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Sample records for acquired radioresistant cells

  1. mRNA and methylation profiling of radioresistant esophageal cancer cells: the involvement of Sall2 in acquired aggressive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Judong; Wang, Wenjie; Tang, Yiting; Zhou, Dandan; Gao, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xifa; Zhu, Hui; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest malignancies worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the curative management of inoperable ESCC patients. However, radioresistance restricts the efficacy of radiotherapy for ESCC patients. The molecules involved in radioresistance remain largely unknown, and new approaches to sensitize cells to irradiation are in demand. Technical advances in analysis of mRNA and methylation have enabled the exploration of the etiology of diseases and have the potential to broaden our understanding of the molecular pathways of ESCC radioresistance. In this study, we constructed radioresistant TE-1 and Eca-109 cell lines (TE-1/R and Eca-109/R, respectively). The radioresistant cells showed an increased migration ability but reduced apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity compared with their parent cells. mRNA and methylation profiling by microarray revealed 1192 preferentially expressed mRNAs and 8841 aberrantly methylated regions between TE-1/R and TE-1 cells. By integrating the mRNA and methylation profiles, we related the decreased expression of transcription factor Sall2 with a corresponding increase in its methylation in TE-1/R cells, indicating its involvement in radioresistance. Upregulation of Sall2 decreased the growth and migration advantage of radioresistant ESCC cells. Taken together, our present findings illustrate the mRNA and DNA methylation changes during the radioresistance of ESCC and the important role of Sall2 in esophageal cancer malignancy. PMID:28367244

  2. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Ryohei; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  3. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/Cyclin D1/Cdk4 Survival Signaling Pathway for Eradication of Tumor Radioresistance Acquired by Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kakuda, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yasushi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Takai, Yoshihiro; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Radioresistance is a major cause of treatment failure of radiotherapy (RT) in human cancer. We have recently revealed that acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by fractionated radiation is attributable to cyclin D1 overexpression as a consequence of the downregulation of GSK3{beta}-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis mediated by a constitutively activated serine-threonine kinase, AKT. This prompted us to hypothesize that targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1 pathway may improve fractionated RT by suppressing acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were exposed to X-rays after incubation with either an AKT inhibitor, AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor-2 (API-2), or a Cdk4 inhibitor (Cdk4-I). Cells were then subjected to immunoblotting, clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, and cell death analysis with TUNEL and annexin V staining. In vivo radiosensitivity was assessed by growth of human tumors xenografted into nude mice. Results: Treatment with API-2 resulted in downregulation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with acquired radioresistance. Cellular radioresistance disappeared completely both in vitro and in vivo with accompanying apoptosis when treated with API-2. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 by Cdk4-I was sufficient for abolishing radioresistance. Treatment with either API-2 or Cdk4-I was also effective in suppressing resistance to cis-platinum (II)-diamine-dichloride in the cells with acquired radioresistance. Interestingly, the radiosensitizing effect of API-2 was canceled by overexpression of cyclin D1 whereas Cdk4-I was still able to sensitize cells with cyclin D1 overexpression. Conclusion: Cyclin D1/Cdk4 is a critical target of the AKT survival signaling pathway responsible for tumor radioresistance. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway would provide a novel approach to improve fractionated RT and would have an impact on tumor

  4. Sensitization of radio-resistant prostate cancer cells with a unique cytolethal distending toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Ho; Chang, Chia-Shuo; Liu, Hsin-Ho; Tsai, Yuh-Shyan; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Yu, Yung-Luen; Lai, Cheng-Kuo; Gandee, Leah; Pong, Rey-Chen; Hsu, Heng-Wei; Yu, Lan; Saha, Debabrata; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) produced by Campylobacter jejuni is a genotoxin that induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in mammalian cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that prostate cancer (PCa) cells can acquire radio-resistance when DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is downregulated. In this study, we showed that CDT could induce cell death in DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells. A combination of CDT and radiotherapy significantly elicited cell death in DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells by inhibiting the repair of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) during G2/M arrest, which is triggered by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA damage checkpoint responses. We also found that CDT administration significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in a xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that CDT can be a potent therapeutic agent for radio-resistant PCa. PMID:25015118

  5. Expression of TIP-1 Confers Radioresistance of Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas represent one group of tumors that poorly respond to ionizing radiation (IR) alone or combined with chemotherapeutic agents because of the intrinsic or acquired resistance. In this study, TIP-1 was identified as one novel protein that confers resistance of glioma cells to IR. Methodology/Principal Findings Meta-analysis indicated that high TIP-1 expression levels correlate with the poor prognosis of human malignant gliomas after radiotherapy. Studies with established human glioma cell lines demonstrated that TIP-1 depletion with specific shRNAs sensitized the cells to IR, whereas an ectopic expression of TIP-1 protected the glioma cells from the IR-induced DNA damage and cell death. Biochemical studies indicated that TIP-1 protein promoted p53 ubiquitination and resulted in a reduced p53 protein level. Furthermore, p53 and its ubiquitination are required for the TIP-1 regulated cellular response to IR. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified that TIP-1, through its single PDZ domain, binds to the carboxyl terminus of LZAP that has been studied as one tumor suppressor functioning through ARF binding and p53 activation. It was revealed that the presence of TIP-1 enhances the protein association between LZAP and ARF and modulates the functionality of ARF/HDM2 toward multi-ubiquitination of p53, while depleting TIP-1 rescued p53 from polyubiquitination and degradation in the irradiated glioma cells. Studies with a mouse xenograft model indicated that depleting TIP-1 within D54 cells improved the tumor growth control with IR. Conclusions/Significance This study provided the first evidence showing that TIP-1 modulates p53 protein stability and is involved in the radioresistance of malignant gliomas, suggesting that antagonizing TIP-1 might be one novel approach to sensitize malignant gliomas to radiotherapy. PMID:23028987

  6. Bmi-1 confers adaptive radioresistance to KYSE-150R esophageal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guanyu; Liu, Luying; Sharma, Sherven; Liu, Hai; Yang, Weifang; Sun, Xiaonan; Dong, Qinghua

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adaptive radioresistant KYSE-150R cells expressed high level of Bmi-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bmi-1 depletion sensitized KYSE-150R cells to RT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bmi-1 depletion increased the generation of ROS in KYSE-150R cells exposed to radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bmi-1 depletion impaired DNA repair capacities in KYSE-150R cells exposed to radiation. -- Abstract: Radiotherapy (RT) is a major modality of cancer treatment. However, tumors often acquire radioresistance, which causes RT to fail. The exact mechanisms by which tumor cells subjected to fractionated irradiation (FIR) develop an adaptive radioresistance are largely unknown. Using the radioresistant KYSE-150R esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) model, which was derived from KYSE-150 parental cells using FIR, the role of Bmi-1 in mediating the radioadaptive response of ESCC cells to RT was investigated. The results showed that the level of Bmi-1 expression was significantly higher in KYSE-150R cells than in the KYSE-150 parental cells. Bmi-1 depletion sensitized the KYSE-150R cells to RT mainly through the induction of apoptosis, partly through the induction of senescence. A clonogenic cell survival assay showed that Bmi-1 depletion significantly decreased the radiation survival fraction in KYSE-150R cells. Furthermore, Bmi-1 depletion increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the expression of oxidase genes (Lpo, Noxo1 and Alox15) in KYSE-150R cells exposed to irradiation. DNA repair capacities assessed by {gamma}-H2AX foci formation were also impaired in the Bmi-1 down-regulated KYSE-150R cells. These results suggest that Bmi-1 plays an important role in tumor radioadaptive resistance under FIR and may be a potent molecular target for enhancing the efficacy of fractionated RT.

  7. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Misbah; Qazi, Aamer; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Parveen, Gulshan; Waquar, Sulayman; Ashraf, Abdul Basit; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds. PMID:26998418

  8. Fractionated radiation exposure amplifies the radioresistant nature of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, N.; Meunier, A.; Mooney, B.; Nortey, G.; Hernandez, C.; Hurley, S.; Lynam-Lennon, N.; Barsoom, S. H.; Bowman, K. J.; Marples, B.; Jones, G. D. D.; Marignol, L.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of recurrence following radiation therapy remains high for a significant number of prostate cancer patients. The development of in vitro isogenic models of radioresistance through exposure to fractionated radiation is an increasingly used approach to investigate the mechanisms of radioresistance in cancer cells and help guide improvements in radiotherapy standards. We treated 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells with fractionated 2 Gy radiation to a cumulative total dose of 60 Gy. This process selected for 22Rv1-cells with increased clonogenic survival following subsequent radiation exposure but increased sensitivity to Docetaxel. This RR-22Rv1 cell line was enriched in S-phase cells, less susceptible to DNA damage, radiation-induced apoptosis and acquired enhanced migration potential, when compared to wild type and aged matched control 22Rv1 cells. The selection of radioresistant cancer cells during fractionated radiation therapy may have implications in the development and administration of future targeted therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy. PMID:27703211

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1–mediated characteristic features of cancer cells for tumor radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been attracting increasing attention in the fields of radiation biology and oncology since Thomlinson and Gray detected hypoxic cells in malignant solid tumors and showed that they exert a negative impact on the outcome of radiation therapy. This unfavorable influence has, at least partly, been attributed to cancer cells acquiring a radioresistant phenotype through the activation of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). On the other hand, accumulating evidence has recently revealed that, even though HIF-1 is recognized as an important regulator of cellular adaptive responses to hypoxia, it may not become active and induce tumor radioresistance under hypoxic conditions only. The mechanisms by which HIF-1 is activated in cancer cells not only under hypoxic conditions, but also under normoxic conditions, through cancer-specific genetic alterations and the resultant imbalance in intermediate metabolites have been summarized herein. The relevance of the HIF-1–mediated characteristic features of cancer cells, such as the production of antioxidants through reprogramming of the glucose metabolic pathway and cell cycle regulation, for tumor radioresistance has also been reviewed. PMID:26983985

  10. Efficient killing of radioresistant breast cancer cells by cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingming; Zhu, Danni; Bu, Xiaocui; Wei, Xiaofang; Li, Changyou; Gao, Daiqing; Wei, Xiaoqiang; Ma, Xuezhen; Zhao, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of breast cancer after radiotherapy may be partly explained by the presence of radioresistant cells. Thus, it would be desirable to develop an effective therapy against radioresistant cells. In this study, we demonstrated the intense antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against MCF-7 and radioresistant MCF-7 cells, as revealed by cytokine-induced killer-mediated cytotoxicity, tumor cell proliferation, and tumor invasion. Radioresistant MCF-7 cells were more susceptible to cytokine-induced killer cell killing. The stronger cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against radioresistant MCF-7 cells was dependent on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I polypeptide-related sequence A/B on radioresistant MCF-7 cells after exposure of cytokine-induced killer cells to sensitized targets. In addition, we demonstrated that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy via the downregulation of TK1, TYMS, and MDR1. These results indicate that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in combination with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may induce synergistic antitumor activities and represent a novel strategy for breast cancer.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells show radioresistance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvpreet; Kloss, Frank R; Brunauer, Regina; Schimke, Magdalena; Jamnig, Angelika; Greiderer-Kleinlercher, Brigitte; Klima, Günter; Rentenberger, Julia; Auberger, Thomas; Hächl, Oliver; Rasse, Michael; Gassner, Robert; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation impacts on the viability and differentiation capacity of tissue-borne mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which play a pivotal role in bone regeneration. As a consequence of radiotherapy, bones may develop osteoradionecrosis. When irradiating human bone-derived MSC in vitro with increasing doses, the cells' self-renewal capabilities were greatly reduced. Mitotically stalled cells were still capable of differentiating into osteoblasts and pre-adipocytes. As a large animal model comparable to the clinical situation, pig mandibles were subjected to fractionized radiation of 2 χ 9 Gy within 1 week. This treatment mimics that of a standardized clinical treatment regimen of head and neck cancer patients irradiated 30 χ 2 Gy. In the pig model, fractures which had been irradiated, showed delayed osseous healing. When isolating MSC at different time points post-irradiation, no significant changes regarding proliferation capacity and osteogenic differentiation potential became apparent. Therefore, pig mandibles were irradiated with a single dose of either 9 or 18 Gy in vivo, and MSC were isolated immediately afterwards. No significant differences between the untreated and 9 Gy irradiated bone with respect to proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were unveiled. Yet, cells isolated from 18 Gy irradiated specimens exhibited a reduced osteogenic differentiation capacity, and during the first 2 weeks proliferation rates were greatly diminished. Thereafter, cells recovered and showed normal proliferation behaviour. These findings imply that MSC can effectively cope with irradiation up to high doses in vivo. This finding should thus be implemented in future therapeutic concepts to protect regenerating tissue from radiation consequences.

  12. Intracellular calcium promotes radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells through activating Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is a major therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer but is restricted by radioresistance. Although Akt signaling promotes radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer, it is not well understood how Akt signaling is activated. Since intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) could activate Akt in A549 cells, we investigated the relationship between intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and Akt signaling in radioresistant A549 cells by establishing radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The radioresistant cell line A549 was generated by dose-gradient irradiation of the parental A549 cells. The cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were, respectively, assessed using the cell counting kit-8, EdU labeling, and flow cytometry analysis. The phosphorylation of Akt was evaluated by Western blotting, and the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was assessed by Fluo 4-AM. The radioresistant A549 cells displayed mesenchymal morphology. After additional irradiation, the radioresistant A549 cells showed decreased cell viability and proliferation but increased apoptosis. Moreover, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the phosphorylation level on the Akt473 site in radioresistant A549 cells were higher than those in original cells, whereas the percentage of apoptosis in radioresistant A549 cells was less. All these results could be reversed by verapamil. In conclusion, our study found that intracellular Ca(2+) could promote radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells through phosphorylating of Akt on the 473 site, which contributes to a better understanding on the non-small cell lung cancer radioresistance, and may provide a new target for radioresistance management.

  13. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresistance genes Hsp90 and Her-3. RR-H460 cells displayed characteristics of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), including induction of the surface marker CD44 and stem cell markers Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. RR-H460 cells also exhibited sphere formation and malignant behavior, further supporting a CSC phenotype. Using proteomic analyses, we identified 8 proteins that were up-regulated in RR-H460 CSC lines and therefore potentially involved in radioresistance and CSC-related biological processes. Notably, 4 of these-PAI-2, NOMO2, KLC4, and PLOD3-have not been previously linked to radioresistance. Depletion of these individual genes sensitized RR-H460 cells to radiotoxicity and additively enhancing radiation-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest the possibility of integrating molecular targeted therapy with radiotherapy as a strategy for resolving the radioresistance of lung tumors.

  14. PTK7 regulates radioresistance through nuclear factor-kappa B in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Misun; Yoon, Hyeon-Joon; Kang, Moon Chul; Kwon, Junhye; Lee, Hae Won

    2016-10-01

    Tumor radioresistance is a major reason for decreased efficiency of cancer radiation therapy. Although a number of factors involved in radioresistance have been identified, the molecular mechanisms underlying radioresistance of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7) in the resistance of ESCC to radiation therapy. ESCC cell lines with high PTK7 expression were more refractive to radiation than those with low PTK7 levels. In radioresistant ESCC cells, PTK7 knockdown by specific siRNAs decreased the survival of irradiated cells and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, while in radiosensitive ESCC cells, PTK7 overexpression promoted cell survival and inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis. We hypothesized that PTK7 could regulate the activation of transcription factor NF-kB known for its role in cancer radioresistance. Our results indicated that the inhibition of PTK7 suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-kB subunit p65 induced by radiation, suggesting relevance of PTK7 expression with NF-kB activation in radioresistant ESCC. Furthermore, the levels of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), XIAP, and survivin, encoded by NF-kB-regulated genes, were induced in irradiated radioresistant cells but not in radiosensitive cells, while PTK7 knockdown downregulated IAP expression. Our findings revealed a novel mechanism underlying radioresistance in ESCC, which is associated with PTK7 and NF-kB-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that the manipulation of PTK7 expression can be instrumental in enhancing ESCC response to radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that PTK7 plays a significant role in ESCC radioresistance via the NF-kB pathway.

  15. Multiple factors conferring high radioresistance in insect Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I-Cheng; Lee, How-Jing; Wang, T C

    2009-05-01

    Sf9, a lepidopteran cell line isolated from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, was shown to be significantly more resistant to growth inhibition and apoptosis induction effects of x-ray irradiation than several human cell lines of different origins. The single-cell electrophoresis technique revealed that Sf9 cells showed lower x-ray irradiation-induced DNA damage as well as better efficiency at repairing these damages. In addition, Sf9 cells were lower in both background and x-ray irradiation-induced intracellular oxidative stress, in which the higher intracellular level of reduced glutathione seemed to play a major role. The significance of oxidative stress in determining the radioresistance of Sf9 cells was confirmed by their being more resistant to hydrogen peroxide while equally susceptible to other non-reactive oxygen species of N-nitroso alkylating agents when compared with a human cell line. Although the Sf9 and human cell lines were equally susceptible to the lethal effects of N-nitroso alkylating agents, the components of DNA damage-induced and the repair enzymes involved significantly differ. This phenomenon is also discussed in this report.

  16. Targeting radioresistant breast cancer cells by single agent CHK1 inhibitor via enhancing replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhanwen; Gao, Jinnan; Yang, Shuming; Gorityala, Shashank; Xiong, Xiahui; Deng, Ou; Ma, Zhefu; Yan, Chunhong; Susana, Gonzalo; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junran

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains a standard therapeutic modality for breast cancer patients. However, intrinsic or acquired resistance limits the efficacy of RT. Here, we demonstrate that CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 alone significantly inhibited the growth of radioresistant breast cancer cells (RBCC). Given the critical role of ATR/CHK1 signaling in suppressing oncogene-induced replication stress (RS), we hypothesize that CHK1 inhibition leads to the specific killing for RBCC due to its abrogation in the suppression of RS induced by oncogenes. In agreement, the expression of oncogenes c-Myc/CDC25A/c-Src/H-ras/E2F1 and DNA damage response (DDR) proteins ATR/CHK1/BRCA1/CtIP were elevated in RBCC. AZD7762 exposure led to significantly higher levels of RS in RBCC, compared to the parental cells. The mechanisms by which CHK1 inhibition led to specific increase of RS in RBCC were related to the interruptions in the replication fork dynamics and the homologous recombination (HR). In summary, RBCC activate oncogenic pathways and thus depend upon mechanisms controlled by CHK1 signaling to maintain RS under control for survival. Our study provided the first example where upregulating RS by CHK1 inhibitor contributes to the specific killing of RBCC, and highlight the importance of the CHK1 as a potential target for treatment of radioresistant cancer cells. PMID:27167194

  17. Increased radioresistance of tumor cells exposed to metallothionein-inducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Renan, M.J.; Dowman, P.I. )

    1989-12-01

    In this study, we have determined the radiosensitivity parameters of cells exposed in vitro to metallothionein-inducing agents. Three well-characterized tumor cell lines were chosen for investigation: HeLa, B16, and WHFIB. We have shown that exposure of cells in vitro to a heavy metal (cadmium), followed by irradiation, enhances cell survival for two out of three cell lines studied. As measured by the mean inactivation dose, the radioresistance increases by a factor of 1.6 for HeLa cells, 1.4 for WHFIB, and a negligible factor for B16 cells. An additional effect was noted when different classes of metallothionein inducers (such as serum factors, cadmium, and dexamethasone) were allowed to act together. Also, we found that the increase in radioresistance exhibits a peak at exposure times of approximately 10 h; longer exposure to inducing agents results in a reduction in radioresistance.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells and Radioresistance: Rho/ROCK Pathway Plea Attention

    PubMed Central

    Pranatharthi, Annapurna; Ross, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Radiation is the most potent mode of cancer therapy; however, resistance to radiation therapy results in tumor relapse and subsequent fatality. The cancer stem cell (CSC), which has better DNA repair capability, has been shown to contribute to tumor resistance and is an important target for treatment. Signaling molecules such as Notch, Wnt, and DNA repair pathways regulate molecular mechanisms in CSCs; however, none of them have been translated into therapeutic targets. The RhoGTPases and their effector ROCK-signaling pathway, though important for tumor progression, have not been well studied in the context of radioresistance. There are reports that implicate RhoA in radioresistance. ROCK2 has also been shown to interact with BRCA2 in the regulation of cell division. Incidentally, statins (drug for cardiovascular ailment) are functional inhibitors of RhoGTPases. Studies suggest that patients on statins have a better prognosis in cancers. Data from our lab suggest that ROCK signaling regulates radioresistance in cervical cancer cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that Rho/ROCK signaling may be important for radiation resistance. In this review, we enumerate the role of Rho/ROCK signaling in stemness and radioresistance and highlight the need to explore these molecules for a better understanding of radioresistance and development of therapeutics. PMID:27597870

  19. Profiling Global Kinome Signatures of the Radioresistant MCF-7/C6 Breast Cancer Cells Using MRM-based Targeted Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is widely used in cancer therapy; however, cancer cells often develop radioresistance, which compromises the efficacy of cancer radiation therapy. Quantitative assessment of the alteration of the entire kinome in radioresistant cancer cells relative to their radiosensitive counterparts may provide important knowledge to define the mechanism(s) underlying tumor adaptive radioresistance and uncover novel target(s) for effective prevention and treatment of tumor radioresistance. By employing a scheduled multiple-reaction monitoring analysis in conjunction with isotope-coded ATP affinity probes, we assessed the global kinome of radioresistant MCF-7/C6 cells and their parental MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We rigorously quantified 120 kinases, of which 1/3 exhibited significant differences in expression levels or ATP binding affinities. Several kinases involved in cell cycle progression and DNA damage response were found to be overexpressed or hyperactivated, including checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2), and the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase. The elevated expression of CHK1, CDK1, and CDK2 in MCF-7/C6 cells was further validated by Western blot analysis. Thus, the altered kinome profile of radioresistant MCF-7/C6 cells suggests the involvement of kinases on cell cycle progression and DNA repair in tumor adaptive radioresistance. The unique kinome profiling results also afforded potential effective targets for resensitizing radioresistant cancer cells and counteracting deleterious effects of ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:25341124

  20. Gain of Nrf2 function in non-small-cell lung cancer cells confers radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anju; Bodas, Manish; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Bunz, Fred; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox-sensitive transcription factor, regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes and several anti-apoptotic proteins, which confer cytoprotection against oxidative stress and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of Nrf2 in lung cancer cells promotes tumorigenicity and contributes to chemoresistance by upregulation of glutathione, thioredoxin, and the drug efflux pathways involved in detoxification of electrophiles and broad spectrum of drugs. In this study, we show that RNAi-mediated lowering of Nrf2 levels in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H460) led to a dramatic increase in endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Similarly, γ-irradiation-induced formation of protein carbonyls were significantly higher in Nrf2-depleted lung cancer cells, suggesting increased lethality of ionizing radiation in the absence of Nrf2. Radiation-induced protein oxidation in Nrf2shRNA cells correlated with reduced survival as measured by clonogenic assay. Radiation-induced cell death was abrogated by pretreatment with antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, glutathione, and vitamin-E, highlighting the importance of antioxidants in conferring protection against radiation injury. Using genetically-modified gain and loss of function models of Nrf2, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we establish that constitutive activation of Nrf2 protects against ionizing radiation toxicity and confers radioresistance. Thus, targeting Nrf2 activity in radioresistant tumors could be a promising strategy to circumvent radioresistance.

  1. Gain of Nrf2 Function in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Confers Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anju; Bodas, Manish; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Bunz, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox-sensitive transcription factor, regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes and several anti-apoptotic proteins, which confer cytoprotection against oxidative stress and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of Nrf2 in lung cancer cells promotes tumorigenicity and contributes to chemoresistance by upregulation of glutathione, thioredoxin, and the drug efflux pathways involved in detoxification of electrophiles and broad spectrum of drugs. In this study, we show that RNAi-mediated lowering of Nrf2 levels in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H460) led to a dramatic increase in endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Similarly, γ-irradiation-induced formation of protein carbonyls were significantly higher in Nrf2-depleted lung cancer cells, suggesting increased lethality of ionizing radiation in the absence of Nrf2. Radiation-induced protein oxidation in Nrf2shRNA cells correlated with reduced survival as measured by clonogenic assay. Radiation-induced cell death was abrogated by pretreatment with antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, glutathione, and vitamin-E, highlighting the importance of antioxidants in conferring protection against radiation injury. Using genetically-modified gain and loss of function models of Nrf2, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we establish that constitutive activation of Nrf2 protects against ionizing radiation toxicity and confers radioresistance. Thus, targeting Nrf2 activity in radioresistant tumors could be a promising strategy to circumvent radioresistance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1627–1637. PMID:20446773

  2. ERp57 modulates STAT3 activity in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells and serves as a prognostic marker for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Min Ho; Min, Joong Won; Jeon, Hong Bae; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Oh, Jeong Su; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Hwang, Sang-Gu; An, Sungkwan; Han, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-02-20

    Although targeting radioresistant tumor cells is essential for enhancing the efficacy of radiotherapy, the signals activated in resistant tumors are still unclear. This study shows that ERp57 contributes to radioresistance of laryngeal cancer by activating STAT3. Increased ERp57 was associated with the radioresistant phenotype of laryngeal cancer cells. Interestingly, increased interaction between ERp57 and STAT3 was observed in radioresistant cells, compared to the control cells. This physical complex is required for the activation of STAT3 in the radioresistant cells. Among STAT3-regulatory genes, Mcl-1 was predominantly regulated by ERp57. Inhibition of STAT3 activity with a chemical inhibitor or siRNA-mediated depletion of Mcl-1 sensitized radioresistant cells to irradiation, suggesting that the ERp57-STAT3-Mcl-1 axis regulates radioresistance of laryngeal cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed a positive correlation between ERp57 and phosphorylated STAT3 or Mcl-1 and in vivo interactions between ERp57 and STAT3 in human laryngeal cancer. Importantly, we also found that increased ERp57-STAT3 complex was associated with poor prognosis in human laryngeal cancer, indicating the prognostic role of ERp57-STAT3 regulation. Overall, our data suggest that ERp57-STAT3 regulation functions in radioresistance of laryngeal cancer, and targeting the ERp57-STAT3 pathway might be important for enhancing the efficacy of radiotherapy in human laryngeal cancer.

  3. Report on the International Workshop 'Cancer stem cells: the mechanisms of radioresistance and biomarker discovery'.

    PubMed

    Dubrovska, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the Workshop "Cancer stem cells: The mechanisms of radioresistance and biomarker discovery", which was held on 23-24 September 2013 at OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology in Dresden, Germany, was to bring together the most recent viewpoints and insights about: (i) the molecular characterization and regulation of CSC, (ii) the mechanisms of CSC radioresistance, and (iii) the discovery of new CSC targeting therapeutics and biomarkers. In this report some research aspects presented in these three topics are highlighted.

  4. Radiation induces the generation of cancer stem cells: A novel mechanism for cancer radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengsheng; Zhou, Kunming; Gao, Ling; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wei; Yan, Weijuan; Song, Xiujun; Yu, Huijie; Wang, Sinian; Yu, Nan; Jiang, Qisheng

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance remains a major obstacle for the radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that the radioresistance of cancer is due to the existence of intrinsic cancer stem cells (CSCs), which represent a small, but radioresistant cell subpopulation that exist in heterogeneous tumors. By contrast, non-stem cancer cells are considered to be radiosensitive and thus, easy to kill. However, recent studies have revealed that under conditions of radiation-induced stress, theoretically radiosensitive non-stem cancer cells may undergo dedifferentiation subsequently obtaining the phenotypes and functions of CSCs, including high resistance to radiotherapy, which indicates that radiation may directly result in the generation of novel CSCs from non-stem cancer cells. These findings suggest that in addition to intrinsic CSCs, non-stem cancer cells may also contribute to the relapse and metastasis of cancer following transformation into CSCs. This review aims to investigate the radiation-induced generation of CSCs, its association with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its significance with regard to the radioresistance of cancer. PMID:27899964

  5. STAT1 is overexpressed in tumors selected for radioresistance and confers protection from radiation in transduced sensitive cells

    PubMed Central

    Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Beckett, Michael; Labay, Edwardine; Darga, Thomas; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2004-01-01

    Nu61, a radiation-resistant human tumor xenograft, was selected from a parental radiosensitive tumor SCC-61 by eight serial cycles of passage in athymic nude mice and in vivo irradiation. Replicate DNA array experiments identified 52 genes differentially expressed in nu61 tumors compared with SCC-61 tumors. Of these, 19 genes were in the IFN-signaling pathway and moreover, 25 of the 52 genes were inducible by IFN in the nu61 cell line. Among the genes involved in IFN signaling, STAT1α and STAT1β were the most highly overexpressed in nu61 compared to SCC-61. STAT1α and STAT1β cDNAs were cloned and stably transfected into SCC-61 tumor cells. Clones of SCC-61 tumor cells transfected with vectors expressing STAT1α and STAT1β demonstrated radioprotection after exposure to 3 Gy (P < 0.038). The results indicate that radioresistance acquired during radiotherapy treatment may account for some treatment failures and demonstrate an association of acquired tumor radioresistance with up-regulation of components of the IFN-related signaling pathway. PMID:14755057

  6. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Junye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Yan; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Libo; Guo, Guozhen

    2010-07-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  7. Twist1 Enhances Hypoxia Induced Radioresistance in Cervical Cancer Cells by Promoting Nuclear EGFR Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hua; Nie, Xin; Zou, Yanmei; Gong, Chen; Li, Yang; Wu, Hua; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhuang, Liang; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yihua; Xiong, Huihua

    2017-01-01

    Twist1 is a crucial transcription factor that regulates epithelial mesenchymal transition and involves in metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that Twist1 plays important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we investigated the change of Twist1 expression in human cervical squamous cancer cell line SiHa after hypoxia treatment. We also explored the role of Twist1 in radioresistance by manipulating the expression level of Twist1. We observed that hypoxia treatment elevated the expression of Twist1 in SiHa cells. Knockdown of Twist1 with siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of SiHa cells under hypoxia condition, accompanied by reduced levels of nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Conversely, overexpression of Twist1 led to increased radioresistance of SiHa cells, which in turn increased nuclear EGFR localization and expression levels of nuclear DNA-PK. Moreover, concomitant high expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and Twist1 in primary tumors of cervical cancer patients correlated with the worse prognosis after irradiation treatment. Taken together, these data provide new insights into molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced radioresistance in cervical cancer cells, and suggest that Twist1 is a promising molecular target to improve the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy. PMID:28261334

  8. Radioresistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells that survived multiple fractions of ionizing radiation are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Epperly, Michael W.; Wang, Hong; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common usage of radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC, outcomes for these cancers when treated with ionizing radiation (IR) are still unsatisfactory. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying resistance to IR is needed to design approaches to eliminate the radioresistant cells and prevent tumor recurrence and metastases. Using multiple fractions of IR we generated radioresistant cells from T2821 and T2851 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. The radioresistant phenotypes present in T2821/R and T2851/R cells include multiple changes in DNA repair genes and proteins expression, upregulation of EMT markers, alterations of cell cycle distribution, upregulation of PI3K/AKT signaling and elevated production of growth factors, cytokines, important for lung cancer progression, such as IL-6, PDGFB and SDF-1 (CXCL12). In addition to being radioresistant these cells were also found to be resistant to cisplatin. HSP90 is a molecular chaperone involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins implicated in NSCLC cell survival and radioresistance. We examined the effect of ganetespib, a novel HSP90 inhibitor, on T2821/R and T2851/R cell survival, migration and radioresistance. Our data indicates that ganetespib has cytotoxic activity against parental T2821 and T2851 cells and radioresistant T2821/R and T2851/R lung tumor cells. Ganetespib does not affect proliferation of normal human lung fibroblasts. Combining IR with ganetespib completely abrogates clonogenic survival of radioresistant cells. Our data show that HSP90 inhibition can potentiate the effect of radiotherapy and eliminate radioresistant and cisplatin -resistant residual cells, thus it may aid in reducing NSCLC tumor recurrence after fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:26517240

  9. Cancer stem cell related markers of radioresistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ina; Hein, Linda; Mäbert, Katrin; Peitzsch, Claudia; Koi, Lydia; Cojoc, Monica; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and improvement of treatment techniques, locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSC) may cause tumor recurrence if they are not eradicated by current therapies as radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy. Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that CSCs may be protected from treatment-induced death by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Therefore, early determination of CSC abundance in tumor biopsies prior-treatment and development of therapeutics, which specifically target CSCs, are promising strategies to optimize treatment. Here we provide evidence that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is indicative for radioresistant HNSCC CSCs. Our study suggests that ALDH+ cells comprise a population that maintains its tumorigenic properties in vivo after irradiation and may provide tumor regrowth after therapy. We found that ALDH activity in HNSCC cells can be attributed, at least in part, to the ALDH1A3 isoform and inhibition of the ALDH1A3 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases tumor cell radioresistance. The expression dynamic of ALDH1A3 upon irradiation by either induction or selection of the ALDH1A3 positive population correlates to in vivo curability, suggesting that changes in protein expression during radiotherapy are indicative for tumor radioresistance. Our data indicate that ALDH1A3+ HNSCC cells may contribute to tumor relapse after irradiation, and inhibition of this cell population might improve therapeutic response to radiotherapy. PMID:26460734

  10. 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, D.; Mustafi, R.; Schwartz, J.L. |

    1992-06-01

    The effect of 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D{sub 0} values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D{sub 0} values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 {mu}M) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 {mu}M were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo.

  11. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo.

  12. Role of miR-100 in the radioresistance of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Yong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Ru, Gan; Xu, Hong-Tao; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of radioresistant colorectal cancer (CRC) is generally poor. Abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in the radiosensitivity of various tumor cells as these RNAs regulate biological signaling pathways. However, radioresistance-associated miRNAs in CRC have not yet been identified. In this study, we filtered out HCT116 and CCL-244 from seven CRC cell lines that showed the highest difference in radiosensitivity in a clonogenic assay. MiRNA sequencing identified 33 differentially expressed miRNAs (13 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated) in CCL-244 and 37 in HCT116 (20 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated) cells. MiR-100 was significantly down-regulated in CCL-244 cells after X-ray irradiation but not in HCT116 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of miR-100 in CRC tissues was significantly lower than that in normal tissues. Thus, miR-100 seems to be involved in the radioresistance of CCL-244 cells. MiR-100 up-regulation sensitized CCL-244 cells to X-ray irradiation, which probably led to apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in these. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first study to show that miR-100 may play an important role in regulating the radiosensitivity of CRC, and it may act as a new clinical target for CRC radiotherapy. PMID:25973296

  13. Lysyl oxidase mediates hypoxia-induced radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chongwen; Gu, Runxia; Jin, Honglin; Sun, Yao; Li, Zhenyu; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced radioresistance has been well known as the main obstacle in cancer radiotherapy. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) was previously demonstrated to play an important role in hypoxia-induced biological behaviors, such as metastasis and angiogenesis, through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is an important contributing factor to radioresistance in tumor cells. However, how LOX plays a role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance has yet to be determined. Here, we found that LOX expression was in accordance with HIF-1α expression, and LOX expression at the mRNA and protein level, and enzymatic activity were remarkably upregulated in the hypoxic A549 cells, compared with normoxic A549 cells. Inhibition of LOX resulted in the reduction of the ability to repair double-stranded breaks (DSBs), promotion of apoptosis, relief of G2/M cycle arrest, and eventually reduction of hypoxia-induced radioresistance in the hypoxic A549 cells. This suggests that LOX may play an important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Together, our results might suggest a novel potential therapeutic target in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PMID:26515140

  14. MET inhibitor PHA-665752 suppresses the hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tongxin; Li, Qi; Sun, Quanquan; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Chen, Longhua; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation. • The aberrant MET signal mediated by HGF induced proliferation and radioresistance of NPC cells. • MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. • PHA-665752 suppressed the three downstream pathway of HGF/MET signal in a dose-dependent manner. - Abstract: Although ionizing radiation (IR) has provided considerable improvements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), in subsets of patients, radioresistance is still a major problem in the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation, and the aberrant MET signal mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced radioresistance. We also found that MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. Further investigation indicated that PHA-665752 suppressed the phosphorylation of the Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that the combination of IR with a MET inhibitor, such as PHA-665752, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  15. PARP3 interacts with FoxM1 to confer glioblastoma cell radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jun-Jie; Song, Jin-Ning; Qu, Jian-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (PARP3), a critical player in cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), plays an essential role in the maintenance of genome integrity. However, the role of PARP3 in tumorigenesis especially in glioblastoma remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that the mRNA and protein levels of PARP3 were upregulated in primary glioblastoma tissues. Knockdown of PARP3 expression by lentivirus-based shRNA decreased cell glioblastoma proliferation and inhibited tumor growth in vivo by using a xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, we found that silencing the expression of PARP3 resulted in a synergistic radiosensitizing effect when combined with radiotherapy in glioblastoma cell lines. At the molecular level, we found that PARP3 interacted with FoxM1 to enhance its transcriptional activity and conferred glioblastoma cell radioresistance. Thus, our data suggest that PARP3 could be a therapeutic target to overcome radioresistance in glioblastoma.

  16. The PDRG1 is an oncogene in lung cancer cells, promoting radioresistance via the ATM-P53 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zheng; Chen, Shaomu; Mao, Guocai; Xia, Haifeng; Huang, Haitao; Ma, Haitao

    2016-10-01

    PDRG1, is short for P53 and DNA damage-regulated gene, which have been found over 10 years. Although severe studies have described the roles of PDRG1 separately in many kinds of tumors, how to act as an oncogene are unclear. To better verify the function of PDRG1 in lung cancer, both loss-function and gain-function of PDRG1 studies based on two human lung cancer lines were performed. Following the transfection of PDRG1, both A549 and 95-D cells showed significant changes in cell viability, the expression of some protein and apoptosis, which were all implied the PDRG1 is an oncogene. Another interesting finding is PDRG1 could promote radioresistance involved the ATM-p53 signaling pathway in lung cancer. If we combine radiotherapy with gene-targeted therapy together effectively, predominant effect may be acquired, which is a huge milestone in clinical cure about lung cancer.

  17. Sensitization of Radioresistant Prostate Cancer Cells by Resveratrol Isolated from Arachis hypogaea Stems

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Min-Chuan; Lo, U-Ging; Lin, Li-Chiung; Lin, Chun-Jung; Chang, Sheau-Jiun; Chen, Chia-Chang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lin, Ho; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol (RV, 3,4ʹ,5-trihydroxystilbene) is naturally produced by a wide variety of plants including grapes and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea). However, the yield of RV from peanut stem and its potential radiosensitizing effects in prostate cancer (PCa) have not been well investigated. In this study, we characterized RV in peanut stem extract (PSE) for the first time and showed that both RV and PSE dose-dependently induced cell death in DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP)-deficient PCa cells with the radioresistant phenotype. Furthermore, the combination of radiation with either RV or PSE induced the death of radioresistant PCa cells through delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) and prolonged G2/M arrest, which induced apoptosis. The administration of RV and PSE effectively enhanced radiation therapy in the shDAB2IP PCa xenograft mouse model. These results demonstrate the promising synergistic effect of RV and PSE combined with radiation in the treatment of radioresistant PCa. PMID:28081154

  18. Small-molecule inhibition of STAT3 in radioresistant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Eckols, T. Kris; Xu, Xuejun; Kasembeli, Moses M.; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Song, Yongcheng; Mo, Qianxing; Lai, Stephen Y.; Tweardy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    While STAT3 has been validated as a target for treatment of many cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), a STAT3 inhibitor is yet to enter the clinic. We used the scaffold of C188, a small-molecule STAT3 inhibitor previously identified by us, in a hit-to-lead program to identify C188-9. C188-9 binds to STAT3 with high affinity and represents a substantial improvement over C188 in its ability to inhibit STAT3 binding to its pY-peptide ligand, to inhibit cytokine-stimulated pSTAT3, to reduce constitutive pSTAT3 activity in multiple HNSCC cell lines, and to inhibit anchorage dependent and independent growth of these cells. In addition, treatment of nude mice bearing xenografts of UM-SCC-17B, a radioresistant HNSCC line, with C188-9, but not C188, prevented tumor xenograft growth. C188-9 treatment modulated many STAT3-regulated genes involved in oncogenesis and radioresistance, as well as radioresistance genes regulated by STAT1, due to its potent activity against STAT1, in addition to STAT3. C188-9 was well tolerated in mice, showed good oral bioavailability, and was concentrated in tumors. Thus, C188-9, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy, has potential for use in treating HNSCC tumors that demonstrate increased STAT3 and/or STAT1 activation. PMID:27027445

  19. A role for chromosomal instability in the development of and selection for radioresistant cell variants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Jordan, R.; Morgan, W. F.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome instability is a common occurrence in tumour cells. We examined the hypothesis that the elevated rate of mutation formation in unstable cells can lead to the development of clones of cells that are resistant to the cancer therapy. To test this hypothesis, we compared chromosome instability to radiation sensitivity in 30 independently isolated clones of GM10115 human-hamster hybrid cells. There was a broader distribution of radiosensitivity and a higher mean SF(2)in chromosomally unstable clones. Cytogenetic and DNA double-strand break rejoining assays suggest that sensitivity was a function of DNA repair efficiency. In the unstable population, the more radioresistant clones also had significantly lower plating efficiencies. These observations suggest that chromosome instability in GM10115 cells can lead to the development of cell variants that are more resistant to radiation. In addition, these results suggest that the process of chromosome breakage and recombination that accompanies chromosome instability might provide some selective pressure for more radioresistant variants. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign.

  20. Ionizing radiation, ion transports, and radioresistance of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stephan M.; Butz, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Dominik; Braun, Norbert; Ruth, Peter; Eckert, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of many tumor entities comprises fractionated radiation therapy which applies ionizing radiation to the tumor-bearing target volume. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in the DNA backbone that result in cell death if the number of DNA double-strand breaks exceeds the DNA repair capacity of the tumor cell. Ionizing radiation reportedly does not only act on the DNA in the nucleus but also on the plasma membrane. In particular, ionizing radiation-induced modifications of ion channels and transporters have been reported. Importantly, these altered transports seem to contribute to the survival of the irradiated tumor cells. The present review article summarizes our current knowledge on the underlying mechanisms and introduces strategies to radiosensitize tumor cells by targeting plasma membrane ion transports. PMID:23966948

  1. Discovery of the cancer stem cell related determinants of radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, Claudia; Kurth, Ina; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Tumors are known to be heterogeneous containing a dynamic mixture of phenotypically and functionally different tumor cells. The two concepts attempting to explain the origin of intratumor heterogeneity are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. The stochastic model argues that tumors are biologically homogenous and all cancer cells within the tumor have equal ability to propagate the tumor growth depending on continuing mutations and selective pressure. By contrast, the stem cells model suggests that cancer heterogeneity is due to the hierarchy that originates from a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are biologically distinct from the bulk tumor and possesses self-renewal, tumorigenic and multilineage potential. Although these two hypotheses have been discussed for a long time as mutually exclusive explanations of tumor heterogeneity, they are easily reconciled serving as a driving force of cancer evolution and diversity. Recent discovery of the cancer cell plasticity and heterogeneity makes the CSC population a moving target that could be hard to track and eradicate. Understanding the signaling mechanisms regulating CSCs during the course of cancer treatment can be indispensable for the optimization of current treatment strategies.

  2. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  3. Increase in the radioresistance of normal skin fibroblasts but not tumor cells by mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zelin; Wang, Xin; Jin, Taotao; Wang, Yu; Hong, Christopher S; Tan, Li; Dai, Tingyu; Wu, Liao; Zhuang, Zhengping; Shi, Chunmeng

    2017-02-02

    The timing of radiation after mechanical injury such as in the case of surgery is considered a clinical challenge because radiation is assumed to impair wound healing. However, the physiological responses and underlying mechanisms of this healing impairment are still unclear. Here, we show that mechanical injury occurring before ionizing radiation decreases radiation-induced cell damage and increases cell repair in normal fibroblasts but not tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. At the molecular level, mechanical injury interrupts focal adhesion complexes and cell-cell cadherin interactions, transducing mechanical signals into intracellular chemical signals via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) pathways. We show that subsequent nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and β-catenin strengthen the stemness, antioxidant capabilities, and DNA double-strand break repair abilities of fibroblasts, ultimately contributing to increased radioresistance. Our findings demonstrate that mechanical injury to normal fibroblasts enhances radioresistance and may therefore question conventional wisdom surrounding the timing of radiation after surgery.

  4. Triptolide inhibits cell growth and GRP78 protein expression but induces cell apoptosis in original and radioresistant NPC cells

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wuwu; Lai, Chen; Chen, Zhikang; Wang, Ran; Long, Xueying; Feng, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    The radioresistance is the key factor to hamper curative effect and survival of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Nature triptolide (TPL) has been found to circumvent drug-resistant effect of cancer, but its effect on NPC radioresistance has been rarely studied. In the present study, the 10 Gy-resistant CNE2 subclones (CNE2-SR) were used as a NPC radioresistant model. The IC50 of TPL in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells was measured by MTT assay, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression was examined by western blot. Our data showed that TPL treatment decreased the percentage of viable cells, and IC50 value in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells was 23.6 ± 1.41 nmol/L and 31.2 ± 1.16 nmol/L, respectively. Six Gy was a moderate dosage of X-ray for CNE2, and 25 nM TPL was close to IC50 value of CNE2 and CNE2-SR. Six Gy X-ray and/or 25 nM TPL significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, 6 Gy X-ray and/or 25 nM TPL significantly inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis and M/G2 phase arrest in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells. Moreover, TPL treatment significantly inhibited the expression of GRP78 protein in CNE2 and CNE2-SR cells. These results suggest that TPL may serve as a potential radiosensitizer agent for NPC treatment. PMID:27391061

  5. Sp1-mediated transcriptional activation of miR-205 promotes radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Sujie; Liu, Xing; Wang, Lingxiong; Wu, Liangliang; Chen, Rui; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Bohua; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yunsheng; Steer, Clifford J.; Zhao, Jian; Guo, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients is limited by resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the roles and mechanisms of microRNAs in radioresistance are obscure. Here, we investigated that microRNA-205 (miR-205) was upregulated in radioresistant (RR) ESCC cells compared with the parental cells. Overexpression of miR-205 promoted colony survival post-IR, whereas depletion of miR-205 sensitized ESCC cells to IR in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrated that miR-205 promoted radioresistance by enhancing DNA repair, inhibiting apoptosis and activating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, miR-205, upregulated post-IR, was demonstrated to be activated by Sp1 in parallel with its host gene, miR-205HG, both of which showed a perfect correlation. We also identified and validated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), as a target of miR-205 that promoted radioresistance via PI3K/AKT pathway. Lastly, increased miR-205 expression was closely associated with decreased PTEN expression in ESCC tissues and miR-205 expression predicted poor prognosis in patients with ESCC. Taken together, these findings identify miR-205 as a critical determinant of radioresistance and a biomarker of prognosis. The Sp1-mediated transcriptional activation of miR-205 promotes radioresistance through PTEN via PI3K/AKT pathway in ESCC. Inhibition of miR-205 expression may be a new strategy for radiotherapy in ESCC. PMID:27974696

  6. Nanomedicine to overcome radioresistance in glioblastoma stem-like cells and surviving clones.

    PubMed

    Séhédic, Delphine; Cikankowitz, Annabelle; Hindré, François; Davodeau, François; Garcion, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the standard treatments for glioblastoma, but its effectiveness often encounters the phenomenon of radioresistance. This resistance was recently attributed to distinct cell contingents known as glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) and dominant clones. It is characterized in particular by the activation of signaling pathways and DNA repair mechanisms. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for radiosensitizing these cell populations. Several strategies have been developed in this direction, the first consisting of encapsulating a contrast agent or synthesizing metal-based nanocarriers to concentrate the dose gradient at the level of the target tissue. In the second strategy the physicochemical properties of the vectors are used to encapsulate a wide range of pharmacological agents which act in synergy with the ionizing radiation to destroy the cancerous cells. This review reports on the various molecular anomalies present in GSCs and the predominant role of nanomedicines in the development of radiosensitization strategies.

