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Sample records for acquired risk factors

  1. Clinical factors influencing mortality risk in hospital acquired sepsis.

    PubMed

    López-Mestanza, Cristina; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Gómez-López, Juan Ramón; Bermejo Martín, Jesús F

    2017-09-04

    Identification of factors that confer an increased risk of mortality in hospital acquired sepsis (HAS) is necessary to help prevent, and improve the outcome of, this condition. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients with HAS. Retrospective study of patients with HAS in a major Spanish Hospital from 2011 to 2015. Data from adults receiving any of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes associated with sepsis were collected. Those fulfilling the SEPSIS-2 definition with no evidence of infection during the first 48 hours following hospitalization were included (n=196). A multivariate analysis was employed to identify the risk factors of mortality. HAS patients were found to have many of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (male sex, ageing, antecedent of cardiac disease, arterial hypertension, dyslipemia, smoking habit) and cancer. Vascular disease or chronic kidney disease were associated with 28 day mortality. Time from hospital admission to sepsis diagnosis, and the presence of organ failure were risk factors for 28-day and hospital mortality. Experiencing more than one episode of sepsis increased the risk of hospital mortality. "Sepsis Code" for the early identification of sepsis was protective against hospital mortality. We have identified a number of major factors associated to mortality in patients suffering from HAS. Implementation of surveillance programmes for the early identification and treatment of sepsis translate into a clear benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhaled drugs as risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J; Bolíbar, I; Serra-Prat, M; Palomera, E; Roig, J; Hospital, I; Carandell, E; Agustí, M; Ayuso, P; Estela, A; Torres, A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of inhaled drugs in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is unclear. This case-control study was designed to determine whether inhaled drugs were risk factors for CAP. All incident cases of confirmed CAP that occurred over 1 yr in patients with chronic bronchitis (CB), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma were included, as well as CB, COPD and asthma controls. Risk factors for CAP and inhaled treatment were recorded during a personal interview. An effect of inhaled drugs on the risk of CAP was observed in COPD and asthma patients after adjusting for the effect of other respiratory diseases and their concomitant treatments. In COPD patients, inhaled steroids had a risk OR of 3.26 (95% CI 1.07-9.98) and in asthma patients inhaled anticholinergics had a risk OR of 8.80 (95% CI 1.02-75.7). In CB patients, no association with CAP was observed for any inhaler. These effects were independent of adjusting variables related to severity and other respiratory and non-respiratory risk factors for CAP, including vaccines. Inhaled β(2)-adrenergic agonists did not show a significant effect on the risk of CAP in any of the respiratory diseases. Inhaled steroids may favour CAP in COPD patients, whereas anticholinergics may favour CAP in asthma patients. It is difficult to differentiate the effect of inhaled therapy from the effect of COPD or asthma severity on the risk of CAP, and these relationships may not be causal, but could call attention to inhaled therapy in COPD and asthma patients.

  3. [Risk factors for destructive periodontitis. I. Behavioral and acquired factors (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Gera, István

    2004-02-01

    Dental plaque is a necessary but not sufficient etiologic factor of the destructive periodontal disease. The manifestation of periodontal destruction is influenced by a wide variety of risk factors and determinants. In the introduction the terminology of different etiologic and risk factors are discussed in general. Than the risk factors and determinants of destructive periodontitis are overviewed. In the first part the acquired and behavioral factors and determinates are discussed. Among the local factors the role of the individual oral hygiene, the specificity of subgingival dental plaque the plaque retentive factors and occlusal traumatism are discussed. The hormonal, the acquired immunological factors, osteoporosis and the age are discussed as systemic risk factors and determinants. Among the behavioral factors smoking, psychological stress and socio-economic factors are covered. The second part is going to cover the genetic predisposing factors.

  4. Modifiable risk factors for nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Quagliarello, Vincent; Ginter, Sandra; Han, Ling; Van Ness, Peter; Allore, Heather; Tinetti, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to identify modifiable risk factors for pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents. A cohort of 613 elderly residents (age, >65 years) of 5 nursing homes in the New Haven, Connecticut, area was followed-up prospectively from February 2001 through March 2003. The primary outcome was radiographically documented pneumonia within a 12-month surveillance period. Baseline modifiable risk factors were evaluated for their independent association with pneumonia. Of 613 elderly nursing home residents, 131 (21%) died, and an additional 112 (18%) developed a radiographically documented case of pneumonia during the 12-month surveillance period. Among the 9 candidate modifiable risk factors that were evaluated individually in Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for covariates (i.e., nursing home facility, age, race, coexisting conditions, and immobility), inadequate oral care (hazard ratio [HR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.35; P=.024) and swallowing difficulty (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.04-2.62; P=.033) were associated with pneumonia. When modifiable risk factors were evaluated simultaneously in the same Cox proportional hazards model, inadequate oral care (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04-2.30; P=.030) and swallowing difficulty (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.02-2.55; P=.043) remained independently associated with pneumonia, adjusting for the same covariates. Calculation of population-based attributable fractions showed that 21% of all cases of pneumonia in our cohort could have been avoided if inadequate oral care and swallowing difficulty were not present. Two biologically plausible and modifiable risk factors increased the risk of pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents. These results provide a framework for the development and testing of a targeted pneumonia prevention strategy.

  5. Analysing risk factors for urinary tract infection based on automated monitoring of hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Redder, J D; Leth, R A; Møller, J K

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections account for as much as one-third of all nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to examine previously reported characteristics of patients with hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (HA-UTI) using an automated infection monitoring system (Hospital-Acquired Infection Registry: HAIR). A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the association of risk factors with HA-UTI. Patients with HA-UTI more frequently had indwelling urinary catheters or a disease in the genitourinary or nervous system than the controls. Automated hospital-acquired infection monitoring enables documentation of key risk factors to better evaluate infection control interventions in general or for selected groups of patients. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with a history of superficial vein thrombosis and acquired venous thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Roach, Rachel E J; Lijfering, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2013-12-19

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) increases the risk of venous thrombosis fourfold to sixfold. As most individuals with SVT do not develop venous thrombosis, additional risk factors may explain the risk of developing a venous thrombosis. In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study, we assessed the risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with previous SVT and a mild thrombotic risk factor (smoking or overweight/obesity), a strong risk factor (surgery, hospitalization, plaster cast immobilization, or malignancy), or a reproductive factor in women (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, or pregnancy/puerperium). Individuals with previous SVT alone had a 5.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-6.8) increased risk of venous thrombosis. This was 9.3 (95% CI, 7.2-12.1) combined with a mild thrombotic risk factor, 31.4 (95% CI, 14.6-67.5) with a strong risk factor, and 34.9 (95% CI, 19.1-63.8) in women with a reproductive risk factor. The highest separate risk estimates were found for SVT with surgery (42.5; 95% CI, 10.2-177.6), hospitalization (49.8; 95% CI, 11.9-209.2), or oral contraception (43.0; 95% CI, 15.5-119.3 in women). In conclusion, the risk of venous thrombosis is markedly increased in individuals with previous SVT who have an acquired thrombotic risk factor.

  7. New evidence of risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J; Bolíbar, I; Serra-Prat, M; Roig, J; Hospital, I; Carandell, E; Agustí, M; Ayuso, P; Estela, A; Torres, A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with special emphasis on modifiable risk factors and those applicable to the general population. A population-based, case-control study was conducted, with a target population of 859,033 inhabitants aged >14 yrs. A total of 1,336 patients with confirmed CAP were matched to control subjects by age, sex and primary centre over 1 yr. In the univariate analysis, outstanding risk factors were passive smoking in never-smokers aged >65 yrs, heavy alcohol intake, contact with pets, households with >10 people, contact with children, interventions on the upper airways and poor dental health. Risky treatments included amiodarone, N-acetylcysteine and oral steroids. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, and visiting the dentist were protective factors. Multivariable analysis confirmed cigarette smoking, usual contact with children, sudden changes of temperature at work, inhalation therapy (particularly containing steroids and using plastic pear-spacers), oxygen therapy, asthma and chronic bronchitis as independent risk factors. Interventions for reducing community-acquired pneumonia should integrate health habits and lifestyle factors related to household, work and community, together with individual clinical conditions, comorbidities and oral or inhaled regular treatments. Prevention would include vaccination, dental hygiene and avoidance of upper respiratory colonisation.

  8. Exposure to extrinsic risk factors in prevalence surveys of hospital-acquired infections: a methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Rosselló-Urgell, J; Vaqué-Rafart, J; Villate-Navarro, J I; Sánchez-Payá, J; Martínez-Gómez, X; Arribas-Llorente, J L; Sáenz-Domínguez, J R

    2006-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in studying the presence of extrinsic risk factors in the framework of prevalence surveys of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) have led to the use of a variety of methodological approaches. This study examined the effect of retrospective approaches for obtaining data regarding exposure to extrinsic risk factors. The EPINE database for 1990 was used and a simulation model was created. All the evaluated approaches differed in their impact upon the association between risk factors and infections. Prevalence of exposure on the day of the survey, prevalence of exposure at any time before the survey was conducted, and total prevalence were found to be significantly associated with the probability of exposure and duration of exposure. For exposure periods of less than four days, the prevalence of exposure during the week prior to the survey was higher than that encountered on the day of the survey. In studying exposure to risk factors retrospectively, no evidence-based justification could be found to determine how many days prior to the day of actual exposure should be included in the study. However, the site of infection determined the proportion of devices removed due to HAI, and this proportion was not very high in this study. Limiting data to recording the presence of the risk factor on the day of the survey, without investigating past exposures, can provide an adequate estimate of the burden of extrinsic risk factors in one-day, point-prevalence surveys.

  9. Meteorological factors and risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease in Switzerland: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Conza, Lisa; Casati, Simona; Limoni, Costanzo; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify meteorological factors that could be associated with an increased risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease (LD) in two Swiss regions. Design Retrospective epidemiological study using discriminant analysis and multivariable Poisson regression. Setting We analysed legionellosis cases notified between January 2003 and December 2007 and we looked for a possible relationship between incidence rate and meteorological factors. Participants Community-acquired LD cases in two Swiss regions, the Canton Ticino and the Basle region, with climatically different conditions were investigated. Primary outcome measures Vapour pressure, temperature, relative humidity, wind, precipitation and radiation recorded in weather stations of the two Swiss regions during the period January 2003 and December 2007. Results Discriminant analysis showed that the two regions are characterised by different meteorological conditions. A multiple Poisson regression analysis identified region, temperature and vapour pressure during the month of infection as significant risk factors for legionellosis. The risk of developing LD was 129.5% (or 136.4% when considering vapour pressure instead of temperature in the model) higher in the Canton Ticino as compared to the Basle region. There was an increased relative risk of LD by 11.4% (95% CI 7.70% to 15.30%) for each 1 hPa rise of vapour pressure or by 6.7% (95% CI 4.22% to 9.22%) for 1°C increase of temperature. Conclusions In this study, higher water vapour pressure and heat were associated with a higher risk of community-acquired LD in two regions of Switzerland. PMID:23468470

  10. Incidence, risk factors and risk prediction of hospital-acquired suspected adverse drug reactions: a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the incidence and risk factors of hospital-acquired suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among Ugandan inpatients. We also constructed risk scores to predict and qualitatively assess for peculiarities between low-risk and high-risk ADR patients. Methods Prospective cohort of consented adults admitted on medical and gynaecological wards of the 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Hospital-acquired suspected ADRs were dichotomised as possible (possible/probable/definite) or not and probable (probable/definite) or not, using the Naranjo scale. Risk scores were generated from coefficients of ADR risk-factor logistic regression models. Results The incidence of possible hospital-acquired suspected ADRs was 25% (194/762, 95% CI: 22% to 29%): 44% (85/194) experienced serious possible ADRs. The risk of probable ADRs was 11% (87/762, 95% CI 9% to 14%): 46% (40/87) had serious probable ADRs. Antibacterials-only (51/194), uterotonics-only (21/194), cardiovascular drugs-only (16/194), antimalarials-only (12/194) and analgesics-only (10/194) were the most frequently implicated. Treatment with six or more conventional medicines during hospitalisation (OR=2.31, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.15) and self-reported herbal medicine use during the 4 weeks preadmission (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.22 to 3.13) were the risk factors for probable hospital-acquired ADRs. Risk factors for possible hospital-acquired ADRs were: treatment with six or more conventional medicines (OR=2.72, 95% CI 1.79 to 4.13), herbal medicine use during the 4 weeks preadmission (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.43), prior 3 months hospitalisation (OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26) and being on gynaecological ward (OR=2.16, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.44). More drug classes were implicated among high-risk ADR-patients, with cardiovascular drugs being the most frequently linked to possible ADRs. Conclusions The risk of hospital-acquired suspected ADRs was higher with preadmission herbal medicine use and treatment with

  11. Risk and vulnerability: do socioeconomic factors influence the risk of acquiring HIV in Asia?

    PubMed

    Greener, Robert; Sarkar, Swarup

    2010-09-01

    HIV epidemics in Asia have been mainly concentrated among certain population groups such as injecting drug users, sex workers and their clients and men who have sex with men (MSM). HIV risk has also been associated with labour migrants and their partners. Many of the people at risk through these behaviours are very poor, and this raises the question that poverty and social deprivation may be underlying factors that drive the adoption of risk behaviours and can be regarded as 'determinants' of vulnerability to HIV infection in Asia. The study presents some observations of the socioeconomic pattern of HIV spread in Asia, using country-level and household-level data. The discussion then draws tentative conclusions about what is known concerning the mechanisms influencing the risk of HIV acquisition in Asia and what they might imply for programme design and policy. In summary, the data presented here do not support the hypothesis that HIV epidemics in Asia are primarily driven by poverty and social deprivation, though sex inequality and education for women and girls are strongly associated factors. There is clearly a multidimensional relationship between the risk of HIV infection and a host of underlying social and cultural factors that confound any attempt at a single explanation for the HIV epidemic in Asia or elsewhere. There is an undeniable need for further research through multicountry studies and better analysis of existing household data, as well as through further investigation of the quantitative relationship between the barriers to HIV services and the risk of infection. The key message for policy is to seek a broad balance between a focus on prevention and treatment for the higher-risk behaviours without losing sight of the importance of programmes that address vulnerability and behavioural change among the sexually active adult population. The implication of these findings for the allocation of resources for downstream factors such as risk behaviours as

  12. Aetiology of, and risk factors for, recurrent community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vidal, C; Carratalà, J; Fernández-Sabé, N; Dorca, J; Verdaguer, R; Manresa, F; Gudiol, F

    2009-11-01

    Recurrent community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization is a matter of particular concern. However, current information on its prevalence, aetiology and risk factors is lacking. To address these issues, we performed an observational analysis of a prospective cohort of hospitalized adults with CAP. Recurrence was defined as two or more episodes of CAP 1 month apart within 3 years. Patients with severe immunosuppression or local predisposing factors were excluded. Of the 1556 patients, 146 (9.4%) had recurrent CAP. The most frequent causative organism was Streptococcus pneumoniae, both in patients with recurrent CAP and in those without recurrence. Haemophilus influenzae, other Gram-negative bacilli and aspiration pneumonia were more frequent among patients with recurrent CAP, whereas Legionella pneumophila was rarely identified in this group. Independent factors associated with recurrent CAP were greater age, lack of pneumococcal vaccination, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and corticosteroid therapy. In a sub-analysis of 389 episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia, the only independent risk factor for recurrence was lack of pneumococcal vaccination. Recurrence of CAP is not a rare clinical problem and it occurs mainly in the elderly, patients with COPD, and those receiving corticosteroids. Our study provides support for recommending pneumococcal vaccination for adults at risk of pneumonia, including those with a first episode of CAP.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for surgically acquired pressure ulcers: a prospective cohort study investigators.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joan; Lister, Carolyn; Corry, Jean; Holland, Michelle; Coleman, Kerrie; Marquart, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital-acquired, surgery-related pressure injury (ulcers) and identify risk factors for these injuries. We used a prospective cohort study to investigate the research question. The study was conducted at a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred thirty-four adult patients booked for any surgical procedure expected to last more than 30 minutes were eligible for inclusion. Patients who provided informed consent for study participation were assessed for pressure ulcers, using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Guidelines, before entering the operating room and again in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Research nurses and all PACU nurses were trained in skin assessment and in pressure ulcer staging. Patients were not assessed again after their discharge from the PACU. Seven patients (1.3%) had existing pressure injuries (ulcers) and a further 6 (1.3%) developed a surgery-related pressure ulcer. Risk factors associated with surgery-related pressure injuries were similar to non-surgically related risks and included older age, skin condition, and being admitted from a location other than one's own home. Length of surgery was not associated with pressure ulcer development in this cohort. Perioperative nurses play an important role in identifying existing or new pressure injuries. However, many of these nurses are unfamiliar with pressure ulcer classification, so education in this area is essential. Although the incidence of surgically acquired pressure ulcers was low in this cohort, careful skin inspection before and after surgery provides an opportunity for early treatment and may prevent existing lesions progressing to higher stages.

  14. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  15. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  16. Antimicrobial use: a risk factor or a protective factor for acquiring campylobacteriosis?

    PubMed

    Koningstein, Maike; Simonsen, Jacob; Helms, Morten; Hald, Tine; Mølbak, Kåre

    2011-10-01

    It is well acknowledged that the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals leads to antimicrobial drug resistance in foodborne bacteria such as Campylobacter; however, the role of human antimicrobial usage is much less investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify the odds of campylobacteriosis conferred by human consumption of fluoroquinolones and macrolides. We conducted a registry-based retrospective case-control study on 31 669 laboratory-confirmed cases of campylobacteriosis between 1999 and 2005 in Denmark. Data were obtained from several Danish databases: the National Registry of Enteric Pathogens, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Prescription Database, and the Integrated Database on Labor Market Research. Odds ratios (OR) for campylobacteriosis were calculated by conditional logistic regression. The risk of campylobacteriosis was reduced 1 month after exposure to macrolides (OR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.92). Macrolide exposure 1 month to 2 years before infection was associated with an increased risk of a Campylobacter diagnosis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4-1.6). A history of fluoroquinolone use was also associated with increased risk (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.8-3.5). This risk was higher for resistant isolates than for susceptible ones. Treatment with macrolides may protect against Campylobacter infection for a limited period of time, possibly due to the antibacterial effects of the drug or its metabolites. Fluoroquinolone treatment confers increased risk, probably due to a combination of competitive and selective effects, similar to what has been observed for nontyphoid Salmonella infection.

  17. Incidence of and risk factors for hospital-acquired diarrhea in three tertiary care public hospitals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Luby, Stephen P; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Rahman, M Waliur; Sharker, M A Yushuf; Hossain, M Jahangir; Rasul, Choudhury H; Ekram, A R M Saifuddin; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Gurley, Emily S

    2014-07-01

    During April 2007-April 2010, surveillance physicians in adult and pediatric medicine wards of three tertiary public hospitals in Bangladesh identified patients who developed hospital-acquired diarrhea. We calculated incidence of hospital-acquired diarrhea. To identify risk factors, we compared these patients to randomly selected patients from the same wards who were admitted > 72 hours without having diarrhea. The incidence of hospital-acquired diarrhea was 4.8 cases per 1,000 patient-days. Children < 1 year of age were more likely to develop hospital-acquired diarrhea than older children. The risk of developing hospital-acquired diarrhea increased for each additional day of hospitalization beyond 72 hours, whereas exposure to antibiotics within 72 hours of admission decreased the risk. There were three deaths among case-patients; all were infants. Patients, particularly young children, are at risk for hospital-acquired diarrhea and associated deaths in Bangladeshi hospitals. Further research to identify the responsible organisms and transmission routes could inform prevention strategies. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Hospital-Acquired Diarrhea in Three Tertiary Care Public Hospitals in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Luby, Stephen P.; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Rahman, M. Waliur; Sharker, M. A. Yushuf; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Rasul, Choudhury H.; Ekram, A. R. M. Saifuddin; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    During April 2007–April 2010, surveillance physicians in adult and pediatric medicine wards of three tertiary public hospitals in Bangladesh identified patients who developed hospital-acquired diarrhea. We calculated incidence of hospital-acquired diarrhea. To identify risk factors, we compared these patients to randomly selected patients from the same wards who were admitted > 72 hours without having diarrhea. The incidence of hospital-acquired diarrhea was 4.8 cases per 1,000 patient-days. Children < 1 year of age were more likely to develop hospital-acquired diarrhea than older children. The risk of developing hospital-acquired diarrhea increased for each additional day of hospitalization beyond 72 hours, whereas exposure to antibiotics within 72 hours of admission decreased the risk. There were three deaths among case-patients; all were infants. Patients, particularly young children, are at risk for hospital-acquired diarrhea and associated deaths in Bangladeshi hospitals. Further research to identify the responsible organisms and transmission routes could inform prevention strategies. PMID:24778198

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome knowledge and risk factors in Ethiopian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N; Abebe, Yegeremu; Brodine, Stephanie K; Kraft, Heidi S; Shaffer, Richard A; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2004-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related knowledge and behaviors were assessed in face-to-face structured interviews with 314 Ethiopian military personnel. A significant finding of this research was the association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and risky sexual behavior. That is, military personnel who had inaccurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention were 3.4 times as likely to engage in combined sexual risk behaviors compared with personnel with accurate knowledge, after controlling for age, military rank, and marital status (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.22). This finding highlights the potential value of educational programs in slowing the spread of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Eye color as a risk factor for acquired sensorineural hearing loss: a review.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Schermbrucker, Jonah; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-02-01

    Eye color may be an indicator of inner ear melanin content and has been associated with hearing loss. There is controversy as to whether eye color has an effect on acquired causes of sensorineural hearing loss. This review was conducted to analyze the literature evaluating the relationship between eye color and causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Six databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Included articles were independently assessed for quality by two authors. Eighteen articles were eligible for review. Eye color was not found to have an effect in the non-exposed population or in presbycusis. In noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss, light-eyed patients had more significant loss following noise exposure, although the variability reported due to eye color was modest (r(2) = 0.01-0.14). Two out of three studies reported that dark eye color is associated with cisplatin ototoxicity. In one study, green-eyed patients were found to be at higher risk of radiation-induced hearing loss. Eye color does not appear to play a role in hearing loss in non-exposed individuals or presbycusis. It is possible that dark-eyed individuals, with greater inner ear melanin content, are better protected against noise-induced hearing loss. Evidence suggests that melanin can be protective against radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss, but may predispose individuals to cisplatin ototoxicity. Future studies are required to support these conclusions.

  1. Role of genetic and acquired prothrombotic risk factors in genesis of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Fusconi, Massimo; Chistolini, Antonio; Angelosanto, Noemi; Pignoloni, Patrizia; Tombolini, Mario; De Virgilio, Armando; Pagliarella, Martina; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation, factor V G1691A (factor V Leiden) mutation, prothrombin G20210A mutation and 8 other laboratory values associated with increased thrombotic risk were analyzed in 40 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). The results were compared with those obtained from 120 controls not affected by SSHL. We found a statistically significant higher frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia in the SSHL group compared with controls, and that this was also associated with the presence of homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation. The study results suggest that SSHL might be caused, among other factors, by a combination of these 2 variables. We suggest that this analysis of the MTHFR C677T mutation should be further investigated to establish the etiology of SSHL, and that the same analysis should be taken into account in those patients with high levels of homocysteine. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Care-Related Risk Factors for Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Mona; Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Langenberg, Patricia; Orwig, Denise L.; Palmer, Mary H.; Jones, Patricia S.; Sterling, Robert; Kinosian, Bruce P.; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify care-related factors associated with increased incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING Nine hospitals in Baltimore Hip Studies network PARTICIPANTS 658 patients age ≥65 years who underwent surgery for hip fracture MEASUREMENTS Skin examinations at baseline and alternating days until hospital discharge. Patients were deemed to have a HAPU if they developed ≥1 new pressure ulcers stage 2 or higher during the hospital stay. RESULTS Longer emergency department stays were associated with lower HAPU incidence (>4-6 hours: adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48-0.96; >6 hours: aIRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-0.99, both compared to ≤4 hours). Patients with ≥24 hours between admission and surgery had a higher post-surgery HAPU rate than those with <24 hours (aIRR 1.62, 95% CI 1.24-2.11). Surgery with general anesthesia had a lower post-surgery HAPU rate than surgery with other types of anesthesia (aIRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49-0.88). There was no significant association of HAPU incidence with timing or type of transport to hospital, or surgery duration. CONCLUSION Most of the factors hypothesized to be associated with higher pressure ulcer incidence were either associated with lower incidence or were not significantly associated, suggesting that HAPU development may not be as sensitive to care-related factors as commonly believed. Rigorous studies of innovative preventive interventions are needed to inform policy and practice. PMID:22332674

  3. Dental and Microbiological Risk Factors for Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in Non-Ventilated Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Victoria C.; Sails, Andrew D.; Walls, Angus W. G.; Rushton, Steven; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is often fatal in older patients. The mouth is the main reservoir of infection and studies have suggested that oral hygiene interventions may prevent HAP. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between HAP and preceding a) heavy dental plaque and b) oral carriage of potential respiratory pathogens in older patients with lower limb fracture to determine the target for intervention studies. Methods We obtained a time series of tongue/throat swabs from 90 patients with lower limb fracture, aged 65-101 in a general hospital in the North East of England between April 2009-July 2010. We used novel real-time multiplex PCR assays to detect S. aureus, MRSA, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, H. influenza and Acinetobacter spp. We collected data on dental/denture plaque (modified Quigley-Hein index) and outcomes of clinician-diagnosed HAP. Results The crude incidence of HAP was 10% (n = 90), with mortality of 80% at 90 days post discharge. 50% of cases occurred within the first 25 days. HAP was not associated with being dentate, tooth number, or heavy dental/denture plaque. HAP was associated with prior oral carriage with E. coli/S. aureus/P.aeruginosa/MRSA (p = 0.002, OR 9.48 95% CI 2.28-38.78). The incidence of HAP in those with carriage was 35% (4% without), with relative risk 6.44 (95% CI 2.04-20.34, p = 0.002). HAP was associated with increased length of stay (Fishers exact test, p=0.01), with mean 30 excess days (range -11.5-115). Target organisms were first detected within 72 hours of admission in 90% participants, but HAP was significantly associated with S. aureus/MRSA/P. aeruginosa/E. coli being detected at days 5 (OR 4.39, 95%CI1.73-11.16) or 14 (OR 6.69, 95%CI 2.40-18.60). Conclusions Patients with lower limb fracture who were colonised orally with E. coli/ S. aureus/MRSA/P. aeruginosa after 5 days in hospital were at significantly greater risk of HAP (p = 0.002). PMID:25923662

  4. Risk factors for local complications in children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Krenke, Katarzyna; Krawiec, Marta; Kraj, Grażyna; Peradzynska, Joanna; Krauze, Agnieszka; Kulus, Marek

    2016-07-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors that could predict the development of local complications (parapneumonic effusion/pleural empyema, necrotizing pneumonia, and lung abscess) in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were prospectively collected and compared in children with noncomplicated and complicated CAP. Two-hundred and three patients aged from 2 months to 17 years were enrolled. There were 141 and 62 children with noncomplicated and complicated CAP, respectively. Significantly longer duration of fever and a higher level of acute phase reactants were demonstrated in complicated when noncomplicated to complicated CAP. Asymmetric chest pain as well as prehospital treatment with ibuprofen and acetaminophen were significantly more common in patients with complicated CAP (P < .001, P = .02 and P = .003, respectively). Preadmission cumulative dose of ibuprofen exceeding 78.3 mg/kg (median dose for the entire group) was associated with 2.5-fold higher odds ratio (OR) for CAP complications [OR 2.54 CI (1.31-4.94); P = .008)]. In contrast, pneumococcal vaccination was associated with lower odds ratio [OR.03 CI (.23-.89); P = .03] for local complications. Some clinical and laboratory data including chest pain, longer duration of fever, higher acute phase reactants, and especially preadmission treatment with ibuprofen or acetaminophen were associated with local complications of CAP. The results of this study highlight the association between the dose of ibuprofen and local CAP complications. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and factors with the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections in college students].

    PubMed

    Occhionero, Marcelo; Paniccia, Laura; Pedersen, Dina; Rossi, Gabriela; Mazzucchini, Héctor; Entrocassi, Andrea; Gallo Vaulet, Lucia; Gualtieri, Valeria; Rodríguez Fermepin, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection is nowadays considered one of the most frequent causes of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the world, mainly affecting the group of young people under 25 years old. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in newly admitted students to Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca, Argentina, and to evaluate the risk factors to acquire STI. For that purpose, 204 young college students with a mean age of 19 were involved in this study. Each participant delivered a sample of first-void urine and completed a questionnaire which was then submitted anonymously. The research for C. trachomatis was done on 114 valid samples through a technique of DNA amplification, whose molecular target was the gene ompA. Four cases of infection by C. trachomatis were detected with a prevalence of 3.5%. The risks factors associated to the infection were a history of 7 or more partners since the start of sexual activity and contact with a new sexual partner in the last 4 months. The prevalence of such infection reflects a moderate circulation of this microorganism in the studied population. This fact, along with some aspects shown by the questionnaire results, would characterize a population having a low risk profile for acquiring STIs. However, some other information obtained from the questionnaires gave some opposite evidence, which would alert us on the need of keeping watch, raising awareness and implementing preventive actions in this population.

  6. Integrating eating disorder-specific risk factors into the acquired preparedness model of dysregulated eating: A moderated mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Racine, Sarah E; Martin, Shelby J

    2017-01-01

    Tests of the acquired preparedness model demonstrate that the personality trait of negative urgency (i.e., the tendency to act impulsively when distressed) predicts the expectation that eating alleviates negative affect, and this eating expectancy subsequently predicts dysregulated eating. Although recent data indicate that eating disorder-specific risk factors (i.e., appearance pressures, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint) strengthen negative urgency-dysregulated eating associations, it is unclear whether these risk factors impact associations directly or indirectly (i.e., through eating expectancies). The current study used latent moderated structural equation modeling to test moderated mediation hypotheses in a sample of 313 female college students. Eating expectancies mediated the association between negative urgency and dysregulated eating, and the indirect effect of negative urgency on dysregulated eating through eating expectancies was conditional on level of each eating disorder risk factor. Appearance pressures, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint significantly moderated the association between eating expectancies and dysregulated eating, while only dietary restraint moderated the direct effect of negative urgency on dysregulated eating. Findings suggest that the development of high-risk eating expectancies among individuals with negative urgency, combined with sociocultural pressures for thinness and their consequences, is associated with the greatest risk for dysregulated eating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Incidence, Etiology, Risk Factors, and Outcome of Hospital-acquired Fever

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Daniel R; Flanders, Scott A; Beck, James M; Saint, Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Temperature is universally measured in the hospitalized patient, but the literature on hospital-acquired fever has not been systematically reviewed. This systematic review is intended to provide clinicians with an overview of the incidence, etiology, and outcome of hospital-acquired fever. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE (1970 to 2005), EMBASE (1988 to 2004), and Web of Knowledge. References of all included articles were reviewed. Articles that focused on children, fever in the developing world, classic fever of unknown origin, or specialized patient populations were excluded. REVIEW METHODS Articles were reviewed independently by 2 authors before inclusion; a third author acted as arbiter. RESULTS Of over 1,000 studies reviewed, 7 met the criteria for inclusion. The incidence of hospital-acquired fever ranged from 2% to 17%. The etiology of fever was infection in 37% to 74%. Rates of antibiotic use for patients with a noninfectious cause of fever ranged from 29% to 55% for a mean duration of 6.6 to 9.6 days. Studies varied widely in their methodology and the patient population studied. CONCLUSIONS Limited information is available to guide an evidence-based approach to hospital-acquired fever. We propose criteria to help standardize future studies of this important clinical situation. PMID:17026728

  8. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population.

  9. Identification of novel risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection using spatial statistics and geographic information system analyses.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deverick J; Rojas, Leoncio Flavio; Watson, Shera; Knelson, Lauren P; Pruitt, Sohayla; Lewis, Sarah S; Moehring, Rebekah W; Sickbert Bennett, Emily E; Weber, David J; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    The rate of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI) is increasing. While receipt of antibiotics remains an important risk factor for CDI, studies related to acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals are lacking. As a result, risk factors for exposure to C. difficile in community settings have been inadequately studied. To identify novel environmental risk factors for CA-CDI. We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study of patients with CA-CDI from 1/1/2007 through 12/31/2014 in a 10-county area in central North Carolina. 360 Census Tracts in these 10 counties were used as the demographic Geographic Information System (GIS) base-map. Longitude and latitude (X, Y) coordinates were generated from patient home addresses and overlaid to Census Tracts polygons using ArcGIS; ArcView was used to assess "hot-spots" or clusters of CA-CDI. We then constructed a mixed hierarchical model to identify environmental variables independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI. A total of 1,895 unique patients met our criteria for CA-CDI. The mean patient age was 54.5 years; 62% were female and 70% were Caucasian. 402 (21%) patient addresses were located in "hot spots" or clusters of CA-CDI (p<0.001). "Hot spot" census tracts were scattered throughout the 10 counties. After adjusting for clustering and population density, age ≥ 60 years (p = 0.03), race (<0.001), proximity to a livestock farm (0.01), proximity to farming raw materials services (0.02), and proximity to a nursing home (0.04) were independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI. Our study is the first to use spatial statistics and mixed models to identify important environmental risk factors for acquisition of C. difficile and adds to the growing evidence that farm practices may put patients at risk for important drug-resistant infections.

  10. Number and size of acquired melanocytic nevi and affecting risk factors in cases admitted to the dermatology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Ülker; Kılıç, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The size and number of acquired melanocytic nevi (AMN) and presence of dysplastic nevi are the leading risk factors that should be recognized in the development of malignant melanoma. Aim To evaluate AMN and risk factors in the development of AMN in all age groups admitted to a dermatology outpatient clinic. Material and methods Four hundred and twelve patients who were admitted to the dermatology outpatient clinic for any dermatological symptom and who accepted to participate in the study were randomly included in the study. For each case, background-family history and dermatological findings were recorded. All AMN observed in the patients were dermatoscopically examined. Results The presence of more than 50 nevi was significantly higher in males, in individuals who had a history of sunburn and smokers. The number of nevi that were 5 mm and below was found to be higher in individuals who regularly sunbathed their face/body, in individuals using sunscreen, in individuals who had a history of sunburn, smokers and alcohol users. The number of nevi that were above 5 mm was higher in smokers. The total dermatoscopy score between 4.75 and 5.45 was found to be higher in individuals who had more than 50 nevi, in individuals exposed to more than one chemical substance and in alcohol users. Conclusions When determining the patient’s risk factors, factors such as the patient’s sunbathing habits and chemical substance exposure features should be taken into consideration besides the number and size of nevi. PMID:27881943

  11. Risk factors for sporadic domestically acquired Salmonella serovar Enteritidis infections: a case-control study in Ontario, Canada, 2011.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Savage, R; Tighe, M K; Vrbova, L; Walton, R; Whitfield, Y; Varga, C; Lee, B; Rosella, L; Dhar, B; Johnson, C; Ahmed, R; Allen, V G; Crowcroft, N S

    2014-07-01

    In Ontario, Canada, the number of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) cases increased over the years 2005-2010. A population-based case-control study was undertaken from January to August 2011 for the purpose of identifying risk factors for acquiring illness due to SE within Ontario. A total of 199 cases and 241 controls were enrolled. After adjustment for confounders, consuming any poultry meat [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2·24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·31-3·83], processed chicken (aOR 3·32, 95% CI 1·26-8·76) and not washing hands following handling of raw eggs (OR 2·82, 95% CI 1·48-5·37) were significantly associated with SE infection. The population attributable fraction was 46% for any poultry meat consumption and 10% for processed chicken. Poultry meat continues to be identified as a risk factor for SE illness. Control of SE at source, as well as proper food handling practices, are required to reduce the number of SE cases.

  12. Risk factors for infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria in non-ventilated patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia*,**

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Renato; Ramos-Lima, Luis Francisco; Oliveira, Vivian do Amaral; Sanvicente, Carina; Sartori, Juliana; Pacheco, Elyara Fiorin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in non-ventilated patients. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational cohort study conducted over a three-year period at a tertiary-care teaching hospital. We included only non-ventilated patients diagnosed with HAP and presenting with positive bacterial cultures. Categorical variables were compared with chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for HAP caused by MDR bacteria. RESULTS: Of the 140 patients diagnosed with HAP, 59 (42.1%) were infected with MDR strains. Among the patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and those infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, mortality was 45.9% and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.763). Among the patients infected with MDR and those infected with non-MDR gram-negative bacilli, mortality was 45.8% and 38.3%, respectively (p = 0.527). Univariate analysis identified the following risk factors for infection with MDR bacteria: COPD; congestive heart failure; chronic renal failure; dialysis; urinary catheterization; extrapulmonary infection; and use of antimicrobial therapy within the last 10 days before the diagnosis of HAP. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of antibiotics within the last 10 days before the diagnosis of HAP was the only independent predictor of infection with MDR bacteria (OR = 3.45; 95% CI: 1.56-7.61; p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: In this single-center study, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics within the last 10 days before the diagnosis of HAP was the only independent predictor of infection with MDR bacteria in non-ventilated patients with HAP. PMID:23857697

  13. Identification of novel risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection using spatial statistics and geographic information system analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Leoncio Flavio; Watson, Shera; Knelson, Lauren P.; Pruitt, Sohayla; Lewis, Sarah S.; Moehring, Rebekah W.; Sickbert Bennett, Emily E.; Weber, David J.; Chen, Luke F.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The rate of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI) is increasing. While receipt of antibiotics remains an important risk factor for CDI, studies related to acquisition of C. difficile outside of hospitals are lacking. As a result, risk factors for exposure to C. difficile in community settings have been inadequately studied. Main objective To identify novel environmental risk factors for CA-CDI Methods We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study of patients with CA-CDI from 1/1/2007 through 12/31/2014 in a 10-county area in central North Carolina. 360 Census Tracts in these 10 counties were used as the demographic Geographic Information System (GIS) base-map. Longitude and latitude (X, Y) coordinates were generated from patient home addresses and overlaid to Census Tracts polygons using ArcGIS; ArcView was used to assess “hot-spots” or clusters of CA-CDI. We then constructed a mixed hierarchical model to identify environmental variables independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI. Results A total of 1,895 unique patients met our criteria for CA-CDI. The mean patient age was 54.5 years; 62% were female and 70% were Caucasian. 402 (21%) patient addresses were located in “hot spots” or clusters of CA-CDI (p<0.001). “Hot spot” census tracts were scattered throughout the 10 counties. After adjusting for clustering and population density, age ≥ 60 years (p = 0.03), race (<0.001), proximity to a livestock farm (0.01), proximity to farming raw materials services (0.02), and proximity to a nursing home (0.04) were independently associated with increased rates of CA-CDI. Conclusions Our study is the first to use spatial statistics and mixed models to identify important environmental risk factors for acquisition of C. difficile and adds to the growing evidence that farm practices may put patients at risk for important drug-resistant infections. PMID:28510584

  14. Community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Burkholderia cepacia complex in patients with no underlying risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Mamuno; Hani, Osama Bani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) remain common infections diagnosed in outpatients as well as hospitalized patients. Community-acquired UTIs are generally caused by Escherichia coli and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen mainly affecting immunocompromised and hospitalized patients, particularly those who have received prior broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy. Case presentation. Urine samples were collected from 157 outpatients clinically diagnosed with UTI and from 100 healthy control subjects. Samples were cultured on differential media and non-motile lactose-non-fermentors were identified via the Remel RapID ONE system. The isolates were tested by the disc diffusion method against 17 antimicrobial agents. Burkholderia was isolated as a single organism from four patients having uncomplicated infections, and one from recurrent infection. None of these patients had an underlying risk factor for this pathogen. Identification of these isolates by the Remel-RapID ONE system was confirmed by recA gene amplification. The four isolates were resistant to lincomycin, nalidixic acid, oxacillin and penicillin G. These cases received monotherapy of oral co-trimoxazole. Conclusions. Our findings alert urologists and diagnostic laboratories to the potential of B. cepacia complex infections in similar cases, and that this bacterium should not be ruled out. PMID:28348799

  15. Hospital-acquired urinary tract infection point prevalence in Turkey: differences in risk factors among patient groups.

    PubMed

    Isikgoz Tasbakan, Meltem; Durusoy, Raika; Pullukcu, Husnu; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Ulusoy, Sercan

    2013-11-04

    The aim of this study was to determine the point prevalence of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and to investigate risk factors for pathogen type (E. coli vs. others) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positivity among nosocomial UTI patients. A questionnaire consisting of 44 questions on demographic data and risk factors of UTI cases was sent to 51 tertiary care hospitals. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. The overall prevalence of UTI was 1.82% (483/26534). The prevalence of UTI was higher in intensive care units (ICUs) with 6.77% versus 1.45% outside ICUs. Hospitals of the Ministry of Health (compared to university hospitals), hospitals in less developed provinces and hospitals with bed capacity < 500 had higher UTI prevalence. Patients without a urinary catheter were more likely to have received immunosuppressive therapy, current corticosteroid use, renal transplantation and uterine prolapsus and less likely to have another infection outside the urinary tract, as compared to catheterized patients. Among the 422 culture-positive patients, the most common pathogen was E. coli (45.5%). The risk factors increasing the likelihood of E. coli in urine culture were being female, history of urinary tract operation, no use of antibiotics in the preceding three months and infection outside the urinary tract. There were 247 patients with E. coli or Klebsiella spp. positive in culture. Among these, 61% (n=151) were ESBL- positive. Among patients having E. coli/Klebsiella positive in culture, antibiotic use in the preceding three months and history of urinary tract operation were the independent risk factors significantly increasing the risk of ESBL. The reasons underlying the high prevalence of nosocomial UTIs, and a better understanding of the risk factors might lead to improved control of these infections.

  16. Hospital-acquired urinary tract infection point prevalence in Turkey: Differences in risk factors among patient groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the point prevalence of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and to investigate risk factors for pathogen type (E. coli vs. others) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positivity among nosocomial UTI patients. Methods A questionnaire consisting of 44 questions on demographic data and risk factors of UTI cases was sent to 51 tertiary care hospitals. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results The overall prevalence of UTI was 1.82% (483/26534). The prevalence of UTI was higher in intensive care units (ICUs) with 6.77% versus 1.45% outside ICUs. Hospitals of the Ministry of Health (compared to university hospitals), hospitals in less developed provinces and hospitals with bed capacity < 500 had higher UTI prevalence. Patients without a urinary catheter were more likely to have received immunosuppressive therapy, current corticosteroid use, renal transplantation and uterine prolapsus and less likely to have another infection outside the urinary tract, as compared to catheterized patients. Among the 422 culture-positive patients, the most common pathogen was E. coli (45.5%). The risk factors increasing the likelihood of E. coli in urine culture were being female, history of urinary tract operation, no use of antibiotics in the preceding three months and infection outside the urinary tract. There were 247 patients with E. coli or Klebsiella spp. positive in culture. Among these, 61% (n=151) were ESBL- positive. Among patients having E. coli/Klebsiella positive in culture, antibiotic use in the preceding three months and history of urinary tract operation were the independent risk factors significantly increasing the risk of ESBL. Conclusions The reasons underlying the high prevalence of nosocomial UTIs, and a better understanding of the risk factors might lead to improved control of these infections. PMID:24188193

  17. Risk factors for hospital-acquired infections in teaching hospitals of Amhara regional state, Ethiopia: A matched-case control study.

    PubMed

    Yallew, Walelegn Worku; Kumie, Abera; Yehuala, Feleke Moges

    2017-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infection affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. It is a major global issue for patient safety. Understanding the potential risk factors is important to appreciate the local context. A matched case control study design, which is the first of its kind in the study region, was undertaken to identify risk factors in teaching hospitals of Amhara regional state, Ethiopia. A matched case control study design matched with age and hospital type was used. The study was conducted in University of Gondar and Felege-Hiwot medical teaching hospital. Cases were patients who fulfilled the criteria based on CDC definition of hospital-acquired infection and controls were patients admitted to the hospital that stayed for more than 48 hours in the ward in the study period, but who did not develop infection. For one case, four controls were selected. Of 545 patients, 109 were cases and 436 were controls. Conditional logistic regression using STATA 13 was used for data analysis. The median length of stay for cases and controls was 7 and 8 days, respectively. Patients admitted in wards with the presence of medical waste container in the room had 82% less chance of developing hospital-acquired infection (AOR 0.18; 95% CI, 0.03-0.98). The odds of developing hospital-acquired infection among immune deficient patients were 2.34 times higher than their counterparts (95% CI; 1.17-4.69). Patients received antimicrobials, central vascular catheter and surgery since admission had 8.63, 6.91 and 2.35 higher odds of developing hospital-acquired infection, respectively. Health providers and mangers should consider the provision and availability of healthcare materials and facilities in all of the ward rooms, follow appropriate safe medical procedures for use of external devices on patients, and give attention to the immunocompromised patients for the prevention and control of hospital-acquired infections.

