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Sample records for acquired tumor resistance

  1. Erlotinib is a viable treatment for tumors with acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Brand, Toni M; Dunn, Emily F; Iida, Mari; Myers, Rebecca A; Kostopoulos, Kellie T; Li, Chunrong; Peet, Chimera R; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a ubiquitously expressed receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and is recognized as a key mediator of tumorigenesis in many human tumors. Currently there are five EGFR inhibitors used in oncology, two monoclonal antibodies (panitumumab, and cetuximab) and three tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both strategies of EGFR inhibition have demonstrated clinical successes, however many tumors remain non-responsive or acquire resistance during therapy. To explore potential molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to cetuximab we previously established a series of cetuximab-resistant clones by chronically exposing the NCI-H226 NSCLC cell line to escalating doses of cetuximab. Cetuximab-resistant clones exhibited a dramatic increase in steady-state expression of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 receptors as well as increased signaling through the MAPK and AKT pathways. RNAi studies demonstrated dependence of cetuximab-resistant clones on the EGFR signaling network. These findings prompted investigation on whether or not cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab would be sensitive to the EGFR targeted TKI erlotinib. In vitro, erlotinib was able to decrease signaling through the EGFR axis, decrease cellular proliferation, and induce apoptosis. To determine if erlotinib could have therapeutic benefit in vivo, we established cetuximab-resistant NCI-H226 mouse xenografts, and subsequently treated them with erlotinib. Mice harboring cetuximab-resistant tumors treated with erlotinib exhibited either a tumor regression or growth delay as compared to vehicle controls. Analysis of the erlotinib treated tumors demonstrated a decrease in cell proliferation and increase rates of apoptosis. The work presented herein suggests that 1) cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab maintain their dependence on EGFR and 2) tumors developing resistance to cetuximab can benefit from subsequent treatment with erlotinib, providing

  2. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  3. BIIB021, a synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, has broad application against tumors with acquired multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Neely, Laura; Lundgren, Karen; Yang, Yong-Ching; Lough, Rachel; Timple, Noel; Burrows, Francis

    2010-03-01

    17-AAG, the first-generation clinical Hsp90 inhibitor, exhibits promising antitumor activity in clinical studies, but is limited by poor solubility and hepatotoxicity. To pursue compounds with better biopharmaceutical properties, we have developed a series of fully synthetic orally bioavailable inhibitors of Hsp90. Here, we report that 17-AAG and other ansamycin derivatives are inactive in P-gp and/or MRP-1 expressing cell lines and sensitivity could be restored by coadministration of P-gp or MRP inhibitors. In contrast, the synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, BIIB021 was active in these models. Accordingly, BIIB021 was considerably more active than 17-AAG against adrenocortical carcinoma, a tumor that naturally expresses P-gp, both in vitro and in vivo. This efflux pump-mediated resistance is manifested in both cytotoxicity assays and measurements of target inhibition, such as client protein degradation. Other than this, the cytotoxic activity of BIIB021 was also not influenced by loss of NQO1 or Bcl-2 overexpression, molecular lesions that do not prevent client loss but are nonetheless associated with reduced cell killing by 17-AAG. Our results indicate that the activity of 17-AAG and other ansamycins may be curtailed in tumors that have upregulated efflux pumps or antiapoptotic proteins or other genetic alterations. These data indicate that the new generation of synthetic anti-Hsp90 drugs, exemplified by BIIB021 that is currently undergoing Phase II testing, may have broader application against tumors with acquired multidrug resistance or tumors located in organs protected by MDR proteins, such as the adrenal glands, brain and testis. PMID:19676042

  4. The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF-1R inhibition in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Quail, Daniela F; Bowman, Robert L; Akkari, Leila; Quick, Marsha L; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Sutton, James C; Joyce, Johanna A

    2016-05-20

    Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression and can be targeted via inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that although overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas reestablish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment-driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurrent GBM, driven by macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and tumor cell IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Combining IGF-1R or PI3K blockade with CSF-1R inhibition in recurrent tumors significantly prolonged overall survival. Our findings thus reveal a potential therapeutic approach for treating resistance to CSF-1R inhibitors. PMID:27199435

  5. RACK1 overexpression is linked to acquired imatinib resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaodong; Xue, Anwei; Fang, Yong; Shu, Ping; Ling, Jiaqian; Hou, Yingyong; Shen, Kuntang; Qin, Jing; Sun, Yihong; Qin, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment with imatinib, which inhibits KIT and PDGFR, controls advanced disease in about 80% of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients, resistance to imatinib often develops. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a ribosomal protein that contributes to tumor progression by affecting proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and migration. Here, we found that c-KIT binds to RACK1 and increases proteasome-mediated RACK1 degradation. Imatinib treatment inhibits c-KIT activity and prevents RACK1 degradation, and RACK1 is upregulated in imatinib-resistant GIST cells compared to non-resistant parental cells. Moreover, Erk and Akt signaling were reactivated by imatinib in resistant GIST cells. RACK1 functioned as a scaffold protein and mediated Erk and Akt reactivation after imatinib treatment, thereby promoting GIST cell survival even in the presence of imatinib. Combined inhibition of KIT and RACK1 inhibited growth in imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines and reduced tumor relapse in GIST xenografts. These findings provide new insight into the role of RACK1 in imatinib resistance in GIST. PMID:26893362

  6. Circulating tumor DNA to monitor treatment response and detect acquired resistance in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elin S; Rizos, Helen; Reid, Anna L; Boyd, Suzanah C; Pereira, Michelle R; Lo, Johnny; Tembe, Varsha; Freeman, James; Lee, Jenny H J; Scolyer, Richard A; Siew, Kelvin; Lomma, Chris; Cooper, Adam; Khattak, Muhammad A; Meniawy, Tarek M; Long, Georgina V; Carlino, Matteo S; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Melanie

    2015-12-01

    Repeat tumor biopsies to study genomic changes during therapy are difficult, invasive and data are confounded by tumoral heterogeneity. The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can provide a non-invasive approach to assess prognosis and the genetic evolution of tumors in response to therapy. Mutation-specific droplet digital PCR was used to measure plasma concentrations of oncogenic BRAF and NRAS variants in 48 patients with advanced metastatic melanoma prior to treatment with targeted therapies (vemurafenib, dabrafenib or dabrafenib/trametinib combination) or immunotherapies (ipilimumab, nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Baseline ctDNA levels were evaluated relative to treatment response and progression-free survival (PFS). Tumor-associated ctDNA was detected in the plasma of 35/48 (73%) patients prior to treatment and lower ctDNA levels at this time point were significantly associated with response to treatment and prolonged PFS, irrespective of therapy type. Levels of ctDNA decreased significantly in patients treated with MAPK inhibitors (p < 0.001) in accordance with response to therapy, but this was not apparent in patients receiving immunotherapies. We show that circulating NRAS mutations, known to confer resistance to BRAF inhibitors, were detected in 3 of 7 (43%) patients progressing on kinase inhibitor therapy. Significantly, ctDNA rebound and circulating mutant NRAS preceded radiological detection of progressive disease. Our data demonstrate that ctDNA is a useful biomarker of response to kinase inhibitor therapy and can be used to monitor tumor evolution and detect the early appearance of resistance effectors. PMID:26524482

  7. Circulating tumor DNA to monitor treatment response and detect acquired resistance in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elin S.; Rizos, Helen; Reid, Anna L.; Boyd, Suzanah C.; Pereira, Michelle R.; Lo, Johnny; Tembe, Varsha; Freeman, James; Lee, Jenny H.J.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Siew, Kelvin; Lomma, Chris; Cooper, Adam; Khattak, Muhammad A.; Meniawy, Tarek M.; Long, Georgina V.; Carlino, Matteo S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Repeat tumor biopsies to study genomic changes during therapy are difficult, invasive and data are confounded by tumoral heterogeneity. The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can provide a non-invasive approach to assess prognosis and the genetic evolution of tumors in response to therapy. Mutation-specific droplet digital PCR was used to measure plasma concentrations of oncogenic BRAF and NRAS variants in 48 patients with advanced metastatic melanoma prior to treatment with targeted therapies (vemurafenib, dabrafenib or dabrafenib/trametinib combination) or immunotherapies (ipilimumab, nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Baseline ctDNA levels were evaluated relative to treatment response and progression-free survival (PFS). Tumor-associated ctDNA was detected in the plasma of 35/48 (73%) patients prior to treatment and lower ctDNA levels at this time point were significantly associated with response to treatment and prolonged PFS, irrespective of therapy type. Levels of ctDNA decreased significantly in patients treated with MAPK inhibitors (p < 0.001) in accordance with response to therapy, but this was not apparent in patients receiving immunotherapies. We show that circulating NRAS mutations, known to confer resistance to BRAF inhibitors, were detected in 3 of 7 (43%) patients progressing on kinase inhibitor therapy. Significantly, ctDNA rebound and circulating mutant NRAS preceded radiological detection of progressive disease. Our data demonstrate that ctDNA is a useful biomarker of response to kinase inhibitor therapy and can be used to monitor tumor evolution and detect the early appearance of resistance effectors. PMID:26524482