  7. Radioresistance of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kevin; Knisely, Jonathan; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as part of the standard of care treatment of the majority of brain tumors. The efficacy of RT is limited by radioresistance and by normal tissue radiation tolerance. This is highlighted in pediatric brain tumors where the use of radiation is limited by the excessive toxicity to the developing brain. For these reasons, radiosensitization of tumor cells would be beneficial. In this review, we focus on radioresistance mechanisms intrinsic to tumor cells. We also evaluate existing approaches to induce radiosensitization and explore future avenues of investigation. PMID:27043632

  8. Egr-1 regulates irradiation-induced autophagy through Atg4B to promote radioresistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, W-x; Wan, Y-y; Gong, A-h; Ge, L; Jin, J; Xu, M; Wu, C-y

    2017-01-01

    Although hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually response to radiation therapy, radioresistance is still the major obstacle that limits the efficacy of radiotherapy for HCC patients. Therefore, further investigation of underlying mechanisms in radioresistant HCC cells is warranted. In this study, we determined the effect of early growth response factor (Egr-1) on irradiation-induced autophagy and radioresistance in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721 and HepG2. We showed that autophagy-related gene 4B (Atg4B) is induced by Egr-1 upon ionizing radiation (IR) in HCC cells. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Egr-1 binds to the Atg4B promoter to upregulate its expression in HCC cells. Suppression of Egr-1 function by dominant-negative Egr-1 dampens IR-induced autophagy, cell migration, and increases cell sensitivity to radiotherapy. Together, these results suggest that Egr-1 contributes to HCC radioresistance through directly upregulating target gene Atg4B, which may serve as a protective mechanism by preferential activation of the autophagy. PMID:28134935

  9. Investigating the Radioresistant Properties of Lung Cancer Stem Cells in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ryan; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; McGarry, Ronald; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer. While recent research has shown that cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit radioresistant and chemoresistant properties, current cancer therapy targets the bulk of the tumor burden without accounting for the CSC and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. CSC interaction with the stroma enhances NSCLC survival, thus limiting the efficacy of treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CSC and the microenvironment in conferring radio- or chemoresistance in an in vitro tumor model for NSCLC. The novel in vitro three-dimensional (3D) NSCLC model of color-coded tumor tissue analogs (TTA) that we have developed is comprised of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and NSCLC cancer stem cells maintained in low oxygen conditions (5% O2) to recapitulate the physiologic conditions in tumors. Using this model, we demonstrate that a single 5 Gy radiation dose does not inhibit growth of TTA containing CSC and results in elevated expression of cytokines (TGF-α, RANTES, ENA-78) and factors (vimentin, MMP and TIMP), indicative of an invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, combined treatment of single dose or fractionated doses with cisplatin was found to either attenuate or decrease the proliferative effect that radiation exposure alone had on TTA containing CSC maintained in hypoxic conditions. In summary, we utilized a 3D NSCLC model, which had characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell heterogeneity, to elucidate the multifactorial nature of radioresistance in tumors. PMID:26836231

  10. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide 7909 enhances radiosensitivity via downregulating Oct-4 expression in radioresistant lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Na; Qiao, Tiankui; Zhuang, Xibing; Yuan, Sujuan; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Guoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a powerful cure for local advanced non-small cell lung cancer. However, radioresistance and tumor relapse still occur in a high proportion of patients. Octamer-4 (Oct-4), a transcription factor of the POU family, plays a key role in maintaining chemoradioresistant properties and regulating cancer progression. In this study, we demonstrated that Oct-4 expression was significantly increased in radioresistant H460 (H460R) cell line. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (CpG-ODN) 7909 sensitized H460R cells when combined with irradiation treatment. The clonogenic capacity was significantly decreased, and the values of D0 and Dq were lower than those of irradiation alone group. The sensitive enhancement ratio (SER) of D0 was 1.224. This combined treatment led to a dramatic reduction in Oct-4 expression in a dose-dependent manner and also showed increased percentage of cells in the radiosensitive G2/M phase relative to either treatment alone. These results identified that Oct-4 was involved in radioresistance. CpG-ODN 7909 could enhance radiosensitivity partly through downregulating Oct-4 expression in radioresistant lung cancer cells. PMID:26109868

  11. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide 7909 enhances radiosensitivity via downregulating Oct-4 expression in radioresistant lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, Na; Qiao, Tiankui; Zhuang, Xibing; Yuan, Sujuan; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Guoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a powerful cure for local advanced non-small cell lung cancer. However, radioresistance and tumor relapse still occur in a high proportion of patients. Octamer-4 (Oct-4), a transcription factor of the POU family, plays a key role in maintaining chemoradioresistant properties and regulating cancer progression. In this study, we demonstrated that Oct-4 expression was significantly increased in radioresistant H460 (H460R) cell line. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (CpG-ODN) 7909 sensitized H460R cells when combined with irradiation treatment. The clonogenic capacity was significantly decreased, and the values of D0 and Dq were lower than those of irradiation alone group. The sensitive enhancement ratio (SER) of D0 was 1.224. This combined treatment led to a dramatic reduction in Oct-4 expression in a dose-dependent manner and also showed increased percentage of cells in the radiosensitive G2/M phase relative to either treatment alone. These results identified that Oct-4 was involved in radioresistance. CpG-ODN 7909 could enhance radiosensitivity partly through downregulating Oct-4 expression in radioresistant lung cancer cells.

  12. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human

  14. A calcium-insensitive attenuated nitrosative stress response contributes significantly in the radioresistance of Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Seth, Rakesh Kumar; Chandna, Sudhir

    2011-09-01

    Lepidopteran insects/insect cells display 50-100 times higher radioresistance than humans, and are evolutionarily closest to mammals amongst all radioresistant organisms known. Compared to mammalian cells, Lepidopteran cells (TN-368, Sf9) display more efficient antioxidant system and DNA repair and suffer considerably less radiation-induced DNA/cytogenetic damage and apoptosis. Recent studies indicate that a considerably lower radiation-induced oxidative stress may significantly reduce macromolecular damage in Lepidopteran cells. Since nitrosative stress contributes in radiation-induced cellular damage, we investigated its nature in the γ-irradiated Sf9 cells (derived from Spodoptera frugiperda; order Lepidoptera; family Noctuidae) and compared with BMG-1 human cell line having significant NOS expression. Radiation induced considerably less ROS/RNS in Sf9 cells, which remained unchanged on treatment with NOS inhibitor l-NMMA. Surprisingly, growth of Sf9 cultures or irradiation could not induce NO or its metabolites, indicating negligible basal/radiation-induced NOS activity that remained unchanged even after supplementation with arginine. Cytosolic calcium release following high-dose (1000-2000Gy at 61.1cGys(-1)) γ-irradiation or H(2)O(2) (250μM) treatment also failed to generate NO in Sf9 cells having high constitutive levels of calmodulin, whereas BMG-1 cells displayed considerable calcium-dependent NO generation even following 10Gy dose. These results strongly imply the lack of calcium-mediated NOS activity in Sf9 cells. Addition of exogenous NO from GSH-NO caused considerable increase in radiation-induced apoptosis, indicating significant contribution of constitutively attenuated nitrosative stress response into the radioresistance of Lepidopteran cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that a calcium-insensitive, attenuated nitrosative stress response may contribute significantly in the unusual radioresistance displayed by Lepidopteran insect cells.

  15. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, WEI; XIE, LI; ZHAO, LONG; ZHAO, YUEHUAN

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4×44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY™ LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  16. FOXM1 and STAT3 interaction confers radioresistance in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maachani, Uday B.; Shankavaram, Uma; Kramp, Tamalee; Tofilon, Philip J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Tandle, Anita T.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to be the most frequently diagnosed and lethal primary brain tumor. Adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy remains the standard of care following surgical resection. In this study, using reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs), we assessed the biological effects of radiation on signaling pathways to identify potential radiosensitizing molecular targets. We identified subsets of proteins with clearly concordant/discordant behavior between irradiated and non-irradiated GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we observed high expression of Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) in irradiated GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Recent evidence of FOXM1 as a master regulator of metastasis and its important role in maintaining neural, progenitor, and GBM stem cells, intrigued us to validate it as a radiosensitizing target. Here we show that FOXM1 inhibition radiosensitizes GBM cells by abrogating genes associated with cell cycle progression and DNA repair, suggesting its role in cellular response to radiation. Further, we demonstrate that radiation induced stimulation of FOXM1 expression is dependent on STAT3 activation. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays revealed physical interaction of FOXM1 with phosphorylated STAT3 under radiation treatment. In conclusion, we hypothesize that FOXM1 regulates radioresistance via STAT3 in GBM cells. We also, show GBM patients with high FOXM1 expression have poor prognosis. Collectively our observations might open novel opportunities for targeting FOXM1 for effective GBM therapy. PMID:27764801

  17. HAb18G/CD147 promotes radioresistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells: a potential role for integrin β1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiao; Li, Yong; Dang, Ya-Zheng; Gao, Hong-Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2015-02-01

    Radiotherapy has played a limited role in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the risk of tumor radioresistance. A previous study in our laboratory confirmed that CD147 interacts with integrin β1 and plays an important role in modulating the malignant properties of HCC cells. In this study, we further evaluated the role of CD147 in the radioresistance of HCC and as a potential target for improving radiosensitivity. Upon irradiation, the colony formation, apoptosis, cell-cycle distribution, migration, and invasion of SMMC-7721, CD147-knockout SMMC-7721, HepG2, and CD147-knockdown HepG2 cells were determined. A nude mouse xenograft model and a metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in radioresistance in vivo. Deletion of HAb18G/CD147 significantly enhanced the radiosensitivity of SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells, and knocking out HAb18G/CD147 in SMMC-7721 cells attenuated irradiation-enhanced migration and invasion. The knockout and antibody blockade of CD147 decreased the tumor growth and metastatic potentials of HCC cells under irradiation. CD147-deleted SMMC-7721 cells showed diminished levels of calpain, cleaved talin, active integrin β1, and decreased p-FAK (Tyr397) and p-Akt (Ser473) levels. FAK and PI3K inhibitors, as well as integrin β1 antibodies, increased the radiation-induced apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. Our data provide evidence for CD147 as an important determinant of radioresistance via the regulation of integrin β1 signaling. Inhibition of the HAb18G/CD147 integrin interaction may improve the efficiency of radiosensitivity and provide a potential new approach for HCC therapy.

  18. Bcl-2 inhibitors potentiate the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Takamitsu; Omura-Minamisawa, Motoko . E-mail: momuram@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp; Chao Cheng; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Ito, Megumi; Inoue, Tomio

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis frequently shows elevated expression in human tumors, thus resulting in resistance to radiation therapy. Therefore, inhibiting Bcl-2 function may enhance the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Tetrocarcin A (TC-A) and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides exhibit antitumor activity by inhibiting Bcl-2 function and transcription, respectively. We investigated whether these antitumor agents would enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation in tumor cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Methods and materials: We used HeLa/bcl-2 cells, a stable Bcl-2-expressing cell line derived from wild-type HeLa (HeLa/wt) cells. Cells were incubated with TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides for 24 h after irradiation, and cell viability was then determined. Apoptotic cells were quantified by flow cytometric assay. Results: The HeLa/bcl-2 cells were more resistant to radiation than HeLa/wt cells. At concentrations that are not inherently cytotoxic, both TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides increased the cytotoxic effects of radiation in HeLa/bcl-2 cells, but not in HeLa/wt cells. However, in HeLa/bcl-2 cells, additional treatment with TC-A in combination with radiation did not significantly increase apoptosis. Conclusions: The present results suggest that TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides reduce radioresistance of tumor cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Therefore, a combination of radiotherapy and Bcl-2 inhibitors may prove to be a useful therapeutic approach for treating tumors that overexpress Bcl-2.

  19. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    PubMed

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  20. Reversal effect of GnT-V on the radioresistance of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by alteration β1, 6-GlcNAc branched N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Bo; Shen, Li; Qiu, Li; Duan, Qi-Wen; Luo, Zhi-Guo; Dong, Xiao-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), yet radioresistance remains a major obstacle to successful treatment in many cases. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), which synthesizes β1, 6-GlcNAc branched N-glycans, is closely related to the radiosensitivity of NPC cells. However, a better understanding of the functional role of GnT-V in NPC radioresistance and the related mechanisms is urgently needed. In the present study, a radioresistant NPC cell line, CNE-2R, was established by repeated γ-irradiation. We found that GnT-V levels, as well as β1, 6-GlcNAc branched N-glycans were significantly increased in the CNE-2R cells as compared with that in the parental cells. Meanwhile, knockdown of GnT-V in the CNE-2R cells enhanced cell radiosensitivity and inhibited the formation of β1, 6-branched N-glycans. In addition, the regulated expression of GnT-V in the CNE-2R cells converted the heterogeneous N-glycosylated forms of CD147. Furthermore, swainsonine, an inhibitor of N-glycan biosynthesis, was also able to reverse the radioresistance of the CNE-2R cells. Taken together, the present study revealed a novel mechanism of GnT-V as a regulator of radioresistance in NPC cells, which may be useful for fully understanding the biological role of N-glycans in NPC radioresistance.

  1. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. Methods HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of 75 Gy each, over 8 months, yielding the sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR. Radioresistant characteristics were detected by clone formation assay, ultrastructural observations, cell doubling time, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis assay. Gene expression patterns of the radioresistant sub-lines were studied through microarray analysis and verified by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results The radioresistant sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR were more radioresisitant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays than parental HeLa cells by detecting their radioresistant characteristics, respectively. Compared to HeLa cells, the expression of 24 genes was significantly altered by at least 2-fold in HeLaNR cells. Of these, 19 genes were up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. In HeLaXR cells, 41 genes were significantly altered by at least 2-fold; 38 genes were up-regulated and 3 down-regulated. Conclusions Chronic exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induces adaptive responses that enhance tolerance of ionizing radiation and allow investigations of cellular radioresistance mechanisms. The insights gained into the molecular mechanisms activated by these "radioresistance" genes will lead to new therapeutic targets for cervical cancer. PMID:20184742

  2. Glioblastoma Stem Cells Microenvironment: The Paracrine Roles of the Niche in Drug and Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Fidoamore, Alessia; Cristiano, Loredana; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Di Giacomo, Erica; Astarita, Carlo; Giordano, Antonio; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Cimini, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Among all solid tumors, the high-grade glioma appears to be the most vascularized one. In fact, “microvascular hyperplasia” is a hallmark of GBM. An altered vascular network determines irregular blood flow, so that tumor cells spread rapidly beyond the diffusion distance of oxygen in the tissue, with the consequent formation of hypoxic or anoxic areas, where the bulk of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) reside. The response to this event is the induction of angiogenesis, a process mediated by hypoxia inducible factors. However, this new capillary network is not efficient in maintaining a proper oxygen supply to the tumor mass, thereby causing an oxygen gradient within the neoplastic zone. This microenvironment helps GSCs to remain in a “quiescent” state preserving their potential to proliferate and differentiate, thus protecting them by the effects of chemo- and radiotherapy. Recent evidences suggest that responses of glioblastoma to standard therapies are determined by the microenvironment of the niche, where the GSCs reside, allowing a variety of mechanisms that contribute to the chemo- and radioresistance, by preserving GSCs. It is, therefore, crucial to investigate the components/factors of the niche in order to formulate new adjuvant therapies rendering more efficiently the gold standard therapies for this neoplasm. PMID:26880981

  3. MiR-210 expression reverses radioresistance of stem-like cells of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jia; Xi, Ru-Xing; Chang, Yu-Wei; Pan, Fei-Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of miR-210 and the role it plays in the cell cycle to regulate radioresistance in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: MiR-210 expression was evaluated in 37 pairs of ESCC tissues and matched para-tumorous normal oesophageal tissues from surgical patients who had not received neoadjuvant therapy, and in the cells of two novel radioresistant cell lines, TE-1R and Eca-109R, using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The transient up-regulation of miR-210 expression in TE-1R and Eca-109R cells was studied using liposomes and was confirmed using qRT-PCR. The rate of cell survival after a series of radio-treatment doses was evaluated using the clone formation assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect the changes to the cell cycle patterns due to radiation treatment. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) after irradiation, and the cell sphere formation assay was used to evaluate the proliferative ability of the cancer stem-like cells. RESULTS: The level of miR-210 expression was significantly decreased, by 21.3% to 97.2%, with the average being 39.2% ± 16.1%, in the ESCC tissues of most patients (81.1%, 30 of 37 vs patients with high miR-210 expression, P < 0.05). A low level of expression of miR-210 was correlated with a poorly differentiated pathological type (P < 0.01) but was not correlated with the T-stage or lymph node infiltration (both P > 0.05). Early local recurrences (< 18 mo, n = 19) after radiotherapy were significantly related with low miR-210 expression (n = 13, P < 0.05). The level of miR-210 was decreased by approximately 73% (vs TE-1, 0.27 ± 0.10, P < 0.01) in the established radioresistant TE-IR cell line and by 52% (vs Eca-109, 0.48 ± 0.17, P < 0.05) in the corresponding Eca-109R line. Transient transfection with a miR-210 precursor increased the level of miR-210

  4. The radioresistance to killing of A1-5 cells derives from activation of the Chk1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, B.; Zhou, X. Y.; Wang, X.; Zeng, Z. C.; Iliakis, G.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Checkpoints respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for facilitating repair. In mammalian cells, the G(2) checkpoint prevents the Cdc25C phosphatase from removing inhibitory phosphate groups from the mitosis-promoting kinase Cdc2. Both Chk1 and Chk2, the checkpoint kinases, can phosphorylate Cdc25C and inactivate its in vitro phosphatase activity. Therefore, both Chk1 and Chk2 are thought to regulate the activation of the G(2) checkpoint. Here we report that A1-5, a transformed rat embryo fibroblast cell line, shows much more radioresistance associated with a much stronger G(2) arrest response when compared with its counterpart, B4, although A1-5 and B4 cells have a similar capacity for nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair. These phenotypes of A1-5 cells are accompanied by a higher Chk1 expression and a higher phosphorylation of Cdc2. On the other hand, Chk2 expression increases slightly following radiation; however, it has no difference between A1-5 and B4 cells. Caffeine or UCN-01 abolishes the extreme radioresistance with the strong G(2) arrest and at the same time reduces the phosphorylation of Cdc2 in A1-5 cells. In addition, Chk1 but not Chk2 antisense oligonucleotide sensitizes A1-5 cells to radiation-induced killing and reduces the G(2) arrest of the cells. Taken together these results suggest that the Chk1/Cdc25C/Cdc2 pathway is the major player for the radioresistance with G(2) arrest in A1-5 cells.

  5. SOX9 Maintains Reserve Stem Cells and Preserves Radioresistance in Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Kyle C.; Gracz, Adam D.; Liu, Xiao Fu; Newton, Victoria; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Magness, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Reserve intestinal stem cells (rISCs) are quiescent/slowly cycling under homeostatic conditions, allowing for their identification with label-retention assays. rISCs mediate epithelial regeneration after tissue damage by converting to actively proliferating stem cells (aISCs) that self renew and demonstrate multipotency, which are defining properties of stem cells. Little is known about the genetic mechanisms that regulate the production and maintenance of rISCs. High expression levels of the transcription factor Sox9 (Sox9high) are associated with rISCs. This study investigates the role of SOX9 in regulating the rISC state. METHODS We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate cells defined as aISCs (Lgr5high) and rISCs (Sox9high) from Lgr5EGFP and Sox9EGFP reporter mice. Expression of additional markers associated with active and reserve ISCs were assessed in Lgr5high and Sox9high populations by single-cell gene expression analyses. We used label-retention assays to identify whether Sox9high cells were label-retatining cells (LRCs). Lineage-tracing experiments were performed in Sox9-CreERT2 mice to measure the stem cell capacities and radioresistance of Sox9-expressing cells. Conditional SOX9 knockout mice and inducible-conditional SOX9 knockout mice were used to determine whether SOX9 was required to maintain LRCs and rISC function. RESULTS Lgr5high and a subset of crypt-based Sox9high cells co-express markers of aISC and rISC (Lgr5. Bmi1. Lrig1, and Hopx). LRCs express high levels of Sox9 and are lost in SOX9-knockout mice. SOX9 is required for epithelial regeneration after high-dose irradiation. Crypts from SOX9-knockout mice have increased sensitivity to radiation, compared with control mice, which could not be attributed to impaired cell-cycle arrest or DNA repair. CONCLUSIONS SOX9 limits proliferation in LRCs and imparts radiation resistance to rISCs in mice. PMID:26170137

  6. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in “DNA damage response”, “direct p53 effectors” and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  7. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in "DNA damage response", "direct p53 effectors" and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols.

  8. Ursolic acid sensitizes radioresistant NSCLC cells expressing HIF-1α through reducing endogenous GSH and inhibiting HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Maohu; Qi, Xinrong; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Linlin; Yi, Qiyi; Jin, Wensen

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, the present authors demonstrated that effective sensitization of ionizing radiation-induced death of tumor cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, could be produced by oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid present in plants. In the present study, it was investigated whether ursolic acid (UA), an isomer of OA, had also the capacity of sensitizing radioresistant NSCLC cells. The radioresistant cell line H1299/M-hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was established by transfection with a recombinant plasmid expressing mutant HIF-1α (M-HIF-1α). Compared with parental H1299 cells and H1299 cells transfected with empty plasmid, H1299/M-HIF-1α cells had lower radiosensitivity. Following the use of UA to treat NSCLC cells, elevation of the radiosensitivity of cells was observed by MTT assay. The irradiated H1299/M-HIF-1α cells were more sensitive to UA pretreatment than the irradiated cells with empty plasmid and control. The alteration of DNA damage in the irradiated cells was further measured using micronucleus (MN) assay. The combination of UA treatment with radiation could induce the increase of cellular MN frequencies, in agreement with the change in the tendency observed in the cell viability assay. It was further shown that the endogenous glutathione (GSH) contents were markedly attenuated in the differently irradiated NSCLC cells with UA (80 µmol/l) pretreatment through glutathione reductase/5,5′-dithiobis-(2-nitrob-enzoic acid) (DTNB) recycling assay. The results revealed that UA treatment alone could effectively decrease the GSH content in H1299/M-HIF-1α cells. In addition, the inhibition of HIF-1α expression in radioresistant cells was confirmed by western blotting. It was then concluded that UA could upregulate the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells, and in particular reduce the refractory response of cells expressing HIF-1α to ionizing radiation. The primary mechanism is associated with reduction of

  9. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549.

  10. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549. PMID:26078725

  11. miR-221/222 confers radioresistance in glioblastoma cells through activating Akt independent of PTEN status.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Guo, F; Wang, P; Hong, S; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is highly resistant to radiation therapy. The underlying molecular mechanism is not completely understood. The DNA damage response (DDR) pathway plays a crucial role in radioresistance of glioablastoma cells. Growing evidence has demonstrated that radiation induces alterations in microRNA (miR) profiles. However, how radiation induces specific miRs and how they might regulate the DDR remain elusive. In our study, we found that radiation induced c-jun transcription of miR-221 and miR-222. miR-221 and miR- 222 modulated DNA-PKcs expression to affect DNA damage repair by activating Akt independent of PTEN status. Knocking down of miR-221/222 significantly increased radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cells. Inhibition of Akt by RNAi or LY294002 treatment may overcome miR-221/222 induced radioresistance. Notably, combined anti-miR-221/222 and radiotherapy has remarkably inhibited tumor growth compared with anti-miR-221/222 or radiotherapy alone in a subcutaneous mouse model. Our results suggest that radio-induced c-jun promotes transcription of miR-221/222, which mediates DNA damage repair of glioblastoma cells independent of PTEN. These data indicate for the first time that miR-221/222 play an important role in mediating radio-induced DNA damage repair and that miR-221/222 could serve as potential therapeutic targets for increasing radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cells.

  12. PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors enhance radiosensitivity in radioresistant prostate cancer cells through inducing apoptosis, reducing autophagy, suppressing NHEJ and HR repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Chang, L; Graham, P H; Hao, J; Ni, J; Bucci, J; Cozzi, P J; Kearsley, J H; Li, Y

    2014-10-02

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has a central role in cancer metastasis and radiotherapy. To develop effective therapeutics to improve radiosensitivity, understanding the possible pathways of radioresistance involved and the effects of a combination of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors with radiotherapy on prostate cancer (CaP) radioresistant cells is needed. We found that compared with parent CaP cells, CaP-radioresistant cells demonstrated G0/G1 and S phase arrest, activation of cell cycle check point, autophagy and DNA repair pathway proteins, and inactivation of apoptotic proteins. We also demonstrated that compared with combination of single PI3K or mTOR inhibitors (BKM120 or Rapamycin) and radiation, low-dose of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors (BEZ235 or PI103) combined with radiation greatly improved treatment efficacy by repressing colony formation, inducing more apoptosis, leading to the arrest of the G2/M phase, increased double-strand break levels and less inactivation of cell cycle check point, autophagy and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)/homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway proteins in CaP-radioresistant cells. This study describes the possible pathways associated with CaP radioresistance and demonstrates the putative mechanisms of the radiosensitization effect in CaP-resistant cells in the combination treatment. The findings from this study suggest that the combination of dual PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors (BEZ235 or PI103) with radiotherapy is a promising modality for the treatment of CaP to overcome radioresistance.

  13. Inter- and intra-cellular mechanism of NF-kB-dependent survival advantage and clonal expansion of radio-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Aravindan, Natarajan; Xu, Ji; Natarajan, Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism by which cancer cells acquire resistance to radiation and favorably selected for its clonal expansion will provide molecular insight into tumor recurrence at the treatment site. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms prompted in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to clinical radiation and the associated coordination of intra- and inter-cellular signaling that orchestrate radio-resistance and tumor relapse/recurrence. Our findings showed that 2 or 10Gy of (137)Cs γ-rays at a dose rate of 1.03Gy/min trigger the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), its DNA-binding activity and recycles its own transcription. NF-κB DNA-binding kinetic analysis demonstrated both sustained and dual phase NF-κB activation with radiation. Gene manipulation approach revealed that radiation triggered NF-κB-mediated TNF-α transcriptional activity. TNF-α blocking approach confirmed that the de novo synthesis and secretion of TNF-α serves as a pre-requisite for the second phase of NF-κB activation and sustained maintenance. Radiation-associated NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF-α from irradiated cells, in parallel, activates NF-κB in the non-targeted un-irradiated bystander cells. Together, these findings demonstrated that radiation-triggered NF-κB-dependent TNFα secretion is critical for self-sustenance of NF-κB (through autocrine positive feedback signaling) and for coordinating bystander response (through inter-cellular paracrine mechanism) after radiation exposure. Further, the data suggest that this self-sustained NF-κB in the irradiated cells determines radio-resistance, survival advantage and clonal expansion of the tumor cells at the treatment site. Parallel maintenance of NF-ΚB-TNF-α-NF-κB feedback-cycle in the un-irradiated non-targeted bystander cells initiates supportive mechanism for the promotion and progression of surviving tumor cells. Intervening this molecular pathway would help us to

  14. MiR-20a Induces Cell Radioresistance by Activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuqin; Zheng, Lin; Ding, Yi; Li, Qi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Tongxin; Sun, Quanquan; Yang, Hua; Peng, Shunli; Wang, Wei; Chen, Longhua

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of miR-20a in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell radioresistance, which may reveal potential strategies to improve treatment. Methods and Materials: The expression of miR-20a and PTEN were detected in HCC cell lines and paired primary tissues by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell radiation combined with colony formation assays was administrated to discover the effect of miR-20a on radiosensitivity. Bioinformatics prediction and luciferase assay were used to identify the target of miR-20a. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was used to inhibit phosphorylation of Akt, to verify whether miR-20a affects HCC cell radioresistance through activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway. Results: MiR-20a levels were increased in HCC cell lines and tissues, whereas PTEN was inversely correlated with it. Overexpression of miR-20a in Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells enhances their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation, and the inhibition of miR-20a in HCCLM3 and QGY-7701 cells sensitizes them to it. PTEN was identified as a direct functional target of miR-20a for the induction of radioresistance. Overexpression of miR-20a activated the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Additionally, the kinase inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the effect of miR-20a–induced radioresistance. Conclusion: MiR-20a induces HCC cell radioresistance by activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway, which suggests that miR-20a/PTEN/PI3K/Akt might represent a target of investigation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against HCC.

  15. WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with Tumor Radioresistence: An Indication for Individualized Breast Cancer Therapy Adapted to Cancer Stem Cell Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, S; Pajonk, F; McCloskey, S; Low, D; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purposes: The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in a solid tumor could result in poor tumor control probability. The purposes are to study CSC radiosensitivity parameters α and β and their correlation to CSC levels to understand the underlying radioresistance mechanisms and enable individualized treatment design. Methods: Four established breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, and SUM159PT) were irradiated in vitro using single radiation doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. The fractions of CSCs in each cell lines were determined using cancer stem cell markers. Mammosphere assays were also performed to better estimate the number of CSCs and represent the CSC repopulation in a human solid tumor. The measured cell surviving fractions were fitted using the Linear-quadratic (LQ) model with independent fitting parameters: α-TC, β-TC (TCs), α-CSC, β-CSC (CSCs), and fs (the percentage of CSCs in each sample). Results: The measured fs increased following the irradiation by MCF-7 (0.1%), T47D (0.9%), MDA-MB-231 (1.18%) and SUM159T (2.46%), while decreasing surviving curve slopes were observed, indicating greater radioresistance, in the opposite order. The fitting yielded the radiosensitive parameters for the MCF-7: α-TC=0.1±0.2Gy{sup −1}, β-TC= 0.08 ±0.14Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.07Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.02±0.3Gy{sup −2}; for the SUM159PT, α-TC=0.08±0.25 Gy{sup −1}, β-TC=0.02±0.02Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.18Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.004±0.24Gy{sup −2}. In the mammosphere assay, where fs were higher than the corresponding cell line assays, there was almost no shoulder found in the surviving curves (more radioresistant in mammosphere assays) yielding β-CSC of approximately 0. Conclusion: Breast cancer stem cells were more radioresistant characterized by smaller α and β values compared to differentiated breast cancer cells. Percentage of breast cancer stem cells strongly correlated to overall tumor radioresistance. This observation

  16. DANGER is involved in high glucose-induced radioresistance through inhibiting DAPK-mediated anoikis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Youn, HyeSook; Son, Beomseok; Kim, Daehoon; Seong, Ki Moon; Park, Sungkyun; Kim, Wanyeon; Youn, BuHyun

    2016-02-09

    18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake during FDG positron emission tomography seems to reflect increased radioresistance. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying high glucose (HG)-induced radioresistance is unclear. In the current study, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced activation of the MEK-ERK-DAPK-p53 signaling axis is required for anoikis (anchorage-dependent apoptosis) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in normal glucose media. Phosphorylation of DAPK at Ser734 by ERK was essential for p53 transcriptional activity and radiosensitization. In HG media, overexpressed DANGER directly bound to the death domain of DAPK, thus inhibiting the catalytic activity of DAPK. In addition, inhibition of the DAPK-p53 signaling axis by DANGER promoted anoikis-resistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), resulting in radioresistance of HG-treated NSCLC cells. Notably, knockdown of DANGER enhanced anoikis, EMT inhibition, and radiosensitization in a mouse xenograft model of lung cancer. Taken together, our findings offered evidence that overexpression of DANGER and the subsequent inhibitory effect on DAPK kinase activity are critical responses that account for HG-induced radioresistance of NSCLC.

  17. High linear-energy-transfer radiation can overcome radioresistance of glioma stem-like cells to low linear-energy-transfer radiation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Kondo, Natsuko; Kawabata, Shinji; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Fujimori, Akira; Ono, Koji; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is applied as the standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, radiotherapy remains merely palliative, not curative, because of the existence of glioma stem cells (GSCs), which are regarded as highly radioresistant to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) photons. Here we analyzed whether or not high-LET particles can overcome the radioresistance of GSCs. Glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) were induced from the GBM cell line A172 in stem cell culture medium. The phenotypes of GSLCs and wild-type cells were confirmed using stem cell markers. These cells were irradiated with (60)Co gamma rays or reactor neutron beams. Under neutron-beam irradiation, high-LET proton particles can be produced through elastic scattering or nitrogen capture reaction. Radiosensitivity was assessed by a colony-forming assay, and the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were assessed by a histone gamma-H2AX focus detection assay. In stem cell culture medium, GSLCs could form neurosphere-like cells and express neural stem cell markers (Sox2 and Musashi) abundantly in comparison with their parental cells. GSLCs were significantly more radioresistant to gamma rays than their parental cells, but neutron beams overcame this resistance. There were significantly fewer gamma-H2AX foci in the A172 GSLCs 24 h after irradiation with gamma rays than in their parental cultured cells, while there was no apparent difference following neutron-beam irradiation. High-LET radiation can overcome the radioresistance of GSLCs by producing unrepairable DNA DSBs. High-LET radiation therapy might have the potential to overcome GBM's resistance to X-rays in a clinical setting.

  18. A Functional Screen Identifies miRs that Induce Radioresistance in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Moskwa, Patryk; Zinn, Pascal O.; Choi, Young Eun; Shukla, Sachet A; Fendler, Wojciech; Chen, Clark C; Lu, Jun; Golub, Todd R; Hjelmeland, Anita; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy in many tumor types is limited by normal tissue toxicity and by intrinsic or acquired radioresistance. Therefore, it is essential to understand the molecular network responsible for regulating radiosensitivity/resistance. Here, an unbiased functional screen identified four microRNAs (miR-1, miR-125a, miR-150, and miR-425) that induce radioresistance. Considering the clinical importance of radiotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM) patients, the impact of these miRNAs on GBM radioresistance was investigated. Overexpression of miR-1, miR-125a, miR-150 and/or miR-425 in GBM promotes radioresistance through upregulation of the cell cycle checkpoint response. Conversely, antagonizing with antagomiRs sensitizes GBM cells to irradiation, suggesting their potential as targets for inhibiting therapeutic resistance. Analysis of GBM datasets from TCGA revealed that these miRNAs are expressed in GBM patient specimens and correlate with Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β) signaling. Finally, it is demonstrated that expression of miR-1 and miR-125a can be induced by TGF-β and antagonized by a TGF-β receptor inhibitor. Together, these results identify and characterize a new role for miR-425, miR-1, miR-125, and miR-150 in promoting radioresistance in GBMs and provide insight into the therapeutic application of TGF-β inhibitors in radiotherapy. Systematic identification of miRs that cause radioresistance in gliomas is important for uncovering predictive markers for radiotherapy or targets for overcoming radioresistance. PMID:25256711

  19. Hypoxia-induced angiotensin II by the lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism mediates radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guozhu; Liu, Ying; Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Zhang, Lanfang; Lin, Jie; Guo, Zhaoze; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Yuan, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a principal determinant of arterial blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance. RAS component dysregulation was recently found in some malignancies and correlated with poor patient outcomes. However, the exact mechanism of local RAS activation in tumors is still unclear. Here, we find that the local angiotensin II predominantly exists in the hypoxic regions of tumor formed by nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, where these tumor cells autocrinely produce angiotensin II by a chymase-dependent rather than an angiotensin converting enzyme-dependent mechanism. We further demonstrate in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 and 5–8F cells that this chymase-dependent effect is mediated by increased levels of lactate, a by-product of glycolytic metabolism. Finally, we show that the enhanced angiotensin II plays an important role in the intracellular accumulation of HIF-1α of hypoxic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells and mediates the radiation-resistant phenotype of these nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Thus, our findings reveal the critical role of hypoxia in producing local angiotensin II by a lactate-chymase-dependent mechanism and highlight the importance of local angiotensin II in regulating radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:28205588

  20. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Wakatsuki, Masaru

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  1. BEMER Electromagnetic Field Therapy Reduces Cancer Cell Radioresistance by Enhanced ROS Formation and Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Artati, Anna; Adamski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Each year more than 450,000 Germans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer subsequently receiving standard multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On top, molecular-targeted agents are increasingly administered. Owing to intrinsic and acquired resistance to these therapeutic approaches, both the better molecular understanding of tumor biology and the consideration of alternative and complementary therapeutic support are warranted and open up broader and novel possibilities for therapy personalization. Particularly the latter is underpinned by the increasing utilization of non-invasive complementary and alternative medicine by the population. One investigated approach is the application of low-dose electromagnetic fields (EMF) to modulate cellular processes. A particular system is the BEMER therapy as a Physical Vascular Therapy for which a normalization of the microcirculation has been demonstrated by a low-frequency, pulsed EMF pattern. Open remains whether this EMF pattern impacts on cancer cell survival upon treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and the molecular-targeted agent Cetuximab inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Using more physiological, three-dimensional, matrix-based cell culture models and cancer cell lines originating from lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreas, we show significant changes in distinct intermediates of the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways and enhanced cancer cell radiosensitization associated with increased DNA double strand break numbers and higher levels of reactive oxygen species upon BEMER treatment relative to controls. Intriguingly, exposure of cells to the BEMER EMF pattern failed to result in sensitization to chemotherapy and Cetuximab. Further studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the cellular alterations induced by the BEMER EMF pattern and to clarify the application areas for human disease. PMID:27959944

  2. BEMER Electromagnetic Field Therapy Reduces Cancer Cell Radioresistance by Enhanced ROS Formation and Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Storch, Katja; Dickreuter, Ellen; Artati, Anna; Adamski, Jerzy; Cordes, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Each year more than 450,000 Germans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer subsequently receiving standard multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On top, molecular-targeted agents are increasingly administered. Owing to intrinsic and acquired resistance to these therapeutic approaches, both the better molecular understanding of tumor biology and the consideration of alternative and complementary therapeutic support are warranted and open up broader and novel possibilities for therapy personalization. Particularly the latter is underpinned by the increasing utilization of non-invasive complementary and alternative medicine by the population. One investigated approach is the application of low-dose electromagnetic fields (EMF) to modulate cellular processes. A particular system is the BEMER therapy as a Physical Vascular Therapy for which a normalization of the microcirculation has been demonstrated by a low-frequency, pulsed EMF pattern. Open remains whether this EMF pattern impacts on cancer cell survival upon treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and the molecular-targeted agent Cetuximab inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Using more physiological, three-dimensional, matrix-based cell culture models and cancer cell lines originating from lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreas, we show significant changes in distinct intermediates of the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways and enhanced cancer cell radiosensitization associated with increased DNA double strand break numbers and higher levels of reactive oxygen species upon BEMER treatment relative to controls. Intriguingly, exposure of cells to the BEMER EMF pattern failed to result in sensitization to chemotherapy and Cetuximab. Further studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the cellular alterations induced by the BEMER EMF pattern and to clarify the application areas for human disease.

  3. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  4. Epothilone B Confers Radiation Dose Enhancement in DAB2IP Gene Knock-Down Radioresistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Zhaolu; Raghavan, Pavithra; Xie Daxing; Boike, Thomas; Burma, Sandeep; Chen, David; Chakraborty, Arup; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Saha, Debabrata

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In metastatic prostate cancer, DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is often downregulated and has been reported as a possible prognostic marker to predict the risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Our preliminary results show that DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells are radioresistant. In this study, we investigated the anticancer drug Epothilone B (EpoB) for the modulation of radiosensitivity in DAB2IP-deficient human PCa cells. Methods and Materials: We used a stable DAB2IP-knock down human PCa cell line, PC3 shDAB2IP, treated with EpoB, ionizing radiation (IR), or the combined treatment of EpoB and IR. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined by surviving fraction, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. For in vivo studies, the PC3shDAB2IP xenograft model was used in athymic nude mice. Results: Treatment with EpoB at IC{sub 50} dose (33.3 nM) increased cellular radiosensitivity in the DAB2IP-deficient cell line with a dose enhancement ratio of 2.36. EpoB delayed the DSB repair kinetics after IR and augmented the induction of apoptosis in irradiated cells after G{sub 2}/M arrest. Combined treatment of EpoB and radiation enhanced tumor growth delay with an enhancement factor of 1.2. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a significant radiation dose enhancement using EpoB in DAB2IP-deficient prostate cancer cells. This radiosensitization can be attributed to delayed DSB repair, prolonged G{sub 2} block, and increased apoptosis in cells entering the cell cycle after G{sub 2}/M arrest.

  5. SHP-1 overexpression increases the radioresistance of NPC cells by enhancing DSB repair, increasing S phase arrest and decreasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofen; Mou, Jingjing; Liu, Sha; Sun, Ziyi; Meng, Rui; Zhou, Zhenwei; Wu, Gang; Peng, Gang

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of SHP-1 on the radioresistance of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line CNE-2 and the relevant underlying mechanisms. The human NPC cell line CNE-2 was transfected with a lentivirus that contained the SHP-1 gene or a nonsense sequence (referred to as LP-H1802Lv201 and LP-NegLv201 cells, respectively). Cells were irradiated with different ionizing radiation (IR) doses. Cell survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, and the expression of related proteins were assessed using colony formation assay, immunofluorescent assays (IFAs), flow cytometry (FCM) and western blot analyses, respectively. Compared with the control (CNE-2 cells) and LP-NegLv201 cells, LP-H1802Lv201 cells were more resistant to IR. IFAs showed that IR caused less histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and RAD51 foci in the LP-H1802Lv201 cells. Compared with the control and LP-NegLv201 cells, LP-H1802Lv201 cells showed increased S phase arrest. After IR, the apoptotic rate of the LP-H1802Lv201 cells was lower in contrast to the control and LP-NegLv201 cells. Western blot analyses showed that IR increased the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2), ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) protein, checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) and p53. In LP-H1802Lv201 cells, the phosphorylation levels of ATM and CHK2 were significantly increased while the p53 phosphorylation level was decreased compared to these levels in the control and LP-NegLv201 cells. Phosphorylation of ATR and CHK1 did not show significant differences in the three cell groups. Overexpression of SHP-1 in the CNE-2 cells led to radioresistance and the radioresistance was related to enhanced DNA DSB repair, increased S phase arrest and decreased cell apoptosis.

  6. SIX1 overexpression predicts poor prognosis and induces radioresistance through AKT signaling in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng; Li, Guang; Tang, Lingrong; Li, Yaming

    2017-01-01

    The Sineoculis homeobox homolog 1 (SIX1) protein has been found to be overexpressed in several human cancers. However, its expression pattern and biological roles in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unexplored. This study examined the clinical significance of SIX1 in 119 ESCC tissues. It was found that SIX1 protein was upregulated in 36.9% (44/119) cases. SIX1 overexpression was an independent predictor for short survival of ESCC patients. siRNA knockdown and plasmid transfection were carried out in ESCC cell lines. SIX1 depletion inhibited cell growth, invasion, and colony formation, whereas its overexpression facilitated in vivo and in vitro cell growth, invasion, and colony formation. The apoptosis rate induced by X-ray irradiation was substantially increased by SIX1 knockdown in Eca-109 cells. Ectopic overexpression of SIX1 in TE-1 cells dramatically enhanced resistance to irradiation. Western blot analysis showed that SIX1 depletion downregulated cyclin E, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), Bcl-2 expression and upregulated Bim expression. SIX1 overexpression exhibited the opposite effect on these proteins. In addition, it was found that SIX1 could positively regulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT signaling pathway. ERK inhibitor abolished the effect of SIX1 on MMP-2 expression. AKT inhibitor treatment blocked the role of SIX1 on anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that SIX1 overexpression predicts poor survival in ESCC patients and confers radioresistance through activation of AKT signaling pathways. PMID:28260921

  7. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiancheng; Wu, Kaijie; Gao, Dexuan; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun; Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; He, Dalin

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  8. The Interplay between Radioresistant Caco-2 Cells and the Immune System Increases Epithelial Layer Permeability and Alters Signaling Protein Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Morini, Jacopo; Babini, Gabriele; Barbieri, Sofia; Baiocco, Giorgio; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent type of cancer, with a higher incidence in the developed countries. Colorectal cancer is usually managed with both surgeries, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Radiotherapy has the well-known advantage of targeting the tumor, minimizing normal tissue exposure. Nevertheless, during radiation treatment, exposure of healthy tissues is of great concern, in particular because of the effects on the intestinal barrier functions and on cells belonging to the immune system. The functional role of intestinal barrier in avoiding paracellular trafficking and controlling bacterial spread from gut it is well known and it is due to the presence of tight junction complexes. However, intestinal barrier is fundamental in participating to the interplay with immune system, especially considering the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Until few years ago, radiotherapy was considered to bear only a depressive action on the immune system. However, it is now recognized that the release of pro-inflammatory signals and phenotypic changes in tumoral cells due to ionizing radiation could trigger the immune system against the tumor. In this work, we address how intestinal barrier functions are perturbed by X-ray doses in the range 0–10 Gy, focusing on the interplay between tumoral cells and the immune system. To this aim, we adopted a coculture model in which Caco-2 cells can be grown in presence/absence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We focused our attention on changes in the proliferation, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytokine release, and proteins of the junctional complexes. Our results indicate a high radioresistance of Caco-2 in the investigated dose range, and an increased permeability of the tumoral cell layer due to the presence of PBMC. This is found to be correlated with activation of PBMC, inhibiting the apoptotic pathway, with the enhancement of cytokine release and with variation of tight junction

  9. Radioresistant Sf9 insect cells display moderate resistance against cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jyoti Swaroop; Suman, Shubhankar; Singh, Vijaypal; Chandna, Sudhir

    2012-08-01

    Lepidopteran insect cells serve as excellent model to study stress responses and are known to display resistance against DNA damaging agents including ionizing radiation; however, limited information is available on the effects of membrane damaging agents in these cells. In this study, we investigated the response of Sf9 cells (derived from ovaries of Spodoptera frugiperda; order Lepidoptera) to cumene hydroperoxide (CHPx), compared to human BMG-1 cells. CHPx treatment at doses lethal for human cells also caused typical necrosis in Sf9. Severe necrosis in human BMG-1 cells was observed at 125 μM, whereas similar effect in Sf9 cells was observed at 250 μM. In Sf9 cells, CHPx (250 μM) induced negligible changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species, while moderate effect was observed on intracellular calcium distribution. Reduced DNA damage and lipid (including cardiolipin) oxidation was observed in Sf9 cells that could be due to moderate total antioxidant status and constitutive/induced glutathione S-transferase activity. This study importantly demonstrates that Lepidopteran insect cells having extensive resistance towards DNA damaging agents show only moderately higher resistance to membrane damaging agents. A stronger reducing environment involving efficient antioxidant system seems to contribute significantly in this response.

  10. Cancer stem cells, the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and radioresistance: potential role of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Marie-Egyptienne, Delphine Tamara; Lohse, Ines; Hill, Richard Peter

    2013-11-28

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within solid tumors. Although the precursor of these cells is not clearly established, recent studies suggest that the phenotype of CSCs may be quite plastic and associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In patients, the presence of EMT and CSCs has been implicated in increased resistance to radiotherapy. Hypoxia, a negative prognostic factor for treatment success, is a potent driver of a multitude of molecular signalling pathways that allow cells to survive and thrive in the hostile tumor microenvironment and can induce EMT. Hypoxia also provides tumor cells with cues for maintenance of a stem-like state and may help to drive the linkage between EMT and CSCs. Understanding the biology of CSCs, the EMT phenotype and their implications in therapeutic relapse may provide crucial new approaches in the development of improved therapeutic strategies.

  11. Prolonged autophagy by MTOR inhibitor leads radioresistant cancer cells into senescence.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hae Yun; Han, Myung Woul; Chang, Hyo Won; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Seong Who

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the well-established therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment. However, the emergence of cells refractory to radiation is a major obstacle to successful treatment with radiotherapy. Many reports suggest that inhibitors targeting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) can sensitize cancer cells to the effect of radiation, although by which mechanism MTOR inhibitors enhance the efficacy of radiation toward cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Our studies indicate that a potent and persistent activation of autophagy via inhibition of the MTOR pathway, even in cancer cells where autophagy is occurring, can trigger premature senescence, cellular proliferation arrest. Combined treatment of MTOR inhibitor and radiation induce heterochromatin formation, an irreversible growth arrest and an increase of senescence-associated GLB1 (β-galactosidase) activity, which appear to result from a constant activation of TP53 and a restoration in the activity of retinoblastoma 1 protein (RB1)-E2F1. Thus, this study provides evidence that promoting cellular senescence via inhibition of the MTOR pathway may serve as an avenue to augment radiosensitivity in cancer cells that initiate an autophagy-survival mode to radiotherapy.

  12. Cell division cycle 25 homolog c effects on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance at elevated dosage in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Cui, Yingshan; Han, Jun; Ren, Jinghua; Wu, Gang; Cheng, Jing

    2012-09-01

    The underlying mechanisms behind both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and induced radioresistance (IRR), generally occurring at elevated radiation levels, remain unclear; however, elucidation of the relationship between cell cycle division 25 homolog c (Cdc25c) phosphatase and HRS/IRR may provide important insights into this process. Two cell lines with disparate HRS status, A549 and SiHa cells, were selected as cell models for comparison of dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase expression subsequent to low-dose irradiation. Knockdown of Cdc25c in A549 cells was mediated by transfection with a pGCsi-RAN-U6neo vector containing hairpin siRNA sequences. S216-phosphorylated Cdc25c protein [p-Cdc25c (Ser216)], cell survival and mitotic ratio were measured by western blot, colony-forming assay and histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Variant p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression was observed in the two cell lines after irradiation. The p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression noted in SiHa cells after administration of 0-1 Gy radiation was similar to the radioresistance model; however, in A549 cells, the dose response for the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue overlapped the level required to overcome the HRS response. Furthermore, Cdc25c repression prior to low-dose radiation induced more distinct HRS and prevented the development of IRR. The dose required to overcome the HRS response coincided with the effect of early G2-phase checkpoint arrest in A549 cells (approximately 0.3 Gy), and Cdc25c knockdown in A549 cells (approximately 0.5 Gy) corresponded to the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue. Resultant data confirmed that dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase does effectively act as an early G2-phase checkpoint, thus indicating mechanistic importance in the HRS to IRR transition in A549 cells.

  13. Flavopiridol Potentiates the Cytotoxic Effects of Radiation in Radioresistant Tumor Cells in Which p53 is Mutated or Bcl-2 is Overexpressed

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Takamitsu; Omura-Minamisawa, Motoko Kang, Yun; Cheng, Chao; Inoue, Tomio

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Loss of the cell-cycle regulatory protein p53 or overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 is associated with resistance to radiation in several types of cancer cells. Flavopiridol, a synthetic flavone, inhibits the growth of malignant tumors cells in vitro and in vivo through multiple mechanisms. The purpose of the present study is to clarify whether flavopiridol enhances the cytotoxic effects of radiation in tumor cells that contain dysfunction p53 or that overexpress Bcl-2. Methods and Materials: A human glioma cell line (A172/mp53) stably transfected with a plasmid containing mutated p53 and a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa/bcl-2) transfected with a bcl-2 expression plasmid were used. Cells were incubated with flavopiridol for 24 h after radiation, and then cell viability was determined by a colony formation assay. Foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX were also evaluated as a sensitive indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. Results: Compared with the parental wild-type cells, both transfected cell lines were more resistant to radiation. Post-treatment with flavopiridol increased the cytotoxic effects of radiation in both transfected cell lines, but not in their parental wild-type cell lines. Post-treatment with flavopiridol inhibited sublethal damage repair as well as the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in response to radiation. Conclusions: Flavopiridol enhanced the cytotoxic effect of radiation in radioresistant tumor cells that harbor p53 dysfunction or Bcl-2 overexpression. A combination treatment of flavopiridol with radiation has the potential to conquer the radioresistance of malignant tumors induced by the genetic alteration of p53 or bcl-2.