  18. Incidence, timing and risk factors associated with 1-year mortality after hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Adamuz, Jordi; Viasus, Diego; Jiménez-Martínez, Emilio; Isla, Pilar; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    To identify the incidence, causes, timing and risk factors associated with 1-year mortality in CAP patients after hospital discharge. Adult patients with CAP who were admitted to a tertiary hospital from 2007 to 2011 were prospectively recruited and followed up for 1 year after hospital discharge. Of the 1284 patients discharged, 93 (7.2%) died within 1-year of leaving hospital. Sixty eight (73.1%) patients died in the first six months. The main reasons for 1-year mortality after hospital discharge were infectious diseases, mainly pneumonia, followed by acute cardiovascular events. Mortality from infectious diseases was higher during the first 6 months (86.1%), while the number of deaths from cardiovascular causes was stable throughout the months of follow-up. After adjustment for confounders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, cancer, dementia, rehospitalization within 30 days of hospital discharge and nursing home were independently associated with 1-year mortality. The incidence of long-term mortality increased >50% when ≥4 risk factors were present (P < .001). Patients mainly died from infectious diseases and acute cardiovascular events in the first six months after leaving hospital for an acute CAP episode. Certain features may help to identify the risk of long-term mortality in CAP patients. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of acquiring Strongyloides stercoralis infection among patients attending a tertiary hospital in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jongwutiwes, Ubonvan; Waywa, Duangdao; Silpasakorn, Saowaluk; Wanachiwanawin, Darawan; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors for Strongyloides stercoralis infection in adult patients attending Siriraj Hospital, a tertiary hospital in Thailand. Methods A case–control study was carried out between July 2008 and April 2010. Case and control were identified from 6022 patients for whom results of faecal examination were available. A case was a patient who had S. stercoralis larva detected from faecal examination. Control was randomly selected from patients without S. stercoralis larvae detected in three consecutive faecal examinations. The proportion of control to case was 2 : 1. Demographic and clinical data for the day of diagnosis and retrospectively up to 15 days preceding the date of faecal examination were reviewed from their medical records. Results Overall, 149 (2.47%) patients had S. stercoralis larvae positive. There were 105 males (70.5%), with the mean (SD) age of 53.9 (17.2) years. A total of 300 controls were selected. Male gender (odds ratio (OR)  =  2.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78–4.27)), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (OR  =  3.23, 95% CI 1.43–7.29), and eosinophilia (OR  =  1.81, 95% CI 1.33–2.47) were found to be independent risk factors associated with S. stercoralis infection in this setting. Corticosteroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, and other concomitant illnesses were not associated with increased risk of S. stercoralis infection. Conclusion In this setting, strongyloidiasis was seen more often in male patients with eosinophilia and with HIV infection. Prevention of fatal complication caused by S. stercoralis by regular faecal examination, or serology for early detection and treatment of undiagnosed S. stercoralis infection, is warranted in these high-risk patients. PMID:24766337

  20. Risk Factors for Sporadic Domestically Acquired Campylobacter Infections in Norway 2010-2011: A National Prospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Emily; White, Richard; Mexia, Ricardo; Bruun, Tone; Kapperud, Georg; Lange, Heidi; Nygård, Karin; Vold, Line

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most frequently reported food- and waterborne infection in Norway. We investigated the risk factors for sporadic Campylobacter infections in Norway in order to identify areas where control and prevention measures could be improved. A national prospective case-control study of factors associated with Campylobacter infection was conducted from July 2010 to September 2011. Cases were recruited from the Norwegian Surveillance System of Communicable Diseases (MSIS). Controls were randomly selected from the Norwegian Population Registry. Cases and controls were mailed a paper questionnaire with a prepaid return envelope. Univariable analyses using logistic regression were conducted for all exposures. A final parsimonious multivariable model was developed using regularized/penalized logistic regression, and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. A total of 995 cases and 1501 controls were included in the study (response proportion 55% and 30%, respectively). Exposures that had significant increases in odds of Campylobacter infection in multivariable analysis were drinking water directly from river, stream, or lake (OR: 2.96), drinking purchased bottled water (OR: 1.78), eating chicken (1.69), eating meat that was undercooked (OR: 1.77), eating food made on a barbecue (OR: 1.55), living on a farm with livestock (OR: 1.74), having a dog in the household (OR: 1.39), and having household water supply serving fewer than 20 houses (OR: 1.92). Consumption of poultry and untreated water remain important sources of Campylobacter infection in Norway, despite ongoing control efforts. The results justify the need for strengthening education for consumers and food handlers about the risks of cross-contamination when preparing poultry and with consuming raw or undercooked chicken. The public should also be reminded to take precautions when drinking untreated water in nature and ensure continued vigilance in order to protect and maintain the quality of water

  1. Time to decannulation and associated risk factors in the postacute rehabilitation of critically ill patients with intensive care unit-acquired weakness: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simone; Sauter, Wolfgang; Starrost, Ulrike; Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Treatment of critical illness on intensive-care-units (ICU) results often in persistent invasive endotracheal intubation which might delay rehabilitation and increases the risk of mortality. Recent longitudinal studies have described the recovery of critically ill people, but the detailed time course of decannulation in patients with chronic critical illness with ICU-acquired muscle weakness (ICUAW) is not well known. The aim of our study was to describe the decannulation times and associated risk factors in patients who are chronic critically ill with ICU acquired weakness. This is a cohort study. Postacute and rehabilitation units. Chronic critically ill patients with ICUAW and tracheostomy tube. We calculated the time until decannulation and used possible predictor variables to explain this time course. We included 122 patients with ICUAW. Successful decannulation of the tracheostomy tube was achieved after a median of 40.5 days (interquartile range= 44) after study onset and after a median of 89 days (interquartile range= 58) after onset of primary illness. Our final multivariate Cox-Proportional Hazard model included two main risk factors for decannulation: the amount of medical tubes such as catheters at admission to the rehabilitation center (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.572 (95% CI: 1.021 to 2.415) and the duration of weaning from respirator in days (adjusted HR= 1.02 per day (95% CI: 1.006 to 1.03). No adverse events occurred. We described the detailed time course of decannulation in the rehabilitation of chronic critically ill patients and no adverse events were observed. Taken many single factors into account the quantity of medical tubes and the duration of weaning from respirator were associated risk factors for decannulation in this population. Knowing an exact time course of decannulation supports medical decisions in clinical rehabilitation and might help to give a prognosis for decannulation. The amount of medical tubes and the duration of weaning

  2. Brief report: incidence, etiology, risk factors, and outcome of hospital-acquired fever: a systematic, evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Daniel R; Flanders, Scott A; Beck, James M; Saint, Sanjay

    2006-11-01

    Temperature is universally measured in the hospitalized patient, but the literature on hospital-acquired fever has not been systematically reviewed. This systematic review is intended to provide clinicians with an overview of the incidence, etiology, and outcome of hospital-acquired fever. We searched MEDLINE (1970 to 2005), EMBASE (1988 to 2004), and Web of Knowledge. References of all included articles were reviewed. Articles that focused on children, fever in the developing world, classic fever of unknown origin, or specialized patient populations were excluded. Articles were reviewed independently by 2 authors before inclusion; a third author acted as arbiter. Of over 1,000 studies reviewed, 7 met the criteria for inclusion. The incidence of hospital-acquired fever ranged from 2% to 17%. The etiology of fever was infection in 37% to 74%. Rates of antibiotic use for patients with a noninfectious cause of fever ranged from 29% to 55% for a mean duration of 6.6 to 9.6 days. Studies varied widely in their methodology and the patient population studied. Limited information is available to guide an evidence-based approach to hospital-acquired fever. We propose criteria to help standardize future studies of this important clinical situation.

  3. Lifestyle-Associated Risk Factors for Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in the Netherlands: An Exploratory Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    van Rijen, Miranda M. L.; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, Marjolein F. Q.; Verkade, Erwin J. M.; ten Ham, Peter B. G.; Feingold, Beth J.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) is rapidly increasing. Currently, it is unknown which reservoirs are involved. An exploratory hospital-based case-control study was performed in sixteen Dutch hospitals to identify risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage in patients not belonging to established risk groups. Methods Cases were in- or outpatients from sixteen Dutch hospitals, colonised or infected with MRSA without healthcare- or livestock-associated risk factors for MRSA carriage. Control subjects were patients not carrying MRSA, and hospitalised on the same ward or visited the same outpatients' clinic as the case. The presence of potential risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage was determined using a standardised questionnaire. Results Regular consumption of poultry (OR 2⋅40; 95% CI 1⋅08–5⋅33), cattle density per municipality (OR 1⋅30; 95% CI 1⋅00–1⋅70), and sharing of scuba diving equipment (OR 2⋅93 95% CI 1⋅19–7⋅21) were found to be independently associated with CA-MRSA carriage. CA-MRSA carriage was not related to being of foreign origin. Conclusions The observed association between the consumption of poultry and CA-MRSA carriage suggests that MRSA in the food chain may be a source for MRSA carriage in humans. Although sharing of scuba diving equipment was found to be associated with CA-MRSA carriage, the role played by skin abrasions in divers, the lack of decontamination of diving materials, or the favourable high salt content of sea water is currently unclear. The risk for MRSA MC398 carriage in areas with a high cattle density may be due to environmental contamination with MRSA MC398 or human-to-human transmission. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings and to determine the absolute risks of MRSA acquisition associated with the factors identified. PMID:23840344

  4. Risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in critically ill patients: a multicenter study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tark; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Seong Yeon; Jeon, Min-Hyok; Choo, Eun Joo; Chung, Jin-Won; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Dong-Min; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Yang Soo

    2014-04-01

    We performed a case-control study to identify risk factors of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) as an increasing cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). The study included critically ill adult patients with HAP whose microbial etiology was identified at eight tertiary centers in Korea between June 2008 and December 2009. Eighty two patients with 86 isolates of CRGNB (62 Acinetobacter baumannii, 14 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 10 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) were included in the case group, and 122 patients with carbapenem-susceptible Gram-negative bacteria were included in the control group. Diabetes mellitus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.25-6.38), radiologic score ≥5 (aOR 4.56, 95% CI 2.36-8.81), prior fluoroquinolone (aOR 2.39. 95% CI = 1.07-5.35), or carbapenem usage (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.75-17.83) were found to be independent risk factors. Fluoroquinolone and carbapenem should be cautiously used to avoid HAP caused by CRGNB.

  5. Passive smoking at home is a risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia in older adults: a population-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether passive smoking exposure at home is a risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults. Setting A population-based case-control study was designed in a Mediterranean area with 860 000 inhabitants >14 years of age. Participants 1003 participants who had never smoked were recruited. Primary and secondary outcome measures Risk factors for CAP, including home exposure to passive smoking, were registered. All new cases of CAP in a well-defined population were consecutively recruited during a 12-month period. Methods A population-based case-control study was designed to assess risk factors for CAP, including home exposure to passive smoking. All new cases of CAP in a well-defined population were consecutively recruited during a 12-month period. The subgroup of never smokers was selected for the present analysis. Results The study sample included 471 patients with CAP and 532 controls who had never smoked. The annual incidence of CAP was estimated to be 1.14 cases×10–3 inhabitants in passive smokers and 0.90×10−3 in non-passive smokers (risk ratio (RR) 1.26; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.55) in the whole sample. In participants ≥65 years of age, this incidence was 2.50×10−3 in passive smokers and 1.69×10−3 in non-passive smokers (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.03). In this last age group, the percentage of passive smokers in cases and controls was 26% and 18.1%, respectively (p=0.039), with a crude OR of 1.59 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.38) and an adjusted (by age and sex) OR of 1.56 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.45). Conclusions Passive smoking at home is a risk factor for CAP in older adults (65 years or more). PMID:24928592

  6. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Jan C.; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A.; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S.; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Methods Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008–2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Results Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1–2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4–78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47–2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61–4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27–3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17–3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5g/L higher, 0.58–0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14–0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P < 0.001). Microbial etiology did not predict mortality. Conclusions Results largely confirm substantial comorbidity-related 5-year mortality after hospitalization for CAP and the impact of several well-known risk factors for death, and extend

  7. Seasonality, risk factors and burden of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients: a population database study using linked health care records

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nicholas P; Coombs, Ngaire A; Johnson, Matthew J; Josephs, Lynn K; Rigge, Lucy A; Staples, Karl J; Thomas, Mike; Wilkinson, Tom MA

    2017-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common in patients with COPD than in the adult general population, with studies of hospitalized CAP patients consistently reporting COPD as a frequent comorbidity. However, despite an increasing recognition of its importance, large studies evaluating the incidence patterns over time, risk factors and burden of CAP in COPD are currently lacking. Methods A retrospective observational study using a large UK-based database of linked primary and secondary care records was conducted. Patients with a diagnosis of COPD aged ≥40 years were followed up for 5 years from January 1, 2010. CAP and exacerbation episodes were identified from hospital discharge data and primary care coding records, and rates were calculated per month, adjusting for mortality, and displayed over time. In addition, baseline factors predicting future risk of CAP and hospital admission with CAP were identified. Results A total of 14,513 COPD patients were identified: 13.4% (n=1,938) had ≥1 CAP episode, of whom 18.8% suffered from recurrent (≥2) CAP. Highest rates of both CAP and exacerbations were seen in winter. A greater proportion of frequent, compared to infrequent, exacerbators experienced recurrent CAP (5.1% versus 2.0%, respectively, P<0.001); 75.6% of CAP episodes were associated with hospital admission compared to 22.1% of exacerbations. Older age and increasing grade of airflow limitation were independently associated with increased odds of CAP and hospital admission with CAP. Other independent predictors of future CAP included lower body mass index, inhaled corticosteroid use, prior frequent exacerbations and comorbidities, including ischemic heart disease and diabetes. Conclusion CAP in COPD demonstrates clear seasonal patterns, with patient characteristics predictive of the odds of future CAP and hospital admission with CAP. Highlighting this burden of COPD-associated CAP during the winter period informs us of the likely triggers

  8. Risk factors for resistance to ciprofloxacin in community-acquired urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Marlies; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Goessens, Wil H F; de Visser, Herman; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H; Verbon, Annelies

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance to ciprofloxacin is rising worldwide, especially in bacteria causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). Prudent use of current antibiotic drugs is therefore necessary. We analysed (modifiable) risk factors for ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli. Urinary cultures of UTIs caused by E. coli were collected from participants in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study in an elderly population, and analysed for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate several possible risk factors for resistance. Ciprofloxacin resistance in 1080 E. coli isolates was 10.2%. Multivariate analysis showed that higher age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00-1.05) and use of two (OR 5.89; 95% CI 3.45-10.03) and three or more (OR 3.38; 95% CI 1.92-5.97) prescriptions of fluoroquinolones were associated with ciprofloxacin resistance, while no association between fluoroquinolone use more than 1 year before culture and ciprofloxacin resistance could be demonstrated. Furthermore, a high intake of pork (OR 3.68; 95% CI 1.36-9.99) and chicken (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.08-6.85) and concomitant prescription of calcium supplements (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.20-5.22) and proton pump inhibitors (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.18-3.51) were associated with ciprofloxacin resistance. Ciprofloxacin resistance in community-acquired UTI was associated with a high intake of pork and chicken and with concomitant prescription of calcium supplements and proton pump inhibitors. Modification of antibiotic use in animals as well as temporarily stopping the prescription of concomitant calcium and proton pump inhibitors need further evaluation as strategies to prevent ciprofloxacin resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Acquired prolongation of QT interval as a risk factor for torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia: a narrative review for the anesthesiologist and intensivist.

    PubMed

    Uvelin, Arsen; Pejaković, Jasmina; Mijatović, Vesna

    2017-06-01

    More than 70% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience heart rhythm disturbances, and these patients have correspondingly higher mortality rates. Consequently, one of the standards of care in ICUs is continuous electrocardiography monitoring. One of the potentially preventable dysrhythmic events is the occurrence of torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia in the setting of acquired prolonged QT interval. This type of ventricular tachycardia can be malignant because it often progresses to ventricular fibrillation. Many factors predispose to lengthening of the QT interval, the most important of which are electrolyte abnormalities and the administration of specific medications. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of acquired long QT interval, stressing the medication-induced acquired long QT-interval and factors present in ICU patients that promote prolongation of the QT interval. We also propose guidelines to avoid the occurrence of torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia.

  10. Rates and Risk Factors for Recurrent Pneumonia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study With 5 Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dang, T. T.; Eurich, D. T.; Weir, D. L.; Marrie, T. J.; Majumdar, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The rates and risk factors for developing recurrent pneumonia following hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are poorly understood. Methods. We examined a population-based cohort of patients with CAP who survived hospital admission and who were free of pneumonia for at least 3 months. We collected clinical, functional, and medication-related information and pneumonia severity index (PSI). Using linked databases we followed patients for 5 years and captured any clinical episode of pneumonia 90 days or more post-discharge. We used Cox proportional hazards models (adjusted for age, sex, PSI, functional status, medications) to determine rates and independent correlates of recurrent pneumonia. Results. The final cohort included 2709 inpatients; 43% were 75 years or older, 34% were not fully independent, and 56% had severe pneumonia. Over 5 years of follow–up, 245 (9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8%–10%) patients developed recurrent pneumonia, and 156 (64%) of these episodes required hospitalization. Rate of recurrence was 3.0/100 person–years and median time to recurrence was 317 days (interquartile range, 177–569); 32 (13%) patients had 2 or more recurrences. In multivariable analyses only age >75 years (adjusted P = .047) and less than fully independent functional status (12% recurrence rate with impaired functional status vs 7% for fully independent; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3–2.2; P < .001) were significantly associated with recurrent pneumonia. Conclusions. One of 11 patients who survived CAP hospitalization had recurrent pneumonia over 5 years and those with impaired functional status were at particularly high risk. Recurrent pneumonia is common and more attention to preventive strategies at discharge and closer follow-up over the long-term seem warranted. PMID:24729503

  11. Life style factors and acquired susceptibility to environmental disease.

    PubMed

    Au, W W

    2001-10-01

    Multifactorial risk factors are responsible for many diseases. They can be broadly categorized as environmental, genetic and life style factors. Much attention has been focused on the first two categories, e.g. the identification of environmental toxicants/carcinogens and the elucidation of genetic susceptibility to disease. Life style risk factors such as aging, poor nutrition, infection and exposure to toxicants can also increase susceptibility to illnesses. These life style factors can therefore be considered to cause acquired susceptibility for increased risk for environmental disease. Among Egyptians, infection with the parasite, Schistosoma, is the primary risk factor for bladder cancer and the risk is enhanced by exposure to mutagenic chemicals. We have shown that inheritance of susceptible metabolizing genes that can increase body burden of mutagenic chemicals enhances the risk. We have also hypothesized that chronic exposure to mutagenic chemicals causes cellular abnormalities that can reduce the capacity of cells to repair DNA damage and thus increase the risk for environmental disease. We have used a challenge assay to show that cells from cigarette smokers and from populations exposed to uranium, butadiene and pesticides have abnormal DNA repair responses compared to matched controls. On the other hand, the response is normal in workers exposed to very low concentrations of butadiene and benzene, and in mothers who had children with birth defects. This suggests that exposure to high enough concentrations of certain mutagens can cause acquired susceptibility in human populations. The acquired susceptibility is expected to interact with environmental factors and with genetic susceptibility to increase risk for environmental disease.

  12. Travel to Asia and traveller's diarrhoea with antibiotic treatment are independent risk factors for acquiring ciprofloxacin-resistant and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae-a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Reuland, E A; Sonder, G J B; Stolte, I; Al Naiemi, N; Koek, A; Linde, G B; van de Laar, T J W; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E; van Dam, A P

    2016-08-01

    Travel to (sub)tropical countries is a well-known risk factor for acquiring resistant bacterial strains, which is especially of significance for travellers from countries with low resistance rates. In this study we investigated the rate of and risk factors for travel-related acquisition of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E), ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CIPR-E) and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Data before and after travel were collected from 445 participants. Swabs were cultured with an enrichment broth and sub-cultured on selective agar plates for ESBL detection, and on plates with a ciprofloxacin disc. ESBL production was confirmed with the double-disc synergy test. Species identification and susceptibility testing were performed with the Vitek-2 system. All isolates were subjected to ertapenem Etest. ESBL and carbapenemase genes were characterized by PCR and sequencing. Twenty-seven out of 445 travellers (6.1%) already had ESBL-producing strains and 45 of 445 (10.1%) travellers had strains resistant to ciprofloxacin before travel. Ninety-eight out of 418 (23.4%) travellers acquired ESBL-E and 130 of 400 (32.5%) travellers acquired a ciprofloxacin-resistant strain. Of the 98 ESBL-E, predominantly Escherichia coli and predominantly blaCTX-M-15, 56% (55/98) were resistant to gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and co-trimoxazole. Multivariate analysis showed that Asia was a high-risk area for ESBL-E as well as CIPR-E acquisition. Travellers with diarrhoea combined with antimicrobial use were significantly at higher risk for acquisition of resistant strains. Only one carbapenemase-producing isolate was acquired, isolated from a participant after visiting Egypt. In conclusion, travelling to Asia and diarrhoea combined with antimicrobial use are important risk factors for acquiring ESBL-E and CIPR-E.

  13. Risk Factors for Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CAMRSA) Infectors in Military Trainees: Review of an Outbreak in San Diego, California, 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-23

    potential virulence factor that has been linked to other CA- MRSA infections (19, 28). Finally, the identification of all 22 MRSA isolates as ST8 by...summer of 2002. A questionnaire was developed and administered to 209 trainees, 22 of whom had MRSA infections. Factors associated with infection were...provided an opportunity to describe risk factors for CA- MRSA , which may 10 help focus prevention efforts in this and other communities. 3

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  15. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  16. Individual-level factors associated with the risk of acquiring human Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Malaysia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Matthew J; Cox, Jonathan; William, Timothy; Jelip, Jenarun; Fornace, Kimberly M; Brock, Patrick M; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Barber, Bridget E; Anstey, Nicholas M; Yeo, Tsin W; Drakeley, Christopher J

    2017-06-09

    The emergence of human malaria due to the monkey parasite Plasmodium knowlesi threatens elimination efforts in southeast Asia. Changes in land use are thought to be driving the rise in reported P knowlesi cases, but the role of individual-level factors is unclear. To address this knowledge gap we assessed human and environmental factors associated with zoonotic knowlesi malaria risk. We did this population-based case-control study over a 2 year period in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. We enrolled cases with microscopy-positive, PCR-confirmed malaria who presented to two primary referral hospitals serving the adjacent districts of Kudat and Kota Marudu. We randomly selected three malaria-negative community controls per case, who were matched by village within 2 weeks of case detection. We obtained questionnaire data on demographics, behaviour, and residential malaria risk factors, and we also assessed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity. We used conditional logistic regression models to evaluate exposure risk between P knowlesi cases and controls, and between P knowlesi and human-only Plasmodium spp malaria cases. From Dec 5, 2012, to Jan 30, 2015, we screened 414 patients and subsequently enrolled 229 cases with P knowlesi malaria mono-infection and 91 cases with other Plasmodium spp infection. We enrolled 953 matched controls, including 683 matched to P knowlesi cases and 270 matched to non-P knowlesi cases. Age 15 years or older (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4·16, 95% CI 2·09-8·29, p<0·0001), male gender (4·20, 2·54-6·97, p<0·0001), plantation work (3·50, CI, 1·34-9·15, p=0·011), sleeping outside (3·61, 1·48-8·85, p=0·0049), travel (2·48, 1·45-4·23, p=0·0010), being aware of the presence of monkeys in the past 4 weeks (3·35, 1·91-5·88, p<0·0001), and having open eaves or gaps in walls (2·18, 1·33-3·59, p=0·0021) were independently associated with increased risk of symptomatic P knowlesi infection. Farming occupation

  17. Individual-level factors associated with the risk of acquiring human Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Malaysia: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Matthew J; Cox, Jonathan; William, Timothy; Jelip, Jenarun; Fornace, Kimberly M; Brock, Patrick M; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Barber, Bridget E; Anstey, Nicholas M; Yeo, Tsin W; Drakeley, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The emergence of human malaria due to the monkey parasite Plasmodium knowlesi threatens elimination efforts in southeast Asia. Changes in land use are thought to be driving the rise in reported P knowlesi cases, but the role of individual-level factors is unclear. To address this knowledge gap we assessed human and environmental factors associated with zoonotic knowlesi malaria risk. Methods We did this population-based case-control study over a 2 year period in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. We enrolled cases with microscopy-positive, PCR-confirmed malaria who presented to two primary referral hospitals serving the adjacent districts of Kudat and Kota Marudu. We randomly selected three malaria-negative community controls per case, who were matched by village within 2 weeks of case detection. We obtained questionnaire data on demographics, behaviour, and residential malaria risk factors, and we also assessed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity. We used conditional logistic regression models to evaluate exposure risk between P knowlesi cases and controls, and between P knowlesi and human-only Plasmodium spp malaria cases. Findings From Dec 5, 2012, to Jan 30, 2015, we screened 414 patients and subsequently enrolled 229 cases with P knowlesi malaria mono-infection and 91 cases with other Plasmodium spp infection. We enrolled 953 matched controls, including 683 matched to P knowlesi cases and 270 matched to non-P knowlesi cases. Age 15 years or older (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4·16, 95% CI 2·09–8·29, p<0·0001), male gender (4·20, 2·54–6·97, p<0·0001), plantation work (3·50, CI, 1·34–9·15, p=0·011), sleeping outside (3·61, 1·48–8·85, p=0·0049), travel (2·48, 1·45–4·23, p=0·0010), being aware of the presence of monkeys in the past 4 weeks (3·35, 1·91–5·88, p<0·0001), and having open eaves or gaps in walls (2·18, 1·33–3·59, p=0·0021) were independently associated with increased risk of

  18. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  19. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

    2005-06-01

    Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility

  20. [Blood deficiency values of polyunsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids, vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase as possible risk factors in the onset and development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Passi, S; De Luca, C; Picardo, M; Morrone, A; Ippolito, F

    1990-04-01

    Plasma levels of vitamin E (vit E) and polyunsatured fatty acids of phospholipids (PUFA-PL) as well as erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity are significantly lower (p less than 0.001) in patients HIV sero-positive (AIDS and ARC cases) both affected and not affected with seborrheic dermatitis and in 32% of HIV sero-negative intravenous drug abusers (IVDA, A subgroup) than in controls. The deficiency of PUFA-PL (mainly C20:3 n-6, C20:4 n-6 and C22:6 n-3) which is associated with a significant increase (p less than 0.001) of saturated palmitic and stearic acids and monounsaturated oleic acid, cannot be correlated to an active lipoperoxidative process. In fact the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive materials (TBA-RM) are not increased in the plasma of HIV sero-positive patients and A subgroup of IVDA. It is likely that the reduction of PUFA-PL is due to an inhibition of hepatic microsomal desaturase enzymes (delta 6 desaturase, delta 5 desaturase, delta 4 desaturase) which are involved in both n-6 and n-3 pathways. Since IVDA represent, and not only in Italy, a major risk category for HIV infection, we suggest that reduced blood levels of vit E, GSH-Px and particularly PUFA-PL may be added to the list of risk factors favouring the onset and the development of AIDS.

  1. The relationship among pressure ulcer risk factors, incidence and nursing documentation in hospital-acquired pressure ulcer patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan

    2016-08-01

    To explore the quality/comprehensiveness of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers and to investigate the relationship between the nursing documentation and the incidence of pressure ulcers in four intensive care units. Pressure ulcer prevention requires consistent assessments and documentation to decrease pressure ulcer incidence. Currently, most research is focused on devices to prevent pressure ulcers. Studies have rarely considered the relationship among pressure ulcer risk factors, incidence and nursing documentation. Thus, a study to investigate this relationship is needed to fill this information gap. A retrospective, comparative, descriptive, correlational study. A convenience sample of 196 intensive care units patients at the selected medical centre comprised the study sample. All medical records of patients admitted to intensive care units between the time periods of September 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012 were audited. Data used in the analysis included 98 pressure ulcer patients and 98 non-pressure ulcer patients. The quality and comprehensiveness of pressure ulcer documentation were measured by the modified European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Ulcers Assessment Instrument and the Comprehensiveness in Nursing Documentation instrument. The correlations between quality/comprehensiveness of pressure ulcer documentation and incidence of pressure ulcers were not statistically significant. Patients with pressure ulcers had longer length of stay than patients without pressure ulcers stay. There were no statistically significant differences in quality/comprehensiveness scores of pressure ulcer documentation between dayshift and nightshift. This study revealed a lack of quality/comprehensiveness in nursing documentation of pressure ulcers. This study demonstrates that staff nurses often perform poorly on documenting pressure ulcer appearance, staging and treatment. Moreover, nursing documentation of pressure ulcers does not provide a complete

  2. KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae enteric colonization acquired during intensive care unit stay: the significance of risk factors for its development and its impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Marangos, Markos; Fligou, Fotini; Christofidou, Myrto; Sklavou, Christina; Vamvakopoulou, Sophia; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Filos, Kriton S

    2013-10-01

    A prospective observational study of 226 intensive care unit (ICU) patients was conducted during a 25-month period. Rectal samples were taken at day 1, 4, and 7 and, afterwards, once weekly. Klebsiella pneumoniae was identified using standard techniques, whereas the presence of bla(KPC) gene was confirmed by PCR. During ICU stay, 72.6% of the patients were colonized with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp). Male gender, prior bed occupants, and patients in nearby beds colonized with KPC-Kp, tracheotomy, number of invasive catheters inserted, and number of antibiotics administered were the major risk factors for KPC-Kp colonization. ICU mortality (35.4%) was significantly related to Simplified Acute Physiology II score and respiratory insufficiency upon admission, cortisone administration, aminoglycoside administration, confirmed KPC-Kp infection, and severe sepsis or septic shock. The high prevalence of KPC-Kp enteric carriage in ICU patients and the significant mortality associated with KPC-Kp infection dictate the importance of early identification and isolation of such carriers.

  3. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  4. Factors that are associated with the risk of acquiring Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Sabah, Malaysia: a case-control study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, M J; William, T; Drakeley, C J; Jelip, J; von Seidlein, L; Barber, B E; Fornace, K M; Anstey, N M; Yeo, T W; Cox, J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Plasmodium knowlesi has long been present in Malaysia, and is now an emerging cause of zoonotic human malaria. Cases have been confirmed throughout South-East Asia where the ranges of its natural macaque hosts and Anopheles leucosphyrus group vectors overlap. The majority of cases are from Eastern Malaysia, with increasing total public health notifications despite a concurrent reduction in Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria. The public health implications are concerning given P. knowlesi has the highest risk of severe and fatal disease of all Plasmodium spp in Malaysia. Current patterns of risk and disease vary based on vector type and competence, with individual exposure risks related to forest and forest-edge activities still poorly defined. Clustering of cases has not yet been systematically evaluated despite reports of peri-domestic transmission and known vector competence for human-to-human transmission. Methods and analysis A population-based case–control study will be conducted over a 2-year period at two adjacent districts in north-west Sabah, Malaysia. Confirmed malaria cases presenting to the district hospital sites meeting relevant inclusion criteria will be requested to enrol. Three community controls matched to the same village as the case will be selected randomly. Study procedures will include blood sampling and administration of household and individual questionnaires to evaluate potential exposure risks associated with acquisition of P. knowlesi malaria. Secondary outcomes will include differences in exposure variables between P. knowlesi and other Plasmodium spp, risk of severe P. knowlesi malaria, and evaluation of P. knowlesi case clustering. Primary analysis will be per protocol, with adjusted ORs for exposure risks between cases and controls calculated using conditional multiple logistic regression models. Ethics This study has been approved by the human research ethics committees of Malaysia, the Menzies School of

  5. Factors that are associated with the risk of acquiring Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Sabah, Malaysia: a case-control study protocol.

    PubMed

    Grigg, M J; William, T; Drakeley, C J; Jelip, J; von Seidlein, L; Barber, B E; Fornace, K M; Anstey, N M; Yeo, T W; Cox, J

    2014-08-22

    Plasmodium knowlesi has long been present in Malaysia, and is now an emerging cause of zoonotic human malaria. Cases have been confirmed throughout South-East Asia where the ranges of its natural macaque hosts and Anopheles leucosphyrus group vectors overlap. The majority of cases are from Eastern Malaysia, with increasing total public health notifications despite a concurrent reduction in Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria. The public health implications are concerning given P. knowlesi has the highest risk of severe and fatal disease of all Plasmodium spp in Malaysia. Current patterns of risk and disease vary based on vector type and competence, with individual exposure risks related to forest and forest-edge activities still poorly defined. Clustering of cases has not yet been systematically evaluated despite reports of peri-domestic transmission and known vector competence for human-to-human transmission. A population-based case-control study will be conducted over a 2-year period at two adjacent districts in north-west Sabah, Malaysia. Confirmed malaria cases presenting to the district hospital sites meeting relevant inclusion criteria will be requested to enrol. Three community controls matched to the same village as the case will be selected randomly. Study procedures will include blood sampling and administration of household and individual questionnaires to evaluate potential exposure risks associated with acquisition of P. knowlesi malaria. Secondary outcomes will include differences in exposure variables between P. knowlesi and other Plasmodium spp, risk of severe P. knowlesi malaria, and evaluation of P. knowlesi case clustering. Primary analysis will be per protocol, with adjusted ORs for exposure risks between cases and controls calculated using conditional multiple logistic regression models. This study has been approved by the human research ethics committees of Malaysia, the Menzies School of Health Research, Australia, and the London

  6. Risk factors for hospital admission in the 28 days following a community-acquired pneumonia diagnosis in older adults, and their contribution to increasing hospitalisation rates over time: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Elizabeth R C; De Stavola, Bianca L; Smeeth, Liam; Thomas, Sara L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine factors associated with hospitalisation after community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among older adults in England, and to investigate how these factors have contributed to increasing hospitalisations over time. Design Cohort study. Setting Primary and secondary care in England. Population 39 211 individuals from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, who were eligible for linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality data, were aged ≥65 and had at least 1 CAP episode between April 1998 and March 2011. Main outcome measures The association between hospitalisation within 28 days of CAP diagnosis (a ‘post-CAP’ hospitalisation) and a wide range of comorbidities, frailty factors, medications and vaccinations. We examined the role of these factors in post-CAP hospitalisation trends. We also looked at trends in post-CAP mortality and length of hospitalisation over the study period. Results 14 comorbidities, 5 frailty factors and 4 medications/vaccinations were associated with hospitalisation (of 18, 12 and 7 considered, respectively). Factors such as chronic lung disease, severe renal disease and diabetes were associated with increased likelihood of hospitalisation, whereas factors such as recent influenza vaccination and a recent antibiotic prescription decreased the odds of hospitalisation. Despite adjusting for these and other factors, the average predicted probability of hospitalisation after CAP rose markedly from 57% (1998–2000) to 86% (2009–2010). Duration of hospitalisation and 28-day mortality decreased over the study period. Conclusions The risk factors we describe enable identification of patients at increased likelihood of post-CAP hospitalisation and thus in need of proactive case management. Our analyses also provide evidence that while comorbidities and frailty factors contributed to increasing post-CAP hospitalisations in recent years, the trend appears to be largely driven by changes in service provision and

  7. A Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors for Acquiring HIV Among Men Who Have Sex with Men: Implications for Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Programs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Philip A; Rose, Jennifer; Maher, Justine; Benben, Stacey; Pfeiffer, Kristen; Almonte, Alexi; Poceta, Joanna; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Parker, Sharon; Marshall, Brandon Dl; Lally, Mickey; Mayer, Kenneth; Mena, Leandro; Patel, Rupa; Nunn, Amy S

    2015-11-01

    Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV transmission are broad. In order to better characterize groups who may benefit most from PrEP, we reviewed demographics, behaviors, and clinical outcomes for individuals presenting to a publicly-funded sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic in Providence, Rhode Island, from 2012 to 2014. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of men who have sex with men (MSM) at highest risk for contracting HIV. A total of 1723 individuals presented for testing (75% male; 31% MSM). MSM were more likely to test HIV positive than heterosexual men or women. Among 538 MSM, we identified four latent classes. Class 1 had the highest rates of incarceration (33%), forced sex (24%), but had no HIV infections. Class 2 had <5 anal sex partners in the previous 12 months, the lowest rates of drug/alcohol use during sex and lower HIV prevalence (3%). Class 3 had the highest prevalence of HIV (7%) and other STDs (16%), > 10 anal sex partners in the previous 12 months (69%), anonymous partners (100%), drug/alcohol use during sex (76%), and prior STDs (40%). Class 4 had similar characteristics and HIV prevalence as Class 2. In this population, MSM who may benefit most from PrEP include those who have >10 sexual partners per year, anonymous partners, drug/alcohol use during sex and prior STDs. LCA is a useful tool for identifying clusters of characteristics that may place individuals at higher risk for HIV infection and who may benefit most from PrEP in clinical practice.

  8. A Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors for Acquiring HIV Among Men Who Have Sex with Men: Implications for Implementing Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Programs

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jennifer; Maher, Justine; Benben, Stacey; Pfeiffer, Kristen; Almonte, Alexi; Poceta, Joanna; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Parker, Sharon; Marshall, Brandon DL; Lally, Mickey; Mayer, Kenneth; Mena, Leandro; Patel, Rupa; Nunn, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV transmission are broad. In order to better characterize groups who may benefit most from PrEP, we reviewed demographics, behaviors, and clinical outcomes for individuals presenting to a publicly-funded sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic in Providence, Rhode Island, from 2012 to 2014. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify subgroups of men who have sex with men (MSM) at highest risk for contracting HIV. A total of 1723 individuals presented for testing (75% male; 31% MSM). MSM were more likely to test HIV positive than heterosexual men or women. Among 538 MSM, we identified four latent classes. Class 1 had the highest rates of incarceration (33%), forced sex (24%), but had no HIV infections. Class 2 had <5 anal sex partners in the previous 12 months, the lowest rates of drug/alcohol use during sex and lower HIV prevalence (3%). Class 3 had the highest prevalence of HIV (7%) and other STDs (16%), > 10 anal sex partners in the previous 12 months (69%), anonymous partners (100%), drug/alcohol use during sex (76%), and prior STDs (40%). Class 4 had similar characteristics and HIV prevalence as Class 2. In this population, MSM who may benefit most from PrEP include those who have >10 sexual partners per year, anonymous partners, drug/alcohol use during sex and prior STDs. LCA is a useful tool for identifying clusters of characteristics that may place individuals at higher risk for HIV infection and who may benefit most from PrEP in clinical practice. PMID:26389735

  9. What environmental factors irritate people with acquired brain injury?

    PubMed

    Pryor, Julie

    2004-08-19

    This study aims to determine the environmental factors nurses identify as being irritating to people with acquired brain injury. This was a qualitative study. An experienced interviewer used the Critical Decision Method to interview 28 nurses working in 10 inpatient brain injury rehabilitation units in Australia on a one to one basis for 1-1.5 h on two consecutive days. Transcripts of interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Nurses identified five groups of irritants that acted as triggers for aggression: The nurses in this study identified many environmental factors that irritate people with acquired brain injury. Some irritants appeared unavoidable but others could be addressed by staff expertise.

  10. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Nicholas B.; Streiff, Michael B.; Gocke, Christian B.; Kickler, Thomas S.; Lanzkron, Sophie M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient's plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered. PMID:24955264

  11. Membranous nephropathy with acquired factor V inhibitor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. In contrast, acquired factor V inhibitor is a rare bleeding disorder. Case presentation A 62-year-old Asian man with a history of cerebral hemorrhage, purpura, eosinophilia and hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome developed proteinuria. The bleeding disorder was diagnosed with acquired factor V inhibitors. A renal biopsy revealed that he suffered from membranous nephropathy with glomerular endothelial damage which is reported to be involved in another factor disorder. After the steroid administration, the coagulation test and proteinuria were improved. Conclusions The presence of factor V inhibitors may have been involved in the development of membranous nephropathy. PMID:24360027

  12. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still unknown. Scientists ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  13. The Acquired Preparedness Model of Risk for Bulimic Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Jessica L.; Smith, Gregory T.; Flory, Kate; Simmons, Jean R.; Hill, Kelly K.

    2010-01-01

    The authors applied person-environment transaction theory to test the acquired preparedness model of eating disorder risk. The model holds that (a) middle school girls high in the trait of ineffectiveness are differentially prepared to acquire high risk expectancies for reinforcement from dieting/thinness; (b) those expectancies predict subsequent binge eating and purging; and (c) the influence of the disposition of ineffectiveness on binge eating and purging is mediated by dieting/thinness expectancies. In a three-wave longitudinal study of 394 middle school girls, they found support for the model. Seventh grade girls’ scores on ineffectiveness predicted their subsequent endorsement of high risk dieting/thinness expectancies, which in turn predicted subsequent increases in binge eating and purging. Statistical tests of mediation supported the hypothesis that the prospective relation between ineffectiveness and binge eating was mediated by dieting/thinness expectancies, as was the prospective relation between ineffectiveness and purging. This application of a basic science theory to eating disorder risk appears fruitful, and the findings suggest the importance of early interventions that address both disposition and learning. PMID:20853933

  14. [Ambulatory acquired pneumonia--risk assessment, empirical and targeted therapy].

    PubMed

    Ruef, C

    2001-10-01

    The management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia confronts the practicing physician with the requirement to make two principal decisions. The first decision is on the site of treatment of this infection. The options are to either treat the patient as an outpatient or to hospitalize the patient. The second decision concerns the selection of an appropriate antimicrobial agent. Over the course of the last five years, a prediction rule was developed and validated in the U.S., which allows to accurately identify those patients that carry a low risk for the development of complications of their infections. Hence, these patients can safely be managed as outpatients. On the other hand, patients with high scores (risk classes III-V) should be hospitalized and at least initially managed as inpatients. The calculation of this score requires the collection of a substantial number of parameters. However, good clinical practice requires the evaluation of most of this parameters. Therefore, the additional work resulting from the calculation of this score is moderate and certainly justifiable. Details of the prediction rule according to Fine et al. are presented in this article. Several guidelines exist for the empiric antibiotic treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Some key recommendations are influenced by the aggravating problem of antibiotic resistance in the U.S. The situation in Switzerland differs from the American situation and therefore recommendations in this article reflect this difference. In daily clinical practice it is somewhat rare to know the microbiological etiology of the individual episode of community-acquired pneumonia with certainty. Therefore, antibiotic treatment is started empirically and also continued empirically in most cases.

  15. Acquired factor VII deficiency in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Toor, A A; Slungaard, A; Hedner, U; Weisdorf, D J; Key, N S

    2002-03-01

    Acquired factor VII (FVII) deficiency in the absence of vitamin K deficiency, oral anticoagulant therapy, synthetic liver dysfunction, or DIC is rare, with only a handful of cases thus far reported. In the period from 1990 to 1996 we identified eight patients with acquired FVII deficiency, all of whom presented with prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) in the first 2 weeks following stem cell transplantation (SCT). The mean plasma FVII clotting activity (FVII:c) was 22% (range 8-35%) with an approximately equivalent reduction in FVII antigen (FVII:Ag) level. Mean plasma levels of fibrinogen and factors II, V, IX, and X were normal. Protein C activity was significantly depressed in only one of the three patients in whom it was measured. Several patients experienced bleeding complications, and hemorrhage directly accounted for death in two cases. Veno-occlusive disease of the liver developed in three patients. We conclude that FVII deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged PT in patients who have recently undergone SCT. The mechanism of this acquired deficiency state remains to be defined.

  16. Bacteraemia and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community acquired pneumonia: risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrús, Albert; Polverino, Eva; Villegas, Santiago; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Menéndez, Rosario; Niederman, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of blood cultures in the diagnosis of bacteraemia for community-acquired pneumonia is low. Recommendations, by guidelines, to perform blood cultures are discordant. We aimed to determine the incidence, microbial aetiology, risk factors and outcomes of bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia, including cases with antibiotic-resistant pathogens (ARP). A prospective, observational study was undertaken on consecutive adult patients admitted to the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain) with community-acquired pneumonia and blood cultures were obtained. Of the 2892 patients included, bacteraemia was present in 297 (10%) patients; 30 (10%) of whom had ARP (multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and an extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae). In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL(-1) and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. The risk factors for ARP bacteraemia were previous antibiotics and C-reactive protein <22.2 mg·dL(-1), while pleuritic pain was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis. Bacteraemia (excluding ARP), appropriate empiric treatment, neurological disease, arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction <250, pneumonia severity index risk classes IV and V, and intensive care unit admission were independently associated with a 30-day hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis. Inappropriate therapy was more frequent in ARP bacteraemia, compared with other bacteraemias (27% versus 3%, respectively, p<0.001). Antibiotic therapy protected against bacteraemia, but increased specifically the risk of bacteraemia from ARP due to the inappropriate coverage of these pathogens. Identifying patients at risk of ARP bacteraemia would help in

  17. Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

  18. Similarities in Acquired Factors Related to Postmenopausal Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Sirola, Joonas; Kröger, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Postmenopausal population is at increased risk of musculoskeletal impairments. Sarcopenia and osteoporosis are associated with significant morbidity and social and health-care costs. These two conditions are uniquely linked with similarities in pathophysiology and diagnostic methods. Uniform diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia are still evolving. Postmenopausal sarcopenia and osteoporosis share many environmental risk- and preventive factors. Moreover, geriatric frailty syndrome may result from interaction of osteoporosis and sarcopenia and may lead to increased mortality. The present paper reviews the factors in evolution of postmenopausal sarcopenia and osteoporosis. PMID:21904688

  19. Rituximab in the treatment of acquired factor VIII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiestner, Adrian; Cho, Hearn J; Asch, Adam S; Michelis, Mary Ann; Zeller, Jack A; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Weksler, Babette B; Schechter, Geraldine P

    2002-11-01

    Autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) are rare but can cause life-threatening bleeding requiring costly factor replacement and prolonged immunosuppression. We report 4 consecutively treated patients whose acquired FVIII inhibitors responded rapidly to immunosuppressive regimens that included rituximab, a monoclonal antibody against CD20(+) B cells. Three patients had spontaneously occurring inhibitors. The fourth, a patient with mild hemophilia A, developed both an autoantibody and an alloantibody following recombinant FVIII treatment. Pretreatment FVIII activities ranged from less than 1% to 4% and inhibitor titers from 5 to 60 Bethesda units (BU). One patient with polymyalgia rheumatica who developed the inhibitor while receiving prednisone responded to single agent rituximab. The hemophilia patient had rapid resolution of the autoantibody, whereas the alloantibody persisted for months. Responses continue off treatment from more than 7 to more than 12 months. This report adds to the growing evidence that rituximab has efficacy in immune disorders resulting from autoantibody formation.

  20. [Prognostic factors of community acquired pneumonia in very old patients].

    PubMed

    Cabré, Mateu; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Pallarés, Román

    2006-07-08

    To determine whether there are differences between the prognostic factors associated with 30-days mortality in patients 65-84 year-old and patients over 84 years hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). An observational study with retrospective data collection was carried out in a representative sample of all CAP in-patients of 27 general hospitals. Data regarding comorbidities, signs and symptoms on admission, radiological and laboratory examinations, and complications during hospitalization were recorded. 1,191 CAP patients were studied, 80.1% in the 65-84 age group and 19.9% in the over 84 age group. Mortality during the first 30 days was 11.9% in the younger group and 20.7% in the older (p < 0.001). In the younger group, the multivariate analysis showed the following independent prognostic factors: general discomfort (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93), respiratory rate > 30/min (OR = 5.02), atrial fibrillation (OR = 3.57), dementia (OR = 9.18), and hospitalization during the previous year (OR = 3.74). In the older group, independent prognostic factors were cancer (OR = 8.4) and renal failure (3.32). Age significantly modified the effect of altered mental state, tachypnea, tachycardia, hyperglycemia, and dementia on mortality. In people over 84 years, except cancer and renal failure, classic CAP prognostic factors used in severity indexes do not distinguish those who will die from those who will not. Therefore, these factors must be interpreted with caution.

  1. [Study on the prevalence of loss to follow-up and risk factors among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Baoshan city, Yunnan province].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongsheng; Zheng, Weibin; Yang, Jiafang; Li, Yanping; Hu, Anyan; Xu, Zhengcui

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of loss to follow-up (PLF) and risk factors among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients from 1989 to 2012 in Baoshan city, Yunnan province. The epidemic and follow-up databases of HIV/AIDS patients by the end of 2012 were downloaded from "the history card downloading site" of HIV/AIDS database in China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention and obtained the related data of patients from 1989 to 2012 who had local residence in Baoshan city. These data included demographic characteristics (genders, age at the time of HIV testing positive, and occupation, marital status, and education levels, et al), transmission routes, and disease staging, antiretroviral therapy (ART), and sources of samples, the first CD4(+)T cell counts, and status of follow-up, et al. Descriptive epidemiological study was used to describe the general characteristics of loss to follow-up. Multivariable Cox regression was used for determining risk factors associated with loss to follow-up. A total of 3 295 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from 1989 to 2012 were included. The accumulative study person-year was 11 416.59 years, 222 HIV/AIDS patients were lost to follow-up, and the PLF was 0.019 4/ person years (py). The highest PLF was 0.052 8/py in 2008, the lowest was 0.006 2/py in 2012. The lost patients included 56.76% (126/222) males and 43.24% (96/222) females, the PLFs were 0.020 4/py, 0.018 3/py, respectively. Baoshan city, other cities in Yunnan province, and other provinces, foreign nationality as the family register reached 53.60% (119/222) , 28.83% (64/222) , and 5.86% (13/222) , 11.71% (26/222) , respectively, and their PLFs were 0.012 5/py, 0.046 3/py, and 0.053 6/py, 0.095 6/py, respectively. Receiving ART and not receiving ART occupied 6.76% (15/222) , 93.24% (207/222) , respectively, and the PLFs were 0.001 9/py, 0.0588/py. AIDS and HIV staging standed at 8.11% (18/222) , 91.89% (204

  2. Predisposing factors for primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Kazuyoshi; Ueta, Takashi; Toyama, Taku; Nagahara, Miyuki

    2013-07-01

    Pathological origin of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) is considered as inflammation of unknown causes; however, specific predisposing factors have not been fully addressed to date. In an institutional setting, background factors of 45 patients with PANDO were compared to those in 67 control subjects. The control subjects were persons with senile cataract, representing the non-pathological general population. The evaluated background factors were inflammatory medical histories (infectious conjunctivitis and allergic conjunctivitis and/or rhinitis), previously reported factors (POAG and topical timolol), and a novel factor proposed in the current study (exposure to swimming pool). Data were extracted from the patients through interview based on a standardized questionnaire as well as from their clinical records. After adjustment for age and gender, a history of infectious conjunctivitis was more common in the PANDO group than in the control group (55.6 % vs 32.8 %, P = 0.0027), and regular attendance to indoor swimming pools was also more common in the PANDO group (33.3 % vs 0 %, P < 0.0001). Furthermore, when age- and gender- matched subjects were selected, a history of conjunctivitis and swimming pool exposure were independently associated with the development of PANDO (P = 0.022 and P < 0.0001 respectively). On the other hand, the frequencies of histories of POAG, topical timolol, and allergic conjunctivitis and/or rhinitis were similar between the two groups. Histories of infectious conjunctivitis and swimming pool exposure could be associated with the development of PANDO, although the pathogenesis of this condition has been considered as inflammation of unknown causes.