  8. MC32 tumor cells acquire Ag-specific CTL resistance through the loss of CEA in a colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeul; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that MC32 cells resist carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) DNA vaccination by losing their antigen presentation to Ag-specific CTLs in the context of MHC class I antigens in a colon cancer therapeutic model. In this study, we selected 2 tumor cells, MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2, which have the ability to form tumors in CEA DNA vaccine-immunized mice. Wild type MC32 cells grew significantly less in CEA-immunized mice (with Ag-specific CTL lytic activity) than in control mice (with no Ag-specific CTL lytic activity). However, MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2 cells grew at a similar rate in both control and CEA-immunized mice, confirming their resistant status against CEA DNA vaccination. MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2 cells were not susceptible to lysis by CEA-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, when MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2 cells were used as stimulating agents of CEA-specific immune cells for IFN-γ production, these cells failed to stimulate the induction of Ag-specific IFN-γ, suggesting a loss of tumor cell recognition by Ag-specific immune cells. However, MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2 cells expressed MHC class I antigens in a manner similar to that of wild type MC32 cells. Finally, Western blot assay confirmed that in MC32-S2–2 and MC32-S4–2 cells, CEA expression remained absent but mouse CEA was expressed. Taken together, these data show that MC32 cells may also be able to achieve resistance to CEA-specific CTLs by antigen loss in this model. PMID:25902414

  9. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen; Natarajan, Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  10. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutant lung cancer: Distinct natural history of patients with tumors harboring the T790M mutation

    PubMed Central

    Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Arcila, Maria E.; Sima, Camelia S.; Riely, Gregory J.; Chmielecki, Juliann; Kris, Mark G.; Pao, William; Ladanyi, Marc; Miller, Vincent A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) after a median of 10–16 months. In half of these cases a second EGFR mutation, T790M, underlies acquired resistance. We undertook this study to examine the clinical course of patients harboring the T790M mutation following progression on TKI. Experimental design EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs were identified as part of a prospective re-biopsy protocol where post-progression tumor specimens were collected for molecular analysis. Post-progression survival and characteristics of disease progression were compared in patients with and without T790M. Results We identified T790M in the initial re-biopsy specimens from 58/93 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 52%–72%). T790M was more common in biopsies of lung/pleura tissue and lymph nodes than in more distant sites (p=0.014). Median post-progression survival was 16 months (interquartile range 9–29 months); patients with T790M had a significantly longer post-progression survival (p=0.036). Patients without T790M more often progressed in a previously uninvolved organ system (p=0.014) and exhibited a poorer performance status at time of progression (p=0.007). Conclusions Among patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, the presence of T790M defines a clinical subset with a relatively favorable prognosis and more indolent progression. Knowledge of T790M status is therefore important for the clinical care of these patients as well as for the optimal design and interpretation of clinical trials in this setting. PMID:21135146

  11. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  12. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  13. Acquired resistance to immunotherapy and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Smyth, Mark J; Snyder, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Advances in immunotherapy have resulted in remarkable clinical responses in some patients. However, one of the biggest challenges in cancer therapeutics is the development of resistant disease and disease progression on or after therapy. Given that many patients have now received various types of immunotherapy, we asked three scientists to give their views on the current evidence for whether acquired resistance to immunotherapy exists in patients and the future challenges posed by immunotherapy. PMID:26822578

  14. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC. PMID:12570741

  15. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore; Vestergaard, Martin; Rasmussen, Simon; Lund, Ole; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data. Methods We developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de-novo-sequenced isolates. Results When testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial species, with available phenotypes. Furthermore, ResFinder was evaluated on WGS chromosomes and plasmids of 30 isolates. Seven of these isolates were annotated to have antimicrobial resistance, and in all cases, annotations were compatible with the ResFinder results. Conclusions A web server providing a convenient way of identifying acquired antimicrobial resistance genes in completely sequenced isolates was created. ResFinder can be accessed at www.genomicepidemiology.org. ResFinder will continuously be updated as new resistance genes are identified. PMID:22782487

  16. Tetracycline resistance genes acquired at birth.

    PubMed

    Alicea-Serrano, Angela M; Contreras, Mónica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2013-06-01

    Newborns acquire their first microbiota at birth. Maternal vaginal or skin bacteria colonize newborns delivered vaginally or by C-section, respectively (Dominguez-Bello et al. 2010 #884). We aimed to determine differences in the presence of four tetracycline (tet) resistance genes, in the microbes of ten newborns and in the mouth and vagina of their mothers, at the time of birth. DNA was amplified by PCR with primers specific for [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W)]. Maternal vaginas harbored all four tet resistance genes, but most commonly tet(M) and tet(O) (63 and 38 %, respectively). Genes coding for tet resistance differed by birth mode, with 50 % of vaginally delivered babies had tet(M) and tet(O) and 16 and 13 % of infants born by C-section had tet(O) and tet(W), respectively. Newborns acquire antibiotic resistance genes at birth, and the resistance gene profile varies by mode of delivery. PMID:23483141

  17. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  18. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26744526

  19. Activation of Alternate Prosurvival Pathways Accounts for Acquired Sunitinib Resistance in U87MG Glioma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hua; Mazloom, Amin R.; Xu, Huilei; Ma'ayan, Avi; Gallo, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance represents a major obstacle to using sunitinib for the treatment of solid tumors. Here, we examined the cellular and molecular alterations in tumors that are associated with acquired brain tumor resistance to sunitinib by using an in vivo model. U87MG tumors obtained from nude mice that received sunitinib (40 mg/kg/day) for 30 days were classified into sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant groups based on tumor volume and underwent targeted gene microarray and protein array analyses. The expression of several angiogenesis-associated genes was significantly modulated in sunitinib-treated tumors compared with those in control tumors (p < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were observed between sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant tumors (p > 0.05). Tumor vasculature based on microvessel density, neurogenin 2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan density, and α-smooth muscle actin density was also similar in sunitinib-treatment groups (p > 0.05). The moderate increase in unbound sunitinib tumor-to-plasma area-under-the-curve ratio in sunitinib-resistant mice was accompanied by up-regulated ATP-binding cassette G2 expression in tumor. The most profound difference between the sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant groups was found in the expression of several phosphorylated proteins involved in intracellular signaling. In particular, phospholipase C-γ1 phosphorylation in sunitinib-resistant tumors was up-regulated by 2.6-fold compared with that in sunitinib-sensitive tumors (p < 0.05). In conclusion, acquired sunitinib resistance in U87MG tumors is not associated with revascularization in tumors, but rather with the activation of alternate prosurvival pathways involved in an escape mechanism facilitating tumor growth and possibly insufficient drug uptake in tumor cells caused by an up-regulated membrane efflux transporter. PMID:22869928

  20. Adaptive and Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Converge on the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengfei; Fu, Yujie; Chen, Minjiang; Jing, Ying; Wu, Jie; Li, Ke; Shen, Ying; Gao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Both adaptive and acquired resistance significantly limits the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors. However, the distinct or common mechanisms of adaptive and acquired resistance have not been fully characterized. Here, through systematic modeling of erlotinib resistance in lung cancer, we found that feedback reactivation of MAPK signaling following erlotinib treatment, which was dependent on the MET receptor, contributed to the adaptive resistance of EGFR inhibitors. Interestingly, acquired resistance to erlotinib was also associated with the MAPK pathway activation as a result of CRAF or NRAS amplification. Consequently, combined inhibition of EGFR and MAPK impeded the development of both adaptive and acquired resistance. These observations demonstrate that adaptive and acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors can converge on the same pathway and credential cotargeting EGFR and MAPK as a promising therapeutic approach in EGFR mutant tumors. PMID:27279914

  1. Managing acquired resistance in EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Forde, Patrick M; Ettinger, David S

    2015-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) deliver high response rates with relatively modest toxicity in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer. Despite this, nearly all tumors eventually develop resistance to first-line therapy. At present, the only standard treatment option for patients with acquired resistance is cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this article, we review the latest research into methods of targeting acquired resistance to EGFR TKI therapy, including third-generation EGFR TKIs that target the T790M resistance mutation and other novel agents in development. PMID:26351816

  2. Nuclear EGFR Contributes to Acquired Resistance to Cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunrong; Iida, Mari; Dunn, Emily F.; Ghia, Amol J.; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a ubiquitously expressed receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the etiology of several human cancers. Cetuximab is an EGFR blocking-antibody that has been approved for the treatment of patients with cancers of the head and neck (HNSCC) and metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Previous reports have shown that EGFR translocation to the nucleus is associated with cell proliferation. Here we investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant cells overexpress HER family ligands including epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF) and β-cellulin. Overexpression of these ligands is associated with the nuclear translocation of the EGFR and this process was mediated by the Src family kinases (SFK). Treatment of cetuximab-resistant cells with the SFK inhibitor, dasatinib, resulted in loss of nuclear EGFR, increased membrane expression of the EGFR and re-sensitization to cetuximab. In addition, expression of a nuclear localization sequence tagged EGFR in cetuximab-sensitive cells increased resistance to cetuximab both in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that nuclear expression of EGFR may be an important molecular determinant of resistance to cetuximab therapy and provides a rationale for investigating nuclear EGFR as a biomarker for cetuximab response. Further, these data suggest a rationale for the design of clinical trials that examine the value of treating patients with cetuximab-resistant tumors with inhibitors of SFKs in combination with cetuximab. PMID:19684613