  14. Combination of nicotinamide and hyperthermia to eliminate radioresistant chronically and acutely hypoxic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Chaplin, D.J.; Overgaard, J. )

    1990-12-01

    The interaction among nicotinamide, radiation, and heat was studied in vivo using a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice. Response following local tumor treatment was assessed by tumor control and regrowth delay. Nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg i.p.) produced maximal radiosensitization when injected 30 min to 2 h before irradiation (enhancement ratios (ERs), 1.2-1.5). Radiation damage was also increased by heating tumors (43.5 degrees C for 60 min) 4 h after irradiation (ERs = 1.6-2.6). This combined radiation and heat treatment was enhanced by nicotinamide but the effect depended on the assay procedure, such that although a significant increase was observed with the tumor control assay, only a slight increase was seen using regrowth delay as the end point. The development of moist desquamation in normal feet was used to estimate skin damage after irradiation. Nicotinamide and heat both resulted in a small yet significant increase in skin damage (ERs less than 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). A combined treatment resulted in a greater ER of 1.7, but when compared to the tumor response it still gave a therapeutic gain. A histological fluorescent staining technique was used to assess functional tumor vasculature at two periods in time separated by 20 min. Under normal conditions 7.7% of the vessels in this tumor were functional at one time but not the other. This value was reduced to 2.8% after nicotinamide administration. Since these fluctuations in blood flow can result in acute hypoxia we conclude that while heat eliminates chronically hypoxic tumor cells, nicotinamide probably removes the presence of acute hypoxia.

  15. Activation of mitochondrial promoter P{sub H}-binding protein in a radio-resistant Chinese hamster cell strain associated with Bcl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Paromita; Ghosh, Utpal . E-mail: keyachaudhuri@yahoo.com

    2006-11-17

    The cellular response to ionizing radiation is mediated by a complex interaction of number of proteins involving different pathways. Previously, we have shown that up regulation of mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and COX1 transcribed from the heavy strand promoter (P{sub H}) has been increased in a radio-resistant cell strain designated as M5 in comparison with the parental Chinese hamster V79 cells. These genes are also up regulated in Chinese hamster V79 cells VB13 that express exogenous human Bcl2. In the present study, the expression of the gene ND6 that is expressed from the light strand promoter (P{sub L}) was found to be similar in both the cell lines, as determined by RT-PCR. To test the possibility that this differential expression of mitochondrial genes under these two promoters was mediated by differences in proteins' affinity to interact with these promoters, we have carried out electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using mitochondrial cell extracts from these two cell lines. Our result of these experiments revealed that two different proteins formed complex with the synthetic promoters and higher amount of protein from M5 cell extracts interacted with the P{sub H} promoter in comparison to that observed with cell extracts from Chinese hamster V79 cells. The promoter-specific differential binding of proteins was also observed in VB13. These results showed that differential mitochondrial gene expression observed earlier in the radio-resistant M5 cells was due to enhanced interaction proteins with the promoters P{sub H} and mediated by the expression of Bcl2.

  16. TGF-β and Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Promote Radioresistance of A549 Lung Cancer Cells through Activation of Nrf2 and EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sae-lo-oom; Ryu, Hwani; Son, A-rang; Seo, Bitna; Kim, Jooyoung; Jung, Seung-Youn; Song, Jie-Young; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have examined the roles of hypoxia and transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β separately in the tumor microenvironment, the effects of simultaneous treatment with hypoxia/reoxygenation and TGF-β on tumor malignancy are unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of redox signaling and oncogenes on cell proliferation and radioresistance in A549 human lung cancer cells in the presence of TGF-β under hypoxia/reoxygenation conditions. Combined treatment with TGF-β and hypoxia activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a redox-sensitive transcription factor. Interestingly, Nrf2 knockdown suppressed the effects of combined treatment on EGFR phosphorylation. In addition, blockade of EGFR signaling also suppressed induction of Nrf2 following combined treatment with hypoxia and TGF-β, indicating that the combined treatment induced positive crosstalk between Nrf2 and EGFR. TGF-β and hypoxia/reoxygenation increased the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine abolished the activation of Nrf2 and EGFR. Treatment with TGF-β under hypoxic conditions increased the proliferation of A549 cells compared with that after vehicle treatment. Moreover, cells treated with the combined treatment exhibited resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), and knockdown of Nrf2 increased IR-induced cell death under these conditions. Thus, taken together, our findings suggested that TGF-β and hypoxia/reoxygenation promoted tumor progression and radioresistance of A549 cells through ROS-mediated activation of Nrf2 and EGFR. PMID:26904167

  17. Abnormal Expression of miR-21 and miR-95 in Cancer Stem-Like Cells is Associated with Radioresistance of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Chailan; Hu, Lin; He, Yin; Shi, Zeya; Tang, Siyuan; Chen, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrated that miR-21 and miR-95 expression were significantly higher in the ALDH1(+)CD133(+)subpopulation than in the ALDH1(-)CD133(-) subpopulation of lung cancer cells. Combined delivery of anti-miR-21 and anti-miR-95 by calcium phosphate nanoparticles significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and sensitized radiotherapy. The anti-miRNAs significantly reduced miR-21 and miR-95 levels, increased PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 protein expression, but reduced Akt Ser(473) and Thr(308) phosphorylation. ALDH1(+)CD133(+) subpopulation of NSCLC tumor cells confers radioresistance due to high expression of miR-21 and miR-95. Targeting inhibition of miR-21 and miR-95 can inhibit tumor growth through elevating PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 expression and inhibiting Akt phosphorylation.

  18. Effects of the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS350, a radiation mitigator, on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures and on radioresistance of marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ashwin; Epperly, Michael W; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Sprachman, Melissa M; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation mitigator MMS350 prolongs survival of mice treated with total-body irradiation and prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis when added to drinking water at day 100 after thoracic irradiation. The effects of MMS350 on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture and on the radiobiology of derived bone marrow stromal cell lines were tested. Long-term bone marrow cultures were established from C57BL/6NTac mice and maintained in a high-humidity incubator, with 7% CO2 and the addition of 100 μM MMS350 at the weekly media change. Over 10 weeks in culture, MMS350 had no significant effect on maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell production, or on nonadherent cells or colony-forming units of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Stromal cell lines derived from non MMS350-treated long-term cultures or control stromal cells treated with MMS350 were radioresistant in the clonogenic survival curve assay. MMS350 is a non-toxic, highly water-soluble radiation mitigator that exhibits radioprotective effects on bone marrow stromal cells.

  19. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hong Shik; Hong, Eun-Hee; Lee, Su-Jae; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer.

  20. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ying-Yi

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer.

  1. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline; Imbert, Sandrine; Salles, Bernard; Valet, Philippe; Muller, Catherine

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  2. Radioresistance of culture-induced augmented natural killer-like activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brovall, C.; Levitz, S.M.; Ellner, J.J.; Schacter, B.

    1983-07-01

    Human NK activity is radiosensitive under the control of X-linked genes. We have evaluated the expression of these genes in other forms of cellular cytotoxicity. The NK radioresistant and radiosensitive phenotype is expressed in ADCC. Specific cellular cytotoxicity, generated in a MLC with a radiosensitive donor as responder, was radioresistant. NK-like activity recruited from nonadherent cells of radiosensitive subjects stimulated with allogenic cells, mitogens (PHA, Con A or PWM), or recall antigens (TT or PPD) was radioresistant. The acquisition of radioresistance was relatively rapid, beginning within 24 hr after exposure to PHA, prior to detectable proliferation. Radioresistance of MLR augmented NK-like activity was maximal 3 days after initiation of the culture. MLR augmented NK-like activity was spared by the immunosuppressive polypeptide antibiotic CsA at doses up to 1 mu gm/ml. CsA did, however, reduce acquisition of radioresistance by the NK-like activity at doses above 0.01 mu gm/ml, a concentration which does not inhibit uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine but does reduce the level of specific CML. These data suggest that mitogens and antigens, including allogeneic cells, are recruiting radioresistant NK-like activity which can be distinguished from the radiosensitive spontaneous NK activity of the cell donor. Further, in the MLR, both radiosensitive and radioresistant NK-like activity may be recruited.

  3. FoxM1 Promotes Stemness and Radio-Resistance of Glioblastoma by Regulating the Master Stem Cell Regulator Sox2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Geon; Cho, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeonghwan; Rheey, Jinguen; Shin, Kayoung; Seo, Yun Jee; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Il; Lee, Jeongwu; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and most lethal brain tumor. As current standard therapy consisting of surgery and chemo-irradiation provides limited benefit for GBM patients, novel therapeutic options are urgently required. Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor is an oncogenic regulator that promotes the proliferation, survival, and treatment resistance of various human cancers. The roles of FoxM1 in GBM remain incompletely understood, due in part to pleotropic nature of the FoxM1 pathway. Here, we show the roles of FoxM1 in GBM stem cell maintenance and radioresistance. ShRNA-mediated FoxM1 inhibition significantly impeded clonogenic growth and survival of patient-derived primary GBM cells with marked downregulation of Sox2, a master regulator of stem cell phenotype. Ectopic expression of Sox2 partially rescued FoxM1 inhibition-mediated effects. Conversely, FoxM1 overexpression upregulated Sox2 expression and promoted clonogenic growth of GBM cells. These data, with a direct binding of FoxM1 in the Sox2 promoter region in GBM cells, suggest that FoxM1 regulates stemness of primary GBM cells via Sox2. We also found significant increases in FoxM1 and Sox2 expression in GBM cells after irradiation both in vitro and in vivo orthotopic tumor models. Notably, genetic or a small-molecule FoxM1 inhibitor-mediated FoxM1 targeting significantly sensitized GBM cells to irradiation, accompanying with Sox2 downregulation. Finally, FoxM1 inhibition combined with irradiation in a patient GBM-derived orthotopic model significantly impeded tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor bearing mice. Taken together, these results indicate that the FoxM1-Sox2 signaling axis promotes clonogenic growth and radiation resistance of GBM, and suggest that FoxM1 targeting combined with irradiation is a potentially effective therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26444992

  4. Erythroleukemia cells acquire an alternative mitophagy capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Zhang, Suping; Xu, Li; Nie, Meilan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-04-19

    Leukemia cells are superior to hematopoietic cells with a normal differentiation potential in buffering cellular stresses, but the underlying mechanisms for this leukemic advantage are not fully understood. Using CRISPR/Cas9 deletion of the canonical autophagy-essential gene Atg7, we found that erythroleukemia K562 cells are armed with two sets of autophagic machinery. Alternative mitophagy is functional regardless of whether the canonical autophagic mechanism is intact or disrupted. Although canonical autophagy defects attenuated cell cycling, proliferation and differentiation potential, the leukemia cells retained their abilities for mitochondrial clearance and for maintaining low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Treatment with a specific inducer of mitophagy revealed that the canonical autophagy-defective erythroleukemia cells preserved a mitophagic response. Selective induction of mitophagy was associated with the upregulation and localization of RAB9A on the mitochondrial membrane in both wild-type and Atg7(-/-) leukemia cells. When the leukemia cells were treated with the alternative autophagy inhibitor brefeldin A or when the RAB9A was knocked down, this mitophagy was prohibited. This was accompanied by elevated ROS levels and apoptosis as well as reduced DNA damage repair. Therefore, the results suggest that erythroleukemia K562 cells possess an ATG7-independent alternative mitophagic mechanism that functions even when the canonical autophagic process is impaired, thereby maintaining the ability to respond to stresses such as excessive ROS and DNA damage.

  5. Erythroleukemia cells acquire an alternative mitophagy capability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Zhang, Suping; Xu, Li; Nie, Meilan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are superior to hematopoietic cells with a normal differentiation potential in buffering cellular stresses, but the underlying mechanisms for this leukemic advantage are not fully understood. Using CRISPR/Cas9 deletion of the canonical autophagy-essential gene Atg7, we found that erythroleukemia K562 cells are armed with two sets of autophagic machinery. Alternative mitophagy is functional regardless of whether the canonical autophagic mechanism is intact or disrupted. Although canonical autophagy defects attenuated cell cycling, proliferation and differentiation potential, the leukemia cells retained their abilities for mitochondrial clearance and for maintaining low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Treatment with a specific inducer of mitophagy revealed that the canonical autophagy-defective erythroleukemia cells preserved a mitophagic response. Selective induction of mitophagy was associated with the upregulation and localization of RAB9A on the mitochondrial membrane in both wild-type and Atg7−/− leukemia cells. When the leukemia cells were treated with the alternative autophagy inhibitor brefeldin A or when the RAB9A was knocked down, this mitophagy was prohibited. This was accompanied by elevated ROS levels and apoptosis as well as reduced DNA damage repair. Therefore, the results suggest that erythroleukemia K562 cells possess an ATG7-independent alternative mitophagic mechanism that functions even when the canonical autophagic process is impaired, thereby maintaining the ability to respond to stresses such as excessive ROS and DNA damage. PMID:27091640

  6. Loss of Keap1 Function in Prostate Cancer Cells Causes Chemo- and Radio-resistance and Promotes Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Singh, Anju; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Esopi, David; Kombairaju, Ponvijay; Bodas, Manish; Wu, Hailong; Bova, G. Steven; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor-2 (Nrf2) inhibitor, Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein (Keap1), result in increased Nrf2 activity in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and confer therapeutic resistance. We detected point mutations in Keap1 gene leading to non-conservative amino acid substitutions in prostate cancer cells. We found novel transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms of Keap1 inactivation such as promoter CpG island hypermethylation and aberrant splicing of Keap1 in DU-145 cells. Very low levels of Keap1 mRNA were detected in DU-145 cells, which significantly increased by treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-cytidine. The loss of Keap1 function led to an enhanced activity of Nrf2 and its downstream electrophile/drug detoxification pathway. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression in DU-145 cells by RNAi attenuated the expression of glutathione, thioredoxin, and the drug efflux pathways involved in counteracting electrophiles, oxidative stress, and detoxification of a broad spectrum of drugs. DU-145 cells expressing Nrf2-shRNA had lower levels of total glutathione and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Attenuation of Nrf2 function in DU-145 cells enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation-induced cell death. In addition, Inhibition of Nrf2 greatly suppressed in vitro and in vivo tumor growth of DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Thus, targeting Nrf2 pathway in prostate cancer cells may provide a novel strategy to enhance chemo- and radio-therapy responsiveness and ameliorate the growth and tumorigenecity leading to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:20124447

  7. Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian Marples PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: William Beaumont Hospital Inc...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...for highly aggressive advanced-stage neuroblastoma remains poor despite a multidisciplinary approach involving aggressive surgery, chemotherapy and

  8. Radiation-induced radioresistance of mammals and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.; Yonezawa, M.

    It is shown experimentally that a preliminary low dose exposure can induce radioresistance in mice in two (early and late) periods after preirradiation. The manifestation of such effects is reduced mortality of pre-exposed specimens after challenge acute irradiation, the reason of the animal death being the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. Therefore, proceeding from the radiobiological concept of the critical system, the theoretical investigation of the influence of preirradiation on mammalian radiosensitivity is conducted by making use of mathematical models of the vital body system, hematopoiesis. Modeling results make it possible to elucidate the mechanisms of the radioprotection effect of low level priming irradiation on mammals. Specifically, the state of acquired radioresistance in mice is caused by reduced radiosensitivity of lymphopoietic and thrombocytopoietic systems in the early period and by reduced radiosensitivity of granulocytopoietic system in the late period after preirradiation. It is important to emphasize that the evaluations of the duration of the early and late periods of postirradiation radioresistance in mice, carried out on the basis of the modeling and experimental investigations, practically coincide. All this demonstrates the effectiveness of joint modeling and experimental methods in studies and predictions of modification effects of preirradiation on mammalian radiosensitivity. The results obtained show the importance of accounting such effects in radiation risk assessments for cosmonauts and astronauts on long-term missions.

  9. Progeny from irradiated colorectal cancer cells acquire an EMT-like phenotype and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Lilian Gonçalves dos Reis; de Marcondes, Priscila Guimarães; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Leve, Fernanda; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza, Waldemir Fernandes; de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; Abdelhay, Eliana Saul Furquim Werneck; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major approach to adjuvant therapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer, however, the fractionation schedules frequently allow for the repopulation of surviving tumors cells, neoplastic progression, and subsequent metastasis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the transgenerational effects induced by radiation and evaluate whether it could increase the malignant features on the progeny derived from irradiated parental colorectal cancer cells, Caco-2, HT-29, and HCT-116. The progeny of these cells displayed a differential radioresistance as seen by clonogenic and caspase activation assay and had a direct correlation with survivin expression as observed by immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence showed that the most radioresistant progenies had an aberrant morphology, disturbance of the cell-cell adhesion contacts, disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and vimentin filaments. Only the progeny derived from intermediary radioresistant cells, HT-29, reduced the E-cadherin expression and overexpressed β-catenin and vimentin with increased cell migration, invasion, and metalloprotease activation as seen by immunoblotting, wound healing, invasion, and metalloprotease activity assay. We also observed that this most aggressive progeny increased the Wnt/β-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF activity and underwent an upregulation of mesenchymal markers and downregulation of E-cadherin, as determined by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that the intermediate radioresistant cells can generate more aggressive cellular progeny with the EMT-like phenotype. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway may constitute an important target for new adjuvant treatment schedules with radiotherapy, with the goal of reducing the migratory and invasive potential of the remaining cells after treatment.

  10. Acquired factor VII deficiency in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Toor, A A; Slungaard, A; Hedner, U; Weisdorf, D J; Key, N S

    2002-03-01

    Acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency in the absence of vitamin K deficiency, oral anticoagulant therapy, synthetic liver dysfunction, or DIC is rare, with only a handful of cases thus far reported. In the period from 1990 to 1996 we identified eight patients with acquired FVII deficiency, all of whom presented with prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) in the first 2 weeks following stem cell transplantation (SCT). The mean plasma FVII clotting activity (FVII:c) was 22% (range 8-35%) with an approximately equivalent reduction in FVII antigen (FVII:Ag) level. Mean plasma levels of fibrinogen and factors II, V, IX, and X were normal. Protein C activity was significantly depressed in only one of the three patients in whom it was measured. Several patients experienced bleeding complications, and hemorrhage directly accounted for death in two cases. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver developed in three patients. We conclude that FVII deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged PT in patients who have recently undergone SCT. The mechanism of this acquired deficiency state remains to be defined.

  11. Carbon ions of different linear energy transfer (LET) values induce apoptosis & G2 cell cycle arrest in radio-resistant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jelena, Žakula; Lela, Korićanac; Otilija, Keta; Danijela, Todorović; Cirrone, Giuseppe A.P.; Francesco, Romano; Giacomo, Cuttone; Ivan, Petrović; Aleksandra, Ristić-Fira

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The main goal when treating malignancies with radiation is to deprive tumour cells of their reproductive potential. One approach is to induce tumour cell apoptosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of carbon ions (12C) to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human HTB140 melanoma cells. Methods: In this in vitro study, human melanoma HTB140 cells were irradiated with the 62 MeV/n carbon (12C) ion beam, having two different linear energy transfer (LET) values: 197 and 382 keV/μm. The dose range was 2 to 16 Gy. Cell viability was estimated by the sulforhodamine B assay seven days after irradiation. The cell cycle and apoptosis were evaluated 48 h after irradiation using flow cytometry. At the same time point, protein and gene expression of apoptotic regulators were estimated using the Western blot and q-PCR methods, respectively. Results: Cell viability experiments indicated strong anti-tumour effects of 12C ions. The analysis of cell cycle showed that 12C ions blocked HTB140 cells in G2 phase and induced the dose dependent increase of apoptosis. The maximum value of 21.8 per cent was attained after irradiation with LET of 197 keV/μm at the dose level of 16 Gy. Pro-apoptotic effects of 12C ions were confirmed by changes of key apoptotic molecules: the p53, Bax, Bcl-2, poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). At the level of protein expression, the results indicated significant increases of p53, NFκB and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and PARP cleavage. The Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA ratio was also increased, while no change was detected in the level of NFκB mRNA. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results indicated that anti-tumour effects of 12C ions in human melanoma HTB140 cells were accomplished through induction of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as G2 arrest. PMID:27748286

  12. Downregulation of Annexin A1 is correlated with radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lifang; Liao, Li; Wan, Yanping; Cheng, Ailan; Li, Meixiang; Chen, Sihan; Li, Maoyu; Tan, Xing; Zeng, Guqing

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but radioresistance often remains an obstacle to successful treatment. In our previous study, it was demonstrated that Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was involved in the p53-mediated radioresponse in NPC cells, which suggested that it may be associated with radioresistance in NPC; however, the role of ANXA1 in NPC radioresistance is unknown. In the present study, CNE2 cells were stably transfected with pLKO.1-ANXA1-small hairpin (sh)RNAs to investigate the effects of ANXA1 on the radiosensitivity of NPC. CNE2 cells transfected with pLKO.1 were used as the control. The radiosensitivities of the cells in vitro were analyzed using the clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. ANXA1 downregulation significantly enhanced clonogenic survival and cell growth following treatment of CNE2 cells with ionizing radiation (IR), increased the number of cells in the S phase and decreased IR-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that the radiosensitivity of CNE2 cells transfected with ANXA1-specific shRNA was significantly lower compared with the control cells. Therefore, ANXA1 downregulation may be involved in the radioresistance of NPC, and ANXA1 may be considered a novel biomarker for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy. PMID:28101240

  13. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  14. DNA Repair and Cytokines: TGF-β, IL-6, and Thrombopoietin as Different Biomarkers of Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Centurione, Lucia; Aiello, Francesca B.

    2016-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by radiotherapy are highly cytotoxic lesions, leading to chromosomal aberrations and cell death. Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA-damage response, non-homologous end joining, and homologous recombination pathways coordinately contribute to repairing DSBs in higher eukaryotes. It is known that the expression of DSB repair genes is increased in tumors, which is one of the main reasons for radioresistance. The inhibition of DSB repair pathways may be useful to increase tumor cell radiosensitivity and may target stem cell-like cancer cells, known to be the most radioresistant tumor components. Commonly overexpressed in neoplastic cells, cytokines confer radioresistance by promoting proliferation, survival, invasion, and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, tumor irradiation increases the expression of various cytokines displaying these effects, including transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6. Recently, the capabilities of these cytokines to support DNA repair pathways and the ATM-dependent DNA response have been demonstrated. Thrombopoietin, essential for megakaryopoiesis and very important for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis, has also been found to promote DNA repair in a highly selective manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying cytokine-related radioresistance, which may be clinically relevant. Therapies targeting specific cytokines may be used to improve radiosensitivity. Specific inhibitors may be chosen in consideration of different tumor microenvironments. Thrombopoietin may be useful in fending off irradiation-induced loss of HSCs. PMID:27500125

  15. Proteomic identification of the lactate dehydrogenase A in a radioresistant prostate cancer xenograft mouse model for improving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Chang, Lei; Ni, Jie; Wasinger, Valerie; Beretov, Julia; Deng, Junli; Duan, Wei; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance is a major challenge for prostate cancer (CaP) metastasis and recurrence after radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify potential protein markers and signaling pathways associated with radioresistance using a PC-3 radioresistant (RR) subcutaneous xenograft mouse model and verify the radiosensitization effect from a selected potential candidate. PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors were established and differential protein expression profiles from two groups of xenografts were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. One selected glycolysis marker, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was validated, and further investigated for its role in CaP radioresistance. We found that 378 proteins and 51 pathways were significantly differentially expressed between PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors, and that the glycolysis pathway is closely linked with CaP radioresistance. In addition, we also demonstrated that knock down of LDHA with siRNA or inhibition of LDHA activity with a LDHA specific inhibitor (FX-11), could sensitize PC-3RR cells to radiotherapy with reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, hypoxia, DNA repair ability and autophagy, as well as increased DNA double strand breaks and apoptosis. In summary, we identified a list of potential RR protein markers and important signaling pathways from a PC-3RR xenograft mouse model, and demonstrate that targeting LDHA combined with radiotherapy could increase radiosensitivity in RR CaP cells, suggesting that LDHA is an ideal therapeutic target to develop combination therapy for overcoming CaP radioresistance. PMID:27708237

  16. Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian Marples, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: William Beaumont Hospital Inc Royal Oak, MI... Neuroblastoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0355 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Brian Marples, PhD 5e. TASK NUMBER...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Patient survival for highly aggressive advanced-stage neuroblastoma remains poor despite a

  17. Loss of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 function in prostate cancer cells causes chemoresistance and radioresistance and promotes tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Singh, Anju; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Esopi, David; Kombairaju, Ponvijay; Bodas, Manish; Wu, Hailong; Bova, Steven G; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-02-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) result in increased Nrf2 activity in non-small cell lung cancer and confer therapeutic resistance. We detected point mutations in Keap1 gene, leading to nonconservative amino acid substitutions in prostate cancer cells. We found novel transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms of Keap1 inactivation, such as promoter CpG island hypermethylation and aberrant splicing of Keap1, in DU-145 cells. Very low levels of Keap1 mRNA were detected in DU-145 cells, which significantly increased by treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine. The loss of Keap1 function led to an enhanced activity of Nrf2 and its downstream electrophile/drug detoxification pathway. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression in DU-145 cells by RNA interference attenuated the expression of glutathione, thioredoxin, and the drug efflux pathways involved in counteracting electrophiles, oxidative stress, and detoxification of a broad spectrum of drugs. DU-145 cells constitutively expressing Nrf2 short hairpin RNA had lower levels of total glutathione and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Attenuation of Nrf2 function in DU-145 cells enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation-induced cell death. In addition, inhibition of Nrf2 greatly suppressed in vitro and in vivo tumor growth of DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Thus, targeting the Nrf2 pathway in prostate cancer cells may provide a novel strategy to enhance chemotherapy and radiotherapy responsiveness and ameliorate the growth and tumorigenicity, leading to improved clinical outcomes.

  18. Aberrant DNA topoisomerase II activity, radioresistance and inherited susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J. M.; Francis, G. E.; Holland, M. J.; Pirollo, K. F.; Chang, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to a wide variety of neoplasias (Li-Fraumeni syndrome), has been shown in studies of one cancer-prone family, to have an intriguing association with an aberrant c-raf-1 gene and inheritance of a radioresistant phenotype in their non-cancerous skin fibroblasts. This association together with observations that DNA topoisomerases, when defective, can introduce errors into DNA and that these enzymes are perturbed in vitro by serine/threonine kinases similar to raf encoded proteins, prompted investigation of DNA topoisomerase activity of the family's fibroblasts. Since radioresistance was transferred to murine cells (NIH-3T3) when the aberrant c-raf-1 gene from this family was transfected, we also examined transformants containing this and other oncogenes. V-raf/c-myc and EJ-ras transformants were examined, the former because the family's skin fibroblasts also have 3-8-fold elevated myc expression (not apparently relevant to radioresistance) and the latter because ras, like raf, conveys radioresistance. The family members' fibroblasts and the three transfected murine lines, showed a similar perturbation of a spermidine and ATP-dependent DNA catenation activity (typical of DNA topoisomerase II). There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.93; P = 0.0026) between the degree of activation of topoisomerase II and one measure of radioresistance (the Dq value). Relaxation of DNA supercoiling (topoisomerase I activity and other DNA nicking enzymes) was not abnormal. Cytotoxicity assays and evaluation of the influence of topoisomerase II inhibitors on DNA/protein complex formation, corroborated the existence of a qualitative topoisomerase II defect in the family's cells and transfectants. Although the contention that the qualitative topoisomerase II abnormalities observed here may be associated with malfunction is highly speculative, these findings may be relevant to the mechanism of oncogenesis, not only in this family, but with raf and ras

  19. Identification of protein biomarkers and signaling pathways associated with prostate cancer radioresistance using label-free LC-MS/MS proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lei; Ni, Jie; Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Hao, Jingli; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers and signaling pathways are important for the management of prostate cancer (CaP) radioresistance. In this study, we identified differential proteins and signaling pathways from parental CaP cell lines and CaP radioresistant (RR) sublines using a label-free LC-MS/MS proteomics approach. A total of 309 signaling pathway proteins were identified to be significantly altered between CaP and CaP-RR cells (p ≤ 0.05, fold differences >1.5, ≥80% power). Among these proteins, nineteen are common among three paired CaP cell lines and associated with metastasis, progression and radioresistance. The PI3K/Akt, VEGF and glucose metabolism pathways were identified as the main pathways associated with CaP radioresistance. In addition, the identified potential protein markers were further validated in CaP-RR cell lines and subcutaneous (s.c) animal xenografts by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively and protein aldolase A (ALDOA) was selected for a radiosensitivity study. We found the depletion of ALDOA combined with radiotherapy effectively reduced colony formation, induced more apoptosis and increased radiosensitivity in CaP-RR cells. Our findings indicate that CaP radioresistance is caused by multifactorial traits and downregulation of ALDOA increases radiosensitivity in CaP-RR cells, suggesting that controlling these identified proteins or signaling pathways in combination with radiotherapy may hold promise to overcome CaP radioresistance. PMID:28225015

  20. A robust potency assay highlights significant donor variation of human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell immune modulatory capacity and extended radio-resistance.

    PubMed

    Ketterl, Nina; Brachtl, Gabriele; Schuh, Cornelia; Bieback, Karen; Schallmoser, Katharina; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    The inherent immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) encouraged initiation of multiple clinical trials. Release criteria for therapeutic MSPCs cover identity, purity and safety but appropriate potency assessment is often missing. Reports on functional heterogeneity of MSPCs created additional uncertainty regarding donor and organ/source selection. We established a robust immunomodulation potency assay based on pooling responder leukocytes to minimize individual immune response variability. Comparing various MSPCs revealed significant potency inconsistency and generally diminished allo-immunosuppression compared to dose-dependent inhibition of mitogenesis. Gamma-irradiation to block unintended MSPC proliferation did not prohibit chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in vivo, indicating the need for alternative safety strategies.

  1. Incidence, radioresistance, and behavior of Psychrobacter spp. in rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calleja, José M; Patterson, Margaret F; García-López, Isabel; Santos, Jesús A; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa

    2005-03-01

    The relative incidence of Psychrobacter spp. in rabbit meat, the radioresistance of these bacteria, and the growth of nonirradiated and irradiated psychrobacter isolates, alone and in coculture, during chilled storage of inoculated sterile rabbit meat was investigated. Psychrobacter spp. accounted for 4.2% of the storage psychrotrophic flora of 30 rabbit carcasses. The radiation D10-values of 10 Psychrobacter isolates, irradiated at 4 degrees C in minced rabbit meat, ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 kGy, with significant (P < 0.05) differences among strains. Over 12 days of storage at 4 degrees C, pure cultures of two nonirradiated psychrobacter strains (D10 = 2 kGy) were capable of substantial increases (up to 3 log CFU/g) in sterile rabbit meat, but when the fastest growing strain was cocultured with Pseudomonas fluorescens and Brochothrix thermosphacta isolates, maximum cell densities and growth rates were significantly (P < 0.01) lower. After irradiation (2.5 kGy) of pure cultures in sterile rabbit meat, surviving cells of both Psychrobacter strains decreased for a period of 5 to 7 days and then resumed multiplication that, at day 12, resulted in a similar increase (1.6 to 1.7 log CFU/g) over initial survivor numbers. When irradiated in combination with the spoilage bacteria, one of the strains required 12 days to reach initial numbers. In conclusion, Psychrobacter spp. are radioresistant nonsporeforming bacteria with a low relative incidence among the storage flora of rabbit meat, unable to compete with food spoilage bacteria in this ecosystem and apparently not a major contributor to the spoilage of rabbit meat after irradiation.

  2. Successful treatment of acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) by allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shih-Bin; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chang, Chao-Sung; Liu, Ta-Chih; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Chen, Tyen-Po

    2003-12-01

    A 37-year-old male was treated successfully by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from his HLA-identical sister for refractory acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). The conditioning regimen was cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day for 4 days plus TBI 300 cGy in a single fraction. Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) >500/microl and platelet counts >20,000/microl were achieved 8 days after PBSCT without transfusion. Chimerism study on day 218 revealed full donor chimerism. The hemoglobin level was stable around 12-13 g/dl with normal leukocyte and platelet counts after PBSCT during a long follow-up period. From this case, PBSCT should be considered for patients with refractory acquired PRCA with an HLA-identical donor.

  3. Small Cell Variant of T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia with Acquired Palmoplantar Keratoderma and Cutaneous Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Al-Musalhi, Buthaina; Shehata, Nancy; Billick, Robin

    2016-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare and aggressive post-thymic malignancy that is characterized by the proliferation of small- to medium- sized prolymphocytes. The classic clinical features of T-PLL are lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin lesions. Skin involvement varies clinically from diffuse infiltrated erythema. Infiltration is localized to the face and ears, nodules, and erythroderma. We present a case of small cell variant of T-PLL in a patient who presented with unusual cutaneous manifestations of acquired palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) followed by diffuse erythematous infiltrated papules and plaques involving the trunk. When the etiology of acquired PPK is not clear, the physician should consider the possibility of an underlying malignant disease. In this case, the diagnosis of T-PLL was subsequently confirmed by laboratory and cytological findings, as well as by the immunophenotyping of leukemic cells in skin biopsy. Since paraneoplastic acquired PPK may be the initial evident sign of malignancy, the physician's awareness of this manifestation may be crucial for early diagnosis and treatment. Our case emphasizes the importance of accurate evaluation of skin lesions and early skin biopsy in the diagnosis of some hematological malignancies.

  4. In hepatic fibrosis, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells acquire enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Michael K; Bedrosian, Andrea S; Malhotra, Ashim; Henning, Justin R; Ibrahim, Junaid; Vera, Valery; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E; Hassan, Burhan U; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven; Frey, Alan B; Miller, George

    2010-08-15

    The normal liver is characterized by immunologic tolerance. Primary mediators of hepatic immune tolerance are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). LSECs block adaptive immunogenic responses to Ag and induce the generation of T regulatory cells. Hepatic fibrosis is characterized by both intense intrahepatic inflammation and altered hepatic immunity. We postulated that, in liver fibrosis, a reversal of LSEC function from tolerogenic to proinflammatory and immunogenic may contribute to both the heightened inflammatory milieu and altered intrahepatic immunity. We found that, after fibrotic liver injury from hepatotoxins, LSECs become highly proinflammatory and secrete an array of cytokines and chemokines. In addition, LSECs gain enhanced capacity to capture Ag and induce T cell proliferation. Similarly, unlike LSECs in normal livers, in fibrosis, LSECs do not veto dendritic cell priming of T cells. Furthermore, whereas in normal livers, LSECs are active in the generation of T regulatory cells, in hepatic fibrosis LSECs induce an immunogenic T cell phenotype capable of enhancing endogenous CTLs and generating potent de novo CTL responses. Moreover, depletion of LSECs from fibrotic liver cultures mitigates the proinflammatory milieu characteristic of hepatic fibrosis. Our findings offer a critical understanding of the role of LSECs in modulating intrahepatic immunity and inflammation in fibro-inflammatory liver disease.

  5. Deinococcus radiodurans pprI expression enhances the radioresistance of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ling; Yue, Ling; Shi, Yi; Ren, Lili; Chen, Tingting; Li, Na; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    PprI accelerates radiation-induced DNA damage repair via regulating the expression of DNA repair genes and enhances antioxidative enzyme activity in Deinococcus radiodurans after radiation. The main aim of our study was to determine whether the expression of pprI gene could fulfil its DNA repair function in eukaryotes and enhance the radioresistance of eukaryotic organism or not. In this study, we constructed pEGFP-c1-pprI eukaryotic expression vector and established a human lung epithelial cell line BEAS-2B with stable integration of pprI gene. We found that pprIexpression enhanced radioresistance of BEAS-2B cells, decreased γ-H2AX foci formation and apoptosis in irradiated BEAS-2B cells and alleviated radiation induced G2/M arrest of BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, we transferred pEGFP-c1-pprI vector into muscle of BALB/c mice by in vivo electroporation and studied the protective effect of prokaryotic pprI gene in irradiated mice. We found that pprI expression alleviated acute radiation induced hematopoietic system, lung, small intestine and testis damage and increased survival rate of irradiated mice via regulating Rad51 expression in different organs. These findings suggest that prokaryotic pprI gene expression in mammalian cells could enhance radioresistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26992215

  6. Acquired subglottic stenosis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus that produce epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Sugai, M; Woo, M; Nishida, N; Sugimoto, T

    2001-01-01

    Local infection of the trachea in intubated neonates is one of the main risk factors for development of acquired subglottic stenosis, although its role in the pathogenesis is unclear. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is often the cause of critical illness in neonatal patients. Two cases are reported of acquired subglottic stenosis following bacterial infection of the trachea, suggesting an association with the staphylococcal exotoxin, epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor (EDIN). EDIN-producing MRSA were isolated from purulent tracheal secretions from both infants. Acquired subglottic stenosis in both cases was probably caused by delayed wound healing as the result of EDIN inhibition of epithelial cell migration.

 PMID:11124922

  7. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  8. Proteomics of the Radioresistant Phenotype in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Gp96 as a Novel Prediction Marker and Sensitizing Target for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ting-Yang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is an integral part of the treatment modality for head-neck cancer (HNC), but in some cases the disease is radioresistant. We designed this study to identify molecules that may be involved in this resistance. Methods and Materials: Two radioresistant sublines were established by fractionated irradiation of the HNC cell lines, to determine differentially proteins between parental and radioresistant cells. Proteomic analysis and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were used to identify and confirm the differential proteins. The siRNA knockdown experiments were applied to examine cellular functions of a radioresistant gene, with investigation of the alterations in colonogenic survival, cell cycle status, and reactive oxygen species levels. Xenografted mouse tumors were studied to validate the results. Results: IN all, 64 proteins were identified as being potentially associated with radioresistance, which are involved in several cellular pathways, including regulation of stimulus response, cell apoptosis, and glycolysis. Six genes were confirmed to be differentially expressed in both radioresistant sublines, with Gp96, Grp78, HSP60, Rab40B, and GDF-15 upregulated, and annexin V downregulated. Gp96 was further investigated for its functions in response to radiation. Gp96-siRNA transfectants displayed a radiation-induced growth delay, reduction in colonogenic survival, increased cellular reactive oxygen species levels, and increased proportion of the cells in the G2/M phase. Xenograft mice administered Gp96-siRNA showed significantly enhanced growth suppression in comparison with radiation treatment alone (p = 0.009). Conclusions: We identified 64 proteins and verified 6 genes that are potentially involved in the radioresistant phenotype. We further demonstrated that Gp96 knockdown enhances radiosensitivity both in cells and in vivo, which may lead to a better prognosis of HNC treatment.

  9. Cerebellar granule cells acquire a widespread predictive feedback signal during motor learning.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Andrea; Badura, Aleksandra; Deverett, Ben; Najafi, Farzaneh; Pereira, Talmo D; Gao, Zhenyu; Ozden, Ilker; Kloth, Alexander D; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios; Paninski, Liam; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Medina, Javier F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2017-03-20

    Cerebellar granule cells, which constitute half the brain's neurons, supply Purkinje cells with contextual information necessary for motor learning, but how they encode this information is unknown. Here we show, using two-photon microscopy to track neural activity over multiple days of cerebellum-dependent eyeblink conditioning in mice, that granule cell populations acquire a dense representation of the anticipatory eyelid movement. Initially, granule cells responded to neutral visual and somatosensory stimuli as well as periorbital airpuffs used for training. As learning progressed, two-thirds of monitored granule cells acquired a conditional response whose timing matched or preceded the learned eyelid movements. Granule cell activity covaried trial by trial to form a redundant code. Many granule cells were also active during movements of nearby body structures. Thus, a predictive signal about the upcoming movement is widely available at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex, as required by forward models of cerebellar control.

  10. Protein expression of nucleophosmin, annexin A3 and nm23-H1 correlates with human nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    QU, SONG; LI, XIAO-YU; LIANG, ZHONG-GUO; LI, LING; HUANG, SHI-TING; LI, JIA-QUAN; LI, DAN-RONG; ZHU, XIAO-DONG

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance is a significant obstacle in the treatment of endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The present study aimed to identify proteins associated with radioresistance in NPC in vitro and in vivo. Proteomics analyses were conducted to screen for differentially-expressed proteins (DEPs) in parental CNE-2 cells and CNE-2R cells. Using proteomics approaches, 16 DEPs were identified. Of these DEPs, nucleophosmin (NPM1), annexin A3 and nm23-H1, were verified using western blot analyses. The tumorigenicity was investigated using mouse xenograft tumorigenicity assays, and tumor growth curves were generated. The protein expression of NPM1, annexin A3 and nm23-H1 was examined by immunohistochemically staining tumor tissues. NPM1 and annexin A3 protein levels were downregulated in the CNE-2R cells, whereas nm23-H1 expression was upregulated. In vivo tests showed that compared with the CNE-2 tumors, CNE-2R tumor growth was significantly retarded (P<0.05). CNE-2 tumor progression was inhibited by irradiation, but CNE-2R tumor progression was not, indicating that the CNE-2R cells were also radioresistant in vivo. NPM1 and annexin A3 expression was significantly lower in non-irradiated (NIR)-CNE-2R tumors compared with NIR-CNE-2 tumors (P<0.01). However, Nm23-H1 protein levels were significantly higher (P<0.05). Overall, the present study established comparable radioresistant and radiosensitive tumor models of human NPC, and identified candidate biomarkers that may correlate with radioresistance. The data showed that dysregulation of NPM1, annexin A3 and nm23-H1 expression correlated with the cellular and tumor radioresponse. These proteins are involved in the regulation of intracellular functions, including stress responses, cell proliferation and DNA repair. However, further clinical evaluations are required. PMID:27347189

  11. miR-620 promotes tumor radioresistance by targeting 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyong; Taeb, Samira; Jahangiri, Sahar; Korpela, Elina; Cadonic, Ivan; Yu, Nancy; Krylov, Sergey N.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Boutros, Paul C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA contribute to tumor radiation resistance, which is an important clinical problem, and thus we are interested in identifying and characterizing their function. We demonstrate that miR-620 contributes to radiation resistance in cancer cells by increasing proliferation, and decreasing the G2/M block. We identify the hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) (HPGD/15-PGDH) tumor suppressor gene as a direct miR-620 target, which results in increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. Furthermore, we show that siRNA targeting of HPGD or administration of exogenous PGE2 recapitulates radioresistance. Targeting of the EP2 receptor that responds to PGE2 using pharmacological or genetic approaches, abrogates radioresistance. Tumor xenograft experiments confirm that miR-620 increases proliferation and tumor radioresistance in vivo. Regulation of PGE2 levels via targeting of HPGD by miR-620 is an innovative manner by which a microRNA can induce radiation resistance. PMID:26068950

  12. Distinct mechanisms contribute to acquired cisplatin resistance of urothelial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Annika; Krüger, Katharina; Skowron, Margaretha A.; Bormann, Stefanie; Schumacher, Lena; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Hoffmann, Michèle J.; Niegisch, Günter; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is frequently used in the therapy of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Its therapeutic efficacy is limited by inherent or acquired drug resistance. Here, we comparatively investigated the CisPt-induced response of two different parental urothelial carcinoma cell lines (RT-112, J-82) with that of respective drug resistant variants (RT-112R, J-82R) obtained upon month-long CisPt selection. Parental RT-112 cells were ~2.5 fold more resistant to CisPt than J-82 cells and showed a different expression pattern of CisPt-related resistance factors. CisPt resistant RT-112R and J-82R variants revealed a 2–3-fold increased CisPt resistance as compared to their corresponding parental counterparts. Acquired CisPt resistance was accompanied by morphological alterations resembling epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). RT-112R cells revealed lower apoptotic frequency and more pronounced G2/M arrest following CisPt exposure than RT-112 cells, whereas no differences in death induction were observed between J-82 and J-82R cells. CisPt resistant J-82R cells however were characterized by a reduced formation of CisPt-induced DNA damage and related DNA damage response (DDR) as compared to J-82 cells. Such difference was not observed between RT-112R and RT-112 cells. J-82R cells showed an enhanced sensitivity to pharmacological inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and, moreover, could be re-sensitized to CisPt upon Chk1 inhibition. Based on the data we suggest that mechanisms of acquired CisPt resistance of individual UC cells are substantially different, with apoptosis- and DDR-related mechanisms being of particular relevance. Moreover, the findings indicate that targeting of Chk1 might be useful to overcome acquired CisPt resistance of certain subtypes of UC. PMID:27191498

  13. Deubiquitinase USP9x Confers Radioresistance through Stabilization of Mcl-112

    PubMed Central

    Trivigno, Donatella; Essmann, Frank; Huber, Stephan M; Rudner, Justine

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1), an antiapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is often overexpressed in tumor cells limiting the therapeutic success. Mcl-1 differs from other Bcl-2 members by its high turnover rate. Its expression level is tightly regulated by ubiquitylating and deubiquitylating enzymes. Interaction of Mcl-1 with certain Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only members of the Bcl-2 family can limit the access to Mcl-1 ubiquitin ligase E3 and stabilizes the antiapoptotic protein. In addition, the overexpression of the deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific protease 9x (USP9x) can result in the accumulation of Mcl-1 by removing poly-ubiquitin chains from Mcl-1 preventing its proteasomal degradation. Analyzing radiation-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, we found that Mcl-1 was downregulated more efficiently in sensitive parental cells than in a resistant subclone. The decline of Mcl-1 correlated with cell death induction and clonogenic survival. Knockdown of BH3-only proteins Bim, Puma, and Noxa did not affect Mcl-1 level or radiation-induced apoptosis. However, ionizing radiation resulted in activation of USP9x and enhanced deubiquitination of Mcl-1 in the radioresistant cells preventing fast Mcl-1 degradation. USP9x knockdown enhanced radiation-induced decrease of Mcl-1 and sensitized the radioresistant cells to apoptosis induction, whereas USP9x knockdown alone did not change Mcl-1 level in unirradiated cells. Together, our results indicate that radiation-induced activation of USP9x inhibits Mcl-1 degradation and apoptosis resulting in increased radioresistance. PMID:23097624

  14. Acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to cisplatin is multifactorial with cell context-dependent involvement of resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; Wagner, G T; McDonald, J F

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal of malignancies, in large measure, due to the propensity of PDAC cells to acquire resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. A better understanding of the molecular basis of acquired resistance is a major focus of contemporary PDAC research. We report here the results of a study to independently develop cisplatin resistance in two distinct parental PDAC cell lines, AsPC1 and BxPC3, and to subsequently examine the molecular mechanisms associated with the acquired resistance. Cisplatin resistance in both resistant cell lines was found to be multifactorial and to be associated with mechanisms related to drug transport, drug inactivation, DNA damage response, DNA repair and the modulation of apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that the two resistant cell lines employed alternative molecular strategies in acquiring resistance dictated, in part, by pre-existing molecular differences between the parental cell lines. Collectively, our findings indicate that strategies to inhibit or reverse acquired resistance of PDAC cells to cisplatin, and perhaps other chemotherapeutic agents, may not be generalized but will require individual molecular profiling and analysis to be effective. PMID:27910856

  15. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE TO ENDOCRINE THERAPY IN HORMONE-DEPENDENT BREAST CANCER CELLS1

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Fan, Ping; Wang, Jiping; Li, Yuebai; Santen, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Acquired resistance is a major problem limiting the clinical benefit of endocrine therapy. To investigate the mechanisms involved, two in vitro models were developed from MCF-7 cells. Long-term culture of MCF-7 cells in estrogen deprived medium (LTED) mimics aromatase inhibition in patients. Continued exposure of MCF-7 to tamoxifen represents a model of acquired resistance to antiestrogens (TAM-R). Long-term estrogen deprivation results in sustained activation of the ERK MAP kinase and the PI3 kinase/mTOR pathways. Using a novel Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS), to achieve dual inhibition of the pathways, we found that the mTOR pathway plays the primary role in mediation of proliferation of LTED cells. In contrast to the LTED model, there is no sustained activation of ERK MAPK but enhanced responsiveness to rapid stimulation induced by E2 and TAM in TAM-R cells. An increased amount of ERα formed complexes with EGFR and c-Src in TAM-R cells, which apparently resulted from extra-nuclear redistribution of ERα. Blockade of c-Src activity drove ERα back to the nucleus and reduced ERα-EGFR interaction. Prolonged blockade of c-Src activity restored sensitivity of TAM-R cells to tamoxifen. Our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in acquired endocrine resistance and the necessity for individualized treatment of recurrent diseases. PMID:17616457

  16. Increased sensitivity to platinum drugs of cancer cells with acquired resistance to trabectedin

    PubMed Central

    Colmegna, B; Uboldi, S; Frapolli, R; Licandro, S A; Panini, N; Galmarini, C M; Badri, Nadia; Spanswick, V J; Bingham, J P; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Erba, E; Hartley, J A; D'Incalci, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance to trabectedin, trabectedin-resistant human myxoid liposarcoma (402-91/T) and ovarian carcinoma (A2780/T) cell lines were derived and characterised in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Resistant cell lines were obtained by repeated exposures to trabectedin. Characterisation was performed by evaluating drug sensitivity, cell cycle perturbations, DNA damage and DNA repair protein expression. In vivo experiments were performed on A2780 and A2780/T xenografts. Results: 402-91/T and A2780/T cells were six-fold resistant to trabectedin compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were found to be hypersensitive to UV light and did not express specific proteins involved in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway: XPF and ERCC1 in 402-91/T and XPG in A2780/T. NER deficiency in trabectedin-resistant cells was associated with the absence of a G2/M arrest induced by trabectedin and with enhanced sensitivity (two-fold) to platinum drugs. In A2780/T, this collateral sensitivity, confirmed in vivo, was associated with an increased formation of DNA interstrand crosslinks. Conclusions: Our finding that resistance to trabectedin is associated with the loss of NER function, with a consequent increased sensitivity to platinum drugs, provides the rational for sequential use of these drugs in patients who have acquired resistance to trabectedin. PMID:26633559

  17. Effects of YM155 on survivin levels and viability in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Voges, Yvonne; Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Schaller, Torsten; Schneider, Constanze; Politt, Katharina; Mernberger, Marco; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Wass, Mark N; Rödel, Franz; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    Resistance formation after initial therapy response (acquired resistance) is common in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. YM155 is a drug candidate that was introduced as a survivin suppressant. This mechanism was later challenged, and DNA damage induction and Mcl-1 depletion were suggested instead. Here we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of YM155 in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance. The efficacy of YM155 was determined in neuroblastoma cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to clinically relevant drugs. Survivin levels, Mcl-1 levels, and DNA damage formation were determined in response to YM155. RNAi-mediated depletion of survivin, Mcl-1, and p53 was performed to investigate their roles during YM155 treatment. Clinical YM155 concentrations affected the viability of drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells through survivin depletion and p53 activation. MDM2 inhibitor-induced p53 activation further enhanced YM155 activity. Loss of p53 function generally affected anti-neuroblastoma approaches targeting survivin. Upregulation of ABCB1 (causes YM155 efflux) and downregulation of SLC35F2 (causes YM155 uptake) mediated YM155-specific resistance. YM155-adapted cells displayed increased ABCB1 levels, decreased SLC35F2 levels, and a p53 mutation. YM155-adapted neuroblastoma cells were also characterized by decreased sensitivity to RNAi-mediated survivin depletion, further confirming survivin as a critical YM155 target in neuroblastoma. In conclusion, YM155 targets survivin in neuroblastoma. Furthermore, survivin is a promising therapeutic target for p53 wild-type neuroblastomas after resistance acquisition (neuroblastomas are rarely p53-mutated), potentially in combination with p53 activators. In addition, we show that the adaptation of cancer cells to molecular-targeted anticancer drugs is an effective strategy to elucidate a drug's mechanism of action. PMID:27735941

  18. [The causes of necrobiosis and apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells during primary acquired keratoconus].