  3. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  4. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  5. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, distribution of viral types and risk factors in cervical samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive women attending three human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immune deficiency syndrome reference centres in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barboza, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Maruza, Magda; Tenório, Terezinha; Ximenes, Ricardo AA

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have a greater prevalence of coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is of high oncogenic risk. Indeed, the presence of the virus favours intraepithelial squamous cell lesion progression and may induce cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection, distribution of HPV types and risk factors among HIV-positive patients. Cervical samples from 450 HIV-positive patients were analysed with regard to oncotic cytology, colposcopy and HPV presence and type by means of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The results were analysed by comparing demographic data and data relating to HPV and HIV infection. The prevalence of HPV was 47.5%. Among the HPV-positive samples, 59% included viral types of high oncogenic risk. Multivariate analysis showed an association between HPV infection and the presence of cytological alterations (p = 0.003), age greater than or equal to 35 years (p = 0.002), number of partners greater than three (p = 0.002), CD4+ lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 (p = 0.041) and alcohol abuse (p = 0.004). Although high-risk HPV was present in the majority of the lesions studied, the low frequency of HPV 16 (3.3%), low occurrence of cervical lesions and preserved immunological state in most of the HIV-positive patients were factors that may explain the low occurrence of precancerous cervical lesions in this population. PMID:25317701

  6. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  7. Factors related to fatigue after paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI).

    PubMed

    van Markus-Doornbosch, F; de Kloet, A J; Berger, M A M; Lambregts, S A M; Wolterbeek, R; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the degree of fatigue in children and youth after traumatic and non-traumatic brain injury (TBI and NTBI) and related factors. Follow-up study including patients with a hospital-based diagnosis of acquired brain injury (ABI), aged 4-20 years at onset and their parents. Parents and children (dependent on age) completed the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (PedsQL™ MFS), which measures general fatigue (GF), sleep/rest fatigue (SRF) and cognitive fatigue (CF). Additional assessments included the Child & Family Follow-up Survey (CFFS) and PedsQL™ 4.0 General Core Scales and sociodemographic and disease characteristics. Eighty-eight parents completed the PedsQL™ MFS 24-30 months after diagnosis, with 49/88 patients (56%) completing the child version. The median age of the patients was 11 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 7). There were 69 patients with TBI (16% moderate/severe TBI) and 19 patients with NTBI (16% moderate/severe NTBI). The median parent-reported and child-reported PedsQL™ MFS Total Scale Scores were 76.5 (SD = 16.4) and 78.5 (12.9), respectively (Spearman r = 0.450, p = 0.001). Apart from NTBI, increasing age and a single-parent household were significantly associated with more fatigue according to the parent-reported PedsQL™ MFS Total Score (and/or one or more sub-scale scores). Two years after onset, in particular, the parent-reported fatigue after NTBI was considerable. Moreover, older children and children from a single-parent household were found to have higher fatigue levels.

  8. Risks of acquiring and transmitting sexually transmitted diseases in sexual partner networks.

    PubMed

    Ghani, A C; Garnett, G P

    2000-11-01

    A person's risk for acquiring infection and their role in continued transmission has traditionally been assessed on the basis of individual characteristics. Recently, network studies have attempted to relate individual risks to position in the wider network. To assess the importance of local and global network structures in assessing the risk of acquiring and transmitting infection. An individual-based simulation model was used to construct a variety of potential network structures and track the transmission of infection over time. Logistic and Poisson regression were used to identify which measures of network position influence a person's risk for acquiring and transmitting infection. Measures of local centrality were more important to risk of acquisition, whereas global centrality mattered more to transmission. Continuous snowball sampling, rather than a fixed number of waves, better estimates a person's risks. There is an asymmetry regarding the risk of acquiring and transmitting infection.

  9. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  10. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  11. 12 CFR 955.6 - Risk-based capital requirement for acquired member assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... losses as support for the credit risk of all AMA estimated by the Bank to represent a credit risk that is...) Recalculation of credit enhancement. For risk-based capital purposes, each Bank shall recalculate the estimated... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-based capital requirement for acquired...

  12. Factors related to prognosis of acquired aphasia in children.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, H R; Loonen, M C

    1977-06-01

    In a follow up study of 15 children with acquired aphasia, it was found that the persistent presence of concomitant neurological disorders was important for the final outcome. Prognosis seemed to be related to etiology, EEG disturbances and the severity of comprehension deficit at the onset of aphasia.

  13. A prediction rule for estimating the risk of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, Miquel; Trujillano, Javier; Caro, Sílvia; Menéndez, Rosario; Carratalà, Jordi; Ruiz-González, Agustín; Vilà, Manuel; García, Mercè; Porcel, José Manuel; Torres, Antoni

    2009-08-01

    We endeavored to construct a simple score based entirely on epidemiological and clinical variables that would stratify patients who require hospital admission because of community-acquired pneumonia into groups with a low or high risk of developing bacteremia. Derivation and internal validation cohorts were obtained by retrospective analysis of a database that included 3116 consecutive patients with community-acquired pneumonia from 2 university hospitals. Potential predictive factors were determined by means of a multivariate logistic regression equation applied to a cohort consisting of 60% of the patients. Points were assigned to significant parameters to generate the score. It was then internally validated with the remaining 40% of patients and was externally validated using an independent multicenter cohort of 1369 patients. The overall rates of bacteremia were 12%-16% in the cohorts. The clinical probability estimate of developing bacteremia was based on 6 variables: liver disease, pleuritic pain, tachycardia, tachypnea, systolic hypotension, and absence of prior antibiotic treatment. For the score, 1 point was assigned to each predictive factor. In the derivation cohort, a cutoff score of 2 best identified the risk of bacteremia. In the validation cohorts, rates of bacteremia were <8% for patients with a score 1 (43%-49% of patients), whereas blood culture results were positive in 14%-63% of cases for patients with a score 2. This clinical score, based on readily available and objective variables, provides a useful tool to predict bacteremia. The score has been internally and externally validated and may be useful to guide diagnostic decisions for community-acquired pneumonia.

  14. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  15. Two outbreaks of occupationally acquired histoplasmosis: more than workers at risk.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Gregory D; Austin, Connie; Carr, Mark; Heyer, Diana; Boudreau, Pam; Gilbert, Glynnis; Eimen, Terry; Lindsley, Mark D; Cali, Salvatore; Conover, Craig S; Dworkin, Mark S

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and risk factors for acute histoplasmosis in two outbreaks in Illinois among laborers at a landfill in 2001 and at a bridge reconstruction site in 2003. We performed environmental investigations during both outbreaks and also performed an analytic cohort study among bridge workers. Workers at the landfill during May 2001 and those at the bridge site during August 2003 participated in the study. At the landfill, workers moved topsoil from an area that previously housed a barn; at the bridge, workers observed bat guano on bridge beams. We defined a case by positive immunodiffusion serology, a > or = 4-fold titer rise in complement fixation between acute and convalescent sera, or positive urinary Histoplasma capsulatum (HC) antigen. Relative risks (RR) for disease among bridge workers were calculated using bivariate analysis. Eight of 11 landfill workers (73%) and 6 of 12 bridge workers (50%) were laboratory-confirmed histoplasmosis cases. Three bridge workers had positive urinary HC antigen. At the bridge, seeing or having contact with bats [RR = 7.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-43.0], jack-hammering (RR = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.2-13.3), and waste disposal (RR = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.2-13.3) were the most significant job-related risk factors for acquiring histoplasmosis. Workers performing activities that aerosolized topsoil and dust were at increased risk for acquiring histoplasmosis. Relevance to professional and clinical practice: Employees should wear personal protective equipment and use dust-suppression techniques when working in areas potentially contaminated with bird or bat droppings. Urinary HC antigen testing was important in rapidly identifying disease in the 2003 outbreak.

  16. Two Outbreaks of Occupationally Acquired Histoplasmosis: More than Workers at Risk

    PubMed Central

    Huhn, Gregory D.; Austin, Connie; Carr, Mark; Heyer, Diana; Boudreau, Pam; Gilbert, Glynnis; Eimen, Terry; Lindsley, Mark D.; Cali, Salvatore; Conover, Craig S.; Dworkin, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and risk factors for acute histoplasmosis in two outbreaks in Illinois among laborers at a landfill in 2001 and at a bridge reconstruction site in 2003. Design: We performed environmental investigations during both outbreaks and also performed an analytic cohort study among bridge workers. Participants: Workers at the landfill during May 2001 and those at the bridge site during August 2003 participated in the study. At the landfill, workers moved topsoil from an area that previously housed a barn; at the bridge, workers observed bat guano on bridge beams. Evaluations/Measurements: We defined a case by positive immunodiffusion serology, a ≥ 4-fold titer rise in complement fixation between acute and convalescent sera, or positive urinary Histoplasma capsulatum (HC) antigen. Relative risks (RR) for disease among bridge workers were calculated using bivariate analysis. Results: Eight of 11 landfill workers (73%) and 6 of 12 bridge workers (50%) were laboratory-confirmed histoplasmosis cases. Three bridge workers had positive urinary HC antigen. At the bridge, seeing or having contact with bats [RR = 7.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–43.0], jack-hammering (RR = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.2–13.3), and waste disposal (RR = 4.0; 95% CI, 1.2–13.3) were the most significant job-related risk factors for acquiring histoplasmosis. Conclusions: Workers performing activities that aerosolized topsoil and dust were at increased risk for acquiring histoplasmosis. Relevance to Professional and Clinical Practice: Employees should wear personal protective equipment and use dust-suppression techniques when working in areas potentially contaminated with bird or bat droppings. Urinary HC antigen testing was important in rapidly identifying disease in the 2003 outbreak. PMID:15866767

  17. Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Pak, Mila; Lindseth, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common public health problems in the United States. Approximately 10%-20% of the national adult populations currently carry gallstones, and gallstone prevalence is rising. In addition, nearly 750,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United States; direct and indirect costs of gallbladder surgery are estimated to be $6.5 billion. Cholelithiasis is also strongly associated with gallbladder, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer occurrence. Moreover, the National Institutes of Health estimates that almost 3,000 deaths (0.12% of all deaths) per year are attributed to complications of cholelithiasis and gallbladder disease. Although extensive research has tried to identify risk factors for cholelithiasis, several studies indicate that definitive findings still remain elusive. In this review, predisposing factors for cholelithiasis are identified, the pathophysiology of gallstone disease is described, and nonsurgical preventive options are discussed. Understanding the risk factors for cholelithiasis may not only be useful in assisting nurses to provide resources and education for patients who are diagnosed with gallstones, but also in developing novel preventive measures for the disease.

  18. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  19. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  20. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  1. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  2. Risk factors in school shootings.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  3. Increased risk of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients with comorbid cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Hao; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Ching-Pei; Chai, Woei-Horng; Yeh, Chin-Shui; Kor, Chew-Teng; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chen, Jeremy JW; Lin, Ching-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective COPD patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have worse clinical outcomes, as compared to those without COPD. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common comorbidity for COPD patients. Whether COPD with comorbid CVD will increase the risk of CAP is not well investigated. The incidence and factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD were analyzed. Methods The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed COPD between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. The patients’ characteristics, medical history of CVD, occurrence of CAP, and type of medication were recorded. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to assess the differences in cumulative incidence of CAP. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals in relation to factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD. Results Among 2,440 patients, 475 patients (19.5%) developed CAP during the follow-up period. COPD patients who developed CAP were significantly older, had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second, frequent severe exacerbation and comorbid CVD, as well as received inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)-containing therapy than those without CAP. The cumulative incidence of CAP was higher in COPD patients with CVD compared to those without CVD. Patients who received ICS-containing therapy had significantly increased risk of developing CAP compared to those who did not. Conclusion For patients with COPD, comorbid CVD is an independent risk factor for developing CAP. ICS-containing therapy may increase the risk of CAP among COPD patients. PMID:27980402

  4. Adult Nephrotic Syndrome and Acquired Coagulopathies: Hageman Factor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Branson, Herman E.; Vaziri, N. Dabir; Slater, Lewis M.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of tests of coagulation and fibrinolysis from 20 adult nephrotics prior to the onset of therapy disclosed that 40 percent had low factor XII levels. The mean factor XI was normal. The platelet count and fibrinogen concentration were elevated. The findings of this study on adults are similar to those of Honig and Lindley21 in the nephrotic syndrome of childhood. Subjects with minimal change disease constituted a small (15 percent) but readily segregated subpopulation without evidence of fibrinolysis in association with low factor XII activity. Prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time corresponded in every instance with factor XII activities of ≤30 percent. Lengthening of the one stage prothrombin time was not directly attributable to factor deficiencies. PMID:7120469

  5. Acquiring capital equipment through shared-risk agreements.

    PubMed

    Louie, C

    1997-11-01

    The Medical Center at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) developed a shared-risk relationship with a vendor to manage the costs of infusion therapy. The relationship was centered on upgrading UCSF's aging stock of infusion pumps. Over the course of the 60-month agreement, the vendor agreed to provide the medical center with 750 new infusion pumps, upgrades on related software, a full warranty, full maintenance on the pumps, and assistance with ensuring appropriate utilization. Additional pumps were to be available if required to meet demand. In exchange, UCSF agreed to pay the vendor a fixed rate based on the number of admissions. If the number of pumps required exceeded 775 or fell below 730, the fixed rate could be reassessed. As a result of the agreement, UCSF has needed fewer infusion pumps and infusion sets. A slight increase in operating expenses has been more than offset by avoidance of the 7 to 10 percent interest the medical center would have had to pay if it had borrowed funds to purchase new pumps.

  6. Polymorphisms of the TGF-β1 gene and the risk of acquired aplastic anemia in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hong; Rong, Liucheng; He, Guangsheng; He, Hailong; Lin, Shengyun; Yang, Yan; Xue, Yao; Fang, Yongjun

    2017-03-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a hematological disease characterized by failure of bone marrow hematopoiesis resulting in pancytopenia. While immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of acquired AA, the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is crucial in adjusting the immune system. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms rs1800469 and rs2317130 in susceptibility to acquired AA. Via the approach of SNaPshot, we genotyped rs1800469 and rs2317130 in 101 patients with acquired AA and 165 controls. It derived us to the conclusion that the genotype TT of rs1800469 (C/T) was significantly associated with decreased risk of acquired AA (adjusted OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.18-0.83, P = 0.014). Furthermore, this decreased risk was more pronounced among male patients (adjusted OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.13-0.95, P = 0.038) and SAA/vSAA (severe AA/very severe AA) patients (adjusted OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.12-0.77, P = 0.02) compared with controls in subgroup analysis. However, a significant increased risk was observed in the genotype distributions of rs2317130 for TT genotype (adjusted OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.03-6.19, P = 0.04) compared with the CC genotype among the SAA/vSAA patients and controls in the severity stratification analysis. Our results indicated that TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms might be involved in the munity of acquired AA in a Chinese population. This initial analysis provides valuable clues for further study of TGF-β1 pathway genes in acquired AA.

  7. Blood donors at high risk of transmitting the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Contreras, M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A; Mochnaty, P Z

    1985-03-09

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurs most commonly in homosexual men. This group carries the greatest risk of transmitting AIDS by blood transfusion. Both promiscuous and nonpromiscuous male homosexuals should refrain from giving blood. A leaflet stating this advice was prepared by the Department of Health and Social Security, United Kingdom. In July 1984 a questionnaire was given to all donors attending a blood donor clinic in the west end of London, England. 53% were male. Donors were given a leaflet on AIDS and a questionnaire to complete in private. Those who considered themselves to be in a high risk group were asked to designate their blood for research purposes only. Serum samples from donors who confirmed that they were in the high risk category were tested for antihepatitis B core antigen and anti-human T lymphotropic virus type III (anti-HTLV-III) in addition to the routine screening of donors for hepatitis B surface antigen and syphilis. All high risk donors were men. Homosexuality was the only high risk factor. Of 5000 questionnaires administered between July and October, 614 were not completed or had ambiguous answers. 38 donors who completed the questionnaire beonged to a high risk group. Of these, 7 were positive for antihepatitis B core antigen; none were positive for anti-HTLV-III, T pallidum hemagglatination, or hepatits B surface antigen. Although the homosexual donors had a much lower incidence of sexually transmitted disease than those attending special clinics, this should not encourage complacency. All possible measures must be taken to prevent homosexuals from donating blood.

  8. Histoplasmosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a study of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Couppié, Pierre; Sobesky, Milko; Aznar, Christine; Bichat, Saravane; Clyti, Emmanuel; Bissuel, François; El Guedj, Myriam; Alvarez, Fernand; Demar, Magali; Louvel, Dominique; Pradinaud, Roger; Carme, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to identify prognostic factors for AIDS-associated disseminated histoplasmosis. In a multivariate analysis, we found that dyspnea, a platelet count of <100,000 platelets/mm3, and lactate dehydrogenase levels of >2 times the upper limit of the normal range were significantly independently associated with the death of the patient during the first 30 days of antifungal treatment.

  9. Type 2 diabetes: prevalence and relevance of genetic and acquired factors for its prediction.

    PubMed

    Rathmann, Wolfgang; Scheidt-Nave, Christa; Roden, Michael; Herder, Christian

    2013-05-01

    The epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in Germany is of major societal interest, as is the question of the predictive value of genetic and acquired risk factors. We present clinically relevant aspects of these topics on the basis of a selective review of pertinent literature retrieved by a PubMed search that centered on population-based studies. The German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (Studie zur Gesundheit Erwachsener in Deutschland [DEGS1], 2008-2011) revealed that diabetes was diagnosed in 7.2% of the population aged 18 to 79 years (women 7.4%, men 7.0%). These figures are two percentage points higher than those found in the preceding national survey (1998). The percentage of cases that were not captured by these surveys is estimated at 2% to 7% depending on the method. Independently of personal factors (the individual's life style), it seems that living in a disadvantaged region characterized by high unemployment, air pollution, and poor infrastructure raises the risk of diabetes. Moreover, type 2 diabetes has a substantial hereditary component. More than 60 genetic regions have been identified to date that affect the risk of type 2 diabetes, yet all of them together account for only 10% to 15% of the genetic background of the disease. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Germany has risen in recent years. The discovery of new genetic variants that confer a higher risk of developing the disease has improved our understanding of insulin secretion in diabetes pathogenesis rather than the prediction of individual diabetes risk ("personalized medicine").

  10. Injury Region and Risk of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia Among Pediatric Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Gretchen J; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Nowak, Jeffrey; Ortega, Henry W

    2017-03-01

    To describe the relationship between injury region and risk of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in pediatric trauma patients. Analyses included patients <19 years of age from the National Trauma Data Bank, during 2009-2011. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between injury region and odds of developing HAP stratified by age group. A total of 71 377 patients were eligible for analysis, and 1818 patients developed pneumonia. In adjusted regression models both younger (11-15 years) and older (16-18 years) adolescents with multisite injuries including the head and neck had higher odds of developing HAP compared with adolescents with isolated head and neck injuries (odds ratio [OR] = 2.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-3.10; OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.14-1.89, respectively), and younger adolescents with multisite injuries not involving the head and neck also had higher odds of developing HAP (OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.08-3.60). We found no significant association between injury region and risk of HAP in children <11 years of age. Younger and older adolescents with firearm (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.00-3.42; OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.88, respectively) or pulmonary (OR = 3.78, 95% CI 1.26-11.3; OR = 2.56, 95% CI 1.01-6.51, respectively) injuries had higher odds of developing HAP compared with those with motor vehicle collision injuries. Adolescent trauma patients with multisite injuries including the head and neck have a higher risk of developing HAP compared with those with isolated head and neck injuries. We identified several risk factors that can be used to inform future research focused on identifying subgroups at high risk for the development of HAP. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  12. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore; Matheny, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Risk factors for surgical infections.

    PubMed

    Dominioni, Lorenzo; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Rovera, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Many risk factors for postoperative infections have been identified that can be used individually or in combination as scoring indices. Infection risk scores can be applied in clinical practice to identify high-risk surgical patients, to indicate the need to implement risk-reduction strategies, and to stratify risk for comparison of outcome among different patient series. In the hierarchy of patient-related risk factors, serum albumin concentration and advanced age rank at the top of the list. Among the treatment-related factors, the quality of the surgical technique is a most important determinant, although most surgical site infections are attributable to patient-related risk factors rather than to flawed surgical care. Scoring systems can identify the patients at highest risk, thus prompting the implementation of therapy to improve modifiable conditions, but most clinicians outside the academic and research setting do not use them. Risk assessment also can be performed by expert clinical judgment. Discussion with the patient and informed consent are essential. Carefully collected scores of patient risk factors may be valuable to document the relations between the risk and the outcome of surgery. Ideally, each institution should select a validated scoring system to audit postoperative infectious morbidity and surgical performance in the various specialties.

  14. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... a higher risk. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease, and some types of arthritis. Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy. Both during and in the weeks right after ...

  15. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  16. Environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  17. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  18. Is UV-exposure acquired at work the most important risk factor for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma? Results of the population-based case-control study FB-181.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Haufe, E; Trautmann, F; Schulze, H-J; Elsner, P; Drexler, H; Bauer, A; Letzel, S; John, S M; Fartasch, M; Brüning, T; Seidler, A; Dugas-Breit, S; Gina, M; Weistenhöfer, W; Bachmann, K; Bruhn, I; Lang, B M; Bonness, S; Allam, J P; Grobe, W; Stange, T; Westerhausen, S; Knuschke, P; Wittlich, M; Diepgen, T L; Bieber, Thomas; Brans, Richard; Brecht, Beate; Grabbe, Stephan; Küster, Denise; Ruppert, Linda; Stephan, Victoria; Thielitz, Anja; Zimmermann, Elisabeth

    2017-08-27

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is among the most frequent types of cancer constituting a significant public health burden. Prevention strategies focus on limiting UV-exposure during leisure time. However, the relative impact of occupational and non-occupational UV-exposure for SCC occurrence is unclear. To investigate the association between occupational and non-occupational UV-exposure with SCC in a multicenter population-based case-control study hypothesizing that high occupational UV-exposure increases the risk for SCC. Consecutive patients with incident SCC (n=632) were recruited from a German national dermatology network. Population-based controls (n=996) without history of skin cancer were recruited from corresponding residents' registration offices and propensity score matched to cases. Lifetime UV-exposure, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were assessed by trained physicians. Occupational and non-occupational UV-exposure dosages were estimated by blinded investigators using established reference values. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95%-confidence intervals (95%-CI) were assessed using conditional logistic regression adjusting for relevant confounders. Total solar UV-exposure was significantly associated with an increased SCC. The OR (95%-CI) for high (>90(th) percentile) vs. low (<40(th) percentile) and moderate (40(th) to 60(th) percentile) occupational UV-exposure was 1.95 (1.19-3.18) and 2.44 (1.47-4.06) for SCC. Adjusting for occupational UV-exposure non-occupational UV-exposure was not significantly related to SCC incidence. Dose-response relationships were observed for occupational but not for non-occupational solar UV-exposure. Solar occupational UV-exposure is a major determinant of incident SCC. Our findings indicate that prevention strategies should be further expanded to the occupational setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  20. Biological risk factors for deep vein trombosis.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Mira, Yolanda; Martínez, Marcial; Villa, Piedad; Ferrando, Fernando; Estellés, Amparo; Corella, Dolores; Aznar, Justo

    2002-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states due either to inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors are only present in approximately half of cases of DVT, but the causes in the other half, remain unknown. The importance of biological risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypofibrinolysis and hemorheological alterations in the pathogenesis of DVT has not been well established. In order to ascertain whether the above mentioned biological factors are associated with DVT and could constitute independent risk factors, we carried out a case-control study in 109 first DVT patients in whom inherited or acquired thrombophilic risk factors had been ruled out and 121 healthy controls age (42+/-15 years) and sex matched. From all the biological variables analyzed (cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation, hematocrit, plasma viscosity and PAI-1) only fibrinogen concentration reached a statistically significant difference on the comparison of means (290+/-73 mg/dl in cases vs 268+/-58 mg/dl in controls, p<0.05). After this continuous variables were dichotomized according to our reference values, the percentage of cases with cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl, hematocrit >45% and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl was higher in cases than in controls: 38% vs 22%; p<0.01; 43% vs 27%; p<0.05; 36% vs 23%; p<0.05, respectively. The percentage of cases with PAI-1 values >30 ng/ml, 37% vs 25% was borderline significant; p=0.055. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl constitute independent predictors of venous thrombotic risk. The adjusted OR's were 2.03 (95% CI; 1.12-3.70) for cholesterolemia and 1.94 (95% CI; 1.07-3.55) for fibrinogen. When these two variables combined DVT risk rose about fourfold (3.96; p<0.05). Our results suggest that hypercholesterolemia and hyperfibrinogenemia should be added to the list of known DVT risk factors and we recommend adopting measures to decrease these variables in the population with a

  1. Factors associated with acquired Anti IFN- γ autoantibody in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Phoompoung, Pakpoom; Ankasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pithukpakorn, Manop; Foongladda, Suporn; Umrod, Pinklow; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2017-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection in patients who were previously healthy is now well recognized to be associated with an acquired autoantibody to Interferon gamma (Anti IFN- γ autoantibody). However, the risk factors of this syndrome remain unknown. We performed an unmatched case control study among patients with NTM diseases who were diagnosed and treated at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Anti-IFN autoantibody was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Cases were patients with NTM diseases and detectable anti IFN- γ autoantibody. Controls were randomly selected from those with undetectable anti IFN- γ autoantibody. Data from both groups including demographic data, clinical presentation, laboratory results, other risk factors and HLA genotypes were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors for this syndrome. 70 cases (mean age 50 ± 11 years) and 70 controls (mean age 58 ± 18 years) were enrolled into the study. Mycobacterial abscessus was the most common NTM pathogen found in both groups (72.9% in cases and 41.4% in controls respectively). However, disseminated NTM disease was significantly more common in cases (92.9%) than in the controls (14.3%, p<0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that previous OIs (adjusted OR14.87, 95% CI 2.36-93.86), birthplace outside Central region (adjusted OR 19.19, 95% CI 3.86-95.35), lack of comorbidities lead to immunosuppression, such as HIV infection or diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR 23.68, 95% CI 4.01-139.94), and presence of HLA DRB1*15/16 (adjusted OR 153.28, 95% CI 16.87-139.88) were independent factors associated with this syndrome. Patients with NTM disease associated with anti IFN- γ autoantibody are almost always previously healthy and HIV negative. Most of these patients presented with disseminated NTM disease with generalized lymphadenitis and often with reactive skin

  2. Acquired factor VIII deficiency after consuming the dried gallbladder of a cobra, Naja naja

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Won Sik; Lee, Young Jin; Jun, Hyun Soo; Seo, Su-Kil

    2010-01-01

    Acquired factor VIII deficiency is very rare, often fatal. It is associated with pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, malignancy, and drugs, although no underlying cause is found in 50%. A 49-year-old male was referred with right shoulder bruising. The coagulation test showed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. The factor VIII level was less than 1%, and the factor VIII inhibitor antibody titer was 246 Bethesda units/mL. The findings were compatible with acquired factor VIII deficiency. He had consumed the dried gallbladder of a cobra, Naja naja, for two weeks, it contained venom. After the initial treatment with factor VIII, he did not take supplemental coagulation factor VIII. The patient was readmitted with left forearm swelling. He lost consciousness suddenly and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed a subdural hematoma. Despite administering recombinant factor VII, his bleeding was not controlled and he died. PMID:21120211

  3. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... previous history of clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and livedo reticularis, a mottled purplish discoloration of the skin. “Risk factors are cumulative,” Dr. Kittner adds. “Reducing even one ...

  4. What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... those who smoke. Personal or Family History of Lung Cancer If you are a lung cancer survivor, there ...

  5. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk.

  6. [Perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martinez, A M; Martínez-Sanchez, C; Pérez-Segura, J

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk perception on several factors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing an educational intervention based on detected needs. 405 women between 12 and 44 years were interviewed at home. 62.2% perceived the risk of pregnancy at 17 years and younger; 78.8% the risk of pregnancy at 35 years and older; 76.6% the risk of parity of 5 and higher; and 55.1% the risk of birth interval of 2 years and less. 60.5% recognized family history of birth defects, 80.2% age 35 years and older, and 84.4% rubella during pregnancy, as risk factors for newborns with congenital malformations. 27.7% identified history of a low birth weight and 61.0% birth interval of 1 year and less, as risk factors for low birth weight. The majority perceived the risk of tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy, diseases with no treatment and deficient nutrition. There was an inconsistent influence of social and obstetric variables on risk perception. No linear correlation was detected. Health educators should recognize differences on knowledge and behavior of future receptors before an educational intervention starts.

  7. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  8. Predictive and prognostic factors in patients with blood-culture-positive community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Rosanel; Liapikou, Adamantia; Cilloniz, Catia; Gabarrus, Albert; Marco, Francesc; Sellares, Jacobo; Polverino, Eva; Garau, Javier; Ferrer, Miquel; Musher, Daniel M; Torres, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    In patients with pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the risk factors for bacteraemia and its impact on outcomes are not fully elucidated. We aimed to compare characteristics of patients with blood-culture-positive versus blood-culture-negative pneumococcal CAP, and to characterise bacteraemic serotypes.We describe a prospective, observational study on nonimmunocompromised patients with pneumococcal CAP, from 1996 to 2013. We define severe pneumonia according to American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.Of a total of 917 patients with pneumococcal CAP, 362 had blood-culture-positive pneumococcal pneumonia (BCPPP; 39%). High C-reactive protein (CRP) (≥20 mg·dL(-1)) (odds ratio (OR) 2.36, 95% CI 1.45-3.85), pleural effusion (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.13-3.65) and multilobar involvement (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02-2.79) were independently associated with bacteraemic CAP, while nursing home resident (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01-1.00) was found as a protective factor. Despite the clinical differences, BCPPP showed similar outcomes to blood-culture-negative pneumococcal pneumonia (BCNPP). 14% of the serotypes (period 2006-2013) causing bacteraemia are included in pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PVC7, 74% in pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PVC13 and 83% in pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine PPSV23.Pleural effusion, a high level of CRP and multilobar involvement predicted an increased risk of BCPPP. Although BCPPP patients were more severely ill at admission, mortality was not significantly greater than in BCNPP patients. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  9. [Prognostic factors in community acquired pneumonia. Prospective multicenter study in internal medical departments].

    PubMed

    Apolinario Hidalgo, R; Suárez Cabrera, M; Geijo Martínez, M P; Bernabéu-Wittel, M; Falguera Sacrest, M; Limiñana Cañal, J M

    2007-10-01

    the aims of the present study were to evaluate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients suffering from community-acquired pneumonia attended in the Internal Medical Departments of several Spanish institutions and to analyze those prognostic factors predicting thirty-day mortality in such patients. Past medical history, symptoms and signs, radiological pattern and blood parameters including albumin and C Reactive Protein, were recorded for each patient. Time from admission to starting antibiotics (in hours) and follow-up (in days) were also recorded. Patients were stratified by the Pneumonia Severity Index in five risk classes. 389 patients were included in the study, most of them in Fine categories III to V. Mortality rate for all patients was 12.1% (48 patients), increasing up to 40% in Fine Class V. Neither age, sex nor time from admission to the start of antibiotic treatment predicted survival rates. Plasmatic levels of PCR or microbiologic diagnosis were not related to clinical outcome. In the Cox regression analysis, oriented patients (OR 0.138, IC95% 0.055-0.324), and those with normal albuminemia (OR 0.207, IC95% 0.103-0.417) showed better survival rates. On the contrary, those with active carcinoma (OR 3.2, IC95% 1.181-8.947) significantly showed a reduced life expectancy. Besides the fully accepted Fine scale criteria, albumin measurements should be included in routine evaluation in order to improve patient s prognostic classification.

  10. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  11. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  12. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Blánaid M; Yin, Hui; Bladou, Franck; Ernst, Pierre; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Androgens have been shown to influence both the immune system and lung tissue, raising the hypothesis that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may increase the risk of pneumonia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in patients with prostate cancer. This was a population-based cohort study using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository. The cohort consisted of 20 310 men newly diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 2015. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia associated with current and past use of ADT compared with non-use. During a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, there were 621 incident hospitalisations for community-acquired pneumonia (incidence rate: 7.2/1000 person-years). Current ADT use was associated with an 81% increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (12.1 vs 3.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively; HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.23). The association was observed within the first six months of use (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.42) and remained elevated with increasing durations of use (≥25 months; HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.30). In contrast, past ADT use was not associated with an increased risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.60). The use of ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in men with prostate cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  14. Acquired factor V inhibitor after exposure to topical human thrombin related to an otorhinolaryngological procedure.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, K; Levine, R

    2015-10-01

    Acquired factor V (FV) inhibitors occur rarely and classically develop after exposure to bovine thrombin. The clinical presentation is variable, ranging from asymptomatic with incidental laboratory abnormalities to significant bleeding. With the development of human-derived thrombin agents, bovine thrombin is less frequently used. We report a case of an acquired FV inhibitor that developed in a patient after exposure to human thrombin used as a hemostatic agent during an otorhinolaryngology surgical procedure. Our review of the literature revealed only one prior reported case of FV inhibitor after exposure to human thrombin. Hematologists and surgeons should be aware of this rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication in the postprocedural setting.

  15. Juvenile respiratory papillomatosis: risk factors for severity.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Caroline; Lapointe, Annie; Coutlée, François; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Roger, Michel; Trottier, Helen

    2013-08-01

    Juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is caused mainly by human papillomavirus genotypes 6 or 11, acquired at birth or during pregnancy from an infected mother. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is characterized by recurring warts growing most commonly in the larynx. Multiple surgical procedures and the risk of airway obstruction contribute to the devastating impact of this disease. Some children will go into remission after a few surgeries whereas others will require repeated interventions over several years. Further understanding of the risk factors associated with severity may contribute to tailored treatments. A retrospective study of cases diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2008 was conducted to study determinants of severe forms of juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Demographic and clinical variables were abstracted from children's medical charts and mothers' delivery charts. Viral factors (HPV genotyping and viral load) were studied from archived biopsies. Specific HLA class II alleles and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genes were tested from saliva samples. Logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for severity. Overall, 31 pediatric cases of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis were identified. The only significant factor associated with severe forms of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis was the maternal history of condylomas during pregnancy (OR: 12.05 [P=0.05]). The analysis failed to identify risk factors that could be used clinically to identify recurrent respiratory papillomatosis cases likely to take a severe course. Although too early to determine, vaccination against the HPV types involved most commonly in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis may provide the best hope to prevent severe forms of this disease.

  16. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures.

  17. Risk factors for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) originates, in most of the cases (95 %), from a full trisomy of chromosome 21. The remaining cases are due to either mosaicism for chromosome 21 or the inheritance of a structural rearrangement leading to partial trisomy of the majority of its content. Full trisomy 21 and mosaicism are not inherited, but originate from errors in cell divisions during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. In addition, full trisomy for chromosome 21 should be further divided into cases of maternal origin, the majority, and cases of paternal origin, less than 10 %. Among cases of maternal origin, a further stratification should be performed into errors that have occurred or originated during the first meiotic division in the maternal grandmother's body and errors that occurred later in life during the second maternal meiotic division. This complex scenario suggests that our understanding of the risk factors for trisomy 21 should take into account the above stratification as it reflects different individuals and generations in which the first error has occurred. Unfortunately, most of the available literature is focused on maternal risk factors, and the only certain risk factors for the birth of a child with DS are advanced maternal age at conception and recombination errors, even though the molecular mechanisms leading to chromosome 21 nondisjunction are still a matter of debate. This article critically reviews the hypotheses and the risk factors which have been suggested to contribute to the birth of a child with DS, including folate metabolism, dietary, lifestyle, environmental, occupational, genetic and epigenetic factors, with focus on maternal and paternal risk factors, and taking into account the possible contribution of the maternal grandmother and that of the developing trisomic embryo, in a complex scenario depicting the birth of a child with DS as the result of complex gene-environment interactions and selection processes involving different

  18. Hospital-acquired infection in public hospital buildings in the Philippines: Is the type of ventilation increasing the risk?

    PubMed

    Vergeire-Dalmacion, Godofreda Ruiz; Itable, Jill Rafols; Baja, Emmanuel Saporna

    2016-11-24

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, especially in developing countries. However, limited information is available about the risk of HAIs in naturally ventilated wards (NVWs) and mechanically ventilated intensive care units (MVICUs) of public hospitals in the Philippines. We aimed to assess the association between HAIs and type of ventilation in an urban tertiary care hospital in the Philippines. A cross-sectional point-prevalence survey of infections was done in NVWs and MVICUs of a tertiary care hospital in December 2013. Multivariate analyses were done to examine the associations between HAIs and type of ventilation and other risk factors. Of the 224 patients surveyed, 63 (28%) patients had 69 HAIs. Pneumonia was the most common HAI (35%). Wards near areas with high vehicular activity had more respiratory HAI cases. Being immunocompromised is a risk factor for HAI for pediatric and adult patients. Among pediatric patients, staying in MVICUs had a lower risk for HAIs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10-1.08) compared to staying in NVWs. For adult patients, a higher risk for HAIs (AOR: 2.41; 95% CI: 0.29-18.20) was observed in MVICUs compared to NVWs. Type of ventilation is not a risk factor for HAIs. Patients who are immunocompromised may be at a higher risk for HAI. Indoor air pollution, proximity to congested main thoroughfare, and increased human foot traffic may contribute to the susceptibility of patients to HAIs. Hospital layout should be considered in infection control.

  19. Non-dietary environmental risk factors in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrís-i-Tortajada, J; Berbel-Tornero, O; Garcia-i-Castell, J; López-Andreu, J.A.; Sobrino-Najul, E; Ortega-García, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim is to update and disclose the main environmental risk factors, excluding dietary factors, involved in the etiopathology of prostate cancer. Materials and methods Bibliographic review of the last 25 years of non-dietary environmental risk factors associated with prostate cancer between 1985 and 2010, obtained from MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Environmental Risk Factors/Tobacco/Infectious-Inflammatory Factors/Pesticides/Vasectomy/Occupational Exposures/ Chemoprevention Agents/Radiation and Prostate Cancer. Results While some non-dietary environmental risk factors increase the risk of acquiring the disease, others decrease it. Of the former, it is worth mentioning exposal to tobacco smoke, chronic infectious-inflammatory prostatic processes and occupational exposure to cadmium, herbicides and pesticides. The first factors that reduce the risk are the use of chemopreventive drugs (Finasterida, Dutasteride) and exposure to ultraviolet solar radiation. With the current data, a vasectomy does not influence the risk of developing the disease. Conclusions The slow process of prostate carcinogenesis is the final result of the interaction of constitutional risk and environmental factors. Non-dietary environmental factors play an important role in the etiopathology of this disease. To appropriately assess the risk factors, extensive case studies that include all the possible variables must be analyzed. PMID:21439685

  20. Universal precautions and mortuary practitioners: influence on practices and risk of occupationally acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Beck-Sagué, C M; Jarvis, W R; Fruehling, J A; Ott, C E; Higgins, M T; Bates, F L

    1991-08-01

    Embalming, the most common funeral practice in the United States, may expose the embalmer to infectious diseases and blood. We surveyed the 860 members of the National Selected Morticians in 1988 to estimate the incidence of self-reported occupational contact with blood and infectious disease, assess morticians' knowledge of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), determine their adherence to universal precautions, and identify predictors of practices designed to reduce risk of occupational exposure to infections. Of 539 (63%) respondents, 212 (39%) reported needle-stick injuries in the past 12 months, and 15 (3%) reported percutaneous exposures to the blood of a decedent with AIDS. Those rating the risk of occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection as very high or high (194/539 [36%]) were more likely to decline funerals of decedents with antemortem diagnosis of AIDS (59/194 [30%]) and/or to charge more for such funerals (133/194 [69%]) than those who rated the risk as low to moderate (31/345 [9%], 174/135 [51%]).

  1. Prediction of fracture risk. II: Other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1996-12-01

    Many osteoporotic fractures are probably preventable-by definition, prevention requires identification of those at risk prior to fracture. There is a continuum in fracture risk and a very wide range in risk among individuals. Bone density, previous fractures, and the frequency and types of falls are important risk factors for fractures. There are also many other risk factors for bone loss, falls, and fractures. People with multiple risk factors are at greater risk than those with either a single risk factor or none. Identification of risk factors can help when planning interventions. For example, dietary deficiencies are amenable to dietary modification or supplementation; however, the effects of many risk factors have not been quantified separately, making it difficult to determine the importance. In addition, it is not possible to accurately predict current bone density and fracture risk from risk factors for bone loss; bone density should always be measured directly.

  2. The acquired preparedness risk model applied to smoking in 5th grade children.

    PubMed

    Combs, Jessica L; Spillane, Nichea S; Caudill, Leann; Stark, Brittany; Smith, Gregory T

    2012-03-01

    The very early onset of smoking predicts numerous health problems. The authors conducted the first test of one risk model for elementary school age smoking, known as the acquired preparedness (AP) model of risk, in a cross-sectional sample of 309 5th grade children. The model posits that (a) impulsivity-related personality traits contribute to risk for a variety of risky, maladaptive behaviors; (b) smoking expectancies confer risk only for smoking; and (c) the personality traits contribute to the formation of high risk expectancies for reinforcement from smoking, which in turn increases the likelihood of early onset smoking. The model was supported: the high-risk personality traits distinguished children engaging in any risky, maladaptive behavior from other children, and the smoking expectancies differentiated smokers from all other children. The relationship between personality tendencies to act rashly when experiencing intense positive or negative emotions and smoker status was partially mediated by expectancies for reinforcement from smoking. This model should be investigated longitudinally.

  3. [Risk factors associated to preclampsia].

    PubMed

    López-Carbajal, Mario Joaquín; Manríquez-Moreno, María Esther; Gálvez-Camargo, Daniela; Ramírez-Jiménez, Evelia

    2012-01-01

    preeclampsia constitutes one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim was to identify the risk factors associated to the developmental of preeclampsia mild-moderate and severe, as well as the force of association of these factors in a hospital of second-level medical care. study of cases and controls, a relation 1:1, in women withdrawn of the Service of Gynecology and Obstetrics during 2004 to 2007. Pregnant women with more than 20 weeks gestation were included. In the cases group we included patients with diagnosis of preeclampsia mild-moderate or severe (corroborated clinical and laboratory). In the controls group that had a normal childbirth without pathology during the pregnancy. 42 cases and 42 controls. The average age was of 27 years. The associated risk factors were overweight, obesity, irregular prenatal control, short or long intergenesic period, history of caesarean or preeclampsia in previous pregnancies. the knowledge of the risk factors will allow the accomplishment of preventive measures and decrease the fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia.

  4. [Risk factors and protective factors of the insanities].

    PubMed

    Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The Alzheimer's disease (AD) is multifactorial. How to explain this group of very heterogeneous factors? Many of them can be considered as biopsychosocial risk factors. In other words, the risk factors, in link with the physiological functioning and a physiopathology, are difficultly dissociable of contingencies of psychological and/or social nature. The vital lead could be the stress bound to these variables, be it biological or psychosocial. It remains to ask the question of the preventive efficiency of treatments to relieve the impact of the traumatizing events of life that entail a depressive state or a state of posttraumatic stress. The hippocamp has to be the object of a quite particular attention. AD is a disease of the adaptation. This integrative model combines three vulnerabilities: a genetic vulnerability which would be there to dictate the type of lesions, their localization and the age of occurence; a psychobiographic vulnerability corresponding to a personality with inadequate mechanisms of defence, precarious adaptability in front of the adversity, weak impact strength and biography built on events of life during childhood, then during the grown-up life of traumatic nature, with a psychosocial environment insufficiently auxiliary; a neuroendocrinologic vulnerability which would base on a deregulation of the corticotrope axis, acquired during its infantile maturation, hampered by too premature stress. It would lead to a bad biological adaptability in stress later, at the origin of the observable lesions in the insanities.

  5. Suicide Risk Among BDSM Practitioners: The Role of Acquired Capability for Suicide.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah L; Roush, Jared F; Mitchell, Sean M; Cukrowicz, Kelly C

    2017-03-10

    Bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, and sadomasochism (BDSM) practitioners are at increased risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. We hypothesized the association between (a) lifetime frequency of BDSM-related sexual behaviors and (b) BDSM identification and suicide attempt status would be mediated by acquired capability components (i.e., fearlessness about death and pain tolerance). Gender differences were examined. Participants were 576 BDSM practitioners (meanage = 28.71; 66.7% male) recruited from online BDSM-related groups, cross-sectionally. Among males, the total indirect effect of acquired capability components in the relation between BDSM-related sexual behaviors and suicide attempt status was significant. The specific indirect effect of perceived pain tolerance in the relation between both BDSM-related sexual behaviors and BDSM identification and suicide attempt status was significant. There were no significant effects for females. Additionally, 12% reported a suicide attempt history. Among males, BDSM-related sexual behaviors and BDSM identification were associated with increased acquired capability components, which were positively associated with suicide attempt status. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neighborhood risk factors for obesity.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Russ P

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to explore neighborhood environmental factors associated with obesity in a sample of adults living in a major U.S. metropolitan area. This was a multi-level study combining data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System with data from the U.S. Census. A total of 15,358 subjects living in 327 zip code tabulation areas were surveyed between 1998 and 2002. The outcome was obesity (BMI >30), and independent variables assessed included individual level variables (age, education, income, smoking status, sex, black race, and Hispanic ethnicity), and zip code level variables (percentage black, percentage Hispanic, percentage with more than a high school education, retail density, establishment density, employment density, population density, the presence of a supermarket, intersection density, median household income, and density of fast food outlets). After controlling for individual level factors, median household income [relative risk (RR) = 0.992; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.990, 0.994], population density (RR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.972, 0.990), employment density (RR = 1.004; 95% CI = 1.001, 1.009), establishment density (RR = 0.981 95% CI = 0.964, 0.999), and the presence of a supermarket (RR = 0.893; 95% CI = 0.815, 0.978) were associated with obesity risk. Fast food establishment density was poorly associated with obesity risk. Where one lives may affect obesity status. Given the influence of the presence of a supermarket on obesity risk, efforts to address food access might be a priority for reducing obesity.

  7. Risk factors of striae gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Kasielska-Trojan, A; Sobczak, M; Antoszewski, B

    2015-04-01

    Stretch marks are a common skin disorder. Pregnancy-related lesions are defined as striae gravidarum. The root cause of striae formation remains unknown. The aim of this paper was to identify the risk factors associated with striae gravidarum (SG) development. The study was conducted at Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic and Obstetrics Outpatient Department among 299 Caucasian women maximum 6 months after the delivery, regardless of whether they were primiparas or multiparas. Among the women participating in the study, 71.2% (213 of 299) developed striae gravidarum at least in one site. Logistic regression analysis showed that four of the analysed factors were independent predictors of striae gravidarum occurrence: family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, the lack of chronic diseases and birthweight (P < 0.0001). It has been found that the presence of striae distensae on the breasts increases the risk of SG development (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P = 0.0008), whereas the presence of these lesions on the thighs decreases the risk (23% vs. 77%, P = 0.0076). In this study, we presented a model that can help to predict the risk of SG formation, including family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, birthweight and chronic diseases. Moreover, women with stretch marks on their breasts should know that the risk of SG development is significantly higher, whereas lesions on the thighs do not increase such a risk. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  8. The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma among individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Shiels, Meredith S; McGlynn, Katherine A; Engels, Eric A

    2012-12-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a concern among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors analyzed population-based registry linkage data from the US HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study (1980-2009) to examine the risk and trends of HCC among individuals with AIDS. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to measure HCC risk relative to the general population, and Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) comparing incidence among individuals with AIDS. People with AIDS were categorized according to their HIV risk group into high and low hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence groups based on their HIV transmission risk category. Among 615,150 individuals with AIDS, HCC risk was elevated almost 4 times compared with the risk in the general population (N = 366; SIR, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.5-4.3). Although HCC incidence increased steadily across calendar periods (P(trend) < .0001; adjusted for sex and age), the excess risk in individuals with AIDS compared with the general population remained somewhat constant (SIRs range, 3.5-3.9) between the monotherapy/dual therapy era (1990-1995) and the recent highly active antiretroviral therapy era (2001-2009). In a multivariate model adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, and attained calendar period, HCC incidence increased with advancing age (P(trend) < .0001) and was associated with HIV risk groups with a known higher prevalence of HCV (adjusted RR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-2.8). HCC incidence in individuals with AIDS has increased over time despite improved HIV treatment regimens, likely reflecting prolonged survival with chronic liver disease. The high incidence in older adults suggests that this cancer will increase in importance with aging of the HIV-infected population. Published 2012 American Cancer Society.