  3. Nuclear EGFR contributes to acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Iida, M; Dunn, E F; Ghia, A J; Wheeler, D L

    2009-10-29

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a ubiquitously expressed receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the etiology of several human cancers. Cetuximab is an EGFR-blocking antibody that has been approved for the treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic colorectal cancer. Previous reports have shown that EGFR translocation to the nucleus is associated with cell proliferation. Here we investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to cetuximab using a model derived from the non-small cell lung cancer line H226. We demonstrated that cetuximab-resistant cells overexpress HER family ligands including epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin, heparin-binding EGF and beta-cellulin. Overexpression of these ligands is associated with the nuclear translocation of the EGFR and this process was mediated by the Src family kinases (SFK). Treatment of cetuximab-resistant cells with the SFK inhibitor, dasatinib, resulted in loss of nuclear EGFR, increased membrane expression of the EGFR and resensitization to cetuximab. In addition, expression of a nuclear localization sequence-tagged EGFR in cetuximab-sensitive cells increased resistance to cetuximab both in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that nuclear expression of EGFR may be an important molecular determinant of resistance to cetuximab therapy and provides a rationale for investigating nuclear EGFR as a biomarker for cetuximab response. Further, these data suggest a rationale for the design of clinical trials that examine the value of treating patients with cetuximab-resistant tumors with inhibitors of SFKs in combination with cetuximab. PMID:19684613

  4. Response and Acquired Resistance to Everolimus in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Nikhil; Grabiner, Brian C.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Rosenberg, Mara; Gray, Nathanael; Barletta, Justine A.; Guo, Yanan; Swanson, Scott J.; Ruan, Daniel T.; Hanna, Glenn J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Getz, Gad; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Carter, Scott L.; Sabatini, David M.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lorch, Jochen H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is effective in treating tumors harboring alterations in the mTOR pathway. Mechanisms of resistance to everolimus remain undefined. Resistance developed in a patient with metastatic anaplastic thyroid carcinoma after an extraordinary 18-month response. Whole-exome sequencing of pretreatment and drug-resistant tumors revealed a nonsense mutation in TSC2, a negative regulator of mTOR, suggesting a mechanism for exquisite sensitivity to everolimus. The resistant tumor also harbored a mutation in MTOR that confers resistance to allosteric mTOR inhibition. The mutation remains sensitive to mTOR kinase inhibitors. PMID:25295501

  5. Evolution of acquired resistance to anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Jasmine; Michor, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a major limitation for the successful treatment of cancer. Resistance can emerge due to a variety of reasons including host environmental factors as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations in the cancer cells. Evolutionary theory has contributed to the understanding of the dynamics of resistance mutations in a cancer cell population, the risk of resistance pre-existing before the initiation of therapy, the composition of drug cocktails necessary to prevent the emergence of resistance, and optimum drug administration schedules for patient populations at risk of evolving acquired resistance. Here we review recent advances towards elucidating the evolutionary dynamics of acquired drug resistance and outline how evolutionary thinking can contribute to outstanding questions in the field. PMID:24681298

  6. Irreversible inhibitors of the EGF receptor may circumvent acquired resistance to gefitinib

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Eunice L.; Sordella, Raffaella; Bell, Daphne W.; Godin-Heymann, Nadia; Okimoto, Ross A.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Harris, Patricia L.; Driscoll, David R.; Fidias, Panos; Lynch, Thomas J.; Rabindran, Sridhar K.; McGinnis, John P.; Wissner, Allan; Sharma, Sreenath V.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Haber, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) with activating mutations in the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) demonstrate dramatic, but transient, responses to the reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) and erlotinib (Tarceva). Some recurrent tumors have a common secondary mutation in the EGFR kinase domain, T790M, conferring drug resistance, but in other cases the mechanism underlying acquired resistance is unknown. In studying multiple sites of recurrent NSCLCs, we detected T790M in only a small percentage of tumor cells. To identify additional mechanisms of acquired resistance to gefitinib, we used NSCLC cells harboring an activating EGFR mutation to generate multiple resistant clones in vitro. These drug-resistant cells demonstrate continued dependence on EGFR and ERBB2 signaling for their viability and have not acquired secondary EGFR mutations. However, they display increased internalization of ligand-activated EGFR, consistent with altered receptor trafficking. Although gefitinib-resistant clones are cross-resistant to related anilinoquinazolines, they demonstrate sensitivity to a class of irreversible inhibitors of EGFR. These inhibitors also show effective inhibition of signaling by T790M-mutant EGFR and killing of NSCLC cells with the T790M mutation. Both mechanisms of gefitinib resistance are therefore circumvented by irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our findings suggest that one of these, HKI-272, may prove highly effective in the treatment of EGFR-mutant NSCLCs, including tumors that have become resistant to gefitinib or erlotinib. PMID:15897464

  7. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  8. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  9. Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

    2012-01-01

    A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often ‘silent’ spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of β-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

  10. Sym004, a novel EGFR antibody mixture, can overcome acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Starr, Megan M; Li, Chunrong; Huppert, Evan J; Luthar, Neha; Pedersen, Mikkel W; Horak, Ivan D; Kragh, Michael; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in a variety of human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody that has been approved for head and neck and colorectal cancer treatment, but many patients treated with cetuximab don't respond or eventually acquire resistance. To determine how tumor cells acquire resistance to cetuximab, we previously developed a model of acquired resistance using the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. These cetuximab-resistant (Ctx(R)) cells exhibit increased steady-state EGFR expression secondary to alterations in EGFR trafficking and degradation and, further, retained dependence on EGFR signaling for enhanced growth potential. Here, we examined Sym004, a novel mixture of antibodies directed against distinct epitopes on the extracellular domain of EGFR, as an alternative therapy for Ctx(R) tumor cells. Sym004 treatment of Ctx(R) clones resulted in rapid EGFR degradation, followed by robust inhibition of cell proliferation and down-regulation of several mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. To determine whether Sym004 could have therapeutic benefit in vivo, we established de novo Ctx(R) NCI-H226 mouse xenografts and subsequently treated Ctx(R) tumors with Sym004. Sym004 treatment of mice harboring Ctx(R) tumors resulted in growth delay compared to mice continued on cetuximab. Levels of total and phospho-EGFR were robustly decreased in Ctx(R) tumors treated with Sym004. Immunohistochemical analysis of these Sym004-treated xenograft tumors further demonstrated decreased expression of Ki67, and phospho-rpS6, as well as a modest increase in cleaved caspase-3. These results indicate that Sym004 may be an effective targeted therapy for Ctx(R) tumors. PMID:24204198

  11. Overexpression of Specific CD44 Isoforms Is Associated with Aggressive Cell Features in Acquired Endocrine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bellerby, Rebecca; Smith, Chris; Kyme, Sue; Gee, Julia; Günthert, Ursula; Green, Andy; Rakha, Emad; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Hiscox, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While endocrine therapy is the mainstay of ER+ breast cancer, the clinical effectiveness of these agents is limited by the phenomenon of acquired resistance that is associated with disease relapse and poor prognosis. Our previous studies revealed that acquired resistance is accompanied by a gain in cellular invasion and migration and also that CD44 family proteins are overexpressed in the resistant phenotype. Given the association of CD44 with tumor progression, we hypothesized that its overexpression may act to promote the aggressive behavior of endocrine-resistant breast cancers. Here, we have investigated further the role of two specific CD44 isoforms, CD44v3 and CD44v6, in the endocrine-resistant phenotype. Our data revealed that overexpression of CD44v6, but not CD44v3, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 cells resulted in a gain in EGFR signaling, enhanced their endogenous invasive capacity, and attenuated their response to endocrine treatment. Suppression of CD44v6 in endocrine-resistant cell models was associated with a reduction in their invasive capacity. Our data suggest that upregulation of CD44v6 in acquired resistant breast cancer may contribute to a gain in the aggressive phenotype of these cells and loss of endocrine response through transactivation of the EGFR pathway. Future therapeutic targeting of CD44v6 may prove to be an effective strategy alongside EGFR-targeted agents in delaying/preventing acquired resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27379207