    PubMed

    Ziangirova, G G; Antonova, O V

    2002-01-01

    We studied 56 biopsy samples of conjunctiva and 50 corneal discs excised from 28 patients with acquired keratoconus cornea. The conjunctivas in all biopsy samples showed various stages of immune inflammation. Necrobiotic changes have been revealed in epithelium of the corneal discs going by the pathways of apoptosis--programmed cell death--and oncosis--initial edematic stage of necrobiosis. At the stage of acute inflammation they are due to cytotoxic effect of the lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. Antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by plasma and lymphoid cells predominates at this stage. At the reparative stage of inflammation ischemia, an inductor of apoptosis and oncosis, underlies necrobiotic changes in corneal epithelium.

  19. Successful treatment of refractory acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Müller, B U; Tichelli, A; Passweg, J R; Nissen, C; Wodnar-Filipowicz, A; Gratwohl, A

    1999-06-01

    This case describes a 16-year-old woman treated successfully by a bone marrow transplant from her HLA-identical brother for refractory acquired pure red cell aplasia. Conditioning was as for severe aplastic anaemia with cyclophosphamide 4 x 50 mg/kg and antithymocyte globulin. Complete donor type engraftment at 3 months reversed to full autologous reconstitution at 2 years with normal haemopoiesis. The potential implications on pathogenesis of the disease as well as on treatment of autoimmune disorders by stem cell transplantation are discussed.

  20. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  1. Acquired TERT promoter mutations stimulate TERT transcription in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Panero, Julieta; Alves-Paiva, Raquel M; Roisman, Alejandro; Santana-Lemos, Barbara A; Falcão, Roberto P; Oliveira, Gustavo; Martins, Diego; Stanganelli, Carmen; Slavutsky, Irma; Calado, Rodrigo T

    2016-05-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm with poor prognosis. Acquired telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter (TERTp) mutations are among the most frequent somatic non-coding mutations in cancers. In this study, the prevalence of TERTp mutations in 24 MCL and 21 other lymphoid neoplasias (oLN) was investigated. Eight MCL samples (33%) carried TERTp mutations, two homozygous and six heterozygous (seven C228T and one C250T), which directly correlated with higher TERT transcription, mitochondrial DNA copy number, and IGHV mutational status in MCL neoplastic cells. TERTp mutations were not found in oLN. TERTp mutations correlated with more lymphoma proliferation and tumor burden, as suggested by the higher number of lymphoma cells circulating in peripheral blood, and tended to associate with longer MCL telomeres, especially in homozygous mutants, although not statistically significant. Telomere-biology genes were overexpressed in MCL cells in comparison to healthy lymphocytes, but were not influenced by mutation status. The findings described for the first time that acquired TERTp mutations are common in MCL but not in other lymphoid neoplasms. It was also demonstrated that TERTp mutations are associated with higher TERT mRNA expression in MCL cells in vivo and higher tumor burden, suggesting these mutations as a driver event in MCL development and progression.

  2. ABCB1 as predominant resistance mechanism in cells with acquired SNS-032 resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rothweiler, Florian; Voges, Yvonne; Balónová, Barbora; Blight, Barry A.; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor SNS-032 had previously exerted promising anti-neuroblastoma activity via CDK7 and 9 inhibition. ABCB1 expression was identified as major determinant of SNS-032 resistance. Here, we investigated the role of ABCB1 in acquired SNS-032 resistance. In contrast to ABCB1-expressing UKF-NB-3 sub-lines resistant to other ABCB1 substrates, SNS-032-adapted UKF-NB-3 (UKF-NB-3rSNS- 032300nM) cells remained sensitive to the non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin and were completely re-sensitized to cytotoxic ABCB1 substrates by ABCB1 inhibition. Moreover, UKF-NB-3rSNS-032300nM cells remained similarly sensitive to CDK7 and 9 inhibition as UKF-NB-3 cells. In contrast, SHEPrSNS-0322000nM, the SNS-032-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SHEP, displayed low level SNS-032 resistance also when ABCB1 was inhibited. This discrepancy may be explained by the higher SNS-032 concentrations that were used to establish SHEPrSNS-0322000nM cells, since SHEP cells intrinsically express ABCB1 and are less sensitive to SNS-032 (IC50 912 nM) than UKF-NB-3 cells (IC50 153 nM). In conclusion, we show that ABCB1 expression represents the primary (sometimes exclusive) resistance mechanism in neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to SNS-032. Thus, ABCB1 inhibitors may increase the SNS-032 efficacy in ABCB1-expressing cells and prolong or avoid resistance formation. PMID:27517323

  3. XRCC2 as a predictive biomarker for radioresistance in locally advanced rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chang-Jiang; Song, Xin-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Ren, Xue-Qun; Xu, Kai-Wu; Jing, Hong; He, Yu-Long

    2015-01-01

    XRCC2 has been shown to increase the radioresistance of some cancers. Here, XRCC2 expression was investigated as a predictor of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) treatment response in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). XRCC2 was found to be overexpressed in rectal cancer tissues resected from patients who underwent surgery without PRT. In addition, overall survival for LARC patients was improved in XRCC2-negative patients compared with XRCC2-positive patients after treatment with PRT (P < 0.001). XRCC2 expression was also associated with an increase in LARC radioresistance. Conversely, XRCC2-deficient cancer cells were more sensitive to irradiation in vitro, and a higher proportion of these cells underwent cell death induced by G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. When XRCC2 was knocked down, the repair of DNA double-strand breaks caused by irradiation was impaired. Therefore, XRCC2 may increases LARC radioresistance by repairing DNA double-strand breaks and preventing cancer cell apoptosis. Moreover, the present data suggest that XRCC2 is a useful predictive biomarker of PRT treatment response in LARC patients. Thus, inhibition of XRCC2 expression or activity represents a potential therapeutic strategy for improving PRT response in LARC patients. PMID:26320178

  4. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin.

    PubMed

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10-11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13-15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation - a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin.

  5. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells acquire distinct DNA-hypermethylation during in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Carola Ingrid; Walenda, Thomas; Lin, Qiong; Wölfler, Monika Martina; Denecke, Bernd; Costa, Ivan Gesteira; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-11-28

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPCs) can be maintained in vitro, but the vast majority of their progeny loses stemness during culture. In this study, we compared DNA-methylation (DNAm) profiles of freshly isolated and culture-expanded HPCs. Culture conditions of CD34(+) cells - either with or without mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) - had relatively little impact on DNAm, although proliferation is greatly increased by stromal support. However, all cultured HPCs - even those which remained CD34(+) - acquired significant DNA-hypermethylation. DNA-hypermethylation occurred particularly in up-stream promoter regions, shore-regions of CpG islands, binding sites for PU.1, HOXA5 and RUNX1, and it was reflected in differential gene expression and variant transcripts of DNMT3A. Low concentrations of DNAm inhibitors slightly increased the frequency of colony-forming unit initiating cells. Our results demonstrate that HPCs acquire DNA-hypermethylation at specific sites in the genome which is relevant for the rapid loss of stemness during in vitro manipulation.

  6. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  7. Lymphocyte imprinting with melanoma antigens acquired by trogocytosis facilitates identification of tumor-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Galit; Uzana, Ronny; Pato, Aviad; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Merims, Sharon; Yefenof, Eitan; Ferrone, Soldano; Peretz, Tamar; Machlenkin, Arthur; Lotem, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent inter-cellular transfer of membrane fragments and associated molecules from antigen presenting cells to effector lymphocytes. We previously demonstrated that trogocytosis also occurs between tumor target and cognate melanoma antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Here we show that, following trogocytosis, immune effector cells acquire molecular components of the tumor, including surface antigens, which are detectable by specific monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate that CD8+ and CD4+ T cells from melanoma patients’ PBMC and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) capture melanoma antigens, enabling identification of trogocytosing lymphocytes by staining with antigen-specific antibodies. This finding circumvents the necessity of tumor pre-labeling, which in the past was mandatory to detect membrane-capturing T cells. Through the detection of melanoma antigens on TIL, we sorted trogocytosing T cells and verified their preferential reactivity and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, tumor-antigen imprinted T cells were detected at low frequency in fresh TIL cultures shortly after extraction from the tumor. Thus, T cell imprinting by tumor antigens may allow the enrichment of melanoma antigen-specific T cells for research and potentially even for the adoptive immunotherapy of patients with cancer. PMID:23626012

  8. Therapy-induced developmental reprogramming of prostate cancer cells and acquired therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mannan; Caradec, Josselin; Lubik, Amy Anne; Li, Na; Hollier, Brett G; Takhar, Mandeep; Altimirano-Dimas, Manuel; Chen, Mengqian; Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Butler, Miriam; Lehman, Melanie; Bishop, Jennifer; Truong, Sarah; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Cochrane, Dawn; Cox, Michael; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalafa, Mohamed; Davicioni, Elai; Nelson, Colleen; Gregory-Evans, Sheryl; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-27

    Treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD) complicates therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Based on evidence that PCa cells can transdifferentiate to other neuroectodermally-derived cell lineages in vitro, we proposed that NEtD requires first an intermediary reprogramming to metastable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) of a neural class and we demonstrate that several different AR+/PSA+ PCa cell lines were efficiently reprogrammed to, maintained and propagated as CSCs by growth in androgen-free neural/neural crest (N/NC) stem medium. Such reprogrammed cells lost features of prostate differentiation; gained features of N/NC stem cells and tumor-initiating potential; were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition; and acquired an invasive phenotype in vitro and in vivo. When placed back into serum-containing mediums, reprogrammed cells could be re-differentiated to N-/NC-derived cell lineages or return back to an AR+ prostate-like state. Once returned, the AR+ cells were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition. Acute androgen deprivation or anti-androgen treatment in serum-containing medium led to the transient appearance of a sub-population of cells with similar characteristics. Finally, a 132 gene signature derived from reprogrammed PCa cell lines distinguished tumors from PCa patients with adverse outcomes. This model may explain neural manifestations of PCa associated with lethal disease. The metastable nature of the reprogrammed stem-like PCa cells suggests that cycles of PCa cell reprogramming followed by re-differentiation may support disease progression and therapeutic resistance. The ability of a gene signature from reprogrammed PCa cells to identify tumors from patients with metastasis or PCa-specific mortality implies that developmental reprogramming is linked to aggressive tumor behaviors.

  9. Tacrolimus versus Cyclosporine after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Flowers, Mary E D; Wang, Tao; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Hemmer, Michael T; Cutler, Corey S; Couriel, Daniel R; Alousi, Amin M; Antin, Joseph H; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hamilton, Betty K; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Marks, David I; Ringdén, Olle T H; Socié, Gérard; Solh, Melhem M; Akpek, Görgün; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chao, Nelson J; Hayashi, Robert J; Nishihori, Taiga; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Shah, Ami; Teshima, Takanori; Tallman, Martin S; Wirk, Baldeep; Spellman, Stephen R; Arora, Mukta; Martin, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Combinations of cyclosporine (CSP) with methotrexate (MTX) have been widely used for immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. We compared outcomes with tacrolimus (TAC)+MTX versus CSP+MTX after transplantation from HLA-identical siblings (SIB) or unrelated donors (URD) in a retrospective cohort of 949 patients with severe aplastic anemia. Study endpoints included hematopoietic recovery, graft failure, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, and mortality. TAC+MTX was used more frequently in older patients and, in recent years, in both SIB and URD groups. In multivariate analysis, TAC+MTX was associated with a lower risk of mortality in URD recipients and with slightly earlier absolute neutrophil count recovery in SIB recipients. Other outcomes did not differ statistically between the 2 regimens. No firm conclusions were reached regarding the relative merits of TAC+MTX versus CSP+MTX after hematopoietic cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. Prospective studies would be needed to determine whether the use of TAC+MTX is associated with lower risk of mortality in URD recipients with acquired aplastic anemia.

  10. The PHA Test Reflects Acquired T-Cell Mediated Immunocompetence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Lemus, Jesús A.; Carrete, Martina; Blanco, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Background cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. Methodology Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD5+ and CD8+) and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. Principal Findings Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. Conclusions/Significance These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host-parasite interactions. PMID:18820730

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron by cell-surface sequestration and internalization of human holo-transferrin.

    PubMed

    Boradia, Vishant Mahendra; Malhotra, Himanshu; Thakkar, Janak Shrikant; Tillu, Vikas Ajit; Vuppala, Bhavana; Patil, Pravinkumar; Sheokand, Navdeep; Sharma, Prerna; Chauhan, Anoop Singh; Raje, Manoj; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar

    2014-08-28

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), which requires iron for survival, acquires this element by synthesizing iron-binding molecules known as siderophores and by recruiting a host iron-transport protein, transferrin, to the phagosome. The siderophores extract iron from transferrin and transport it into the bacterium. Here we describe an additional mechanism for iron acquisition, consisting of an M.tb protein that drives transport of human holo-transferrin into M.tb cells. The pathogenic strain M.tb H37Rv expresses several proteins that can bind human holo-transferrin. One of these proteins is the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, Rv1436), which is present on the surface of M.tb and its relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Overexpression of GAPDH results in increased transferrin binding to M.tb cells and iron uptake. Human transferrin is internalized across the mycobacterial cell wall in a GAPDH-dependent manner within infected macrophages.

  12. Evidence for Increased Response to Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Myeloid Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Alpa; Callaghan, Michael U; Gadgeel, Manisha S; Buck, Steven A; Fribley, Andrew M; Savaşan, Süreyya

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune response targeting the hematopoietic stem cells highlights the current understanding of acquired aplastic anemia (AAA) pathogenesis. Upregulation of the unfolded protein response is the cell's rejoinder to a variety of stresses, which either result in restoring homeostasis or cell death by increased expression of the transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein. We hypothesized that there is an inherent increased sensitivity to various cellular stressors, including the ones that target endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in AAA leading to a decreased proliferation and potentially contributing to susceptibility to autologous cytotoxicity. Using archived bone marrow aspirate samples, we demonstrate that the culture-expanded AAA myeloid cells have an increased response to ER stress induced by tunicamycin leading to decreased cell proliferation. Within the AAA myeloid samples, we show that the disease status, active versus response to therapy at the time of sampling does not alter the ER stress response. This is the first report, which provides evidence for an inherent defective stress control in the myeloid cells as a possible mechanism of evolution of the disease process in AAA.

  13. Myeloid cells that impair immunotherapy are restored in melanomas which acquire resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Shannon M; Shabaneh, Tamer; Zhang, Peisheng; Martyanov, Viktor; Li, Zhenghui; Malik, Brian; Wood, Tammara; Boni, Andrea; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Angeles, Christina V; Curiel, Tyler J; Whitfield, Michael; Turk, Mary Jo

    2017-02-15

    Acquired resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors (BRAFi) in melanoma remains a common clinical obstacle, as is the case for any targeted drug therapy that can be developed given the plastic nature of cancers. While there has been significant focus on the cancer cell-intrinsic properties of BRAFi resistance, the impact of BRAFi resistance on host immunity has not been explored. Here we provide preclinical evidence that resistance to BRAFi in an autochthonous mouse model of melanoma is associated with restoration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the tumor microenvironment initially reduced by BRAFi treatment. In contrast to restoration of MDSC, levels of T regulatory cells remained reduced in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Accordingly, tumor gene expression signatures specific for myeloid cell chemotaxis and homeostasis reappeared in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Notably, MDSC restoration relied upon MAPK pathway reactivation and downstream production of the myeloid attractant CCL2 in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cells. Strikingly, while combination checkpoint blockade (anti-CTLA-4 + anti-PD-1) was ineffective against BRAFi-resistant melanomas, the addition of MDSC depletion/blockade (anti-Gr-1 + CCR2 antagonist) prevented outgrowth of BRAFi-resistant tumors. Our results illustrate how extrinsic pathways of immunosuppression elaborated by melanoma cells dominate the tumor microenvironment and highlight the need to target extrinsic as well as intrinsic mechanisms of drug resistance.

  14. Defective in vitro growth of the hemopoietic progenitor cells in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Stella, C C; Ganser, A; Hoelzer, D

    1987-01-01

    In addition to immunologic derangement, hematological abnormalities have been reported in the majority of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study 15 patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex (ARC) were evaluated for the in vitro growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells. In all patients a significant reduction of growth (mean +/- SEM) of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage, (megakaryocyte) (CFU-GEM) (1.2 +/- 0.3), burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) (17 +/- 10), CFU-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk) (1.7 +/- 0.6), and CFU-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) (35 +/- 10) was observed in comparison with normal controls. Depletion of T cells from the bone marrow before culture led to a significant increase in colony growth, which indicated an imbalance of the normally modulating T cell subsets. This increase was reversed by readdition of autologous T cells causing a decrease in colony growth to a degree, dependent on the T4 to T8 ratio. A decreased number of hemopoietic progenitor cells and/or a defective modulation of progenitor cell growth, normally carried out by T lymphocyte subsets, might be the cause of the hematological abnormalities in AIDS patients. PMID:3497175

  15. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    PubMed Central

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Cohn, Marianne T.; Catalan-Moreno, Arancha; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Westh, Henrik; Penadés, José R.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S. aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction', allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus. PMID:27819286

  16. Acquired resistance to venetoclax (ABT-199) in t(14;18) positive lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bodo, Juraj; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Souers, Andrew J; Phillips, Darren C; Smith, Mitchell R; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-10-25

    The chromosomal translocation t(14;18) in follicular lymphoma (FL) is a primary oncogenic event resulting in BCL-2 over-expression. This study investigates activity of the BH3 mimetic venetoclax (ABT-199), which targets BCL-2, and mechanisms of acquired resistance in FL.The sensitivity of FL cells to venetoclax treatment correlated with BCL-2/BIM ratio. Cells with similar expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, but with higher levels of BIM were more sensitive to the treatment. Venetoclax induced dissociation of BCL-2/ BIM complex and a decrease in mitochondrial potential. Interestingly the population of cells that survived venetoclax treatment showed increased p-ERK1/2 and p-BIM (S69), as well as a decrease in total BIM levels. Venetoclax resistant cells initially showed elevated levels of p-AKT and p-Foxo1/3a, a dissociation of BIM/BCL-2/BECLIN1 complex, and a decrease in SQSTM1/p62 level (indicating increased autophagy) together with a slight decline in BIM expression. After stable resistant cell lines were established, a significant reduction of BCL-2 levels and almost total absence of BIM was observed.The acquisition of these resistance phenotypes could be prevented via selective ERK/AKT inhibition or anti-CD20 antibody treatment, thus highlighting possible combination therapies for FL patients.

  17. GDF15 contributes to radioresistance and cancer stemness of head and neck cancer by regulating cellular reactive oxygen species via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Chang-Hsu; You, Guo-Rung; Chen, Hsin-Ying; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an integral part for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC), while radioresistance is a major cause leads to treatment failure. GDF15, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is hypothesized to participate in various types of homeostasis. However, the potential role of this molecule in regulation of radiosensitivity remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance of HNC, as determined by both gain- and lost-of-functional experiments. These results were achieved by the induction of mitochondrial membrane potential and suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We further showed that GDF15 facilitated the conversion of cancer stemness, as assessed by the promotion of CD44+ and ALDH1+ cell populations and spheroid cell formation. At molecular level, GDF15 conferred to these cellular functions was through phosphorylated SMAD1 proteins to elite downstream signaling molecules. These cellular results were further confirmed in a tumor xenograft mouse study. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance and cancer stemness by regulating cellular ROS levels via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway. GDF15 may serve as a prediction marker of radioresistance and a therapeutic target for the development of radio-sensitizing agents for the treatment of refractory HNC. PMID:27903972

  18. GDF15 contributes to radioresistance and cancer stemness of head and neck cancer by regulating cellular reactive oxygen species via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Liang; Chang, Joseph T; Lee, Li-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Chang-Hsu; You, Guo-Rung; Chen, Hsin-Ying; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2017-01-03

    Radiotherapy is an integral part for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC), while radioresistance is a major cause leads to treatment failure. GDF15, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is hypothesized to participate in various types of homeostasis. However, the potential role of this molecule in regulation of radiosensitivity remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance of HNC, as determined by both gain- and lost-of-functional experiments. These results were achieved by the induction of mitochondrial membrane potential and suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We further showed that GDF15 facilitated the conversion of cancer stemness, as assessed by the promotion of CD44+ and ALDH1+ cell populations and spheroid cell formation. At molecular level, GDF15 conferred to these cellular functions was through phosphorylated SMAD1 proteins to elite downstream signaling molecules. These cellular results were further confirmed in a tumor xenograft mouse study. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GDF15 contributed to radioresistance and cancer stemness by regulating cellular ROS levels via a SMAD-associated signaling pathway. GDF15 may serve as a prediction marker of radioresistance and a therapeutic target for the development of radio-sensitizing agents for the treatment of refractory HNC.

  19. Impaired in vitro T-cell responses in patients with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bay, M L; Mahuad, R D; Urízar, L A; Morini, J C; Bottassol, O A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the status of the cellular immune response of patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP), 8 CAP cases were studied for their in vitro T-cell responses to concanavalin A (Con A), tuberculin, and candidin, as well as levels of major T-cell populations in peripheral blood. Assessment on admission revealed that CAP patients had significantly decreased responses to both antigen and mitogen driven lymphocyte proliferation when compared to age and sex matched controls. Studies performed upon 1 week of antibiotic treatment made evident, in turn, that clinical improvement was accompanied by a reestablishment of the in vitro responses to tuberculin and candidin, whereas the lymphoproliferation induced by Con A remained decreased as in its first evaluation. Data from admission and day 7 of treatment showed no significant differences as to the levels of peripheral T-cell subsets when compared to those of healthy controls. Our results indicate that CAP coincides with reduced in vitro T-cell responses to antigen and mitogen stimulation.

  20. Acquired color vision loss and a possible mechanism of ganglion cell death in glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nork, T M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: First, to study the cellular mechanisms of acquired color vision loss in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy. Second, to learn why, in glaucoma, the type of color vision deficit that is observed is more characteristic of a retinal injury than it is of an optic neuropathy. Third, to test a hypothesis of photoreceptor-induced, ganglion cell death in glaucoma. METHODS: Various histologic techniques were employed to distinguish the L/M-cones (long/medium wavelength-sensitive cones, or red/green sensitive cones) from the S-cones (short wavelength-sensitive cones, or blue sensitive cones) in humans and monkeys with retinal detachment, humans with diabetic retinopathy, and both humans and monkeys with glaucoma. To test if the photoreceptors were contributing to ganglion cell death, laser photocoagulation was used in a experimental model of glaucoma to focally eliminate the photoreceptors. As a control, optic nerve transection was done following retinal laser photocoagulation in one animal. RESULTS: Selective and widespread loss of the S-cones was found in retinal detachment as well as diabetic retinopathy. By contrast, in human as well as experimental glaucoma, marked swelling of the L/M-cones was the predominant histopathologic feature. Retinal laser photocoagulation followed by experimental glaucoma resulted in selective protection of ganglion cells overlying the laser spots. This was not seen with retinal laser photocoagulation by optic nerve transection. CONCLUSIONS: In retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, acquired tritan-like color vision loss could be caused, or contributed to, by selective loss of the S-cones. Both L- and M-cones are affected in glaucoma, which is also consistent with a tritan-like deficit. Although not a therapeutic option, protection of ganglion cells by retinal laser in experimental glaucoma is consistent with an hypothesis of anterograde, photoreceptor-induced, ganglion cell death. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3

  1. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  2. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress on osteogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Semeins, Cornelis M; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2005-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to perform bone cell-specific functions, such as (re)modeling of bone tissue. In vivo, local bone mass and architecture are affected by mechanical loading, which is thought to provoke a cellular response via loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid. Adipose tissue is an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering, and is available in abundant amounts compared with bone marrow. We studied whether adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) on osteogenic stimulation in vitro. We found that ATMSCs show a bone cell-like response to fluid shear stress as a result of PFF after the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PFF increased nitric oxide production, as well as upregulated cyclooxygenase-2, but not cyclooxygenase-1, gene expression in osteogenically stimulated AT-MSCs. These data suggest that AT-MSCs acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to pulsating fluid shear stress on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-induced osteogenic differentiation. ATMSCs might be able to perform bone cell-specific functions during bone (re)modeling in vivo and, therefore, provide a promising new tool for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Induction of autophagy counteracts the anticancer effect of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Le; Gu, Chunping; Zhong, Desheng; Shi, Lili; Kong, Yi; Zhou, Zhitao; Liu, Shuwen

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy frequently resulted in acquired resistance. The underpinning mechanism of such resistance remains obscure especially in relation to autophagic response. This study thus investigated the role of autophagy in the anticancer activity of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. In response to cisplatin treatment, EC109 cells exhibited substantial apoptosis and senescence whereas cisplatin-resistant EC109/CDDP cells exhibited resistance. In this respect, cisplatin increased ERK phosphorylation whose inhibition by MEK inhibitor significantly attenuated the cytotoxic and cytostatic effect of cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin preferentially induces autophagy in EC109/CDDP cells but not in EC109 cells. Moreover, the induction of autophagy was accompanied by the suppression of mTORC1 activity. Abolition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of ATG5/7 re-sensitized EC109/CDDP cells. Co-administration of an autophagy inhibitor chloroquine and cisplatin significantly suppressed tumor growth whereas cisplatin monotherapy failed to elicit anticancer activity in nude mice xenografted with EC109/CDDP cells. To conclude, our data implicate autophagic response as a key mechanism of acquired resistance to cisplatin, suggesting that autophagy is a novel target to improve therapy efficiency of cisplatin toward human esophageal cancers with acquired resistance.

  4. Modification of low dose radiation induced radioresistance by 2-deoxy-D-glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: mechanistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Bala, Madhu; Goel, Harish C

    2007-07-01

    Use of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) in combination with radiotherapy to radio-sensitize the tumor tissue is undergoing clinical trials. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of 2-DG on radiation induced radioresistance (RIR) in normal cells. The sub-lethal radiation dose to the normal cells at the periphery of target tumor tissue is likely to induce radioresistance and protect the cells from lethal radiation dose. 2-DG, since, enters both normal and tumor cells, this study have clinical relevance. A diploid respiratory proficient strain D7 of S. cerevisiae was chosen as the model system. In comparison to non-pre-irradiated cultures, the cultures that were pre-exposed to low doses of UVC (254 nm) or (60)Co-gamma-radiation, then maintained in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0, 67 mM), containing 10 mM glucose (PBG), for 2-5 h, showed 18-35% higher survivors (CFUs) after subsequent exposure to corresponding radiation at lethal doses suggesting the radiation induced radioresistance (RIR). The RIR, in the absence of 2-DG, was associated with reduced mutagenesis, decreased DNA damage, and enhanced recombinogenesis. Presence of 2-DG in PBG countered the low dose induced increase in survivors and protection to DNA damage. It also increased mutagenesis, altered the recombinogenesis and the expression of rad50 gene. The changes differed quantitatively with the type of radiation and the absorbed dose. These results, since, imply the side effects of 2-DG, it is suggested that new approaches are needed to minimize the retention of 2-DG in normal cells at the time of radiation exposure.

  5. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G; Kaplan, Mariana J; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Barrett, A John; O'Shea, John; Young, Neal S

    2016-02-15

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8(+) TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8(+) TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8(+) and CD4(+) TSCMs. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4(+) and CD8(+) TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8(+) TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA.

  6. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M.; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Barrett, A. John; O’Shea, John; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8+ TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8+ TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8+ TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8+ and CD4+ T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8+ and CD4+ TSCMs. CD8+ TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4+ and CD8+ TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8+ TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA. PMID:26764034

  7. Radioresistant Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Maxillary Sinus: A Case Report and review article

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, Matin; Alavi Amlashi, Hesamodin; Mehrparvar, Golfam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Plasmacytoma is a monoclonal proliferation of plasma cells. It can be an isolated lesion, for which the term extramedullary plasmacytoma is used, or a representation of multiple myeloma.The upper respiratory tract is the most common site for an extramedullary plasmacytoma. Sinonasal plasmacytomas cause different symptoms depending on the sites of origins and the areas of involvement. The treatment of choice for extramedullary plasmacytoma is local radiotherapy. Although it is generally accepted that plasmacytomas are radiosensitive, there are reports of cases that do not respond to radiotherapy. Case Report: A case of a 24-year-old male diagnosed with radioresistant extramedullary plasmacytoma of the maxillary sinus, who responded to surgical treatment, is reported. Conclusion: It is reasonable to consider an interdisciplinary approach in the management of extramedullary plasmacytoma. Considering early surgical intervention in cases encompassing risk factors of radiotherapy resistance is especially recommended before debilitating complications emerge. PMID:26788481

  8. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-26

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  9. Mouse Oocytes Acquire Mechanisms that Permit Independent Cell Volume Regulation at the End of Oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Samantha; Tartia, Alina P; Boison, Detlev; Baltz, Jay M

    2016-09-02

    Mouse embryos employ a unique mechanism of cell volume regulation in which glycine is imported via the GLYT1 transporter to regulate intracellular osmotic pressure. Independent cell volume regulation normally becomes active in the oocyte after ovulation is triggered. This involves two steps: the first is the release of the strong adhesion between the oocyte and zona pellucida (ZP) while the second is the activation of GLYT1. In fully-grown oocytes, release of adhesion and GLYT1 activation also occur spontaneously in oocytes removed from the follicle. It is unknown, however, whether the capacity to release oocyte-ZP adhesion or activate GLYT1 first arises in the oocyte after ovulation is triggered or instead growing oocytes already possess these capabilities but they are suppressed in the follicle. Here, we assessed when during oogenesis oocyte-ZP adhesion can be released and when GLYT1 can be activated, with adhesion assessed by an osmotic assay and GLYT1 activity determined by [(3) H]-glycine uptake. Oocyte-ZP adhesion could not be released by growing oocytes until they were nearly fully grown. Similarly, the amount of GLYT1 activity that can be elicited in oocytes increased sharply at the end of oogenesis. The SLC6A9 protein that is responsible for GLYT1 activity and Slc6a9 transcripts are present in growing oocytes and increased over the course of oogenesis. Furthermore, SLC6A9 becomes localized to the oocyte plasma membrane as the oocyte grows. Thus, oocytes acquire the ability to regulate their cell volume by releasing adhesion to the ZP and activating GLYT1 as they approach the end of oogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Ubenimex attenuates acquired sorafenib resistance in renal cell carcinoma by inhibiting Akt signaling in a lipophagy associated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Gao, Mingwei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ding, Sentai; Lv, Jiaju; Gao, Dexuan; Wang, Zhiyang; Niu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is used as first line treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) due to the poor sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of this malignancy; however, acquired resistance limits the application of sorafenib and its analogues. In this study, we explored a new strategy to overcome acquired resistance to sorafenib. The RCC cell lines 786-O and ACHN were cultured in presence of increasing concentrations of sorafenib to generate sorafenib-resistant cell lines, 786-O-R and ACHN-R. Interestingly, treatment with ubenimex (0.25 mg/ml) and 3-MA (2 mM) restored the sensitivity of resistant cell lines to sorafenib, indicating the involvement of autophagy in acquired resistance. High levels of autophagy flux were observed in resistant cells, and the opposite effects of ubenimex and 3-MA suggested a complex role for autophagy. While 3-MA abolished protection in sorafenib-resistant cells, ubenimex induced uncontrolled autophagy and autophagic cell death. Lipophagy, characterized by a lipid droplet cargo, was observed in RCC tissues and cells. In sorafenib-resistant cells, ubenimex inhibited the Akt signaling pathway that regulates autophagy. In summary, lipophagy participates in sorafenib-resistance of RCC, which could be reversed by interventions targeting the Akt pathway. PMID:27816967

  11. Gene expression profiling of mononuclear cells from patients with sepsis secondary to community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patricia; Silva, Eliezer; Baggio-Zappia, Giovana Lotici; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Nucci, Laura Alejandra; Junior, Otelo Rigato; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms governing the inflammatory response during sepsis involve crosstalk between diverse signaling pathways, but current knowledge provides an incomplete picture of the syndrome. Microarray-based expression profiling is a powerful approach for the investigation of complex clinical conditions such as sepsis. In this study, we investigated whole-genome expression profiles in mononuclear cells from septic patients admitted in intensive care units with community-acquired pneumonia. Blood samples were collected at the time of sepsis diagnosis and seven days later since we aimed to evaluate the role of biological processes or genes possibly involved in patient recovery. Here we provide a detailed description of the study design, including clinical information, experimental methods and procedures regarding data analysis. Metadata corresponding to microarray results deposited in the database Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession number GSE48080 are also described in this report. Our dataset allows the identification of genes possibly associated with host defense to infection as well as gene expression patterns associated with patient outcome.

  12. Comparison of protein patterns of xrs-5, a radiosensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and CHO-K1, its radioresistant parent, using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.M. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray sensitive strains of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines have been used to analyze radiation repair mechanisms. One cell line, xrs-5, has been shown to be very sensitive to ionizing radiation and radical forming chemical mutagens. This sensitivity is thought to be a result a mutation in the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanism, and its characterization has been a goal of several repair mechanism studies. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected a protein (MW approximately 55KD) in the DNA/Nuclear Matrix (nucleoid) cell fraction of CHO-Kl cells that is absent in the nucleoid fraction of xrs-5. This protein is present, however, in both CHO-Kl and xrs-5 whole cell protein maps. To determine whether the 55KD protein is responsible for the radiosensitive and defective DSB repair phenotype of xrs-5 cells, studies are now underway to analyze revertants of xrs-5 that are proficient in DSB repair. Furthermore, an effort to sequence the protein in question is planned. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  13. CAVEOLIN-1 expression in brain metastasis from lung cancer predicts worse outcome and radioresistance, irrespective of tumor histotype.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Senetta, Rebecca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Stella, Giulia; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zorzetto, Michele; Mantovani, Cristina; Papotti, Mauro; Cassoni, Paola

    2015-10-06

    Brain metastases develop in one-third of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and are associated with a dismal prognosis, irrespective of surgery or chemo-radiotherapy. Pathological markers for predicting outcomes after surgical resection and radiotherapy responsiveness are still lacking. Caveolin 1 has been associated with chemo- and radioresistance in various tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer. Here, caveolin 1 expression was assessed in a series of 69 brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer and matched primary tumors to determine its role in predicting survival and radiotherapy responsiveness. Only caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis was associated with poor prognosis and an increased risk of death (log rank test, p = 0.015). Moreover, in the younger patients (median age of <54 years), caveolin 1 expression neutralized the favorable effect of young age on survival compared with the older patients. Among the radiotherapy-treated patients, an increased risk of death was detected in the group with caveolin 1-positive brain metastasis (14 out of 22 patients, HR=6.839, 95% CI 1.849 to 25.301, Wald test p = 0.004). Overall, caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer is independently predictive of worse outcome and radioresistance and could become an additional tool for personalized therapy in the critical subset of brain-metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

  14. Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla; Bajrovic, Amira; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

  15. Bovine NK cells acquire cytotoxic activity and produce IFN-gamma after stimulation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or Babesia bovis-exposed splenic dendritic cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early interactions of innate immune cell populations such as DC, monocytes/macrophages and NK cells, can affect the ability of the acquired immune response to control infection of intracellular microorganisms. In this study, we investigated the activation of bovine NK cells by CD13+ splenic DC or CD...

  16. Superoxide dismutase activity in radioresistant tissues of irradiated rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stoklasová, A; Kovárová, H; Ledvina, M

    1992-01-01

    The activities of Cu, Zn-containing superoxide dismutase were studied in radioresistant tissues (liver, brain, erythrocytes) of whole-body irradiated rabbits with 6.0 Gy and 24.0 Gy with local shielding. No significant changes were observed after irradiation with 6.0 Gy. Both the changes in Cu, Zn-SOD activity and the protein concentrations were more pronounced after exposure to 24.0 Gy with local shielding of the head and abdominal region. The dose on the shielded regions was about 6.0 Gy. Local shielding of rabbits irradiated with a lethal dose 24.0 Gy influenced positively the survival of animals. However, the decrease in SOD activity on 60th day after irradiation seems to be unfavourable for further survival of rabbits, if we accept that SOD content in tissue is maintained at a rather constant level.

  17. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    SciTech Connect

    Tentes, I.K.; Schmidt, W.M.; Krupitza, G.; Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W.; Kortsaris, A.; Mader, R.M.

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  18. c-Fos over-expression promotes radioresistance and predicts poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guokai; Chen, Furong; Tu, Ziwei; Liu, Guiyun; Zhao, Yu; Peng, Ming-Jing; He, Zheng-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Lindsay, Holly; Xia, Yun-Fei; Li, Xiao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    c-Fos is a major component of activator protein (AP)-1 complex. It has been implicated in cell differentiation, proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. To investigate the role of c-Fos in glioma radiosensitivity and to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, we downregulated c-Fos gene expression by lentivirus-mediated shRNA in glioma cell lines and subsequently analyzed the radiosensitivity, DNA damage repair capacity, and cell cycle distribution. Finally, we explored its prognostic value in 41 malignant glioma patients by immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that silencing c-Fos sensitized glioma cells to radiation by increasing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), disturbing the DNA damage repair process, promoting G2/M cell cycle arrest, and enhancing apoptosis. c-Fos protein overexpression correlated with poor prognosis in malignant glioma patients treated with standard therapy. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of radioresistance in malignant glioma and identify c-Fos as a potentially novel therapeutic target for malignant glioma patients. PMID:27602752

  19. Integrating Enzymatic Self-Assembly and Mitochondria Targeting for Selectively Killing Cancer Cells without Acquired Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wang, Youzhi; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Bing

    2016-12-14

    Targeting organelles by modulating the redox potential of mitochondria is a promising approach to kill cancer cells that minimizes acquired drug resistance. However, it lacks selectivity because mitochondria perform essential functions for (almost) all cells. We show that enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), a bioinspired molecular process, selectively generates the assemblies of redox modulators (e.g., triphenyl phosphinium (TPP)) in the pericellular space of cancer cells for uptake, which allows selectively targeting the mitochondria of cancer cells. The attachment of TPP to a pair of enantiomeric, phosphorylated tetrapeptides produces the precursors (L-1P or D-1P) that form oligomers. Upon dephosphorylation catalyzed by ectophosphatases (e.g., alkaline phosphatase (ALP)) overexpressed on cancer cells (e.g., Saos2), the oligomers self-assemble to form nanoscale assemblies only on the surface of the cancer cells. The cancer cells thus uptake these assemblies of TPP via endocytosis, mainly via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. Inside the cells, the assemblies of TPP-peptide conjugates escape from the lysosome, induce dysfunction of mitochondria to release cytochrome c, and result in cell death, while the controls (i.e., omitting TPP motif, inhibiting ALP, or removing phosphate trigger) hardly kill the Saos2 cells. Most importantly, the repeated stimulation of the cancers by the precursors, unexpectedly, sensitizes the cancer cells to the precursors. As the first example of the integration of subcellular targeting with cell targeting, this study validates the spatial control of the assemblies of nonspecific cytotoxic agents by EISA as a promising molecular process for selectively killing cancer cells without inducing acquired drug resistance.

  20. Was Earth ever infected by martian biota? Clues from radioresistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Anatoly K; Kalinin, Vitaly L; Konstantinov, Alexei N; Shelegedin, Vladimir N; Pavlov, Alexander A

    2006-12-01

    Here we propose that the radioresistance (tolerance to ionizing radiation) observed in several terrestrial bacteria has a martian origin. Multiple inconsistencies with the current view of radioresistance as an accidental side effect of tolerance to desiccation are discussed. Experiments carried out 25 years ago were reproduced to demonstrate that "ordinary" bacteria can develop high radioresistance ability after multiple cycles of exposure to high radiation dosages followed by cycles of recovery of the bacterial population. We argue that "natural" cycles of this kind could have taken place only on the martian surface, and we hypothesize that Mars microorganisms could have developed radioresistance in just several million years' time and, subsequently, have undergone transfer to Earth by way of martian meteorites. Our mechanism implies multiple and frequent exchanges of biota between Mars and Earth.

  1. Targeting the miR-200c/LIN28B axis in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance non-small cell lung cancer cells harboring EMT features

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Shien, Kazuhiko; Tomida, Shuta; Okayasu, Kazuhiro; Suzawa, Ken; Hashida, Shinsuke; Torigoe, Hidejiro; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-200 family members (miR-200s) are frequently silenced in advanced cancer and have been implicated in the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We previously reported that miR-200s were silenced through promoter methylation in acquired EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells harboring EMT features. In this study, we examined the functional role of miR-200s in NSCLC cells and investigated a novel approach to overcoming acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. In the analysis of NSCLC cell lines, each of the miR-200s expression-silenced cell lines showed promoter methylation. Significant correlations between miR-200c silencing and several oncogenic pathway alterations, including EMT-changes and LIN28B overexpression, were observed in the database analysis. In addition, EGFR-wild type cell lines had lower miR-200s expression levels than EGFR-mutant cell lines. The introduction of miR-200c using pre-miR-200c caused LIN28B suppression in cells with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance that harbored EMT features. Interestingly, both the introduction of miR-200c and the knockdown of LIN28B produced an antitumor effect in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance cells, whereas these manipulations were not effective in parental cells. The miR-200c/LIN28B axis plays an important role in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI that harbor EMT features and might be a useful therapeutic target for overcoming resistance. PMID:28084458

  2. Targeting glucosylceramide synthase induction of cell surface globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in acquired cisplatin-resistance of lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Andreas; Johansson, Anders; Karlsson, Terese; Gudey, Shyam Kumar; Brännström, Thomas; Grankvist, Kjell; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz

    2015-08-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to cisplatin treatment is a caveat when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Ceramide increases in response to chemotherapy, leading to proliferation arrest and apoptosis. However, a tumour stress activation of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) follows to eliminate ceramide by formation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), the functional receptor of verotoxin-1. Ceramide elimination enhances cell proliferation and apoptosis blockade, thus stimulating tumor progression. GSLs transactivate multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression which further prevents ceramide accumulation and stimulates drug efflux. We investigated the expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 in NSCLC and MPM cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and if GCS activity or MDR1 pump inhibitors would reduce their expression and reverse cisplatin-resistance. Methods: Cell surface expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 and intracellular expression of MDR1 and MRP1 was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy on P31 MPM and H1299 NSCLC cells and subline cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. The effect of GCS inhibitor PPMP and MDR1 pump inhibitor cyclosporin A for 72 h on expression and cisplatin cytotoxicity was tested. Results: The cisplatin-resistant cells expressed increased cell surface Gb3. Cell surface Gb3 expression of resistant cells was annihilated by PPMP whereas cyclosporin A decreased Gb3 and MDR1 expression in H1299 cells. No decrease of MDR1 by PPMP was noted in using flow cytometry, whereas a decrease of MDR1 in H1299 and H1299res was indicated with confocal microscopy. No certain co-localization of Gb3 and MDR1 was noted. PPMP, but not cyclosporin A, potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in all cells. Conclusions: Cell surface Gb3 expression is a likely tumour biomarker for acquired cisplatin

  3. Human Phosphatidylethanolamine-Binding Protein 4 Promoted the Radioresistance of Human Rectal Cancer by Activating Akt in an ROS-Dependent Way

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Yang, Guangen; Lin, Ali; Shen, Zhong; Wang, Dong; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Human phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 4(hPEBP4) is a novel anti-apoptosis molecule associated with the resistance of tumors to apoptotic agents. Here we sought to investigate the role of hPEBP4 in the radioresistance of rectal cancer. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed hPEBP4 was expressed in 27/33 of rectal cancer specimens, but only in 2/33 of neighboring normal mucosa. Silencing the expression of hPEBP4 with siRNA significantly reduced the clonogenic survival and enhanced the apoptosis of rectal cancer cells on irradiation. Instead, forced overexpression of hPEBP4 promoted its survival and decreased the apoptosis. Western blot showed hPEBP4 could increase the radiation-induced Akt activation, for which reactive oxygen specimen(ROS) was required. The radioresistance effect of hPEBP4 was reversed after given LY-294002 to inhibit Akt activation or antioxidant to abolish the ROS production. We also confirmed that effect of hPEBP4 in vivo with nude mice. Thus we concluded that hPEBP4, specifically expressed in rectal cancer cells, is associated with radioresistance of rectal cancer, implying that modulation of hPEBP4 may have important therapeutic implications in radiotherapy of rectal cancer. PMID:24594691

  4. Acquired resistance to dasatinib in lung cancer cell lines conferred by DDR2 gatekeeper mutation and NF1 loss.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Ellen M; Woods, Brittany A; Dulak, Austin M; Tan, Li; Xu, Chunxiao; Gray, Nathanael S; Bass, Adam J; Wong, Kwok-kin; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of non-small cell lung cancer has evolved dramatically over the past decade with the adoption of widespread use of effective targeted therapies in patients with distinct molecular alterations. In lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC), recent studies have suggested that DDR2 mutations are a biomarker for therapeutic response to dasatinib and clinical trials are underway testing this hypothesis. Although targeted therapeutics are typically quite effective as initial therapy for patients with lung cancer, nearly all patients develop resistance with long-term exposure to targeted drugs. Here, we use DDR2-dependent lung cancer cell lines to model acquired resistance to dasatinib therapy. We perform targeted exome sequencing to identify two distinct mechanisms of acquired resistance: acquisition of the T654I gatekeeper mutation in DDR2 and loss of NF1. We show that NF1 loss activates a bypass pathway, which confers ERK dependency downstream of RAS activation. These results indicate that acquired resistance to dasatinib can occur via both second-site mutations in DDR2 and by activation of bypass pathways. These data may help to anticipate mechanisms of resistance that may be identified in upcoming clinical trials of anti-DDR2 therapy in lung cancer and suggest strategies to overcome resistance.

  5. Inhibition of ABCB1 Overcomes Cancer Stem Cell-like Properties and Acquired Resistance to MET Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Teppei; Seike, Masahiro; Noro, Rintaro; Soeno, Chie; Chiba, Mika; Zou, Fenfei; Nakamichi, Shinji; Nishijima, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Masaru; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) EGFR mutations have shown a dramatic response to EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-TKI). EGFR T790M mutation and MET amplification have been recognized as major mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI. Therefore, MET inhibitors have recently been used in NSCLC patients in clinical trials. In this study, we tried to identify the mechanism of acquired resistance to MET inhibitors. We analyzed the antitumor effects of two MET inhibitors, PHA-665752 and crizotinib, in 10 NSCLC cell lines. EBC-1 cells with MET amplification were the only cells that were sensitive to both MET inhibitors. We established PHA-665752-resistant EBC-1 cells, namely EBC-1R cells. Activation of KRAS, EGFR, and FGFR2 signaling was observed in EBC-1R cells by FISH and receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation antibody arrays. EBC-1R cells also showed overexpression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) as well as phosphorylation of MET. EBC-1R cells grew as cell spheres that exhibited cancer stem cell-like (CSC) properties and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The level of miR-138 that targeted ABCB1 was decreased in EBC-1R cells. ABCB1 siRNA and the ABCB1 inhibitor elacridar could reduce sphere numbers and suppress EMT. Elacridar could also reverse resistance to PHA-665752 in EBC-1R cells. Our study demonstrated that ABCB1 overexpression, which was associated with CSC properties and EMT, was involved in the acquired resistance to MET inhibitors. Inhibition of ABCB1 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with acquired resistance to MET inhibitors.