  9. The Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Among Individuals With Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Shiels, Meredith S.; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Engels, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a concern among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). METHODS The authors analyzed population-based registry linkage data from the US HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study (1980–2009) to examine the risk and trends of HCC among individuals with AIDS. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to measure HCC risk relative to the general population, and Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) comparing incidence among individuals with AIDS. People with AIDS were categorized according to their HIV risk group into high and low hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence groups based on their HIV transmission risk category. RESULTS Among 615,150 individuals with AIDS, HCC risk was elevated almost 4 times compared with the risk in the general population (N = 366; SIR, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.5–4.3). Although HCC incidence increased steadily across calendar periods (Ptrend < .0001; adjusted for sex and age), the excess risk in individuals with AIDS compared with the general population remained somewhat constant (SIRs range, 3.5–3.9) between the monotherapy/dual therapy era (1990–1995) and the recent highly active antiretroviral therapy era (2001–2009). In a multivariate model adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, and attained calendar period, HCC incidence increased with advancing age (Ptrend < .0001) and was associated with HIV risk groups with a known higher prevalence of HCV (adjusted RR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–2.8). CONCLUSIONS HCC incidence in individuals with AIDS has increased over time despite improved HIV treatment regimens, likely reflecting prolonged survival with chronic liver disease. The high incidence in older adults suggests that this cancer will increase in importance with aging of the HIV-infected population. PMID:22736272

  10. Hospital acquired pneumonia with high-risk bacteria is associated with increased pulmonary matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Bernhard; Liebau, Cornelia; Kurowski, Volkhard; Droemann, Daniel; Dalhoff, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Background Neutrophil products like matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), involved in bacterial defence mechanisms, possibly induce lung damage and are elevated locally during hospital- acquired pneumonia (HAP). In HAP the virulence of bacterial species is known to be different. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of high-risk bacteria like S. aureus and pseudomonas species on pulmonary MMPconcentration in human pneumonia. Methods In 37 patients with HAP and 16 controls, MMP-8, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP) were analysed by ELISA and MMP-9 activity using zymography in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Results MMP-9 activity in mini-BAL was increased in HAP patients versus controls (149 ± 41 vs. 34 ± 11, p < 0.0001). In subgroup analysis, the highest MMP concentrations and activity were seen in patients with high-risk bacteria: patients with high-risk bacteria MMP-9 1168 ± 266 vs. patients with low-risk bacteria 224 ± 119 ng/ml p < 0.0001, MMP-9 gelatinolytic activity 325 ± 106 vs. 67 ± 14, p < 0.0002. In addition, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 concentration was associated with the state of ventilation and systemic inflammatory marker like CRP. Conclusion Pulmonary MMP concentrations and MMP activity are elevated in patients with HAP. This effect is most pronounced in patients with high-risk bacteria. Artificial ventilation may play an additional role in protease activation. PMID:18700005

  11. Oral candidiasis in high-risk patients as the initial manifestation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klein, R S; Harris, C A; Small, C B; Moll, B; Lesser, M; Friedland, G H

    1984-08-09

    We studied the frequency with which unexplained oral candidiasis led to unequivocal acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in patients at risk. Twenty-two previously healthy adults with unexplained oral candidiasis, of whom the 19 tested had a reversed T4/T8 ratio and 20 had generalized lymphadenopathy, were compared with 20 similar patients with a reversed T4/T8 ratio and generalized lymphadenopathy who did not have oral candidiasis. All were intravenous-drug abusers, homosexual or bisexual men, or both. Thirteen of the 22 patients with oral candidiasis (59 per cent) acquired a major opportunistic infection or Kaposi's sarcoma at a median of three months (range, 1 to 23) as compared with none of 20 patients with generalized lymphadenopathy and immunodeficiency but without candidiasis who were followed for a median of 12 months (range, 5 to 21) (P less than 0.001). AIDS developed in 12 of 15 patients with candidiasis and T4/T8 ratios less than or equal to 0.51, as compared with none of four with ratios equal to or greater than 0.60 (P less than 0.01). We conclude that in patients at high risk for AIDS, the presence of unexplained oral candidiasis predicts the development of serious opportunistic infections more than 50 per cent of the time. Whether the remainder will have AIDS is not yet known.

  12. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  13. Obesity and related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, H; Nabaei, B

    2007-03-01

    To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Iranian schoolgirls and to identify risk factors which lead to obesity. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2002 and a sample of 1800 female students between 7-12 years old was obtained using a multistage cluster sampling method from Tehran. Height and weight were measured and related socio-economic information was collected. The overall percent of overweight and obesity was 13.3% and 7.7% respectively. BMI (Body Mass Index) was directly and significantly(r=+0.28, P< 0.001) correlated with increasing age. Physical activity was significantly different between obese and non-obese children. (P=0.03) Also, economical factors such as the type of school (private&public) were different in these children. (P=0.03) The statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant and inverse correlation(r=-0.03, P=0.04) between maternal education and occurrence of overweight and obesity in children. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in young Iranian girls was high. Advanced age, lack of physical inactivity, low economical factors and maternal educational status could be risk factors for obesity in children.

  14. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  15. Perceived factors in return to work after acquired brain injury: A qualitative meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Frostad Liaset, Ingeborg; Lorås, Håvard

    2016-11-01

    A substantial proportion of survivors after brain injuries originating from trauma, tumour, or stroke may experience reduced ability to work due to a number of challenges. The purpose of this review is to summarize and highlight factors that have been perceived and reported as important in order to return to work after an acquired brain injury. A qualitative ethnographic meta-synthesis is used to interpret and develop concepts from studies retrieved from systematic searches in the electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science. A total of 16 studies were included in the meta-synthesis. Four key concepts were identified as important for return to work after an acquired brain injury: empowerment, self-awareness, motivation, and facilitation. The results of the meta-synthesis indicate that personal development is experienced as essential in order to return to work after an acquired brain injury, involving identification of each individual's strengths and weaknesses. These personal factors intersect with an emphasis of the employer providing a certain degree of facilitation in the workplace. All of these aspects will affect one's motivation to return to work and can therefore be crucial to succeed.

  16. What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer? A risk factor is ... may have few or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk ...

  17. Epigenetic Risk Factors in PTSD and Depression.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Florian Joachim; Spengler, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that children exposed to adverse experiences are at increased risk for the development of depression, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A history of child abuse and maltreatment increases the likelihood of being subsequently exposed to traumatic events or of developing PTSD as an adult. The brain is highly plastic during early life and encodes acquired information into lasting memories that normally subserve adaptation. Translational studies in rodents showed that enduring sensitization of neuronal and neuroendocrine circuits in response to early life adversity are likely risk factors of life time vulnerability to stress. Hereby, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis integrates cognitive, behavioral, and emotional responses to early-life stress and can be epigenetically programed during sensitive windows of development. Epigenetic mechanisms, comprising reciprocal regulation of chromatin structure and DNA methylation, are important to establish and maintain sustained, yet potentially reversible, changes in gene transcription. The relevance of these findings for the development of PTSD requires further studies in humans where experience-dependent epigenetic programing can additionally depend on genetic variation in the underlying substrates which may protect from or advance disease development. Overall, identification of early-life stress-associated epigenetic risk markers informing on previous stress history can help to advance early diagnosis, personalized prevention, and timely therapeutic interventions, thus reducing long-term social and health costs.

  18. Epigenetic Risk Factors in PTSD and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, Florian Joachim; Spengler, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that children exposed to adverse experiences are at increased risk for the development of depression, anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A history of child abuse and maltreatment increases the likelihood of being subsequently exposed to traumatic events or of developing PTSD as an adult. The brain is highly plastic during early life and encodes acquired information into lasting memories that normally subserve adaptation. Translational studies in rodents showed that enduring sensitization of neuronal and neuroendocrine circuits in response to early life adversity are likely risk factors of life time vulnerability to stress. Hereby, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis integrates cognitive, behavioral, and emotional responses to early-life stress and can be epigenetically programed during sensitive windows of development. Epigenetic mechanisms, comprising reciprocal regulation of chromatin structure and DNA methylation, are important to establish and maintain sustained, yet potentially reversible, changes in gene transcription. The relevance of these findings for the development of PTSD requires further studies in humans where experience-dependent epigenetic programing can additionally depend on genetic variation in the underlying substrates which may protect from or advance disease development. Overall, identification of early-life stress-associated epigenetic risk markers informing on previous stress history can help to advance early diagnosis, personalized prevention, and timely therapeutic interventions, thus reducing long-term social and health costs. PMID:23966957

  19. Vitamin D level and risk of community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jovanovich, Anna J; Ginde, Adit A; Holmen, John; Jablonski, Kristen; Allyn, Rebecca L; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel

    2014-06-10

    Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OH)D levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OH)D levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% CI 1.08-6.08) were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OH)D levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11-2.77) were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  20. The occupational risk to dental anesthesiologists of acquiring 3 bloodborne pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Suljak, J. P.; Leake, J. L.; Haas, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the occupational risk to dental anesthesiologists of contracting 3 bloodborne pathogens: hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: Through an anonymously returned, mailed questionnaire, dental anesthesiologists in Canada and the United States provided information regarding percutaneous and mucocutaneous contacts with contaminated fluid during the treatment of patients under deep sedation and general anesthesia as well as other general practice information. A mathematical model was applied to determine the occupational risk. RESULTS: Of the 101 (65%) returned questionnaires, 98 reported having treated patients within the previous 6 months. Of these, 41 (42%) had at least one percutaneous accident (89 accidents in total), and the projected mean annual injury rate for dental anesthesiologists overall was 1.82. The most common causes of injury were burs, intraoral needles, and dental instruments. Operator error during use was associated with 31% of reported accidents. Significantly more injuries were reported by those who also reported a mucocutaneous contact and by those working more than 25 hours per week. The projected mean annual number of mucocutaneous exposures was 0.88 for dental anesthesiologists overall. CONCLUSIONS: The calculated annual risk to the average dental anesthesiologist of acquiring HBV (if not immune), HCV, and HIV following percutaneous injury was very low for all infections (HBV the most; HIV the least). The risk of contracting HIV following mucocutaneous contact was extremely low. PMID:10853567

  1. Non-negative factor analysis supporting the interpretation of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Stacks of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF can be difficult to interpret, if they contain high degrees of redundancy and components differing in their quantitative but not qualitative elemental composition. Factor analysis, mainly in the form of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), has been used to reduce the level of redundancy and highlight correlations. PCA, however, does not yield physically meaningful representations as they often contain negative values. This limitation can be overcome, by employing factor analysis that is restricted to non-negativity. In this paper we present the first application of the Python Matrix Factorization Module (pymf) on XRF data. This is done in a case study on the painting Saul and David from the studio of Rembrandt van Rijn. We show how the discrimination between two different Co containing compounds with minimum user intervention and a priori knowledge is supported by Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF).

  2. Acquiring hepatitis C in prison: the social organisation of injecting risk.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Carla; McCredie, Luke; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2015-04-24

    The potential for transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in prison settings is well established and directly associated with sharing of injecting and tattooing equipment, as well as physical violence. This study is one of the first to examine the circumstances surrounding the acquisition of HCV in the prison setting via inmates' own accounts. This is a sub-study of a cohort of prison inmates in New South Wales, Australia. Cohort participants were inmates who had reported ever injecting drugs and who had a negative HCV serological test within 12 months prior to enrolment. Cohort participants were monitored every 3 to 6 months for HCV antibodies and viraemia and via behavioural risk practices questionnaire. Participants with a documented HCV seroconversion were eligible to participate in in-depth interviews with a research nurse known to them. Participants included six inmates (four men, two women) with documented within-prison HCV seroconversion. Participants reported few changes to their injecting practices or circumstances that they attributed to HCV acquisition. Participants believed that they were sharing syringes with others who were HCV negative and trusted that others would have declared their HCV status if positive. Some participants described cleaning equipment with water, but not with disinfectant. In a departure from usual routine, one participant suggested that he may have acquired HCV as a result of using a syringe pre-loaded with drugs that was given to him in return for lending a syringe to another inmate. Participants described regret at acquiring HCV and noted a number of pre- and post-release plans that this diagnosis impacted upon. Acquiring hepatitis C was not a neutral experience of participants but generated significant emotional reactions for some. Decisions to share injecting equipment were influenced by participants' assumptions of the HCV status of their injecting partners. The social organisation of injecting, in trusted networks, is a

  3. [Risk factors for birth injuries].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Rubio-Espíritu, Jorge; Islas-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with birth trauma. Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital General "Dr. Manuel Gea González", Secretaría de Salud. Case-control, prolective study. There were 129 cases and 134 controls. We recorded the following variables: a) maternal and delivery: age, weight, height, prenatal care, pre-existing disease or gestational disease, mode of delivery, anesthetic management during labor, use of external maneuvers or forceps; b) newborn: birth weight, gestational age, academic degree of attendant physician at delivery, and type of birth injury. The independent risk factors associated to birth injury were: for ecchymoses; general anesthesia (OR 13.7, 95% CI = 3 - 62.6), breech presentation (OR 6.4, 95% IC 95% = 1.4 - 27.9) and gestational age < or = 32 weeks (OR 6.4, 95% CI = 1.3 - 31.1); for lacerations, vaginal dystocic delivery or cesarean section (OR 19, 95% CI = 4.4 - 81.1) and use of external maneuvers (OR 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5 - 21.6); for cephalhematoma maternal height < or = 1.54 m (OR 7.4, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7) and external maneuvers (OR 7.2, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7); for caput succedaneum, external maneuvers (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.5-7.7) and maternal age < or = 19 or > or = 36 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4 - 6.4). Risk factors associated with birth injuries identified in this study involved maternal conditions, neonatal conditions and mechanism of delivery.

  4. Modifications of Coronary Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers. PMID:16813737

  5. Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, Farzad; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Over the past several decades, alcohol abuse and cigarette smoke exposure have been identified as risk factors for the development of ARDS. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are complex and remain under investigation but are thought to involve pulmonary immune impairment as well as alveolar epithelial and endothelial dysfunction. This review summarizes the epidemiologic data supporting links between these exposures and ARDS susceptibility and outcomes and highlights key mechanistic investigations that provide insight into the pathways by which each exposure is linked to ARDS. PMID:25453414

  6. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk – not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems. PMID:25973418

  7. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk - not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems.

  8. Risk prediction with procalcitonin and clinical rules in community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, David T.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Kellum, John A.; Yealy, Donald M.; Kong, Lan; Martino, Michael; Angus, Derek C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and CURB-65 predict outcomes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP), but have limitations. Procalcitonin, a biomarker of bacterial infection, may provide prognostic information in CAP. Our objective was to describe the pattern of procalcitonin in CAP, and determine if procalcitonin provides prognostic information beyond PSI and CURB-65. Methods We conducted a multi-center prospective cohort study in 28 community and teaching emergency departments. Patients presenting with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of CAP were enrolled. We stratified procalcitonin levels a priori into four tiers – I: < 0.1; II: ≥ 0.1 to <0.25; III: ≥ 0.25 to < 0.5; and IV: ≥ 0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was 30d mortality. Results 1651 patients formed the study cohort. Procalcitonin levels were broadly spread across tiers: 32.8% (I), 21.6% (II), 10.2% (III), 35.4% (IV). Used alone, procalcitonin had modest test characteristics: specificity (35%), sensitivity (92%), positive likelihood ratio (LR) (1.41), and negative LR (0.22). Adding procalcitonin to PSI in all subjects minimally improved performance. Adding procalcitonin to low risk PSI subjects (Class I–III) provided no additional information. However, subjects in procalcitonin tier I had low 30d mortality regardless of clinical risk, including those in higher risk classes (1.5% vs. 1.6% for those in PSI Class I–III vs. Class IV/V). Among high risk PSI subjects (Class IV/V), one quarter (126/546) were in procalcitonin tier I, and the negative LR of procalcitonin tier I was 0.09. Procalcitonin tier I was also associated with lower burden of other adverse outcomes. Similar results were seen with CURB-65 stratification. Conclusions Selective use of procalcitonin as an adjunct to existing rules may offer additional prognostic information in high risk patients. PMID:18342993

  9. Factors influencing return to work experienced by people with acquired brain injury: a qualitative research study.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Judith M; van Bennekom, Coen A M; van Dormolen, Max; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2011-01-01

    To describe the factors experienced by adults with moderate-to-severe acquired brain injury (ABI) as either limiting or facilitating during the process of return to work (RTW) in order to give an advice about the vocational rehabilitation process. A qualitative study was performed. Twelve adults who were working before acquiring traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury (2-3 years earlier) participated. The experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as a theoretical framework for the interviews and the analysis. The most common limiting factor was tiredness. The most common facilitating factors were the will to RTW, the ongoing recovery and the knowledge and support of the employer, colleagues, occupational physician and occupational specialist. Different aspects were experienced as being important during the process of RTW after ABI. These aspects should be kept in mind during the process of RTW to make the outcome as successful as possible. It is advised to pay special attention to the recovery opportunities of an individual, to inform the employer, colleagues, occupation physician and the occupational specialist about ABI, and to support people with ABI for long time periods. An important role can be played by the rehabilitation centre.

  10. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  11. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  12. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  13. Risk Factors and Causes of Syncope

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes of Sy... Back to Fainting Risk Factors & Causes of Syncope Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Syncope The ... heart. LQTS is believed to be a common cause of sudden and unexplained death in children and ...

  14. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  15. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  16. Reducing hospital-acquired infection by quantitative risk modeling of intravenous bag preparation.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, Edward C; Rockwell, Jim; Wright, Marc-Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Vascular access of patients by peripheral and central venous catheters for the delivery of sterile or aseptically manufactured parenterals is commonly regarded as one of the major causes of blood stream infections. Rigorous evaluation and management of the risks of microbial infection originating from the administration of aseptically manufactured therapies remain imperative to reduce patient infection risks. Healthcare clinicians are continually faced with choosing intravenous (IV) parenteral administration strategies to minimize patient blood stream infection risk. Data facilitating such decisions are often difficult to obtain. Analysis and interpretation of the available, reported hospital infection rate data to evaluate medical device- and therapy-associated infection rates are constrained by the variability and uncertainty associated with each individual administration scenario. Moreover, clinical trials quantifying infection risk are constrained by their practicality, cost, and the control of the exacting requisite trial criteria. Furthermore, it is ethically inappropriate to systematically conduct clinical evaluations incorporating conditions that do not favor the best possible patient outcomes. Quantitative risk modeling (QRM) is a unique tool offering an alternative and affective means of assessing design and clinical use in the context of the clinical environment on medical device and combinatorial therapy infection rates. Here, we report the generation of QRMs and the evaluation of manual admixing IV bags for use in IV administration sets upon patient infection rates. The manual admixing of IV bags was assessed for the opportunity and risk of microbial ingress accessing across the sterile barrier during clinical preparation and contaminating the IV solution. The risk of microbial contamination was evaluated under (a) ISO 5 compounding conditions adopting ideal aseptic technique (in compliance with USP 〈797〉) and (b) realistic worst-case point

  17. Factor V Leiden in women: a thrombotic risk factor or an evolutionary advantage?

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    Factor V Leiden is a common gain-of-function gene mutation resulting in a genetic predisposition to thromboembolic complications. Growing evidence in the literature indicates an interaction between factor V Leiden thrombophilia and acquired prothrombotic conditions such as contraceptive use or hormone replacement therapy, resulting in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Similarly, when combined with the prothrombotic influence of pregnancy, women who are carriers of factor V Leiden are faced with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including VTE, pre-eclampsia, fetal loss, placental abruption, and fetal growth restriction. The results of the most important meta-analyses on the relationship between inherited (factor V Leiden) and acquired thrombophilia in women are analyzed in this review, along with the possible evolutionary role of this mutation. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease. PMID:27904118

  20. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease.

  1. Pneumococcal vaccination reduces the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Junko; Mori, Mitsuru; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Hori, Tsukasa; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to Japan in 2009, after which there was a rapid decline in invasive pneumococcal disease. There are few data, however, on the effectiveness of PCV7 against community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We conducted an ambispective cohort study among children aged 0-6 years old who attended day-care centers. A total of 624 children at 10 day-care centers in Sapporo, Japan participated in the study. The parents reported whether their child had received PCV7 one or more times, as well as the exact dates of vaccination from records in maternal and child health handbooks marked by pediatricians. Each CAP event was reported by parents according to doctor diagnosis. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95%CI of CAP incidence reduced by PCV7 inoculation. During the observational period, 94 subjects contracted CAP. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, inoculation with PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP (HR, 0.22; 95%CI: 0.13-0.34). On stratified analysis by age, PCV7 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CAP in both children aged <3 years (HR, 0.31; 95%CI: 0.14-0.71), and those ≥3 years (HR, 0.20; 95%CI: 0.09-0.43). PCV7 is highly effective in reducing the risk of CAP in children attending day-care centers. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  3. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH EXTENDED SPECTRUM β-LACTAMASE PRODUCING ESCHERICHIA COLI IN COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION AT HOSPITAL EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT, BANGKOK, THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Savatmorigkorngul, Sorravit; Poowarattanawiwit, Pongsuree; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Sittichanbuncha, Yuwares

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract infection or UTI is most commonly caused by Escherichia coli. This study investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) E. coli in community-acquired UTI presenting at the Emergency Department, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. A retrospective review was conducted over a one-year period (2014) of case histories of patients over 15 years of age diagnosed with (n = 159) and without culture-positive (n = 249) ESBL E. coli. Backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed four independent risk factors for UTI caused by ESBL E. coli, namely, urinary catheter use, previous UTI in which ESBL E. coli was present, and previous use of antibiotics cephalosporin and penicillin. This information should be useful in devising future public health prevention and control programs for ESBL E. coli-associated community-acquired UTI.

  4. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  5. Risk factors and prevention of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Storti, S; Crucitti, P; Cina, G

    1996-01-01

    In the last 20 years within the clinical research on venous thromboembolism a major objective was to identify and develop increasingly effective and safe methods of prevention. This trend is justified by the high incidence of thromboembolism as well as by the relevant mortality for acute pulmonary embolism and postphlebitic sequels of difficult treatment. A significant contribution to the rational application of methods of prevention was given by the knowledge of risk factors. Together with acquired risks, as surgery, age, malignant tumors, in the last 30 years some conditions of thrombophilia were identified. They are caused by deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors (antithrombin III, protein C, protein S) or other alteration of the anticoagulation system as resistance to activated protein C or antiphospholipid antibodies. The primary prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism is aimed at the prevention of thrombosis by pharmacologic methods able to oppose the procoagulant alterations while avoiding hemorrhagic complications. The physical methods tend to reduce the stasis in the veins of the lower extremities. Subcutaneous calcium heparin at the dose of 5000 U twice or three times a day is the most common pharmacologic method used. It was shown to be safe and effective especially in postoperative prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in general surgery. More recently, low molecular weight heparin fractions have been introduced. As compared to standard heparin they have the advantage of a single daily dose and a better efficacy in some groups of patients, as those undergoing hip replacement. Among the substances under clinical experimentation, dermatan sulfate seems promising. Most common physical prevention methods consist in the use of elastic graduated compression stockings and systems of intermittent pneumatic calf compression. The former can be used also in presence of a hemorrhagic risk as in neurosurgery. The latter have shown a good efficacy in increasing flow

  6. Sex-Related Differences in the Risk of Hospital-Acquired Sepsis and Pneumonia Post Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Colbert, James F; Traystman, Richard J; Poisson, Sharon N; Herson, Paco S; Ginde, Adit A

    2016-10-01

    Infectious complications after ischemic stroke are frequent and lead to neurological deterioration, poor functional outcomes, and higher mortality. Local and systemic inflammatory responses to brain ischemia differ between males and females, but little is known about differences in poststroke susceptibility to infection by sex. The purpose of this study was to compare sex-related differences in the risk of hospital-acquired sepsis and pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This is a retrospective, secondary analysis of the 2010-2011 California State Inpatient Database. Previously validated International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes were used to identify adult hospitalizations for AIS. The primary outcome was hospital-acquired sepsis or pneumonia, also identified using ICD-9 codes. Associations between sex and hospital-acquired sepsis or pneumonia were adjusted for baseline characteristics and comorbidities using multivariable logistic regression. There were 91,643 hospitalizations for AIS included in this analysis, of which 1027 had hospital-acquired sepsis and 1225 had hospital-acquired pneumonia. The in-hospital mortality without infection was 4.6%; the presence of hospital-acquired infections was associated with higher mortality for sepsis (32.7%) and pneumonia (21.9%). Female (versus male) sex was associated with lower adjusted odds of hospital-acquired sepsis (odds ratio [OR] .74, 95% confidence interval [CI] .65-.84) and pneumonia (OR .69, 95% CI .62-.78). This difference was similar across age strata. Among hospitalizations with either hospital-acquired sepsis or pneumonia, sex did not influence mortality. Female sex was associated with a lower risk of hospital-acquired sepsis and pneumonia after AIS. Further investigation is needed to determine the mechanisms underlying this clinical observation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Microbiologic spectrum and prognostic factors of hospital-acquired pneumonia cases].

    PubMed

    Sevinç, Can; Sahbaz, Sibel; Uysal, Ulker; Kilinç, Oğuz; Ellidokuz, Hülya; Itil, Oya; Gülay, Zeynep; Yunusoğlu, Sedat; Sargun, Serdar; Akkoyun, Kürşat Kaan; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri

    2007-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are an important cause of preventable morbidity and mortality; they also result in significant socioeconomic cost. Nosocomial pneumonia (NCP) is defined as pneumonia, which occurs 48 hours after hospitalization or after discharge from the hospital. It is the second or third most frequent infection among all hospital acquired infections, and the mortality of NCP is higher than the other hospital acquired infections. Patients, diagnosed as NCP were retrospectively analyzed in order to detect microbiological agent and prognostic factors. We evaluated 173 patients, 67.0% of them were male and 33.0% female. Comorbid diseases were present in 94.2% and a medical procedure had been applied in 75.1% of cases. A single agent was isolated in 79.2% of the cases while a mixt infection was present in 13.3%. In 7.5% of the cases, cultures were negative. Endotracheal aspirates were the most common materials (38.9%) used for detected microorganism and sputum cultures were used in 16.8% of the cases. Most commonly encountered microorganism were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Staphylococcus aureus respectively. NCP developed on approximately 18th day of hospitalization. Overall mortality rate was 45.2%. The effects of diabetes mellitus and chronic pulmonary diseases on mortality rate were analized by logistic regression analysis and it's evaluated that the mortality rates increase 3.7 times with diabetes mellitus and 2.4 times with chronic pulmonary diseases. There was no effect of mechanical ventilation history on mortality.

  8. Investigation of the risk factors for sporadically occurring Legionnaires` disease

    SciTech Connect

    Plouffe, J.F.; Breiman, R.F.; File, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    The potential of acquiring Legionnaires` disease in the home environment was studied using a case-control design with 146 cases of Legionnaires` disease and 275 matched controls living in two counties in Ohio. By multivariate analysis, cases were more likely than controls to have Legionellae cultured from water sources in the home, to have non-municipal water supplied to their home, and to have had recent plumbing work on their home. Franklin county residents with underlying health conditions had strongest associations with domestic risk of acquiring Legionnaires` disease presence of Legionellae in home (p<0.001), non-municipal water supply (p=0.031), and recent plumbing work (p=0.058). Use of electric home hot water heaters was more common in case homes, but was not a significant risk factor in multivariate analysis, because use of electric tanks was strongly associated with non-municipal water source (p=0.01). The authors feel that a portion of community acquired Legionnaires` disease is acquired in the home and that interventional studies which address means to decrease the risk of domestic acquisition of Legionnaires` disease need to be performed.

  9. Factors associated with self-esteem following acquired brain injury in adults: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Curvis, William; Simpson, Jane; Hampson, Natalie

    2016-03-03

    Self-esteem is potentially a key factor in psychological and psychosocial well-being following acquired brain injury (ABI). The current review aimed to identify, synthesise and appraise all existing quantitative empirical studies on predictors or correlates of self-esteem following ABI in adulthood. In total, 27 papers met the inclusion criteria. A range of clinical factors were related to self-esteem after ABI, including the degree of physical and functional impairment. It is unclear if cognitive impairment is related to high or low self-esteem. Additionally, psychological variables such as coping styles, adjustment and perception of problems or rehabilitation are related to self-esteem following ABI. Depression is strongly associated with low self-esteem, alongside anxiety, psychological distress and quality of life. Limitations of the available research and recommendations for clinical practice and further research are discussed. In particular, there is a need to engage with contemporary theoretical understandings of self-esteem, integrated with and supported by developments in how self-esteem is conceptualised and measured over time in an ABI population. The findings of the review suggest that self-esteem is an important factor to consider following ABI, particularly in the context of developing individualised, formulation-driven rehabilitation interventions that take into account biological, social and psychological factors.

  10. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  11. CT and MR imaging findings in patients with acquired heart disease at risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Patrick J; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves L; Doyle, Deirdre J; Nguyen, Elsie T; Paul, Narinder S

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is an important screening and diagnostic tool in conditions associated with sudden cardiac death. The most common cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease, with myocarditis, cardiac sarcoidosis, and dilated and infiltrative cardiomyopathies being less common acquired causes. Common risk factors for sudden cardiac death, regardless of the disease process, include severe ventricular dysfunction and the presence of macroscopic scar seen at delayed contrast material-enhanced imaging. Recent advances in electrocardiographically (ECG) gated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and multidetector computed tomography (CT) have led to increased referrals for cross-sectional imaging; thus, cardiac radiologists should be familiar with the disease entities associated with sudden cardiac death. Inflammatory processes and cardiomyopathies are best depicted with cardiac MR imaging. Steady-state free precession cine sequences coupled with inversion-recovery prepared gradient-echo T1-weighted sequences performed after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material should form the basis of cardiac MR imaging protocols for cardiomyopathy. A clinical history that is suggestive of myocardial ischemia, specific requests to exclude coronary artery disease, or contraindications for MR imaging may imply that multidetector CT would be more appropriate. Nevertheless, both cardiac MR imaging and ECG-gated multidetector CT offer robust diagnosis and risk stratification for individual disease processes associated with sudden cardiac death.

  12. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  13. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  14. Suicide Risk Factors in Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motto, Jerome A.

    1980-01-01

    A current focus in evaluating suicide risk is the "clinical model" approach, which determines those factors associated with high risk for suicide. The sociological factors identified as estimators of suicide risk included impaired health, job instability, multiple unit residence, no change in living setting, and modest financial resources. (JAC)

  15. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided.

  16. Social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, S K; Nedjat, S; Jabbari, H; Saiepour, N; Heris, M J

    2015-12-13

    This study investigated the social capital of Iranian patients living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the associated factors. In a cross-sectional study the Integrated Social Capital Questionnaire was filled by a sequential sample of 300 patients visiting a referral counselling centre in Tehran. The patients' social capital scores were around 50% in the trust, social cohesion, collective action and cooperation and political empowerment domains. The groups and networks membership domain scored the lowest (27.1%). In regression analysis, employment status was significantly associated with groups and networks membership; age, marital status and financial status were associated with collective action and cooperation; period of disease awareness and marital status affected social cohesion and inclusion; and having risky behaviour affected empowerment and political action. Efforts are needed to enhance the social capital of those patients living with AIDS who are younger, unemployed, divorced/widowed, with risky behaviours and shorter disease awareness.

  17. [Genetic risk factors in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fabisch, H; Kroisel, P M; Fabisch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The high pathogenetic relevance of genetic factors in schizophrenia is beyond doubt based on the findings of epidemiological studies. By means of a complex mode of transmission, it is likely that several genes with weak to moderate effect jointly constitute a genetic basis for a vulnerability to schizophrenia that may well vary for different individuals. Other organic and psychosocial factors also play an individually different -- in some cases significant -- role in terms of pathogenesis, as a result of which an oligogenic/polygenic multifactor model is assumed from the standpoint of aetiopathogenetics. Molecular genetic methods consist in linkage analyses and association analyses. Positive linkage findings accumulate particularly for the chromosomes 1q, 6p, 8p, 13q and 22q. By themselves, individual mutations contribute little to the range of schizophrenic feature characteristics, it was not possible -- irrespective of some subtypes -- to replicate genes of major effect. From the large number of possible candidate genes, although studies on DRD3, DRD2 and HTR2A produced positive results, the magnitudes of effect were low. The findings for alleles of dysbindin, neuregulin 1, DAO, COMT, PRODH, ZDHHC and DISC are less clear. The search for schizophrenia-relevant mutations is hampered by the possibility of a heterogeneous phenotype of schizophrenia in case of a homogeneous genotype as much as by the possibility of inter-individually homogeneous phenotypical characteristics in case of schizophrenia-relevant heterotype in the genome. With the aid of the concept of endo-phenotypes, based on neurobiological phenomena, it might be possible to take a more direct approach that leads from relevant mutations to the risk of schizophrenias. However, replacing schizophrenic alienation with neurobiological aspects leads to difficulties in explaining these complex disorder profiles. Schizophrenic diseases require an explanatory approach that also incorporates personality and

  18. [Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer disease risk: epidemiological studies review].

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    Etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still undefined in its most frequent sporadic type, but a role of vascular risk factor is more and more evocated in its pathophysiology. This role enables to hope that preventive or curative care of vascular risk factors could decrease AD incidence. Among these factors, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and tobacco consumption were the most studied. We review the risk for AD, which had been associated with each of these factors in epidemiological studies. High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of AD in most studies while the results are more controversial for the others factors. All these four vascular risk factors have variable interaction with the presence of cerebrovascular diseases and of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene which is a predisposition factor for sporadic AD.

  19. Risk Factors For Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, Yüksel; KURT, Semiha; KARAER ÜNALDI, Hatice; ERKORKMAZ, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for distal symmetric sensory-motor polyneuropathy (DSP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Method Sixty seven patients with type 2 DM (33 males and 34 females) were included in the study. In addition to a detailed neurological examination, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was administered to all patients and their total neuropathy scores were calculated. Nerve conduction examinations were performed for all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.83±.87 years. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) value was 8.56±2.07% (normal: 3–6.5%). The total neuropathy score significantly correlated with diabetes duration, hypertension, retinopathy, and HbA1C. Conclusion This study confirms the previous reports regarding the association of neuropathy with poor glycaemic control and duration of the disease. The association of neuropathy with retinopathy and hypertension is important.

  20. Risk factors for scabies in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Lee, Sai-Cheong; Huang, Shie-Shian; Kao, Yu-Chin; See, Lai-Chu; Yang, Shih-Hsien

    2012-08-01

    Scabies is a global problem. Transmission of scabies is usually due to direct or indirect contact. Delay in diagnosis may result in the spread of the scabies mite. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important. In this study, we collected data from 52 scabies patients and analyzed the risk factors for scabies with the case-control method. Our study has revealed that the patients who were bedridden [odds ratio (OR) 6.72, p < 0.0001], living in a nursing home (OR 9.89, p < 0.0001), had a higher clinical severity status before admission (OR 1.25, p < 0.0001), and a catheter inserted (including nasogastric tube, Foley catheter, Port-A, or Hickman catheter) (OR 9.05, p < 0.0001) were significantly more likely to acquire scabies infection. To prevent scabies, proper management of the nursing home setting, including adequate cleaning of the contaminated clothing, bedding and equipment, in combination with treating all suspected scabies patients, and contact isolation are important and necessary. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Risk of acquiring tick-borne infections in forestry workers from Lazio, Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzi, S; Martini, A; Binazzi, A; Marinaccio, A; Vonesch, N; D'Amico, W; Moro, T; Fiorentini, C; Ciufolini, M G; Visca, P; Tomao, P

    2010-12-01

    The seroprevalence of antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus was evaluated in a group of forestry rangers in the Lazio region of Italy. One hundred and forty-five forestry rangers and 282 blood donors were examined by two-tiered serological tests for B. burgdorferi and TBE virus. Information on occupation, residence, tick bites, outdoor leisure activities and other risk factors was obtained. The prevalence of IgG/IgM antibodies to B. burgdorferi showed no statistical difference between the two groups, but there was a higher occurrence of IgM antibodies. There were significant differences between indoor and outdoor, urban and rural workplaces among the 145 exposed workers (χ² test: p < 0.001), and a higher risk for outdoor rural than urban tasks was detected among the ten Western blot-tested forestry rangers positive to B. burgdorferi (χ² test: p < 0.1). No seropositivity was observed for the TBE virus. Forestry rangers from the Lazio region did not have a higher risk of Borrelia infection than the blood donors, though an increase in the risk for outdoor tasks in a rural environment was observed.

  2. Risk factors for lyme disease in Chester County, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G.; Wileyto, E. P.; Hopkins, R. B.; Cherry, B. R.; Maher, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection for Lyme disease in Chester County, Pennyslvania. METHODS: The authors designed an unmatched case-control study involving 294 incident cases reported to the Chester County Health Department in 1998 and 449 controls selected by random digit dialing. All case and control participants were interviewed by telephone. RESULTS: Age is a risk factor for Lyme disease for groups aged 10-19 years old and 50 years or older. Sex was not a risk factor. Incidence of Lyme disease in a rural setting was three times the incidence in an urban setting. Increased risk also was associated with living in single family homes, homes with yards or attached land, woods on the land, signs of tick hosts seen on the land, and homes within 100 feet of woodland. Gardening for more than four hours per week was also a risk factor, but most other outdoor activities were not. Twice as many participants took protective measures against tick bites before outdoor employment than those who merely ventured into the yard or land associated with the home. Only checking for ticks during outdoor activity and the use of repellents prior to outdoor activities outside the yard were unequivocally associated with a reduced risk of Lyme disease. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to increase public awareness about the risk of acquiring Lyme disease from ticks in the immediate environment of the home. PMID:11889282

  3. Outcomes in UK patients with hospital-acquired bacteraemia and the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Mark; Welch, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is lack of contemporary outcome data on patients with hospital-acquired infections that cause bacteraemia. We determined the risk factors for 7-day mortality and investigated the hypothesis that, compared with central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bacteraemic infections, catheter-associated bacteraemic urinary tract infections (UTIs) were significantly associated with 7-day mortality. Methods From October 2007 to September 2008, demographical, clinical and microbiological data were collected on patients with hospital-acquired bacteraemia. Patients were followed until death, hospital discharge or recovery from infection. Risk factors for 7-day mortality were determined and multivariate logistic regression was used to define the association between catheter-associated bacteraemic UTIs and likelihood of death. Results 559 bacteraemic episodes occurred in 437 patients. Overall, there were 90 deaths (20.6%) at 7 days and 153 deaths (35.0%) at 30 days. Among patients with catheter-associated bacteraemic UTIs, 7-day and 30-day mortalities associated with each bacteraemic episode were 25/83 (30.1%) and 33/83 (39.8%), respectively. Within this subgroup, the commonest isolates were Escherichia coli, 36 (43.4%), Proteus mirabilis, 11 (13.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 9 (10.8%). There were 22 (26.5%) multiple drug-resistant isolates and, of the E coli infections, 6 (16.7%) were extended spectrum β-lactamase producers. In univariate analysis, the variables found to have the strongest association with 7-day mortality were age, Pitt score, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), medical speciality and site of infection. Compared with CVC-associated bacteraemic infections, there was a significant association between catheter-associated bacteraemic UTIs and 7-day mortality (OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.86 to 9.33). After adjustment for age and CCI, this association remained significant (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.19 to 7.07). Conclusions Compared with CVC-associated bacteraemic

  4. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  5. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  6. Risk factors influencing non-use of condoms at sexual relations in populations under heightened risk.

    PubMed

    Medić, Alan; Dzelalija, Boris; Koźul, Karlo; Novosel, Iva Pem; Dijanić, Tomislav

    2014-09-01

    To determine risk factors for non-use of condoms when engaging in sexual intercourse among high-risk population groups for acquiring HIV/STIs. We collected the data obtained by interviews in the period from 2005 to 2011 in the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center for HIV/AIDS at the Institute of Public Health of Zadar County. Four hundred ninety four respondents were divided into risk and control groups. The majority of the respondents in our population does not consistently use condoms, in the risk group as much as 89.9%, and in the control group 65.7% of them (p< 0.001). Persons consuming alcohol when having sexual relations use condoms about 5x less often compared to those not consuming alcohol at all (OR=5.00; CI=1.69-14.29). There are significant differences among women and men in the risk group regarding reasons for non-use of condoms. The main reason with women is "I trust mypartners" 33.7% while men "do not like having sex with condoms, 53.6% of them (p < 0.001). The main risk factors for non-use of condoms are alcohol consumption at sexual relations, non-use of condoms in a casual relationship. Having in mind the non-use of condoms among populations of high-risk groups of acquiring HIV there are significant differences among genders.

  7. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  8. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  9. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  10. [Assessment of dynamic violent behavior risk factors].

    PubMed

    Folino, Jorge Oscar; Cáceres, María Soledad; Campos, María Laura; Silveri, Marina; Ucín, Silvana; Ascazibar, Mariel

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic violent behavior risk factors have special significance since they constitute the main target for preventive intervention. Different dynamic factors as well as violent recidivism were assessed with, among other instruments, the environmental risk (Risk Management) section of the Argentinean version of the HCR-20 in 25 parolees from the Province of Buenos Aires Penitentiary System. Among other findings, the prevalence of the risk factors linked to substance abuse and socioeconomic deprivation, and the heterogeneous perception of the official institutions are very significant. Exposure to destabilizers was the factor most associated with violent recidivism.

  11. Risk Factor Modification and Projections of Absolute Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Background Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Methods Using data from a case–control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. Results The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. Conclusions These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions. PMID:21705679

  12. Risk factor modification and projections of absolute breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Petracci, Elisabetta; Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Gail, Mitchell H

    2011-07-06

    Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Using data from a case-control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions.

  13. Cardiovascular Complications and Short-term Mortality Risk in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Violi, Francesco; Cangemi, Roberto; Falcone, Marco; Taliani, Gloria; Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Nozzoli, Carlo; Venditti, Mario; Chirinos, Julio A; Corrales-Medina, Vicente F

    2017-06-01

    Previous reports suggest that community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular complications. However, a contemporary and comprehensive characterization of this association is lacking. In this multicenter study, 1182 patients hospitalized for CAP were prospectively followed for up to 30 days after their hospitalization for this infection. Study endpoints included myocardial infarction, new or worsening heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, deep venous thrombosis, cardiovascular death, and total mortality. Three hundred eighty (32.2%) patients experienced intrahospital cardiovascular events (CVEs) including 281 (23.8%) with heart failure, 109 (9.2%) with atrial fibrillation, 89 (8%) with myocardial infarction, 11 (0.9%) with ischemic stroke, and 1 (0.1%) with deep venous thrombosis; 28 patients (2.4%) died for cardiovascular causes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) class (hazard ratio [HR], 2.45, P = .027; HR, 4.23, P < .001; HR, 5.96, P < .001, for classes III, IV, and V vs II, respectively), age (HR, 1.02, P = .001), and preexisting heart failure (HR, 1.85, P < .001) independently predicted CVEs. One hundred three (8.7%) patients died by day 30 postadmission. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed CVEs compared with those who did not (17.6% vs 4.5%, P < .001). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital CVEs (HR, 5.49, P < .001) independently predicted 30-day mortality (after adjustment for age, PSI score, and preexisting comorbid conditions). CVEs, mainly those confined to the heart, complicate the course of almost one-third of patients hospitalized for CAP. More importantly, the occurrence of CVEs is associated with a 5-fold increase in CAP-associated 30-day mortality.

  14. Postpartum depression risk factors: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Ghaedrahmati, Maryam; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Bahrami, Masood

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a debilitating mental disorder with a high prevalence. The aim of this study was review of the related studies. In this narrative review, we report studies that investigated risk factors of postpartum depression by searching the database, Scopus, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Uptodate, Proquest in the period 2000-2015 published articles about the factors associated with postpartum depression were assessed in Farsi and English. The search strategy included a combination of keywords include postpartum depression and risk factors or obstetrical history, social factors, or biological factors. Literature review showed that risk factors for postpartum depression in the area of economic and social factors, obstetrical history, and biological factors, lifestyle and history of mental illness detected. Data from this study can use for designing a screening tools for high-risk pregnant women and for designing a prevention programs.

  15. Altered excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borek, E; Sharma, O K; Buschman, F L; Cohn, D L; Penley, K A; Judson, F N; Dobozin, B S; Horsburgh, C R; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1986-05-01

    Urinary excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid, subsequently referred to as markers, was determined in populations of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or at risk for development of AIDS. Our results show that asymptomatic adult male homosexuals excreted elevated amounts of markers as compared to male heterosexuals. This aberrant excretion was more pronounced in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III. Significantly greater excretion of 1-methylinosine, N4-acetylcytidine, and N2-methylguanosine was observed in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III than in asymptomatic male homosexuals without antibodies to HTLV-III. Increased amounts of markers were also excreted by subjects with the generalized or chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome, AIDS related complex (ARC), or AIDS. In these subjects, the most pronounced differences between groups were between subjects with chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome and those with ARC; subjects with ARC excreted greater amounts of seven of the ten urinary markers. There were few differences between subjects with ARC and those with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma, or AIDS with opportunistic infections. This observation may be useful for identifying subjects who are at risk of developing AIDS. A prospective study to test this hypothesis is under way.

  16. Occupational and personal factors associated with acquired lumbar spondylolisthesis of urban taxi drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Chan, W; Katz, J; Chang, W; Christiani, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2%) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ⩽5 years, 6–15 years, and >15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1%, 2.4%, and 7.1% respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving >15 years (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ⩽5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46–55; and OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 12.9 for age >55), body mass index ⩾25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association. PMID:15550605

  17. CLINICAL PROFILE AND TRIGGERING FACTORS FOR ACQUIRED, BILATERAL NEVUS OF OTA-LIKE MACULES.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Jiang, Pei; Yang, Gang

    2017-01-25

    BACKGROUD Acquired, bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules (ABNOM) is one of the most common dermal melanocytoses. Although there are some literatures on ABNOM, its clinical features and etiopathogenetic factors have not been fully understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and characteristics of ABNOM among the Chinese patients. METHODS A survey was carried out using the clinical examination and a questionnaire on 3,212 first-time outpatients in our dermatology department, and 102 cases of ABNOM were subsequently enrolled. RESULTS The outpatient prevalence of ABNOM was 3.18%, and the age of the onset was 27.2 years on average. They all presented as speckled macules on the face alone or coexisted with patchy lesions (17.7%) or a band-like pigmentation (1.0%). Unprecedentedly, we found the zygomatic arch, the infraorbital, the cheek and the parotid region can be involved, and 52.0% cases had sclera pigmentation. ABNOM commonly coexisted with the pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, the melasma, the acne, prementstrual syndrome (female) and breast cystic hyperplasia(female) with the rates of 33.3%, 20.6%, 26.5%, 47.0% and 43.0% separately. Triggering factors' investigation disclosed screen irradiation (47.1%), pregnancy (32.0%), cosmetics (29.4%), sensitive skin (22.6%), and positive family histories (21.6%) were highly related. CONCLUSIONS Our study confirms that ABNOM is a relatively common disorder among adult Chinese's outpatients. It is commonly distributed over the malar, lateral forehead and temple's areas. The sclera pigmentation is another common finding that is overlooked in previous research. ABNOM is concomitant with melasma and some other disorders. Excessive sun exposure, hormonal disturbances and hereditary susceptibility are the main potential triggering factors of ABNOM.

  18. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: von Willebrand factor propeptide to von Willebrand factor antigen ratio predicts remission status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adrienne; Sinclair, Gary; Valentine, Karen; James, Paula

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) secondary to a nonneutralizing anti-von Willebrand factor (VWF) antibody associated with an autoimmune disorder. At diagnosis, VWF activity (VWF:Act), antigen (VWF:Ag), multimers, and factor VIII coagulant activity were virtually absent. VWF propeptide (VWFpp) was elevated with an infinitely high VWFpp to VWF:Ag ratio (VWFpp:Ag) consistent with rapid VWF clearance. Immunosuppressive treatment resulted in phenotypic remission 1 with normalization of VWF/factor VIII levels and multimer pattern. However, VWFpp:Ag remained elevated (∼2× normal), consistent with ongoing VWF clearance by the remaining anti-VWF antibody still present by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This suggests that increased VWF secretion was compensating for the incomplete remission state. Relapse occurred when VWFpp:Ag was again infinitely high, with associated decreased VWFpp but unchanged anti-VWF titers; switching the balance to favor VWF clearance over secretion. Complete remission with undetectable anti-VWF occurred only when VWFpp:Ag was normal. This case of relapsing-remitting AVWS demonstrates the use of VWFpp:Ag for predicting remission status. PMID:24951428

  19. Phytate (myo-inositol hexaphosphate) and risk factors for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    López-González, A A; Grases, F; Roca, P; Mari, B; Vicente-Herrero, M T; Costa-Bauzá, A

    2008-12-01

    Several risk factors seem to play a role in the development of osteoporosis. Phytate is a naturally occurring compound that is ingested in significant amounts by those with diets rich in whole grains. The aim of this study was to evaluate phytate consumption as a risk factor in osteoporosis. In a first group of 1,473 volunteer subjects, bone mineral density was determined by means of dual radiological absorptiometry in the calcaneus. In a second group of 433 subjects (used for validation of results obtained for the first group), bone mineral density was determined in the lumbar column and the neck of the femur. Subjects were individually interviewed about selected osteoporosis risk factors. Dietary information related to phytate consumption was acquired by questionnaires conducted on two different occasions, the second between 2 and 3 months after performing the first one. One-way analysis of variance or Student's t test was used to determine statistical differences between groups. Bone mineral density increased with increasing phytate consumption. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that body weight and low phytate consumption were the risk factors with greatest influence on bone mineral density. Phytate consumption had a protective effect against osteoporosis, suggesting that low phytate consumption should be considered an osteoporosis risk factor.