  12. Tumor microenvironment and cancer therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu

    2016-09-28

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, however, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful regimens. Cancer cells gain resistance through a variety of mechanisms in both primary and metastatic sites, involving cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the latter often remains overlooked. Mounting evidence suggests critical roles played by the tumor microenvironment (TME) in multiple aspects of cancer progression particularly therapeutic resistance. The TME decreases drug penetration, confers proliferative and antiapoptotic advantages to surviving cells, facilitates resistance without causing genetic mutations and epigenetic changes, collectively modifying disease modality and distorting clinical indices. Recent studies have set the baseline for future investigation on the intricate relationship between cancer resistance and the TME in pathological backgrounds. This review provides an updated outline of research advances in TME biology and highlights the prospect of targeting the TME as an essential strategy to overcome cancer resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes through precise intervention. In the long run, continued inputs into translational medicine remain highly desired to achieve durable responses in the current era of personalized clinical oncology. PMID:26272180

  13. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  14. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  15. Acquired resistance to 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin) in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Nathalie; Sharp, Swee Y; Pacey, Simon; Jones, Chris; Walton, Michael; Vassal, Gilles; Eccles, Suzanne; Pearson, Andrew; Workman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    HSP90 inhibitors, such as 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin) which is currently in phase II/III clinical trials, are promising new anticancer agents. Here, we explored acquired resistance to HSP90 inhibitors in glioblastoma, a primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. Glioblastoma cells were exposed continuously to increased 17-AAG concentrations. Four 17-AAG-resistant glioblastoma cell lines were generated. High resistance levels with resistance indices (RI=resistant line IC50/parental line IC50) of 20-137 were obtained rapidly (2-8 weeks). After cessation of 17-AAG exposure, RI decreased and then stabilised. Cross-resistance was found with other ansamycin benzoquinones but not with the structurally unrelated HSP90 inhibitors, radicicol, the purine BIIB021 and the resorcinylic pyrazole/isoxazole amide compounds VER-49009, VER-50589, and NVP-AUY922. An inverse correlation between NQO1 expression/activity and 17-AAG IC50 was observed in the resistant lines. The NQO1 inhibitor ES936 abrogated the differential effects of 17-AAG sensitivity between the parental and resistant lines. NQO1 mRNA levels and NQO1 DNA polymorphism analysis indicated different underlying mechanisms: reduced expression and selection of the inactive NQO1*2 polymorphism. Decreased NQO1 expression was also observed in a melanoma line with acquired resistance to 17-AAG. No resistance was generated with VER-50589 and NVP-AUY922. In conclusion, low NQO1 activity is a likely mechanism of acquired resistance to 17-AAG in glioblastoma, melanoma and possibly other tumor types. Such resistance can be overcome with novel HSP90 inhibitors. PMID:19244114

  16. Staphylococci in community-acquired infections: Increased resistance to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Chidi, C C; Macon, W L

    1976-04-01

    One hundred patients with community-acquired staphylococcal infections of the skin and soft tissues were treated in the Emergency Ward of Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital from June to October of 1974. Each staphylococcal infection was considered community-acquired if, within two weeks prior to being treated for the first time, the patient had not received antibiotics, had not been hospitalized, and had not been in contact with other recently hospitalized persons. Of 100 community-acquired staphylococcal infections, 85 were resistant to penicillin. Almost no resistance to other tested antibiotics was observed. Unless indicated otherwise by bacteriologic testing, penicillin is a poor drug of choice in those skin and soft tissue infections suspected of harboring staphylococci. PMID:1267491

  17. Extensive Drug Resistance Acquired During Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cegielski, J. Peter; Dalton, Tracy; Yagui, Martin; Wattanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Via, Laura E.; Van Der Walt, Martie; Tupasi, Thelma; Smith, Sarah E.; Odendaal, Ronel; Leimane, Vaira; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Kummik, Tiina; Kuksa, Liga; Kliiman, Kai; Kiryanova, Elena V.; Kim, HeeJin; Kim, Chang-ki; Kazennyy, Boris Y.; Jou, Ruwen; Huang, Wei-Lun; Ershova, Julia; Erokhin, Vladislav V.; Diem, Lois; Contreras, Carmen; Cho, Sang Nae; Chernousova, Larisa N.; Chen, Michael P.; Caoili, Janice Campos; Bayona, Jaime; Akksilp, Somsak; Calahuanca, Gloria Yale; Wolfgang, Melanie; Viiklepp, Piret; Vasilieva, Irina A.; Taylor, Allison; Tan, Kathrine; Suarez, Carmen; Sture, Ingrida; Somova, Tatiana; Smirnova, Tatyana G.; Sigman, Erika; Skenders, Girts; Sitti, Wanlaya; Shamputa, Isdore C.; Riekstina, Vija; Pua, Kristine Rose; Therese, M.; Perez, C.; Park, Seungkyu; Norvaisha, Inga; Nemtsova, Evgenia S.; Min, Seonyeong; Metchock, Beverly; Levina, Klavdia; Lei, Yung-Chao; Lee, Jongseok; Larionova, Elena E.; Lancaster, Joey; Jeon, Doosoo; Jave, Oswaldo; Khorosheva, Tatiana; Hwang, Soo Hee; Huang, Angela Song-En; Gler, M. Tarcela; Dravniece, Gunta; Eum, Seokyong; Demikhova, Olga V.; Degtyareva, Irina; Danilovits, Manfred; Cirula, Anda; Cho, Eunjin; Cai, Ying; Brand, Jeanette; Bonilla, Cesar; Barry, Clifton E.; Asencios, Luis; Andreevskaya, Sofia N.; Akksilp, Rattanawadee

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing access to drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is crucial but could lead to increasing resistance to these same drugs. In 2000, the international Green Light Committee (GLC) initiative began to increase access while attempting to prevent acquired resistance. Methods. To assess the GLC's impact, we followed adults with pulmonary MDR tuberculosis from the start to the end of treatment with monthly sputum cultures, drug susceptibility testing, and genotyping. We compared the frequency and predictors of acquired resistance to second-line drugs (SLDs) in 9 countries that volunteered to participate, 5 countries that met GLC criteria, and 4 countries that did not apply to the GLC. Results. In total, 832 subjects were enrolled. Of those without baseline resistance to specific SLDs, 68 (8.9%) acquired extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis, 79 (11.2%) acquired fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance, and 56 (7.8%) acquired resistance to second-line injectable drugs (SLIs). The relative risk (95% confidence interval [CI]) of acquired resistance was lower at GLC-approved sites: 0.27 (.16–.47) for XDR tuberculosis, 0.28 (.17–.45) for FQ, and 0.15 (.06–.39) to 0.60 (.34–1.05) for 3 different SLIs. The risk increased as the number of potentially effective drugs decreased. Controlling for baseline drug resistance and differences between sites, the odds ratios (95% CIs) were 0.21 (.07–.62) for acquired XDR tuberculosis and 0.23 (.09–.59) for acquired FQ resistance. Conclusions. Treatment of MDR tuberculosis involves substantial risk of acquired resistance to SLDs, increasing as baseline drug resistance increases. The risk was significantly lower in programs documented by the GLC to meet specific standards. PMID:25057101

  18. Direct pharmacological assessment of clinically acquired models as a strategy to overcome resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Cyril H

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a study using cell lines established from biopsies of clinically resistant non-small cell lung cancers with the aim of discovering therapeutic strategies to overcome acquired resistance. Our results indicate that pharmacological assessment of tumor material might efficiently complement genetic profiling in the future path toward personalized medicine. PMID:27308520

  19. Direct pharmacological assessment of clinically acquired models as a strategy to overcome resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Benes, Cyril H

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a study using cell lines established from biopsies of clinically resistant non-small cell lung cancers with the aim of discovering therapeutic strategies to overcome acquired resistance. Our results indicate that pharmacological assessment of tumor material might efficiently complement genetic profiling in the future path toward personalized medicine. PMID:27308520

  20. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rathert, Philipp; Roth, Mareike; Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R; Zuber, Johannes

    2015-09-24

    Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), bromodomain and extra terminal protein (BET) inhibitors are being explored as a promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced haematological malignancies, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukaemia, here we perform a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL-AF9;Nras(G12D)-driven AML mouse model, and investigate dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant mouse and human leukaemias. Our screen shows that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodelling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukaemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukaemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signalling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and self-transcribing active regulatory region sequencing of enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodelled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signalling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukaemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting

  1. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M.; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E.; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Zuber, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Summary Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)1,2, BET inhibitors are being explored as promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers3–5. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced hematologic malignancies6, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, we performed a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL/AF9; NrasG12D -driven AML model, and investigated dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant murine and human leukemias. Our screen reveals that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodeling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signaling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic ChIP- and STARR-seq enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodeled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signaling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting resistance to BET inhibitors and, potentially, other chromatin-targeted therapies. PMID:26367798

  2. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  3. Imaging the urokinase plasminongen activator receptor in preclinical breast cancer models of acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Craik, Charles S; Murphy, Laura L; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and (111)In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the (111)In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  4. Overcoming acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma via targeted inhibition of Hsp90 with ganetespib.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Jaime; Smith, Donald L; Jimenez, John-Paul; Zhang, Chaohua; Sequeira, Manuel; He, Suqin; Sang, Jim; Bates, Richard C; Proia, David A