  6. Tacrolimus versus cyclosporine after hematopoietic cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Wang, Tao; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Hemmer, Michael T.; Cutler, Corey S.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Alousi, Amin M.; Antin, Joseph H.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hamilton, Betty K.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Socié, Gérard; Solh, Melhem M.; Akpek, Görgün; Cairo, Mitchel S.; Chao, Nelson J.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Nishihori, Taiga; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Shah, Ami; Teshima, Takanori; Tallman, Martin S.; Wirk, Baldeep; Spellman, Stephen R.; Arora, Mukta; Martin, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cyclosporine (CSP) with methotrexate (MTX) have been widely used for immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia. We compared outcomes with tacrolimus (TAC)+MTX versus CSP+MTX after transplantation from HLA-identical siblings (SIB) or unrelated donors (URD) in a retrospective cohort of 949 patients with severe aplastic anemia. Study endpoints included hematopoietic recovery, graft failure, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD and mortality. TAC+MTX was used more frequently in older patients and in recent years in both SIB and URD groups. In multivariate analysis, TAC+MTX was associated with a lower risk of mortality in URD recipients and with slightly earlier ANC recovery in SIB recipients. Other outcomes did not differ statistically between the two regimens. No firm conclusions were reached regarding the relative merits of TAC+MTX versus CSP+MTX after HCT for acquired aplastic anemia. Prospective studies would be needed to determine whether the use of TAC+MTX is associated with lower risk of mortality in URD recipients with acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:26033280

  7. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  8. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1{alpha} survival pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} under hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}). HIF-1{alpha} is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1{alpha}. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1{alpha} levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1{alpha} is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1{alpha} levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  9. I kappa B kinase alpha (IKKα) activity is required for functional maturation of dendritic cells and acquired immunity to infection.

    PubMed

    Mancino, Alessandra; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Johnson, Ella; Luron, Lionel; Bebien, Magali; Memet, Sylvie; Fong, Carol; Bajenoff, Marc; Wu, Xuefeng; Karin, Michael; Caamano, Jorge; Chi, Hongbo; Seed, Michael; Lawrence, Toby

    2013-03-20

    Dendritic cells (DC) are required for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to many important human pathogens, including Mycobacteriuim tuberculosis (TB) and influenza. However, inappropriate priming of auto-reactive T cells is linked with autoimmune disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the priming and activation of naïve T cells is critical for development of new improved vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The serine/threonine kinase IKKα (CHUK) has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity and inhibit innate immunity. Here, we show that IKKα is required in DC for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We describe a new role for IKKα in regulation of IRF3 activity and the functional maturation of DC. This presents a unique role for IKKα in dampening inflammation while simultaneously promoting adaptive immunity that could have important implications for the development of new vaccine adjuvants and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  10. Clinical definition of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackman, David; Pao, William; Riely, Gregory J; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Kris, Mark G; Jänne, Pasi A; Lynch, Thomas; Johnson, Bruce E; Miller, Vincent A

    2010-01-10

    Ten percent of North American patients with non-small-cell lung cancer have tumors with somatic mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Approximately 70% of patients whose lung cancers harbor somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR experience significant tumor regressions when treated with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib or erlotinib. However, the overwhelming majority of these patients inevitably acquire resistance to either drug. Currently, the clinical definition of such secondary or acquired resistance is not clear. We propose the following criteria be used to define more precisely acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. All patients should have the following criteria: previous treatment with a single-agent EGFR TKI (eg, gefitinib or erlotinib); either or both of the following: a tumor that harbors an EGFR mutation known to be associated with drug sensitivity or objective clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR TKI; systemic progression of disease (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or WHO) while on continuous treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib within the last 30 days; and no intervening systemic therapy between cessation of gefitinib or erlotinib and initiation of new therapy. The relatively simple definition proposed here will lead to a more uniform approach to investigating the problem of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in this unique patient population. These guidelines should minimize reporting of false-positive and false-negative activity in these clinical trials and would facilitate the identification of agents that truly overcome acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib.

  11. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acquired tamoxifen resistance involves complex signaling events that are not yet fully understood. Successful therapeutic intervention to delay the onset of hormone resistance depends critically on mechanistic elucidation of viable molecular targets associated with hormone resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the global proteomic alterations in a tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line obtained by long term treatment of the wild type MCF-7 cell line with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH Tam). Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells with 4-OH Tam over a period of 12 months to obtain the resistant cell line. A gel-free, quantitative proteomic method was used to identify and quantify the proteome of the resistant cell line. Nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to analyze fractionated peptide mixtures that were isobarically labeled from the resistant and control cell lysates. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blots were used to verify selected proteomic changes. Lentiviral vector transduction was used to generate MCF-7 cells stably expressing S100P. Online pathway analysis was performed to assess proteomic signatures in tamoxifen resistance. Survival analysis was done to evaluate clinical relevance of altered proteomic expressions. Results Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a wide breadth of signaling events during transition to acquired tamoxifen resistance. A total of 629 proteins were found significantly changed with 364 up-regulated and 265 down-regulated. Collectively, these changes demonstrated the suppressed state of estrogen receptor (ER) and ER-regulated genes, activated survival signaling and increased migratory capacity of the resistant cell line. The protein S100P was found to play a critical role in conferring tamoxifen resistance and enhanced cell motility. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the adaptive changes in the proteome of

  12. Exocytosis of polyubiquitinated proteins in bortezomib-resistant leukemia cells: a role for MARCKS in acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Niels E.; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Niewerth, Denise; Kessler, Floortje L.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Kole, Jeroen; Smeets, Serge J.; Ylstra, Bauke; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee Joo; Horton, Terzah M.; Menezes, Rene X.; Musters, Renée J.P.; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    PSMB5 mutations and upregulation of the β5 subunit of the proteasome represent key determinants of acquired resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) in leukemic cells in vitro. We here undertook a multi-modality (DNA, mRNA, miRNA) array-based analysis of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and BTZ-resistant subclones to determine whether or not complementary mechanisms contribute to BTZ resistance. These studies revealed signatures of markedly reduced expression of proteolytic stress related genes in drug resistant cells over a broad range of BTZ concentrations along with a high upregulation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) gene expression. MARCKS upregulation was confirmed on protein level and also observed in other BTZ-resistant tumor cell lines as well as in leukemia cells with acquired resistance to other proteasome inhibitors. Moreover, when MARCKS protein expression was demonstrated in specimens derived from therapy-refractory pediatric leukemia patients (n = 44), higher MARCKS protein expression trended (p = 0.073) towards a dismal response to BTZ-containing chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we show a BTZ concentration-dependent association of MARCKS protein levels with the emergence of ubiquitin-containing vesicles in BTZ-resistant CEM cells. These vesicles were found to be extruded and taken up in co-cultures with proteasome-proficient acceptor cells. Consistent with these observations, MARCKS protein associated with ubiquitin-containing vesicles was also more prominent in clinical leukemic specimen with ex vivo BTZ resistance compared to BTZ-sensitive leukemia cells. Collectively, we propose a role for MARCKS in a novel mechanism of BTZ resistance via exocytosis of ubiquitinated proteins in BTZ-resistant cells leading to quenching of proteolytic stress. PMID:27542283

  13. Osteopontin is involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance of cisplatin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tao; Ohashi, Rina; Cui, Ri; Tajima, Ken; Yoshioka, Masakata; Iwakami, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Shinichi; Shinohara, Atsuko; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Kobayashi, Jun; Inaba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-11-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in cell survival, migration and adhesion which is associated with tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. However, the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of human lung cancer has not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of lung cancer cells. We developed a stable OPN transfectant (SBC-3/OPN) and a control transfectant (SBC-3/NEO) from human small cell lung cancer cell line, SBC-3. SBC-3/OPN cells were more resistant to cisplatin than SBC-3/NEO cells. Multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP) does not appear to be involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance, since MRP inhibitor did not alter chemo-sensitivity. After exposure to cisplatin, the apoptotic SBC-3/OPN cells were reduced in number compared to SBC-3/NEO cells. Treatment with cisplatin revealed that the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, was down-regulated in SBC-3/NEO cells, while that of SBC-3/OPN cells was not altered. In contrast, pro-apoptotic protein, bax, was not altered in both SBC-3/OPN and SBC-3/NEO cells, thus bcl-2/bax ratio was decreased in SBC-3/NEO but not altered in SBC-3/OPN cells. Activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was increased in SBC-3/NEO cells, but not in SBC-3/OPN cells. Our results suggest that OPN enhances chemo-resistance of cisplatin in SBC-3 cells by suppressing bcl-2 protein down-regulation, thereby blocking the caspase-9- and caspase-3-dependent cell apoptosis.

  14. Virus-triggered acquired immunodeficiency by cytotoxic T-cell-dependent destruction of antigen-presenting cells and lymph follicle structure.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B; Eppler, M; Leist, T P; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-01-01

    Virus-induced acquired immune suppression in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is shown here to be caused by the CD8+-T-cell-dependent elimination of macrophages/antigen-presenting cells. Surprisingly, this is associated with severe destruction of the follicular organization of lymphoid organs, indicating a crucial role for dendritic cells and marginal zone macrophages in maintaining follicular structure. Once established, this immunopathology cannot be readily reversed by the elimination of CD8+ effector cells. Such a T-cell-mediated pathogenesis may play a pivotal role in acquired virus-induced immunosuppression and may represent one strategy by which virus escapes immune surveillance and establishes persistent infections in initially immunocompetent hosts. Images PMID:1910175

  15. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK-cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-02-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B-Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug-resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines MEL-HO, COLO-38, SK-MEL-37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug-resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL-2-activated NK cells; and two BRAFi-resistant lines (BRAFi-R) became significantly more susceptible to NK-cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD-L1 upregulation on the drug-resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi-R and parental cells to NK-cell-mediated lysis, antibody-mediated inhibition of PD1-PD-L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi-R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK-cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK-cell-based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

  16. BLyS inhibition eliminates primary B cells but leaves natural and acquired humoral immunity intact.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jean L; Crowley, Jenni E; Tomayko, Mary M; Steinel, Natalie; O'Neill, Patrick J; Quinn, William J; Goenka, Radhika; Miller, Juli P; Cho, Yun Hee; Long, Vatana; Ward, Chris; Migone, Thi-Sau; Shlomchik, Mark J; Cancro, Michael P

    2008-10-07

    We have used an inhibiting antibody to determine whether preimmune versus antigen-experienced B cells differ in their requisites for BLyS, a cytokine that controls differentiation and survival. Whereas in vivo BLyS inhibition profoundly reduced naïve B cell numbers and primary immune responses, it had a markedly smaller effect on memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells, as well as secondary immune responses. There was heterogeneity within the memory pools, because IgM-bearing memory cells were sensitive to BLyS depletion whereas IgG-bearing memory cells were not, although both were more resistant than naïve cells. There was also heterogeneity within B1 pools, as splenic but not peritoneal B1 cells were diminished by anti-BLyS treatment, yet the number of natural antibody-secreting cells remained constant. Together, these findings show that memory B cells and natural antibody-secreting cells are BLyS-independent and suggest that these pools can be separately manipulated.

  17. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  18. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan-xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-yi; Zhou, Li-wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-hong; Gao, Cheng-jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a−/− mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a−/− mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a−/− lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:28008152

  19. Dysregulated miR34a/diacylglycerol kinase ζ interaction enhances T-cell activation in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Xin; Li, Hui; Feng, Qi; Li, Xin; Yu, Ying-Yi; Zhou, Li-Wei; Gao, Yan; Li, Guo-Sheng; Ren, Juan; Ma, Chun-Hong; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Peng, Jun

    2017-01-24

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an idiopathic paradigm of human bone marrow failure syndrome, which involves active destruction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors by cytotoxic T cells in the bone marrow. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in T cells has been shown to lead to development of certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we performed a microarray analysis of miRNA expression in bone marrow CD3+ T cells from patients with aplastic anemia and healthy controls. Overexpression of miR34a and underexpression of its target gene diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) ζ in bone marrow mononuclear cells were validated in 41 patients and associated with the severity of aplastic anemia. Further, the level of miR34a was higher in naïve T cells from patients than from controls. The role of miR34a and DGKζ in aplastic anemia was investigated in a murine model of immune-mediated bone marrow failure using miR34a-/- mice. After T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro, lymph node T cells from miR34a-/- mice demonstrated reduced activation and proliferation accompanied with a less profound down-regulation of DGKζ expression and decreased ERK phosphorylation compared to those from wild-type C57BL6 control mice. Infusion of 5 × 106 miR34a-/- lymph node T cells into sublethally irradiated CB6F1 recipients led to increased Lin-Sca1+CD117+ cells and less vigorous expansion of CD8+ T cells than injection of same number of wild-type lymph node cells. Our study demonstrates that the miR34a/DGKζ dysregulation enhances T-cell activation in aplastic anemia and targeting miR34a may represent a novel molecular therapeutic approach for patients with aplastic anemia.

  20. Modulation of Memory T Cells to Control Acquired Bone Marrow Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    function of T-bet, which is a transcription factor key to the generation of Th1 cells. However, transcription factors are difficult drug targets.55 Thus...reference-37). Fig. 6. In the absence of Ezh2, LN cells are defective in mediating AA in mice. To assess whether conditionally deleting Ezh2 in...new perspective to study how Notch and Notch ligands may interact with epigenetic regulators to control memory T cell development and subsequent

  1. Testing the 'toxin hypothesis of allergy': mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell's viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic type 2 (Th2) immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality.

  2. Testing the "toxin hypothesis of allergy": Mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell’s viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic Th2 immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. PMID:26210895

  3. CDK1-mediated SIRT3 Activation Enhances Mitochondrial Function and Tumor Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Qin, Lili; Zhang, Xiaodi; Eldridge, Angela; Zou, June X.; Zhang, Tieqiao; Juma, Shuaib; Jin, Cuihong; Li, Robert F.; Perks, Julian; Sun, Lun-Quan; Vaughan, Andrew T.M.; Hai, Chun-Xu; Gius, David R.; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    The tumor adaptive resistance to therapeutic radiation remains to be a barrier for further improvement of local cancer control. SIRT3, a member of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases in mitochondria, promotes metabolic homeostasis through regulation of mitochondrial protein deacetylation and plays a key role in prevention of cell aging. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 expression is induced in an array of radiation-treated human tumor cells and their corresponding xenograft tumors including colon cancer HCT-116, glioblastoma U87 and breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells. The SIRT3 transcriptional activation is due to SIRT3 promoter activation controlled by the stress transcription factor NF-κB. Post-transcriptionally, the SIRT3 enzymatic activity is further enhanced via Thr150/Ser159 phosphorylation by Cyclin B1/CDK1, which is also induced by radiation and relocated to mitochondria together with SIRT3. Cells expressing the Thr150Ala/Ser159Ala mutant SIRT3 show a reduction in the mitochondrial protein lysine deacetylation, ΔΨm, MnSOD activity and mitochondrial ATP generation. The clonogenicity of Thr150Ala/Ser159Ala mutant transfectants is lower and significantly decreased under radiation. Tumors harboring the Thr150Ala/Ser159Ala mutant SIRT3 show inhibited growth and sensitivity to in vivo local irradiation. These results demonstrate that enhanced SIRT3 transcription and post-translational modifications in mitochondria contribute to the adaptive radioresistance in tumor cells. The CDK1-mediated SIRT3 phosphorylation is a potential effective target to sensitize tumor cells to radiotherapy. PMID:26141949

  4. Overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhances human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian-Shu; Li, Yi; Yu, Hongliang; Xiong, Wei; Yu, Hao; Wang, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Teng, Yingqi; Zhou, Demin

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3(AKR1C3) is an enzyme involved in prostaglandins metabolism. Studies suggest that AKR1C3 has a pivotal role in the radioresistance of esophageal cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, yet the role of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer cells radiation resistance has not yet been clarified. In our study, we established a stable overexpressing AKR1C3 cell line (AKR1C3-over) derived from the prostate cell line DU145 and its control cell line (Control). We conducted colony formation assay to determine the role of AKR1C3 in radioresistance and we used its chemical inhibitor to detect whether it can restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. Flow cytometry assay was carried out to detect IR-induced ROS accumulation. Elisa was adopted to dedect the concentration of PGF2α in the suspension of the cells after 6GY radiation. Western blotting was used to dedect the MAPK and PPAR γ. The results demonstrated that overexpression of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer can result in radioresistance and suppression of AKR1C3 via its chemical inhibitor indocin restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. According to the flow cytometry assay, ROS was decreased by 80% in DU145-over cells. Also overexpression of AKR1C3 could result in the accumulation of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), which can not only promote prostate cancer cell 's proliferation but also could enhance prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation and activated the MAPK pathway and inhibited the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, we found that overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhanced human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation through activation of MAPK pathway. PMID:27385003

  5. Role of B Cells and Antibodies in Acquired Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Chan, John; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has documented a role for B cells and antibodies (Abs) in the immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Passive transfer studies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mycobacterial antigens have shown protection against the tubercle bacillus. B cells and Abs are believed to contribute to an enhanced immune response against Mtb by modulating various immunological components in the infected host including the T-cell compartment. Nevertheless, the extent and contribution of B cells and Abs to protection against Mtb remains uncertain. In this article we summarize the most relevant findings supporting the role of B cells and Abs in the defense against Mtb and discuss the potential mechanisms of protection. PMID:25301934

  6. Rat Sertoli cells acquire a beta-adrenergic response during primary culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, A L; Spruill, W A; White, M G; Tres, L L; Perkins, J P

    1985-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the radioligand (-)-[125I]iodopindolol (125I-Pin) have been used to study isoproterenol-dependent protein phosphorylation and beta-adrenergic receptor availability, respectively, in cultured Sertoli cells and freshly isolated seminiferous tubular segments of sexually immature and mature rats. Sertoli cells prepared from sexually immature rats show progressive 125I-Pin binding in primary cultures that correlates with isoproterenol-induced cell shape changes, redistribution of immunoreactive vimentin, and phosphorylation of this intermediate filament protein. The development of 125I-Pin binding to Sertoli cell lysates is blocked by cycloheximide. Seminiferous tubules do not show significant isoproterenol-dependent vimentin phosphorylation nor 125I-Pin binding. However, vimentin phosphorylation can be induced by follicle-stimulating hormone or a cyclic nucleotide analog. This study stresses the need for correlating pharmacological-induced responses observed in Sertoli cell primary cultures with those in the intact seminiferous tubule. Images PMID:2984678

  7. An immunohistochemical assessment of hypoxia in prostate carcinoma using pimonidazole: Implications for radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Carnell, Dawn M. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net; Smith, Rowena E.; Daley, Frances; Saunders, Michele I.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the presence of hypoxia in human prostate carcinoma by using pimonidazole immunohistochemical labeling in radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods and Materials: Forty-three patients (median age, 69 years; range, 49-83 years) with localized prostate adenocarcinoma received 0.5 gm/m{sup 2} i.v. pimonidazole 16-24 h before radical prostatectomy. Hypoxia was detected with a monoclonal antibody directed against pimonidazole and scored in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Median and maximal vessel counts were measured with CD34. Results: Thirty-seven patients completed the study. Pimonidazole binding was present in prostate carcinomas in 34 of 37 patients (92%) and in benign prostatic hyperplasia in 35 of 37 patients (95%). A positive correlation of 3+ pimonidazole binding with Gleason score was demonstrated (Spearman's rank, p = 0.044). Vascularity scores did not correlate with hypoxic status or clinical prognostic parameters. Conclusion: Prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia have significant areas of hypoxia; greater hypoxia scores are seen with more aggressive prostate cancer. It is postulated that a hypoxic microenvironment within the prostate might be responsible for the promotion of secondary genetic alterations and angiogenic stimulation, leading to malignant progression, a more aggressive cell phenotype, and greater radioresistance. Modification of radiation regimens to specifically target hypoxia might improve local tumor control.

  8. Memory CD8+ T cells from naturally-acquired primary dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Heather; Burns, Lynne; Woda, Marcia; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Endy, Timothy P.; Stephens, Henry A.F.; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L.; Mathew, Anuja

    2010-01-01

    Cross-reactive memory T cells induced by primary infection with one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) are hypothesized to play an immunopathological role in secondary heterologous DENV infection. To define the T cell response to heterologous serotypes, we isolated HLA-A*1101-restricted epitope-specific CD8+ T cell lines from primary DENV-immune donors. Cell lines exhibited marked cross-reactivity towards peptide variants representing the four DENV serotypes in tetramer binding and functional assays. Many clones responded similarly to homologous and heterologous serotypes with striking cross-reactivity between the DENV-1 and DENV-3 epitope variants. In vitro-stimulated T cell lines consistently revealed a hierarchical induction of MIP-1β > degranulation > TNFα > IFNγ, which depended on the concentration of agonistic peptide. Phosphoflow assays demonstrated peptide dose-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which correlated with cytolysis, degranulation, and induction of TNFα and IFNγ but not MIP-1β production. This is the first study to demonstrate significant DENV serotype-cross-reactivity of CD8+ T cells after naturally-acquired primary infection. We also demonstrate qualitatively different T cell receptor signaling after stimulation with homologous and heterologous peptides. Our data support a model whereby the order of sequential DENV infections influences the immune response to secondary heterologous DENV infection, contributing to varying disease outcomes. PMID:20421879

  9. Memory CD8+ T cells from naturally acquired primary dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Heather; Burns, Lynne; Woda, Marcia; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Endy, Timothy P; Stephens, Henry A F; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Mathew, Anuja

    2011-01-01

    Cross-reactive memory T cells induced by primary infection with one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) are hypothesized to have an immunopathological function in secondary heterologous DENV infection. To define the T-cell response to heterologous serotypes, we isolated HLA-A(*)1101-restricted epitope-specific CD8(+) T-cell lines from primary DENV-immune donors. Cell lines exhibited marked cross-reactivity toward peptide variants representing the four DENV serotypes in tetramer binding and functional assays. Many clones responded similarly to homologous and heterologous serotypes with striking cross-reactivity between the DENV-1 and DENV-3 epitope variants. In vitro-stimulated T-cell lines consistently revealed a hierarchical induction of MIP-1β>degranulation>tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)>interferon-γ (IFNγ), which depended on the concentration of agonistic peptide. Phosphoflow assays showed peptide dose-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which correlated with cytolysis, degranulation, and induction of TNFα and IFNγ, but not MIP-1β production. This is the first study to show significant DENV serotype-cross-reactivity of CD8(+) T cells after naturally acquired primary infection. We also show qualitatively different T-cell receptor signaling after stimulation with homologous and heterologous peptides. Our data support a model whereby the order of sequential DENV infections influences the immune response to secondary heterologous DENV infection, contributing to varying disease outcomes.

  10. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  11. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK‐cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N.; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B‐Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug‐resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF‐mutant melanoma cell lines MEL‐HO, COLO‐38, SK‐MEL‐37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug‐resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL‐2‐activated NK cells; and two BRAFi‐resistant lines (BRAFi‐R) became significantly more susceptible to NK‐cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD‐L1 upregulation on the drug‐resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi‐R and parental cells to NK‐cell‐mediated lysis, antibody‐mediated inhibition of PD1–PD‐L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi‐R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK‐cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK‐cell‐based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:26564811

  12. Cyclosporine restores hematopoietic function by compensating for decreased Tregs in patients with pure red cell aplasia and acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dao, An T T; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Chiharu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Zaimoku, Yoshitaka; Maruyama, Kana; Ly, Trung Q; Espinoza, Luis; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and some with acquired aplastic anemia (AA) respond well to cyclosporine (CsA), but thereafter often show CsA dependency. The mechanism underlying this dependency remains unknown. We established a reliable method for measuring the regulatory T cell (Treg) count using FoxP3 and Helios expression as markers and determined the balance between Tregs and other helper T cell subsets in 16 PRCA and 29 AA patients. The ratios of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) (Th1) T cells to Tregs in untreated patients and CsA-dependent patients were significantly higher (PRCA 5.77 ± 1.47 and 7.38 ± 2.58; AA 6.18 ± 2.35 and 8.94 ± 4.06) than in healthy volunteers (HVs; 3.33 ± 0.90) due to the profound decrease in the percentage of Tregs. In contrast, the ratios were comparable to HVs in convalescent CsA-treated AA patients (4.74 ± 2.10) and AA patients in remission after the cessation of CsA treatment (4.24 ± 1.67). Low-dose CsA (100 ng/ml) inhibited the proliferation of conventional T cells (Tconv) to a similar degree to the inhibition by Tregs in a co-culture with a 1:1 Treg/Tconv ratio. The data suggest that CsA may reverse the hematopoietic suppression in PRCA and AA patients by compensating for the inadequate immune regulatory function that occurs due to a profound decrease in the Treg count.

  13. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for severe acquired aplastic anaemia using a fludarabine-based preparative regimen.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Igor B; Aker, Memet; Shapira, Michael Y; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis D; Bitan, Menachem; Abdul-Hai, Ali; Samuel, Simcha; Ackerstein, Aliza; Gesundheit, Benjamin; Zilberman, Irina; Miron, Svetlana; Yoffe, Luba; Lvovich, Alex; Slavin, Shimon; Or, Reuven

    2006-06-01

    We reviewed our experience in the treatment of 13 patients with severe acquired aplastic anaemia, using a newly developed non-myeloablative regimen consisting of fludarabine (total dose 180 mg/m2), cyclophosphamide (total dose 120 mg/kg), and antithymocyte globulin (total dose 40 mg/kg). All except one patient received multiple transfusions and had failed prior immunosuppressive treatment. Twelve out of 13 patients achieved sustained engraftment. One patient was not evaluable for engraftment because of early death on day +10. None of the patients developed graft failure. Mucositis of mild-to-moderate severity was the only observed regimen-related toxicity. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) grade II-IV and III-IV was 8.3% and 0%, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 45 months, the 5-year overall survival probability was 84%. Eight out of 11 surviving patients have been followed for more than 1 year and only one developed limited chronic GvHD. All patients enjoy a normal life style, with a Karnofsky score of 100%, and all except three, followed for 3, 5 and 6 months respectively, are free of any immunosuppressive medication. The results of this study look promising, while prospective clinical trials may be required to confirm the benefits of this regimen as an alternative to existing protocols.

  14. Essential role of PDL1 expression on nonhematopoietic donor cells in acquired tolerance to vascularized cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Riella, L V; Watanabe, T; Sage, P T; Yang, J; Yeung, M; Azzi, J; Vanguri, V; Chandraker, A; Sharpe, A H; Sayegh, M H; Najafian, N

    2011-04-01

    The PD1:PDL1 pathway is an essential negative costimulatory pathway that plays a key role in regulating the alloimune response. PDL1 is expressed not only on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) but also cardiac endothelium. In this study, we investigated the importance of PDL1 expression on donor cardiac allograft in acquired transplantation tolerance in a fully MHC-mismatched model. We generated PDL1 chimeric mice on B6 background that expressed PDL1 on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells of the heart. Sham animals were used as controls. These hearts were then transplanted into BALB/c recipients and treated with CTLA4-Ig to induce tolerance. Cardiac endothelium showed significant expression of PDL1, which was upregulated upon transplantation. While the absence of PDL1 on hematopoietic cells of the heart resulted in delayed rejection and prevented long-term tolerance in most but not all recipients, we observed an accelerated and early graft rejection of all donor allografts that lacked PDL1 on the endothelium. Moreover, PDL1-deficient endothelium hearts had significant higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing alloreactive cells as well as higher frequency of CD8(+) effector T cells. These findings demonstrate that PDL1 expression mainly on donor endothelium is functionally important in a fully allogeneic mismatched model for the induction of cardiac allograft tolerance.

  15. Ligand-associated ERBB2/3 activation confers acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in FGFR3-dependent cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Mikse, O; Liao, R G; Li, Y; Tan, L; Janne, P A; Gray, N S; Wong, K-k; Hammerman, P S

    2015-04-23

    Somatic alterations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been described in a wide range of malignancies. A number of anti-FGFR therapies are currently under investigation in clinical trials for subjects with FGFR gene amplifications, mutations and translocations. Here, we develop cell line models of acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition by exposure of cell lines harboring FGFR3 gene amplification and translocation to the selective FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and multitargeted FGFR inhibitor ponatinib. We show that the acquisition of resistance is rapid, reversible and characterized by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a switch from dependency on FGFR3 to ERBB family members. Acquired resistance was associated with demonstrable changes in gene expression including increased production of ERBB2/3 ligands, which were sufficient to drive resistance in the setting of FGFR3 dependency but not dependency on other FGFR family members. These data support the concept that activation of ERBB family members is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR3 and suggest that concurrent inhibition of these two pathways may be desirable when targeting FGFR3-dependent cancers.

  16. Normal human mammary epithelial cells spontaneously escape senescence and acquire genomic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanov, S. R.; Kozakiewicz, B. K.; Holst, C. R.; Stampfer, M. R.; Haupt, L. M.; Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    Senescence and genomic integrity are thought to be important barriers in the development of malignant lesions. Human fibroblasts undergo a limited number of cell divisions before entering an irreversible arrest, called senescence. Here we show that human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) do not conform to this paradigm of senescence. In contrast to fibroblasts, HMECs exhibit an initial growth phase that is followed by a transient growth plateau (termed selection or M0; refs 3-5), from which proliferative cells emerge to undergo further population doublings (approximately 20-70), before entering a second growth plateau (previously termed senescence or M1; refs 4-6). We find that the first growth plateau exhibits characteristics of senescence but is not an insurmountable barrier to further growth. HMECs emerge from senescence, exhibit eroding telomeric sequences and ultimately enter telomere-based crisis to generate the types of chromosomal abnormalities seen in the earliest lesions of breast cancer. Growth past senescent barriers may be a pivotal event in the earliest steps of carcinogenesis, providing many genetic changes that predicate oncogenic evolution. The differences between epithelial cells and fibroblasts provide new insights into the mechanistic basis of neoplastic transformation.

  17. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of extended field of view lensfree microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Momey, F.; Coutard, J.-G.; Bordy, T.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Dinten, J.-M.; Allier, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lensfree imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lensfree microscopy setup is a simple device featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful mean for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g. integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm2) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. Here we uses this facility in the context of wound healing assay to perform label-free measurements of the velocities of the fronts of proliferation of the cell layer as a function of time by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing. However, for such tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm2 remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assays, we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm2 through a raster scan, by moving the source/sensor with respect to the Petri dish. We have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm2) and in final point (10 cm2) to assess the combination of velocimetry measurements and final point wide field imaging. In the future, we aim at combining directly our extended field of view acquisitions (>10 cm2) with real time ability inside the incubator. PMID:26977359

  18. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of extended field of view lensfree microscopy.

    PubMed

    Momey, F; Coutard, J-G; Bordy, T; Navarro, F; Menneteau, M; Dinten, J-M; Allier, C

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lensfree imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lensfree microscopy setup is a simple device featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful mean for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g. integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm(2)) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. Here we uses this facility in the context of wound healing assay to perform label-free measurements of the velocities of the fronts of proliferation of the cell layer as a function of time by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing. However, for such tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm(2) remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assays, we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm(2) through a raster scan, by moving the source/sensor with respect to the Petri dish. We have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm(2)) and in final point (10 cm(2)) to assess the combination of velocimetry measurements and final point wide field imaging. In the future, we aim at combining directly our extended field of view acquisitions (>10 cm(2)) with real time ability inside the incubator.

  19. Formalin-treated bacteria as selective B cell mitogens: results in primary and acquired immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, M C; Pucillo, L P; Fiorilli, M; Aiuti, F; Banck, G; Forsgren, A

    1981-01-01

    The mitogenic activity of the formalin-treated bacterial strains Branhamella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with primary immunodeficiencies, acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and in umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The bacteria selectively stimulated B cells, as demonstrated by the finding of a normal de novo DNA synthesis in children with a T cell defect and of an absent response in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and severe combined immunodeficiency. A decreased mitogenic activity was exerted on PBL from four out of seven adults with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (CVH). In B-CLL the mitogenic activity was normal while in T-ALL it was decreased. Umbilical cord blood lymphocytes responded better than PBL from adults. The selective stimulative ability of the bacteria for B lymphocytes is expressed when PBL are cultured together with the formalin-treated bacteria for 48 to 72 hr. PMID:6976247

  20. B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Associated with Primary and Acquired Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Low, Lawrence K; Song, Joo Y

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders associated with immunodeficiency can be challenging because many of these conditions have overlapping clinical and pathologic features and share similarities with their counterparts in the immunocompetent setting. There are subtle but important differences between these conditions that are important to recognize for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. This article provides a clinicopathologic update on how understanding of these B-cell lymphoproliferations in immunodeficiency has evolved over the past decade.

  1. Effects of radiation type and delivery mode on a radioresistant eukaryote Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Bryan, Ruth A.; Broitman, Jack; Marino, Stephen A.; Morgenstern, Alfred; Apostolidis, Christos; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most research on radioresistant fungi, particularly on human pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans, involves sparsely-ionizing radiation. Consequently, fungal responses to densely-ionizing radiation, which can be harnessed to treat life-threatening fungal infections, remain incompletely understood. Methods We addressed this issue by quantifying and comparing the effects of densely-ionizing α-particles (delivered either by external beam or by 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibodies), and sparsely-ionizing 137Cs γ-rays, on Cryptococus neoformans. Results The best-fit linear-quadratic parameters for clonogenic survival were the following: α=0.24×10−2 Gy−1 for γ-rays and 1.07×10−2 Gy−1 for external-beam α-particles, and β=1.44×10−5 Gy−2 for both radiation types. Fungal cell killing by radiolabeled antibodies was consistent with predictions based on the α-particle dose to the cell nucleus and the linear-quadratic parameters for external-beam α-particles. The estimated RBE (for α-particles vs γ-rays) at low doses was 4.47 for the initial portion of the α-particle track, and 7.66 for the Bragg peak. Non-radiological antibody effects accounted for up to 23% of cell death. Conclusions These results quantify the degree of C. neoformans resistance to densely-ionizing radiations, and show how this resistance can be overcome with fungus-specific radiolabeled antibodies. PMID:25800676

  2. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julianne N. P.; Kanwar, Vikramjit S.; MacNamara, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  4. Specialization in tolerance: innate CD(4+)CD(25+) versus acquired TR1 and TH3 regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cottrez, Françoise; Groux, Hervé

    2004-01-15

    The regulation of immune responses to self-antigens is a complex process that involves maintaining self-tolerance while retaining the capacity to mount robust immune responses against invading microorganisms. Over the past few years, many new insights into this process have been gained, leading to the reemergence of the idea that regulatory T cells (Treg) are key players in immune regulation. These insights have raised fundamental questions concerning the definition of a Treg and what exactly constitutes T-cell-mediated suppression, identification of the signals and the cellular environment that promote the development and differentiation of these cells, and which signals maintain the homeostasis of the immune system. Thus far, the different models where Treg have been characterized cannot fully account for CD(4+)CD(25+) T cells. In this article, the authors propose the coexistence of two specialized types of CD(4+) Treg-innate and acquired-that differ in terms of their development, specificity, mechanisms, and sites of action.

  5. ZEB1 Mediates Acquired Resistance to the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Kinose, Fumi; Li, Jiannong; Ohaegbulam, Kim C.; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Qu, Xiaotao; Eschrich, Steven; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Nasarre, Patrick; Gemmill, Robert M.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.; Haura, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one mechanism of acquired resistance to inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinases (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The precise mechanisms of EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC remain unclear. We generated erlotinib-resistant HCC4006 cells (HCC4006ER) by chronic exposure of EGFR-mutant HCC4006 cells to increasing concentrations of erlotinib. HCC4006ER cells acquired an EMT phenotype and activation of the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, while lacking both T790M secondary EGFR mutation and MET gene amplification. We employed gene expression microarrays in HCC4006 and HCC4006ER cells to better understand the mechanism of acquired EGFR-TKI resistance with EMT. At the mRNA level, ZEB1 (TCF8), a known regulator of EMT, was >20-fold higher in HCC4006ER cells than in HCC4006 cells, and increased ZEB1 protein level was also detected. Furthermore, numerous ZEB1 responsive genes, such as CDH1 (E-cadherin), ST14, and vimentin, were coordinately regulated along with increased ZEB1 in HCC4006ER cells. We also identified ZEB1 overexpression and an EMT phenotype in several NSCLC cells and human NSCLC samples with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. Short-interfering RNA against ZEB1 reversed the EMT phenotype and, importantly, restored erlotinib sensitivity in HCC4006ER cells. The level of micro-RNA-200c, which can negatively regulate ZEB1, was significantly reduced in HCC4006ER cells. Our results suggest that increased ZEB1 can drive EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC. Attempts should be made to explore targeting ZEB1 to resensitize TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26789630

  6. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria phenotype cells and leucocyte subset telomere length in childhood acquired aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Tutelman, Perri R; Aubert, Geraldine; Milner, Ruth A; Dalal, Bakul I; Schultz, Kirk R; Deyell, Rebecca J

    2014-03-01

    The significance of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH(pos) ) cells and leucocyte subset telomere lengths in paediatric aplastic anaemia (AA) is unknown. Among 22 children receiving immunosuppressive therapy (IST) for AA, 73% (16/22) were PNH(pos) , of whom 94% achieved at least a partial response (PR) to IST; 11/16 (69%) achieved complete response (CR). Only 2/6 (33%) PNH(neg) patients achieved PR. PNH(pos) patients were less likely to fail IST compared to PNH(neg) patients (odds ratio 0·033; 95% confidence interval 0·002-0·468; P = 0·012). Children with AA had short granulocyte (P = 7·8 × 10(-9) ), natural killer cell (P = 6·0 × 10(-4) ), naïve T lymphocyte (P = 0·002) and B lymphocyte (P = 0·005) telomeres compared to age-matched normative data.

  7. Flap prefabrication and stem cell-assisted tissue expansion: how we acquire a monoblock flap for full face resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao; Li, Haizhou; Zhou, Shuangbai; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Xie, Feng; Xie, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Total face skin and soft-tissue defects remain one of the biggest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Reconstruction of the entire face with uniform coverage and delicate features is difficult to achieve. To avoid the patchwork result seen in multiple flaps and skin grafts, 1 monoblock flap that has similar color, texture, and thickness might be an ideal option to minimize the incisional scars and several surgical procedures but is unavailable with current approaches because of the lack of sufficient matched tissue and the unreliable blood supply for such a large flap. To acquire a monoblock flap for full face reconstruction, we combine the prefabricated flaps, skin overexpansion, and bone marrow mononuclear stem cell transplantation for total facial resurfacing. In this article, we present our experience from our case series that provides universally matched skin and near-normal facial contour. It is a reliable and an excellent reconstructive option for massive facial skin defect.

  8. Melanoma-educated CD14+ cells acquire a myeloid-derived suppressor cell phenotype through COX-2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yumeng; Poschke, Isabel; Wennerberg, Erik; Pico de Coaña, Yago; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne; Schultz, Inkeri; Hansson, Johan; Masucci, Giuseppe; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    Tumors can suppress the host immune system by employing a variety of cellular immune modulators, such as regulatory T cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In the peripheral blood of patients with advanced stage melanoma, there is an accumulation of CD14(+)HLA-DR(lo/-) MDSC that suppress autologous T cells ex vivo in a STAT-3-dependent manner. However, a precise mechanistic basis underlying this effect is unclear, particularly with regard to whether the MDSC induction mechanism relies on cell-cell contact of melanoma cells with CD14(+) cells. Here, we show that early-passage human melanoma cells induce phenotypic changes in CD14(+) monocytes, leading them to resemble MDSCs characterized in patients with advanced stage melanoma. These MDSC-like cells potently suppress autologous T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Notably, induction of myeloid-suppressive functions requires contact or close proximity between monocytes and tumor cells. Further, this induction is largely dependent on production of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) because its inhibition in these MDSC-like cells limits their ability to suppress T-cell function. We confirmed our findings with CD14(+) cells isolated from patients with advanced stage melanoma, which inhibited autologous T cells in a manner relying up prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), STAT-3, and superoxide. Indeed, PGE2 was sufficient to confer to monocytes the ability to suppress proliferation and IFN-γ production by autologous T cells ex vivo. In summary, our results reveal how immune suppression by MDSC can be initiated in the tumor microenvironment of human melanoma.

  9. SCCOHT tumors acquire chemoresistance and protection by interacting mesenchymal stroma/stem cells within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Otte, Anna; Yang, Yuanyuan; von der Ohe, Juliane; Melzer, Catharina; Hillemanns, Peter; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Hass, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug testing of SCCOHT-1 and BIN-67 tumor cells revealed synergistic growth-inhibition of >95% in vitro with a combination of foretinib and FK228. Application of this drug combination in vivo in NODscid mice-induced SCCOHT-1GFP tumors was associated with ~6-fold reduction in tumor mass within 10 days, whereby synergistic effects of the two compounds remained undetectable compared to previous results with foretinib treatment alone. Histopathologic evaluation revealed a reduced vascularization and a lower amount of proliferating cells in the treated tumors. Surprisingly, a simultaneous significant accumulation of extracellular matrix structures with positive elastin-van Gieson staining was observed following foretinib/FK228 exposure. Expression analysis of treated animal tumors exhibited various changes including increased mouse transcript levels of elastin, laminin, and fibronectin. In parallel, markers for mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) including CD73 and CD90 were detectable in all mouse tumors suggesting a possible involvement of these cells in extracellular matrix restructure. Indeed, incubation of MSC with FK228 or foretinib/FK228 demonstrated morphologic alterations and enhanced expression of laminin and fibronectin. Moreover, a co-culture of MSC with lentiviral-labeled SCCOHT-1GFP cells contributed to protection of the tumor cells against FK228-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, explant cultures of SCCOHT-1GFP-induced tumors acquired an increased resistance to FK228 and a combination of foretinib/FK228 in contrast to foretinib alone. Together, these data suggested that FK228-mediated extracellular matrix protein expression by MSC contributes to increased protection and enhanced resistance of SCCOHT tumors which could represent a more general mechanism of MSC during drug-induced alterations of a tumor microenvironment.

  10. Resolution of transfusion dependence by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) in acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) associated with myeloid metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Z R; Rosenfeld, C S; Shadduck, R K

    1993-01-01

    A patient with acquired pure red cell aplasia and agnogenic myeloid metaplasia (AMM) was treated with rHuEPO. She became transfusion independent. Weekly injections of rHuEPO have maintained the response without side-effects or disease progression. In addition, marrow fibrosis and splenomegaly have decreased. Therefore, rHuEPO may be effective therapy for some patients with acquired PRCA and/or AMM.

  11. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  12. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  13. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and PI3K-related kinase (PIKK) activity contributes to radioresistance in thyroid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Natalie; Williams, Joseph; Telfer, Brian A; Resch, Julia; Valentine, Helen R; Fitzmaurice, Richard J; Eustace, Amanda; Irlam, Joely; Rowling, Emily J; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; West, Catharine M; Brabant, Georg; Williams, Kaye J

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic (ATC) and certain follicular thyroid-carcinomas (FTCs) are radioresistant. The Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is commonly hyperactivated in thyroid-carcinomas. PI3K can modify the PI3K-related kinases (PIKKs) in response to radiation: How PIKKs interact with PI3K and contribute to radioresistance in thyroid-carcinomas is unknown. Further uncertainties exist in how these interactions function under the radioresistant hypoxic microenvironment. Under normoxia/anoxia, ATC (8505c) and FTC (FTC-133) cells were irradiated, with PI3K-inhibition (via GDC-0941 and PTEN-reconstitution into PTEN-null FTC-133s) and effects on PIKK-activation, DNA-damage, clonogenic-survival and cell cycle, assessed. FTC-xenografts were treated with 5 × 2 Gy, ± 50 mg/kg GDC-0941 (twice-daily; orally) for 14 days and PIKK-activation and tumour-growth assessed. PIKK-expression was additionally assessed in 12 human papillary thyroid-carcinomas, 13 FTCs and 12 ATCs. GDC-0941 inhibited radiation-induced activation of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM-and Rad3-related (ATR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Inhibition of ATM and DNA-PKcs was PI3K-dependent, since activation was reduced in PTEN-reconstituted FTC-133s. Inhibition of PIKK-activation was greater under anoxia: Consequently, whilst DNA-damage was increased and prolonged under both normoxia and anoxia, PI3K-inhibition only reduced clonogenic-survival under anoxia. GDC-0941 abrogated radiation-induced cell cycle arrest, an effect most likely linked to the marked inhibition of ATR-activation. Importantly, GDC-0941 inhibited radiation-induced PIKK-activation in FTC-xenografts leading to a significant increase in time taken for tumours to triple in size: 26.5 ± 5 days (radiation-alone) versus 31.5 ± 5 days (dual-treatment). PIKKs were highly expressed across human thyroid-carcinoma classifications, with ATM scoring consistently lower. Interestingly, some loss of ATM and DNA

  14. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  15. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-11-16

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy of Astatine-211-Labeled Trastuzumab on Radioresistant SKOV-3 Tumors in Nude Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, Stig Baeck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Danielsson, Anna; Elgqvist, Joergen; Frost, Sofia; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential use of astatine-211 ({sup 211}At)-labeled trastuzumab for the treatment of HER-2-positive, radioresistant ovarian carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Four-week-old nude mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 5 . 10{sup 6} SKOV-3 cells in 0.4 mL saline on Day 0. The endpoint was the total tumor weight in each mouse on Day 63. Three experiments were performed in which the response to single-dose and fractionated treatment with unlabeled and {sup 211}At-labeled antibody was evaluated. Results: Experiment 1 showed, for the same total amount of trastuzumab, a dose-response relationship between {sup 211}At activity (0-400 kBq on Day 7) and therapeutic efficacy (p = 0.001). The effect of varying the amount of unlabeled trastuzumab was studied in Experiment 2. All mice, except for the controls, received 400 kBq {sup 211}At-trastuzumab, and different groups received 5, 50, or 500 {mu}g trastuzumab on Day 7. The increase from 5 to 50 {mu}g trastuzumab reduced the tumors by 78% in weight. No tumors were present in mice given 500 {mu}g trastuzumab. In Experiment 3, the effect of a fractionated treatment regimen was studied. Mice that received 100 kBq {sup 211}At-trastuzumab on Days 7 and 8 had a 42% smaller tumor burden than did controls. Groups of mice injected with 200 + 100 kBq on Days 7 and 21 and mice injected with 100 kBq on Days 7, 8, and 21 both had 24% less tumor weight than the corresponding controls. Conclusion: The combination of 500 {mu}g trastuzumab and 400 kBq {sup 211}At-trastuzumab had the greatest effect, with complete eradication of the tumors in this nude mouse model.

  17. Adipose tissue-deprived stem cells acquire cementoblast features treated with dental follicle cell conditioned medium containing dentin non-collagenous proteins in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiujie; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we examine the effects of dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs) on differentiation of ADSCs. {yields} We examined that ADSCs treated with dNCPs/DFCCM underwent morphological changes and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. {yields} dNCPs/DFCCM enhanced the mineralization behaviour and mineralization-related marker expression of ADSCs. {yields} ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are easily harvested and show excellent pluripotency potential, have generated considerable interest in regenerative medicine. In this study, the differentiation of ADSCs was assessed after treatment with dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). ADSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and high proliferative capacity. However, after treatment with dNCPs/DFCCM, ADSCs changed from a fibroblast-like to cementoblast-like morphology and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. Alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro mineralization behaviour of ADSCs were significantly enhanced. Mineralization-related markers including cementum attachment protein, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteonectin were detected at mRNA or protein levels, whereas dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein were not detected, implying a cementoblast-like phenotype. These results demonstrate that ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment and could be a potential source of cementogenic cells for periodontal regeneration.

  18. Extrachromosomal sequences of hepatitis B virus DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Noonan, C A; Yoffe, B; Mansell, P W; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1986-08-01

    The primary etiologic agent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a human T-lymphotropic retrovirus (the AIDS virus). However, the pathogenesis of this virus suggests that other cofactors may contribute to the development of clinically overt disease. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated as a potential cofactor because HBV and AIDS virus infections frequently coexist, striking similarities exist in their epidemiologic patterns, and recent data indicate that HBV is lymphotropic. To establish the prevalence of HBV infections in lymphoid cells from individuals with AIDS-related disorders, sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 16 males with AIDS virus infections were examined for the presence of HBV DNA by DNA X DNA blot hybridization. Fifteen (94%) of these individuals had serologic evidence of a recent or prior HBV infection. HBV DNA was detected in the PBMC of all of these patients, regardless of existing HBV serology. Among the 36 control individuals without AIDS-related symptomatology, PBMC-associated HBV DNA was detected in 8 of 14 carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and in 3 of 10 individuals immune to HBV, but it was absent from the PBMC of 12 individuals without HBV infection. In all instances, the HBV DNA was extrachromosomal and existed as replicative intermediates or high molecular weight oligomers of the viral genome. Replicative intermediates and serum-associated HBV DNA were detected in all hepatitis B e antigen-positive carriers, regardless of their clinical status. In contrast, the high molecular weight oligomers of HBV DNA were detected in the PBMC of all of the AIDS virus-infected patients examined, but in only 33% of those in the control group who had evidence of HBV infection. This finding suggests that a unique and complex HBV-host-cell interaction exists in patients infected with the AIDS virus.

  19. Methemoglobinemia - acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood disorder in which the body cannot reuse hemoglobin because it is damaged. Hemoglobin is the oxygen-carrying molecule found in red blood cells. In some cases of methemoglobinemia, the hemoglobin is unable to carry enough oxygen to body ...