  20. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  1. Factors associated with fatigue in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with antiretroviral drug adverse reactions: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Jiping; Liu, Huijuan; Jin, Yantao

    2013-06-01

    To retrospectively study the prevalence of fatigue and factors associated with fatigue among acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with antiretroviral drug adverse reactions. Data were collected from case report forms (CRFs) for a project funded by the 11th National 5-year Special Science and Technology Program on Major Infectious Diseases. Fatigue was defined by patient self-report. The outcomes were the prevalence of fatigue and the potential risk factors of fatigue. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the factors associated with fatigue. Among the 228 subjects, the prevalence of fatigue was 86.8%. In univariate analysis, the significant differences in demographic characteristics between patients with and without fatigue were: gender [OR = 2.29; 95% CI (1.05-4.98)], education level [OR = 0.40; 95% CI (0.18-0.85)], anemia [OR = 3.80; 95% CI (1.27-11.31)], time of HIV diagnosis [OR = 0.29; 95% CI (0.13-0.65)], and route of infection [OR = 0.14; 95% CI (0.06-0.32)]. Abnormal taste and rapid pulse were more commonly seen in patients with fatigue (P < 0.05), while abdominal distension and lumbar soreness were encountered less often in patients with fatigue (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the four main factors associated with fatigue were anemia [OR = 3.50; 95% CI (1.01-12.15)], route of infection [OR = 3.40; 95% CI (1.21-9.58); P = 0.02 < 0.05], lumbar soreness [OR = 0.06; 95% CI (0.02-0.18); P = 0.000 < 0.05], and rapid pulse [OR = 10.58; 95% CI (2.16-51.75); P = 0.004 < 0.05]. This study demonstrated that fatigue is common (86.8% prevalence) in AIDS patients with antiretroviral drug adverse reactions, and that anemia, route of infection (i.e., non-commercial blood donation) and rapid pulse were risk factors, while lumbar soreness was a protective factor related to fatigue. More attention should be paid to fatigue and more efforts should be made to find ways to prevent, control and eliminate

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  3. Risk Factor Intervention for Health Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lester

    1978-01-01

    Risk factors for disease consist of personal habits such as cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and bodily characteristics such as hypertension and high serum cholesterol. Progress in identifying, quantifying, and controlling risk factors is opening the way to the prevention of disease. (BB)

  4. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  5. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  6. Risk factors across the eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Wilfley, Denise; Fairburn, Christopher; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Walsh, Timothy; Weissman, Ruth Striegel

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. Risk factors for BN were shared with AN and BED. Dieting was the most common onset symptom in AN, whereas binge eating was most common in BN and BED. Migration between AN and BED was rare, but more frequent between AN and BN and between BN and BED. AN and BED have distinct risk factors and onset patterns, while BN shares similar risk factors and onset patterns with both AN and BED. Results should inform future classification schemes and prevention programs. PMID:25103674

  7. Factors influencing ceftriaxone use in community-acquired pneumonia: Emergency doctors' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Almatar, Maher Ali; Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of ED doctors regarding the use of ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with ED doctors in an Australian tertiary public hospital. A semi-structured interview method was used for collecting data and a framework analysis approach utilised to identify emerging themes regarding the influences on ED prescribers when using ceftriaxone for CAP. Eight interviews were performed (two consultants, four registrars and two residents). Five main themes emerged as influencing decisions regarding the selection of ceftriaxone for patients with CAP: (i) clinical intuition versus structured evaluation of severity; (ii) clinical uncertainty; (iii) prior experience; (iv) source of guidance; and (v) prescribing etiquette. As most cases of CAP are initially diagnosed and treated empirically in the ED, any interventions that aim to decrease inappropriate use of ceftriaxone for CAP should address the factors identified here that influence ED doctors' prescribing decisions. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Brain structural changes as vulnerability factors and acquired signs of post-earthquake stress.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, A; Sugiura, M; Taki, Y; Kotozaki, Y; Nouchi, R; Takeuchi, H; Araki, T; Hanawa, S; Nakagawa, S; Miyauchi, C M; Sakuma, A; Kawashima, R

    2013-05-01

    Many survivors of severe disasters, even those without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), need psychological support. To understand the pathogenesis of PTSD symptoms and prevent the development of PTSD, the critical issue is to distinguish neurological abnormalities as vulnerability factors from acquired signs of PTSD symptoms in the early stage of adaptation to the trauma in the normal population. The neurological underpinnings of PTSD have been well characterized, but the causal relationships with the traumatic event are still unclear. We examined 42 non-PTSD subjects to find brain morphometric changes related to the severity of PTSD symptoms in a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study extending through the Great East Japan Earthquake. We found that regional grey matter volume (rGMV) in the right ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) before the earthquake, and decreased rGMV in the left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) through the earthquake were negatively associated with PTSD symptoms. Our results indicate that subjects with smaller GMV in the ACC before the earthquake, and subjects with decreased GMV in the OFC through the earthquake were likely to have PTSD symptoms. As the ACC is involved in processing of fear and anxiety, our results indicate that these processing are related to vulnerability for PTSD symptoms. In addition, decreased OFC volume was induced by failing to extinct conditioned fear soon after the traumatic event. These findings provide a better understanding of posttraumatic responses in early stage of adaptation to the trauma and may contribute to the development of effective methods to prevent PTSD.

  9. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor in pediatric patients with community-acquired pneumonia and pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Hwan; Park, Eun Young; Jung, Hye Lim; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Deok Soo; Park, Moon Soo; Shim, Jung Yeon

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in children with community-acquired pneumonia. Serum VEGF levels were measured in patients with pneumonia (n=29) and in control subjects (n=27) by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pneumonia group was classified into bronchopneumonia with pleural effusion (n=1), bronchopneumonia without pleural effusion (n=15), lobar pneumonia with pleural effusion (n=4), and lobar pneumonia without pleural effusion (n=9) groups based on the findings of chest radiographs. We also measured serum IL-6 levels and the other acute inflammatory parameters. Serum levels of VEGF in children with pneumonia were significantly higher than those in control subjects (p<0.01). Children with lobar pneumonia with or without effusion showed significantly higher levels of serum VEGF than children with bronchopneumonia. For lobar pneumonia, children with pleural effusion showed higher levels of VEGF than those without pleural effusion. Children with a positive urinary S. pneumonia antigen test also showed higher levels of VEGF than those with a negative result. Serum IL-6 levels did not show significant differences between children with pneumonia and control subjects. Serum levels of VEGF showed a positive correlation with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the children with pneumonia. In conclusion, VEGF may be one of the key mediators that lead to lobar pneumonia and parapneumonic effusion.

  10. Persistent diarrhea: risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, B; Biswal, Niranjan; Adhisivam, B; Parija, S C; Srinivasan, S

    2010-08-01

    To identify risk factors associated with Persistent diarrhea (PD) and deaths due to PD. This prospective case control study included 60 children with PD (cases) and 60 children (controls) with acute diarrhoea (AD). Detailed history, examination and appropriate investigations were done for all children. Crude Odds ratio was calculated for each risk factor by univariate analysis and adjusted odds ratio was calculated by multivariate logistic regression. Prior antibiotic use, steroid use, anemia, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition, LRI, UTI, oral candidiasis, and hyponatremia, were statistically significant risk factors by univariate analysis. Prior antibiotic use, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition and LRI were independently associated with PD by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk factors for mortality were stool frequency more than 10 times per day, severe malnutrition, oral candidiasis, hypoalbuminemia and HIV positivity. The presence of these risk factors should alert the clinician to take appropriate measures, to decrease the mortality.

  11. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  12. [Risk factors of main cancer sites].

    PubMed

    Uleckiene, Saule; Didziapetriene, Janina; Griciūte, Liudvika Laima; Urbeliene, Janina; Kasiulevicius, Vytautas; Sapoka, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a system of various measures devoted to avoid this disease. Primary cancer prevention means the identification, avoidance, or destruction of known risk factors. The main risk factors are smoking, diet, alcohol consumption, occupational factors, environmental pollution, electromagnetic radiation, infection, medicines, reproductive hormones, and lack of physical activity. Approximately one-third of cancers can be avoided by implementing various preventive measures. The aim of this article was to acquaint medical students, family doctors with risk factors of main cancer sites (lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate).

  13. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  14. Vitamin D Status and the Risk for Hospital-Acquired Infections in Critically Ill Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; West, Kathryn G.; Kempker, Russell R.; Siwamogsatham, Oranan; Alvarez, Jessica A.; Tangpricha, Vin; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Martin, Greg S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To identify patient characteristics associated with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in the medical intensive care unit (ICU) and examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and the risk for hospital-acquired infections. Methods This is a prospective observational cohort of adult patients admitted to the medical ICU at an urban safety net teaching hospital in Atlanta, Georgia from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012 with an anticipated ICU stay ≥ 1 day. Phlebotomy for serum 25(OH)D measurement was performed on all patients within 5 days of ICU admission. Patients were followed for 30 days or until death or hospital discharge, whichever came first. Hospital-acquired infections were determined using standardized criteria from review of electronic medical record. Results Among the 314 patients analyzed, 178 (57%) had a low vitamin D at a serum 25(OH)D concentration < 15 ng/mL. The patient characteristics associated with low vitamin D included admission during winter months (28% vs. 18%, P = 0.04), higher PaO2/FiO2 (275 vs. 226 torr, P = 0.03) and a longer time from ICU admission to study phlebotomy (1.8 vs. 1.5 days, P = 0.02). A total of 36 (11%) patients were adjudicated as having a hospital-acquired infection and in multivariable analysis adjusting for gender, alcohol use, APACHE II score, time to study phlebotomy, ICU length of stay and net fluid balance, serum 25(OH)D levels < 15 ng/mL were not associated with risk for hospital-acquired infections (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.40-1.80, P = 0.7). Conclusions In this prospective, observational cohort of adults admitted to a single-center medical ICU, we did not find a significant association between low 25(OH)D and the risk for hospital-acquired infections. PMID:25849649

  15. Risk of Cataract among Subjects with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Free of Ocular Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, John H.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Varma, Rohit; Dunn, James P.; Heinemann, Murk-Hein; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lyon, Alice T.; Lewis, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk of cataract in the setting of AIDS. Design Prospective cohort study. Participants Subjects with AIDS free of ocular opportunistic infections throughout catamnesis. Methods During 1998–2008 inclusive, subjects ≥13 years of age were enrolled. Demographic characteristics and clinical characteristics were documented at enrollment and semiannually. Main Outcome Measures Cataract was defined as high-grade lens opacity observed by biomicroscopy and judged to be the cause of a best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery during follow-up were considered to have developed cataract prior to the first visit when pseudophakia or aphakia was observed. Results Among 1,606 participants (3,212 eyes), at enrollment 1.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3%−2.7%) were observed to have cataract or prior cataract surgery. Among the 2,812 eyes initially free of cataract, and followed longitudinally (median follow-up=4.6 years), the incidence of cataract was 0.37%/eye-year (95% CI: 0.26%– 0.53%). In addition to age, significant cataract risk factors included prior cataract in the contralateral eye (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=21.6, 95% CI: 10.4–44.8), anterior segment inflammation (aHR=4.40, 95% CI: 1.64–11.9), prior retinal detachment (aHR=4.94, 95% CI: 2.21–11.0), and vitreous inflammation (aHR=7.12, 95% CI: 2.02– 25.0), each studied as a time-updated characteristic. Detectable HIV RNA in peripheral blood was associated with lower risk of cataract at enrollment (adjusted odds ratio=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12–0.80) but not of incident cataract (aHR=1.58, 95% CI: 0.90–2.76). After adjustment for other factors, neither the then current absolute CD4+ T cell count nor antiretroviral therapy status showed consistent association with cataract risk, nor did an additive diagnosis of other other co-morbidities. Compared to the available population-based studies that used similar definitions of cataract, the age

  16. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often by as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per=kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessment for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  17. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Biwer, B M; Butler, J P

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often be as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per-kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessments for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  18. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young people].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Contreras, Mónica; Moreno-Gómez, Germán A; Marín-Grisales, Marta E; García-Ortiz, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) involves several disorders related to the formation and development of atherosclerotic processes. Several risk factors are involved in CVD aetiology; some of them (i.e. age, hypertension, obesity, dislipidemia and diabetes) have been clearly associated, whereas others have a variable level of association. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors has been recently reported in the young population; studies of cardiovascular risk factors in this population have shown that its cardiovascular risk profile could be different from that presented by older populations. This review presents a summary of reported cardiovascular risk factors in the young population and their causes which have been released and indexed in different databases. Most factors discussed are life-habit risk factors and represent direct targets for clinical intervention. We propose that primary CVD prevention should include a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the risk factors concerning the young population and could have a positive impact on CVD prevalence during the next few years.

  19. Relationship Satisfaction and Risk Factors for Suicide.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Tran, Ulrich S; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that troubled romantic relationships are associated with higher risk factors for mental health. However, studies examining the role of relationship satisfaction in suicide risk factors are scarce. We investigated differences in risk factors for suicide between individuals with high relationship satisfaction, individuals with low relationship satisfaction, and singles. Furthermore, we explored patterns of experiencing, and dealing with, conflicts in the relationship and examined associations with suicide risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed relationship status, relationship satisfaction, specific types of relationship conflicts, and suicide risk factors (i.e., suicidal ideation, hopelessness, depression) with questionnaires among 382 individuals in Austria. Risk factors for suicide were higher among singles than among individuals in happy relationships, but lower among those with low relationship satisfaction. Participants reporting a high number of unsolved conflicts in their relationship had higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression than individuals who tend to solve issues with their partner amicably or report no conflicts. Relationship satisfaction and relationship conflicts reflect risk factors for suicide, with higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression reported by individuals who mentioned unsolved conflicts with their partner and experienced low satisfaction with their relationship.

  20. Concussion risk factors and strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hamish A

    2014-12-01

    Concussion in children is frequently related to participation in sports. It requires a traumatic event to occur that transmits acceleration to the brain. Some children may have intrinsic risk factors that place them at greater risk for this type of injury. Comorbidities such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, migraine headaches, and mood disorders may place athletes at increased risk of more severe injury. A previous concussion is probably the most important influence on risk for future injury. Extrinsic risk factors include coaching techniques, officiating, and choice of sport. Helmet choice does not diminish concussion risk, nor does the use of mouth guards. Education of athletes, coaches, parents, and physicians is very important in improving recognition of potential concussive injury and helping child athletes and their parents understand the risks involved in sport participation.

  1. Cardiovascular disease and modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and many parts of the world. Potentially modifiable risk factors for CVD include tobacco use, physical inactivity, hypertension, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a cluster of interrelated metabolic risk factors. Over the last several decades, efforts to prevent or treat CVD risk factors have resulted in significantly lower rates of CVD-related mortality. However, many patients never achieve adequate control of CVD risk factors even when these factors have been identified. In addition, the growing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) threatens to undermine the improvements in CVD that have been achieved. In the United States, approximately two thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and even modest excess body weight is associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD-related mortality. Lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss reduce the risk of CVD-related illness but are difficult for patients to sustain over long periods of time. The increased incidence of obesity has also contributed to significant increases in the prevalence of other important CVD risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 DM. Pharmacologic therapies are currently available to address individual CVD risk factors, and others are being evaluated, including endocannabinoid receptor antagonists, inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtypes alpha and gamma, and several agents that modulate the activity of glucagon-like peptide-1. The new agents have the potential to significantly improve several CVD risk factors with a single medication and may provide clinicians with several new strategies to reduce the long-term risk of CVD.

  2. Atherosclerosis risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Elliott, Jennifer R; Manzi, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Growing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from initial endothelial dysfunction to rupture of atheromatous plaques. The increased frequency of atherosclerosis in SLE is likely due to a complex interplay among traditional risk factors, disease-related factors such as medications and disease activity, and inflammatory and immunogenic factors. Identification of these novel risk factors will lead to a better understanding of CVD pathogenesis and may also provide targets for potential treatment strategies. When caring for SLE patients, clinicians should be aware of the increased CVD risk and treat the known modifiable risk factors in addition to controlling disease activity and inflammation.

  3. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  4. Risk assessment and management for providers of community-based rehabilitation to people with acquired brain injury: health professionals' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Olivia; Doig, Emmah; Fleming, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore health professionals' perspectives regarding the presence, assessment and management of risks when providing community-based rehabilitation (CBR) to clients with acquired brain injury (ABI). A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews of health professionals working in CBR. The main themes were: (1) risk assessment in CBR settings is an informal, unstructured, complex, multi-phase and cyclical process extending over a period of time; (2) structured and standardised risk assessments were not considered ideal for use in CBR services catering for people with ABI; (3) CBR services face numerous challenges in providing effective risk assessment and management; (4) the risks encountered by health professionals in CBR settings are not always predictable or preventable; and (5) CBR risk management focuses on implementing a range of practical strategies. A flexible risk assessment process supported by a range of practical risk management strategies to minimise and manage potential risks is advocated by health professionals working in CBR services for people with ABI. There is a need for more research into the effectiveness of current risk assessment and management strategies for CBR services.

  5. [Risk factors for preterm encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kornacka, Maria K; Bokiniec, Renata; Bargiel, Agata

    2009-08-01

    Encephalopathy in a common neonatological sense is a term referring to a complex of clinical symptoms occurring in term infants in the first days of their life as a result of hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, if we accept the encyclopedic definition of encephalopathy as a vast or multifocal brain lesions caused by a variety of factors, we may use the term to describe all patients with traumatic, hypoxic or toxic brain lesions, and therefore also newborns at different levels of maturity. Contrary to term newborns, in which case the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are mostly intrauterine, for preterm infants there is a number of factors which destroy neural tissue postnatally The occurrence of those factors is often influenced by elements of essential intensive care. The article describes the most common biochemical disturbances and clinical causes.

  6. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  7. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of cystic benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland in patients at risk for the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finfer, M D; Gallo, L; Perchick, A; Schinella, R A; Burstein, D E

    1990-01-01

    Cystic benign lymphoepithelial lesion (BLL), a previously rare lesion of the parotid gland consisting of marked lymphoid hyperplasia with accompanying squamous-lined cysts, has recently been described in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS risk factors. Thirteen fine needle aspiration (FNA) samples of parotid gland masses from patients with AIDS (one case), AIDS risk factors (five cases) or denial of AIDS risk factors (two cases) and a histopathologic diagnosis of BLL were examined. The FNA features that correlated best with the histopathologic findings were (1) a heterogeneous lymphoid population, (2) scattered single and/or clustered foamy macrophages and (3) superficial and/or anucleated squamous cells. Most aspirates showed some combination of these three components. The differential diagnostic considerations, the clinical and radiologic correlations and the relationship of this lesion to HIV infection are discussed. Patients with parotid masses whose aspirates consist of some combination of squamous cells, lymphocytes and foamy macrophages should be questioned for possible AIDS risk factors.

  8. Risk behavior-based model of the cubic growth of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Stanley, E.A.; Hyman, J.M.; Layne, S.P.; Qualls, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The cumulative number of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States has grown as the cube of time rather than exponentially. The authors explain this by interactions involving partner choice and sexual frequency in a risk-behavior model with biased mixing. This leads to a saturation wave of infection moving from high- to low-risk groups. If this description is correct, then the decreasing growth rate of AIDS cases is not due to behavior changes; rather it is due to the intrinsic epidemiology of the disease.

  9. Developmental risk factors for sexual offending.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph K P; Jackson, Henry J; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the general, common, and specific developmental risk factors for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, and multiple paraphilia, and to address five methodological issues observed in this area of research. This study involved 64 sex offenders and 33 nonsex, nondrug-related, and nonviolent property offenders. The group of 64 sex offenders was further divided into eight subgroups, some of which overlapped in memberships because of multiple diagnoses. To overcome the methodological problem associated with overlapping group memberships, a special approach involving comparisons of sets of logistic regression analyses was adopted. Offenders were clinically assessed for evidence of paraphilias, and their adverse childhood experiences were measured by a battery of tests. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction, Childhood Behavior Problems, and Childhood Sexual Abuse were found to be general developmental risk factors for paraphilias. Furthermore, Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction was found to be a common developmental risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple paraphilia. Additional analyses revealed that childhood emotional abuse contributed significantly as a common developmental risk factor compared to family dysfunction. Besides, Childhood Sexual Abuse was found to be a specific developmental risk factor for pedophilia. The study has supported the value of conceptualizing certain childhood adversities as developmental risk factors for paraphilic behaviors. The role of childhood emotional abuse as an important developmental risk contributor, and the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and pedophilia are of theoretical significance. Furthermore, the results have significant implications for the prevention of childhood abuse and treatment of sex offenders.

  10. Glaucoma history and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    Apart from the risk of developing glaucoma there is also the risk that it is not detected and irreversible loss of vision ensues. Some studies of methods of glaucoma diagnosis have examined the results of instrument-based examinations with great if not complete reliance on objective findings in arriving at a diagnosis. The very valuable advances in glaucoma detection instrument technologies, and apparent increasing dependence on them, may have led to reduced consideration of information available from a patient history in those studies. Dependence on objective evidence of glaucomatous pathology may reduce the possibility of detecting glaucoma suspects or patients at risk for becoming glaucoma suspects. A valid positive family history of glaucoma is very valuable information. However, negative family histories can often be unreliable due to large numbers of glaucoma cases being undiagnosed. No evidence of family history is appropriate rather than no family history. In addition the unreliability of a negative family history is increased when patients with glaucoma fail to inform their family members. A finding of no family history can only be stated as no known family history. In examining the potential diagnostic contribution from a patient history, this review considers, age, frailty, race, type and degree of refractive error, systemic hyper- and hypotension, vasospasm, migraine, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, medication interactions and side effects, the degree of exposure to intraocular and intracranial pressure elevations and fluctuations, smoking, and symptoms in addition to genetics and family history of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  12. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  13. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  14. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  15. Risk factors for recurrence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Samie, Ahmed Abdel; Traub, Marc; Bachmann, Klaus; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) is one of the most common causes of hospital-acquired diarrhea. Despite increasing incidence of clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, there are few data on risk factors associated with its relapse. We studied retrospectively possible risk factors for the recurrence of CDAD; 124 patients fulfilled the criteria of CDAD during the study period between January 2006 and July 2009. After successful treatment, recurrence occurred in 20 patients. Nineteen patients (95%, p = 0.029) in the relapse group were on long term proton pump inhibitor therapy compared to 77 patients (74%) in the non-relapse group. There was no statistically significant difference in severity (CRP: p = 0.442, leucocytosis: p = 0.415) and length of hospitalization (p= 0.539) in both studied groups; however, CDAD-relapse was associated with more hospital readmissions and increased health care costs. Proton pump inhibitor therapy may be associated with increased risk of recurrence of CDAD, and represents a relevant, yet correctable risk factor. In patients at risk for CDAD, proton pump inhibitors should be used carefully.

  16. Estimating the risks of acquiring a kidney abroad: a meta-analysis of complications following participation in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Anker, Ashley E; Feeley, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of odds ratios comparing the risks of participating in transplant tourism by acquiring a kidney abroad to the risks associated with domestic kidney transplant was undertaken. Comparison across 12 medical outcomes indicates transplant tourists are significantly more likely to contract cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B, HIV, post-transplantation diabetes mellitus, and wound infection than those receiving domestic kidney transplant. Results also indicate that domestic kidney transplant recipients experience significantly higher one-yr patient- and graft-survival rates. Analyses are supplemented by independent comparisons of outcomes and provide practitioners with weighted estimates of the proportion of transplant recipients experiencing 15 medical outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to caution patients of the medical risks associated with transplant tourism. Despite the illegal and unethical nature of transplant tourism, additional efforts are indicated to eliminate the organ trade and to educate wait-listed patients about the risks of transplant tourism.

  17. [Midwives' perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    García-Barrios, C; Castañeda-Camey, X; Romero-Guerrero, X; González-Hernández, D; Langer-Glas, A

    1993-01-01

    Midwives in rural areas of the State of Morelos are one of the most important resources used by rural women for health care of pregnancy, delivery and the puerperium. This work was aimed at identifying midwives perceptions of pregnant women's risk factors, in order to include this knowledge in reproductive health programs which articulate institutional and traditional health systems. We applied a questionnaire to all midwives in the Municipalities of Ocuituco, yecapixtla and Zacualpan, Morelos (n = 35). Four key informants were selected and interviewed. These instruments enabled us to measure variability in perception of risk factors. Knowledge of risk factors is defective among midwives. Previous training made a big difference. Sixty three per cent of midwives who attended training courses are better qualified from an academic medicine point of view. Only 28.7 per cent of non-trained midwives (43% for both groups), indicating that sociocultural aspects prevail over technical training in midwives perceptions of reproductive risk factors.

  18. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  19. Concurrent risk factors for adolescent violence.

    PubMed

    Saner, H; Ellickson, P

    1996-08-01

    To examine the risk and protective factors for different types of violent behavior in a sample of high school age adolescents drawn from the general population, illuminate the multiple and cumulative nature of the different risk factors, and characterize gender differences in explanatory variables that foster involvement in violent activities. Using data from a 6-year longitudinal self-report survey of over 4,500 high school seniors and high school dropouts from California and Oregon, we developed weighted estimates of the proportions of youth exhibiting different risk factors who are also involved in violent activities. We use risk scales to show the cumulative effects of multiple factors within substantive domains, and logistic regression techniques to pinpoint the effects of each risk factor relative to others included in the models. Major risk factors for violence include gender and deviant behaviors, such as using and selling drugs, committing nonviolent felonies, and engaging in other forms of nonviolent delinquency. Low academic orientation, lack of parental affection and support, and perceptions of parents' substance use also show strong links with violent behavior. As the number of risk factors increases, so does the likelihood of engaging in violent behavior. Boys and girls show somewhat different paths to violence, with girls being comparatively more susceptible to the effects of family problems or disruption and impaired relationships with parents. For boys, engaging in other deviant behaviors provides the most information about their propensity to commit violent acts. Weak bonds with school and family also have an impact on serious violence for boys. Risk factors from multiple domains--demographic, environmental, and behavioral--contribute to involvement in various types of violent behavior. The strong links between violence, drug use, and delinquency argue for prevention/intervention programs that take into account the clustering of these behaviors

  20. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  1. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  2. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  3. Risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    von Eckardstein, A

    2005-01-01

    Several controlled interventional trials have shown the benefit of anti-hypertensive and hypolipidaemic drugs for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). International guidelines for the prevention of CHD agree in their recommendations for tertiary prevention and recommend lowering the blood pressure to below 140 mm/90 mm Hg and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to below 2.6 mmol/l in patients with manifest CHD. Novel recommendations for secondary prevention are focused on the treatment of the pre-symptomatic high-risk patient with an estimated CHD morbidity risk of higher than 20% per 10 years or an estimated CHD mortality risk of higher than 5% per 10 years. For the calculation of this risk, the physician must record the following risk factors: sex, age, family history of premature myocardial infarction, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride. This information allows the absolute risk of myocardial infarction to be computed by using scores or algorithms which have been deduced from results of epidemiological studies. To improve risk prediction and to identify new targets for intervention, novel risk factors are sought. High plasma levels of C-reactive protein has been shown to improve the prognostic value of global risk estimates obtained by the combination of conventional risk factors and may influence treatment decisions in patients with intermediate global cardiovascular risk (CHD morbidity risk of 10%-20% per 10 years or CHD mortality risk of 2%-5% per 10 years).

  4. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  5. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  6. Risk factors for homelessness among US veterans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  8. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors.

  9. Vascular risk factors and cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Debette, S

    2013-10-01

    Delaying the onset of dementia by just a few years could have a major impact on the prevalence of the disease at the population level. Vascular risk factors are modifiable and may offer an important opportunity for preventive approaches. Several studies have shown that diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and smoking are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, but other groups have not observed such a relation. Positive associations were observed mainly in studies where risk factors were assessed in midlife, suggesting that age is an important modulator in the relation between vascular risk factors and cognition. The population attributable risk of dementia is particularly high for hypertension. Associations of vascular risk factors with cognitive decline and dementia are probably mediated largely by cerebrovascular disease, including both stroke and covert vascular brain injury, which can have additive or synergistic effects with coexisting neurodegenerative lesions. To date, randomized trials have not convincingly demonstrated that treating vascular risk factors is associated with a reduction in cognitive decline or dementia risk. Of eight randomized trials testing the effect of antihypertensive agents on dementia risk, only one was positive, and another in a subgroup of individuals with recurrent stroke. In most trials, cognition and dementia were secondary outcomes, follow-up was short and treatment was initiated at an older age. No effect on cognitive decline or dementia could be demonstrated for statins and intensive glycemic control. Future areas of investigation could include differential class effects of antihypertensive drugs on cognitive outcomes and identification of high risk individuals as target population for clinical trials initiated in midlife. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [Aflatoxins--health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Miliţă, Nicoleta Manuela; Mihăescu, Gr; Chifiriuc, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a group of strains, mainly Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These mycotoxins are bifurano-coumarin derivatives group with four major products B1, B2, G1 and G2 according to blue or green fluorescence emitted in ultraviolet light and according to chromatographic separation. After metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in the mammalian body, result two metabolites M1 and M2 as hydroxylated derivatives of the parent compound. Aflatoxins have high carcinogenic potential, the most powerful carcinogens in different species of animals and humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified aflatoxin B1 in Group I carcinogens. The target organ for aflatoxins is the liver. In chronic poisoning, aflatoxin is a risk to health, for a long term causing cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and in acute intoxications aflatoxin is lethal. This work purpose to discuss aflatoxins issue: the synthesis, absorption and elimination of aflatoxins, the toxicity mechanisms, and measures to limit the content of aflatoxins in food

  11. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  12. Failed subacromial decompression. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, A; Garret, J; Favard, L; Charles, H; Ollat, D

    2014-12-01

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (acromioplasty) is widely held to be effective, although pain may persist after the procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with residual pain (i.e., the failure rate) after isolated subacromial decompression and to look for predictors of failure. We conducted a retrospective multicentre study of 108 patients managed with isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression between 2007 and 2011, for any reason. We excluded patients in whom surgical procedures on the rotator cuff tendons were performed concomitantly. Data were collected from the medical records, a telephone questionnaire, and radiographs obtained before surgery and at last follow-up. Failure was defined as persistent pain (visual analogue scale score>3) more than 6 months after surgery and at last follow-up. The failure rate was 29% (31/108). Two factors significantly predicted failure, namely, receiving workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition and co-planing. Heterogeneous calcific tendinopathy and deep partial-thickness rotator cuff tears were also associated with poorer outcomes, but the effect was not statistically significant. Co-planing may predict failure of subacromial decompression, although whether this effect is due to an insufficient degree of co-planing or to the technique itself is unclear. Nevertheless, in patients with symptoms from the acromio-clavicular joint, acromio-clavicular resection is probably the best option. Receiving workers' compensation benefits was also associated with treatment failure, as a result of well-known parameters related to the social welfare system. Isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective in 70% of cases. We recommend the utmost caution if co-planing is considered and/or the patient receives workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition, as these two factors are associated with a significant increase in the failure rate. IV

  13. Being at peace as an important factor in acquiring teaching competency by Iranian nurse teachers: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Emamzadeh Ghasemi, Hormat Sadat; Rafii, Forough; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Mohammadi, Nooreddin

    2014-02-24

    It is imperative to understand the factor that influence teaching competency. Therefore, it is necessary to study those that have an impact on the process of acquiring teaching competency. Competent nurse teachers have an important role in the achievement of nursing students and improving the quality of nursing education. However, few researches have focused specifically on the process of acquiring teaching competency in nurse teachers and its related factors. This study as a part of more extensive research aims to explore the factors influencing acquisition of teaching competency by Iranian nurse teachers. Grounded theory was chosen as the method. Eleven teachers from three nursing schools in Tehran were recruited. Data was generated by semi structured interviews during May 2011 to March 2013 and was analyzed through using constant comparison. Three main categories were emerged including "individual characteristics" (spirituality, professional interest, ethical conducts, knowledge expansion and reflective practice), "organizational factors" (management of educational systems, solidarity culture, student characteristics) and "socio-cultural factors" (social situations, and public definition of nursing). Nurse teachers who deal peacefully with the nursing profession and colleagues are responsible and committed to acquiring teaching competency. A suitable organization in nursing educational systems that is structured and ordered also encourages a peaceful approach by nurse teachers.

  14. Environmental factors and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2004-11-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most important risk factors for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. HBV is the primary cause of HCC in high-risk areas including China and Africa, whereas in developed countries such as the United States, HCV plays a more prominent role and is at least partially responsible for the increase in HCC incidence in this country. Humans are exposed to hepatocarcinogenic aflatoxins through ingestion of moldy foods, a consequence of poor storage of susceptible grains. Highly exposed populations are primarily in sub-Sahara Africa and Asia, where dietary aflatoxins significantly enhance the carcinogenic effects of viral hepatitis. Heavy, long-term alcohol use is a risk factor for HCC, whereas moderate use (1-3 drinks/day) is not. Constituents of cigarette smoke are hepatic carcinogens in animals, and there is mounting evidence that the liver is an organ susceptible to tobacco carcinogenicity. Diabetic patients are at risk for HCC probably as a result of the hepatic injury, fibrosis, and eventual cirrhosis resulting from fatty liver disease. Given the current epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States, this risk factor will be increasingly important. Increased risk for HCC is evident in young noncirrhotic users of oral contraceptives in the United States and Europe. In summary, risk factors for HCC are identifiable in most patients and primarily are associated with chronic hepatic injury.

  15. Venous and arterial thrombosis during oral contraceptive use: risks and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Bea C; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2003-02-01

    Since the introduction of oral contraceptives, their use has been associated with an increased risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis. Pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke are serious disorders with a considerable risk of mortality. Because worldwide over 100 million women use oral contraceptives, issues of drug safety are of great importance. The risk of venous thrombosis during low-dose oral contraceptive use is three- to sixfold increased compared with that of nonusers. The association is not only attributed to the estrogen component of the pill: the risk is twice as high for desogestrel and gestodene (third generation) containing oral contraceptives as for levonorgestrel (second generation) containing oral contraceptives. The risk of venous thrombosis is highest in the first year of use and in women with genetic or acquired risk factors for thrombosis. Both venous or arterial thrombosis are unrelated to duration of use or past use of combined oral contraceptives. The risk of myocardial infarction and stroke during low-dose oral contraceptive use is two- to fivefold increased relative to that of nonusers. The risk of arterial thrombosis induced by oral contraceptive use is more pronounced in smokers and women with hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. All types of thrombosis have strongly age-dependent incidences, and therefore in absolute figures the risks and effects of risk factors increase with age. The lowering of the estrogen dose in combined oral contraceptives from 50 microg to 20-30 microg in the last decade did not clearly reduce the risk of venous thrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease. For stroke and peripheral arterial disease no difference in risk was found between second and third generation oral contraceptives. For myocardial infarction study results are conflicting, and a small benefit of third- over second-generation oral contraceptives cannot be ruled out. However, this is

  16. Diagnostic accuracy study of a factor VIII ELISA for detection of factor VIII antibodies in congenital and acquired haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Batty, Paul; Moore, Gary W; Platton, Sean; Maloney, James C; Palmer, Ben; Bowles, Louise; Pasi, K John; Rangarajan, Savita; Hart, Daniel P

    2015-10-01

    Antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) remains the greatest clinical and diagnostic challenge to the haemophilia-treating physician. Current guidance for testing for inhibitory FVIII antibodies (inhibitors) recommends the functional Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA). A FVIII ELISA offers a complementary, immunological approach for FVIII antibody testing. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively evaluate the performance of a FVIII ELISA (index) for detection of FVIII antibodies, compared with the NBA (reference). All samples sent for routine FVIII antibody testing at two haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, were tested in parallel using the NBA and a solid-phase, indirect FVIII ELISA kit (Immucor). A total of 497 samples from 239 patients (severe haemophilia A=140, non-severe haemophilia A=85, acquired haemophilia A=14) were available for analysis. Sixty-three samples tested positive by the NBA (prevalence 12.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.9-15.9 %), with a median inhibitor titre of 1.2 BU/ml (range 0.7-978.0). The FVIII ELISA demonstrated a specificity of 94.0% (95%CI, 91.3-96.0), sensitivity of 77.8% (95%CI, 65.5-87.3), negative predictive value of 96.7% (95%CI, 94.5-98.2), positive predictive value 65.3% (95%CI, 53.5-76.0), negative likelihood ratio 0.2 (95%CI, 0.1-0.4), positive likelihood ratio 13.0 (95%CI, 8.7-19.3) and a diagnostic odds ratio of 54.9 (95%CI, 27.0-112.0). Strong positive correlation (r=0.77, p<0.001) was seen between the results of the NBA (log adjusted) and FVIII ELISA optical density. In conclusion, FVIII ELISA offers a simple, specific, surveillance method enabling batch testing of non-urgent samples for the presence of FVIII antibodies.

  17. Bone metastasis risk factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Catarina; Vendrell, Inês; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Casimiro, Sandra; Mansinho, André; Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Bone is the single most frequent site for bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. Patients with bone-only metastasis have a fairly good prognosis when compared with patients with visceral disease. Nevertheless, cancer-induced bone disease carries an important risk of developing skeletal related events that impact quality of life (QoL). It is therefore particularly important to stratify patients according to their risk of developing bone metastasis. In this context, several risk factors have been studied, including demographic, clinicopathological, genetic, and metabolic factors. Most of them show conflicting or non-definitive associations and are not validated for clinical use. Nonetheless, tumour intrinsic subtype is widely accepted as a major risk factor for bone metastasis development and luminal breast cancer carries an increased risk for bone disease. Other factors such as gene signatures, expression of specific cytokines (such as bone sialoprotein and bone morphogenetic protein 7) or components of the extracellular matrix (like bone crosslinked C-telopeptide) might also influence the development of bone metastasis. Knowledge of risk factors related with bone disease is of paramount importance as it might be a prediction tool for triggering the use of targeted agents and allow for better patient selection for future clinical trials. PMID:28194227

  18. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism.

    PubMed

    Burd, L; Severud, R; Kerbeshian, J; Klug, M G

    1999-01-01

    To identify pre- and perinatal risk factors for autism. Case control study. We matched names of patients from North Dakota who met DSM criteria for autism, a pervasive developmental disorder, and autistic disorder with their birth certificates. Five matched controls were selected for each case. Univariate analysis of the 78 cases and 390 controls identified seven risk factors. Logistic modeling to control for confounding produced a five variable model. The model parameters were chi 2 = 36.6 and p < 0.001. The five variables in the model were decreased birth weight, low maternal education, later start of prenatal care, and having a previous termination of pregnancy. Increasing father's age was associated with increased risk of autism. This methodology may provide an inexpensive method for clinics and public health providers to identify risk factors and to identify maternal characteristics of patients with mental illness and developmental disorders.

  19. Vascular risk factors in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Claudia; Langer, Claus; Stoll, Wolfgang; Rust, Stephan; Walter, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen apheresis was recently reported to be an effective therapy in sudden hearing loss (SHL). In this study, we investigated whether lipoprotein and/or fibrinogen plasma concentrations, related gene polymorphisms and other cardiovascular risk factors are also risk factors for SHL. Total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol plasma concentrations, fibrinogen levels, and two functionally relevant fibrinogen polymorphisms were determined in 142 consecutive patients and in 84 age- and sex-matched control subjects of the same ethnic background, using routine laboratory methods and PCR analysis. In addition, we determined the platelet glycoprotein Ia (GPIa) C807T polymorphism, which was recently proposed to be a genetic risk factor for SHL, and we compared the patients' and controls' clinical characteristics. Total and LDL cholesterol concentrations were not different between patients and controls. Fibrinogen plasma levels were significantly increased in SHL patients (260+/-57 vs. 239+/-110 mg/dl, p=0.002). However, fibrinogen was not related to SHL in multivariate analysis, and none of the investigated fibrinogen polymorphisms was associated with SHL. By contrast, T allele carriers of the GPIa 807 polymorphic site had an increased risk to develop SHL (OR 1.81) and were more likely not to recover from SHL, compared to C allele carriers (OR 3.0). Moreover, significantly more SHL patients were current smokers (56.3% vs. 19.3% in the control group, p<0.0001). In conclusion, there is a partial overlap between classical coronary risk factors and risk factors for SHL. Hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL cholesterol levels) are apparently no major risk factors for SHL, whereas the GPIa C807T polymorphism, elevated fibrinogen levels, and smoking are associated with an increased risk for SHL. Altogether these findings suggest a vascular involvement in the pathogenesis of SHL and may have important implications for the

  20. Cannabis use motives and personality risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hecimovic, Karen; Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine; Stewart, Sherry H

    2014-03-01

    According to the model of substance abuse of Conrod, Pihl, Stewart, and Dongier (2000), four personality factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity [AS], introversion/hopelessness [I/H], sensation seeking [SS], and impulsivity [IMP]) are associated with elevated risk for substance use/misuse, with each personality factor being related to preference for particular drugs of abuse (e.g., AS with anxiolytics). However, cannabis use has not been consistently linked to any one of these personality factors. This may be due to the heterogeneity in cannabis use motives. The present study explored the association between these four personality risk factors and different cannabis use motives. Cannabis users completed an interview about their motives for cannabis use as well as the self-report Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS; Woicik, Conrod, Stewart, & Pihl, 2009), which measures the four personality risk factors. Results showed that AS was associated with conformity motives and I/H was associated with coping motives for cannabis use. SS was positively associated with expansion motives and IMP was associated with drug availability motives. Thus, personality risk factors in the model of Conrod et al. (2000) are associated with distinct cannabis use motives in a pattern consistent with theory.

  1. [Risk factors associated to female infertility].

    PubMed

    Romero Ramos, Ricardo; Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Abortes Monroy, Ignacio; Medina Sánchez, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of female infertility is growing worldwide and the its rate varies from 10 to 20%. It has been reported diverse risk factors associated with this medical complication. To identify the risk factors with significant association with female infertility. A case-control study was carried out. There were included 440 patients, divided into 220 women with primary or secondary female infertility (cases) and 220 women without infertility recruited at mediate postpartum (controls). Twenty sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for female infertility were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard error, Student t test and chi squared. An alpha value was set at 0.05. There were 6 factors with statistical significance: advanced age (p < 0.001), elevated body mass index (p < 0.001), age of onset of sexual activity (p < 0.001), prior pelvic surgeries (p < 0.001), and presence of stress (p < 0.001). Other risk factors such as smoking, chemical and radiological treatments, pelvic inflammatory disease, exercise, contraceptive use, alcohol intake, drugs, coffee, solvents, glue and insecticides, were not significant. There are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with female infertility. Them identification in women at reproductive age could diminish the frequency of female infertility and, thus, avoid them consequences.

  2. Sunburn risk factors at Galveston beaches.

    PubMed

    Shoss-Glaich, Adrienne B; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2004-07-01

    Although the beach is a well-recognized environment for sunburn injury, specific risk factors for sunburn and their interactions are poorly understood. In this epidemiologic study, variables related to sunburn injury at the beach were analyzed. Beachgoers exposed to more than 4 hours of sun at the beach were significantly more likely to sunburn compared with those with less exposure. Other significant sunburn risk factors were lack of sunscreen use or use of sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of 15 or less and Fitzpatrick Skin Types I and II. Reasonable sunburn avoidance strategies should include limiting duration of sun exposure to fewer than 4 hours per day.

  3. Epidemiology and risk factors for infections in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L R; Sekeres, M A; Shrestha, N K; Maciejewski, J P; Tiu, R V; Butler, R; Mossad, S B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a case-control study to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for infections requiring hospitalization in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Of 497 patients identified, 103 patients developed 201 episodes of infection. The probability of acquiring an infection 1 year from date of MDS diagnosis was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12-18%). Patients developing infections had decreased survival compared to those who did not (P = 0.007). Significant risk factors for infection were higher risk MDS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.7-4.1, P < 0.0001), nadir absolute neutrophil count <500/mL (HR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7, P < 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4-4.9, P < 0.003), history of other malignancy (HR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.3-3.1, P < 0.003), and autoimmune disease (HR 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, P < 0.005). Age, nadir platelet count <20,000/mL, diabetes mellitus, and MDS treatment were not significant risk factors. Pneumonia was the most common infection, and bacteria the predominant pathogens.

  4. Simulation Study of the Effect of Influenza and Influenza Vaccination on Risk of Acquiring Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hawken, Steven; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Deeks, Shelley L.; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; McGeer, Allison J.; Ducharme, Robin; Campitelli, Michael A.; Coyle, Doug

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether seasonal influenza vaccination results in a net increase or decrease in the risk for Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). To assess the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination on the absolute risk of acquiring GBS, we used simulation models and published estimates of age- and sex-specific risks for GBS, influenza incidence, and vaccine effectiveness. For a hypothetical 45-year-old woman and 75-year-old man, excess GBS risk for influenza vaccination versus no vaccination was −0.36/1 million vaccinations (95% credible interval −1.22 to 0.28) and −0.42/1 million vaccinations (95% credible interval, –3.68 to 2.44), respectively. These numbers represent a small absolute reduction in GBS risk with vaccination. Under typical conditions (e.g. influenza incidence rates >5% and vaccine effectiveness >60%), vaccination reduced GBS risk. These findings should strengthen confidence in the safety of influenza vaccine and allow health professionals to better put GBS risk in context when discussing influenza vaccination with patients. PMID:25625590

  5. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  6. Risk factors for and assessment of constipation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sherree; Hungerford, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Constipation commonly occurs in older people, particularly in hospital or residential care settings, and leads to decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. Despite its frequency, however, nurses often overlook the condition. One possible reason for this may be the lack of appropriate tools or scales for nurses to assess risk factors for developing constipation. This article identifies, from the academic literature, 14 risk factors for developing constipation in older people. These factors are then considered in light of four common constipation assessment charts. The article concludes by arguing the need for more comprehensive assessment tools to, firstly, identify risk factors; and, secondly, support the implementation of appropriate preventative strategies that will enable better health outcomes for older people.

  7. [The risk factors of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Gerber, J; Sozański, L; Suchocki, S

    2001-12-01

    Authors presents the risk factors in endometrial cancer underlying such problems like hyperestrogenism, both external and internal caused by hormonally active ovarian masses, polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenocortical hyperfunction and role of obesity in this pathological state. Other factors have been also described diabetes mellitus and hypertension, oral contraception, genetics factors, patient's obstetric history and other diseases where the increase of aromatization activity of androstendion to estron has been noted.

  8. Reducing iatrogenic risks: ICU-acquired delirium and weakness--crossing the quality chasm.

    PubMed

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Ely, E Wesley; Speroff, Theodore; Pun, Brenda T; Boehm, Leanne; Dittus, Robert S

    2010-11-01

    ICUs are experiencing an epidemic of patients with acute brain dysfunction (delirium) and weakness, both associated with increased mortality and long-term disability. These conditions are commonly acquired in the ICU and are often initiated or exacerbated by sedation and ventilation decisions and management. Despite > 10 years of evidence revealing the hazards of delirium, the quality chasm between current and ideal processes of care continues to exist. Monitoring of delirium and sedation levels remains inconsistent. In addition, sedation, ventilation, and physical therapy practices proven successful at reducing the frequency and severity of adverse outcomes are not routinely practiced. In this article, we advocate for the adoption and implementation of a standard bundle of ICU measures with great potential to reduce the burden of ICU-acquired delirium and weakness. Individual components of this bundle are evidence based and can help standardize communication, improve interdisciplinary care, reduce mortality, and improve cognitive and functional outcomes. We refer to this as the "ABCDE bundle," for awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring, and exercise/early mobility. This evidence-based bundle of practices will build a bridge across the current quality chasm from the "front end" to the "back end" of critical care and toward improved cognitive and functional outcomes for ICU survivors.

