinction between Life and natural selection. Here, we apply the evolution concept commonly used for studying Life to evolution itself. More precisely, we developed two models aiming at selecting among different evolution rules competing for their supremacy. We explored competition between acquired (AQ) versus non-acquired (NAQ) character inheritance. The first model is parsimonious and non-spatial, in order to understand relationships between environmental forcings and rule selection. The second model is spatially explicit and studies the adaptation differences between AQ and NAQ populations. We established that NAQ evolution rule is dominating in case of changing environment. Furthermore, we observed that a more adapted population better fits its environmental constraints, but fails in rapidly changing environments. NAQ principle and less adapted populations indeed act as a reservoir of traits that helps populations to survive in rapidly changing environments, such as the ones that probably Life experienced at its origins. Although perfectible, our modeling approaches will certainly help us to improve our understanding of origins of Life and Evolution, on Earth or elsewhere.

  6. Early surgery for hospital-acquired and community-acquired active infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-06-01

    Active infective endocarditis (IE) is classified into two groups; hospital acquired IE (HIE) and IE other than HIE, which was defined as community-acquired IE (CIE). Eighty-two patients underwent surgical treatment for active IE. Seventy-one cases were CIE group and eleven were HIE. There were six patients with native valve endocarditis and five cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis in the HIE group. We compared the surgical outcome of both types of active IE retrospectively. The preoperative status of the patients in the HIE group was more critical than that in the CIE group. Streptococcus spp. were the major micro-organisms in the CIE group (39%), while 82% of the HIE cases were caused by Staphylococcus spp. All Staphylococcus organisms in the HIE group were methicillin resistant. There were 10 hospital deaths, three in the CIE group and seven in the HIE group. Operative mortality in the HIE group was significantly higher than in the CIE group (63.6% vs. 4.2%, P<0.001). The outcome of early operation was satisfactory for active CIE, but poor for HIE. These types of active IE should be considered separately.

  7. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  8. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  9. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  10. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  11. Validation of current land cover maps utilizing astronaut acquired photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebelein, Jennifer; Estes, John E.

    2000-01-01

    This investigation focuses on the potential use of astronaut acquired photography for the validation of current, land cover maps. More specifically, this study is directed at assessing the potential for the use of astronaut acquired photography to document and validate land cover change. Space Shuttle, astronaut acquired photography is employed to test the potential utility of data that may be acquired by astronauts employing the Window Observational Rack Facility (WORF) on International Space Station (ISS). The majority of astronaut acquired photography has been obtained under conditions similar to ISS operations in terms of both spectral as well as spatial resolution. Validation of land cover maps utilizing this type of imagery is being accomplished through a process of comparison among three different land cover classification legends created from the Eros Data Center (EDC) Land Characteristics Database. Our study area is a subregional scale portion of an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based global Land Characteristics Database. The goal of this research is to attempt to establish: 1. which legend derived for this area provides the highest overall accuracy for the land cover classes present: 2. which legend is best validated using astronaut acquired photography; and 3. which classes of these legends best lend themselves to validation with astronaut acquired photography. Preliminary results indicate that astronaut acquired photography can be employed to validate land cover maps and that results achieved using this imagery corresponds well to those achieved utilizing Landsat data. .

  12. 27 CFR 6.45 - Assistance in acquiring license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assistance in acquiring license. 6.45 Section 6.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Furnishing Things of Value § 6.45 Assistance in acquiring license....

  13. 27 CFR 6.45 - Assistance in acquiring license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assistance in acquiring license. 6.45 Section 6.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Furnishing Things of Value § 6.45 Assistance in acquiring license....

  14. 27 CFR 6.45 - Assistance in acquiring license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assistance in acquiring license. 6.45 Section 6.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Furnishing Things of Value § 6.45 Assistance in acquiring license....

  15. Free Reading: A Powerful Tool for Acquiring a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priya, J.; Ponniah, R. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The paper claims that free reading is a crucial ingredient in acquiring a second or foreign language. It contributes to the development of all measures of language competence which include grammar, vocabulary, spelling, syntax, fluency and style. The review supports the claim that readers acquire language subconsciously when they receive…

  16. 45 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should...

  17. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the final... develop a plan to fully protect the collateral, and the lender must dispose of the collateral without delay. (b) Re-title collateral. Any collateral accepted by the lender must not be titled in the...

  18. 45 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should...

  19. 34 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should be assigned to...

  20. 34 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should be assigned to...