    2014-02-01

    Activating BRAF kinase mutations serve as oncogenic drivers in over half of all melanomas, a feature that has been exploited in the development of new molecularly targeted approaches to treat this disease. Selective BRAF(V600E) inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, typically induce initial, profound tumor regressions within this group of patients; however, durable responses have been hampered by the emergence of drug resistance. Here, we examined the activity of ganetespib, a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90, in melanoma lines harboring the BRAF(V600E) mutation. Ganetespib exposure resulted in the loss of mutant BRAF expression and depletion of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT signaling, resulting in greater in vitro potency and antitumor efficacy compared with targeted BRAF and MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Dual targeting of Hsp90 and BRAF(V600E) provided combinatorial benefit in vemurafenib-sensitive melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, ganetespib overcame mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to vemurafenib, the latter of which was characterized by reactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Continued suppression of BRAF(V600E) by vemurafenib potentiated sensitivity to MEK inhibitors after acquired resistance had been established. Ganetespib treatment reduced, but not abolished, elevations in steady-state ERK activity. Profiling studies revealed that the addition of a MEK inhibitor could completely abrogate ERK reactivation in the resistant phenotype, with ganetespib displaying superior combinatorial activity over vemurafenib. Moreover, ganetespib plus the MEK inhibitor TAK-733 induced tumor regressions in vemurafenib-resistant xenografts. Overall these data highlight the potential of ganetespib as a single-agent or combination treatment in BRAF(V600E)-driven melanoma, particularly as a strategy to overcome acquired resistance to selective BRAF inhibitors. PMID:24398428

  5. Co-option of Liver Vessels and Not Sprouting Angiogenesis Drives Acquired Sorafenib Resistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynski, Elizabeth A.; Yin, Melissa; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Lee, Christina R.; Butz, Henriett; Man, Shan; Daley, Frances; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Yousef, George M.; Foster, F. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anti-angiogenic Sorafenib is the only approved systemic therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, acquired resistance limits its efficacy. An emerging theory to explain intrinsic resistance to other anti-angiogenic drugs is ‘vessel co-option,’ ie, the ability of tumors to hijack the existing vasculature in organs such as the lungs or liver, thus limiting the need for sprouting angiogenesis. Vessel co-option has not been evaluated as a potential mechanism for acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic agents. Methods: To study sorafenib resistance mechanisms, we used an orthotopic human HCC model (n = 4-11 per group), where tumor cells are tagged with a secreted protein biomarker to monitor disease burden and response to therapy. Histopathology, vessel perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and miRNA sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to monitor changes in tumor biology. Results: While sorafenib initially inhibited angiogenesis and stabilized tumor growth, no angiogenic ‘rebound’ effect was observed during development of resistance unless therapy was stopped. Instead, resistant tumors became more locally infiltrative, which facilitated extensive incorporation of liver parenchyma and the co-option of liver-associated vessels. Up to 75% (±10.9%) of total vessels were provided by vessel co-option in resistant tumors relative to 23.3% (±10.3%) in untreated controls. miRNA sequencing implicated pro-invasive signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transition during resistance development while functional imaging further supported a shift from angiogenesis to vessel co-option. Conclusions: This is the first documentation of vessel co-option as a mechanism of acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy and could have important implications including the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting vessel co-option in conjunction with vascular endothelial growth factor

  6. Acquired resistance and clonal evolution in melanoma during BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangju; Hong, Aayoung; Koya, Richard C.; Moriceau, Gatien; Chodon, Thinle; Guo, Rongqing; Johnson, Douglas B.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Kelley, Mark C.; Kefford, Richard F.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; van Baren, Nicolas; Long, Georgina V.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors elicit rapid anti-tumor responses in the majority of patients with V600BRAF mutant melanoma, but acquired drug resistance is almost universal. We sought to identify the core resistance pathways and the extent of tumor heterogeneity during disease progression. We show that MAPK reactivation mechanisms were detected among 70% of disease-progressive tissues, with RAS mutations, mutant BRAF amplification and alternative splicing being most common. We also detected PI3K-PTEN-AKT-upregulating genetic alterations among 22% of progressive melanomas. Distinct molecular lesions, in both core drug escape pathways, were commonly detected concurrently in the same tumor or among multiple tumors from the same patient. Beyond harboring extensively heterogeneous resistance mechanisms, melanoma re-growth emerging from BRAF inhibitor selection displayed branched evolution marked by altered mutational spectra/signatures and increased fitness. Thus, melanoma genomic heterogeneity contributes significantly to BRAF inhibitor treatment failure, implying upfront, co-targeting of two core pathways as an essential strategy for durable responses. PMID:24265155

  7. Acquired Resistance of Lung Adenocarcinomas to Gefitinib or Erlotinib Is Associated with a Second Mutation in the EGFR Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) or erlotinib (Tarceva) usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of “acquired” resistance. Methods and Findings We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M) in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec). Conclusion In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers. PMID:15737014

  8. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  9. Early Adaptation and Acquired Resistance to CDK4/6 Inhibition in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Abreu, Maria Teresa; Palafox, Marta; Asghar, Uzma; Rivas, Martín A; Cutts, Rosalind J; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Pearson, Alex; Guzman, Marta; Rodriguez, Olga; Grueso, Judit; Bellet, Meritxell; Cortés, Javier; Elliott, Richard; Pancholi, Sunil; Baselga, José; Dowsett, Mitch; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Turner, Nicholas C; Serra, Violeta

    2016-04-15

    Small-molecule inhibitors of the CDK4/6 cell-cycle kinases have shown clinical efficacy in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive metastatic breast cancer, although their cytostatic effects are limited by primary and acquired resistance. Here we report that ER-positive breast cancer cells can adapt quickly to CDK4/6 inhibition and evade cytostasis, in part, via noncanonical cyclin D1-CDK2-mediated S-phase entry. This adaptation was prevented by cotreatment with hormone therapies or PI3K inhibitors, which reduced the levels of cyclin D1 (CCND1) and other G1-S cyclins, abolished pRb phosphorylation, and inhibited activation of S-phase transcriptional programs. Combined targeting of both CDK4/6 and PI3K triggered cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and in patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models, resulting in tumor regression and improved disease control. Furthermore, a triple combination of endocrine therapy, CDK4/6, and PI3K inhibition was more effective than paired combinations, provoking rapid tumor regressions in a PDX model. Mechanistic investigations showed that acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition resulted from bypass of cyclin D1-CDK4/6 dependency through selection of CCNE1 amplification or RB1 loss. Notably, although PI3K inhibitors could prevent resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors, they failed to resensitize cells once resistance had been acquired. However, we found that cells acquiring resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors due to CCNE1 amplification could be resensitized by targeting CDK2. Overall, our results illustrate convergent mechanisms of early adaptation and acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors that enable alternate means of S-phase entry, highlighting strategies to prevent the acquisition of therapeutic resistance to these agents. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2301-13. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020857

  10. Effects of Sorafenib Dose on Acquired Reversible Resistance and Toxicity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuczynski, Elizabeth A; Lee, Christina R; Man, Shan; Chen, Eric; Kerbel, Robert S

    2015-06-15

    Acquired evasive resistance is a major limitation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sorafenib. Recent findings suggest that resistance to sorafenib may have a reversible phenotype. In addition, loss of responsiveness has been proposed to be due to a gradual decrease in sorafenib plasma levels in patients. Here, the possible mechanisms underlying reversible sorafenib resistance were investigated using a Hep3B-hCG orthotopic human xenograft model of locally advanced HCC. Tissue and plasma sorafenib and metabolite levels, downstream antitumor targets, and toxicity were assessed during standard and dose-escalated sorafenib treatment. Drug levels were found to decline significantly over time in mice treated with 30 mg/kg sorafenib, coinciding with the onset of resistance but a greater magnitude of change was observed in tissues compared with plasma. Skin rash also correlated with drug levels and tended to decrease in severity over time. Drug level changes appeared to be partially tumor dependent involving induction of tumoral CYP3A4 metabolism, with host pretreatment alone unable to generate resistance. Escalation from 30 to 60 mg/kg sorafenib improved antitumor efficacy but worsened survival due to excessive body weight loss. Microvessel density was inhibited by sorafenib treatment but remained suppressed over time and dose increase. In conclusion, tumor CYP3A4 induction by sorafenib is a novel mechanism to account for variability in systemic drug levels; however, declining systemic sorafenib levels may only be a minor resistance mechanism. Escalating the dose may be an effective treatment strategy, provided toxicity can be controlled. PMID:25908587

  11. DNA-PK mediates AKT activation and apoptosis inhibition in clinically acquired platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Stronach, Euan A; Chen, Michelle; Maginn, Elaina N; Agarwal, Roshan; Mills, Gordon B; Wasan, Harpreet; Gabra, Hani

    2011-11-01

    Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS) ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinum-resistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Resensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage-mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors. PMID:22131882

  12. DNA-PK Mediates AKT Activation and Apoptosis Inhibition in Clinically Acquired Platinum Resistance12

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Euan A; Chen, Michelle; Maginn, Elaina N; Agarwal, Roshan; Mills, Gordon B; Wasan, Harpreet; Gabra, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS) ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinum-resistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Resensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage-mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors. PMID:22131882