  9. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: Epidemiology, microbiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruna; Ferreira, Carina; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Silva, Sónia

    2016-11-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by Candida species that affects millions of women every year. Although Candida albicans is the main cause of VVC, the identification of non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, especially Candida glabrata, as the cause of this infection, appears to be increasing. The development of VVC is usually attributed to the disturbance of the balance between Candida vaginal colonization and host environment by physiological or nonphysiological changes. Several host-related and behavioral risk factors have been proposed as predisposing factors for VVC. Host-related factors include pregnancy, hormone replacement, uncontrolled diabetes, immunosuppression, antibiotics, glucocorticoids use and genetic predispositions. Behavioral risk factors include use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine device, spermicides and condoms and some habits of hygiene, clothing and sexual practices. Despite a growing list of recognized risk factors, much remains to be elucidated as the role of host versus microorganisms, in inducing VVC and its recurrence. Thus, this review provides information about the current state of knowledge on the risk factors that predispose to VVC, also including a revision of the epidemiology and microbiology of VVC, as well as of Candida virulence factors associated with vaginal pathogenicity.

  10. Acquired factor V inhibitor in a patient receiving venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for Legionella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anne K H; Ng, George W Y; Sin, K C; Au, S Y; Lai, K Y; Lee, K L; Law, K I

    2015-04-01

    We report a rare complication of factor V deficiency in a patient having Legionella pneumonia. This patient also had other complications like severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, and septic shock that required venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. This is the first reported case of acquired factor V deficiency in a patient receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for Legionella pneumonia. With the combined use of intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab and plasma exchange, we achieved rapid clearance of the factor V inhibitor within 1 week so as to allow safe decannulation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  11. Is ambient ethene a cancer risk factor?

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, M

    1994-01-01

    Ethene is, on a molar basis, a major urban air pollutant. It has been shown beyond doubt that a fraction of inhaled ethene is metabolized in mammals (including humans) via ethylene oxide, an electrophilic reagent that has been shown to be mutagenic and carcinogenic. To the extent that the linearity hypothesis for dose-response relationships at low levels is accepted, exposure to ethene is therefore expected to lead to a risk increment. In order to judge whether ethene as a single compound should be considered a risk factor, it has to be evaluated whether this risk increment is negligibly small or of concern to individuals or societies. The magnitude of the cancer risk from ethene cannot be inferred from animal experiments. Because of saturation of the metabolism of ethene, sufficient statistical power cannot be attained in long-term animal tests with about 100 animals per dose. By application of the radiation-dose equivalent of the unit of target dose of ethylene oxide and using the best (although still uncertain) value for the conversion factor (about 5%), exposure to 10 ppb ethene--a level occurring in urban areas--is expected to lead to a lifetime risk of cancer death amounting to approximately 70 per 100,000. According to a recent estimate the average exposure in Sweden to ethene is some six times lower. These figures are uncertain by a factor of at least three. They indicate ethene to be a risk factor of concern. PMID:7821290

  12. [Cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students].

    PubMed

    García-Gulfo, María H; García-Zea, Jerson A

    2012-10-01

    Determining cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students from Medellin. A descriptive study of 112 students determined their lipid profile and a survey was conducted to assess their life-style and family history. There results were analyzed by gender using Chi² test and simple binary logistic regression. 82.1 % of the sample was female. A modifiable risk factor was found for at least 99.1 % of the study population: sedentary life-style (79.5 %), smoking (17 %), alcohol consumption (75.0 %), atherogenic diet (78.6 %), hypertension (1.8 %), some form of dyslipidemia (48.3 % BMI >25 (4.5 %)) and stress (86.7 %). At least one non-modifiable risk factor was identified in 77.7 % of the students. New intervention strategies are needed given the significant percentage of the target population ± 19 mean age having cardiovascular disease risk factors and young people must be encouraged to develop healthy life-styles to reduce cardiovascular risk factor prevalence.

  13. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  14. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  15. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  16. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... Cancer? Can Thymus Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... not cancer). Other risk factors Family history of kidney cancer People with a strong family history of ...

  20. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  1. Nosocomial vs. community-acquired infective endocarditis in Greece: changing epidemiological profile and mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Giannitsioti, E; Skiadas, I; Antoniadou, A; Tsiodras, S; Kanavos, K; Triantafyllidi, H; Giamarellou, H

    2007-08-01

    Current epidemiological trends of infective endocarditis (IE) in Greece were investigated via a prospective cohort study of all cases of IE that fulfilled the Duke criteria during 2000-2004 in 14 tertiary and six general hospitals in the metropolitan area of Athens. Demographics, clinical data and outcome were compared for nosocomial IE (NIE) and community-acquired IE (CIE). NIE accounted for 42 (21.5%) and CIE for 153 (78.5%) of 195 cases. Intravenous drug use was associated exclusively with CIE, while co-morbidities (cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure requiring haemodialysis and malignancies) were more frequent in the NIE group (p <0.05). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) predominated in the NIE group (p 0.006), and >50% of NIE cases had a history of vascular intervention. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci were more frequent in cases of NIE than in cases of CIE (26.2% vs. 5.2%, p <0.01, and 30.9% vs. 16.3%, p 0.05, respectively). Enterococci accounted for 19.5% of total IE cases and were the leading cause of NIE. Staphylococcus aureus IE was hospital-acquired in only 11.9% of cases. In-hospital mortality was higher for NIE than for CIE (39.5% vs. 18.6%, p 0.02). Cardiac failure (New York Heart Association grade III-IV; OR 13.3, 95% CI 4.9-36.1, p <0.001) and prosthetic valve endocarditis (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3-10.6, p 0.01) were the most important predictors of mortality.

  2. Perinatal risk factors and infantile autism.

    PubMed

    Maimburg, R D; Vaeth, M

    2006-10-01

    Suboptimal conditions during pregnancy and birth have been suggested as a cause of infantile autism. We have studied the association between obstetric factors and infantile autism. A population-based, matched case-control study of infantile autism. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The risk of infantile autism was increased for mothers aged >35 years, with foreign citizenship, and mothers who used medicine during pregnancy. A higher risk of infantile autism was seen among children with low birth weight and with congenital malformations. Birth interventions, pathological cardiotocography, green amnion fluid and acidosis during delivery were not associated with increased risk for infantile autism. Our findings suggest that suboptimal birth conditions are not an independent risk factor for infantile autism. A high prevalence of low birth weight and birth defects among autism cases seems to explain the suboptimal birth outcome.

  3. Ten-year experience of recombinant activated factor VII use in surgical patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors or acquired haemophilia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takedani, H; Shima, M; Horikoshi, Y; Koyama, T; Fukutake, K; Kuwahara, M; Ishiguro, N

    2015-05-01

    Patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors or acquired haemophilia are at risk of bleeding complications during surgery. In these patients, replacement therapy for the missing coagulation factor is ineffective, and a bypassing agent such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is required to manage bleeding. To evaluate the safety and haemostatic efficacy of rFVIIa treatment in Japanese patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors to FVIII/FIX or acquired haemophilia undergoing surgery. Postmarketing surveillance data from May 2000 to March 2010 were analysed to assess the haemostatic efficacy of 38 procedures in 22 patients with congenital haemophilia A, 13 procedures in seven patients with congenital haemophilia B, and five procedures in five patients with acquired haemophilia. Postoperative bleeding control was judged to be effective (bleeding was stopped completely or reduced considerably) for 34/38 procedures (89%) in patients with congenital haemophilia A, 10/13 procedures (77%) in patients with congenital haemophilia B, and 4/5 procedures (80%) in patients with acquired haemophilia. Tranexamic acid was used concomitantly for 36/56 procedures (64%). Safety was analysed for 66 procedures in 37 patients. Adverse effects potentially related to rFVIIa treatment included mild superficial thrombophlebitis, mild decrease in platelet count, and mild elevation of the serum alanine transaminase level in one patient each. All adverse effects resolved without treatment. Administration of rFVIIa provided adequate haemostasis without serious adverse effects in the majority of cases. The efficacy and safety data in Japanese patients were similar to previously published data from other countries.

  4. Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaş, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; Stǎnciugelu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

  5. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, G E

    1998-09-01

    A systematic review of the literature to identify risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection was conducted. Two main outcomes were considered: C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. A qualitative assessment, based on a set of defined and consistently applied criteria, appeared to be the best approach for risk factors other than antibiotic use, as an approach based on meta-analysis would have utilized only the information provided by a minority of the studies. Risk factors for which there was evidence suggestive or consistent with an association with C. difficile diarrhoea were: increasing age (excluding infancy), severity of underlying diseases, non-surgical gastrointestinal procedures, presence of a nasogastric tube, anti-ulcer medications, stay on ITU, duration of hospital stay, duration of antibiotic course, administration of multiple antibiotics. For malignant haematological disorders there was evidence of an association only with C. difficile carriage, but there were no suitable studies to explore a possible association of this risk factor with symptomatic infection. Antibiotic use lent itself to quantitative assessment with meta-analysis using logistic regression. Exposure to an antibiotic was shown to be statistically significantly associated with both C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. The meta-analysis approach enabled the ranking of individual antibiotics in relation to the risk of C. difficile infection, though the 95% confidence intervals were often wide and overlapping. Antibiotics associated with a lower risk of C. difficile diarrhoea should be considered, especially when attempting to control a C. difficile outbreak or when prescribing for a patient with other C. difficile risk factors. This systematic review of the literature enabled the identification of features it would be desirable to consider in future epidemiological studies.

  6. Risk and Protective Factors and Achievement of Children At Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Diane

    A study was done to identify social, economic, and childhood characteristics of high and low achieving children living in adverse environmental conditions, and to test the association between achievement and specific risk and protective factors. In addition, the study identified the most powerful model for predicting achievement by comparing…

  7. Effectiveness of recorded messages to communicate the risk of acquiring hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Predy, G; Carney, B; Edwards, J

    1997-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a recorded information line in communicating health risk during the emergence of a new disease, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), in the Edmonton area and to study the accuracy of recall of information about hantavirus among the general public. A random telephone survey of residents five months after a death from HPS had occurred. The number of residents who received their information from the recorded line was quite low (approximately 2%), and more people remembered receiving their information through the news media, particularly television (74%) and newspaper (57%). An information line by itself will not communicate risk effectively during an outbreak or other emergent health situation. However, an information line used in conjunction with news media proved effective in providing ongoing, accurate information and allaying public fears in a low-risk situation.

  8. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  9. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions. PMID:24155703

  10. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Eurich, Dean T; Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-02-13

    Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection.Design Cohort study.Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02.Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060).Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses.Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients.Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes of

  11. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection. Design Cohort study. Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02. Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060). Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients. Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes

  12. Risk factors for osteoporosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, J R; Dennerstein, L; Wark, J D

    2000-01-01

    Skeletal fragility and falls are the 2 most potent factors leading to osteoporotic fractures. The aim of this article is to review factors associated with women's risk of developing skeletal fragility and subsequent osteoporosis. Many factors have been implicated, but the evidence for some is unsubstantial. Low premenopausal bone mineral density (BMD), a decrease in BMD, and an increase in bone fragility -- which occur as a result of both aging and the menopause -- are major determinants of subsequent risk for osteoporotic fracture. In addition, low body mass index (BMI), low calcium intake, low physical activity, and smoking can affect BMD. The relative importance of the effects these physical and lifestyle factors have on BMD in midlife women is not fully established. The impact of gynecologic history (parity, lactation, oral contraceptive use, age of menarche) on BMD is uncertain.

  13. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  14. Risk factors analysis of consecutive exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qianwen; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Xu; Li, Ziyuan; Liu, Longqian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate clinical factors associated with the onset of consecutive exotropia (XT) following esotropia surgery. By a retrospective nested case-control design, we reviewed the medical records of 193 patients who had undergone initial esotropia surgery between 2008 and 2015, and had follow-up longer than 6 months. The probable risk factors were evaluated between groups 1 (consecutive XT) and 2 (non-consecutive exotropia). Pearson chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U test were used for univariate analysis, and conditional logistic regression model was applied for exploring the potential risk factors of consecutive XT. Consecutive exotropia occurred in 23 (11.9%) of 193 patients. Patients who had undergone large bilateral medial rectus recession (BMR) (P = 0.017) had a high risk of developing consecutive XT. Oblique dysfunction (P = 0.001), adduction limitation (P = 0.000) were associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which was confirmed in the conditional logistic regression analysis. In addition, large amount of BMR (6 mm or more) was associated with higher incidence of adduction limitation (P = 0.045). The surgical methods and preoperative factors did not appear to influence the risk of developing consecutive XT (P > 0.05). The amount of surgery could be optimized to reduce the risk of consecutive XT. The presence of oblique overaction and postoperative adduction limitation may be associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which may require close supervision, and/or even earlier operation intervention. PMID:27977611

  15. Isolation and study of an acquired inhibitor of human coagulation factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Nesheim, M E; Nichols, W L; Cole, T L; Houston, J G; Schenk, R B; Mann, K G; Bowie, E J

    1986-01-01

    A coagulation Factor V inhibitor developed in a man 75 yr of age in association with an anaplastic malignancy and drug treatment (including the aminoglycoside antibiotic, gentamicin). The patient did not bleed abnormally, despite both surgical challenge and plasma Factor V activity of less than 1%. The inhibited plasma had grossly prolonged prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, but a normal thrombin time. Mixing studies indicated progressive coagulation inhibition with normal plasma, but not with Factor V-deficient plasma, and reversal of coagulation inhibition by the addition of bovine Factor V to the patient's plasma. 1 ml of patient plasma inhibited the Factor V activity of 90 ml of normal human plasma. The inhibitor was isolated by sequential affinity chromatography on protein A-Sepharose and Factor V-Sepharose. The IgG isolate markedly inhibits the activity of prothrombinase assembled from purified Factors Xa and Va, calcium ion, and phospholipid vesicles, and partially inhibits prothrombinase assembled from purified Factor Xa, calcium ion, and normal platelets. The Factor V of platelets, however, appears relatively inaccessible to the antibody, inasmuch as platelets isolated from whole blood supplemented for 8 h with the antibody functioned normally with respect to platelet Factor V-mediated prothrombinase function. The absence of obvious hemorrhagic difficulties in the patient, the total inhibition of plasma Factor V by the inhibitor, and the apparent inaccessibility of platelet Factor V to the inhibitor specifically implicate platelet Factor V in the maintenance of hemostasis. Images PMID:3944265

  16. Risk factors for mortality in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uppal, H; Chandran, S; Potluri, R

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition that contributes to a significantly shorter life expectancy compared with the general population. We investigated the most common comorbidities in a population of acute hospital patients with Down syndrome and further explored what the most common risk factors for mortality are within this population. From our database of one million patients admitted to National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in northern England, we identified 558 people who had Down syndrome. We compared this group with an age- and gender-matched control group of 5580 people. The most prevalent comorbid diseases within the Down's population were hypothyroidism (22.9%) and epilepsy (20.3%). However, the conditions that had the highest relative risks (RRs) in the Down's population were septal defects and dementia. Respiratory failure, dementia and pneumonia were the most significantly related comorbidities to mortality in the Down syndrome population. In the control population, respiratory failure, dementia and renal failure were the most significant disease contributors. When these contributors were analysed using multivariate analysis, heart failure, respiratory failure, pneumonia and epilepsy were the identified risk factors for in-hospital mortality in the Down syndrome population. Respiratory failure was the sole risk factor for mortality in the Down syndrome population [RR = 9.791 (1.6-59.9) P ≤ 0.05], when compared with the risk factors for mortality in the control population. There is significant medical morbidity in Down syndrome. This morbidity contributes to the lower life expectancy. Respiratory failure is a risk factor for mortality in Down syndrome. We need to thoroughly investigate people with Down syndrome to ensure any treatable illnesses are well managed. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 'Fetal programming' and 'functional teratogenesis': on epigenetic mechanisms and prevention of perinatally acquired lasting health risks.

    PubMed

    Plagemann, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Alterations of the intrauterine and early postnatal nutritional, metabolic, and hormonal environment may cause predispositions to the development of disorders and diseases in later life. Mechanisms responsible for this perinatally acquired 'malprogramming' still remain unclear. It has long been known, however, that hormones are environment-dependent organizers of the developing 'neuroendocrine-immune network', which regulates all fundamental processes of life. When present in nonphysiological concentrations during critical ontogenetic periods, hormones can therefore also act as 'endogenous functional teratogens'. Fetal and neonatal hyperinsulinism is a pathognomic feature in the offspring of diabetic mothers. Perinatal hyperinsulinism also occurs due to early postnatal overfeeding. Data obtained by our group indicate that elevated insulin concentrations during critical periods of perinatal life may induce a lasting 'malprogramming' of neuroendocrine systems regulating body weight, food intake, and metabolism. Similar characteristics may occur due to perinatal hyperleptinism, hypercortisolism etc. Since mechanisms of early 'programming' of obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome X are unclear, a complex 'neuroendocrine malprogramming' of the regulation of body weight and metabolism may provide a general etiopathogenetic concept in this context, exemplarily revealing critical new implications for chances and challenges of perinatal preventive medicine in the future.

  18. Established and potential risk factors for Clostridum difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vaishnavi, C

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent for almost all cases of pseudo membranous colitis and 15-25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In recent years, C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) has been increasing in frequency and severity due to the emergence of virulent strains. Severe cases of toxic mega colon may be associated with mortality rates of 24-38%. The prevalence of CDAD is global and the incidence varies considerably from place to place. In the initial stages of its discovery, C. difficile infection was regarded mainly as an outcome of antibiotic intake and not as a life threatening disease. Intervention by man has produced conditions making C. difficile a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The recent outbreak of CDAD in Quebec has sent the alarm bells ringing. Apart from a threefold increase in the incidence of CDAD, clinicians have also reported a higher number of cases involving toxic mega colon, colectomy or death. Among all the risk factors, inclusive of the host and the environmental factors, antibiotics are the most important ones. Surgical patients comprise 55-75% of all patients with CDAD due to the fact that perioperative prophylaxis requires the use of antibiotics. However, other drugs such as immunosuppressants and proton pump inhibitors are also important risk factors. Thus CDAD is a growing nosocomial and public health challenge. Additionally, the recognition of community acquired CDAD signals the presence of several risk factors. In this review, the established and potential risk factors of CDAD, along with the epidemiology, diagnostic modalities, management and preventive measures of the disease have been elaborated.

  19. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Results Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Conclusions Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE. PMID:27097772

  20. [The concentration of growth factors in patients with inherent and acquired shortenings of limbs bones].

    PubMed

    Strogov, M V; Luneva, S N; Novikov, K I

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the results of study of level of growth factors in blood serum of patients with inherent and post-traumatic shortenings of limbs' bones. The detection in blood serum the level of epidermal growth factor insulin-like growth factor I and angiopoetins is proposed to monitor in given patients the reparative bone formation.

  1. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Marc P.; Inge, Thomas H.; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M.; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. OBJECTIVE To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children’s Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. RESULTS The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit

  2. Clinical definition of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackman, David; Pao, William; Riely, Gregory J; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Kris, Mark G; Jänne, Pasi A; Lynch, Thomas; Johnson, Bruce E; Miller, Vincent A

    2010-01-10

    Ten percent of North American patients with non-small-cell lung cancer have tumors with somatic mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Approximately 70% of patients whose lung cancers harbor somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR experience significant tumor regressions when treated with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib or erlotinib. However, the overwhelming majority of these patients inevitably acquire resistance to either drug. Currently, the clinical definition of such secondary or acquired resistance is not clear. We propose the following criteria be used to define more precisely acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. All patients should have the following criteria: previous treatment with a single-agent EGFR TKI (eg, gefitinib or erlotinib); either or both of the following: a tumor that harbors an EGFR mutation known to be associated with drug sensitivity or objective clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR TKI; systemic progression of disease (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or WHO) while on continuous treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib within the last 30 days; and no intervening systemic therapy between cessation of gefitinib or erlotinib and initiation of new therapy. The relatively simple definition proposed here will lead to a more uniform approach to investigating the problem of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in this unique patient population. These guidelines should minimize reporting of false-positive and false-negative activity in these clinical trials and would facilitate the identification of agents that truly overcome acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib.

  3. Exploring Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambinder, Alexander J.; Shenoy, Pareen J.; Malik, Neha; Maggioncalda, Alison; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent malignancy of germinal center B cells with varied incidence across racial groups and geographic regions. Improvements in the classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes provide an opportunity to explore associations between environmental exposures and FL incidence. Our paper found that aspects of Western lifestyle including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and diets high in meat and milk are associated with an increased risk of FL. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, and certain antioxidants are inversely associated with FL risk. A medical history of Sjogren's syndrome, influenza vaccination, and heart disease may be associated with FL incidence. Associations between FL and exposure to pesticides, industrial solvents, hair dyes, and alcohol/tobacco were inconsistent. Genetic risk factors include variants at the 6p21.32 region of the MHC II locus, polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XRCC3, and UV exposure in individuals with certain polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor. Increasing our understanding of risk factors for FL must involve integrating epidemiological studies of genetics and exposures to allow for the examination of risk factors and interactions between genes and environment. PMID:23028387

  4. [Cardiovascular risk factors in Chilean university students].

    PubMed

    Chiang-Salgado, M T; Casanueva-Escobar, V; Cid-Cea, X; González-Rubilar, U; Olate-Mellado, P; Nickel-Paredes, F; Revello-Chiang, L

    1999-01-01

    To study the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic university students of both sexes, aged 18 to 25 years. Serum lipid levels were measured in a subsample of 293 subjects, using a Hitachi 717 chemical analyzer. Obesity was classified using body mass index (BMI) measurements. A self-applied questionnaire was used to collect data on sedentary life style, family history of cardiovascular disease and cigarette smoking. Statistical associations of lipid levels with lipidic and non-lipidic risk factors were assessed using Pearson's chi-square test and multiple regression. We found lipid risk levels in 29.2% for total cholesterol (CT), 16.2% for low-density lipoproteins (C-LDL) and 5% for high-density lipoproteins (C-HDL). The main non-lipidic factors were smoking (46.1%) and sedentarism (60.8%). Obesity, hypertension and parental history of myocardial infarction were present in 1.9%, 4.6% and 11%, respectively. We observed an association of a lipid risk profile with obesity, cigarette smoking and family history. The results show that sedentarism and smoking are associated with a lipid risk profile. These results call for the need to develop appropriate behavior strategies for the successful prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  6. Oral cancer risk factors in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yakin, Muhammed; Gavidi, Ratu Osea; Cox, Brian; Rich, Alison

    2017-03-03

    Oral cancer constitutes the majority of head and neck cancers, which are the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, accounting for an estimated 984,430 cases in 2012. Between 2000 and 2010, there were 1,916 cases of OSCC in New Zealand with a male to female ratio of 1.85:1, and an age-standardised incidence rate of 42 persons per 1,000,000 population. This article presents an overview of the main risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and their prevalence in New Zealand. Alcohol consumption is the most prevalent risk factor in New Zealand, followed by tobacco. Given the high prevalence of these two risk factors and their synergistic effect, it is important for doctors and dentists to encourage smoking cessation in smokers and to recommend judicious alcohol intake. Research is needed to determine the prevalence of use of oral preparations of tobacco and water-pipe smoking in New Zealand, especially due to changing demography and increases in migrant populations. UV radiation is also an important risk factor. Further investigations are also needed to determine the prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to oncogenic HPV infection.

  7. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  8. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  9. Risk Factors for Paternal Physical Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study uses the developmental-ecological framework to examine a comprehensive set of paternal factors hypothesized to be linked to risk for paternal child abuse (PCA) among a diverse sample of fathers. Attention was given to fathers' marital status and their race/ethnicity (White, African American, and Hispanic). Methods: Interviews…

  10. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  11. Risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, J L

    1989-01-01

    Established risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures are increasing age, female sex, white race, removal of the ovaries at an early age, prolonged immobility, and prolonged use of corticosteroids. Obesity and use of estrogen replacement therapy are protective. Factors that probably or possibly increase risk in postmenopausal white women include a low calcium intake, cigarette smoking, and, at least for hip fractures, use of long half-life psychotrophic drugs and heavy alcohol consumption. Factors probably or possibly associated with a decreased risk include ingestion of vitamin D and its metabolites, fluoride levels of 2 ppm or more in drinking water, moderate physical activity, pregnancies and breast feeding, use of thiazide diuretics, and progestogens. Some evidence suggests that calcium intake and physical activity at young ages may be important determinants of peak bone mass. Few studies have been undertaken in males and blacks, although at least some risk factors in males may be similar to those in females. Preventive efforts may be aimed at increasing peak bone mass at young ages, preventing bone loss in postmenopausal women, and preventing fractures and their adverse consequences in older people with osteoporosis. PMID:2517695

  12. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  13. Risk Factors for Rural Residential Fires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Zwerling, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural households report high fire-related mortality and injury rates, but few studies have examined the risk factors for fires. This study aims to identify occupant and household characteristics that are associated with residential fires in a rural cohort. Methods: Of 1,005 households contacted in a single rural county, 691…

  14. Child sexual assault: risk factors for girls.

    PubMed

    Butler, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    To identify prospectively measured risk factors of sexual assault (SA) among girls age 17 and younger. The data come from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and are derived from interviews with 1,087 girls, their primary caregivers, and household heads. The data were collected from the girls' first year of life through their early twenties. Factors measured during childhood were used to predict whether the girls experienced a subsequent first sexual assault before the age of 18. Prospectively measured risk factors associated with subsequent child SA included the absence of one or both parents, maternal education less than college, family income below 400% of the federal poverty threshold, low caregiver warmth, child internalizing and externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, low achievement scores, and having been classified by their school as needing special education. Girls with behavioral health problems and learning challenges are at heightened risk for sexual assault. Research on behavioral health consequences of SA should control for preexisting SA risk factors to more accurately estimate the impact of child SA on subsequent behavioral health.

  15. Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

    2004-01-01

    Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

  16. Risk Factors for Rural Residential Fires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Zwerling, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural households report high fire-related mortality and injury rates, but few studies have examined the risk factors for fires. This study aims to identify occupant and household characteristics that are associated with residential fires in a rural cohort. Methods: Of 1,005 households contacted in a single rural county, 691…

  17. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  18. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  19. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  20. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  1. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  2. Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

    2004-01-01

    Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

  3. The risk factors of CVA in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Auais, Mohammad A; Alzyoud, Jehad M; Sbieh, Ziad; Abdulla, Fuad A

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to identify the main risk factors of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in Jordan. Identification of risk factors may help to reduce the incidence of CVA. A form was prepared for data collection which consisted of two parts to gather biodata and the incidence of risk factors. A sample of 200 patients with CVA (60% men) were randomly selected from various areas of Jordan. An age, region distribution, and gender-matched sample were selected to serve as control. Hypertension in the experimental group (66%) was significantly higher than the control group (32%) p  <  0.001. Half of the subjects with stroke had diabetes compared to 22% of the control group (p  <  0.001). Cardiovascular diseases were found in 29% of subjects with CVA compared to 14% in the control group (p  <  0.001). About 27% of the CVA group had hyperlipidemia in comparison to 13% in the controls (p <  0.002). Smokers represented 54% of the experimental group compared to 30% of the control group (p <  0.05). An important finding in the present study was that about half of the selected subjects with strokes were under the age of 60 years. In conclusion, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipidemia, and smoking are risk factors for CVA in Jordan.

  4. [Sexual risk factors among European young people].

    PubMed

    Calatrava, María; López-Del Burgo, Cristina; de Irala, Jokin

    2012-05-05

    The sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) in Europe are still rising. In order to prioritize STI prevention strategies in Europe, it is important to describe the prevalence of different sexual risk factors for STIs among European young people. We carried out a systematic review of published articles and studies performed by European institutions. A total of 21 articles and 10 studies were identified. The data shows an increase in early sexual initiation and the number of sexual partners. Young people who use condoms inconsistently ranged from 15 to 20%. The observed risk factors are: unawareness about other STIs different from HIV, being in favour of casual sex, wrongly believing that some measures are effective in avoiding HIV, not being aware of the risks from having multiple sexual partners and unawareness about the sexual transmission of HIV. The data suggests the need to improve the information addressed to youth.

  5. Acquired factor VIII deficiency associated with a novel primary immunodeficiency suggestive of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Tuba Turul; Asal, Gulten Turkkan; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Tezcan, Ilhan; Ersoy, Fugen; Sanal, Ozden

    2007-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are associated with various autoimmune complications and several manifestations of autoimmunity can be seen in the disorders of T cells, B cells, phagocytes, and complement components. Acquired hemophilia is a rare entity in childhood. Although autoantibodies may develop in various forms of PID, Factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors have not been described before. Herein, we present a case of acquired hemophilia resulting from FVIII inhibitors who had underlying undefined PID features suggestive of autosomal recessive hyper IgE syndrome. Our patient responded to corticosteroid treatment rather well and quickly, with an increased FVIII level and decreased FVIII inhibitors. However, FVIII inhibitor reappeared 7 months later, and disappeared spontaneously 4 months ago. Long-term and close follow-up is needed to observe the long-term prognosis in this child.

  6. Risk factors associated with lambing traits.

    PubMed

    McHugh, N; Berry, D P; Pabiou, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the risk factors associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality in the Irish sheep multibreed population. A total of 135 470 lambing events from 42 675 ewes in 839 Irish crossbred and purebred flocks were available. Risk factors associated with producer-scored ewe lambing difficulty score (scale of one (no difficulty) to four (severe difficulty)) were determined using linear mixed models. Risk factors associated with the logit of the probability of lamb mortality at birth (i.e. binary trait) were determined using generalised estimating equations. For each dependent variable, a series of simple regression models were developed as well as a multiple regression model. In the simple regression models, greater lambing difficulty was associated with quadruplet bearing, younger ewes, of terminal breed origin, lambing in February; for example, first parity ewes experienced greater (P7.0 kg) birth weights, quadruplet born lambs and lambs that experienced a more difficult lambing (predicted probability of death for lambs that required severe and veterinary assistance of 0.15 and 0.32, respectively); lambs from dual-purpose breeds and born to younger ewes were also at greater risk of mortality. In the multiple regression model, the association between ewe parity, age at first lambing, year of lambing and lamb mortality no longer persisted. The trend in solutions of the levels of each fixed effect that remained associated with lamb mortality in the multiple regression model, did not differ from the trends observed in the simple regression models although the differential in relative risk between the different lambing difficulty scores was greater in the multiple regression model. Results from this study show that many common flock- and animal-level factors are associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality and management of different risk category groups (e.g. scanned litter sizes, ewe age groups) can be used

  7. Cardiovascular Risk Factors of Taxi Drivers.

    PubMed

    Elshatarat, Rami Azmi; Burgel, Barbara J

    2016-06-01

    In the United States (U.S.), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major leading cause of death. Despite the high mortality rate related to CVD, little is known about CVD risk factors among urban taxi drivers in the U.S. A cross-sectional design was used to identify the predictors of high cardiovascular risk factors among taxi drivers. Convenience sampling method was used to recruit 130 taxi drivers. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain the data. The sample was male (94 %), age mean (45 ± 10.75) years, married (54 %), born outside of the USA (55 %), had some college or below (61.5 %), night drivers (50.8 %), and driving on average 9.7 years and 41 h/week. About 79 % of them were eligible for CVD prevention, and 35.4 % had high CVD risk factors (4-9 risk factors). A CVD high-risk profile had a significant relationship with the subjects who were ≥55 years old; had hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia; were drinking alcohol ≥2 times/week; and had insufficient physical activity. Subjects who worked as a taxi driver for more than 10 years (OR 4.37; 95 % CI 1.82, 10.50) and had mental exertion from cab driving >5 out of 10 (OR 2.63; 95 % CI 1.05, 6.57) were more likely to have a CVD high-risk profile. As a conclusion, system-level or worksite interventions include offering healthy food at taxi dispatching locations, creating a work culture of frequent walking breaks, and interventions focusing on smoking, physical activity, and weight management. Improving health insurance coverage for this group of workers is recommended.

  8. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  9. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    PubMed

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  10. Environmental factors influencing the risk of autism

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Padideh; Kamali, Elahe; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Karahmadi, Mojgan

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disability with age of onset in childhood (under 3 years old), which is characterized by definite impairments in social interactions, abnormalities in speech, and stereotyped pattern of behaviors. Due to the progress of autism in recent decades, a wide range of studies have been done to identify the etiological factors of autism. It has been found that genetic and environmental factors are both involved in autism pathogenesis. Hence, in this review article, a set of environmental factors involved in the occurrence of autism has been collected, and finally, some practical recommendations for reduction of the risk of this devastating disease in children are represented. PMID:28413424

  11. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder.

  12. Is consanguinity a risk factor for keratoconus?

    PubMed

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Essa, Maron; Garth, Jeanne; Ghara, Mohammed; Shneor, Einat

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether consanguinity is a risk factor for keratoconus (KC). A questionnaire was distributed to all patients presenting to St. John Eye Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Questionnaire included data on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors. Patients were divided into two groups: cases with KC, in at least one eye, who were diagnosed by the attending ophthalmologist on the basis of abnormal corneal topography and at least one of the common signs of the disease; and controls presenting for problems other than KC and free of systemic and ocular conditions associated with KC. Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to identify risk factors for KC. Seventy cases and 140 controls participated in the study. Groups were similar with respect to sex and age. Univariate analyses found a significant association between KC and parental first-cousin consanguinity, eye rubbing, allergy, positive family history, education (>12 years), and sunglass wear, whereas asthma, eczema, smoking, and second-cousin consanguinity were not. Multivariate analyses showed that total consanguinity (first-cousin and second-cousin) (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; p = 0.001), eye rubbing and absence of sunglass wear were significant risk factors. Education was also associated with KC, but family history was not so in the multivariate analysis. This study supports the hypothesis that consanguinity is a significant risk factor for KC and provides strong support for a genetic contribution to the disease. Wearing sunglasses in this environment is beneficial, and the study confirmed that eye rubbing, allergy, and education are also significantly associated with KC after adjusting for other predictors.

  13. [Injuries in France: trends and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Richard, J-B; Thélot, B; Beck, F

    2013-06-01

    Whatever the type of injury considered, prevention requires an improvement in health services' awareness of risk factors. The Health Barometer is a general population survey conducted in France since 1992 to contribute to surveillance in this field. The survey's statistical power and the numerous health topics included in the questionnaire provide accurate information for healthcare professionals and decision-makers. The Health Barometer 2010 was a nationwide telephone survey of 9110 persons representative of the 15-85-year-old population. One part of the questionnaire detailed injuries which had occurred during the past year. The numerous variables recorded enabled application of logistic regression models to explore risk factors related to different types of injury by age group. The findings were compared with the Health Barometer 2005 data to search for temporal trends of injury prevalence. The data analysis showed that 10.3% of the 15-85-year-olds reported an injury during the past year. This rate was higher than recorded in 2005; the increase was mainly due to domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities. Both type of injury and risk factors exhibited age-related variability. Domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities predominated in the older population and were associated with physical or mental health problems (chronic disease, diability, sleep disorders). For younger people, injuries were related to cannabis use, drunkedness, and insufficient sleep. Risk factors were also depended on type of injury: occupational accident-related injuries were linked with social disadvantage (manual worker population) whereas sports injuries were more common in the socially advantaged population. This survey confirms established knowledge and highlights, at different stages of life, new risk factors that contribute to injuries in France. These findings should be helpful for the development of adapted injury

  14. Prenatal risk factors for childhood CKD.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine W; Yamamoto, Kalani T; Henry, Rohan K; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Flynn, Joseph T

    2014-09-01

    Development of CKD may be programmed prenatally. We sought to determine the association of childhood CKD with prenatal risk factors, including birth weight, maternal diabetes mellitus (DM), and maternal overweight/obesity. We conducted a population-based, case-control study with 1994 patients with childhood CKD (<21 years of age at diagnosis) and 20,032 controls in Washington state. We linked maternal and infant characteristics in birth records from 1987 to 2008 to hospital discharge data and used logistic regression analysis to assess the association of prenatal risk factors with childhood CKD. The prevalence of CKD was 126.7 cases per 100,000 births. High birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated nominally with CKD, with respective crude odds ratios (ORs) of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.34) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.15 to 3.37); however, adjustment for maternal confounders attenuated these associations to 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.21) and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.51 to 2.81), respectively. The adjusted ORs for CKD associated with other prenatal factors were 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.63) for low birth weight, 1.54 (95% CI, 1.13 to 2.09) for maternal gestational DM, 1.24 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.48) for maternal overweight, and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.52) for maternal obesity. In subgroup analysis by CKD subtype, low birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated significantly with increased risk of renal dysplasia/aplasia. Low birth weight, maternal gestational DM, and maternal overweight/obesity associated significantly with obstructive uropathy. These data suggest that prenatal factors may impact the risk of CKD. Future studies should aim to determine if modification of these factors could reduce the risk of childhood CKD.

  15. Susceptibility and risk factors in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F

    2000-10-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a high prevalence of advanced destruction but also that relatively few individuals in each age group account for most of the advanced periodontal disease. The available data suggest that three quarters of advanced periodontal disease could be prevented by targeting an effective preventive strategy on the 28% of individuals especially at risk. Questions remain regarding: 1) whether an acceptable cost-effective preventive strategy can be devised; and 2) whether it is possible to establish a simple method of identifying the 'at risk' group. The various risk factors are numerous and include systemic diseases, smoking, drug therapy, hormonal disturbances and genetic factors as well as the more mundane factors such as plaque control and socio-economic and education and attitude factors. Aside from these factors, many patients present with periodontal disease and have no discernible predisposition other than possibly genetic, for which we can not currently test, and for the vast majority of patients there would appear to be no other alternative to periodic thorough examination for all patients, early treatment of all periodontal lesions and appropriate dental health education.

  16. [Risk factors associated with dystocic delivery].

    PubMed

    Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Ríos López, Juan Carlos; Cortés Salim, Patricia; Ponce Ponce de León, Ana Lilia

    2007-09-01

    the dystocic delivery is a frequent complication and its perinatal repercussions vary from minor lesions to severe brain damage. It has been reported diverse factors associated with this medical complication. to identify the risk factors with significant association with dystocic delivery. a case-control study was carried out. There were included 750 patients, divided into 250 women with dystocic deliveries (cases) and 500 women with eutocic deliveries (controls). Demographic and clinical variables were registered. The statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard deviation, Student t test, chi2 and logistic regression analysis. An alpha value was set at 0.05. the factors with statistical significance were: advanced age (p < 0.001), major patient's height (p < 0.001), major new born's weight (p = 0.009), lower parity (p < 0.001), and prolonged duration of labor (p = 0.04). Other variables such as number of pregnancies, previous cesarean sections, spontaneous abortions, weight of the patient, weight earned during pregnancy, number of medical appointments during antenatal care, previous dystocic delivery, and premature rupture of the membranes, were not significant. there are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with dystocic delivery. To identify this risk factors during the antenatal care could diminish the frequency of dystocic deliveries and therefore to avoid the associated maternal-fetal complications.

  17. Postnatal Risk of Acquiring Kawasaki Disease: A Nationwide Birth Cohort Database Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Hwan; Lin, Min-Tai; Chen, Hui-Chi; Kao, Feng-Yu; Huang, San-Kuei

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the postnatal risk of Kawasaki disease and coronary complications from a nationwide birth cohort in Taiwan, a country with the third-highest incidence of Kawasaki disease worldwide. We enrolled children born between 2000 and 2009 with complete postnatal medical care records for 2000-2014 in the Taiwan national database. Out of a total of 2 150 590 live births, we identified 6690 (62.6% boys) patients with Kawasaki disease. The onset was mostly (93.9%) within the first 5 years of life (median, 16 months; 38% during infancy), but was rare within the first 3 months of life. The overall cumulative incidence of Kawasaki disease by age 5 years was 2.78‰ (3.33‰ for boys and 2.17‰ for girls; P < .001) and exhibited an increasing trend with birth year (from 2.28‰ for 2000 to 3.67‰ for 2009). The incidence ratio was 1.535 in boys and 1.055 in each increasing year. Kawasaki disease recurred more often in younger patients (cumulative incidence, 2.3% in infants vs 1.7% in children aged 1-4 years). Coronary complications occurred in 16.2% of the patients, including 4 cases of acute myocardial infarction (3 occuring during the acute stage and 1 occurring 5 years later). The probability of a major cardiac event (infarction, undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting, or death) by adolescence was 1.9%. The postnatal risk of Kawasaki disease was 3‰-4‰ and increased with every birth year. Patients with Kawasaki disease are at substantial risk for a major cardiac events during childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for sexually-acquired HIV risk management: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, James; Senn, Heather; Sharma, Malika; Tan, Darrell HS

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant efforts, the rate of new HIV infections worldwide remains unacceptably high, highlighting the need for new HIV prevention strategies. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a new approach that involves the ongoing use of antiretroviral medications by HIV-negative individuals to reduce the risk of HIV infection. The use of daily tenofovir/emtricitabine as oral PrEP was found to be effective in multiple placebo-controlled clinical trials and approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States and the World Health Organization have both released guidelines recommending the offer of oral PrEP to high-risk populations. The scale-up of PrEP is underway, but several implementation questions remain unanswered. Demonstration projects and open-label extensions of placebo-controlled trials are ongoing and hope to contribute to our understanding of PrEP use and delivery outside the randomized controlled trial setting. Evidence is beginning to emerge from these open-label studies and will be critical for guiding PrEP scale-up. Outside of such studies, PrEP uptake has been slow and several client- and provider-related barriers are limiting uptake. Maximizing the public health impact of PrEP will require rollout to be combined with interventions to promote uptake, support adherence, and prevent increases in risk behavior. Additional PrEP strategies are currently under investigation in placebo-controlled clinical trials and may be available in the future. PMID:25987851

  19. Environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, D; Rodzinka-Pasko, J K; Li, Y-M

    2016-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromes that are predominantly defined by behavioral features such as impaired social interactions, restricted verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive or stereotyped behavior. In the past few decades, the reported prevalence of ASD has increased dramatically. This growth can be partially explained by an increased level of awareness of the problem among professionals and better diagnostic methods. Nevertheless, underpinning causes of ASD have not yet been detailed and explained. It is suggested that rather than having a single causative factor, ASD pathogenesis is influenced by environmental or genetic factors, or a combination of both. The aims of this review are to describe the environmental risk factors associated with ASD so as to provide a reference basis for current and future clinical and experimental work. On the basis of a PubMed search, we review the existing knowledge on environmental factors associated with ASD. A series of environmental factors have been repeatedly reported as risk factors for ASD in existing studies. Air pollution, organic toxicants, seasonal factors, psychological stress, migration, birth order, and nutrition may have a close relationship with the incidence of ASD.

  20. Musicians' ability to judge the risk of acquiring noise induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study musicians' abilities to estimate the risk to obtain a hearing loss. Twenty-two professional musicians mainly playing classical music wore dosimeters during 2 working weeks. They also wrote a diary describing all their musical activities and tried to judge the percentage of time that every activity was harmful to their hearing. Half of the musicians seemed to be capable to reasonably judge the harmfulness of the music that they were exposed to. They started to judge the levels to be risky at 80 dB(A) and regarded themselves as slightly more susceptible to noise induced hearing loss than normal.

  1. Environmental risk factors for heart disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD.

  2. Evaluating risks of acquired clinical vulnerability among subjects exposed to E-waste.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Kumar, Sushil

    2011-01-01

    Acquired clinical vulnerability (ACV) results from insults that produce consequential pathophysiological changes and predispose exposed subjects to future disease. ACV comprises a complex biological process that is manifested by exposure to toxicants, generally over the course of many years, and results from subtle changes that occur at the cellular and molecular level. A large proportion of the world's population has already been, or will be, exposed to toxicants emanating from E-waste during the course of their lives. In countries where E-waste recycling is an important economic activity (China, India, among others), the challenge facing researchers is to devise suitable methods for identifying and objectively measuring ACV. Primary prevention can be achieved through legislation/awareness/monitoring and secondary prevention by developing innovative diagnostic tools and corrective measures. Studies in which attempts are made to define the health impact of multiple exposures, as routinely occurs in E-waste recycling, should include measures of as many of the following parameters as possible: (a) characterization of pollutant levels in air/water/soil at the residential or workplace, (b) periodical clinical examination of exposed subjects, (c) assessments of circulating toxicant loads in blood/urine/hair, (d) genomic variation and resultant susceptibility to complex biological responses, (viz, inflammation/dysplasia/immunosuppression/tissue regeneration) that derive from pathway modulation (viz., cytoskeleton/metabolism/cell adhesion/immune system/neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction/cytokine/signaling), (e) routine monitoring of altered gene expression from modulation of hematology or the above-mentioned pathways. E-waste exposure may also serve as a model for the types of multiple exposures that occur in other industrial or environmental exposures. Moreover, the approach used to study and address or alleviate E-waste exposure may also be useful in other

  3. Hard Contact Lens Wear and the Risk of Acquired Blepharoptosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Since there are increasing numbers of patients with blepharoptosis who have a history of wearing contact lenses, we attempted to estimate the risk of developing ptosis from wearing hard contact lenses. Methods: In an age-matched case-control study that was performed in a hospital in Japan, we compared the rate of hard contact lens users in ptosis cases with that in a control group and then estimated the odds ratio. Results: The history of wearing hard contact lenses was significantly higher in patients (90.2%) versus controls (31.6%). Hard contact lens wearers had a 20 times increased risk of ptosis (odds ratio: 19.9; 95% confidence interval: 6.32-62.9) compared with the nonwearing subjects. Conclusions: This study indicated that there was a significant association between hard contact lenses and blepharoptosis. Because of both the prevalence of use and the aging of the population, contact lens–induced blepharoptosis is no longer just a problem for young and middle-aged people with myopia but also for the elderly population. PMID:23826433

  4. Risk factors and their identification second part: study designs for identification of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-06-01

    This is the second a series of three articles which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. In this second article we define the three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and casecohort studies. Examples are provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The final paper will provide some examples of the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first example involves diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  5. Validation and comparison of SCAP as a predictive score for identifying low-risk patients in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    España, Pedro P; Capelastegui, Alberto; Quintana, José M; Bilbao, Amaia; Diez, Rosa; Pascual, Silvia; Esteban, Cristóbal; Zalacaín, Rafael; Menendez, Rosario; Torres, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    (1) To validate the Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia (SCAP) score in predicting 30-day mortality. (2) To validate its ability to identifying patients at low risk of death. (3) To compare it against the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), and the British Thoracic Society's CURB-65 rules. The SCAP score was validated to predict 30-day mortality in an internal validation cohort of consecutive adult patients seen in one hospital. Consecutive inpatients from other three hospitals were used to externally validate the score and compare the SCAP with the PSI and CURB-65. The discriminatory power of these rules to predict 30-day mortality was tested by the Area under Curve (AUC), and their predictive accuracy with the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. The 30-day mortality rate increased directly with increasing SCAP score (class 0: 0.5%, to class 4: 66.5% risk) in the internal validation cohort, and from 1.3% to 29.2% in external cohort (P<0.001) with an AUC of 0.83 and 0.75, respectively (P=0.024). The SCAP score identified 62.4% (95% IC 58.8-66.0) low-risk patients, 52.5% (95% IC 48.8-56.2) the PSI and 46.2% (95% CI 42.5-49.9) the CURB-65 in the external cohort. Patients classified as low risk by the three rules had similar 30-day mortality (SCAP: 2.5%, PSI: 1.6% and CURB-65: 2.7%). The SCAP is valid to predict 30-day mortality among low-risk patients and identifies a larger proportion of patients as low-risk than the other studied rules. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Use of oral antidiabetic agents and risk of community-acquired pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gorricho, Javier; Garjón, Javier; Alonso, Alvaro; Celaya, María Concepción; Saiz, Luis Carlos; Erviti, Juan; López, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the association between use of different oral antidiabetic agents (OAD) and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in patients with type-2 diabetes (T2DM). Case-control study nested in a cohort of patients with T2DM and use of OAD between 2002 and 2013, based in a Spanish general practice research database. Cases were people diagnosed with T2DM, aged >18 years and with a validated diagnosis of CAP between 2002 and 2013. Ten controls were matched on age, sex and calendar year. Odds ratio (OR) of CAP was estimated comparing patients treated with: (1) metformin vs. other monotherapies or no antidiabetic treatment; (2) metformin + sulfonylureas vs. other antidiabetic combinations. OR of CAP was also assessed according to antidiabetic treatment duration. From a cohort of 76 009 T2DM patients, we identified 1803 cases of CAP. No difference in the incidence of CAP was observed when comparing any OAD in monotherapy with metformin. Compared with current use of metformin + sulfonylurea, thiazolidinediones + metformin was associated with an increased risk of CAP (adjusted OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.40-4.38). The use of any combination with thiazolidinediones was also associated with higher risk of CAP (adjusted OR = 2.00, 95% CI 1.22-3.28). Current use of DPP-4 inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of CAP. No differences in the incidence of CAP were observed between the use of OAD in monotherapy vs. metformin. Thiazolidinedione use in combination was associated with an increase in the risk of CAP when compared to metformin + sulfonylureas. The use of DPP-4 inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of CAP. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Risk factor paradox in wasting diseases.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Horwich, Tamara B; Oreopoulos, Antigone; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Younessi, Houman; Anker, Stefan D; Morley, John E

    2007-07-01

    Emerging data indicate that conventional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia and obesity) are paradoxically associated with better survival in distinct populations with wasting. We identify these populations and review survival paradoxes and common pathophysiologic mechanisms. A 'reverse epidemiology' of cardiovascular risk is observed in chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, cancer, AIDS and rheumatoid arthritis, and in the elderly. These populations apparently have slowly progressive to full-blown wasting and significantly greater short-term mortality than the general population. The survival paradoxes may result from the time differential between the two competing risk factors [i.e. over-nutrition (long-term killer but short-term protective) versus undernutrition (short-term killer)]. Hemodynamic stability of obesity, protective adipokine profile, endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction, toxin sequestration of fat, antioxidation of muscle, reverse causation, and survival selection may also contribute. The seemingly counterintuitive risk factor paradox is the hallmark of chronic disease states or conditions associated with wasting disease at the population level. Studying similarities among these populations may help reveal common pathophysiologic mechanisms of wasting disease, leading to a major shift in clinical medicine and public health beyond the conventional Framingham paradigm and to novel therapeutic approaches related to wasting and short-term mortality.