  20. Natural cytotoxicity in immunodeficiency diseases: preservation of natural killer activity and the in vivo appearance of radioresistant killing

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.F.; Polmar, S.H.; Schacter, B.Z.; Brovall, C.; Hornick, D.L.; Sorensen, R.U.

    1986-01-01

    We studied spontaneous natural killer (NK) cell activity and radiation-resistant NK mediated cytotoxicity in four patients with clinically documented severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID), and in one subject each with intestinal lymphangiectasia and cartilage-hair hypoplasia. We observed the preservation of spontaneous NK activity in all patients despite the presence of profound B- and T-lymphocytopenia and clinical immunodeficiency. NK activity was associated with relatively normal circulating numbers of OKM1+ lymphocytes, a population known to contain NK effectors. Spontaneous NK activity resistant to 3000 rad was increased in all patients, indicating the presence of activated natural killer cells in vivo. The concept of a chronically activated immune system in these patients was further supported by the presence of increased Ia positive T cells in all subjects tested, suggesting that radioresistant NK activity may be a useful parameter to measure when assessing in vivo immune activation. Our data, as well as that of others, supports the hypothesis that at least one population of NK cells is a distinct lineage arising at the differentiation level of myeloid and lymphoid stem cells in the bone marrow.

  1. Modulation of Cell Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress Signaling Contribute to Acquired Melphalan Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zub, Kamila Anna; de Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70–80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance. PMID:25769101

  2. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70-80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance.

  3. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  4. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  5. Atypical Cell Populations Associated with Acquired Resistance to Cytostatics and Cancer Stem Cell Features: The Role of Mitochondria in Nuclear Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  6. Atypical cell populations associated with acquired resistance to cytostatics and cancer stem cell features: the role of mitochondria in nuclear encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Carballo, David; Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  7. Stem cells from innate sexual but not acquired sexual planarians have the capability to form a sexual individual.

    PubMed

    Nodono, Hanae; Ishino, Yugo; Hoshi, Motonori; Matsumoto, Midori

    2012-11-01

    Planarian species may harbor as many as three populations with different reproductive strategies. Animals from innate asexual (AS) and innate sexual (InS) populations reproduce only by fission and cross-fertilization, respectively, whereas the third population switches seasonally between the two reproductive modes. AS worms can be experimentally sexualized by feeding them with minced InS worms; we termed the resulting animals "acquired sexual" (AqS) worms. Both AqS and InS worms exhibit sexualizing activity when used as feed, suggesting that they maintain their sexual state via endogenous sexualizing substances, although the mechanisms underlying determination of reproductive strategy and sexual switching in these metazoans remain enigmatic. Therefore, we compared the endogenous sexualizing activity of InS worms and AqS worms. First, we amputated mature worms and assessed if they could re-enter a sexual state. Regenerants of InS worms, but not AqS worms, were only sexual, indicating that sexual state regulation comprises two steps: (1) autonomous initiation of sexualizing substance production and (2) maintenance of the sexual state by continuous production of sexualizing substances. Next, InS neoblasts were characterized by transplantation, finding that they successfully engrafted, proliferated, and replaced all recipient cells. Under such conditions, the AS recipients of InS worm neoblasts, but not those of AqS worms, became sexual. These results clearly show that there is a neoblast-autonomous determination of reproductive strategy in planarians.

  8. Interleukin-35-Producing CD8α+ Dendritic Cells Acquire a Tolerogenic State and Regulate T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Sergio; Duval, Anaïs; Migliorini, Romain; Stevanin, Mathias; Mack, Vanessa; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in shaping immunogenic as well as tolerogenic adaptive immune responses and thereby dictate the outcome of adaptive immunity. Here, we report the generation of a CD8α+ DC line constitutively secreting the tolerogenic cytokine interleukin (IL)-35. IL-35 secretion led to impaired CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation and interfered with their function in vitro and also in vivo. IL-35 was furthermore found to induce a tolerogenic phenotype on CD8α+ DCs, characterized by the upregulation of CD11b, downregulation of MHC class II, a reduced costimulatory potential as well as production of the immunomodulatory molecule IL-10. Vaccination of mice with IL-35-expressing DCs promoted tumor growth and reduced the severity of autoimmune encephalitis not only in a preventive but also after induction of encephalitogenic T cells. The reduction in experimental autoimmune encephalitis severity was significantly more pronounced when antigen-pulsed IL-35+ DCs were used. These findings suggest a new, indirect effector mechanism by which IL-35-responding antigen-presenting cells contribute to immune tolerance. Furthermore, IL-35-transfected DCs may be a promising approach for immunotherapy in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28228759

  9. Identification of New Genes Contributing to the Extreme Radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans Using a Tn5-Based Transposon Mutant Library

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Fanny; Dutertre, Murielle; Porteron, Martine; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Sommer, Suzanne; Pasternak, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have developed an extremely efficient in vivo Tn5-based mutagenesis procedure to construct a Deinococcus radiodurans insertion mutant library subsequently screened for sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as γ and UV radiations or mitomycin C. The genes inactivated in radiosensitive mutants belong to various functional categories, including DNA repair functions, stress responses, signal transduction, membrane transport, several metabolic pathways, and genes of unknown function. Interestingly, preliminary characterization of previously undescribed radiosensitive mutants suggests the contribution of cyclic di-AMP signaling in the recovery of D. radiodurans cells from genotoxic stresses, probably by modulating several pathways involved in the overall cell response. Our analyses also point out a new transcriptional regulator belonging to the GntR family, encoded by DR0265, and a predicted RNase belonging to the newly described Y family, both contributing to the extreme radioresistance of D. radiodurans. Altogether, this work has revealed new cell responses involved either directly or indirectly in repair of various cell damage and confirmed that D. radiodurans extreme radiation resistance is determined by a multiplicity of pathways acting as a complex network. PMID:25884619

  10. Carfilzomib and oprozomib synergize with histone deacetylase inhibitors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma models of acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yan; Kirk, Christopher J; Johnson, Daniel E

    2014-09-01

    Acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors represents a considerable impediment to their effective clinical application. Carfilzomib and its orally bioavailable structural analog oprozomib are second-generation, highly-selective, proteasome inhibitors. However, the mechanisms of acquired resistance to carfilzomib and oprozomib are incompletely understood, and effective strategies for overcoming this resistance are needed. Here, we developed models of acquired resistance to carfilzomib in two head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, UMSCC-1 and Cal33, through gradual exposure to increasing drug concentrations. The resistant lines R-UMSCC-1 and R-Cal33 demonstrated 205- and 64-fold resistance, respectively, relative to the parental lines. Similarly, a high level of cross-resistance to oprozomib, as well as paclitaxel, was observed, whereas only moderate resistance to bortezomib (8- to 29-fold), and low level resistance to cisplatin (1.5- to 5-fold) was seen. Synergistic induction of apoptosis signaling and cell death, and inhibition of colony formation followed co-treatment of acquired resistance models with carfilzomib and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) vorinostat. Synergism was also seen with other combinations, including oprozomib plus vorinostat, or carfilzomib plus the HDACi entinostat. Synergism was accompanied by upregulation of proapoptotic Bik, and suppression of Bik attenuated the synergy. The acquired resistance models also exhibited elevated levels of MDR-1/P-gp. Inhibition of MDR-1/P-gp with reversin 121 partially overcame carfilzomib resistance in R-UMSCC-1 and R-Cal33 cells. Collectively, these studies indicate that combining carfilzomib or oprozomib with HDAC or MDR-1/P-gp inhibitors may be a useful strategy for overcoming acquired resistance to these proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Patterns of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and outcomes from patients with sepsis secondary to community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patricia; Silva, Eliézer; Baggio-Zappia, Giovana Lotici; Brunialti, Milena Karina Coló; Nucci, Laura Alejandra; Rigato, Otelo; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms governing the inflammatory response during sepsis have been shown to be complex, involving cross-talk between diverse signaling pathways. Current knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying sepsis provides an incomplete picture of the syndrome, justifying additional efforts to understand this condition. Microarray-based expression profiling is a powerful approach for the investigation of complex clinical conditions such as sepsis. In this study, we investigate whole-genome expression profiles in mononuclear cells from survivors (n = 5) and non-survivors (n = 5) of sepsis. To circumvent the heterogeneity of septic patients, only patients admitted with sepsis caused by community-acquired pneumonia were included. Blood samples were collected at the time of sepsis diagnosis and seven days later to evaluate the role of biological processes or genes possibly involved in patient recovery. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) profiling discriminated between patients with early sepsis and healthy individuals. Genes with differential expression were grouped according to Gene Ontology, and most genes related to immune defense were up-regulated in septic patients. Additionally, PCA in the early stage was able to distinguish survivors from non-survivors. Differences in oxidative phosphorylation seem to be associated with clinical outcome because significant differences in the expression profile of genes related to mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) I-V were observed between survivors and non-survivors at the time of patient enrollment. Global gene expression profiles after seven days of sepsis progression seem to reproduce, to a certain extent, patterns collected at the time of diagnosis. Gene expression profiles comparing admission and follow-up samples differed between survivors and non-survivors, with decreased expression of genes related to immune functions in non-survivors. In conclusion, genes related to host defense and inflammatory response

  12. Acquired resistance to rechallenge injury in rats recovered from subclinical renal damage with uranyl acetate-Importance of proliferative activity of tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuan; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Sakakima, Masanori; Hishida, Akira

    2010-02-15

    Animals recovered from acute renal failure are resistant to subsequent insult. We investigated whether rats recovered from mild proximal tubule (PT) injury without renal dysfunction (subclinical renal damage) acquire the same resistance. Rats 14 days after recovering from subclinical renal damage, which was induced by 0.2 mg/kg of uranyl acetate (UA) (sub-toxic dose), were rechallenged with 4 mg/kg of UA (nephrotoxic dose). Fate of PT cells and renal function were examined in response to nephrotoxic dose of UA. All divided cells after sub-toxic dose of UA insult were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days then the number of PT cells with or without BrdU-labeling was counted following nephrotoxic dose of UA insult. Rats recovered from subclinical renal damage gained resistance to nephrotoxic dose of UA with reduced renal dysfunction, less severity of peak damage (necrotic and TUNEL+ apoptotic cells) and accelerated PT cell proliferation, but with earlier peak of PT damage. The decrease in number of PT cells in the early phase of rechallenge injury with nephrotoxic UA was more in rats pretreated with sub-toxic dose of UA than vehicle pretreated rats. The exaggerated loss of PT cells was mainly caused by the exaggerated loss of BrdU+ divided cells. In contrast, accelerated cell proliferation in rats recovered from sub-toxic dose of UA was observed mainly in BrdU- non-divided cells. The findings suggest that rats recovered from subclinical renal damage showed partial acquired resistance to nephrotoxic insult. Accelerated recovery with increased proliferative activity of non-divided PT cells after subclinical renal damage may mainly contribute to acquired resistance.

  13. K-RAS(V12) Induces Autocrine Production of EGFR Ligands and Mediates Radioresistance Through EGFR-Dependent Akt Signaling and Activation of DNA-PKcs

    SciTech Connect

    Minjgee, Minjmaa; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Giehl, Klaudia; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: It is known that postirradiation survival of tumor cells presenting mutated K-RAS is mediated through autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study the molecular mechanism of radioresistance of cells overexpressing mutated K-RAS(V12) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu) presenting wild-type K-RAS were transfected with empty vector or vector expressing mutated K-RAS(V12). The effect of K-RAS(V12) on autocrine production of EGFR ligands, activation of EGFR downstream pathways, DNA damage repair, and postirradiation survival was analyzed. Results: Conditioned medium collected from K-RAS(V12)-transfected cells enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway and increased postirradiation survival of wild-type K-RAS parental cells when compared with controls. These effects were reversed by amphiregulin (AREG)-neutralizing antibody. In addition, secretion of the EGFR ligands AREG and transforming growth factor {alpha} was significantly increased upon overexpression of K-RAS(V12). Expression of mutated K-RAS(V12) resulted in an increase in radiation-induced DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation at S2056. This increase was accompanied by increased repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Abrogation of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation by serum depletion or AREG-neutralizing antibody underscored the role of autocrine production of EGFR ligands, namely, AREG, in regulating DNA-PKcs activation in K-RAS mutated cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that radioresistance of K-RAS mutated tumor cells is at least in part due to constitutive production of EGFR ligands, which mediate enhanced repair of DNA double-strand breaks through the EGFR-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt cascade.

  14. Transition in Survival From Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity to Increased Radioresistance Is Independent of Activation of ATM SER1981 Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Sarah A.; Collis, Spencer J.; Joiner, Michael C.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The molecular basis of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activity and the downstream ATM-dependent G{sub 2}-phase cell cycle checkpoint in overcoming HRS and triggering radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Survival was measured using a high-resolution clonogenic assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was measured by Western blotting. The role of ATM was determined in survival experiments after molecular (siRNA) and chemical (0.4 mM caffeine) inhibition and chemical (20 {mu}g/mL chloroquine, 15 {mu}M genistein) activation 4-6 h before irradiation. Checkpoint responsiveness was assessed in eight cell lines of differing HRS status using flow cytometry to quantify the progression of irradiated (0-2 Gy) G{sub 2}-phase cells entering mitosis, using histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Results: The dose-response pattern of ATM activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to radioresistance. However, ATM activation did not play a primary role in initiating increased radioresistance. Rather, a relationship was discovered between the function of the downstream ATM-dependent early G{sub 2}-phase checkpoint and the prevalence and overcoming of HRS. Four cell lines that exhibited HRS failed to show low-dose (<0.3-Gy) checkpoint function. In contrast, four HRS-negative cell lines exhibited immediate cell cycle arrest for the entire 0-2-Gy dose range. Conclusion: Overcoming HRS is reliant on the function of the early G{sub 2}-phase checkpoint. These data suggest that clinical exploitation of HRS could be achieved by combining radiotherapy with chemotherapeutic agents that modulate this cell cycle checkpoint.

  15. MicroRNA-21 modulates radiation resistance through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-promoted glycolysis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Renben; Yan, Hongjiang; Jin, Linzhi; Dou, Xue; Chen, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer affects the transcription of target genes, and profoundly influences cancer‑associated signaling pathways. Radiation resistance is a major problem encountered in the treatment of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miRNA (miR)‑21 in the development of radiation resistance in non‑small cell lung cancer cells. A radiation‑resistant cell line was generated from A549 cells. Significant upregulation of miR‑21 was detected in the radioresistant cancer cells, as compared with the radiosensitive cells, and overexpression of miR‑21 rendered A549 parental cells resistant to radiation. In addition, glycolysis was increased in the radioresistant cells, as compared with the sensitive cells. Furthermore, hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF1α) was upregulated by miR‑21 in radioresistant cells, resulting in promotion of the key enzymes of glycolysis. Inhibition of HIF1α by small interfering RNA suppressed glycolysis and resensitized the cancer cells to radiation, whereas the recovery of HIF1α in miR‑21‑inhibited radioresistant cells resulted in recovery of radioresistance. In conclusion, the present study suggested that miR‑21 may modulate radioresistance through the upregulation of HIF1α. These results may provide a novel perspective on miRNA for the development of anti-radioresistance drugs.

  16. Co-existence of clonal expanded autologous and transplacental-acquired maternal T cells in recombination activating gene-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lev, A; Simon, A J; Ben-Ari, J; Takagi, D; Stauber, T; Trakhtenbrot, L; Rosenthal, E; Rechavi, G; Amariglio, N; Somech, R

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the presence of high amounts of maternal T cells excludes Omenn syndrome (OS) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). We report a SCID patient with a novel mutation in the recombination activating gene (RAG)1 gene (4-BP DEL.1406 TTGC) who presented with immunodeficiency and OS. Several assays, including representatives of specific T cell receptors (TCR), Vβ families and TCR-γ rearrangements, were performed in order to understand more clearly the nature and origin of the patient's T cells. The patient had oligoclonal T cells which, based on the patient–mother human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B50 mismatch, were either autologous or of maternal origin. These cell populations were different in their numbers of regulatory T cells (Treg) and the diversity of TCR repertoires. This is the first description of the co-existence of large amounts of clonal expanded autologous and transplacental-acquired maternal T cells in RAG1-deficient SCID. PMID:24666246

  17. Co-existence of clonal expanded autologous and transplacental-acquired maternal T cells in recombination activating gene-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lev, A; Simon, A J; Ben-Ari, J; Takagi, D; Stauber, T; Trakhtenbrot, L; Rosenthal, E; Rechavi, G; Amariglio, N; Somech, R

    2014-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that the presence of high amounts of maternal T cells excludes Omenn syndrome (OS) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). We report a SCID patient with a novel mutation in the recombination activating gene (RAG)1 gene (4-BP DEL.1406 TTGC) who presented with immunodeficiency and OS. Several assays, including representatives of specific T cell receptors (TCR), Vβ families and TCR-γ rearrangements, were performed in order to understand more clearly the nature and origin of the patient's T cells. The patient had oligoclonal T cells which, based on the patient-mother human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B50 mismatch, were either autologous or of maternal origin. These cell populations were different in their numbers of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and the diversity of TCR repertoires. This is the first description of the co-existence of large amounts of clonal expanded autologous and transplacental-acquired maternal T cells in RAG1-deficient SCID.

  18. IKK phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 contributes to acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhipeng; Yang, Zejia; Lapidus, Rena G; Liu, Xuefeng; Cullen, Kevin J; Dan, Han C

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment methods for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. For recurrent and metastatic HNSCC, cisplatin is the most common treatment option, but most of patients will eventually develop cisplatin resistance. Therefore, it is imperative to define the mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance and find novel therapeutic strategies to overcome this deadly disease. In order to determine the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in contributing to acquired cisplatin resistance in HNSCC, the expression and activity of NF-κB and its upstream kinases, IKKα and IKKβ, were evaluated and compared in three pairs of cisplatin sensitive and resistant HNSCC cell lines, including a pair of patient derived HNSCC cell line. The experiments revealed that NF-κB p65 activity was elevated in cisplatin resistant HNSCC cells compared to that in their parent cells. Importantly, the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 at serine 536 and the phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ at their activation loops were dramatically elevated in the resistant cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of NF-κB or overexpression of p65-S536 alanine (p65-S536A) mutant sensitizes resistant cells to cisplatin. Additionally, the novel IKKβ inhibitor CmpdA has been shown to consistently block the phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 while also dramatically improving the efficacy of cisplatin in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in the cisplatin resistant cancer cells. These results indicated that IKK/NF-κB plays a pivotal role in controlling acquired cisplatin resistance and that targeting the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway may provide a possible therapeutic method to overcome the acquired resistance to cisplatin in HNSCC. PMID:26693062

  19. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation.

  20. Characteristics of malignant melanoma cells in the treatment with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Mori, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The radioresistance of malignant melanoma cells has been explained by the wide shoulder of the dose-cell-survival curve of the cells exposed to photon beams. Fast neutrons, 30 MeV d-Be, were used to treat patients who had malignant melanoma in order to confirm the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for tumor control. Seventy-two patients suffering from malignant melanoma participated in the clinical trials with fast neutrons between November 1975 and December 1986. Of 72 patients, 45 had melanoma of the skin, 20 had melanoma of the head and neck, and seven had choroidal melanoma. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had previously untreated melanoma of the skin was 61% and for patients who received postoperative irradiation, it was 35.7% whereas no patients who had recurrent tumor survived over 4 years. Of 22 patients who had melanoma of the skin, stage I, local control in four cases was achieved by irradiation alone, whereas local control was achieved in 17 of 18 patients who required salvage surgery after fast-neutron therapy. The results of pathological studies performed with specimens obtained from salvage surgery have shown that melanoma cells growing in intradermal tissue are radioresistant, compared with cells growing in intraepidermal tissue. This might suggest that melanoma cells acquire radioresistance when the connective tissue is involved. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had locally advanced melanoma of the head and neck, previously untreated, was 15.4%. Radiation therapy with accelerated protons was suitable for patients suffering from choroidal melanoma.

  1. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition diminishes acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer with T790M mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liguang; Nilsson, Monique; Goonatilake, Ruchitha; Tong, Pan; Li, Lerong; Giri, Uma; Villalobos, Pamela; Mino, Barbara; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio; Wang, Jing; Heymach, John V.; Johnson, Faye M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGFR mutations, but resistance is inevitable. Mechanisms of acquired resistance include T790M mutations and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). One potential strategy for overcoming this resistance is the inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) based on our previous studies showing that mesenchymal NSCLC cell lines are more sensitive to PLK1 inhibition than epithelial cell lines. To determine the extent to which PLK1 inhibition overcomes EGFR TKI resistance we measured the effects of the PLK1 inhibitor volasertib alone and in combination with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in vitro and in vivo in EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines with acquired resistance to erlotinib. Two erlotinib-resistant cell lines that underwent EMT had higher sensitivity to volasertib, which caused G2/M arrest and apoptosis, than their parental cells. In all NSCLC cell lines with T790M mutations, volasertib markedly reduced erlotinib resistance. All erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines with T790M mutations had higher sensitivity to erlotinib plus volasertib than to erlotinib alone, and the combination treatment caused G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Compared with either agent alone, the combination treatment also caused significantly more DNA damage and greater reductions in tumor size. Our results suggest that PLK1 inhibition is clinically effective against NSCLC that becomes resistant to EGFR inhibition through EMT or the acquisition of a T790M mutation. These results uncover new functions of PLK1 inhibition in the treatment of NSCLC with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. PMID:27384992

  2. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    genome, whereas Shewanella oneidensis is killed by levels of IR (0.07 kGy) that result in less than 1 DSB per genome [1]. We have reported a...Mn and Fe in D. radiodurans. The D. radiodurans diplococcus (designation: no. 109) was isolated from the mid- logarithmic growth phase (OD600 0.3...Gaidamakova EK, Matrosova VY, Vasilenko A, et al. (2005) How radiation kills cells: Survival of Deinococcus radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis

  3. Liquid biopsy monitoring uncovers acquired RAS-mediated resistance to cetuximab in a substantial proportion of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schieferdecker, Aneta; Busch, Chia-Jung; Laban, Simon; Grob, Tobias; Kriegs, Malte; Knecht, Rainald; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Binder, Mascha

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy is insufficiently understood in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), entailing the lack of predictive biomarkers. Here, we studied resistance-mediating EGFR ectodomain and activating RAS mutations by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cell lines and tumor tissue of cetuximab-naïve patients (46 cases, 12 cell lines), as well as liquid biopsies taken during and after cetuximab/platinum/5-fluorouracil treatment (20 cases). Tumors of cetuximab-naïve patients were unmutated, except for HRAS mutations in 4.3% of patients. Liquid biopsies revealed acquired KRAS, NRAS or HRAS mutations in more than one third of patients after cetuximab exposure. 46% of patients with on-treatment disease progression showed acquired RAS mutations, while no RAS mutations were found in the non-progressive subset of patients, indicating that acquisition of RAS mutant clones correlated significantly with clinical resistance (Chi square p=0.032). The emergence of mutations preceded clinical progression in half of the patients, with a maximum time from mutation detection to clinical progression of 16 weeks. RAS mutations account for acquired resistance to EGFR-targeting in a substantial proportion of HNSCC patients, even though these tumors are rarely mutated at baseline. Liquid biopsies may be used for mutational monitoring to guide treatment decisions. PMID:27119512

  4. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  5. Innate signals overcome acquired TCR signaling pathway regulation and govern the fate of human CD161(hi) CD8α⁺ semi-invariant T cells.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Cameron J; Delrow, Jeff; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Swanson, Hillary M; Basom, Ryan; Tabellini, Laura; Delaney, Colleen; Heimfeld, Shelly; Hansen, John A; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-09-08

    Type 17 programmed CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells contribute to mucosal immunity to bacteria and yeast. In early life, microbial colonization induces proliferation of CD161(hi) cells that is dependent on their expression of a semi-invariant Vα7.2(+) TCR. Although prevalent in adults, CD161(hi)CD8α(+) cells exhibit weak proliferative and cytokine responses to TCR ligation. The mechanisms responsible for the dichotomous response of neonatal and adult CD161(hi) cells, and the signals that enable their effector function, have not been established. We describe acquired regulation of TCR signaling in adult memory CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells that is absent in cord CD161(hi) cells and adult CD161(lo) cells. Regulated TCR signaling in CD161(hi) cells was due to profound alterations in TCR signaling pathway gene expression and could be overcome by costimulation through CD28 or innate cytokine receptors, which dictated the fate of their progeny. Costimulation with IL-1β during TCR ligation markedly increased proinflammatory IL-17 production, while IL-12-induced Tc1-like function and restored the response to TCR ligation without costimulation. CD161(hi) cells from umbilical cord blood and granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukaphereses differed in frequency and function, suggesting future evaluation of the contribution of CD161(hi) cells in hematopoietic stem cell grafts to transplant outcomes is warranted.

  6. Genome sequence of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    White, O; Eisen, J A; Heidelberg, J F; Hickey, E K; Peterson, J D; Dodson, R J; Haft, D H; Gwinn, M L; Nelson, W C; Richardson, D L; Moffat, K S; Qin, H; Jiang, L; Pamphile, W; Crosby, M; Shen, M; Vamathevan, J J; Lam, P; McDonald, L; Utterback, T; Zalewski, C; Makarova, K S; Aravind, L; Daly, M J; Minton, K W; Fleischmann, R D; Ketchum, K A; Nelson, K E; Salzberg, S; Smith, H O; Venter, J C; Fraser, C M

    1999-11-19

    The complete genome sequence of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is composed of two chromosomes (2,648,638 and 412,348 base pairs), a megaplasmid (177,466 base pairs), and a small plasmid (45,704 base pairs), yielding a total genome of 3,284, 156 base pairs. Multiple components distributed on the chromosomes and megaplasmid that contribute to the ability of D. radiodurans to survive under conditions of starvation, oxidative stress, and high amounts of DNA damage were identified. Deinococcus radiodurans represents an organism in which all systems for DNA repair, DNA damage export, desiccation and starvation recovery, and genetic redundancy are present in one cell.

  7. Plasmodium vivax Cell-Traversal Protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites: Naturally Acquired Humoral Immune Response and B-Cell Epitope Mapping in Brazilian Amazon Inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Isabela Ferreira; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Têva, Antônio; Ramos Franco, Antônia Maria; Pinheiro, Francimeire Gomes; Chaves, Lana Bitencourt; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Banic, Dalma Maria; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS), a highly conserved antigen involved in sporozoite motility, plays an important role in the traversal of host cells during the preerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium species. Recently, it has been considered an alternative target when designing novel antimalarial vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum. However, the potential of Plasmodium vivax CelTOS as a vaccine target is yet to be explored. This study evaluated the naturally acquired immune response against a recombinant P. vivax CelTOS (PvCelTOS) (IgG and IgG subclass) in 528 individuals from Brazilian Amazon, as well as the screening of B-cell epitopes in silico and peptide assays to associate the breadth of antibody responses of those individuals with exposition and/or protection correlates. We show that PvCelTOS is naturally immunogenic in Amazon inhabitants with 94 individuals (17.8%) showing specific IgG antibodies against the recombinant protein. Among responders, the IgG reactivity indexes (RIs) presented a direct correlation with the number of previous malaria episodes (p = 0.003; r = 0.315) and inverse correlation with the time elapsed from the last malaria episode (p = 0.031; r = -0.258). Interestingly, high responders to PvCelTOS (RI > 2) presented higher number of previous malaria episodes, frequency of recent malaria episodes, and ratio of cytophilic/non-cytophilic antibodies than low responders (RI < 2) and non-responders (RI < 1). Moreover, a high prevalence of the cytophilic antibody IgG1 over all other IgG subclasses (p < 0.0001) was observed. B-cell epitope mapping revealed five immunogenic regions in PvCelTOS, but no associations between the specific IgG response to peptides and exposure/protection parameters were found. However, the epitope (PvCelTOSI136-E143) was validated as a main linear B-cell epitope, as 92% of IgG responders to PvCelTOS were also responders to this peptide sequence. This

  8. Plasmodium vivax Cell-Traversal Protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites: Naturally Acquired Humoral Immune Response and B-Cell Epitope Mapping in Brazilian Amazon Inhabitants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Isabela Ferreira; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Têva, Antônio; Ramos Franco, Antônia Maria; Pinheiro, Francimeire Gomes; Chaves, Lana Bitencourt; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Banic, Dalma Maria; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS), a highly conserved antigen involved in sporozoite motility, plays an important role in the traversal of host cells during the preerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium species. Recently, it has been considered an alternative target when designing novel antimalarial vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum. However, the potential of Plasmodium vivax CelTOS as a vaccine target is yet to be explored. This study evaluated the naturally acquired immune response against a recombinant P. vivax CelTOS (PvCelTOS) (IgG and IgG subclass) in 528 individuals from Brazilian Amazon, as well as the screening of B-cell epitopes in silico and peptide assays to associate the breadth of antibody responses of those individuals with exposition and/or protection correlates. We show that PvCelTOS is naturally immunogenic in Amazon inhabitants with 94 individuals (17.8%) showing specific IgG antibodies against the recombinant protein. Among responders, the IgG reactivity indexes (RIs) presented a direct correlation with the number of previous malaria episodes (p = 0.003; r = 0.315) and inverse correlation with the time elapsed from the last malaria episode (p = 0.031; r = −0.258). Interestingly, high responders to PvCelTOS (RI > 2) presented higher number of previous malaria episodes, frequency of recent malaria episodes, and ratio of cytophilic/non-cytophilic antibodies than low responders (RI < 2) and non-responders (RI < 1). Moreover, a high prevalence of the cytophilic antibody IgG1 over all other IgG subclasses (p < 0.0001) was observed. B-cell epitope mapping revealed five immunogenic regions in PvCelTOS, but no associations between the specific IgG response to peptides and exposure/protection parameters were found. However, the epitope (PvCelTOSI136-E143) was validated as a main linear B-cell epitope, as 92% of IgG responders to PvCelTOS were also responders to this peptide sequence. This

  9. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  10. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells. PMID:26020789

  11. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heather D; Macgregor, Jennifer L; Nord, Kristin M; Tyring, Stephen; Rady, Peter; Engler, Danielle E; Grossman, Marc E

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

  12. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Vasilenko, A.; Zhai, M.; leapman, Richard D.; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-04-02

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of manganese-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications which introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions which inhibited Mn-accumulation or Mn redox-cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR resistant and sensitive bacteria, our findings support that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  13. Monocytic differentiation and synthesis of proteins associated with apoptosis in human leukemia U-937 cells acquiring resistance to vincristine.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, P; Chatterjee, D; Han, Z; Wyche, J; DeJesus, A; Giovanella, B

    1996-07-01

    Human leukemia U-937/WT cells were exposed to stepwise increased concentrations of Vincristine so that Vincristine-resistant cell sublines (termed U-937/RV) were developed. Established U-937/RV cell sublines have continuously propagated over a year, both in absence and presence of VCR, and have demonstrated similar features. In contrast to U-937/WT cells, U-937/RV cells have longer doubling time, and are more differentiated as determined by appearance of distinct morphological features and synthesis of mRNA that codes for the monocyte colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (c-fms). Both apoptosis-suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins were undectable in U-937/WT cells, whereas Bcl-2 was nearly detectable and Bcl-XL readily detectable in U-937/RV cells. The apoptosis-promoting Bax protein was also absent in U-937/WT cells and readily detected in U-937/RV cells. Vincristine-resistant cells with different levels of resistance synthesize similar levels of c-fms mRNA and Bax protein. Finally, unlike U-937/WT cells, U-937/RV cells have no ability to induce tumors when xenografted in immunodeficient mice. The findings collectively suggest that development of resistance to Vincristine in U-937/WT cells may correlate with cell differentiation and synthesis of proteins that regulate apoptosis.

  14. Identification of a homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation caused by acquired uniparental disomy in a relapsed early T-cell precursor ALL patient.

    PubMed

    Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Seki, Masafumi; Kato, Motohiro; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Atsuya; Kaneda, Daisuke; Fujiki, Atsushi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Nakatani, Takuya; Osone, Shinya; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Taki, Tomohiko; Takita, Junko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Hosoi, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of genetic alterations associated with relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may help to identify druggable targets for specific therapies. Early T-cell precursor ALL (ETP-ALL) is a subtype of T-ALL with poor prognosis. Although the genetic landscape of ETP-ALL has been determined, genetic alterations related to the relapse of ETP-ALL have not been fully investigated. Here, we report the first patient with relapsed pediatric ETP-ALL to exhibit a homozygous JAK3 activating mutation, V674A, caused by acquired uniparental disomy (UPD). Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed acquired UPD (aUPD) at the 19p13.3-p12 locus only in leukemic cells at relapse. Sanger sequence of the JAK3 gene, which was located at 19p13.1 and frequently mutated in ETP-ALL, was performed in paired leukemic samples to determine homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation only in relapsed leukemic cells. In contrast, leukemic cells at initial diagnosis harbored hemizygous JAK3 V674A mutation. Further, whole-exome sequencing revealed mutations in 18 genes only in relapsed samples, although none of these was recurrent in T-ALL. These findings suggest that aUPD at 19p13.1 is partly associated with relapse in this patient. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 may be therapeutic in such cases.

  15. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  16. CD4+ Th1 cells promote CD8+ Tc1 cell survival, memory response, tumor localization and therapy by targeted delivery of interleukin 2 via acquired pMHC I complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Hao, Siguo; Li, Fang; Ye, Zhenmin; Yang, Junbao; Xiang, Jim

    2007-02-01

    The cooperative role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells has been reported for CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells in tumor eradication. However, its molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. We have recently demonstrated that CD4+ Th cells can acquire major histocompatibility complex/peptide I (pMHC I) complexes and costimulatory molecules by dendritic cell (DC) activation, and further stimulate naïve CD8+ T cell proliferation and activation. In this study, we used CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ Tc1 cells derived from ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OT II and OT I mice to study CD4+ Th1 cell's help effects on active CD8+ Tc1 cells and the molecular mechanisms involved in CD8+ Tc1-cell immunotherapy of OVA-expressing EG7 tumors. Our data showed that CD4+ Th1 cells with acquired pMHC I by OVA-pulsed DC (DCOVA) stimulation are capable of prolonging survival and reducing apoptosis formation of active CD8+ Tc1 cells in vitro, and promoting CD8+ Tc1 cell tumor localization and memory responses in vivo by 3-folds. A combined adoptive T-cell therapy of CD8+ Tc1 with CD4+ Th1 cells resulted in regression of well-established EG7 tumors (5 mm in diameter) in all 10/10 mice. The CD4+ Th1's help effect is mediated via the helper cytokine IL-2 specifically targeted to CD8+ Tc1 cells in vivo by acquired pMHC I complexes. Taken together, these results will have important implications for designing adoptive T-cell immunotherapy protocols in treatment of solid tumors.

  17. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  18. Atypical mucocutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient: T-cell responses and remission of lesions associated with antigen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Da-Cruz, A M; Filgueiras, D V; Coutinho, Z; Mayrink, W; Grimaldi, G; De Luca, P M; Mendonca, S C; Coutinho, S G

    1999-01-01

    An atypical case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated mucocutaneous lesions due to Leishmania braziliensis is described. Many vacuolated macrophages laden with amastigote forms of the parasite were found in the lesions. Leishmanin skin test and serology for leishmaniasis were both negative. The patient was resistant to therapy with conventional drugs (antimonial and amphotericin B). Interestingly, remission of lesions was achieved after an alternative combined therapy of antimonial associated with immunotherapy (whole promastigote antigens). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated and stimulated in vitro with Leishmania antigens to test the lymphoproliferative responses (LPR). Before the combined immunochemotherapy, the LPR to leishmanial antigens was negligible (stimulation index - SI=1.4). After the first course of combined therapy it became positive (SI=4.17). The antigen responding cells were predominantly T-cells (47.5%) most of them with CD8+ phenotype (33%). Very low CD4+ cells (2.2%) percentages were detected. The increased T-cell responsiveness to leishmanial antigens after combined therapy was accompanied by interferon-g (IFN-g) production as observed in the cell culture supernatants. In this patient, healing of the leishmaniasis lesions was associated with the induction of a specific T-cell immune response, characterized by the production of IFN-g and the predominance of the CD8+ phenotype among the Leishmania-reactive T-cells.

  19. Exploiting the unique regenerative capacity of the liver to underpin cell and gene therapy strategies for genetic and acquired liver disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Grant J; de Alencastro, Gustavo; Alexander, Ian E; Yeoh, George C

    2014-11-01

    The number of genetic or acquired diseases of the liver treatable by organ transplantation is ever-increasing as transplantation techniques improve placing additional demands on an already limited organ supply. While cell and gene therapies are distinctly different modalities, they offer a synergistic alternative to organ transplant due to distinct architectural and physiological properties of the liver. The hepatic blood supply and fenestrated endothelial system affords relatively facile accessibility for cell and/or gene delivery. More importantly, however, the remarkable capacity of hepatocytes to proliferate and repopulate the liver creates opportunities for new treatments based on emerging technologies. This review will summarise current understanding of liver regeneration, describe clinical and experimental cell and gene therapeutic modalities and discuss critical challenges to translate these new technologies to wider clinical utility. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: "Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation".

  20. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  1. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models.

    PubMed

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Mishra, Shrawan K; Rhim, Johng S; Nelson, Heather H; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans.

  2. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: Study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Mishra, Shrawan K.; Rhim, Johng S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans. PMID:24752651

  3. Neutrophils acquire the capacity for antigen presentation to memory CD4(+) T cells in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vono, Maria; Lin, Ang; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Koup, Richard A; Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin

    2017-04-06

    Neutrophils are critical cells of the innate immune system and rapidly respond to tissue injury and infection. Increasing evidence also indicates that neutrophils have versatile functions in contributing to adaptive immunity by internalizing and transporting antigen and influencing antigen-specific responses. Here, we demonstrate that freshly isolated human neutrophils can function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to memory CD4(+) T cells. Neutrophils pulsed with the cognate antigens cytomegalovirus pp65 or influenza hemagglutinin were able to present the antigens to autologous antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II; HLA-DR)-dependent manner. Although myeloid dendritic cells and monocytes showed superior presenting ability, neutrophils consistently displayed antigen presentation capability. Upregulation of HLA-DR on neutrophils required the presence of the antigen-specific or activated T cells whereas exposure to innate stimuli such as Toll-like receptor ligands was not sufficient. Neutrophils sorted from vaccine-draining lymph nodes from rhesus macaques also showed expression of HLA-DR and were capable of presenting vaccine antigen to autologous antigen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells ex vivo. Altogether, the data demonstrate that neutrophils can adapt a function as APCs and, in combination with their abundance in the immune system, may have a significant role in regulating antigen-specific T-cell responses.

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  5. Soluble suppressor factors in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and its prodrome. Elaboration in vitro by T lymphocyte-adherent cell interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Gottlieb, A B; Kunkel, H G

    1983-01-01

    Supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from certain patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or its prodrome were capable of depressing spontaneous and pokeweed mitogen-driven B lymphocyte differentiation into plasmacytes, and the proliferative responses of T cells to specific antigen. These soluble suppressor factors (SSF) were present in uniquely high concentrations, with significant differences from healthy controls and from patients with various other conditions previously associated with factor-mediated immunosuppression. T cell-independent functions were not modified by SSF. Suppression was not genetically constrained, and did not appear to be mediated by cytotoxicity, prostaglandin, or alpha or gamma interferons. SSF was a product of the interaction of T lymphocytes with adherent cells. T cells or T cell factors from AIDS patients, but not from normal controls, could collaborate with control adherent cells in the formation of SSF. Restoration of DNA synthesis-independent differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasmacytes in SSF-treated cultures was realized by addition of reducing agents, such as 2-mercaptoethanol, on culture initiation. These data suggest inhibitory mechanisms possibly related to that of concanavalin A-induced soluble immune response suppression, and perhaps offer clues to clinically applicable substances which are potentially capable of mitigating such responses. PMID:6605980

  6. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup −} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup −}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ► The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed

  7. Dendritic cells treated with crude Plasmodium berghei extracts acquire immune-modulatory properties and suppress the development of autoimmune neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Thomé, Rodolfo; Issayama, Luidy K; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Gangi, Rosária D; Ferreira, Isadora T; Rapôso, Catarina; Lopes, Stefanie C P; da Cruz Höfling, Maria Alice; Costa, Fábio T M; Verinaud, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells specifically targeted during Plasmodium infection. Upon infection, DCs show impaired antigen presentation and T-cell activation abilities. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether cellular extracts obtained from Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes (PbX) modulate DCs phenotypically and functionally and the potential therapeutic usage of PbX-modulated DCs in the control of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the mouse model for human multiple sclerosis). We found that PbX-treated DCs have impaired maturation and stimulated the generation of regulatory T cells when cultured with naive T lymphocytes in vitro. When adoptively transferred to C57BL/6 mice the EAE severity was reduced. Disease amelioration correlated with a diminished infiltration of cytokine-producing T cells in the central nervous system as well as the suppression of encephalitogenic T cells. Our study shows that extracts obtained from P. berghei-infected erythrocytes modulate DCs towards an immunosuppressive phenotype. In addition, the adoptive transfer of PbX-modulated DCs was able to ameliorate EAE development through the suppression of specific cellular immune responses towards neuro-antigens. To our knowledge, this is the first study to present evidence that DCs treated with P. berghei extracts are able to control autoimmune neuroinflammation. PMID:24689455

  8. Genome analysis and genome-wide proteomics of Thermococcus gammatolerans, the most radioresistant organism known amongst the Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Armengaud, Jean; Lagorce, Arnaud; Leplat, Christophe; Guérin, Philippe; Dutertre, Murielle; Anthouard, Véronique; Forterre, Patrick; Wincker, Patrick; Confalonieri, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Thermococcus gammatolerans was isolated from samples collected from hydrothermal chimneys. It is one of the most radioresistant organisms known amongst the Archaea. We report the determination and annotation of its complete genome sequence, its comparison with other Thermococcales genomes, and a proteomic analysis. Results T. gammatolerans has a circular chromosome of 2.045 Mbp without any extra-chromosomal elements, coding for 2,157 proteins. A thorough comparative genomics analysis revealed important but unsuspected genome plasticity differences between sequenced Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species that could not be attributed to the presence of specific mobile elements. Two virus-related regions, tgv1 and tgv2, are the only mobile elements identified in this genome. A proteogenome analysis was performed by a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach, allowing the identification of 10,931 unique peptides corresponding to 951 proteins. This information concurrently validates the accuracy of the genome annotation. Semi-quantification of proteins by spectral count was done on exponential- and stationary-phase cells. Insights into general catabolism, hydrogenase complexes, detoxification systems, and the DNA repair toolbox of this archaeon are revealed through this genome and proteome analysis. Conclusions This work is the first archaeal proteome investigation done at the stage of primary genome annotation. This archaeon is shown to use a large variety of metabolic pathways even under a rich medium growth condition. This proteogenomic study also indicates that the high radiotolerance of T. gammatolerans is probably due to proteins that remain to be characterized rather than a larger arsenal of known DNA repair enzymes. PMID:19558674

  9. Cancer Cells Acquire Mitotic Drug Resistance Properties Through Beta I-Tubulin Mutations and Alterations in the Expression of Beta-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Wu, Su-Ying; Lee, Tian-Ren; Chang, Chi-Yen; Wu, Jian-Sung; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Background Anti-mitotic compounds (microtubule de-stabilizers) such as vincristine and vinblastine have been shown clinically successful in treating various cancers. However, development of drug-resistance cells limits their efficacies in clinical situations. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine possible drug resistance mechanisms related to the application of anti-mitotic cancer therapy. Principal Findings A KB-derived microtubule de-stabilizer-resistant KB-L30 cancer cell line was generated for this study. KB-L30 cells showed cross-resistance to various microtubule de-stabilizers including BPR0L075, vincristine and colchicine through multiple-drug resistant (MDR)-independent mechanisms. Surprisingly, KB-L30 cells showed hyper-sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizer, paclitaxel. Results of the RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of both class II and III β-tubulin was down-regulated in KB-L30 cells as compared to its parental KB cancer cells. In addition, DNA sequencing analysis revealed six novel mutation sites present in exon four of the βI-tubulin gene. Computational modeling indicated that a direct relationship exists between βI-tubulin mutations and alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells and this predicted model was supported by an increased microtubule assembly and reduced microtubule dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells, as shown by Western blot analysis. Conclusions and Significance Our study demonstrated that these novel mutations in exon four of the βI-tubulin induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers and hyper-sensitivity to microtubule stabilizer through an alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamics in cancer cells. Importantly, the current study reveals that cancer cells may acquire drug resistance ability to anti-mitotic compounds through multiple changes in the microtubule networks. This study further provided molecular information in drug selection for patients with

  10. [Acquired pure red cell aplasia associated with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a case report-improvement of PRCA after acute hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, K; Oda, K; Katsutani, S; Fujii, T; Abe, K; Imamura, N; Kimura, A

    1998-04-01

    A 47-year-old male patient was admitted because of anemia. He had been diagnosed as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Follicular mixed, B cell type, stage ISA) by splenectomy two years before. Bone marrow examination on admission revealed lymphoma cell infiltration and marked decrease in erythroid cells. These findings confirmed relapsed lymphoma with acquired pure red cell aplasia. After several courses of combination chemotherapy, lymphoma cells disappeared from bone marrow, but PRCA was not improved. In this case there were two times remission of PRCA. At first time, acute B type hepatitis occurred during the chemotherapy, anemia improved transiently. At the second time, mild acute hepatitis associated with herpes zoster occurred. Twenty days after hepatic injury, PRCA was improved, and continued in remission state till present day. To disclose the mechanism of PRCA in this case, erythroid colony assay of marrow cells was performed. This showed the presence of inhibitory factor in patient's serum at PRCA state, that was considered to be related to the occurrence of PRCA. These findings suggest that the improvement of PRCA was associated with the changes on immunological condition after acute hepatitis in this case.

  11. HTB140 melanoma cells under proton irradiation and/or alkylating agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korićanac, L.; Petrović, I.; Privitera, G.; Cuttone, G.; Ristić-Fira, A.

    2007-09-01

    Chemoresistance is a major problem in the treatment of malignant melanoma. The mainstay of treatment for melanoma is the DNA-alkylating agent dacarbazine (DTIC). Fotemustine (FM), a member of the chloroethylnitrosourea group of alkylating agents, has also demonstrated significant antitumor effects in malignant melanoma. However, the intrinsic and acquired resistance of melanoma limits the clinical application of these drugs. Melanomas are also extremely radioresistant. With the objective of enhancing growth inhibition of melanoma cells, combined treatments of FM or DTIC with proton irradiation have been investigated. These effects were studied on HTB140 melanoma cell viability and proliferation. Cells exposed to treatment with FM and protons have shown inhibition of cell growth and significant reduction of proliferation capacity compared to single irradiation or drug treatment. Treatment with DTIC and protons has shown improved growth inhibition compared to appropriate single drug treatment, while the effects of single proton irradiation have been the most pronounced.

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  13. Acquiring Fluorescence Time-lapse Movies of Budding Yeast and Analyzing Single-cell Dynamics using GRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Zopf, Christopher J.; Maheshri, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence time-lapse microscopy has become a powerful tool in the study of many biological processes at the single-cell level. In particular, movies depicting the temporal dependence of gene expression provide insight into the dynamics of its regulation; however, there are many technical challenges to obtaining and analyzing fluorescence movies of single cells. We describe here a simple protocol using a commercially available microfluidic culture device to generate such data, and a MATLAB-based, graphical user interface (GUI) -based software package to quantify the fluorescence images. The software segments and tracks cells, enables the user to visually curate errors in the data, and automatically assigns lineage and division times. The GUI further analyzes the time series to produce whole cell traces as well as their first and second time derivatives. While the software was designed for S. cerevisiae, its modularity and versatility should allow it to serve as a platform for studying other cell types with few modifications. PMID:23892428

  14. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen; Natarajan, Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  15. Superoxide dismutase levels in various radioresistant and radiosensitive tissues of irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Krízala, J; Kovárová, H; Stoklasová, A; Ledvina, M

    1982-01-01

    The activity of superoxide dismutase (E.C. 1.15.1.1; SOD) was determined in male Wistar rats in order to evaluate the possible relationship between both the enzyme content in tissue and the resistance of this tissue to ionizing radiation (8,0 Gy, 60Co). Our results showed that some non-irradiated radioresistant organs (liver) had a high SOD activity and on the contrary, in some radiosensitive tissue (bone marrow) the SOD content was low. In spite of this observation it is not possible to generalize the statement that the radiosensitivity is directly conditioned by the SOD level without any exception. The SOD content in the spleen was higher than in the brain, but the spleen is remarkably radiosensitive, whereas the brain is not. The radiosensitivity of individual tissues probably reflected the changes of SOD activity after the irradiation.

  16. Activation of the LMO2 oncogene through a somatically acquired neomorphic promoter in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sunniyat; Magnussen, Michael; León, Theresa E; Farah, Nadine; Li, Zhaodong; Abraham, Brian J; Alapi, Krisztina Z; Mitchell, Rachel J; Naughton, Tom; Fielding, Adele K; Pizzey, Arnold; Bustraan, Sophia; Allen, Christopher; Popa, Teodora; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Garcia-Perez, Laura; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Staal, Frank J T; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas; Mansour, Marc R

    2017-03-07

    Somatic mutations within non-coding genomic regions that aberrantly activate oncogenes have remained poorly characterized. Here we describe recurrent activating intronic mutations of LMO2, a prominent oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Heterozygous mutations were identified in PF-382 and DU.528 T-ALL cell lines, in addition to 3.7% (6/160) of pediatric and 5.5% (9/163) of adult T-ALL patient samples. The majority of indels harbour putative de novo MYB, ETS1 or RUNX1 consensus binding sites. Analysis of 5'-capped RNA transcripts in mutant cell lines identified the usage of an intermediate promoter site, with consequential monoallelic LMO2 overexpression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the mutant allele in PF-382 cells markedly downregulated LMO2 expression, establishing clear causality between the mutation and oncogene dysregulation. Furthermore, the spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-derived mutations provide important insights into the interconnected contributions of functional transcription factor binding. Finally, these mutations occur in the same intron as retroviral integration sites in gene therapy induced T-ALL, suggesting that such events occur at preferential sites in the non-coding genome.