  13. Induced PD-L1 expression mediates acquired resistance to agonistic anti-CD40 treatment.

    PubMed

    Zippelius, Alfred; Schreiner, Jens; Herzig, Petra; Müller, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    CD40 stimulation on antigen-presenting cells (APC) allows direct activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, independent of CD4⁺ T-cell help. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have been demonstrated to induce beneficial antitumor T-cell responses in mouse models of cancer and early clinical trials. We report here that anti-CD40 treatment induces programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) upregulation on tumor-infiltrating monocytes and macrophages, which was strictly dependent on T cells and IFNγ. PD-L1 expression could be counteracted by coadministration of antibodies blocking the PD-1 (programmed death-1)/PD-L1 axis as shown for T cells from tumor models and human donors. The combined treatment was highly synergistic and induced complete tumor rejection in about 50% of mice bearing MC-38 colon and EMT-6 breast tumors. Mechanistically, this was reflected by a strong increase of IFNγ and granzyme-B production in intratumoral CD8⁺ T cells. Concomitant CTLA-4 blockade further improved rejection of established tumors in mice. This study uncovers a novel mechanism of acquired resistance upon agonistic CD40 stimulation and proposes that the concomitant blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis is a viable therapeutic strategy to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:25623164

  14. Mutations Associated with Acquired Resistance to PD-1 Blockade in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zaretsky, Jesse M; Garcia-Diaz, Angel; Shin, Daniel S; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Hugo, Willy; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Torrejon, Davis Y; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Sandoval, Salemiz; Barthly, Lucas; Saco, Justin; Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Shintaku, I Peter; Sanchez, Phillip J; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cherry, Grace; Seja, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangju; Pang, Jia; Berent-Maoz, Beata; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Graeber, Thomas G; Tumeh, Paul C; Schumacher, Ton N M; Lo, Roger S; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Background Approximately 75% of objective responses to anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) therapy in patients with melanoma are durable, lasting for years, but delayed relapses have been noted long after initial objective tumor regression despite continuous therapy. Mechanisms of immune escape in this context are unknown. Methods We analyzed biopsy samples from paired baseline and relapsing lesions in four patients with metastatic melanoma who had had an initial objective tumor regression in response to anti-PD-1 therapy (pembrolizumab) followed by disease progression months to years later. Results Whole-exome sequencing detected clonal selection and outgrowth of the acquired resistant tumors and, in two of the four patients, revealed resistance-associated loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding interferon-receptor-associated Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) or Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), concurrent with deletion of the wild-type allele. A truncating mutation in the gene encoding the antigen-presenting protein beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) was identified in a third patient. JAK1 and JAK2 truncating mutations resulted in a lack of response to interferon gamma, including insensitivity to its antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The B2M truncating mutation led to loss of surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I. Conclusions In this study, acquired resistance to PD-1 blockade immunotherapy in patients with melanoma was associated with defects in the pathways involved in interferon-receptor signaling and in antigen presentation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.). PMID:27433843

  15. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  16. Signaling by small metabolites in systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jyoti; Chaturvedi, Ratnesh; Chowdhury, Zulkarnain; Venables, Barney; Petros, Robby A

    2014-08-01

    Plants can retain the memory of a prior encounter with a pest. This memory confers upon a plant the ability to subsequently activate defenses more robustly when challenged by a pest. In plants that have retained the memory of a prior, localized, foliar infection by a pathogen, the pathogen-free distal organs develop immunity against subsequent infections by a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The long-term immunity conferred by this mechanism, which is termed systemic acquired resistance (SAR), is inheritable over a few generations. Signaling mediated by the phenolic metabolite salicylic acid (SA) is critical for the manifestation of SAR. Recent studies have described the involvement of additional small metabolites in SAR signaling, including methyl salicylate, the abietane diterpenoid dehydroabietinal, the lysine catabolite pipecolic acid, a glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent factor and the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid. Many of these metabolites can be systemically transported through the plant and probably facilitate communication by the primary infected tissue with the distal tissues, which is essential for the activation of SAR. Some of these metabolites have been implicated in the SAR-associated rapid activation of defenses in response to subsequent exposure to the pathogen, a mechanism termed priming. Here, we summarize the role of these signaling metabolites in SAR, and the relationship between them and SA signaling in SAR. PMID:24506415

  17. Prolongation of acquired cellular resistance to Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Willers, J. M. N.; Hofhuis, F. M. A.; Meer, C. Vander

    1982-01-01

    Intracutaneous immunization of mice with 105 or 106 viable listeria resulted in acquired cellular resistance (ACR) of short duration (7 days) and in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DH) lasting at least 27 days. The ACR was partially non-specific, as 50% of the mice were also protected against a lethal challenge with Salmonella enteritidis. The specific element of the ACR could be transferred by non-adherent spleen cells from immune mice to normal recipient mice. Such transfer was not possible with adherent spleen cells from immune mice or with spleen cells from normal mice. Two systems of multiple immunizations to extend the period during which mice were protected against a challenge with 50 LD50 listeria were used. In the first system, mice were immunized with 106 viable listeria and subsequently challenged with 50 LD50 (= 107) viable listeria. Mice surviving the challenge were actually boosted at the challenge injection for ACR. In the second system mice were immunized and boosted with 108 killed listeria mixed with the adjuvant dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA). In the former system after each booster injection with viable listeria the interval during which the mice were protected doubled and reached a maximum of 31 days. In the latter system all intervals between two booster injections were equally long and never exceeded 28 days. In both systems the existence of immunological memory was suggested. The difference in results obtained after immunization with viable listeria and killed listeria mixed with DDA are discussed. PMID:6809603

  18. Increased interleukin-6 expression is associated with poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Zhao, Sen; Halstensen, Trond S

    2016-06-01

    Increased expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6) is associated with poor prognosis and chemoresistance in many different carcinomas, but its role in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is still unsettled. Analyzing tumorous mRNA expression data from 399 HNSCC patients revealed that high IL-6 expression predicted poor prognosis. Similar tendency was observed in platinum treated patients, suggesting an IL-6 associated cisplatin resistance. IL-6 increase was also found in two in-house acquired cisplatin‑resistant HNSCC cell lines (both basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinoma) by using microarray analysis. However, although the in-house acquired cisplatin-resistant cell lines had higher basal and markedly increased cisplatin-induced IL-6 expression, IL-6 did not mediate the cisplatin resistance as neither exogenous IL-6 nor IL-6R/gp130 inhibitors affected cisplatin sensitivity. Moreover, the IL-6/STAT3 pathway was impaired in the resistant cell lines, partly due to decreased IL-6R expression. Thus, high IL-6 expression correlated to poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance, but it did not mediate cisplatin resistance in the HNSCC cell lines. PMID:27108527

  19. Increased interleukin-6 expression is associated with poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIAN; ZHAO, SEN; HALSTENSEN, TROND S.

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6) is associated with poor prognosis and chemoresistance in many different carcinomas, but its role in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is still unsettled. Analyzing tumorous mRNA expression data from 399 HNSCC patients revealed that high IL-6 expression predicted poor prognosis. Similar tendency was observed in platinum treated patients, suggesting an IL-6 associated cisplatin resistance. IL-6 increase was also found in two in-house acquired cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cell lines (both basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinoma) by using microarray analysis. However, although the in-house acquired cisplatin-resistant cell lines had higher basal and markedly increased cisplatin-induced IL-6 expression, IL-6 did not mediate the cisplatin resistance as neither exogenous IL-6 nor IL-6R/gp130 inhibitors affected cisplatin sensitivity. Moreover, the IL-6/STAT3 pathway was impaired in the resistant cell lines, partly due to decreased IL-6R expression. Thus, high IL-6 expression correlated to poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance, but it did not mediate cisplatin resistance in the HNSCC cell lines. PMID:27108527

  20. Acquired Resistance to Clinical Cancer Therapy: A Twist in Physiological Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Andreas; Mandalà, Mario; Massi, Daniela; Taverna, Daniela; Tang, Huifang; Hemmings, Brian A; Xue, Gongda

    2016-07-01

    Although modern therapeutic strategies have brought significant progress to cancer care in the last 30 years, drug resistance to targeted monotherapies has emerged as a major challenge. Aberrant regulation of multiple physiological signaling pathways indispensable for developmental and metabolic homeostasis, such as hyperactivation of pro-survival signaling axes, loss of suppressive regulations, and impaired functionalities of the immune system, have been extensively investigated aiming to understand the diversity of molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer development and progression. In this review, we intend to discuss the molecular mechanisms of how conventional physiological signal transduction confers to acquired drug resistance in cancer patients. We will particularly focus on protooncogenic receptor kinase inhibition-elicited tumor cell adaptation through two major core downstream signaling cascades, the PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways. These pathways are crucial for cell growth and differentiation and are frequently hyperactivated during tumorigenesis. In addition, we also emphasize the emerging roles of the deregulated host immune system that may actively promote cancer progression and attenuate immunosurveillance in cancer therapies. Understanding these mechanisms may help to develop more effective therapeutic strategies that are able to keep the tumor in check and even possibly turn cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:27142452