  8. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  9. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mahdi K; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade.

  10. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Mahdi K.; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R.; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. Results: In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). Conclusions: In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade. PMID:28904549

  11. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  12. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size.

  13. Factors Affecting Ejection Risk in Rollover Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Funk, James R.; Cormier, Joseph M.; Bain, Charles E.; Wirth, Jeffrey L.; Bonugli, Enrique B.; Watson, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 – 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size. PMID:23169130

  14. The risk factors for labor onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yasumasa; Terauchi, Mikio; Tamakoshi, Koji; Shiozaki, Arihiro; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to clarify the perinatal outcomes of and risk factors for hypertension that is first detected after labor onset (labor onset hypertension, LOH), which may be a risk factor for eclampsia and stroke during labor. A total of 1349 parturient women who did not exhibit preeclampsia or gestational hypertension prior to labor were examined. The patients were classified into four groups: the normotensive (n=1023) (whose systolic blood pressure (SBP) remained below 140 mm Hg throughout labor), mild LOH (n=241) (whose maximum SBP during labor ranged from 140 to 159 mm Hg), severe LOH (n=66) (whose maximum SBP during labor ranged from 160 to 179 mm Hg) and emergent LOH groups (n=19) (whose maximum SBP during labor was greater than 180 mm Hg). The perinatal outcomes and patient characteristics of the four groups were compared. Twenty-four percent of the pregnant women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy developed hypertension during labor. One of the patients in the emergent LOH group developed eclampsia. The blood pressure at delivery and frequencies of hypotensor use, interventional delivery and low Apgar scores differed significantly among the four groups. The following risk factors for severe/emergent LOH were extracted: being over 35 years old, a body mass index at delivery of >30, an SBP at 36 weeks' gestation of 130-134 mm Hg, an SBP at admission of 130-139 mm Hg, proteinuria (a score of 2+ on the dipstick test) and severe edema. The risk factors for severe/emergent LOH were identified in this study. In high risk cases, repeatedly measuring maternal blood pressure during delivery might help detect critical hypertension early.

  15. Do factors other than trauma volume affect attrition of ATLS-acquired skills?

    PubMed

    Ali, Jameel; Howard, Mary; Williams, J Ivan

    2003-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that trauma patient volume affects attrition rate of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS)-acquired skills. This study assesses the possible roles of age, gender, and practice specialty on attrition of these skills over 8 years. Cognitive (assessed by the 40-item Multiple Choice Question Examination [MCQE]) and clinical (assessed by four trauma Objective Structured Clinical Examination [OSCE] stations) skills performance were compared among physicians who completed the ATLS course 0 months, 6 months, 2 years, 4 years, 6 years, and 8 years previously. The physicians were further divided into the following groups: age < 32 years (n = 72) or 32 years or older (n = 72), gender (41 women and 103 men), and specialty (54 surgeons, 90 nonsurgeons, and 22 general surgeons). Multivariate analysis of variance was used for statistical comparison over time and unpaired t tests for between-group comparisons for each time period, with p < 0.05 being considered statistically significant. Regarding age, MCQE decreased from 82.3 +/- 2.8% to 62.7 +/- 3.0% (mean +/- SD) for age < 32 and from 84.1 +/- 3.6% to 62.8 +/- 2.1% for age 32 or older (p = not significant). Overall OSCE score (maximum, 20) decreased similarly for age < 32 (18.0 +/- 0.4 to 13.6 +/- 2.0) and age > 32 or older (18.0 +/- 0.3 to 12.4 +/- 1.3). Decrease in Priorities and Organized Approach scores also showed no differences between the groups. Regarding gender, MCQE decreased similarly in both groups (women, 81.5 +/- 2.2% to 64.4 +/- 2.4%; men, 83.3 +/- 3.2% to 64.1 +/- 4.2%) and so did OSCE, Priorities, and Organized Approach scores. Regarding specialty, surgeons (83.0 +/- 3.1% to 66.1 +/- 4.5%), nonsurgeons (82.9 +/- 3.2% to 63.3 +/- 3.9%), and general surgeons (82.5 +/- 3.5% to 63.8 +/- 5.3%) showed similar decreases in MCQE scores. Overall OSCE scores and Priority and Approach scores decreased similarly in all specialty groups. When trauma volume was controlled, there was still no

  16. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? A risk factor is anything that ... Can Lung Carcinoid Tumors Be Prevented? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  18. Risk factors for suicidal behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldy, B D; Siefen, G R; Urkin, J; Merrick, J

    2006-10-01

    Adolescent suicide is today a public health problem among the leading cause of mortality among adolescents and young adults. There seems to be many reasons for this increase (which has different trends in different populations), but associations have been found with increased substance abuse, television and video violence, socio-economic status and easy access to firearms. Gender differences have also been observed with crime, suicide and substance abuse higher among males, while eating disorder, depression and suicidal behavior more prevalent among females. This paper will review prevalence and incidence of adolescent suicidal behavior, socio-demographic and psychological risk factors, associated cognitive factors and socio-economic factors. Risk factors include previous suicide attempts, a history of others in the family who have been suicidal, mental illness, alcohol and drug use, and other self-destructive behaviors as well as consideration being given to hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept and isolation. At the individual difference level, factors such as trait depression, anger and hostility, perfectionism and social sensitivity would seem critical variables, as would age, gender and intellectual functioning. Sociological and family-related factors may also be implicated including dysfunctional family organizations, a history of physical or psychological abuse (sexual abuse) and limited extent of social support networks. A frequently reported precipitating event of suicidal behavior is family adversity including rejection, separation and interpersonal conflict. At a socio-economic level it would seem essential to provide comprehensive document about the social and economic conditions from which the adolescent comes.

  19. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    PubMed

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  20. Socioeconomic factors and the risk for sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hampras, Shalaka S; Moysich, Kirsten B; Marimuthu, Sathiya P; Ravi, Vinod; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissue. Although several occupational exposures have been evaluated in association with sarcoma, little is known about the role of socioeconomic indicators such as education. Socioeconomic status has been found to be associated with risk of development of several types of cancers, primarily lung, gastric, and cervical cancers. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association of socioeconomic level with the risk for sarcoma. A total of 371 incident cases of sarcoma were matched in terms of age, sex, and year of enrollment in the study with 742 cancer-free controls. Education and income levels were evaluated as the indicators of socioeconomic status. Higher education (college level) was associated with a significantly lower risk for sarcoma [odds ratio (OR)=0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.29-0.80], even after adjusting for important confounders. After stratifying by sex, significantly lower risk for sarcoma was observed among men who had college level education compared with men with a level of education of eighth grade or lower (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.19-0.74). A significant association between education and the risk for sarcoma remained after stratifying by income (OR=0.49, 95% CI=0.28-0.86, among the low income group). When analyzed as a composite exposure, individuals with high education and high income status had significantly lower risk for sarcoma compared with those with low income and low education status (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23-0.71). Thus, socioeconomic factors may play a significant role in determining the risk for sarcoma and should be explored further to elucidate the underlying factors that may explain these sociodemographic inequalities related to sarcoma.

  1. Clinical Risk Factors for Portopulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Krowka, Michael J.; Trotter, James F.; Roberts, Kari E.; Benza, Raymond L.; Badesch, David B.; Taichman, Darren B.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Zacks, Steven; Kaplowitz, Neil; Brown, Robert S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension affects up to 6% of patients with advanced liver disease, but the predictors and biologic mechanism for the development of this complication are unknown. We sought to determine the clinical risk factors for portopulmonary hypertension in patients with advanced liver disease. We performed a multicenter case-control study nested within a prospective cohort of patients with portal hypertension recruited from tertiary care centers. Cases had a mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance >240 dynes · second · cm−5, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg. Controls had a right ventricular systolic pressure < 40 mm Hg (if estimable) and normal right-sided cardiac morphology by transthoracic echocardiography. The study sample included 34 cases and 141 controls. Female sex was associated with a higher risk of portopulmonary hypertension than male sex (adjusted odds ratio =2.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20-7.01, P = 0.018). Autoimmune hepatitis was associated with an increased risk (adjusted odds ratio = 4.02, 95% confidence interval 1.14-14.23, P = 0.031), and hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.65, P =0.005) of portopulmonary hypertension. The severity of liver disease was not related to the risk of portopulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Female sex and autoimmune hepatitis were associated with an increased risk of portopulmonary hypertension, whereas hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk in patients with advanced liver disease. Hormonal and immunologic factors may therefore be integral to the development of portopulmonary hypertension. PMID:18537192

  2. [Risk factors for Alzheimer: towards prevention?].

    PubMed

    Vogel, Thomas; Benetos, Athanase; Verreault, René; Kaltenbach, Georges; Kiesmann, Michèle; Berthel, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Recent longitudinal studies have highlighted associations between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and several factors, especially some cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, diet, obesity, and elevated levels of homocysteine and lipids in the blood. The strongest associations are with hypertension and diabetes. Moderate alcohol consumption also appears to be associated with a decreased risk of incident AD. Studies of the effect of interventions to control these risk factors on the onset and course of dementia report encouraging results about antihypertensive agents and statins. Benefits from other drug therapies such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and antioxidants remain uncertain, and initial hopes for hormonal replacement therapy for postmenopausal women have not been confirmed. Physical, cognitive and leisure activities seem to provide protection against incident AD. Cautious interpretation is necessary in view of the possible biases in these studies (confounding factors as well as survival, regression dilution, and indication biases). These epidemiologic data raise questions about the diagnostic boundaries between AD and vascular dementia. Additional studies are needed to validate these concepts and to confirm the possible benefits of preventive measures.

  3. [Risk factors for anorexia in children].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Xiao; Lang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Qin-Feng

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for anorexia in children, and to reduce the prevalence of anorexia in children. A questionnaire survey and a case-control study were used to collect the general information of 150 children with anorexia (case group) and 150 normal children (control group). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic stepwise regression analysis were performed to identify the risk factors for anorexia in children. The results of the univariate analysis showed significant differences between the case and control groups in the age in months when supplementary food were added, feeding pattern, whether they liked meat, vegetables and salty food, whether they often took snacks and beverages, whether they liked to play while eating, and whether their parents asked them to eat food on time (P<0.05). The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that late addition of supplementary food (OR=5.408), high frequency of taking snacks and/or drinks (OR=11.813), and eating while playing (OR=6.654) were major risk factors for anorexia in children. Liking of meat (OR=0.093) and vegetables (OR=0.272) and eating on time required by parents (OR=0.079) were protective factors against anorexia in children. Timely addition of supplementary food, a proper diet, and development of children's proper eating and living habits can reduce the incidence of anorexia in children.

  4. Defective α2 antiplasmin cross-linking and thrombus stability in a case of acquired factor XIII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Joanne L; Wright, Sonja; Kazi, Sajida; Watson, Henry G; Mutch, Nicola J

    2017-09-01

    Acquired factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is a rare and life-threatening condition that is often misdiagnosed or missed completely. A 72-year-old woman presented with symptoms of major unprovoked bleeding but routine coagulation screening tests and platelet count were normal. Low activated FXIII (FXIIIa) activity levels and abnormal urea clot stability led to diagnosis of acquired FXIII deficiency. A modified Bethesda inhibitor titre of 1.6 Bethesda units/ml indicated the presence of a FXIII inhibitor. Bleeding responded to a single dose of FXIII concentrate and immunosuppression with prednisolone induced remission. A subsequent relapse was treated with combined prednisolone and Rituximab resulting in a prolonged, ongoing remission. Here we analyse the mechanisms underlying this idiopathic case of acquired FXIII deficiency. Prospective analysis of patient plasma revealed minimal FXIIIa activity and antigen in presentation and relapse samples. Thrombi formed from these samples lysed rapidly and showed an absence of cross-linked α2 AP. Western blotting revealed the presence of FXIII-B, indicating only FXIII-A and FXIII-A2 B2 were affected. FXIII activity and antigen levels normalised on remission. Our data suggest the presence of inhibitor-induced clearance of FXIII from plasma. As a consequence, reduced thrombus stability was evident due to defective α2 AP cross-linking, thereby explaining symptoms of excessive bleeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Bleeding associated with acquired factor V inhibitor in a patient on warfarin treated successfully with prednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Khalafallah, Alhossain; Grabek, Julian; Hayes, Robert; Mohamed, Muhajir

    2013-01-01

    An 85-year-old man on warfarin for atrial fibrillation presented with skin bleeding. International normalised ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were elevated and did not correct even after warfarin reversal with vitamin K, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and fresh frozen plasma. Mixing coagulation studies with normal plasma suggested the presence of an inhibitor rather than the multiple coagulation factor deficiencies expected with warfarin. Assays of the common-pathway coagulation factors revealed factor V concentration <2% with inhibitor level elevated to 11 Bethesda units. The bleeding resolved following a course of corticosteroids. Coagulation studies and factor V level returned to normal along with resolution of the inhibitor. We report the case of the diagnostic dilemma posed and successful therapy implemented despite the limited evidence-based data being available for the treatment of this rare condition. PMID:23921688

  6. Risk factors for complete uterine rupture.

    PubMed

    Al-Zirqi, Iqbal; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Forsén, Lisa; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Vangen, Siri

    2017-02-01

    Complete uterine rupture is a rare peripartum complication associated with a catastrophic outcome. Because of its rarity, knowledge about its risk factors is not very accurate. Most previous studies were small and over a limited time interval. Moreover, international diagnostic coding was used in most studies. These codes are not able to differentiate between the catastrophic complete type and less catastrophic partial type. Complete uterine rupture is expected to increase as the rate of cesarean delivery increases. Thus, we need more accurate knowledge about the risk factors for this complication. The objective of the study was to estimate the incidence and risk factors for complete uterine rupture during childbirth in Norway. This population-based study included women that gave birth after starting labor in 1967-2008. Data were from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Patient Administration System, complemented with information from medical records. We included 1,317,967 women without previous cesarean delivery and 57,859 with previous cesarean delivery. The outcome was complete uterine rupture (tearing of all uterine wall layers, including serosa and membranes). Risk factors were parameters related to demographics, pregnancy, and labor. Odds ratios for complete uterine rupture were computed with crude logistic regressions for each risk factor. Separate multivariable logistic regressions were performed to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Complete uterine rupture occurred in 51 cases without previous cesarean delivery (0.38 per 10,000) and 122 with previous cesarean delivery (21.1 per 10,000). The strongest risk factor was sequential labor induction with prostaglandins and oxytocin, compared with spontaneous labor, in those without previous cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 48.0, 95% confidence interval, 20.5-112.3) and those with previous cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio, 16.1, 95% confidence interval, 8

  7. Novel risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in children.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Maribeth R; Thomsen, Isaac P; Slaughter, James C; Creech, C Buddy; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, has been reported to recur in high rates in adults. The rates and risk factors for recurrent C difficile infection (rCDI) in children have not been well established. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 186 pediatric patients seen at a tertiary care referral center for a 5-year period diagnosed as having a primary C difficile infection. Children with recurrent disease, defined as return of symptoms of C difficile infection and positive testing ≤60 days after the completion of therapy, were compared with children who did not experience an episode of recurrence. Of the 186 pediatric patients included in this study, 41 (22%) experienced rCDI. On univariable analysis, factors significantly associated with rCDI included malignancy, recent hospitalization, recent surgery, antibiotic use, number of antibiotic exposures by class, acid blocker use, immunosuppressant use, and hospital-acquired disease. On multivariable analysis, malignancy (odds ratio [OR] 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52-7.85), recent surgery (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.05-5.52), and the number of antibiotic exposures by class (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.75) were significantly associated with recurrent disease in children. The rate of rCDI in children was 22%. Recurrence was significantly associated with the risk factors of malignancy, recent surgery, and the number of antibiotic exposures by class.

  8. Risk Factors for Urosepsis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Brian C.; Garvan, Gerard J.; Garvan, Cynthia S.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors that predispose older adults to urosepsis and urosepsis-related mortality. Method: A systematic search using PubMed and CINAHL databases. Articles that met inclusion criteria were assessed using the Strengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria and were scored on a 4-point Likert-type scale. Results: A total of 180 articles were identified, and six met inclusion criteria. The presence of an internal urinary catheter was associated with the development of urosepsis and septic shock. Although a number of factors were examined, functional dependency, number of comorbidities, and low serum albumin were associated with mortality across multiple studies included in this review. Discussion: Little scientific evidence is available on urosepsis, its associated risk factors, and those factors associated with urosepsis-related mortality in older adults. More research is warranted to better understand urosepsis in this vulnerable population in an effort to improve the quality of patient care. PMID:28138493

  9. Parkinson's disease: evidence for environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kieburtz, Karl; Wunderle, Kathryn B

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has no known cause. Although recent research has focused particularly on genetic causes of PD, environmental causes also play a role in developing the disease. This article reviews environmental factors that may increase the risk of PD, as well as the evidence behind those factors. Enough evidence exists to suggest that age has a causal relationship to PD. Significant evidence exists that gender, tobacco use, and caffeine consumption are also associated with the development of PD. Other environmental factors (pesticide exposure, occupation, blood urate levels, NSAID use, brain injury, and exercise) have limited or conflicting evidence of a relationship to PD. Future research must not neglect the impact of these environmental factors on the development of PD, especially with respect to potential gene-environment interactions.

  10. [Elevated blood pressure as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Wiesław; Hebel, Kazimiera

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases for decades have been and still are the main and current health problem of the Polish society and there are many reasons for these diseases. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. The factors significantly increasing risk the of cardiovascular disease are in addition to high blood pressure, smoking (also passive), high blood fats (cholesterol and its HDL, LDL fractions as well as triglyceride levels, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes and hereditary features. Other important factors which play an important role are external factors such as e.g. environmental pollution, lifestyle, stress. Prediction of cardiovascular disease should start from the evaluation of the fetal period because low birth weight may be a risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, obesity or diabetes in adulthood. The authors of the referred tests showed that the level of blood pressure observed during childhood is closely associated with the level of blood pressure in adults and is also dependent on the body weight. Since the issue of the effects of high pressure on the cardiovascular system is inherent in the issue of the metabolic syndrome, it should be mentioned also that another causative factor may be an irregularity in the removal of urine from the body and the amount of insulin. The control of hypertension is a complex problem, at least in view of the wide range of adverse factors affecting the human body: hypertension is often either a constituent of other lesions. Therefore, it is difficult to treat high blood pressure in the strict sense; more often it is a combination therapy based on pharmacology caused for other reasons.

  11. Risk factors for deep sternal wound infection after sternotomy: a prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Several risk factors for deep sternal wound infection after sternotomy remain unclear. To assess and compare risk factors among units, a prospective study included 1830 patients in 10 units during a 4-month period: 960 underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and 870 underwent other procedures. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions, 2.3% of patients (42/1830) acquired a deep sternal wound infection. Independent risk factors for deep sternal wound infection were obesity, coronary artery bypass grafting, reoperation, and postoperative inotropic support. Independent risk factors after coronary artery bypass grafting were obesity, bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting, reoperation, and postoperative inotropic support. In all five of the units usually performing bilateral internal thoracic artery graftings, this procedure was associated with high risk of deep sternal wound infection. Duration of operation was a major risk factor in comparison of the unit with the highest risk of deep sternal wound infection with the other nine units; this suggests that parameters related to the perioperative period were involved. Multicenter surveillance is useful to determine reliable risk factors for deep sternal wound infection, to define a high-risk population before operation, and to assess unit-specific risk factors.

  12. Circulating cytokine levels, Epstein-Barr viremia and risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rabkin, Charles S.; Engels, Eric A.; Landgren, Ola; Schuurman, Rob; Camargo, M. Constanza; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Goedert, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine dysregulation and decontrol of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are potential mechanisms for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We therefore assessed circulating blood levels in pre-diagnosis plasma or serum from 63 AIDS-related NHL cases 0.1 – 2.0 (median 1.0) years pre-NHL and 181 controls matched for CD4+ T-cell count. Cytokines were measured by Millipore 30-plex Luminex assays and cell-free EBV DNA detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations in multiplex cytokine levels were summarized by factor analysis. Individual cytokines and their principal factors were analyzed for associations with NHL by conditional logistic regression. Cases had higher levels for 25 of the 30 cytokines. In analyses of cytokine profiles, cases had significantly higher scores for a principal factor primarily reflecting levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (four gene products with coordinated transcription in vitro), as well as IL-1alpha. Epstein-Barr viremia was not significantly associated based on 113 evaluable samples without PCR inhibition. We found increases of T-helper type 2 interleukins and generalized elevations of other inflammatory cytokines and growth factors up to two years before AIDS-NHL. Cytokine-mediated hyperstimulation of B-cell proliferation may play a role in AIDS-related lymphomagenesis. PMID:22022727

  13. Familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset.

    PubMed

    Zimić, Jadranka Ivandić; Jukić, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development and favoring drug addiction onset had been statistically more frequently encountered during childhood and adolescence as compared to the controls. The results also indicated the need for further research into familial interrelations and the structure of the families addicts were born into, as well as the need for the implementation of family-based approaches to both drug addiction prevention and therapy.

  14. [Risk factors for hysterectomy among Brazilian women].

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Thália V Barreto; Aquino, Estela M L

    2003-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for hysterectomy among women using the public health system in Northeast Brazil. The cases were 373 women aged 30-54 years that had undergone elective hysterectomy for benign pelvic conditions. Controls were 742 women with preserved uterus selected from public health clinics. Data were collected through a review of medical records and a personal interview using a structured, pre-tested questionnaire. Unconditional multiple logistic regression was applied in the analysis. Women at greater risk for hysterectomy were those with a higher per capita family income, zero to three children, a history of medical consultation for menstrual problems, hospitalization for gynecological problems, or tubal ligation before age 30 years. Menopause and a history of stillbirth appeared as protective factors in the statistical analysis.

  15. Dynamic risk factors: the Kia Marama evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Stephen M; Wales, David S; Bakker, Leon; Ward, Tony

    2002-04-01

    Risk assessment is an essential part of clinical practice. Each of the three aspects of risk (static, stable, and acute dynamic) are important at various points of contact between the man and the systems that are responsible for providing service. Dynamic factors, the typical treatment and supervision targets, have received less research attention than static factors. This paper examined the extent to which pretreatment, posttreatment and change scores were associated with reoffending among men incarcerated for sexually molesting. The results were generally supportive of change in prooffending attitudes as the key to not reoffending and suggested that the perspective-taking component of empathy and the use of fantasy may be important mechanisms. Affect scales generally failed to show any relationship with reoffending, outside decreases in trait and suppressed anger. Moreover, these data suggest that we could improve our assessments and treatment through increased sensitivity to offense pathways.

  16. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ingre, Caroline; Roos, Per M; Piehl, Fredrik; Kamel, Freya; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. It is typically fatal within 2–5 years of symptom onset. The incidence of ALS is largely uniform across most parts of the world, but an increasing ALS incidence during the last decades has been suggested. Although recent genetic studies have substantially improved our understanding of the causes of ALS, especially familial ALS, an important role of non-genetic factors in ALS is recognized and needs further study. In this review, we briefly discuss several major genetic contributors to ALS identified to date, followed by a more focused discussion on the most commonly examined non-genetic risk factors for ALS. We first review factors related to lifestyle choices, including smoking, intake of antioxidants, physical fitness, body mass index, and physical exercise, followed by factors related to occupational and environmental exposures, including electromagnetic fields, metals, pesticides, β-methylamino-L-alanine, and viral infection. Potential links between ALS and other medical conditions, including head trauma, metabolic diseases, cancer, and inflammatory diseases, are also discussed. Finally, we outline several future directions aiming to more efficiently examine the role of non-genetic risk factors in ALS. PMID:25709501

  17. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Misra, A

    2000-06-01

    Atherosclerosis starts in childhood, and is accelerated in some individuals. A cluster of clinical and biochemical factors constitute the risk profile for many of them, perhaps most important being metabolic insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance and its components for children and adolescents, especially obesity and dyslipidemia, are generators of hypertension, glucose intolerance and complications of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Some individuals are genetically predisposed, particularly those with the family history of such disorders. For many subjects, there is 'tracking' of metabolic and lifestyle factors from early age to adulthood. Several new risk factors of atherosclerosis (e.g. level of lipoprotein (a), procoagulant state, hyperhomocysteinemia, low birth weight and adverse in-utero environment, and possibly inflammatory markers) are current and potentially future areas of research concerning children and young individuals. Definition of and research on new and hitherto not investigated factors and formulation of strategies to neutralize the known factors are of paramount importance for primary prevention of atherosclerosis. Simple and effective measures for prevention include increasing awareness of the diseases, maintenance of ideal body weight, regular physical exercise, avoidance of smoking and chewing of tobacco, eating a balanced diet, and early periodic monitoring of blood pressure and metabolic status. These measures, starting from childhood, should be applied to all and in particular to the susceptible offspring, predisposed individuals, and populations.

  18. [Risk factors of fatal outcome in pancreatonecrosis].

    PubMed

    Romanov, É I; Zubeev, P S; Ryzhov, M K; Bodrov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzed risk factors after operations for pancreatonecrosis in order to predict a course of the disease and carefully plan the treatment. It was revealed that the lethality level depended on different factors: the sex, age, a period of admission to the hospital, prevalence of necrotic suppurative process and severity of operative trauma. The authors made a conclusion of radical change to treatment approach. The open operations should be reduced at the expense of introduction of low-invasive methods of treatment in the case of pancreatonecrosis.

  19. Gastric cancer: epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    de Martel, Catherine; Forman, David; Plummer, Martyn

    2013-06-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the major malignancies in the world. This article summarizes the current understanding of the worldwide burden of this disease, its geographic variation, and temporal trends. An overview is presented of known risk factors, including genetic, dietary, and behavioral, but focuses on Helicobacter pylori infection as the most important factor in noncardia gastric cancer. When the data and the literature allow, we distinguish between cardia and noncardia sub-sites, as it is now clear that these two anatomic locations present distinct and sometimes opposite epidemiological characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk stratification of early admission to the intensive care unit of patients with no major criteria of severe community-acquired pneumonia: development of an international prediction rule.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Bertrand; Labarère, José; Coma, Eva; Santin, Aline; Hayon, Jan; Gurgui, Mercé; Camus, Nicolas; Roupie, Eric; Hémery, François; Hervé, Jérôme; Salloum, Mirna; Fine, Michael J; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factors for early (< three days) intensive care unit (ICU) admission of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and not requiring immediate ICU admission, and to stratify the risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3. Using the original data from four North American and European prospective multicentre cohort studies of patients with CAP, we derived and validated a prediction rule for ICU admission on days 1 to 3 of emergency department (ED) presentation, for patients presenting with no obvious reason for immediate ICU admission (not requiring immediate respiratory or circulatory support). A total of 6560 patients were included (4593 and 1967 in the derivation and validation cohort, respectively), 303 (4.6%) of whom were admitted to an ICU on days 1 to 3. The Risk of Early Admission to ICU index (REA-ICU index) comprised 11 criteria independently associated with ICU admission: male gender, age younger than 80 years, comorbid conditions, respiratory rate of 30 breaths/minute or higher, heart rate of 125 beats/minute or higher, multilobar infiltrate or pleural effusion, white blood cell count less than 3 or 20 G/L or above, hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation < 90% or arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) < 60 mmHg), blood urea nitrogen of 11 mmol/L or higher, pH less than 7.35 and sodium less than 130 mEq/L. The REA-ICU index stratified patients into four risk classes with a risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3 ranging from 0.7 to 31%. The area under the curve was 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.78 to 0.83) in the overall population. The REA-ICU index accurately stratifies the risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3 for patients presenting to the ED with CAP and no obvious indication for immediate ICU admission and therefore may assist orientation decisions.

  1. Factors associated with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection in people who inject drugs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: new findings from an unlinked anonymous monitoring survey.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K J; Hope, V D; Croxford, S; Shute, J; Ncube, F; Parry, J V

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring infections and risk in people who inject drugs (PWID) is important for informing public health responses. In 2011, a novel hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV) avidity-testing algorithm to identify samples compatible with recent primary infection was introduced into a national surveillance survey. PWID are recruited annually, through >60 needle-and-syringe programmes and prescribing services. Of the 980 individuals that could have been at risk of HCV infection, there were 20 (2%) samples that were compatible with recent primary infection. These were more common among: those imprisoned ⩾5 times [8/213; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8·7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·04-37·03]; women (8/230; aOR 3·8, 95% CI 1·41-10·38); and those ever-infected with hepatitis B (5/56; aOR 6·25, 95% CI 2·12-18·43). This study is the first to apply this algorithm and to examine the risk factors associated with recently acquired HCV infection in a national sample of PWID in the UK. These findings highlight underlying risks and suggest targeted interventions are needed.

  2. Risk Factors for Hemorrhoids on Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peery, Anne F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Galanko, Joseph A.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Baron, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation, a low fiber diet, sedentary lifestyle and gravidity are commonly assumed to increase the risk of hemorrhoids. However, evidence regarding these factors is limited. We examined the association between commonly cited risk factors and the prevalence of hemorrhoids. Methods We performed a cross sectional study of participants who underwent a colonoscopy in a colorectal adenoma prevention trial and who had a detailed assessment of bowel habits, diet and activity. The presence of hemorrhoids was extracted from the subjects’ colonoscopy reports. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals while adjusting for age and sex. Results The study included 2,813 participants. Of these, 1,074 had hemorrhoids recorded. Constipation was associated with an increased prevalence of hemorrhoids (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11, 1.86). Of the fiber subtypes, high grain fiber intake was associated with a reduced risk (OR for quartile 4 versus quartile 1 = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62, 0.98). We found no association when comparing gravid and nulligravida women (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.62–1.40). Sedentary behavior was associated with a reduced risk (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.98), but not physical activity (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.66–1.03). Neither being overweight nor obese was associated with the presence of hemorrhoids (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.09 and OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70–1.06). Conclusions Constipation is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhoids. Gravidity and physical activity do not appear to be associated. High grain fiber intake and sedentary behavior are associated with a decreased risk of hemorrhoids. PMID:26406337

  3. Risk Factors for Hemorrhoids on Screening Colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Peery, Anne F; Sandler, Robert S; Galanko, Joseph A; Bresalier, Robert S; Figueiredo, Jane C; Ahnen, Dennis J; Barry, Elizabeth L; Baron, John A

    2015-01-01

    Constipation, a low fiber diet, sedentary lifestyle and gravidity are commonly assumed to increase the risk of hemorrhoids. However, evidence regarding these factors is limited. We examined the association between commonly cited risk factors and the prevalence of hemorrhoids. We performed a cross sectional study of participants who underwent a colonoscopy in a colorectal adenoma prevention trial and who had a detailed assessment of bowel habits, diet and activity. The presence of hemorrhoids was extracted from the subjects' colonoscopy reports. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals while adjusting for age and sex. The study included 2,813 participants. Of these, 1,074 had hemorrhoids recorded. Constipation was associated with an increased prevalence of hemorrhoids (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11, 1.86). Of the fiber subtypes, high grain fiber intake was associated with a reduced risk (OR for quartile 4 versus quartile 1 = 0.78, 95% CI 0.62, 0.98). We found no association when comparing gravid and nulligravida women (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.62-1.40). Sedentary behavior was associated with a reduced risk (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.98), but not physical activity (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.66-1.03). Neither being overweight nor obese was associated with the presence of hemorrhoids (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72-1.09 and OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70-1.06). Constipation is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhoids. Gravidity and physical activity do not appear to be associated. High grain fiber intake and sedentary behavior are associated with a decreased risk of hemorrhoids.

  4. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  5. Management of patients with risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

  6. Identification of Commercial Items Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    profitable ) commercial customer-base. This means that the commercial vendors have several customers and their products are manufactured to meet more...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IDENTIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS...of Commercial Items Risk Factors 6. AUTHOR(S) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School

  7. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  8. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Yawn, Barbara P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods.  We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010-2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results.  We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P < .05). Herpes zoster was not associated with trauma, smoking, tonsillectomy, diet, or reported exposure to pesticides or herbicides (P > .1). Conclusions.  We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown.

  9. Engaging Physicians in Risk Factor Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Felix; Gumnit, Stephen A.; Schmidt, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OptumHealth tested the feasibility of physician-directed population management in 3 primary care practices and with 546 continuously insured patients who exhibited claims markers for coronary artery disease, diabetes, and/or hypertension. During the intervention portion of the study, we asked physicians to improve the following health measurements: blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and smoking status. We offered a modest pay-for-outcomes incentive for each risk factor improvement achieved. Additionally, on an eligible subset of these patients, we asked physicians to actively refer to population management programs those patients they determined could benefit from nurse or health coach interventions, advising us as to which components of their treatment plan they wished us to address. The 6-month intervention period exhibited a 10-fold improvement in the trend rate of risk factor management success when compared to the prior 6-month period for the same patients. A net of 96 distinct risk factor improvements were achieved by the 546 patients during the intervention period, whereas 9 net risk factor improvements occurred in the comparison period. This difference in improvement trends was statistically significant at P < 0.01. Of the 546 study participants, a subset of 187 members was eligible for participation in OptumHealth care management programs. Physicians identified 80 of these 187 eligible members as appropriate targets for program intervention. Representing ourselves as “calling on behalf” of the physician practices, we established contact with 50 referred members; 43 members (86%) actively enrolled in our programs. This enrollment rate is 2 to 3 times the rate of enrollment through our standard program outreach methods. We conclude that physician-directed population management with aligned incentives offers promise as a method of achieving important health and wellness goals. (Population Health Management 2010

  10. Epidemiology and risk factors for drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Bernard Y-H; Tan, Teck-Choon

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the current evidence-based knowledge of the epidemiology, prevalence, incidence, risk factors and genetic associations of drug allergy. Articles published between 1966 and 2010 were identified in MEDLINE using the key words adult, adverse drug reaction reporting systems, age factors, anaphylactoid, anaphylaxis, anaesthetics, antibiotics, child, drug allergy, drug eruptions, ethnic groups, hypersensitivity, neuromuscular depolarizing agents, neuromuscular nondepolarizing agents, sex factors, Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Additional studies were identified from article reference lists. Relevant, peer-reviewed original research articles, case series and reviews were considered for review. Current epidemiological studies on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have used different definitions for ADR-related terminology, often do not differentiate immunologically and non-immunologically mediated drug hypersensitivity, study different study populations (different ethnicities, inpatients or outpatients, adults or children), utilize different methodologies (spontaneous vs. non-spontaneous reporting, cohort vs. case-control studies), different methods of assessing drug imputability and different methods of data analyses. Potentially life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) are associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. HLA associations for SCAR associated with allopurinol, carbamazepine and abacavir have been reported with the potential for clinical use in screening prior to prescription. Identification of risk factors for drug allergy and appropriate genetic screening of at-risk ethnic groups may improve the outcomes of drug-specific SCAR. Research and collaboration are necessary for the generation of clinically-relevant, translational pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacogenomic knowledge, and success of health outcomes research and policies on drug allergies. PMID:21480948

  11. Risk factors associated with Barrett's epithelial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mikiko; Nakamura, Yuri; Kasashima, Saeko; Furukawa, Maiko; Misaka, Ryoichi; Nagahara, Hikaru

    2014-04-21

    To elucidate risk factors associated with dysplasia of short-segment Barrett's esophagus (BE). A total of 151 BE patients who underwent endoscopic examination from 2004 to 2008 in Aoyama Hospital, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Japan and whose diagnosis was confirmed from biopsy specimens were enrolled in the study. BE was diagnosed based on endoscopic findings of gastric-appearing mucosa or apparent columnar-lined esophagus proximal to the esophagogastric junction. Dysplasia was classified into three grades - mild, moderate and severe - according to the guidelines of the Vienna Classification System for gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia. Anthropometric and biochemical data were analyzed to identify risk factors for BE dysplasia. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the expression of p53 by immunohistological staining were also investigated. Histological examination classified patients into three types: specialized columnar epithelium (SCE) (n = 65); junctional (n = 38); and gastric fundic (n = 48). The incidence of dysplasia or adenocarcinoma from BE of the SCE type was significantly higher than that of the other two types (P < 0.01). The univariate analysis revealed that sex, H. pylori infection, body weight, p53 overexpression, and low diastolic blood pressure (BP) were associated with BE dysplasia. In contrast, body mass index, waist circumference, metabolic syndrome complications, and variables related to glucose or lipid metabolism were not associated with dysplasia. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that overexpression of p53 [odds ratio (OR) = 13.1, P = 0.004], H. pylori infection (OR = 0.19, P = 0.066), and diastolic BP (OR = 0.87, P = 0.021) were independent risk factors for epithelial dysplasia in BE patients with the SCE type. Overexpression of p53 is a risk factor for dysplasia of BE, however, H. pylori infection and diastolic BP inversely associated with BE dysplasia might be protective.

  12. Maternal Risk Factors for Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    March, Melissa I.; Gupta, Munish; Modest, Anna M.; Wu, Lily; Hacker, Michele R.; Martin, Camilia R.; Rana, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the relationship between maternal hypertensive disease and other risk factors and the neonatal development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Methods This was a retrospective case control study of infants with NEC from 2008 to 2012. The primary exposure of interest was maternal hypertensive disease, which has been hypothesized to put infants at risk for NEC. Other variables collected included demographics, pregnancy complications, medications, and neonatal hospital course. Data was abstracted from medical records. Results 28 cases of singleton neonates with NEC and 81 matched controls were identified and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome. Fetuses with an antenatal diagnosis of growth restriction were more likely to develop NEC (p=0.008). Infants with NEC had lower median birth weight than infants without NEC (p=0.009). Infants with NEC had more late-onset sepsis (p=0.01) and mortality before discharge (p=0.001). Conclusions The factors identified by this case-control study that increased the risk of neonatal NEC included intrauterine growth restriction and lower neonatal birth weight. The primary exposure, hypertensive disease, did not show a significantly increased risk of neonatal NEC, however there was a nearly two-fold difference observed. Our study was underpowered to detect the observed difference. PMID:25162307

  13. Proposal of a risk-factor-based analytical approach for integrating occupational health and safety into project risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Badri, Adel; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gbodossou, André

    2012-09-01

    Excluding occupational health and safety (OHS) from project management is no longer acceptable. Numerous industrial accidents have exposed the ineffectiveness of conventional risk evaluation methods as well as negligence of risk factors having major impact on the health and safety of workers and nearby residents. Lack of reliable and complete evaluations from the beginning of a project generates bad decisions that could end up threatening the very existence of an organization. This article supports a systematic approach to the evaluation of OHS risks and proposes a new procedure based on the number of risk factors identified and their relative significance. A new concept called risk factor concentration along with weighting of risk factor categories as contributors to undesirable events are used in the analytical hierarchy process multi-criteria comparison model with Expert Choice(©) software. A case study is used to illustrate the various steps of the risk evaluation approach and the quick and simple integration of OHS at an early stage of a project. The approach allows continual reassessment of criteria over the course of the project or when new data are acquired. It was thus possible to differentiate the OHS risks from the risk of drop in quality in the case of the factory expansion project.

  14. Gangrenous cholecystitis: mortality and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Önder, Akın; Kapan, Murat; Ülger, Burak Veli; Oğuz, Abdullah; Türkoğlu, Ahmet; Uslukaya, Ömer

    2015-02-01

    As a serious complication of cholelithiasis, gangrenous cholecystitis presents greater mortality than noncomplicated cholecystitis. The aim of this study was to specify the risk factors on mortality. 107 consecutive patients who underwent surgery due to gangrenous cholecystitis between January 1997 and October 2011 were investigated retrospectively. The study included 60 (56.1%) females and 47 (43.9%) males, with a mean age of 60.7 ± 16.4 (21-88) years. Cardiovascular diseases were the most frequently accompanying medical issues (24.3%). Thirty-six complications (33.6%) developed in 29 patients, and surgical site infection was proven as the most common. Longer delay time prior to hospital admission, low white blood cell count, presence of diabetes mellitus, higher blood levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin, pericholecystic fluid in abdominal ultrasonography, and conversion from laparoscopic surgery to open surgery were identified as risk factors affecting mortality (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.044, P = 0.005, P = 0.049, P = 0.009, P = 0.022, P = 0.011, and P = 0.004, respectively). Longer delay time prior to hospital admission and low white blood cell count were determined as independent risk factors affecting mortality.

  15. Risk factors associated with psychiatric readmission.

    PubMed

    Lorine, Kim; Goenjian, Haig; Kim, Soeun; Steinberg, Alan M; Schmidt, Kendall; Goenjian, Armen K

    2015-06-01

    The present study focused on identifying risk factors for early readmission of patients discharged from an urban community hospital. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted on 207 consecutive inpatient psychiatric admissions that included patients who were readmitted within 15 days, within 3 to 6 months, and not admitted for at least 12 months post-discharge. Findings indicated that a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (OR = 18; 95% CI 2.70-117.7; p < 0.05), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 9; 95% CI 1.80-40.60; p < 0.05), number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations (OR = 2; 95% CI 1.28-3.73; p < 0.05), and type of residence at initial admission (e.g., homeless, OR = 29; 95% CI 3.99-217; p < 0.05) were significant risk factors for early readmission, where OR compares readmission group 1 versus group 3 in the multinomial logistic regression. Initial positive urine drug screen, history of drug abuse or incarceration, and legal status at initial admission did not predict early readmission. Reducing the risk factors associated with psychiatric readmissions has the potential to lead to the identification and development of preventative intervention strategies that can significantly improve patient safety, quality of care, well-being, and contain health care expenditures.

  16. Striae gravidarum: Risk factors, prevention, and management.

    PubMed

    Farahnik, B; Park, K; Kroumpouzos, G; Murase, J

    2017-06-01

    Striae gravidarum (SG) are atrophic linear scars that represent one of the most common connective tissue changes during pregnancy. SG can cause emotional and psychological distress for many women. Research on risk factors, prevention, and management of SG has been often inconclusive. We conducted a literature search using textbooks, PubMed, and Medline databases to assess research performed on the risk factors, prevention, and management of SG. The search included the following key words: striae gravidarum, pregnancy stretch marks, and pregnancy stretch. We also reviewed citations within articles to identify relevant sources. Younger age, maternal and family history of SG, increased pre-pregnancy and pre-delivery weight, and increased birth weight were the most significant risk factors identified for SG. Although few studies have confirmed effective prevention methods, Centella asiatica extract, hyaluronic acid, and daily massages showed some promise. Treatment for general striae has greatly improved over the last few years. Topical tretinoin ≥ 0.05% has demonstrated up to 47% improvement of SG and non-ablative fractional lasers have consistently demonstrated 50 to 75% improvement in treated lesions of striae distensae. Overall, SG has seen a resurgence in research over the last few years with promising data being released. Results of recent studies provide dermatologists with new options for the many women who are affected by these disfiguring marks of pregnancy.

  17. [Risk factors for cesarean section: epidemiologic approach].

    PubMed

    Trujillo Hernández, B; Tene Pérez, C E; Ríos Silva, M

    2000-07-01

    The increase in frequency of cesareans that has been noted through 70's, not diminished--like it was expected--perinatal morbidity and mortality. The most important indications to cesarean are distocias, previous cesarean and fetal stress. In 1998 frequency of cesarean deliveries in our hospital was 35% of the pregnancy attended. The claim of this study was to determine risks factors to cesarean in our hospital. A case-control study was performed, selecting 165 cases (cesareans) and 328 controls (via vaginal). It was determined OR of the risks factors and atribuible fraction. Data were analyzed by X2. The most important indications to cesarean delivery were: distocias (39%, n = 64); previous cesarean (23%, n = 41) and fetal stress (11%, n = 21). There was not significative differences in age, height and rupture membrane time in both groups. History of cesarean delivery gave major risk to another surgical intervention (OR = 12.7, p = < 0.0001, atribuible fraction 92%). Nuliparous (OR = 6.6, p < 0.00000, atribuible fraction 85%), second gestation (OR = 1.8, p = 0.002) or history of abortion (OR = 1.8, p = 0.04) were factors mainly associated to cesarean delivery. We concluded that the precise 'medications of this surgical intervention specially in nuliparous or previous cesarean delivery cases must be replanteated to diminish its elevated frequency.

  18. Controlling risk factors in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuomilehto, J; Puska, P; Salonen, J; Nissinen, A

    1980-10-01

    In response to community demands to do something about the highest rates of cardiovascular diseases in the world that were found in the country of North Karelia, Finland, a comprehensive community control programme was set up in 1972. The main objective was to reduce the high rates by reducing level of smoking, serum cholesterol and blood pressure. The success of the programme was evaluated by examining independent representative population samples in 1972 and in 1977 in North Karelia and a matched control county. A decrease in the individual risk factors was found among the population aged 25-29 at the outset. This reduction was mainly based on favourable changes in lifestyle that took place through the whole community. In low as well as in high socioeconomic groups risk factor reductions occurred. At the same time morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases fell in North Karelia. The intensified health education was not accompanied by adverse emotional or psychosomatic reactions that could be measured. Since there are results from a series of experimental and controlled studies on success of risk factor reduction, this evidence should be used in development and implementation of prevention programmes for cardiovascular diseases. Primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases today requires efficient programmes because they are forming the leading cause of death in majority of the countries where reliable mortality statistics are available.

  19. Ovarian cancer: epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The present overview of ovarian cancer epidemiology summarizes the main results for a network of case-control studies in Italy and from the Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian Cancer. There are consistent inverse relations between parity, oral contraceptive use and the risk of ovarian cancer. For other menstrual and hormonal factors (i.e. early age at menarche and late menopause), there are established associations, but of limited impact on ovarian cancer incidence on a population level. Serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers (but not mucinous or clear cell types) are related to current and recent use of hormone replacement therapy in menopause. There are no strong associations with alcohol and tobacco overall, but a direct link for tobacco with (borderline) mucinous cancers, of limited impact, however, on overall ovarian cancer mortality. There are direct associations of ovarian cancer risk with height and BMI, as well as possible relations with selected dietary factors - in the absence, however, of consistent findings - and a possible inverse association with physical activity. There is a strong association with a family history of ovarian cancer (and a few selected other neoplasms, including colorectum and endometrium). Recognized risk factors explain only a limited proportion of ovarian cancer cases on a population level. A key reason for the recent favourable trends of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality in several high-income countries is the widespread use of oral contraceptive in the generations born after 1930.