  17. Loss of AXIN1 drives acquired resistance to WNT pathway blockade in colorectal cancer cells carrying RSPO3 fusions.

    PubMed

    Picco, Gabriele; Petti, Consalvo; Centonze, Alessia; Torchiaro, Erica; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Novara, Luca; Acquaviva, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Medico, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), WNT pathway activation by genetic rearrangements of RSPO3 is emerging as a promising target. However, its low prevalence severely limits availability of preclinical models for in-depth characterization. Using a pipeline designed to suppress stroma-derived signal, we find that RSPO3 "outlier" expression in CRC samples highlights translocation and fusion transcript expression. Outlier search in 151 CRC cell lines identified VACO6 and SNU1411 cells as carriers of, respectively, a canonical PTPRK(e1)-RSPO3(e2) fusion and a novel PTPRK(e13)-RSPO3(e2) fusion. Both lines displayed marked in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to WNT blockade by the porcupine inhibitor LGK974, associated with transcriptional and morphological evidence of WNT pathway suppression. Long-term treatment of VACO6 cells with LGK974 led to the emergence of a resistant population carrying two frameshift deletions of the WNT pathway inhibitor AXIN1, with consequent protein loss. Suppression of AXIN1 in parental VACO6 cells by RNA interference conferred marked resistance to LGK974. These results provide the first mechanism of secondary resistance to WNT pathway inhibition.

  18. Molecular interactions of ErbB1 (EGFR) and integrin-β1 in astrocytoma frozen sections predict clinical outcome and correlate with Akt-mediated in vitro radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Petrás, Miklós; Lajtos, Tamás; Friedländer, Elza; Klekner, Álmos; Pintye, Éva; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of astrocytoma is frequently hampered by radioresistance of the tumor. In addition to overexpression of ErbB1/EGFR, functional crosstalk between receptor tyrosine kinases and cell adhesion molecules may also contribute to therapy resistance. Methods Acceptor photobleaching FRET was implemented on frozen sections of clinical astrocytoma to check the role of ErbB1–integrin-β1 interaction. U251 glioma subclones were obtained by introducing extra CHR7 material or the ErbB1 gene to test the relevance and mechanism of this interaction in vitro. Results Grade IV tumors showed higher ErbB1 and integrin-β1 expression and greater ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation than did grade II tumors. Of these, the extent of molecular association was a single determinant of tumor grade and prognosis in stepwise logistic regression. In vitro, integrin-β1 was upregulated, and radiosensitivity was diminished by ectopic ErbB1 expression. Great excess of ErbB1 provided colony forming advantage over medium excess but did not yield better radiation resistance or faster proliferation and decreased to medium level over time, whereas integrin-β1 levels remained elevated and defined the extent of radioresistance. Increased expression of ErbB1 and integrin-β1 was paralleled by decreasing ErbB1 homoassociation and increasing ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation. Microscopic two-sided FRET revealed that pixels with higher ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation exhibited lowed ErbB1 homoassociation, indicating competition for association partners among these molecules. Boosted Akt phosphorylation response to EGF accompanied this shift toward heteroassociation, and the consequentially increased radioresistance could be reverted by inhibiting PI3K. Conclusion The clinically relevant ErbB1–integrin-β1 heteroassociation may be used as a target of both predictive diagnostics and molecular therapy. PMID:23595626

  19. Upregulation of CD44v6 contributes to acquired chemoresistance via the modulation of autophagy in colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Liu, Hai-Guang; Dong, Si-Yang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Qing-Xuan; Guo, Gui-Long; Pan, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The CD44 isoform containing variant exon v6 (CD44v6) plays an important role in the progression, metastasis, and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, it was found that CD44v6 is involved in acquired drug resistance. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of CD44v6 in the resistance of CRC cells to chemotherapy. A stable CD44v6 overexpression model in SW480 cells was established via lentiviral transduction. The chemosensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (L-OHP) was determined by cell counting kit (CCK)-8, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and colony formation assays. Immunohistochemical staining of CD44v6 was performed in human CRC tissues. The key components in cell apoptosis, drug efflux and metabolism, mismatch repair, autophagy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the PI3K-Akt and MAPK-Ras-Erk1/2 pathways were assessed using flow cytometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and western blot assays. The CD44v6 overexpression cells showed a higher viability, a lower LDH release rate, and an increased clonogenicity than the control cells under drug treatment. Moreover, overexpression of CD44v6 resulted in enhanced autophagy flux, EMT, and phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in the presence of drugs. Furthermore, high CD44v6 expression in the primary tumor was closely associated with an early recurrence in CRC patients who underwent curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, overexpression of CD44v6 contributes to chemoresistance in SW480 cells under cytotoxic stress via the modulation of autophagy, EMT, and activation of the PI3K-Akt and MAPK-Ras-Erk pathways.

  20. Human somatic cells acquire the plasticity to generate embryoid-like metamorphosis via the actin cytoskeleton in injured tissues.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F; Mendoza, Jhonan A; Barreto, Ana M; Poveda, Lina S; Sanchez, Lina K; Poveda, Laura C; Mora, Katherine T

    2016-01-01

    Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype. We captured this hidden collective filamentous assemblage in progress: Hypoxic deformed cells enter into intercellular collisions, generate migratory ejected filaments, and produce self-assembly of triangular chiral hexagon complexes; this dynamic geometry guides the microenvironment scaffold in which this biological process is incubated, recapitulating embryonic morphogenesis. In all injured tissues, especially in damaged skeletal (striated) muscle cells, visibly hypertrophic intercalated actin-myosin filaments are organized in zebra stripe pattern along the anterior-posterior axis in the interior of the cell, generating cephalic-caudal polarity segmentation, with a high selective level of immunopositivity for Actin, Alpha Skeletal Muscle antibody and for Neuron-Specific Enolase expression of ectodermal differentiation. The function of actin filaments in emergent responses to tissue injury is to reconstitute, reactivate and orchestrate cellular metamorphosis, involving the re-expression of fetal genes, providing evidence of the reverse flow of genetic information within a biological system. The resultant embryoid phenotype emerges as a microscopic fractal template copy of the organization of the whole body, likely allowing the modification and reprogramming of the phenotype of the tumor in which these structures develop, as well as establishing a reverse primordial microscopic mold to collectively re-form cellular building blocks to

  1. Human somatic cells acquire the plasticity to generate embryoid-like metamorphosis via the actin cytoskeleton in injured tissues

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F; Mendoza, Jhonan A; Barreto, Ana M; Poveda, Lina S; Sanchez, Lina K; Poveda, Laura C; Mora, Katherine T

    2016-01-01

    Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype. We captured this hidden collective filamentous assemblage in progress: Hypoxic deformed cells enter into intercellular collisions, generate migratory ejected filaments, and produce self-assembly of triangular chiral hexagon complexes; this dynamic geometry guides the microenvironment scaffold in which this biological process is incubated, recapitulating embryonic morphogenesis. In all injured tissues, especially in damaged skeletal (striated) muscle cells, visibly hypertrophic intercalated actin-myosin filaments are organized in zebra stripe pattern along the anterior-posterior axis in the interior of the cell, generating cephalic-caudal polarity segmentation, with a high selective level of immunopositivity for Actin, Alpha Skeletal Muscle antibody and for Neuron-Specific Enolase expression of ectodermal differentiation. The function of actin filaments in emergent responses to tissue injury is to reconstitute, reactivate and orchestrate cellular metamorphosis, involving the re-expression of fetal genes, providing evidence of the reverse flow of genetic information within a biological system. The resultant embryoid phenotype emerges as a microscopic fractal template copy of the organization of the whole body, likely allowing the modification and reprogramming of the phenotype of the tumor in which these structures develop, as well as establishing a reverse primordial microscopic mold to collectively re-form cellular building blocks to

  2. Curcumin Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells by Suppressing Constitutive and Inducible NF-{kappa}B Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Deorukhkar, Amit; Pandey, Manoj K.; Pabon, Ana Maria B.S.; Shentu, Shujun; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is an integral part of the preoperative treatment of rectal cancers. However, only a minority of patients achieve a complete pathologic response to therapy because of resistance of these tumors to radiation therapy. This resistance may be mediated by constitutively active pro-survival signaling pathways or by inducible/acquired mechanisms in response to radiation therapy. Simultaneous inhibition of these pathways can sensitize these tumors to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal cancer cells were exposed to clinically relevant doses of gamma rays, and the mechanism of their radioresistance was investigated. We characterized the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation as a mechanism of inducible radioresistance in colorectal cancer and used curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, to overcome this resistance. Results: Curcumin inhibited the proliferation and the post-irradiation clonogenic survival of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Radiation stimulated NF-{kappa}B activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin suppressed this radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activation via inhibition of radiation-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B alpha, inhibition of inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Curcumin also suppressed NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene products (Bcl-2, Bcl-x{sub L}, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1). Conclusions: Our results suggest that transient inducible NF-{kappa}B activation provides a prosurvival response to radiation that may account for development of radioresistance. Curcumin blocks this signaling pathway and potentiates the antitumor effects of radiation therapy.

  3. [Acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency and accompanying chronic spontaneous urticaria in a patient with chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Klossowski, N; Braun, S A; von Gruben, V; Losem, C; Plewe, D; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2015-10-01

    Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE) is characterized by recurrent edema of the subcutaneous and/or submucosal tissue without wheals and negative family history of angioedema. Here, we present the case of a patient with a chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia who suffered from both C1-INH-AAE and chronic spontaneous urticaria. Oral corticosteroids, antihistamines, and the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab were applied to treat the chronic urticaria in combination with the plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate Berinert® and the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, but the symptoms did not improved significantly. Thus, polychemotherapy targeting the slow-growing lymphoproliferative disease including rituximab was initiated, which resulted in remission of both the urticaria and the angioedema.

  4. Increased thymidylate synthase in L1210 cells possessing acquired resistance to N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717): development, characterization, and cross-resistance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, A.L.; Alison, D.L.; Calvert, A.H.; Harrap, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    The properties are described of a mutant L1210 cell line (L1210:C15) with acquired resistance (greater than 200-fold) to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. TS was overproduced 45-fold and was accompanied by a small increase in the activity of dihydrofolate reductase (2.6-fold). Both the level of resistance and enzyme activities were maintained in drug-free medium (greater than 300 generations). Failure of N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid to suppress the (/sup 3/H)-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the acid-precipitable material of the resistant line supported the evidence that TS overproduction was the mechanism of resistance; consequently the L1210:C15 cells were largely cross-resistant to another (but weaker) TS inhibitor, 5,8-dideazafolic acid. Minimal cross-resistance was observed to the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors methotrexate and 5-methyl-5,8-dideazaaminopterin (5- and 2-fold, respectively). L1210 and L1210:C15 cells were, however, equally sensitive to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), an unexpected finding since a metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, is a potent TS inhibitor; however, this cytotoxicity against the L1210:C15 cells was antagonized by coincubation with 5 microM folinic acid although folinic acid potentiated the cytotoxicity of FdUrd to the N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid-sensitive L1210 line. Thymidine was much less effective as a FdUrd protecting agent in the L1210:C15 when compared with the L1210 cells; however, a combination of thymidine plus hypoxanthine was without any additional effect (compared with thymidine alone) against the sensitive line but effectively protected L1210:C15 cells.

  5. Donor-Specific Regulatory T Cells Acquired from Tolerant Mice Bearing Cardiac Allograft Promote Mixed Chimerism and Prolong Intestinal Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Jin-Peng; Yang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Guan, Wen-Xian; Du, Jun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance has always been a central problem for small bowel transplantation (SBT), which is thought to be the best therapy for end-stage bowel failure. With the development of new tolerance-inducing strategies, mixed chimerism induced by co-stimulation blockade has become most potent for tolerance of allografts, such as skin, kidney, and heart. However, a lack of clinically available co-stimulation blockers has hindered efficient application in humans. Furthermore, unlike those for other types of solid organ transplantation, strategies to induce robust mixed chimerism for intestinal allografts have not been fully developed. To improve current mixed chimerism induction protocols for future clinical application, we developed a new protocol using donor-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells from mice with heart allograft tolerance, immunosuppressive drugs which could be used clinically and low doses of irradiation. Our results demonstrated that donor-specific Treg cells acquired from tolerant mice after in vitro expansion generate stable chimerism and lead to acceptance of intestinal allograft. Increased intragraft Treg cells and clonal deletion contribute to the development of SBT tolerance. PMID:27909438

  6. Comparative 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis of ovarian carcinoma cells: toward a reorientation of biosynthesis pathways associated with acquired platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Lincet, Hubert; Guével, Blandine; Pineau, Charles; Allouche, Stéphane; Lemoisson, Edwige; Poulain, Laurent; Gauduchon, Pascal

    2012-02-02

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer death in women. Emergence of chemoresistance in the course of treatments with platinum drugs is in part responsible for therapeutic failures. In order to improve the understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in acquired platinum chemoresistance, we decided to compare the basal protein expression profile of the platinum-sensitive cell line OAW42 and that of its resistant counterpart OAW42-R by a proteomic approach. Reversed-phase HPLC pre-fractionated extracts from both cell lines were subjected to 2D-DIGE coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). Forty eight differentially expressed proteins were identified, 39 being up-regulated and 19 down-regulated in OAW42-R versus OAW42 cells. From the current knowledge on biological activities of most differentially expressed proteins, it can be inferred that the acquisition of resistance was associated with a global reorganization of biochemical pathways favoring the production of precursors for biosynthesis, and with the mobilization of macromolecule quality control mechanisms, preserving RNA and protein integrity under damage-inducing conditions.

  7. Ex Vivo Generated Natural Killer Cells Acquire Typical Natural Killer Receptors and Display a Cytotoxic Gene Expression Profile Similar to Peripheral Blood Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56dim NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:22571679

  8. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy.

  9. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  10. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED MYCOSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    laboratory- acquired mycoses . Insofar as possible, the etiological fungus, type of laboratory, classification of personnel, type of work conducted, and other...pertinent data have been listed in this study. More than 288 laboratory- acquired mycoses are described here, including 108 cases of

  11. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with gain of chromosomes 3, 7, and 16, gain of chromosome X, and loss of chromosome Y.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently described. To date, there are no reports on genetic findings of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. In this article, we report the first report of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. A 66-year-old Japanese man was found to have a left renal tumor during the follow-up of hemodialysis consequent to chronic renal failure. Left nephrectomy was performed. Histological examination of three tumors in the left kidney showed the cribriform or microcystic growth pattern of neoplastic cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, and many oxalate crystals were observed. The G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC showed 49, X, +X, -Y, +3, +7, +16. These chromosomal abnormalities resemble those of sporadic papillary RCC that has been previously reported. Finally, we suggest that this tumor may show a close relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC, but a large-scale study will be needed to clarify the relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC.

  12. Gallic acid inhibition of Src-Stat3 signaling overcomes acquired resistance to EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Ai N.H.; Hua, Tuyen N.M.; Kim, Min-Kyu; Vo, Vu T.A.; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Rho, Jin Kyung; Kim, Ki Woo; Jeong, Yangsik

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have clinically benefited to lung cancer patients harboring a subset of activating EGFR mutations. However, even with the remarkable therapeutic response at the initial TKI treatment, most lung cancer patients eventually have relapsed aggressive tumors due to acquired resistance to the TKIs. Here, we report that 3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid or gallic acid (GA), a natural polyphenolic compound, shows anti-tumorigenic effects in TKI-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using both in vitro growth assay and in vivo xenograft animal model, we demonstrated tumor suppressive effect of GA was more selective for the TKI-resistant cancer compared to the TKI-sensitive one. Mechanistically, GA treatment inhibited Src-Stat3-mediated signaling and decreased the expression of Stat3-regulated tumor promoting genes, subsequently inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the TKI-resistant lung cancer but not in the TKI-sensitive one. Consistent with the in vitro results, in vivo xenograft experiments showed the TKI-resistant tumor-selective growth inhibition and suppression of Src-Stat3-dependent signaling in the GA-treated tumors isolated from the xenograft model. This finding identified an importance of Src-Stat3 signaling cascade in GA-mediated tumor-suppression activity and, more importantly, provides a novel therapeutic insight of GA for advanced TKI-resistant lung cancer. PMID:27419630

  13. Acquired savolitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer arises via multiple mechanisms that converge on MET-independent mTOR and MYC activation

    PubMed Central

    Castriotta, Lillian; Ladd, Brendon; Markovets, Aleksandra; Beran, Garry; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Feng; Adam, Ammar; Zinda, Michael; Reimer, Corinne; Qing, Weiguo; Su, Weiguo; Clark, Edwin; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Schuller, Alwin G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death globally with a significant, unmet need for more efficacious treatments. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET has been implicated as an oncogene in numerous cancer subtypes, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we explore the therapeutic potential of savolitinib (volitinib, AZD6094, HMPL-504), a potent and selective MET inhibitor, in NSCLC. In vitro, savolitinib inhibits MET phosphorylation with nanomolar potency, which correlates with blockade of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling as well as MYC down-regulation. In vivo, savolitinib causes inhibition of these pathways and significantly decreases growth of MET-dependent xenografts. To understand resistance mechanisms, we generated savolitinib resistance in MET-amplified NSCLC cell lines and analyzed individual clones. We found that upregulation of MYC and constitutive mTOR pathway activation is a conserved feature of resistant clones that can be overcome by knockdown of MYC or dual mTORC1/2 inhibition. Lastly, we demonstrate that mechanisms of resistance are heterogeneous, arising via a switch to EGFR dependence or by a requirement for PIM signaling. This work demonstrates the efficacy of savolitinib in NSCLC and characterizes acquired resistance, identifying both known and novel mechanisms that may inform combination strategies in the clinic. PMID:27472392

  14. MicroRNAs Involvement in Radioresistance of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parwez; Slavik, Marek; Slampa, Pavel; Smilek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to the ionizing radiation is a current problem in the treatment and clinical management of various cancers including head and neck cancer. There are several biological and molecular mechanisms described to be responsible for resistance of the tumors to radiotherapy. Among them, the main mechanisms include alterations in intracellular pathways involved in DNA damage and repair, apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. It has been found that regulation of these complex processes is often controlled by microRNAs. MicroRNAs are short endogenous RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally modulate gene expression and their deregulated expression has been observed in many tumors including head and neck cancer. Specific expression patterns of microRNAs have also been shown to predict prognosis and therapeutic response in head and neck cancer. Therefore, microRNAs present promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets that might overcome resistance to radiation and improve prognosis of head and neck cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the functional role of microRNAs in radioresistance of cancer with special focus on head and neck cancer. PMID:28325958

  15. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  16. Let-7c governs the acquisition of chemo- or radioresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shi-Yun; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Tian; Song, Hai-Zhu; Feng, Bing; Huang, Gui-Chun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Long-Bang; De, Wei

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression and functions have been reported to contribute to phenotypic features of tumor cells. Although targets and functional roles for many miRNAs have been described in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD), their pathophysiologic roles in phenotypes of chemoresistant LAD cells are still largely unclear. Previously, docetaxel (DTX)-resistant LAD cell lines (SPC-A1/DTX and H1299/DTX) were established by our laboratory and displayed chemo- or radioresistance and mesenchymal features with enhanced invasiveness and motility. Unbiased miRNA profiling indicated that let-7c (MIRLET7C) was significantly downregulated in SPC-A1/DTX cells. Ectopic let-7c expression increased the in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitivity of DTX-resistant LAD cells through enhanced apoptosis, reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal phenotypes, and inhibition of in vivo metastatic potential via inactivation of Akt phosphorylation, whereas a let-7c inhibitor decreased the chemo- or radiosensitivity of parental cells. Further investigation suggested that let-7c significantly reduced the luciferase activity of a Bcl-xL 3'-UTR-based reporter, concordant with reduced Bcl-xL protein levels. Additionally, siRNA-mediated Bcl-xL knockdown mimicked the same effects of let-7c precursor, and enforced Bcl-xL expression partially rescued the effects of let-7c precursor in DTX-resistant LAD cells. Furthermore, we found that Bcl-xL was significantly upregulated in DTX-nonresponding LAD tissues, and its expression was inversely correlated with let-7c expression. This study suggests an important role for let-7c in the molecular etiology of chemoresistant lung adenocarcinoma.

  17. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  18. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  19. Capilliposide from Lysimachia capillipes inhibits AKT activation and restores gefitinib sensitivity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired gefitinib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-rong; Xu, Ya-si; Jin, Er; Zhu, Lu-cheng; Xia, Bing; Chen, Xu-feng; Li, Fan-zhu; Ma, Sheng-lin

    2017-01-01

    Most gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) would eventually develop resistance. Lysimachia capillipes (LC) capilliposide extracts from LC Hemsl. show both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects. In this study we investigated whether LC capilliposide in combination with gefitinib could overcome the resistance of NSCLC cells to gefitinib and identified the signaling pathways involved. Treatment with LC capilliposide alone inhibited the growth of a panel of NSCLC cell lines (PC-9, H460, H1975, H1299 and PC-9-GR) sensitive or resistant to gefitinib with IC50 values in the range of μg/mL. In the gefitinib-resistant PC-9-GR cells (which have a T790M EGFR mutation), LC capilliposide (at the IC30, i.e.1.2 μg/mL) markedly enhanced the inhibitory effects of gefitinib with its IC50 value being decreased from 6.80±1.00 to 0.77±0.12 μmol/L. By using the median effect analysis we showed that combination treatment of LC capilliposide and gefitinib could restore gefitinib sensitivity in PC-9-GR cells. Furthermore, LC capilliposide (1.2 μg/mL) significantly increased the apoptotic responses to gefitinib (0.77 μmol/L) in PC-9-GR cells, but did not affect gefitinib-induced G0/G1 arrest. Moreover, LC capilliposide (1.2 μg/mL) in combination with gefitinib (0.77, 1.0 μmol/L) markedly decreased the phosphorylation of the EGFR downstream signaling molecule AKT, which neither LC capilliposide nor gefitinib alone affected. In PC-9-GR cells with siRNA knockdown of AKT, addition of LC capilliposide was unable to increase gefitinib sensitivity. In a PC-9-GR xenograft mouse model, combination treatment with LC capilliposide (15 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) and gefitinib (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) dramatically enhanced tumor growth suppression (with a TGI of 109.3%), compared with TGIs of 22.6% and 56.6%, respectively, in mice were treated with LC capilliposide or gefitinib alone. LC capilliposide can restore the cells' sensitivity to gefitinib through

  20. Space radiobiology and the new era of induced radioresistance: should traditional concepts be moved to science history museums?

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J

    2013-01-01

    Energetic solar particle events (SPE) which are among the main sources of ionizing radiation can be life threatening to astronauts who are not adequately protected. To date, physical shielding of spacecrafts and inducing radioresistance by using radioprotectors have been proposed by different investigators. Mortazavi et al. have previously reported that screening of the candidates of long-term space missions by conducting Ground-based in vitro adaptive response studies before any mission identifies the individuals who respond well to low levels of ionizing radiation and reveal high magnitudes of radioadaptive response. On the other hand, Mortazavi et al. have recently showed that radiofrequency-induced adaptive response can be used as a method for decreasing the risk of infection caused by immunosuppression during deep space missions. Furthermore, over the past years the radioresistance induced by a wide variety of radioprotectors has been studied. According to classical radiobiology, chemical radioprotective agents must be administered before irradiation or at the time of irradiation, to increase the mean survival rate of the exposed individuals. A revolution in this paradigm was started in 2010, when investigators reported that a diet supplemented with antioxidants administered starting 24 h after total-body irradiation is more effective than if given soon after the exposure (radiation mitigation). This finding along with the above mentioned interventions open new horizons in inducing biological radioresistance against unpredictable high levels of radiation due to solar particle events. This wide time window indeed enables astronauts to firstly evaluate their radiation doses before making any decision on the type of intervention. As major solar particle events last for hours, astronauts will be able to consult distinguished radiation biologists via satellite telecommunication before choosing any medical intervention.

  1. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  3. Acquired Hypothyroidism as a Predictive Marker of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: A Literature-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nearchou, Andreas; Valachis, Antonis; Lind, Pehr; Akre, Olof; Sandström, Per

    2015-08-01

    Hypothyroidism in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) during treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sunitinib and sorafenib is a well-established side effect. Furthermore, the potential role of hypothyroidism as predictive marker of outcome has been studied but with conflicting results. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the predictive value of hypothyroidism for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with mRCC during TKI therapy. We searched PubMed and the electronic abstract databases of the major international congresses' proceedings to identify all eligible studies that reported a correlation between the development of hypothyroidism during TKI treatment and outcome in patients with mRCC. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PFS and OS were obtained from these publications and pooled in a meta-analysis. Eleven studies with a total of 500 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We found no statistical significant difference in PFS between patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy and unaffected patients (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.59-1.13; P = .22; 6 studies; 250 patients). The HR for OS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.31-0.87; P = .01) for patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy compared with patients who did not (4 studies; 147 patients). The development of hypothyroidism during TKI therapy is not clearly shown to be predictive of efficacy in patients with mRCC. The observed advantage in OS for the patients with acquired hypothyroidism should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Response of V79 cells to low doses of X-rays and negative pi-mesons: clonogenic survival and DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Marples, B; Adomat, H; Koch, C J; Skov, K A

    1996-10-01

    Mammalian cells are hypersensitive to very low doses of X-rays (< 0.2 Gy), a response which is followed by increased radioresistance up to 1 Gy. Increased radioresistance is postulated to be a response to DNA damage, possibly single-strand breaks, and it appears to be a characteristic of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Here we demonstrate a correspondence between the extent of the increased radioresistance and linear energy transfer of 250 kVp X-rays and plateau and Bragg peak negative pi-mesons. The results support our hypothesis since the size of the increased radioresistant response appears to correspond to the number of radiation induced single-strand breaks. Furthermore, since survival prior to the increased radioresistant response (< 0.2 Gy) was LET-independent, these data support the notion that the increased radioresistant response may dictate the overall survival response to higher doses. However, while these data provide further circumstantial evidence for the involvement of DNA strand breaks in the triggering of increased radioresistance, more direct conclusions cannot be made. The data are not accurate enough to detect structure in the single-strand break profiles, the production of single-strand breaks being apparently linear with dose.

  5. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  6. Knockdown of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptosis of H1299 cells via ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Song, Jie-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2014-07-11

    We previously identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistant biomarker in p53 wild-type A549 cells and found that p53-dependent induction of the PUMA pathway was a critical event in regulating the radioresistant phenotype. Here, we found that HRP-3 knockdown regulates the radioresistance of p53-null H1299 cells through a distinctly different molecular mechanism. HRP-3 depletion was sufficient to cause apoptosis of H1299 cells by generating substantial levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Subsequent, ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation stimulated expression of c-Myc and Noxa proteins, thereby inducing the apoptotic machinery. Our results thus extend the range of targets for the development of new drugs to treat both p53 wild-type or p53-null radioresistant lung cancer cells.

  7. Successful high-dose dexamethasone treatment of acquired pure red cell aplasia following ABO major mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yuki; Shiono, Yousuke; Suzuki, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Kato, Yuichi; Tajima, Katsushi; Kato, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    A 46-year-old man was diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia involving inv(16)(p13.1q22) in August 2007. He received a human leukocyte antigen-identical, ABO major-mismatched (donor: A, recipient: O) bone marrow transplantation from an unrelated donor in June 2009. Cyclosporin A (CsA) and short-course methotrexate were used for graft versus host disease prophylaxis. Although granulocyte and platelet engraftment were achieved, the patient exhibited persistent anemia and was dependent on red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Bone marrow aspiration on day 63 revealed the near absence of erythroid precursors, a finding consistent with pure red cell aplasia. No CBFβ-MYH11 transcripts were detected. The recipient's anti-A IgM antibody titer was 1:64, and his anti-A IgG antibody titer was 1:1024. The discontinuation of CsA, and the initiation of rituximab and donor lymphocyte infusions were all ineffective against his anemia. He was treated with high-dose dexamethasone (DEXA) (40 mg/day DEXA, days 657-660, days 757-760; 20 mg/day DEXA, days 764-767, days 772-775) in April 2010. A follow-up examination performed at 7 months after the high-dose DEXA treatment showed the patient's anti-A antibody titer to have dropped to an undetectable level. His hemoglobin levels also returned to normal (Hb: 13.4 g/dl), and he no longer required RBC transfusions.

  8. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  9. The embryonic cell lineage of Caenorhabditis elegans: A modern hieroglyph: The best way to acquire knowledge in Developmental Biology is to learn how this knowledge was derived.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Zheleva, Angelina; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Cabello, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, in the Internet databases era, certain knowledge is being progressively lost. This knowledge, which we feel is essential and should be acquired through education, is the understanding of how the pioneer researchers faced major questions in their field and made their discoveries.

  10. Usefulness of plasma HGF level for monitoring acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Umeguchi, Hitomi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Kobayashi, Naomi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Sato, Akemi; Takeda, Yuji; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo; Kimura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of molecular markers is indispensable for deciding subsequent treatment after acquired resistance to molecular-targeted therapy. According to results using re-biopsy, EGFR T790M mutation and overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are major mechanisms of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The aim of the present study was to assess whether quantification of HGF using peripheral blood in addition to detection of T790M with plasma DNA is useful for monitoring as an alternative to invasive re-biopsy. HGF levels in plasma were determined using ELISA and T790M mutation was detected using mutation-biased PCR and quenched probe system (MBP-QP). The median level of HGF in plasma at baseline was 140 pg/ml and was significantly higher in the advanced stage of cancer and in smokers and predicted poor survival as determined using 315 plasma samples from 225 lung cancer patients. T790M was detected with plasma DNA in 9 of 16 patients who acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and a greater than 1.5-fold elevation compared with pretreatment HGF levels was observed in 6 patients after acquired resistance. Eleven of 16 patients (69%) showed either HGF elevation or T790M in plasma samples, with both outcomes observed in 25% of patients; this is consistent with results based on re-biopsy reported from other laboratories. Considering these results, assessing HGF and T790M using peripheral blood could be useful for monitoring mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs.

  11. Resistance of colorectal cancer cells to radiation and 5-FU is associated with MELK expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seungho; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} MELK expression significantly increased when the cells are exposed to radiation or 5-FU. {yields} Suppression of MELK caused cell cycle changes and decrease in proliferation. {yields} Radiation or 5-FU treatment after MELK suppression by siRNA induced growth inhibition. -- Abstract: It was reported that the local recurrence would be caused by cancer stem cells acquiring chemo- and radio-resistance. Recently, one of the potential therapeutic targets for colorectal and other cancers has been identified, which is maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). MELK is known as an embryonic and neural stem cell marker, and associated with the cell survival, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, SNU-503, which is a rectal cancer cell line, was treated with radiation or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and elevation of the MELK expression level was observed. Furthermore, the cell line was pre-treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MELK mRNA before treatment of radiation or 5-FU and its effects on cell cycle and proliferation were observed. We demonstrated that knockdown of MELK reduced the proliferation of cells with radiation or 5-FU treatment. In addition, MELK suppression caused changes in cell cycle. In conclusion, MELK could be associated with increased resistance of colorectal cancer cells against radiation and 5-FU.

  12. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  13. Extracting the normal lung dose-response curve from clinical DVH data: a possible role for low dose hyper-radiosensitivity, increased radioresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, J. J.; Snyder, K.; Zhong, H.; Barton, K.; Sun, Z.; Chetty, I. J.; Matuszak, M.; Ten Haken, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    In conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for lung cancer, radiation pneumonitis’ (RP) dependence on the normal lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) is not well understood. Complication models alternatively make RP a function of a summary statistic, such as mean lung dose (MLD). This work searches over damage profiles, which quantify sub-volume damage as a function of dose. Profiles that achieve best RP predictive accuracy on a clinical dataset are hypothesized to approximate DVH dependence. Step function damage rate profiles R(D) are generated, having discrete steps at several dose points. A range of profiles is sampled by varying the step heights and dose point locations. Normal lung damage is the integral of R(D) with the cumulative DVH. Each profile is used in conjunction with a damage cutoff to predict grade 2 plus (G2+) RP for DVHs from a University of Michigan clinical trial dataset consisting of 89 CFRT patients, of which 17 were diagnosed with G2+ RP. Optimal profiles achieve a modest increase in predictive accuracy—erroneous RP predictions are reduced from 11 (using MLD) to 8. A novel result is that optimal profiles have a similar distinctive shape: enhanced damage contribution from low doses (<20 Gy), a flat contribution from doses in the range ~20-40 Gy, then a further enhanced contribution from doses above 40 Gy. These features resemble the hyper-radiosensitivity / increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR) observed in some cell survival curves, which can be modeled using Joiner’s induced repair model. A novel search strategy is employed, which has the potential to estimate RP dependence on the normal lung DVH. When applied to a clinical dataset, identified profiles share a characteristic shape, which resembles HRS/IRR. This suggests that normal lung may have enhanced sensitivity to low doses, and that this sensitivity can affect RP risk.

  14. Extracting the normal lung dose-response curve from clinical DVH data: a possible role for low dose hyper-radiosensitivity, increased radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Barton, K; Sun, Z; Chetty, I J; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R K

    2015-09-07

    In conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for lung cancer, radiation pneumonitis' (RP) dependence on the normal lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) is not well understood. Complication models alternatively make RP a function of a summary statistic, such as mean lung dose (MLD). This work searches over damage profiles, which quantify sub-volume damage as a function of dose. Profiles that achieve best RP predictive accuracy on a clinical dataset are hypothesized to approximate DVH dependence.Step function damage rate profiles R(D) are generated, having discrete steps at several dose points. A range of profiles is sampled by varying the step heights and dose point locations. Normal lung damage is the integral of R(D) with the cumulative DVH. Each profile is used in conjunction with a damage cutoff to predict grade 2 plus (G2+) RP for DVHs from a University of Michigan clinical trial dataset consisting of 89 CFRT patients, of which 17 were diagnosed with G2+ RP.Optimal profiles achieve a modest increase in predictive accuracy--erroneous RP predictions are reduced from 11 (using MLD) to 8. A novel result is that optimal profiles have a similar distinctive shape: enhanced damage contribution from low doses (<20 Gy), a flat contribution from doses in the range ~20-40 Gy, then a further enhanced contribution from doses above 40 Gy. These features resemble the hyper-radiosensitivity / increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR) observed in some cell survival curves, which can be modeled using Joiner's induced repair model.A novel search strategy is employed, which has the potential to estimate RP dependence on the normal lung DVH. When applied to a clinical dataset, identified profiles share a characteristic shape, which resembles HRS/IRR. This suggests that normal lung may have enhanced sensitivity to low doses, and that this sensitivity can affect RP risk.

  15. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  16. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  17. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  18. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS

    PubMed Central

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T.; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M.; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S. H. A. M.; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K.; Fixmer, Carine N.; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M. U.; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D. C.; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E.; Lithgow, Pamela E.; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J.; Garrett, Michelle D.; Gourlay, Campbell W.; Griffin, Darren K.; Gullick, William J.; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J.; Lloyd, Daniel R.; Rossman, Jeremy S.; Smales, C. Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D.; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin. PMID:28192521

  19. Immature myeloid Gr-1+ CD11b+ cells from lipopolysaccharide-immunosuppressed mice acquire inhibitory activity in the bone marrow and migrate to lymph nodes to exert their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Veronica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Chiarella, Paula; Schierloh, Pablo; Isturiz, Martin A; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2016-02-01

    Secondary infections due to post-sepsis immunosuppression are a major cause of death in patients with sepsis. Repetitive inoculation of increasing doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice mimics the immunosuppression associated with sepsis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, Gr-1(+) CD11b(+)) are considered a major component of the immunosuppressive network, interfering with T-cell responses in many pathological conditions. We used LPS-immunosuppressed (IS) mice to address whether MDSCs acquired their suppressive ability in the bone marrow (BM) and whether they could migrate to lymph nodes (LNs) to exert their suppressive function. Our results showed that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells of IS mice already had the potential to inhibit T-cell proliferation in the BM. Moreover, soluble factors present in the BM from IS mice were responsible for inducing this inhibitory ability in control BM cells. In addition, migration of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) to LNs in vivo was maximal when cells obtained from the BM of IS mice were inoculated into an IS context. In this regard, we found chemoattractant activity in cell-free LN extracts (LNEs) from IS mice and an increased expression of the LN-homing chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) in IS BM Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. These results indicate that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells found in BM from IS mice acquire their suppressive activity in the same niche where they are generated, and migrate to LNs to exert their inhibitory role. A better understanding of MDSC generation and/or regulation of factors able to induce their inhibitory function may provide new and more effective tools for the treatment of sepsis-associated immunosuppression.

  20. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS.

    PubMed

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S H A M; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K; Fixmer, Carine N; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M U; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D C; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E; Lithgow, Pamela E; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J; Garrett, Michelle D; Gourlay, Campbell W; Griffin, Darren K; Gullick, William J; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J; Lloyd, Daniel R; Rossman, Jeremy S; Smales, C Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N; Michaelis, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of a multidimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight mass spectrometer: I. How much of the data is theoretically interpretable by search engines?

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J; Baker, Peter R; Hansen, Kirk C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Allen, Nadia P; Rexach, Michael; Burlingame, Alma L

    2005-08-01

    An in-depth analysis of a multidimensional chromatography-mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight (QqTOF) geometry instrument was carried out. A total of 3269 CID spectra were acquired. Through manual verification of database search results and de novo interpretation of spectra 2368 spectra could be confidently determined as predicted tryptic peptides. A detailed analysis of the non-matching spectra was also carried out, highlighting what the non-matching spectra in a database search typically are composed of. The results of this comprehensive dataset study demonstrate that QqTOF instruments produce information-rich data of which a high percentage of the data is readily interpretable.

  2. Bone Marrow Transplantation Results in Human Donor Blood Cells Acquiring and Displaying Mouse Recipient Class I MHC and CD45 Antigens on Their Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Nobuko; Wong, Christine J.; Gertsenstein, Marina; Casper, Robert F.; Nagy, Andras; Rogers, Ian M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mouse models of human disease are invaluable for determining the differentiation ability and functional capacity of stem cells. The best example is bone marrow transplants for studies of hematopoietic stem cells. For organ studies, the interpretation of the data can be difficult as transdifferentiation, cell fusion or surface antigen transfer (trogocytosis) can be misinterpreted as differentiation. These events have not been investigated in hematopoietic stem cell transplant models. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we investigated fusion and trogocytosis involving blood cells during bone marrow transplantation using a xenograft model. We report that using a standard SCID repopulating assay almost 100% of the human donor cells appear as hybrid blood cells containing both mouse and human surface antigens. Conclusion/Significance Hybrid cells are not the result of cell-cell fusion events but appear to be due to efficient surface antigen transfer, a process referred to as trogocytosis. Antigen transfer appears to be non-random and includes all donor cells regardless of sub-type. We also demonstrate that irradiation preconditioning enhances the frequency of hybrid cells and that trogocytosis is evident in non-blood cells in chimera mice. PMID:20046883

  3. Molecular and Cellular Interactions of Allogenic and Autologus Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Innate and Acquired Immunity and Their Role in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinikia, Roghayeh; Nikbakht, Mohammad Reza; Moghaddam, Ali Asghar; Tajehmiri, Ahmad; Hosseinikia, Mahboobe; Oubari, Farhad; Nikougoftar Zarif, Mahin; Pasdar, Yahya; Mansouri, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), as major stem cells for cell therapy, have been studied from different aspects in preclinical and clinical settings for more than a decade. These cells modulate the immune system (humoral and cellular immune responses) in vitro by producing soluble factors (anti-inflammatory molecules) and/or making cell-cell contacts. Hence, they could be used in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and immune therapy. MSCs-based therapy have been recently used for treatment of cancer regarding the migratory potential of these cells towards tumor cells which makes them considerable candidates, also for cell therapy in both allogeneic and autologous settings. So, this review attempts to focus on the factors secreted by MSCs such as cytokines, their functional role in mounting and controlling immune responses mediated by different immune cell subpopulations and their significance in regenerative medicine in clinical trials. Although, further studies remain to be done to increase our knowledge of regulating development mechanisms, homeostasis and tissue repair in order to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials. Although MSCs have been proved safe and effective for cell therapy, there are still challenges to overcome before widely applying MSCs in clinic. PMID:28286618

  4. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  5. Nuclear factor-ĸB plays a critical role in both intrinsic and acquired resistance against endocrine therapy in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oida, Kumiko; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Xia, Yan; Jang, Hyosun; Amagai, Yosuke; Ahn, Ginnae; Nishikawa, Sho; Ishizaka, Saori; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2014-01-01

    Since more than 75% of breast cancers overexpress estrogen receptors (ER), endocrine therapy targeting ER has significantly improved the survival rate. Nonetheless, breast cancer still afflicts women worldwide and the major problem behind it is resistance to endocrine therapy. We have previously shown the involvement of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in neoplastic proliferation of human breast cancer cells; however, the association with the transformation of ER-positive cells remains unclear. In the current study, we focused on roles of NF-κB in the hormone dependency of breast cancers by means of ER-positive MCF-7 cells. Blocking of NF-κB signals in ER-negative cells stopped proliferation by downregulation of D-type cyclins. In contrast, the MCF-7 cells were resistant to NF-κB inhibition. Under estrogen-free conditions, the ER levels were reduced when compared with the original MCF-7 cells and the established cell subline exhibited tamoxifen resistance. Additionally, NF-κB participated in cell growth instead of the estrogen-ER axis in the subline and consequently, interfering with the NF-κB signals induced additive anticancer effects with tamoxifen. MMP-9 production responsible for cell migration, as well as the cell expansion in vivo, were suppressed by NF-κB inhibition. Therefore, we suggest that NF-κB is a master switch in both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:24531845

  6. A single-center case series of eight patients with the rare plasma cell dyscrasia of acquired Fanconi syndrome secondary to monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhu, Tienan; Xu, Lingling; Qin, Yan; Zhuang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Acquired Fanconi syndrome (FS) is a rare presentation of monoclonal gammopathy. We retrospectively summarized the cases of eight patients with FS secondary to monoclonal gammopathy at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) from January 2007 to April 2014. All patients had generalized or partial impairment of proximal renal tubular function. Six patients were diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and two were diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM). Although chemotherapy was administered to the two patients with MM and to one patient with MGUS, decreased paraprotein levels did not lead to improvements in metabolic abnormalities. All patients received continuous supplementation with deficient nutrients, leading to marked remission of bone pain and improved quality of life. Although renal function in most patients gradually declined, none of the patients developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) during an average follow-up time of 31 months, and no case of MGUS has yet transformed into MM.

  7. Myc induced miR-144/451 contributes to the acquired imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Wang, Sitao; Chen, Renan; Wu, Yanlan; Zhang, Bei; Huang, Siyong; Zhang, Jingyi; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Meng; Liang, Yingmin

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased c-myc expression in imatinib resistant CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc contributes the imatinib resistance in CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc transcriptionally reduces the expression of miR-144/451 in K562R cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restoration of miR-144/451 reverses the resistance of K562R cells to imatinib. -- Abstract: Imatinib resistance remains the big hurdle for CML therapy. Previous study reveals that c-myc is important for bcr-abl CML cell proliferation, while its role in imatinib resistance is largely unknown. In this study, we first found that c-myc expression is upregulated in imatinib resistant K562R cells, which in turn enhances the expression of miR-144/451. Knockdown of c-myc or restoration of miR-144/451 in the K562R cells sensitizes K562R cells to imatinib therapy. Our study here reveals an regulatory pathway between myc and miR-144/451 and highlights that targeting either myc or miR-144/451 might be valuable for eliminating the imatinib resistant CML cells.

  8. Alpha-catenin-Dependent Recruitment of the Centrosomal Protein CAP350 to Adherens Junctions Allows Epithelial Cells to Acquire a Columnar Shape

    PubMed Central

    Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25764135

  9. c-Met Overexpression Contributes to the Acquired Apoptotic Resistance of Nonadherent Ovarian Cancer Cells through a Cross Talk Mediated by Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/212

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Maggie K S; Zhou, Hong Y; Yam, Judy W P; Wong, Alice S T

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly because of widespread peritoneal dissemination and malignant ascites. Key to this is the capacity of tumor cells to escape suspension-induced apoptosis (anoikis), which also underlies their resistance to chemotherapy. Here, we used a nonadherent cell culture model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of apoptotic resistance of ovarian cancer cells that may mimic the chemoresistance found in solid tumors. We found that ovarian cancer cells acquired a remarkable resistance to anoikis and apoptosis induced by exposure to clinically relevant doses of two front-line chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and paclitaxel when grown in three-dimensional than monolayer cultures. Inhibition of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met, which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer, by a specific inhibitor or small interfering RNA blocked the acquired anoikis resistance and restored chemosensitivity in three-dimensional not in two-dimensional cultures. These effects were found to be dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling pathways. Inhibitors of PI3K/Akt abrogated ERK1/2 activation and its associated anoikis resistance in response to HGF, suggesting a signaling relay between these two pathways. Furthermore, we identified a central role of Ras as a mechanism of this cross talk. Interestingly, Ras did not lie upstream of PI3K/Akt, whereas PI3K/Akt signaling to ERK1/2 involved Ras. These findings shed new light on the apoptotic resistance mechanism of nonadherent ovarian cancer ascites cells and may have important clinical implications. PMID:20126471

  10. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  11. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  12. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  13. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  14. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  15. Acquired resistance to decitabine and cross-resistance to gemcitabine during the long-term treatment of human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells with decitabine.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Mika; Saito, Mai; Nakano, Aiko; Iwashita, Sakura; Ishizaka, Ayano; Ueda, Kumiko; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of long-term exposure of decitabine (DAC) to HCT116 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on the acquisition of resistance to DAC as well as cross-resistance to anticancer drugs used for CRC or other epigenetic modifiers. In the present study, DAC-resistant HCT116 CRC cells were established through long-term treatment with increasing concentrations of DAC (10 to 540 nM); and the cross-resistance to other drugs was subsequently examined. DAC-resistant HCT116 cells were obtained following a 104-day treatment with DAC, including DAC-free intervals. The results demonstrated that the IC50 value of DAC was increased ~100-fold in DAC-resistant HCT116 cells. Messenger (m)RNA expression of secreted frizzed-related protein 1 (SFRP1), which is regulated by DNA methylation, was not detected in DAC-resistant cells; however, SFRP1 mRNA was present in HCT116 cells treated with DAC for 52 days. DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) protein levels were slightly decreased until day 81 and then returned to control levels in DAC-resistant cells. Further experiments using DAC-resistant HCT116 cells revealed that these cells exhibited cross-resistance to gemcitabine (Gem); however, cross-resistance was not observed for other DNMT inhibitors (azacitidine and zebularine), histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, vorinostat and valproic acid) or anticancer drugs for CRC (5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin). Furthermore, the protein expression levels of cytidine deaminase (CDA) were increased, while those of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) were decreased in DAC-resistant HCT116 cells; by contrast, the mRNA expression levels for these proteins were not significantly altered. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the long-term treatment of HCT116 cells with DAC led to the acquisition of resistance to both DAC and Gem. In addition, these results may be partly attributed to changes in CDA and/or dCK, which are

  16. Maternally acquired runt disease.

    PubMed

    Beer, A E; Billingham, R E

    1973-01-19

    Without altering the structural integrity of the placenta by irradiation or drugs, we have shown that it is possible to immunize females both adoptively and actively against the paternally inherited transplantation antigens of their fetuses. Such immunization causes a high incidence of runt disease among the litters. Although the putative chimeric status of the affected offspring has yet to be confirmed, the results of our experiments support the thesis that runt disease is caused by the activities of "unwanted" immigrant lymphocytes from the maternal circulation. Our results suggest that immunologically activated cells are more likely to cross the placenta than normal cells and that this greater mobility may not be related to the immunologic specificity of the activated cells. Two factors may have contributed to the apparent failure of numerous previous attempts to demonstrate the capacity of transplantation immunity to affect the well-being of a fetus or, more correctly, its placenta, in the way that might be expected of a homograft. (i) Investigators were preoccupied with obtaining a classic type of rejection, in utero, analogous to the rejection of an orthotopic skin homograft. The birth of consistently healthy-looking litters, interpreted as a failure of the experiment, convinced the investigators of the efficacy of nature's solution of the homograft problem and there was no reason for them to suspect its possible limitations. Observation of the litters for several weeks might have uncovered the phenomenon of maternally induced runt disease. (ii) Most investigators resorted to hyperimmunization of the mothers. This would have facilitated the synthesis of protective isoantibodies capable of interfering with the expression of the potentially harmful cellular immune response (6). Ever since the abnormalities of runt disease were first described they have repeatedly been compared to those observed in patients with certain lymphomas (17). Various theories have been

  17. PI3Kδ inhibitor idelalisib in combination with BTK inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in diffuse large B cell lymphoma with acquired resistance to PI3Kδ and BTK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Rick A.; Cui, Zhi-Hua; Keegan, Kathleen S.; Brockett, Robert; Chen, Guang; Quéva, Christophe; Li, Li; Tannheimer, Stacey L.