  1. CRISPR provides acquired resistance against viruses in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Fremaux, Christophe; Deveau, Hélène; Richards, Melissa; Boyaval, Patrick; Moineau, Sylvain; Romero, Dennis A; Horvath, Philippe

    2007-03-23

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are a distinctive feature of the genomes of most Bacteria and Archaea and are thought to be involved in resistance to bacteriophages. We found that, after viral challenge, bacteria integrated new spacers derived from phage genomic sequences. Removal or addition of particular spacers modified the phage-resistance phenotype of the cell. Thus, CRISPR, together with associated cas genes, provided resistance against phages, and resistance specificity is determined by spacer-phage sequence similarity. PMID:17379808

  2. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Acquire Resistance to the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib by Activating Alternative Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Ichihara, Eiki; Takigawa, Nagio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yamane, Hiromichi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sakai, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Kunio; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Bessho, Akihiro; Sendo, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-15

    Crizotinib is the standard of care for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene, but resistance invariably develops. Unlike crizotinib, alectinib is a selective ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with more potent antitumor effects and a favorable toxicity profile, even in crizotinib-resistant cases. However, acquired resistance to alectinib, as for other TKIs, remains a limitation of its efficacy. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms by which human NSCLC cells acquire resistance to alectinib. We established two alectinib-resistant cell lines that did not harbor the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells. One cell line lost the EML4-ALK fusion gene, but exhibited increased activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), and overexpressed the HER3 ligand neuregulin 1. Accordingly, pharmacologic inhibition of IGF1R and HER3 signaling overcame resistance to alectinib in this cell line. The second alectinib-resistant cell line displayed stimulated HGF autocrine signaling that promoted MET activation and remained sensitive to crizotinib treatment. Taken together, our findings reveal two novel mechanisms underlying alectinib resistance that are caused by the activation of alternative tyrosine kinase receptors rather than by secondary ALK mutations. These studies may guide the development of comprehensive treatment strategies that take into consideration the various approaches ALK-positive lung tumors use to withstand therapeutic insult. PMID:26719536

  3. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noll, Elisa M; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-03-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have been described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers--HNF1A and KRT81--that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by using immunohistochemistry. Individuals with tumors of these subtypes showed substantial differences in overall survival, and their tumors differed in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and it is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as a predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  4. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Elisa M.; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M.; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V.; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W.; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) were described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here, we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers—HNF1A and KRT81—that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by immunohistochemistry. Individuals bearing tumors of these subtypes show significant differences in overall survival and their tumors differ in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or shRNA-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  5. Collateral Chemoresistance to Anti-Microtubule Agents in a Lung Cancer Cell Line with Acquired Resistance to Erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomida, Shuta; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Various alterations underlying acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have been described. Although treatment strategies specific for these mechanisms are under development, cytotoxic agents are currently employed to treat many patients following failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, the effect of TKI resistance on sensitivity to these cytotoxic agents is mostly unclear. This study investigated the sensitivity of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to five cytotoxic agents using an in vitro EGFR-TKI-resistant model. Four erlotinib-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and their resistant derivatives were tested. Of the resistant cell lines, all but one showed a similar sensitivity to the tested drugs as their parental cells. HCC4006ER cells with epithelial mesenchymal transition features acquired resistance to the three microtubule-targeting agents, docetaxel, paclitaxel and vinorelbine, but not to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Gene expression array and immunoblotting demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1) was up-regulated in HCC4006ER cells. ABCB1 knockdown by siRNA partially restored sensitivity to the anti-microtubule agents but not to erlotinib. Moreover, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat sensitized HCC4006ER cells to anti-microtubule agents through ABCB1 suppression. Our study indicates that sensitivity of tumor cells to cytotoxic agents in general does not change before and after failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, we describe that two different molecular alterations confer acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and cytotoxic agents, respectively. This phenomenon should be kept in mind in selection of subsequent therapy after failure of EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25875914

  6. Collateral chemoresistance to anti-microtubule agents in a lung cancer cell line with acquired resistance to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomida, Shuta; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Various alterations underlying acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have been described. Although treatment strategies specific for these mechanisms are under development, cytotoxic agents are currently employed to treat many patients following failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, the effect of TKI resistance on sensitivity to these cytotoxic agents is mostly unclear. This study investigated the sensitivity of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to five cytotoxic agents using an in vitro EGFR-TKI-resistant model. Four erlotinib-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and their resistant derivatives were tested. Of the resistant cell lines, all but one showed a similar sensitivity to the tested drugs as their parental cells. HCC4006ER cells with epithelial mesenchymal transition features acquired resistance to the three microtubule-targeting agents, docetaxel, paclitaxel and vinorelbine, but not to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Gene expression array and immunoblotting demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1) was up-regulated in HCC4006ER cells. ABCB1 knockdown by siRNA partially restored sensitivity to the anti-microtubule agents but not to erlotinib. Moreover, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat sensitized HCC4006ER cells to anti-microtubule agents through ABCB1 suppression. Our study indicates that sensitivity of tumor cells to cytotoxic agents in general does not change before and after failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, we describe that two different molecular alterations confer acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and cytotoxic agents, respectively. This phenomenon should be kept in mind in selection of subsequent therapy after failure of EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25875914

  7. Lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors occasionally harbor BRAF gene mutations but lack mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or MEK1.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sequist, Lecia V; Arcila, Maria E; Moran, Teresa; Chmielecki, Juliann; Lin, Ya-Lun; Pan, Yumei; Wang, Lu; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Aoe, Keisuke; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Fidias, Panos; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Miller, Vincent A; Riely, Gregory J; Kris, Mark G; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2012-07-31

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is inevitable in metastatic EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Here, we modeled disease progression using EGFR-mutant human tumor cell lines. Although five of six models displayed alterations already found in humans, one harbored an unexpected secondary NRAS Q61K mutation; resistant cells were sensitive to concurrent EGFR and MEK inhibition but to neither alone. Prompted by this finding and because RAS/RAF/MEK mutations are known mediators of acquired resistance in other solid tumors (colon cancers, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and melanomas) responsive to targeted therapies, we analyzed the frequency of secondary KRAS/NRAS/BRAF/MEK1 gene mutations in the largest collection to date of lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. No recurrent NRAS, KRAS, or MEK1 mutations were found in 212, 195, or 146 patient samples, respectively, but 2 of 195 (1%) were found to have mutations in BRAF (G469A and V600E). Ectopic expression of mutant NRAS or BRAF in drug-sensitive EGFR-mutant cells conferred resistance to EGFR TKIs that was overcome by addition of a MEK inhibitor. Collectively, these positive and negative results provide deeper insight into mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in lung cancer and inform ongoing clinical trials designed to overcome resistance. In the context of emerging knowledge about mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapies in various cancers, our data highlight the notion that, even though solid tumors share common signaling cascades, mediators of acquired resistance must be elucidated for each disease separately in the context of treatment. PMID:22773810

  8. ESR1 mutations as a mechanism for acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeselsohn, Rinath; Buchwalter, Gilles; De Angelis, Carmine; Brown, Myles; Schiff, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive (+) and are treated with endocrine therapies targeting ER activity. Despite efforts, the mechanisms of the frequent clinical resistance to these therapies remain largely unknown. Several recent parallel studies unveiled gain-of-function recurrent ESR1 mutations in up to 20% of patients with metastatic ER+ disease who all received endocrine therapies, which for more cases included an aromatase inhibitor. These mutations, clustered in a hotspot within the ligand-binding domain (LBD), lead to ligand independent ER activity and tumor growth, partial resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant, and potentially increased metastatic capacity. Together, these findings suggest that the ESR1 LBD mutations account for acquired endocrine resistance in a substantial fraction of patients with metastatic disease. The absence of detectable ESR1 mutations in treatment-naïve disease and the correlation with the number of endocrine treatments indicate a clonal expansion of rare mutant clones, selected under the pressure of treatment. New technologies to detect low/ultra rare ESR1 mutations together with tissue and liquid biopsies are required to fully expose their clinical relevance in prognosis and treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical development of rationale-based novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit these mutants has the potential to substantially improve treatment outcomes. PMID:26122181