  20. Coronary risk factors in a rural community.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, V K; Basannar, D R; Sing, R P; Dutt, M; Abraham, D; Mustafa, M S

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional health examination survey was carried out among a random sample of 406 people of 30 years and above from a rural community to investigate the prevalence of coronary heart disease risk factors. Prevalence of smoking and tobacco use was 16%, alcohol intake 9.4 %, daily Salt intake (> or = 5 gram) 34.2%, daily saturated fat intake ( > or =10 % of daily energy intake) 47.0 % and physical inactivity 18.5 %. BMI was > or =25 Kg /m(2) in 18 percent and it was > or =30 Kg / m(2) in 3.2 percent population. Truncal obesity (WHR: men> 0.9; women > 0.8) was found 18.5 percent more in case of males (20.7). Abdominal obesity(men > or =102; women > or = 88)was found 15.7 percent more in case of males (20.6).18.5 percent population was found suffering from systolic hypertension> or =140 mm Hg )and 15 percent from diastolic hypertension(> or =90 mm Hg). Awareness of CHD risk factors was present in 30.0 percent population. Differences in prevalence of riskfactor in male and female were found statistically significant in case of smoking, alcohol consumption and abdominal obesity. The present study shows that prevalence of CHD risk factors increases significantly in men and women having BMI equal or more than 25 Kg /m(2) so this cutoff, should be used to determine obesity in Indian population.

  1. Risk factors for laryngeal cancer in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Zvrko, Elvir; Gledović, Zorana; Ljaljević, Agima

    2008-03-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the most common head and neck cancer. There might be many risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Smoking, especially cigarette smoking and alcohol are indisputable risk factors. The authors of this paper assessed the presumed risk factors in order to identify possible aetiological agents of the disease.A hospital-based case-control study was conducted. The study group consisted of 108 histologically verified laryngeal cancer patients and 108 hospital controls matched by sex, age (+/-3 years) and place of residence. Laryngeal cancer patients and controls were interviewed during their hospital stay using a structured questionnaire. According to multiple logistic regression analysis six variables were independently related to laryngeal cancer: hard liquor consumption (Odd Ratio/OR/=2.93, Confidence Interval/CI/95% = 1.17 to 7.31), consumption more than 2 alcoholic drinks per day (OR=4.96, CI 95% = 2.04 to 12.04), cigarette smoking for more than 40 years (OR=4.32, CI 95% = 1.69 to 11.06), smoking more than 30 cigarettes per day (OR=4.24, CI 95% = 1.75 to 10.27), coffee consumption more than 5 cups per day (OR=4.52, CI 95% = 1.01 to 20.12) and carbonated beverage consumption (OR=0.38, CI 95%=0.16 to 0.92). The great majority of laryngeal cancers could be prevented by eliminating tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption.

  2. Risk factors for malaria in UK travellers.

    PubMed

    Moore, David A; Grant, Alison D; Armstrong, Margaret; Stümpfle, Richard; Behrens, Ron H

    2004-01-01

    After observing an apparent increase in severe falciparum malaria among travellers returning from The Gambia to the United Kingdom (UK) in the last quarter of 2000, we conducted a case-control study to investigate risk factors for malaria. The study participants had visited The Gambia between 1 September and 31 December 2000, travelling with the largest UK tour operator serving this destination. The main outcome measures were risk factors associated with malaria. Forty-six cases and 557 controls were studied. Eighty-seven percent of all participants reported antimalarial use (41% chloroquine/proguanil, 31% mefloquine). On univariate analysis the strongest risk factors for disease were: early calendar period of visit, longer duration of stay, non-use of antimalarial prophylaxis, non-use of mefloquine, lack of room air-conditioning, less use of insect repellent, prior visit to another malarial area and accommodation in 'hotel X'. After adjustment in multivariate analysis, use of mefloquine remained strongly protective (odds ratios, OR 0.13 [95% confidence intervals, 95% CI 0.04-0.40]), and the strongest independent risk factors for malaria were early calendar period (OR 5.19 [2.35-11.45] for 1 September to 9 November 2000 versus 10 November to 31 December 2000), prior visit to another malarial area (OR 3.27 [1.41-7.56]), main accommodation in 'hotel X' (OR 3.24 [1.51-6.97]) and duration of stay (OR 2.05 per extra week [1.42-2.95]). Neither any use, nor > 90% adherence to chloroquine/proguanil were protective (adjusted OR for any use 0.57 [0.27-1.21], P = 0.14). We concluded mefloquine use was strongly protective against malaria (87% protective efficacy), whereas chloroquine/proguanil, which is no longer recommended but remains widely used, was less than half as effective (43% protective efficacy). Waning efficacy of chloroquine/proguanil may have contributed to the observed increase in malaria among travellers to The Gambia in 2000. Local factors may also influence

  3. Nutritional risk screening and clinical outcome assessment among patients with community-acquired infection: A multicenter study in Beijing teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yan; Yu, Kang; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yu-Fang; Li, Rong-Rong; Li, Chun-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to implement nutritional risk screening in patients with community-acquired infection (CAI) and analyze its relationship with clinical outcomes. We consecutively assessed 595 patients with CAI from two teaching hospitals for eligibility during this study. Their nutritional risk was evaluated using Nutritional Risk Screening-2002. The hospital length of stay (LOS), rate of readmission, and nutritional support were recorded. In all, 336 patients with CAI were recruited. Of these, 40.61% were at nutritional risk at admission. The prevalence of nutritional risk in those patients age ≥70 y was significantly higher than in younger patients (51.38% versus 37.29%; P = 0.017). There was significant increase in the prevalence of nutritional risk from admission to 2-wk post-admission in all patients (40.61% versus 48.93%; P = 0.036) and in elderly patients (51.38% versus 69.90%; P = 0.010). Of the at-risk patients, the LOS (19.6 ± 12.2 d versus 11.2 ± 5.3 d; P < 0.001) and the rate of readmission (8.8% versus 3.0%; P = 0.026) were significantly higher than those of the patients not at risk. Multivariate analysis showed nutritional support was a protective factor for longer LOS when adjusted for confounders (odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.68; P < 0.001). Only 55.9% of patients at risk received nutritional support and the average ratio of parenteral to enteral nutrition was 4.2:1. Many patients with CAI were at nutritional risk and tended to worsen during hospitalization, which has been associated with increased LOS and rate of readmission. Nutritional support might be beneficial to the patients by shortening LOS. Inappropriate use of nutritional support was observed in patients with CAI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of Recombinant Activated Factor VII to Treat the Acquired Coagulopathy of Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    rFVIIa) is a drug commonly utilized in the treatment of patients with hemophilia and inhibitors. However, its use in previ- ously normal patients with an...activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is a Foodand Drug Administration (FDA)–licensed drug forthe treatment of patients with hemophilia and inhibitors.1– 4 Use of...Injury, Infection, and Critical Care 1298 June 2005 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the

  5. Perception of personal risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency viral infection/acquired immune deficiency syndrome among people attending outpatient clinics in a teaching hospital of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adegun, P T; Adegoke, S A; Solomon, O S; Ade-Ojo, I P

    2013-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) pandemic is on the increase with the highest burden in sub-Saharan Africa. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 2008 to assess the knowledge, self-perception of risk of contracting HIV infection and risky sexual practices among patients attending some out-patient clinics at the University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. The knowledge on the modes of transmission and methods of prevention of HIV was high. Although, 53.0% of the study participants perceived themselves not to be at risk of contracting HIV infection, 80.6% were engaged in risky sexual practices within a year preceding the study. Significantly more participants with multiple sexual partners, past and present history of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) perceived themselves not to be at risk (P= 0.001, 0.008 and 0.001 respectively). Effective strategies must therefore be developed, to enhance risk-perception since poor risk-perception is known to mitigate behavioral change.

  6. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA.

  7. Risk factors for AA amyloidosis in Germany.

    PubMed

    Blank, Norbert; Hegenbart, Ute; Lohse, Peter; Beimler, Jörg; Röcken, Christoph; Ho, Anthony D; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Schönland, Stefan O

    2015-03-01

    To identify risk factors for serum amyloid-A (AA) amyloidosis in patients living in Germany. Clinical and genetic data were obtained from 71 patients with AA amyloidosis. SAA1 genotypes were analyzed in 231 individuals. Control groups comprised 45 patients with long-standing inflammatory diseases without AA amyloidosis and 56 age-matched patients without any inflammatory disease. The most frequent underlying diseases of AA amyloidosis were familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) (n = 24, 34%) and inflammatory rheumatic diseases (n = 30, 42%). Patients without any known underlying disease (n = 11, 16%) were considered as having idiopathic AA amyloidosis. Patients with FMF were significantly younger at disease onset and younger at diagnosis of AA amyloidosis compared with patients with rheumatic diseases. Patients with idiopathic AA amyloidosis were older than patients with definite rheumatic diseases. Patients with FMF and high penetrance MEFV gene mutations had a relative risk of 1.73 for AA amyloidosis. Patients with FMF or a rheumatic disease and the SAA1 α/α genotype had a relative risk of 4.86 and 2.53, respectively, for developing an AA amyloidosis. The prevalence of this risk genotype was 36% in German patients without an inflammatory disease, 92% in German patients with AA amyloidosis and 100% in German patients with idiopathic AA amyloidosis. Risk factors for AA amyloidosis are the presence of a hereditary autoinflammatory or chronic rheumatic disease, elevated C-reactive protein and SAA serum levels, a long delay of a sufficient therapy, an advanced age and the SAA1α/α genotype.

  8. Risk Factors for Osteonecrosis of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, A.; Cunha-Cruz, J.; Curro, F.A.; Hujoel, P.; Sung, A.H.; Vena, D.; Voinea-Griffin, A.E.; Beadnell, Steven; Craig, Ronald G.; DeRouen, Timothy; Desaranayake, Ananda; Gilbert, Ann; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Goldberg, Ken; Hauley, Richard; Hashimoto, Mariko; Holmes, Jon; Latzke, Brooke; Leroux, Brian; Lindblad, Anne; Richman, Joshua; Safford, Monika; Ship [deceased], Jonathan; Thompson, Van P.; Williams, O. Dale; Yin, Wanrong

    2011-01-01

    Case reports and cohort studies have linked bisphosphonate therapy and osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), but neither causality nor specific risks for lesion development have been clearly established. We conducted a 1:3 case-control study with three dental Practice-based Research Networks, using dentist questionnaires and patient interviews for collection of data on bisphosphonate therapy, demographics, co-morbidities, and dental and medical treatments. Multivariable logistic regression analyses tested associations between bisphosphonate use and other risk factors with ONJ. We enrolled 191 ONJ cases and 573 controls in 119 dental practices. Bisphosphonate use was strongly associated with ONJ (odds ratios [OR] 299.5 {95%CI 70.0-1282.7} for intravenous [IV] use and OR = 12.2 {4.3-35.0} for oral use). Risk markers included local suppuration (OR = 7.8 {1.8-34.1}), dental extraction (OR = 7.6 {2.4-24.7}), and radiation therapy (OR = 24.1 {4.9-118.4}). When cancer patients (n = 143) were excluded, bisphosphonate use (OR = 7.2 {2.1-24.7}), suppuration (OR = 11.9 {2.0-69.5}), and extractions (OR = 6.6 {1.6-26.6}) remained associated with ONJ. Higher risk of ONJ began within 2 years of bisphosphonate initiation and increased four-fold after 2 years. Both IV and oral bisphosphonate use were strongly associated with ONJ. Duration of treatment > 2 years; suppuration and dental extractions were independent risk factors for ONJ. PMID:21317246

  9. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  10. Nonoccupational Risk Factors for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Daniel H; Katz, Jeffrey N; Bohn, Rhonda; Mogun, Helen; Avorn, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the relation between selected nonoccupational risk factors and surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome. DESIGN Case-control study using an administrative database. PARTICIPANTS Enrollees of New Jersey Medicare or Medicaid programs during 1989 to 1991. MEASUREMENTS The outcome of interest was open or endoscopic carpal tunnel release. We examined the relation between carpal tunnel release and diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, inflammatory arthritis, hemodialysis, pregnancy, use of corticosteroids, and hormone replacement therapy. MAIN RESULTS In multivariate models, inflammatory arthritis was strongly associated with carpal tunnel release (odds ratio [OR] 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2, 3.8). However, corticosteroid use also appeared to be associated with a greater likelihood of undergoing carpal tunnel release, even in the absence of inflammatory arthritis (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2, 2.1). Diabetes had a weak but significant association with carpal tunnel release (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2, 1.8), as did hypothyroidism (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1, 2.8), although patients with hyperthyroidism did not have any change in risk. Women who underwent carpal tunnel release were almost twice as likely to be users of estrogen replacement therapy as controls (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.0, 3.2). CONCLUSIONS Although inflammatory arthritis is the most important nonoccupational risk factor for carpal tunnel release, these data substantiate the increase in risk associated with diabetes and untreated hypothyroidism. Further investigation in detailed clinical studies will be necessary to confirm whether changes in corticosteroid use and hormone replacement therapy offer additional means of risk reduction for this common condition. PMID:10337041

  11. Early-life factors and endometriosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Upson, Kristen; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Scholes, Delia; Holt, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study early-life factors in relation to endometriosis risk in adulthood. Design Population-based case-control study. Setting Women’s Risk of Endometriosis (WREN) study was conducted among female enrollees ages 18-49 years of a large, integrated healthcare system in western Washington State. Patients Cases (n=310) were women diagnosed for the first time with endometriosis between years 1996-2001 and controls (n=727) were women without a diagnosis of endometriosis randomly selected from the healthcare system population. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between intrauterine diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure, maternal smoking, mother’s age at delivery, firstborn status, birth weight, fetal number, prematurity, and regular soy formula feeding during infancy and endometriosis were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for frequency matching and confounding variables. Information on early-life factors was ascertained retrospectively by in-person interview, with information on maternal DES use and regular soy formula feeding directly gathered from the participant’s mother or other family member. Results We observed that women who were regularly fed soy formula as infants had over twice the risk of endometriosis compared to unexposed women (aOR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.2-4.9). Our data also suggested increased endometriosis risk with prematurity (aOR 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) and maternal use of DES (OR 2.0, 95% CI: 0.8-4.9, adjusting only for frequency matching variables), although these confidence intervals included the null. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that disruption of development during fetal and infant periods may increase the risk of endometriosis in adulthood. PMID:26211883

  12. Identification of Caries Risk Factors in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, M.; Jackson, R.; Eckert, G.; Swigonski, N.; Chin, J.; Zandona, A. Ferreira; Ando, M.; Stookey, G.K.; Downs, S.; Zero, D.T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors to predict caries progression in toddlers in primary-healthcare settings for the cost-effective targeting of preventive and referral strategies. We examined 329 children (26 ± 6 mos old) twice, one year apart, in Indiana, USA. A 107-item structured interview was used to collect information from the primary caregiver and child on factors/beliefs/perceptions/behaviors that could affect caries development, transmission of bacteria, medical-dental health, and access to care. Bacterial levels, gingivitis, dental plaque, and caries experience were assessed. Multiple-variable logistic regression models of caries progression toward cavitation included family caries experience, transmission-related behaviors, dietary factors, health beliefs, and lower income, but differed in selected predictors/predictive power by race/ethnicity. Addition of clinical variables did not significantly improve the prediction. PMID:21173434

  13. [Subjective perception of maladjustment risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salomone, M; Romano, L; Esposito, A; Nigro, E; Boggia, B; Napolano, E; Carbone, U

    2007-01-01

    Maladjustment at work results from organizational and relational features of the work, the so-called fourth type factors; they include working hours, ways and contents of working activities, and horizontal and vertical business relations. The study reports the percentage of sensed disturbing factors in workers with maladjustment and disaffection at work. Data have been taken from 1382 white collars, 1117 males and 265 females, observed from January 2006 to June 2007 for Health Surveillance. Maladjustment prevalence was higher in females than in males. As individual variables, ageing and family care increased the prevalence of maladjustment among females, whilst a higher prevalence of maladjustment were found in youngest and unmarried males. A very different perception of work harmfulness were found between sexes. As risk factors, female have denounced more wear and tear and authoritarian management; male denounced physical strain.

  14. Hepatitis C risk factor for patients submitted to dialysis.

    PubMed

    Baldessar, Maria Zélia; Bettiol, Jane; Foppa, Fabrício; Oliveira, Lúcia Helena das Chagas

    2007-02-01

    This article reports the results of the research which has evaluated the prevalence and factors associated to the presence of Hepatitis C in patients submitted to dialysis at the Clinica de Doenças Renais (Clinic of Renal Diseases) in Tubarao city (CRDT), Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in the period between January 1st, 2004 to December 31st in the same year. The prevalence of 16.8% of Hepatitis C in the studied population and the time-length of dialysis as significative risk factor have become evident. The non-correlation of seropositivity of the followings factors is also indicated: age, gender, base diseases, infrastructures, the type of clinic machines, the type of dialyser, used membranes, the machine sterilisation and substances for this process as well as the number of times of the dialyser reutilization. The data represented in this project suggest that the Hepatitis C presents high prevalence in patients in dialysis and the time-length of the treatment is a risky factor to acquire the infection.

  15. Discordance of physician clinical judgment vs. pneumonia severity index (PSI) score to admit patients with low risk community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Marcos I.; González-Barcala, Francisco J.; Soni, Nilam J.; Vidal, Iria; Sanjuàn, Pilar; Llinares, Diego; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Lucía; Rábade, Carlos; Otero-González, Isabel; Verea-Hernando, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Background The relationship between clinical judgment and the pneumonia severity index (PSI) score in deciding the site of care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has not been well investigated. The objective of the study was to determine the clinical factors that influence decision-making to hospitalize low-risk patients (PSI ≤2) with CAP. Methods An observational, prospective, multicenter study of consecutive CAP patients was performed at five hospitals in Spain. Patients admitted with CAP and a PSI ≤2 were identified. Admitting physicians completed a patient-specific survey to identify the clinical factors influencing the decision to admit a patient. The reason for admission was categorized into 1 of 6 categories. We also assessed whether the reason for admission was associated with poorer clinical outcomes [intensive care unit (ICU) admission, 30-day mortality or readmission]. Results One hundred and fifty-five hospitalized patients were enrolled. Two or more reasons for admission were seen in 94 patients (60.6%), including abnormal clinical test results (60%), signs of clinical deterioration (43.2%), comorbid conditions (28.4%), psychosocial factors (28.4%), suspected H1N1 pneumonia (20.6%), and recent visit to the emergency department (ED) in the past 2 weeks (7.7%). Signs of clinical deterioration and abnormal clinical test results were associated with poorer clinical outcomes (P<0.005). Conclusions Low-risk patients with CAP and a PSI ≤2 are admitted to the hospital for multiple reasons. Abnormal clinical test results and signs of clinical deterioration are two specific reasons for admission that are associated with poorer clinical outcomes in low risk CAP patients. PMID:28740667

  16. Geriatric assessment and prognostic factors of mortality in very elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Calle, Alicia; Márquez, Miguel Angel; Arellano, Marta; Pérez, Laura Mónica; Pi-Figueras, Maria; Miralles, Ramón

    2014-10-01

    To assess the relationship between the parameters obtained in the geriatric assessment and mortality in elderly people with community-acquired pneumonia in an acute care geriatric unit. Four hundred fifty-six patients (≥75years). age, sex, referral source, background, consciousness level, heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, laboratory data, pleural effusion, multilobar infiltrates, functional status (activities of daily living) prior to admission [Lawton index (LI), Barthel index (BIp)] prior to and at admission (BIa), cognitive status [Pfeiffer test (PT)], comorbidity [Charlson index (ChI)] and nutrition (total protein, albumin). A hundred ten patients died (24.2%) during hospitalization. These patients were older (86.6±6.4 vs 85.1±6.4, P<.04), had more comorbidity (ChI 2.35±1.61 vs 2.08±1.38; P<.083), worse functional impairment [(LI: 0.49±1.15 vs 1.45±2.32, P<.001) (BIp: 34.6±32.9 vs 54.0±34.1, P<.001) (BIa: 5.79±12.5 vs 20.5±22.9, P<.001)], a higher percentage of functional loss at admission (85.9±23.2 vs 66.4±28.6; P<.0001), worse cognitive impairment (PT: 7.20±3.73 vs 5.10±3.69, P<.001) and malnutrition (albumin 2.67±0.54 vs 2.99±0.49, P<.001). Mortality was higher with impaired consciousness [49.2% (P<.01)], tachypnea [33.3% (P<.01)], tachycardia [44.4% (P<.002), high urea levels [31.8 (P<.001)], anemia [44.7% (P<.02)], pleural effusion [42.9% (P<.002)], and multilobar infiltrates [43.2% (P<.001)]. In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with mortality were: age ≥90years [OR: 3.11 (95%CI: 1.31 to 7.36)], impaired consciousness [3.19 (1.66 to 6.15)], hematocrit <30% [2.87 (1.19 to 6.94)], pleural effusion [3.77 (1.69 to 8.39)] and multilobar infiltrates [2.76 (1.48 to 5.16)]. Female sex and a preserved functional status prior (LI≥5) and during admission (BIa≥40) were protective of mortality [0.40 (0.22 to 0.70), 0.09 (0.01 to 0.81) and 0.11 (0.02 to 0.51)]. Geriatric assessment parameters and routine clinical

  17. Community-Acquired Bacteremic Acinetobacter Pneumonia in Tropical Australia Is Caused by Diverse Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, with Carriage in the Throat in At-Risk Groups

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Nicholas M.; Currie, Bart J.; Hassell, Marilyn; Palmer, Didier; Dwyer, Brian; Seifert, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Acinetobacter isolates from eight subjects with community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia (CAAP), a major cause of fatal community-acquired pneumonia in tropical Australia, were phenotypically and genotypically confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis to be broadly diverse Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Wet-season throat carriage of A. baumannii was found in 10% of community residents with excess levels of alcohol consumption, the major at-risk group for CAAP. PMID:11825997

  18. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  19. Risk factors for asthma: is prevention possible?

    PubMed

    Beasley, Richard; Semprini, Alex; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2015-09-12

    Asthma is one of the most common diseases in the world, resulting in a substantial burden of disease. Although rates of deaths due to asthma worldwide have reduced greatly over the past 25 years, no available therapeutic regimens can cure asthma, and the burden of asthma will continue to be driven by increasing prevalence. The reasons for the increase in asthma prevalence have not been defined, which limits the opportunities to develop targeted primary prevention measures. Although associations are reported between a wide range of risk factors and childhood asthma, substantiation of causality is inherently difficult from observational studies, and few risk factors have been assessed in primary prevention studies. Furthermore, none of the primary prevention intervention strategies that have undergone scrutiny in randomised controlled trials has provided sufficient evidence to lead to widespread implementation in clinical practice. A better understanding of the factors that cause asthma is urgently needed, and this knowledge could be used to develop public health and pharmacological primary prevention measures that are effective in reducing the prevalence of asthma worldwide. To achieve this it will be necessary to think outside the box, not only in terms of risk factors for the causation of asthma, but also the types of novel primary prevention strategies that are developed, and the research methods used to provide the evidence base for their implementation. In the interim, public health efforts should remain focused on measures with the potential to improve lung and general health, such as: reducing tobacco smoking and environmental tobacco smoke exposure; reducing indoor and outdoor air pollution and occupational exposures; reducing childhood obesity and encouraging a diet high in vegetables and fruit; improving feto-maternal health; encouraging breastfeeding; promoting childhood vaccinations; and reducing social inequalities.

  20. Risk Factors for Aspiration Pneumonia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Toshie; Teramoto, Shinji; Tamiya, Nanako; Okochi, Jiro; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Aspiration pneumonia is a dominant form of community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia, and a leading cause of death among ageing populations. However, the risk factors for developing aspiration pneumonia in older adults have not been fully evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the risk factors for aspiration pneumonia among the elderly. Methodology and Principal Findings We conducted an observational study using data from a nationwide survey of geriatric medical and nursing center in Japan. The study subjects included 9930 patients (median age: 86 years, women: 76%) who were divided into two groups: those who had experienced an episode of aspiration pneumonia in the previous 3 months and those who had not. Data on demographics, clinical status, activities of daily living (ADL), and major illnesses were compared between subjects with and without aspiration pneumonia. Two hundred and fifty-nine subjects (2.6% of the total sample) were in the aspiration pneumonia group. In the univariate analysis, older age was not found to be a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia, but the following were: sputum suctioning (odds ratio [OR] = 17.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.16–22.62, p < 0.001), daily oxygen therapy (OR = 8.29, 95% CI: 4.39–15.65), feeding support dependency (OR = 8.10, 95% CI: 6.27–10.48, p < 0.001), and urinary catheterization (OR = 4.08, 95% CI: 2.81–5.91, p < 0.001). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk factors associated with aspiration pneumonia after propensity-adjustment (258 subjects each) were sputum suctioning (OR = 3.276, 95% CI: 1.910–5.619), deterioration of swallowing function in the past 3 months (OR = 3.584, 95% CI: 1.948–6.952), dehydration (OR = 8.019, 95% CI: 2.720–23.643), and dementia (OR = 1.618, 95% CI: 1.031–2.539). Conclusion The risk factors for aspiration pneumonia were sputum suctioning, deterioration of swallowing function, dehydration, and dementia

  1. Risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots, taking into account person-, work-, health-, sleep-, and lifestyle-related characteristics. The study population consisted of 502 pilots who participated in the MORE Energy study. Included risk factors were either measured through an online questionnaire or provided by the company. The outcome of this study, fatigue, was assessed using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), and was defined as scoring more than 76 points on this questionnaire. The association of the risk factors with fatigue was determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of the participating pilots, 29.5 % scored more than 76 points on the CIS and were classified as being fatigued. The fully adjusted regression model showed that person-, work-, health-, and lifestyle-related characteristics were associated with fatigue. Pilots who were aged 31 to 40 (OR 3.36, 95 % CI 1.32-8.53) or 41 to 50 (OR 4.19, 95 % CI 1.40-12.47), an evening type (OR 2.40, 95 % CI 1.38-4.16), scored higher on work-life balance disturbance (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.10-1.36), scored higher on need for recovery (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), scored lower on general health perception (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.20-0.47), were less physically active (OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.89), and had a moderate alcohol consumption (OR 3.88, 95 % CI 1.21-12.43), were at higher risk for fatigue. Higher age, being an evening type, disturbance of the work-life balance, more need for recovery, a lower perceived health, less physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption were shown to be risk factors for fatigue. Further longitudinal research is needed to elucidate the direction of the associations found and to evaluate the effects of possible countermeasures in airline pilots.

  2. Risk factors for local recurrence of fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, V; Troncoso, S; Mejías, L; Idoate, M Á; San-Julián, M

    To evaluate the clinical, radiological and histological factors that can predict local recurrence of fibromatosis. A retrospective study was conducted on 51 patients diagnosed with fibromatosis in this hospital from 1983 to 2014. The mean follow-up was 83 months. A study was made of the clinical parameters, location, depth, size, surgical margins, and proliferation index (Ki-67). An evaluation was also made of the risk of recurrence depending on the adjuvant treatment and the relationship between treatment and patient functionality. Tumour location and depth were identified as risk factors for local recurrence, showing statistically significant differences (P<.001 and P=.003, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in age, gender, size, surgical margins, or adjuvant treatments, or in the Musculoskeletal Tumour Society Score according to the treatment received. The mean Ki-67 was 1.9% (range 1-4), and its value was not associated with the risk of recurrence. Deep fibromatosis fascia tumours, and those located in extremities are more aggressive than superficial tumours and those located in trunk. The Ki-67 has no predictive value in local recurrence of fibromatosis. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or other adjuvant treatments such as tamoxifen have not been effective in local control of the disease. Given the high recurrence rate, even with adequate margins, a wait and see attitude should be considered in asymptomatic patients and/or stable disease. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ARID5B polymorphism confers an increased risk to acquire specific MLL rearrangements in early childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia in early age (EAL) is characterized by acquired genetic alterations such as MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this case-controlled study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IKZF1, ARID5B, and CEBPE could be related to the onset of EAL cases (<24 months-old at diagnosis). Methods The SNPs (IKZF1 rs11978267, ARID5B rs10821936 and rs10994982, CEBPE rs2239633) were genotyped in 265 cases [169 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 96 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] and 505 controls by Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SNPs of cases and controls, adjusted on skin color and/or age. The risk was determined by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Children with the IKZF1 SNP had an increased risk of developing MLL-germline ALL in white children. The heterozygous/mutant genotype in ARID5B rs10994982 significantly increased the risk for MLL-germline leukemia in white and non-white children (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.09-6.18 and OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.57-8.68, respectively). The heterozygous genotype in ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk for MLL-r leukemia in both white and non-white (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.12-3.79 and OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.09-5.10, respectively). Furthermore, ARID5B rs10821936 conferred increased risk for MLL-MLLT3 positive cases (OR 7.10, 95% CI:1.54-32.68). Our data do not show evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 confers increased genetic susceptibility to EAL. Conclusions IKZF1 and CEBPE variants seem to play a minor role in genetic susceptibility to EAL, while ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk of MLL-MLLT3. This result shows that genetic susceptibility could be associated with the differences regarding MLL breakpoints and partner genes. PMID:24564228

  5. Parkinson's disease: A risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Durif, Franck; Thomas, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. On the long term, it may be complicated by various musculoskeletal problems, such as osteoporotic fractures, that have significant socioeconomic consequences. Indeed, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have a higher fracture risk, particularly hip fracture risk, than other subjects of the same age because of both a higher risk of falls and lower bone mineral density. Bone loss in Parkinson's disease may be associated with the severity and duration of the disease. We review here the different suspected mechanisms of accelerated bone loss in Parkinson's disease, amongst which weight loss and reduced mobility appear to play key roles. Antiparkinsonian drugs, particularly levodopa, may also be associated with decreased bone mineral density as a result of hyperhomocysteinaemia. We discuss the role of other nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folate or vitamin K. In conclusion, it seems necessary to screen for and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population, while actions to prevent falls are still disappointing. A better understanding of the factors explaining bone loss in this population would help implementing preventive actions.

  6. Emergency Medicine Evaluation of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: History, Examination, Imaging and Laboratory Assessment, and Risk Scores.

    PubMed

    Long, Brit; Long, Drew; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-09-20

    Pneumonia is a common infection, accounting for approximately one million hospitalizations in the United States annually. This potentially life-threatening disease is commonly diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. To investigate emergency medicine evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia including history, physical examination, imaging, and the use of risk scores in patient assessment. Pneumonia is the number one cause of death from infectious disease. The condition is broken into several categories, the most common being community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis centers on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. However, all are unreliable when used alone, and misdiagnosis occurs in up to one-third of patients. Chest radiograph has a sensitivity of 46-77%, and biomarkers including white blood cell count, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein provide little benefit in diagnosis. Biomarkers may assist admitting teams, but require further study for use in the emergency department. Ultrasound has shown utility in correctly identifying pneumonia. Clinical gestalt demonstrates greater ability to diagnose pneumonia. Clinical scores including Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI); Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age 65 score (CURB-65); and several others may be helpful for disposition, but should supplement, not replace, clinical judgment. Patient socioeconomic status must be considered in disposition decisions. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires clinical gestalt using a combination of history and physical examination. Chest radiograph may be negative, particularly in patients presenting early in disease course and elderly patients. Clinical scores can supplement clinical gestalt and assist in disposition when used appropriately. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Risk Factors for Rhabdomyolysis in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Hill, Owen T; Scofield, Dennis E; Usedom, Jenna; Bulathsinhala, Lakmini; McKinnon, Craig; Kwon, Paul; Haley, Timothy; Carter, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The standardized mortality rate of rhabdomyolysis (RM) in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers is considerably higher than in the civilian population. RM occurs when large amounts of intracellular contents from damaged skeletal muscle escape into circulation, leading to serious sequelae (e.g., acute renal failure, hyperkalemia, compartment syndrome). Extended physical exertion, especially in hot environments, and trauma can precipitate RM. The aim of this study was to identify RM risk factors among U.S. Active Duty Army (ADA) Soldiers. This nested case-control study used data from the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database (years 2004-2006) to examine RM among ADA male Soldiers. Demographic and occupational variables were identified as potential risk factors. Each RM case was age and date-matched to 4 controls. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed using conditional logistic regression analyses. From years 2004 to 2006, 1,086 Soldiers (0.19%) met the study criteria for clinically diagnosed RM. Three variables were found to increase the odds of acquiring RM: (1) prior heat stroke, OR 4.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-21.7); (2) self-reported Black race, OR 2.56 (95% CI 2.2-3.0); and (3) length of service (0-90 days), OR 2.05 (95% CI 1.6-2.7). There is a substantially greater likelihood for male U.S. Army Soldiers to develop RM who: (1) have had a prior heat injury, (2) self-report in the Black racial category, and (3) who are within the initial 90 days of service. Greater awareness of the risk factors associated with RM may improve force health protection and readiness through targeted mitigation strategies. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Behavior Risk Factors Among Russian Students.

    PubMed

    Anischenko, Aleksander; Arhangelskaya, Anna; Klenov, Michael; Burdukova, Ekaterina; Ogarev, Valrii; Ignatov, Nikolay; Osadchenko, Irina; Gurevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the prevalence of risk factors among Russian students. Methods In this study, 834 students were included from five Federal universities which were localized in four Federal regions of Russian Federation. Future doctors, school teachers, and wellness trainers were included in this study. Students were specifically asked about smoking, physical activity International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and food preference. Waist, hip, weight, and height were measured. Results The region of study and ethnic group were not influenced with respect to age and body mass index ( p > .1), while all other factors had a significant influence ( p < .05). High levels of smoking, hypodynamia, and motivation to intake of unhealthy food were found in medical students in comparison with those in future teachers and wellness instructors ( p < .05). The indicators of central obesity (due to levels of body mass index and waist-hip ratio) were found in medical students. Perspective Special programs to prevent the most common behavior risk factors in future medical doctors have to be designed.

  9. Assessing risk factors for periodontitis using regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo Pereira, J. A.; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is indispensable to assess the associations and interactions between different factors and the risk of periodontitis. Among others, regression analysis is a statistical technique widely used in healthcare to investigate and model the relationship between variables. In our work we study the impact of socio-demographic, medical and behavioral factors on periodontal health. Using regression, linear and logistic models, we can assess the relevance, as risk factors for periodontitis disease, of the following independent variables (IVs): Age, Gender, Diabetic Status, Education, Smoking status and Plaque Index. The multiple linear regression analysis model was built to evaluate the influence of IVs on mean Attachment Loss (AL). Thus, the regression coefficients along with respective p-values will be obtained as well as the respective p-values from the significance tests. The classification of a case (individual) adopted in the logistic model was the extent of the destruction of periodontal tissues defined by an Attachment Loss greater than or equal to 4 mm in 25% (AL≥4mm/≥25%) of sites surveyed. The association measures include the Odds Ratios together with the correspondent 95% confidence intervals.

  10. Perinatal epidemiological risk factors for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bobić, Mirna Vuković; Habek, Dubravko; Habek, Jasna Čerkez

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, the impact of the potential perinatal epidemiological factors on preeclampsia development was assessed. This clinical study included 55 pregnant women with preeclampsia and control group of 50 healthy pregnant women. Positive family history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus or thromboembolic disease was recorded in 50% of women with preeclampsia versus 28% of control group women. Positive personal history of this disease was recorded in 15% of women with preeclampsia, whereas all control group women had negative personal history of preeclampsia. Dietary habits, i.e. the intake of meat and meat products, fruit and vegetables, coffee and alcohol drinks were similar in the two groups, without statistically significant differences. The women with preeclampsia and control women reported comparable habits; there was no difference in the consumption of meat, fruit, vegetables, coffee and alcohol, smoking, use of folate and oral hormonal contraception before pregnancy, or in physical activity as the potential risk factors for preeclampsia in current pregnancy. However, personal and family history of vascular disease proved to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of preeclampsia, emphasizing the need of lifestyle and dietary modifications with healthy dietary habits, while avoiding adverse habits in pregnancy.

  11. [Risk factors and pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Paknys, Gintaras; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its pathogenesis and to introduce the readers to the basic concept of autoimmune thyroid disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease are different expressions of a basically similar autoimmune process, and the clinical appearance reflects the spectrum of the immune response in a particular patient. During this response, cytotoxic autoantibodies, stimulatory autoantibodies, blocking autoantibodies, or cell-mediated autoimmunity may be observed. Persons with classic Hashimoto's thyroiditis have serum antibodies reacting with thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. These antibodies (particularly antibodies against thyroid peroxidase) are complement-fixing immunoglobulins and may be cytotoxic. In addition, many patients have cell-mediated immunity directed against thyroid antigens. Cell mediated-immunity is also a feature of experimental thyroiditis induced in animals by injection of thyroid antigen with adjuvants. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is predominantly the clinical expression of cell-mediated immunity leading to destruction of thyroid cells, which in its severest form causes thyroid failure. The significance of genetic component and nongenetic risk factors (pregnancy, drugs, age, sex, infection, and irradiation) in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also reviewed. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the genetic component is important in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, although the pattern of inheritance is non-Mendelian and is likely to be influenced by subtle variations in the functions of multiple genes. Nongenetic risk factors (environmental factors) are also etiologically important, because the concordance rate in monozygotic twins is below 1.

  12. Preventing delirium in dementia: Managing risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ford, Andrew H

    2016-10-01

    Delirium is a common, disabling medical condition that is associated with numerous adverse outcomes. A number of inter-related factors, including pre-existing cognitive impairment, usually contribute to the development of delirium in a particular susceptible individual. Non-pharmacological approaches to prevention typically target multiple risk factors in a systematic manner (multicomponent interventions). There is generally good evidence that multicomponent interventions reduce the incidence of delirium in hospital populations but there are limited data in people with dementia and those living in the community. It is likely that there is a differential effect of specific interventions in those with cognitive impairment (e.g. people with dementia may respond better to simpler, more pragmatic interventions rather than complex procedures) but this cannot be determined from the existing data. Targeted interventions focussed on hydration, medication rationalization and sleep promotion may also be effective in reducing the incidence of delirium, as well as the active involvement of family members in the care of the elderly hospitalized patient. Hospitalization itself is a potential risk factor for delirium and promising data are emerging of the benefits of home-based care as an alternative to hospitalization but this is restricted to specific sub-populations of patients and is reliant on these services being available. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Internet Abuse Risk Factors among Spanish Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Carballo, José L; Marín-Vila, María; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia; Piqueras, José A

    2015-11-27

    Empirical evidence has revealed various factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of Internet abuse. The aim of this paper was to analyze, on a sample of Spanish adolescents, the relationship between Internet abuse and: (1) Personal and interpersonal risk factors, including social skills in both virtual and real-life contexts; (2) Drug use. A total of 814 high school students aged between 13 and 17 participated in this study, and were divided into two groups: Internet Abusers (IA = 173) and Non-Internet Abusers (NIA = 641). Questionnaires were used to analyze Internet and drug use/abuse, as well as social skills, in virtual and real contexts. Various interpersonal risk factors (family and group of friends) were also assessed. IA showed a more severe pattern of Internet and drug use, as well as poorer social skills in both contexts. Moreover, their groups of friends appeared more likely to become involved in risky situations related to Internet and drug abuse. Both IA and NIA showed more adaptive social skills in the virtual context than in the real one. There is a need for further research to build on these findings, with a view to designing specific preventive programs that promote responsible Internet use.

  14. Firearm Ownership and Acquisition Among Parents With Risk Factors for Self-Harm or Other Violence.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Elliott, Marc N; Kanouse, David E; Schwebel, David C; Toomey, Sara L; Mrug, Sylvie; Cuccaro, Paula M; Tortolero, Susan R; Schuster, Mark A

    Recent policy initiatives aiming to reduce firearm morbidity focus on mental health and illness. However, few studies have simultaneously examined mental health and behavioral predictors within families, or their longitudinal association with newly acquiring a firearm. Population-based, longitudinal survey of 4251 parents of fifth-grade students in 3 US metropolitan areas; 2004 to 2011. Multivariate logistic models were used to assess associations between owning or acquiring a firearm and parent mental illness and substance use. Ninety-three percent of parents interviewed were women. Overall, 19.6% of families reported keeping a firearm in the home. After adjustment for confounders, history of depression (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.77), binge drinking (aOR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.14-2.68), and illicit drug use (aOR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.12-2.76) were associated with a higher likelihood of keeping a firearm in the home. After a mean of 3.1 years, 6.1% of parents who did not keep a firearm in the home at baseline acquired one by follow-up and kept it in the home (average annual likelihood = 2.1%). No risk factors for self-harm or other violence were associated with newly acquiring a gun in the home. Families with risk factors for self-harm or other violence have a modestly greater probability of having a firearm in the home compared with families without risk factors, and similar probability of newly acquiring a firearm. Treatment interventions for many of these risk factors might reduce firearm-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology and risk factors for invasive candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Yapar, Nur

    2014-01-01

    The number of immunosuppressive patients has increased significantly in recent years. These patients are at risk for opportunistic infections, especially fungal infections. Candidiasis is one of the most frequent fungal infections determined in these immunosuppressive patients and its epidemiology has changed over the last two decades. Recently, new antifungal agents and new therapy strategies such as antifungal prophylaxis, secondary prophylaxis, and preemptive therapy have come into use. These changes resulted in the alteration of Candida species causing invasive infections. The incidence of Candida albicans was decreased in many countries, especially among patients with immunosuppressive disorders, while the incidence of species other than C. albicans was increased. In this review, incidence, risk factors, and species distribution of invasive candidiasis are discussed. PMID:24611015

  16. Measures to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome transmission by blood transfusion. Evidence of volunteer blood donor cooperation.

    PubMed

    Pindyck, J; Waldman, A; Zang, E; Oleszko, W; Lowy, M; Bianco, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether volunteers giving blood to the Greater New York Blood Program (GNYBP) cooperated with procedures implementing public health recommendations intended to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) transmission by blood transfusion. Predonation medical screening was expanded to exclude donors who might be ill with AIDS. To exclude possible asymptomatic carriers of the disease, members of groups at increased risk of AIDS were asked either not to give blood or to give it for laboratory studies. A confidential questionnaire, administered to all donors after medical screening, provided the vehicle for donors to advise the GNYBP whether their donation was for laboratory studies or for patient transfusion. We found that the number of male donors decreased; AIDS-related questions in medical history led to a 2 percent increase in donor rejections; 97 percent of donors said their blood could be used for transfusions; 1.4 percent said their blood could be used for laboratory studies only; and 1.6 percent did not respond. Only units designated for transfusion were released to hospitals. People who indicated that their donation was for laboratory studies had a higher prevalence of markers for hepatitis B virus and of antibodies to cytomegalovirus. White cell counts and helper/suppressor T lymphocyte ratios were not significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that volunteer donors have cooperated with the established procedures. None of the laboratory assays identified blood units donated by individuals who, based on information about AIDS high-risk groups, designated their donation for laboratory studies.

  17. Periodontitis: a risk factor for coronary heart disease?

    PubMed

    Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S; Williams, R; Gibbs, P; Garcia, R

    1998-07-01

    measure reflecting microbial burden, also is related to onset of new CHD events. Our previously published model describing the potential biological mechanisms underlying the associations found is reviewed. This model places the associations into a context of an intrinsic or acquired hyperinflammatory monocyte trait that results in a more intense inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenges, such as periodontal infections. This hyperinflammatory response may promote atheroma formation and thromboembolic events. finally, new findings from ongoing animal studies are presented, indicating that high fat diets in atherosclerotic-susceptible mice induce greater inflammatory responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis challenges. We conclude that the available evidence does allow an interpretation of periodontitis being a risk factor for atherosclerosis/CHD. This conclusion, however. is made with some qualifications. While the associations found across a wide variety of subjects are remarkably consistent, for the most part they are represented by incidence odds ratios around 2.0. While this level of association would result in oral conditions contributing to a large number of CHD cases, it is possible that associations of this magnitude are due to bias in the study designs. In addition, some studies report that periodontitis is associated with all-cause mortality and low birth weight infants. These multiple associations detract from the credibility of periodontitis as a risk factor, as specificity of association is more often related to causality. However, all-cause mortality may largely be driven by mortality from cardiovascular events: and some exposures, such as smoking. are indeed risk factors for multiple conditions. On the other hand, current findings regarding the associations between oral conditions and atherosclerosis/CHD imply that the criteria for causality may be met in the not-too-distant future.

  18. Risk factors for perineal injury during delivery.

    PubMed

    Christianson, L M; Bovbjerg, V E; McDavitt, E C; Hullfish, K L

    2003-07-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for anal sphincter injury during vaginal delivery. This was a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 2078 records of vaginal deliveries within a 2-year period from May 1, 1999, through April 30, 2001. Cases (n = 91) during the study period were defined as parturients who had documentation of greater than a second-degree perineal injury. Control subjects (n = 176), who were identified with the use of a blinded protocol, included women who were delivered vaginally with less than or equal to a second-degree perineal injury. For each patient, we reviewed medical and obstetrics records for the following characteristics: maternal age, race, weight, gestational age, parity, tobacco use, duration of first and second stages of labor, use of oxytocin, use of forceps or vacuum, infant birth weight, epidural use, and episiotomy use. Of the 2078 deliveries that were reviewed, we discovered 91 cases (4.4%) of documented anal sphincter injury. The mean maternal age of our sample was 24.9 +/- 5.9 years). Nearly two thirds (63.2%) were white; 26.7% were black, and 10.1% were of other racial backgrounds. Forceps were used in 51.6% of deliveries that resulted in tears (cases), compared to 8.6% of deliveries without significant tears (control subjects, P <.05). Using cases and control subjects with complete data (cases, 82; control subjects, 144), delivery with forceps was associated with a 10-fold increased risk of perineal injury (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 5.2-22.3) compared to noninstrumented deliveries. The association was similar after adjustment for age, race, parity, mode of delivery, tobacco use, episiotomy, duration of labor (stages 1 and 2), infant birth weight, epidural, and oxytocin use (odds ratio, 11.9; 95% CI, 4.7-30.4). Nulliparous women were at increased risk for tears (adjusted odds ratio, 10.0; 95% CI, 3.0-33.3) compared with multiparous patients, but parity did not reduce the association between forceps-assisted deliveries

  19. Environmental and genetic risk factors in obesity.

    PubMed

    Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Because of its high prevalence and the associated medical and psychosocial risks, research into the causes of childhood obesity has experienced a tremendous upswing. Formal genetic data based on twin, adoption, and family studies lead to the conclusion that at least 50% of the interindividual variance of the body mass index (BMI; defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is due to genetic factors. As a result of the recent advent of genome-wide association studies, the first polygenes involved in body weight regulation have been detected. Each of the predisposing alleles explain a few hundred grams of body weight. More polygenes will be detected in the near future, thus for the first time allowing in-depth analyses of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. They also will enable developmental studies to assess the effect of such alleles throughout childhood and adulthood. The recent increase in obesity prevalence rates illustrates the extreme relevance of environmental factors for body weight. Similar to polygenes, the effect sizes of most such environmental factors are likely to be small, thus rendering their detection difficult. In addition, the validation of the true causality of such factors is not a straightforward task. Important factors are socioeconomic status and television consumption. The authors conclude by briefly assessing implications for treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

  20. Risk Factors for Relapse of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Moulana, Zahra; Afshar, Zeinab Mohseni; Ebrahimpour, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Background & Propose: Brucellosis is serious disease around the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. Relapse is major problem in therapy of brucellosis. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors of relapse after treatment in patients. Methods: It is a descriptive-analytic study from 1990 to 2014, in Ayatolla Rohani hospital in Babol, Iran. We studied 980 patients with brucellosis. The studied community included patients infected with brucellosis and the required information was gathered based on their hospital files. The base for recognizing Malta fever were clinical symptoms and Para-clinical sign congruent with infection like as, titer SAT>1:320 and 2-ME>1:160. Patients with relapse and patients without relapse were placed separately in two groups. The data were statistically compared with Spss 16, by Chi-square and Cox–regression tests. Results: Based on this study, treatment regimen is a preventive factor (P=0.000). Moreover, Based on some statistical methods, regimens no. 3 and 4 were introduce preventive factors (P=0.001) and (P=0.004). It should also be noted that findings the same statistical model, factors like gender, age, residence, professional contacts, complications and delay in treatment were also analyzed but none of them are considered as preventive factors. Conclusion: Based our finding, we suggest aminoglycosides (gentamicin or streptomycin with doxycycline) are associated with lower rate of relapse in brucellosis. PMID:26925907