    2017-01-01

    Activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma relies on B-cell receptor signaling to drive proliferation and survival. Downstream of the B-cell receptor, the key signaling kinases Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention by agents such as ibrutinib, ONO/GS-4059, and idelalisib. Combination therapy with such targeted agents could provide enhanced efficacy due to complimentary mechanisms of action. In this study, we describe both the additive interaction of and resistance mechanisms to idelalisib and ONO/GS-4059 in a model of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Significant tumor regression was observed with a combination of PI3Kδ and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the mouse TMD8 xenograft. Acquired resistance to idelalisib in the TMD8 cell line occurred by loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway upregulation, but not by mutation of PIK3CD. Sensitivity to idelalisib could be restored by combining idelalisib and ONO/GS-4059. Further evaluation of targeted inhibitors revealed that the combination of idelalisib and the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 inhibitor GSK2334470 or the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 could partially overcome resistance. Characterization of acquired Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance revealed a novel tumor necrosis factor alpha induced protein 3 mutation (TNFAIP3 Q143*), which led to a loss of A20 protein, and increased p-IκBα. The combination of idelalisib and ONO/GS-4059 partially restored sensitivity in this resistant line. Additionally, a mutation in Bruton’s tyrosine kinase at C481F was identified as a mechanism of resistance. The combination activity observed with idelalisib and ONO/GS-4059, taken together with the ability to overcome resistance, could lead to a new therapeutic option in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A clinical trial is currently underway to evaluate the

  18. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and Substance P Antagonist Enhancement of Natural Killer Cell Innate Immunity in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Dwight L.; Lynch, Kevin G.; Benton, Tami; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David; Douglas, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity and are involved in the host defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This study examines the potential role of three underlying regulatory systems that have been under investigation in central nervous system research as well as immune and viral research: serotonin, neurokinin, and glucocorticoid systems. Methods Fifty-one HIV-seropositive subjects were recruited to achieve a representative sample of depressed and nondepressed women. The effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), a substance P (SP) antagonist, and a glucocorticoid antagonist on NK cell function were assessed in a series of ex vivo experiments of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from each HIV-seropositive subject. Results Natural killer cell cytolytic activity was significantly increased by the SSRI citalopram and by the substance P antagonist CP-96345 relative to control conditions; the glucocorticoid antagonist, RU486, showed no effect on NK cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the effects of the three agents did not differ as a function of depression. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that NK cell function in HIV infection may be enhanced by serotonin reuptake inhibition and by substance P antagonism. It remains to be determined if HIV-related impairment in not only NK cytolytic activity but also NK noncytolytic activity can be improved by an SSRI or an SP antagonist. Clinical studies are warranted to address these questions and the potential roles of serotonergic agents and SP antagonists in improving NK cell immunity, delaying HIV disease progression, and extending survival with HIV infection. PMID:17945197

  19. Loss of Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein Induces Radioresistance in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Woods Ignatoski, Kathleen M.; Grewal, Navdeep K.; Markwart, Sonja M.; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Yeung, Kam; Ray, Michael E.; Keller, Evan T.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is often used in an attempt to cure localized prostate cancer (PCa), but it is only palliative against disseminated disease. Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in approximately 50% of localized PCa tissues and is absent in metastases. Chemotherapeutic agents have been shown to induce tumor apoptosis through induction of RKIP expression. Our goal was to test whether RT similarly induces apoptosis through induction of RKIP expression. Methods and Materials: The C4-2B PCa cell line was engineered to overexpress or underexpress RKIP. The engineered cells were tested for apoptosis in cell culture and tumor regression in mice after RT. Results: RT induced both RKIP expression and apoptosis of PCa cells. Overexpression of RKIP sensitized PCa cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, short-hairpin targeting of RKIP, so that RT could not induce RKIP expression, protected cells from radiation-induced apoptosis. In a murine model, knockdown of RKIP in PCa cells diminished radiation-induced apoptosis. Molecular concept mapping of genes altered on manipulation of RKIP expression revealed an inverse correlation with the concept of genes altered by RT. Conclusion: The data presented in this report indicate that the loss of RKIP, as seen in primary PCa tumors and metastases, confers protection against radiation-induced apoptosis. Therefore, it is conceivable that the loss of RKIP confers a growth advantage on PCa cells at distant sites, because the loss of RKIP would decrease apoptosis, favoring proliferation.

  20. [Modification of the radiosensitivity of cultured "Vero" cells by cumene hydroperoxide].

    PubMed

    Drancourt, N; Waultier, S; Paulin, R; Feugeas, C

    1993-12-01

    Cumene-hydroperoxide is a radical reaction promoter. Vero cells monolayers treated with this compound were irradiated with gamma-rays and their radiosensitization was compared with that of irradiated, non-treated control cells. Cumene-hydroperoxide treated cells showed a paradoxal radioresistance. We propose a possible buffer-like effect of cumene-hydroperoxide to explain these results.

  1. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions for Local Tumor Control of a Radioresistant Prostate Carcinoma in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peschke, Peter; Karger, Christian P.; Scholz, Michael; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ion beams relative to X-rays for local tumor control in a syngeneic rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1). Methods and Materials: A total of 198 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with increasing single and split doses of either {sup 12}C ions or photons using a 20-mm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for D{sub 50} (dose at 50% tumor control probability) were used to determine RBE values. Results: The D{sub 50} values for single doses were 32.9 {+-} 0.9 Gy for {sup 12}C ions and 75.7 {+-} 1.6 Gy for photons. The respective values for split doses were 38.0 {+-} 2.3 Gy and 90.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy. The corresponding RBE values were 2.30 {+-} 0.08 for single and 2.38 {+-} 0.16 for split doses. The most prominent side effects were dry and moist desquamation of the skin, which disappeared within weeks. Conclusion: The study confirmed the effectiveness of carbon ion therapy for severely radioresistant tumors. For 1- and 2-fraction photon and {sup 12}C ion radiation, we have established individual D{sub 50} values for local tumor control as well as related RBE values.

  2. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of 25 mm2 to 10 cm2 lens-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momey, F.; Coutard, J.-G.; Bordy, T.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Dinten, J.-M.; Allier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lens-free imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lens-free microscopy setup is a simple optical system featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful means for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g., integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm2) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. But in the case of tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm2 remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assay, here we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm2 through two different approaches. The first method consists in performing a scan of the cell culture by moving the source/sensor couple and then stitch the stack of images. The second is to make an acquisition by scanning with a line scan camera. The two approaches are compared in term of resolution, complexity and acquisition time. Next we have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm2) and in final point (10 cm2) to assess the combination of these two complementary modalities. In the future, we aim at combining directly super wide field of view acquisitions (>10 cm2) with real time ability inside the incubator.

  3. Dual HER2/PIK3CA Targeting Overcomes Single-Agent Acquired Resistance in HER2-Amplified Uterine Serous Carcinoma Cell Lines In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Salvatore; Cocco, Emiliano; Black, Jonathan; Bellone, Stefania; Bonazzoli, Elena; Predolini, Federica; Ferrari, Francesca; Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Ratner, Elena; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Terranova, Corrado; Angioli, Roberto; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-11-01

    HER2/neu gene amplification and PIK3CA driver mutations are common in uterine serous carcinoma (USC) and may represent ideal therapeutic targets against this aggressive variant of endometrial cancer. We examined the sensitivity to neratinib, taselisib, and the combination of the two compounds in in vitro and in vivo experiments using PIK3CA-mutated and PIK3CA wild-type HER2/neu-amplified USC cell lines. Cell viability and cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow-cytometry assays. Downstream signaling was assessed by immunoblotting. Preclinical efficacy of single versus dual inhibition was evaluated in vivo using two USC xenografts. We found both single-agent neratinib and taselisib to be active but only transiently effective in controlling the in vivo growth of USC xenografts harboring HER2/neu gene amplification with or without oncogenic PIK3CA mutations. In contrast, the combination of the two inhibitors caused a stronger and long-lasting growth inhibition in both USC xenografts when compared with single-agent therapy. Combined targeting of HER2 and PIK3CA was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle and a dose-dependent decline in the phosphorylation of S6. Importantly, dual inhibition therapy initiated after tumor progression in single-agent-treated mice was still remarkably effective at inducing tumor regression in both large PIK3CA and pan-ErbB inhibitor-resistant USC xenografts. Dual HER2/PIK3CA blockade may represent a novel therapeutic option for USC patients harboring tumors with HER2/neu gene amplification and mutated or wild-type PIK3CA resistant to chemotherapy.

  4. Transformed aggressive γδ-variant T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia with acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q11.2q25.3 and additional aberrations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Papenhausen, Peter; Loughran, Thomas P; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-09-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGLL) is a rare indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cytopenias, splenomegaly, and various degrees of T-cell lymphocytosis, due to a clonal expansion of CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cells. Phenotypic variants of T-LGLL include CD4(+) /CD8(-) T-cells, with dual CD4(-) /CD8(-) /γδ(+) T-cells being even rarer. Cytogenetic abnormalities in T-LGLL have rarely been reported, and there is scientific debate regarding the existence of aggressive or transformed variants of T-LGLL. We report a patient with T-LGLL, γδ variant, with nearly 20-year-long duration of cytopenias before transformation to an unusual clinical scenario, manifesting with marked lymphocytosis >100 × 10(9) /L and infiltration of lymph nodes, tonsils, and subcutaneous tissue. Single-nucleotide polymorphism assays revealed acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q and deletion of 3p21.31, in addition to trisomy 5, monosomy X, and monosomy 21. These genetic abnormalities provided a better understanding of the molecular nature and the potentiality of disease transformation.

  5. Tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens, reproductive microchimerism and regulatory T cell memory: 60 years after ‘Evidence for actively acquired tolerance to Rh antigens’

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Ertelt, James M.; Xin, Lijun; Strong, Beverly S.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compulsory exposure to genetically foreign maternal tissue imprints in offspring sustained tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMA). Immunological tolerance to NIMA was first described by Dr. Ray D. Owen for women genetically negative for erythrocyte rhesus (Rh) antigen with reduced sensitization from developmental Rh exposure by their mothers. Extending this analysis to HLA haplotypes has uncovered the exciting potential for therapeutically exploiting NIMA-specific tolerance naturally engrained in mammalian reproduction for improved clinical outcomes after allogeneic transplantation. Herein, we summarize emerging scientific concepts stemming from tolerance to NIMA that includes postnatal maintenance of microchimeric maternal origin cells in offspring, expanded accumulation of immune suppressive regulatory T cells with NIMA-specificity, along with teleological benefits and immunological consequences of NIMA-specific tolerance conserved across mammalian species. PMID:26517600

  6. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  7. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  8. Acquired pure red cell aplasia associated with malignant lymphomas: a nationwide cohort study in Japan for the PRCA Collaborative Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Makoto; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Fujishima, Naohito; Kawano, Fumio; Kimura, Akiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Arai, Ayako; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Nakao, Shinji; Urabe, Akio; Omine, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Keiya

    2009-03-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) has been reported in association with lymphoma as one of the autoimmune diseases seen during the course of lymphoid malignancies. However, the relation of PRCA with the underlying lymphomas remains unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the histologic subtypes of lymphomas, the chronological sequence of anemia and lymphoma, and the response to treatment. We conducted a nationwide survey in Japan. From a cohort of 185 PRCA patients, 8 patients with lymphoma were evaluated. Histologic subtypes varied and the lymphoma was of the B-cell type in four cases and of the T-cell type in four. Four patients simultaneously developed PRCA and lymphoma. Three patients developed PRCA following lymphoma, two of whom developed anemia during remission of lymphoma. PRCA preceded lymphoma in one patient. Effective chemotherapy was associated with remission of anemia in concurrent lymphoma and PRCA. Overall, anemia responded to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive therapy in seven patients. In four responding patients, PRCA remained in durable remission without maintenance immunosuppressive therapy, which is different from a recurrent feature of idiopathic PRCA. We suggest that the mechanism of lymphoma-associated PRCA is heterogeneous and that durable maintenance-free remission of anemia can be obtained in some patients.

  9. Identification of inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II as a novel tumor resistance biomarker in human laryngeal cancer HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Yun, Hong Shik; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Lee, Kee-Ho; Kang, Chang-Mo; Lee, Su-Jae; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2012-11-01

    Although tumor resistance remains a significant impediment to successful radiotherapy, associated regulatory markers and detailed molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well defined. In this study, we identified inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) as a novel marker of radioresistance by systematically analyzing Unigene libraries of laryngeal cancer. INPP4B was highly expressed in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells and was induced by treatment with either radiation or anticancer drugs in various types of cancer cells. Ectopic INPP4B overexpression increased radioresistance and anticancer drug resistance by suppressing apoptosis in HEp-2 cells. Conversely, INPP4B depletion with small interfering RNA resensitized HEp-2 as well as A549 and H1299 cells to radiation- and anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, radiation-induced INPP4B expression was blocked by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). INPP4B depletion significantly attenuated radiation-induced increases in Akt phosphorylation, indicating an association of INPP4B-mediated radioresistance with Akt survival signaling. Taken together, our data suggest that ERK-dependent induction of INPP4B triggers the development of a tumor-resistance phenotype via Akt signaling and identify INPP4B as a potentially important target molecule for resolving the radioresistance of cancer cells.

  10. Effect of Cytomegalovirus Co-Infection on Normalization of Selected T-Cell Subsets in Children with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection Treated with Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Aaron, Lisa; Montepiedra, Grace; Anthony, Patricia; Thuvamontolrat, Kasalyn; Pahwa, Savita; Burchett, Sandra; Weinberg, Adriana; Kovacs, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) co-infection and viremia on reconstitution of selected CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children ≥ 1-year old who participated in a partially randomized, open-label, 96-week combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-algorithm study. Methods Participants were categorized as CMV-naïve, CMV-positive (CMV+) viremic, and CMV+ aviremic, based on blood, urine, or throat culture, CMV IgG and DNA polymerase chain reaction measured at baseline. At weeks 0, 12, 20 and 40, T-cell subsets including naïve (CD62L+CD45RA+; CD95-CD28+), activated (CD38+HLA-DR+) and terminally differentiated (CD62L-CD45RA+; CD95+CD28-) CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were measured by flow cytometry. Results Of the 107 participants included in the analysis, 14% were CMV+ viremic; 49% CMV+ aviremic; 37% CMV-naïve. In longitudinal adjusted models, compared with CMV+ status, baseline CMV-naïve status was significantly associated with faster recovery of CD8+CD62L+CD45RA+% and CD8+CD95-CD28+% and faster decrease of CD8+CD95+CD28-%, independent of HIV VL response to treatment, cART regimen and baseline CD4%. Surprisingly, CMV status did not have a significant impact on longitudinal trends in CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+%. CMV status did not have a significant impact on any CD4+ T-cell subsets. Conclusions In this cohort of PHIV+ children, the normalization of naïve and terminally differentiated CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to cART was detrimentally affected by the presence of CMV co-infection. These findings may have implications for adjunctive treatment strategies targeting CMV co-infection in PHIV+ children, especially those that are now adults or reaching young adulthood and may have accelerated immunologic aging, increased opportunistic infections and aging diseases of the immune system. PMID:25794163

  11. Chronic hypoxia decreases synthesis of homologous recombination proteins to offset chemoresistance and radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Chan, Norman; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Zhao, Helen; Bindra, Ranjit; Glazer, Peter M; Powell, Simon; Belmaaza, Abdellah; Wouters, Brad; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-01-15

    Hypoxic and/or anoxic tumor cells can have increased rates of mutagenesis and altered DNA repair protein expression. Yet very little is known regarding the functional consequences of any hypoxia-induced changes in the expression of proteins involved in DNA double-strand break repair. We have developed a unique hypoxic model system using H1299 cells expressing an integrated direct repeat green fluorescent protein (DR-GFP) homologous recombination (HR) reporter system to study HR under prolonged chronic hypoxia (up to 72 h under 0.2% O(2)) without bias from altered proliferation, cell cycle checkpoint activation, or severe cell toxicity. We observed decreased expression of HR proteins due to a novel mechanism involving decreased HR protein synthesis. Error-free HR was suppressed 3-fold under 0.2% O(2) as measured by the DR-GFP reporter system. This decrease in functional HR resulted in increased sensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agents mitomycin C and cisplatin but not to the microtubule-interfering agent, paclitaxel. Chronically hypoxic H1299 cells that had decreased functional HR were relatively radiosensitive [oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), 1.37] when compared with acutely hypoxic or anoxic cells (OER, 1.96-2.61). Using CAPAN1 cells isogenic for BRCA2 and siRNA to RAD51, we confirmed that the hypoxia-induced radiosensitivity was due to decreased HR capacity. Persistent down-regulation of HR function by the tumor microenvironment could result in low-fidelity DNA repair and have significant implications for response to therapy and genetic instability in human cancers.

  12. Multiplicity of acquired cross-resistance in paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells is associated with feedback control of TUBB3 via FOXO3a-mediated ABCB1 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aldonza, Mark Borris D.; Hong, Ji-Young; Alinsug, Malona V.; Song, Jayoung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a primary obstacle for effective cancer therapy. The correlation of point mutations in class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and the prominent overexpression of ATP-binding cassette P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), a multidrug resistance gene, have been protruding mechanisms of resistance to microtubule disruptors such as paclitaxel (PTX) for many cancers. However, the precise underlying mechanism of the rapid onset of cross-resistance to an array of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs in PTX-resistant cancers has been poorly understood. We determined that our established PTX-resistant cancer cells display ABCB1/ABCC1-associated cross-resistance to chemically different drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, docetaxel, and cisplatin. We found that feedback activation of TUBB3 can be triggered through the FOXO3a-dependent regulation of ABCB1, which resulted in the accentuation of induced PTX resistance and encouraged multiplicity in acquired cross-resistance. FOXO3a-directed regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function suggests that control of ABCB1 involves methylation-dependent activation. Consistently, transcriptional overexpression or downregulation of FOXO3a directs inhibitor-controlled protease-degradation of TUBB3. The functional PI3K/Akt signaling is tightly responsive to FOXO3a activation alongside doxorubicin treatment, which directs FOXO3a arginine hypermethylation. In addition, we found that secretome factors from PTX-resistant cancer cells with acquired cross-resistance support a P-gp-dependent association in multidrug resistance (MDR) development, which assisted the FOXO3a-mediated control of TUBB3 feedback. The direct silencing of TUBB3 reverses induced multiple cross-resistance, reduces drug-resistant tumor mass, and suppresses the impaired microtubule stability status of PTX-resistant cells with transient cross-resistance. These findings highlight the control of the TUBB3 response to ABCB1 genetic suppressors as a mechanism to reverse the

  13. Long-term outcome of patients with acquired chronic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) following immunosuppressive therapy: a final report of the nationwide cohort study in 2004/2006 by the Japan PRCA collaborative study group.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Makoto; Sawada, Kenichi; Fujishima, Naohito; Teramura, Masanao; Bessho, Masami; Dan, Kazuo; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Nakao, Shinji; Urabe, Akio; Fujisawa, Shin; Yonemura, Yuji; Kawano, Fumio; Oshimi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Koichi; Matsuda, Akira; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Arai, Ayako; Komatsu, Norio; Harigae, Hideo; Omine, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Keiya; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy has been employed as the initial treatment for acquired chronic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), such as idiopathic, thymoma-associated, or large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia-associated PRCA, which is thought to be immune-mediated. To explore the overall long-term outcome following immunosuppression and to identify the risk factors for death in these disorders, we conducted nationwide surveys in Japan 2004 and 2006, and identified a total of 185 patients with acquired chronic PRCA, including 72 idiopathic, 41 thymoma-associated and 14 LGL leukaemia-associated cases of PRCA for whom data was available. The present study evaluated 127 patients with these three subsets of PRCA. The median overall survival has not yet been reached in idiopathic PRCA. The estimated median overall survival times in patients with thymoma-associated and LGL leukaemia-associated PRCA were 142·1 and 147·8 months, respectively. Twenty-two deaths were reported, and the response to induction therapy and relapse of anaemia were found to be associated with death. The major causes of death were infection in seven patients and organ failure in another seven patients. The results suggest that maintenance therapy and the management of infectious complications are crucial for improving the prognosis of chronic PRCA.

  14. Regulation of miRNAs Affects Radiobiological Response of Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-mei; Liao, Xing-yun; Chen, Xie-wan; Li, De-zhi; Sun, Jian-guo; Liao, Rong-xia

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a key therapeutic strategy for lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, but radioresistance often occurs and leads to failure of RT. It is therefore important to clarify the mechanism underlying radioresistance in lung cancer. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered the fundamental reason for radioresistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been regarded as important regulatory molecules of CSCs, carcinogenesis, and treatment response of cancers. It is crucial to clarify how regulation of miRNAs affects repair of DNA damage, redistribution, repopulation, reoxygenation, and radiosensitivity (5R) of lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs). A thorough understanding of the regulation of miRNAs affecting 5R of LCSCs has potential impact on identifying novel targets and thus may improve the efficacy of lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25815339

  15. Plasmodium vivax VIR Proteins Are Targets of Naturally-Acquired Antibody and T Cell Immune Responses to Malaria in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Pilar; Rui, Edmilson; Padilla, Norma; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E.; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hans, Dhiraj; Menegon, Michela; Mateo, Francesca; Sanz, Sergi; Desai, Meghna; Mayor, Alfredo; Chitnis, Chetan C.; Bardají, Azucena; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen; Severini, Carlo; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-01-01

    P. vivax infection during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes such as anemia, low birth weight and congenital malaria, thus representing an important global health problem. However, no vaccine is currently available for its prevention. Vir genes were the first putative virulent factors associated with P. vivax infections, yet very few studies have examined their potential role as targets of immunity. We investigated the immunogenic properties of five VIR proteins and two long synthetic peptides containing conserved VIR sequences (PvLP1 and PvLP2) in the context of the PregVax cohort study including women from five malaria endemic countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea (PNG) at different timepoints during and after pregnancy. Antibody responses against all antigens were detected in all populations, with PNG women presenting the highest levels overall. P. vivax infection at sample collection time was positively associated with antibody levels against PvLP1 (fold-increase: 1.60 at recruitment -first antenatal visit-) and PvLP2 (fold-increase: 1.63 at delivery), and P. falciparum co-infection was found to increase those responses (for PvLP1 at recruitment, fold-increase: 2.25). Levels of IgG against two VIR proteins at delivery were associated with higher birth weight (27 g increase per duplicating antibody levels, p<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PNG uninfected pregnant women had significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ TH1 responses (p=0.006) and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 after PvLP2 stimulation than P. vivax-infected women (p<0.05). These data demonstrate that VIR antigens induce the natural acquisition of antibody and T cell memory responses that might be important in immunity to P. vivax during pregnancy in very diverse geographical settings. PMID:27711158

  16. Plasmodium vivax VIR Proteins Are Targets of Naturally-Acquired Antibody and T Cell Immune Responses to Malaria in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Requena, Pilar; Rui, Edmilson; Padilla, Norma; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Umbers, Alexandra J; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina; Hans, Dhiraj; Menegon, Michela; Mateo, Francesca; Sanz, Sergi; Desai, Meghna; Mayor, Alfredo; Chitnis, Chetan C; Bardají, Azucena; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen; Severini, Carlo; Fernández-Becerra, Carmen; Menéndez, Clara; Del Portillo, Hernando; Dobaño, Carlota

    2016-10-01

    P. vivax infection during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes such as anemia, low birth weight and congenital malaria, thus representing an important global health problem. However, no vaccine is currently available for its prevention. Vir genes were the first putative virulent factors associated with P. vivax infections, yet very few studies have examined their potential role as targets of immunity. We investigated the immunogenic properties of five VIR proteins and two long synthetic peptides containing conserved VIR sequences (PvLP1 and PvLP2) in the context of the PregVax cohort study including women from five malaria endemic countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea (PNG) at different timepoints during and after pregnancy. Antibody responses against all antigens were detected in all populations, with PNG women presenting the highest levels overall. P. vivax infection at sample collection time was positively associated with antibody levels against PvLP1 (fold-increase: 1.60 at recruitment -first antenatal visit-) and PvLP2 (fold-increase: 1.63 at delivery), and P. falciparum co-infection was found to increase those responses (for PvLP1 at recruitment, fold-increase: 2.25). Levels of IgG against two VIR proteins at delivery were associated with higher birth weight (27 g increase per duplicating antibody levels, p<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PNG uninfected pregnant women had significantly higher antigen-specific IFN-γ TH1 responses (p=0.006) and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 after PvLP2 stimulation than P. vivax-infected women (p<0.05). These data demonstrate that VIR antigens induce the natural acquisition of antibody and T cell memory responses that might be important in immunity to P. vivax during pregnancy in very diverse geographical settings.

  17. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  18. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  19. Increased Artemis levels confer radioresistance to both high and low LET radiation exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemis has a defined role in V(D)J recombination and has been implicated in the repair of radiation induced double-strand breaks. However the exact function(s) of Artemis in DNA repair and its preferred substrate(s) in vivo remain undefined. Our previous work suggests that Artemis is important for the repair of complex DNA damage like that inflicted by high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. To establish the contribution of Artemis in repairing DNA damage caused by various radiation qualities, we evaluated the effect of over-expressing Artemis on cell survival, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest after exposure to high and low LET radiation. Results Our data reveal that Artemis over-expression confers marked radioprotection against both types of radiation, although the radioprotective effect was greater following high LET radiation. Inhibitor studies reveal that the radioprotection imparted by Artemis is primarily dependent on DNA-PK activity, and to a lesser extent on ATM kinase activity. Together, these data suggest a DNA-PK dependent role for Artemis in the repair of complex DNA damage. Conclusions These findings indicate that Artemis levels significantly influence radiation toxicity in human cells and suggest that Artemis inhibition could be a practical target for adjuvant cancer therapies. PMID:22713703

  20. Squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma and Burkitt's lymphoma are consequences of impaired immune surveillance of ubiquitous viruses in acquired immune deficiency syndrome, allograft recipients and tropical African patients.

    PubMed

    Purtilo, D T; Manolov, G; Manolova, Y; Harada, S; Lipscomb, H

    1984-01-01

    The immune system has evolved under Darwinian pressures as a defence against ubiquitous viruses. Immune surveillance against viral antigens protects the normal host. Individuals with inherited or acquired immune-deficiency disorders can become vulnerable to ubiquitous viruses and neoplasms can ensue, such as B-cell lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, and carcinoma of the penis and uterine cervix. Immunodeficiency permits Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus, papillomavirus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus to induce sustained target-cell proliferation. Each virus selects specific cellular targets bearing viral receptors and the infection leads to proliferation of the target cells rather than lysis. Various co-factors, including nutrition, exposure to tumour-promoting agents, parasitic infection, and ultraviolet light, may promote carcinogenesis. Depending on the type and severity of the immune deficiency, gradual proliferation may lead to evolution of a malignant clone. Conversion of polyclonal virally infected proliferating cells to give monoclonal malignancy is probably due to specific cytogenetic rearrangements which allow oncogene activation and endow an altered tumour cell with selective growth advantages over normal diploid cells. Prevention of viral oncogenesis may be possible by treatment of immune-deficient individuals with premalignant disorders. Immunotherapy and antiviral therapy may prevent progression of viral-induced proliferation to malignancy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of immune deficiency and viruses in the induction of malignancies commonly occurring in Africans residing in sub-Saharan Africa (Purtilo, 1976). The types of malignancies commonly occurring in this region are believed to be due to ubiquitous viruses. A failure of immune surveillance mechanisms to recognize viral antigens and abrogate proliferation of infected target cells predisposes to

  1. Overexpression of IGF-I receptor in HeLa cells enhances in vivo radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Haruna; Yu, Dong; Miura, Masahiko

    2007-11-30

    Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase whose activation strongly promotes cell growth and survival. We previously reported that IGF-IR activity confers intrinsic radioresistance in mouse embryo fibroblasts in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether tumor cells overexpressing IGF-IR exhibit radioresistance in vivo. For this purpose, we established HeLa cells that overexpress IGF-IR (HeLa-R), subcutaneously transplanted these cells into nude mice, and examined radioresponse in the resulting solid tumors. HeLa-R cells exhibited typical in vitro phenotypes generally observed in IGF-IR-overexpressing cells, as well as significant intrinsic radioresistance in vitro compared with parent cells. As expected, the transplanted HeLa-R tumors grew at a remarkably higher rate than parent tumors. Histological analysis revealed that HeLa-R tumors expressed more VEGF and had a higher density of tumor vessels. Unexpectedly, a marked growth delay was observed in HeLa-R tumors following 10 Gy of X-irradiation. Immunostaining of HeLa-R tumors for the hypoxia marker pimonidazole revealed a significantly lower level of hypoxic cells. Moreover, clamp hypoxia significantly increased radioresistance in HeLa-R tumors. Tumor microenvironments in vivo generated by the IGF-IR expression thus could be a major factor in determining the tumor radioresponse in vivo.

  2. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; De Raeve, Hendrik; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  3. Carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase is involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Sun, Zongtao; Xu, Zhenjian; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Hu; Hua, Yuejin

    2008-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid product, which contributes to cell resistance following various stresses. The biosynthetic pathway of deinoxanthin is unclear, although several enzymes are presumed to be involved. The gene (dr2250) predicted by gene homologue analysis to encode carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (CrtD) was deleted to investigate its function. A mutant deficient in the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) was also constructed to verify the catalytic function of the gene product in the native host. Carotenoid analysis of the resultant mutants verified that DR2250 encodes carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase, which catalyses the C-3',4'-desaturation of the monocyclic precursor of deinoxanthin but not acyclic carotenoids. Mutation of the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) resulted in accumulation of lycopene, confirming that it encodes the lycopene cyclase in the native host. The lack of CrtD decreased the antioxidant capacity of the mutant deficient in dr2250 compared with the wild-type, indicating that the C-3',4'-desaturation step contributes to the antioxidant capacity of deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans.

  4. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct.

  5. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  6. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  7. The complex pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y; Katsanis, E

    2015-06-01

    Immune-mediated destruction of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia (aAA). Dysregulated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, CD4(+) T cells including T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, regulatory T cells and Th17 cells, natural killer (NK) cells and NK T cells, along with the abnormal production of cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, induce apoptosis of HSPCs, constituting a consistent and defining feature of severe aAA. Alterations in the polymorphisms of TGF-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α genes, as well as certain human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, may account for the propensity to immune-mediated killing of HSPCs and/or ineffective haematopoiesis. Although the inciting autoantigens remain elusive, autoantibodies are often detected in the serum. In addition, recent studies provide genetic and molecular evidence that intrinsic and/or secondary deficits in HSPCs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may underlie the development of bone marrow failure.

  8. MiR-200c inhibits autophagy and enhances radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells by targeting UBQLN1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quanquan; Liu, Tongxin; Yuan, Yawei; Guo, Zhenli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha; Lin, Xiaoshan; Xu, Zhixin; Liu, Minfeng; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Longhua

    2015-03-01

    Radioresistance is a major challenge during the treatment of breast cancer. A further understanding of the mechanisms of radioresistance could provide strategies to address this challenge. In our study, we compared the expression of miR-200c in four distinct breast cancer cell lines: two representative basal cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and BT549) vs. two representative luminal cancer cells (MCF-7 and BT474). The results revealed practically lower expression of miR-200c in the two basal cancer cell lines and higher expression of miR-200c in luminal cancer cells compared to the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Ectopic expression of miR-200c in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited irradiation-induced autophagy and sensitized the breast cancer cells to irradiation. We also identified UBQLN1 as a direct functional target of miR-200c involved in irradiation-induced autophagy and radioresistance. In 35 human breast cancer tissue samples, we detected an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-200c vs. UBQLN1 and LC3. These results indicate that the identified miR-200c/UBQLN1-mediated autophagy pathway may help to elucidate radioresistance in human breast cancer and might represent a therapeutic strategy.

  9. Successful steroid treatment of acquired idiopathic partial hypohidrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoritaka, Asako; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Akagi, Kumiko; Kishida, Shuji

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic-acquired hypohidrosis remains unknown, and no specific causes have yet been established. We report a 34-year-old man with acquired idiopathic hypohidrosis successfully treated with prednisolone. The patient noticed heat intolerance and hypohidrosis of the pectoral and back during the summer. No systemic disease or neurological findings were identified. Eccrine sweat glands displayed infiltration by inflammatory cells, with immunoglobulin G and C3 deposition in the basement membrane. Steroid therapy improved the hypohidrosis. An immunological pathogenesis could be a major factor in idiopathic-acquired hypohidrosis.

  10. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  11. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  12. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    PubMed

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  13. Detection of the T790M mutation of EGFR in plasma of advanced non–small cell lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (West Japan oncology group 8014LTR study)

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koichi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Oguri, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ebi, Noriyuki; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Bessho, Akihiro; Tachihara, Motoko; Akamatsu, Hiroaki; Bandoh, Shuji; Himeji, Daisuke; Ohira, Tatsuo; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Next-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to overcome resistance to earlier generations of such drugs mediated by a secondary T790M mutation of EGFR, but the performance of a second tumor biopsy to assess T790M mutation status can be problematic. Methods We developed and evaluated liquid biopsy assays for detection of TKI-sensitizing and T790M mutations of EGFR by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) in EGFR mutation–positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. Results A total of 260 patients was enrolled between November 2014 and March 2015 at 29 centers for this West Japan Oncology Group (WJOG 8014LTR) study. Plasma specimens from all subjects as well as tumor tissue or malignant pleural effusion or ascites fluid from 41 patients were collected after the development of EGFR-TKI resistance. All plasma samples were genotyped successfully and the results were reported to physicians within 14 days. TKI-sensitizing and T790M mutations were detected in plasma of 120 (46.2%) and 75 (28.8%) patients, respectively. T790M was detected in 56.7% of patients with plasma positive for TKI-sensitizing mutations. For the 41 patients with paired samples obtained after acquisition of EGFR-TKI resistance, the concordance for mutation detection by ddPCR in plasma compared with tumor tissue or malignant fluid specimens was 78.0% for TKI-sensitizing mutations and 65.9% for T790M. Conclusions Noninvasive genotyping by ddPCR with cell-free DNA extracted from plasma is a promising approach to the detection of gene mutations during targeted treatment. PMID:27542267

  14. Intrinsic resistance to the lethal effects of x-irradiation in insect and arachnid cells

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve cell lines representing 10 genera of three orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera) of the class Insecta and one cell line (Acarina) from the class Arachnida were examined to discern their sensitivity to the lethal effects of x-irradiation. Radiosensitivity was measured by a combination of colony formation and population growth curve techniques. Each of these arthropod cell lines is significantly more radioresistant than mammalian cells, though the degree of resistance varies greatly with order. Dipteran cells are 3 to 9 times and lepidopteran cells 52 to 104 times more radioresistant than mammalian cells. Orthopteran and acarine cells are intermediate in radiosensitivity between dipteran and lepidopteran cells. These cells, especially the lepidopteran, should be valuable in determining the molecular nature of repair mechanisms that result in resistance to ionizing radiation. PMID:16593348

  15. Radiation Response of Cancer Stem-Like Cells From Established Human Cell Lines After Sorting for Surface Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Assar, Osama; Muschel, Ruth J.; Mantoni, Tine S.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: A subpopulation of cancer stem-like cells (CSLC) is hypothesized to exist in different cancer cell lines and to mediate radioresistance in solid tumors. Methods and Materials: Cells were stained for CSLC markers and sorted (fluorescence-activated cell sorter/magnetic beads) to compare foci and radiosensitivity of phosphorylated histone H2AX at Ser 139 (gamma-H2AX) in sorted vs. unsorted populations in eight cell lines from different organs. CSLC properties were examined using anchorage-independent growth and levels of activated Notch1. Validation consisted of testing tumorigenicity and postirradiation enrichment of CSLC in xenograft tumors. Results: The quantity of CSLC was generally in good agreement with primary tumors. CSLC from MDA-MB-231 (breast) and Panc-1 and PSN-1 (both pancreatic) cells had fewer residual gamma-H2AX foci than unsorted cells, pointing to radioresistance of CSLC. However, only MDA-MB-231 CSLC were more radioresistant than unsorted cells. Furthermore, MDA-MB-231 CSLC showed enhanced anchorage-independent growth and overexpression of activated Notch1 protein. The expression of cancer stem cell surface markers in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model was increased after exposure to fractionated radiation. In contrast to PSN-1 cells, a growth advantage for MDA-MB-231 CSLC xenograft tumors was found compared to tumors arising from unsorted cells. Conclusions: CSLC subpopulations showed no general radioresistant phenotype, despite the quantities of CSLC subpopulations shown to correspond relatively well in other reports. Likewise, CSLC characteristics were found in some but not all of the tested cell lines. The reported problems in testing for CSLC in cell lines may be overcome by additional techniques, beyond sorting for markers.

  16. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2016-09-29

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  17. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  18. Natural acquired inhibitory antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) equally block erythrocyte binding of homologous and heterologous expressed PvDBP-II on the surface of COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Vahideh; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Mehrizi, Akram A; Mirkazemi, Sedigheh; Djadid, Navid D

    2016-02-01

    The binding domain of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP-II) is a promising blood-stage vaccine candidate for vivax malaria. For the development of a successful vivax malaria vaccine based on DBP-II, the antigenic diversity and also naturally occurring functional antibodies to different PvDBP-II variant types in the various populations must be determined. However, similar to other blood-stage antigens, allelic variation within the PvDBP-II is a fundamental challenge for the development of a broadly efficient vaccine. The present study was performed to define whether the polymorphisms in PvDBP-II influence the nature of functional inhibitory activity of naturally acquired or induced anti-DBP-II antibodies in mice. In this investigation, five genetically distinct variants of PvDBP-II were transiently expressed on the COS-7 cell surface. Erythrocyte-binding inhibition assay (EBIA) was performed using human sera infected with corresponding and non-corresponding P. vivax variants as well as by the use of mice sera immunized with different expressed recombinant PvDBP-IIs. EBIA results showed that the inhibitory percentage varied between 50 and 63 % by using sera from infected individuals, and in case of mouse antisera, inhibition was in the range of 76-86 %. Interestingly, no significant difference was detected in red blood cell binding inhibition when different PvDBP-II variants on the COS-7 cell surfaces were incubated with heterologous and homologous sera infected with PvDBP-II variants. This suggests that the detected polymorphisms in all five forms of PvDBP-II may not affect functional activity of anti-DBP-II antibodies. In conclusion, our results revealed that there are functional cross-reactive antibody responses to heterologous PvDBP-II variants that might provide a broader inhibitory response against all, or at least the majority of strains compared to single allele of this protein that should be considered in development of PvDBP-II-based vaccine.

  19. [Gamma-radiation action on cells of algae Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Glinkova, E; Zhuchkina, N I; Koltovoĭ, N A; Koltovaia, N A

    2012-01-01

    Considering the potentials of algae Euglena to constitute a part of biological systems of human life support, effects of low radiation doses on algal cells and radiosensitivity dependence on their genotype were studied. In experiments with gamma-irradiation (60Co) of Euglena gracilis, the highest radioresistance was demonstrated by strain Z. OFL; the chloroplasts lacking Z-derived strain showed hypersensitivity to radiation. E. bacillaris and derived chlorophyll-lacking strains W3 and W10 had intermediate radiosensitivity. Irradiation with the doses of up to 10 Gy produced a hormetic effect in the stock strains. Cells death was observed only after irradiation by doses above 100 Gy. The stimulating effect was exerted both on radioresistance and growth rate. Dyes made possible rapid evaluation of the proportion of living and dead cells. Comparison of two survival tests showed that the classic medium inoculation overestimates cell deaths as it disregards the living non-proliferating cells.

  20. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  1. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Quagliarello, V.

    1982-01-01

    A recently recognized syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-AIDS) has arisen since June 1981. It has received international attention. The clinical spectrum consists of repeated opportunistic infections, rare malignancies, and autoimmune phenomena, occurring in previously healthy adults with no history of an immunologic disorder. The population subset at risk for this syndrome appears to be predominantly homosexual American males and intravenous drug abusers with rare cases being reported in heterosexuals, hemophiliacs, and foreign patients, especially Haitians. The immunologic aberrancy in all patients described appears limited to T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and imbalance of T-helper and suppressor cells. This disordered immunoregulation is a consistent finding in all reported cases and appears to predispose to the opportunistic infections and malignancies which have been associated with a 40 percent mortality. The underlying factor responsible for the immunoregulatory defect is unknown but possible etiologies include a transmissible infectious agent, drug use, chronic antigen stimulation, and spermatozoa exposure. Treatment of the associated infections and malignancies has been a frustrating endeavor as many patients respond incompletely or relapse soon after successful treatment course. Preventive measures, including patient education, physician awareness, and immunomodulating agents, are discussed. PMID:6134399

  2. Sensitivity and Specificity of Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1, Midregional Proatrial Natriuretic Peptide and Midregional Proadrenomedullin for Distinguishing Etiology and to Assess Severity in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Di Gangi, Maria; Cardinale, Fabio; Baraldi, Eugenio; Corsini, Ilaria; Da Dalt, Liviana; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Correra, Antonio; Villani, Alberto; Sacco, Oliviero; Tenero, Laura; Dones, Piera; Gambino, Monia; Zampiero, Alberto; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) to distinguish bacterial from viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and to identify severe cases in children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP. Index test results were compared with those derived from routine diagnostic tests, i.e., white blood cell (WBC) counts, neutrophil percentages, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels. Methods This prospective, multicenter study was carried out in the most important children’s hospitals (n = 11) in Italy and 433 otherwise healthy children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP were enrolled. Among cases for whom etiology could be determined, CAP was ascribed to bacteria in 235 (54.3%) children and to one or more viruses in 111 (25.6%) children. A total of 312 (72.2%) children had severe disease. Results CRP and PCT had the best performances for both bacterial and viral CAP identification. The cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity for the identification of bacterial and viral infections using CRP were ≥7.98 mg/L and ≤7.5 mg/L, respectively. When PCT was considered, the cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity were ≥0.188 ng/mL for bacterial CAP and ≤0.07 ng/mL for viral CAP. For the identification of severe cases, the best results were obtained with evaluations of PCT and MR-proANP. However, in both cases, the biomarker cut-off with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (≥0.093 ng/mL for PCT and ≥33.8 pmol/L for proANP) had a relatively good sensitivity (higher than 70%) but a limited specificity (of approximately 55%). Conclusions This study indicates that in children with CAP, sTREM-1, MR-proANP, and MR-proADM blood levels have poor abilities to differentiate

  3. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood.

  4. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  5. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  6. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  7. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  8. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  9. Acquired haemophilia in recipients of depot thioxanthenes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A J; Manson, L M; Dasani, H; Beddall, A; Collins, P; Shima, M; Ludlam, C A

    2000-11-01

    We present two cases in which the occurrence of acquired haemophilia is associated with the use of depot preparations of the thioxanthenes zuclopenthixol and flupenthixol. These drugs have not previously been implicated in the aetiology of acquired haemophilia.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  11. Treatment of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budde, Ulrich; Scheppenheim, Sonja; Dittmer, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) accounts for 22% of patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor. Most patients with known pathophysiological mechanisms suffer from cardiovascular, myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. Less frequent associations are of autoimmune origin, due to hyperfibrinolysis, adsorption to tumor cells, reduced synthesis and prolonged circulation. The mechanisms leading to aVWS is hitherto not known in patients with liver and kidney diseases, drug use, glycogen storage disease, virus infections and at least 18 other disease entities. Diagnosis is complicated by the battery of tests needed, and their inherent rather low sensitivity and specificity for aVWS. Thus, even in acute bleeding situations it may take days until a firm diagnosis is settled and specific therapies can be initiated. The main aim is to shed more light onto this, compared with inherited von Willebrand disease, rare disease which affects at least 2-3% of the older population.

  12. Severe acquired anaemia in Africa: new concepts.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, Michael B; Jonker, Femkje; Bates, Imelda

    2011-09-01

    Severe anaemia is common in Africa. It has a high mortality and particularly affects young children and pregnant women. Recent research provides new insights into the mechanisms and causes of severe acquired anaemia and overturns accepted dogma. Deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin A, but not of iron or folic acid, are associated with severe anaemia. Bacterial infections and, in very young children, hookworm infections are also common in severe anaemia. Irrespective of the aetiology, the mechanism causing severe anaemia is often red cell production failure. Severe anaemia in Africa is therefore a complex multi-factorial syndrome, which, even in an individual patient, is unlikely to be amenable to a single intervention. Policies and practices concerning anaemia diagnosis, treatment and prevention need to be substantially revised if we are to make a significant impact on the huge burden of severe anaemia in Africa.

  13. Acquiring Evolving Technologies: Web Services Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards Harry L. Levinson Software Engineering Institute Carnegie...Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards © 2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring

  14. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  15. Corticomotoneuronal function and hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Yiannikas, Con; Vincent, Angela; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    Acquired neuromyotonia encompasses a group of inflammatory disorders characterized by symptoms reflecting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, which may be clinically confused in the early stages with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite a clear peripheral nerve focus, it remains unclear whether the ectopic activity in acquired neuromyotonia receives a central contribution. To clarify whether cortical hyperexcitability contributes to development of clinical features of acquired neuromyotonia, the present study investigated whether threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation could detect cortical hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia, and whether this technique could differentiate acquired neuromyotonia from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken in 18 patients with acquired neuromyotonia and 104 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with results compared to 62 normal controls. Short-interval intracortical inhibition in patients with acquired neuromyotonia was significantly different when compared to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (averaged short interval intracortical inhibition acquired neuromyotonia 11.3 +/- 1.9%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2.6 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.001). In addition, the motor evoked potential amplitudes (acquired neuromyotonia 21.0 +/- 3.1%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 38.1 +/- 2.2%, P < 0.0001), intracortical facilitation (acquired neuromyotonia -0.9 +/- 1.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -2.3 +/- 0.6%, P < 0.0001), resting motor thresholds (acquired neuromyotonia 62.2 +/- 1.6%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 57.2 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05) and cortical silent period durations (acquired neuromyotonia 212.8 +/- 6.9 ms; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 181.1 +/- 4.3 ms, P < 0.0001) were significantly different between patients with acquired neuromyotonia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation established corticomotoneuronal integrity

  16. Acquired hemoglobin variants and exposure to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient red blood cell units during exchange transfusion for sickle cell disease in a patient requiring antigen-matched blood.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Patricia M; Francis, Richard O; Spitalnik, Patrice F; Schwartz, Joseph; Jhang, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Red blood cell exchange (RBCEx) is frequently used in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and acute chest syndrome or stroke, or to maintain target hemoglobin S (HbS) levels. In these settings, RBCEx is a category I or II recommendation according to guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis published by the American Society for Apheresis. Matching donor red blood cells (RBCs) to recipient phenotypes (e.g., C, E, K-antigen negative) can decrease the risk of alloimmunization in patients with multi-transfused SCD. However, this may select for donors with a higher prevalence of RBC disorders for which screening is not performed. This report describes a patient with SCD treated with RBCEx using five units negative for C, E, K, Fya, Fyb (prospectively matched), four of which were from donors with hemoglobin variants and/or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Pre-RBCEx HbS quantification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) demonstrated 49.3% HbS and 2.8% hemoglobin C, presumably from transfusion of a hemoglobin C-containing RBC unit during a previous RBCEx. Post-RBCEx HPLC showed the appearance of hemoglobin G-Philadelphia. Two units were G6PD-deficient. The patient did well, but the consequences of transfusing RBC units that are G6PD-deficient and contain hemoglobin variants are unknown. Additional studies are needed to investigate effects on storage, in-vivo RBC recovery and survival, and physiological effects following transfusion of these units. Post-RBCEx HPLC can monitor RBCEx efficiency and detect the presence of abnormal transfused units.

  17. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  18. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  19. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  1. Knockdown of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptosis of H1299 cells via ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Song, Jie-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. • ROS generation enhances NF-κB activity, which acts as an upstream signal in the c-Myc/Noxa apoptotic pathway. - Abstract: We previously identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistant biomarker in p53 wild-type A549 cells and found that p53-dependent induction of the PUMA pathway was a critical event in regulating the radioresistant phenotype. Here, we found that HRP-3 knockdown regulates the radioresistance of p53-null H1299 cells through a distinctly different molecular mechanism. HRP-3 depletion was sufficient to cause apoptosis of H1299 cells by generating substantial levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Subsequent, ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation stimulated expression of c-Myc and Noxa proteins, thereby inducing the apoptotic machinery. Our results thus extend the range of targets for the development of new drugs to treat both p53 wild-type or p53-null radioresistant lung cancer cells.

  2. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  3. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC.

  4. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  5. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity.

  6. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  7. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  8. Innate-type and acquired-type allergy regulated by IL-33.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Tomohiro; Matsushita, Kazufumi

    2014-05-01

    We propose two types of allergic response: IgE-dependent and IgE-independent, and designate these as 'acquired-type allergy' and 'innate-type allergy', respectively. IL-33 stimulates both innate (basophils, mast cells, or group 2 innate lymphoid cells) and acquired (Th2 cells) allergy-related cells to induce and/or augment Th2 cytokine production, which leads to eosinophilic inflammation in vivo. Thus, IL-33 is an essential regulator for both 'innate-type allergy' and 'acquired-type allergy', and might be an attractive therapeutic target for allergic diseases.

  9. Mechanisms of diminished natural killer cell activity in pregnant women and neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Baley, J.E.; Schacter, B.Z.

    1985-05-01

    Because alterations in natural killer (NK) activity in the perinatal period may be important in the maintenance of a healthy pregnancy, the mechanisms by which these alterations are mediated in neonates and in pregnant and postpartum women was examined. NK activity, as measured in a 4-hr /sup 51/Cr-relea