  9. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  10. Axl mediates acquired resistance of head and neck cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Giles, Keith M; Kalinowski, Felicity C; Candy, Patrick A; Epis, Michael R; Zhang, Priscilla M; Redfern, Andrew D; Stuart, Lisa M; Goodall, Gregory J; Leedman, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Elevated expression and activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with development and progression of head and neck cancer (HNC) and a poor prognosis. Clinical trials with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib) have been disappointing in HNC. To investigate the mechanisms mediating resistance to these agents, we developed an HNC cell line (HN5-ER) with acquired erlotinib resistance. In contrast to parental HN5 HNC cells, HN5-ER cells exhibited an epithelial-mesenchymal (EMT) phenotype with increased migratory potential, reduced E-cadherin and epithelial-associated microRNAs (miRNA), and elevated vimentin expression. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinase profiling identified Axl activation in HN5-ER cells. Growth and migration of HN5-ER cells were blocked with a specific Axl inhibitor, R428, and R428 resensitized HN5-ER cells to erlotinib. Microarray analysis of HN5-ER cells confirmed the EMT phenotype associated with acquired erlotinib resistance, and identified activation of gene expression associated with cell migration and inflammation pathways. Moreover, increased expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in HN5-ER cells suggested a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling in EMT and erlotinib resistance. Expression of the tumor suppressor miR-34a was reduced in HN5-ER cells and increasing its expression abrogated Axl expression and reversed erlotinib resistance. Finally, analysis of 302 HNC patients revealed that high tumor Axl mRNA expression was associated with poorer survival (HR = 1.66, P = 0.007). In summary, our results identify Axl as a key mediator of acquired erlotinib resistance in HNC and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of Axl by small molecule drugs or specific miRNAs might overcome anti-EGFR therapy resistance. PMID:24026012

  11. Association between Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Phylogenetic Lineage and Acquired Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.; Click, Eleanor S.; Cavanaugh, J. Sean; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of resistance to antituberculosis drugs during treatment (i.e., acquired resistance) can lead to emergence of resistant strains and consequent poor clinical outcomes. However, it is unknown whether Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species and lineage affects the likelihood of acquired resistance. Methods We analyzed data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service for tuberculosis cases during 2004–2011 with assigned species and lineage and both initial and final drug susceptibility test results. We determined univariate associations between species and lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteria and acquired resistance to isoniazid, rifamycins, fluoroquinolones, and second-line injectables. We used Poisson regression with backward elimination to generate multivariable models for acquired resistance to isoniazid and rifamycins. Results M. bovis was independently associated with acquired resistance to isoniazid (adjusted prevalence ratio = 8.46, 95% CI 2.96–24.14) adjusting for HIV status, and with acquired resistance to rifamycins (adjusted prevalence ratio = 4.53, 95% CI 1.29–15.90) adjusting for homelessness, HIV status, initial resistance to isoniazid, site of disease, and administration of therapy. East Asian lineage was associated with acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones (prevalence ratio = 6.10, 95% CI 1.56–23.83). Conclusions We found an association between mycobacterial species and lineage and acquired drug resistance using U.S. surveillance data. Prospective clinical studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these findings, including whether rapid genotyping of isolates at the outset of treatment may benefit patient management. PMID:24376623

  12. Acquired Multidrug Antifungal Resistance in Candida lusitaniae during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Giulieri, Stefano; Diezi, Manuel; Marchetti, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is usually susceptible to echinocandins. Beta-1,3-glucan synthase encoded by FKS genes is the target of echinocandins. A few missense mutations in the C. lusitaniae FKS1 hot spot 1 (HS1) have been reported. We report here the rapid emergence of antifungal resistance in C. lusitaniae isolated during therapy with amphotericin B (AMB), caspofungin (CAS), and azoles for treatment of persistent candidemia in an immunocompromised child with severe enterocolitis and visceral adenoviral disease. As documented from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, the five C. lusitaniae isolates examined were related to each other. From antifungal susceptibility and molecular analyses, 5 different profiles (P) were obtained. These profiles included the following: profile 1 (P1) (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; fluconazole [FLC] MIC, 0.25), determined while the patient was being treated with liposomal AMB for 3 months; P2 (FLC MIC [μg/ml], 0.25; CAS MIC, 4), while the patient was being treated with CAS for 2 weeks; P3 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; FLC MIC, 32), while the patient was being treated with azoles and CAS initially followed by azoles alone for a week; P4 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 8; FLC MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with both drugs for 3 weeks; and P5 (AMB MIC [μg/ml], 0.125; CAS MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with AMB and FLC for 2 weeks. CAS resistance was associated with resistance not only to micafungin and anidulafungin but also to AMB. Analysis of CAS resistance revealed 3 novel FKS1 mutations in CAS-resistant isolates (S638Y in P2; S631Y in P4; S638P in P5). While S638Y and -P are within HS1, S631Y is in close proximity to this domain but was confirmed to confer candin resistance using a site-directed mutagenesis approach. FLC resistance could be linked with overexpression of major facilitator gene 7 (MFS7) in C. lusitaniae P2 and P4 and was associated with resistance to 5

  13. Acquired antifungal drug resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus: epidemiology and detection.

    PubMed

    Howard, Susan Julie; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2011-04-01

    Voriconazole is the recommended agent for invasive aspergillosis, with lipid amphotericin B or caspofungin as second line treatment choices. Being the only agents available in oral formulation, azoles are used in chronic infections and often over longer time periods. In addition to being used in clinical medicine, azoles are employed extensively in agriculture. Azole-resistant Aspergillus has been isolated in azole naïve patients, in azole exposed patients and in the environment. The primary underlying mechanism of resistance is as a result of alterations in the cyp51A target gene, with a variety of mutations found in clinical isolates but just one identified in a environmental strain (a point mutation at codon 98 accompanied by a tandem repeat in the promoter region). Much less is currently known about echinocandin resistance in Aspergillus, in part because susceptibility testing is not routinely performed and because the methods suffer from technical difficulties and suboptimal reproducibility. Clinical breakthrough cases have been reported however, and resistance has been confirmed in vivo. In this paper we review the current knowledge on epidemiology, susceptibility testing and underlying mechanisms involved in azole and echinocandin resistance in Aspergillus. PMID:20795765

  14. Overcoming acquired resistance to kinase inhibition: the cases of EGFR, ALK and BRAF.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon

    2013-01-15

    In the past decade, several kinase inhibitors have been approved based on their clinical benefit for cancer patients. Unfortunately, in many cases, patients develop resistance to these agents via secondary mutations and alternative mechanisms. This review will focus on the cases of acquired resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer patients and BRAF inhibitors for melanoma patients. I will overview the main causes of acquired resistance, and explore the chemical scaffolds as well as combination of drugs, used to tackle these major causes of resistance. PMID:23245516

  15. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance: Are We Born with It? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Kinkelaar, Daniel; Huang, Ying; Li, Yingli; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Hua H.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) is a major public health concern. Recent findings on the prevalence of food-borne antibiotic-resistant (ART) commensal bacteria in ready-to-consume food products suggested that daily food consumption likely serves as a major avenue for dissemination of ART bacteria from the food chain to human hosts. To properly assess the impact of various factors, including the food chain, on AR development in hosts, it is important to determine the baseline of ART bacteria in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We thus examined the gut microbiota of 16 infant subjects, from the newborn stage to 1 year of age, who fed on breast milk and/or infant formula during the early stages of development and had no prior exposure to antibiotics. Predominant bacterial populations resistant to several antibiotics and multiple resistance genes were found in the infant GI tracts within the first week of age. Several ART population transitions were also observed in the absence of antibiotic exposure and dietary changes. Representative AR gene pools including tet(M), ermB, sul2, and blaTEM were detected in infant subjects. Enterococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Streptococcus spp., and Escherichia coli/Shigella spp. were among the identified AR gene carriers. ART bacteria were not detected in the infant formula and infant foods examined, but small numbers of skin-associated ART bacteria were found in certain breast milk samples. The data suggest that the early development of AR in the human gut microbiota is independent of infants' exposure to antibiotics but is likely impacted by exposure to maternal and environmental microbes during and after delivery and that the ART population is significantly amplified within the host even in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:21821748

  16. Characterization of naturally acquired multiple-drug resistance of Yoshida rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Wakabayashi, D; Minamino, T; Nomura, M; Wakusawa, S; Nakamura, S

    1996-01-01

    Characteristics of multiple-drug resistance of rat ascites hepatoma AH66, a cell line induced by dimethylaminoazobenzene and established as a transplantable tumor, were compared with those of AH66F, a drug sensitive line obtained from AH66. The AH66 cell line was resistant to vinblastine, adriamycin, SN-38 an active form of camptothesine, etoposide, and clorambucil by 10-fold or more than the AH66F cell line. The resistance of AH66 cells to vinblastine, adriamycin, and SN-38 was closely related to P-glycoprotein overexpression in the plasma membrane, because the resistance was significantly inhibited by verapamil. AH66 cells contained much glutahione and had a high activity of glutathione S-transferase P-form (GST-P), compared with AH66F cells, and resistance to clorambucil was decreased by treatment with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. AH66 cells have a similar topoisomerase I activity, but about 6 times lower topoisomerase II activity than AH66F cells. Therefore, the resistance to etoposide and a part of the resistance to adriamycin of AH66 cells seems to depend upon this low topoisomerase II activity. These results, show that the AH66 cell line has high multiple-drug resistance compared with the AH66F cell line, by several mechanisms. Consequently, the AH66 and AH66F cell lines are useful to study naturally acquired multiple-drug resistance of hepatomas. PMID:8702243

  17. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys.

  18. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM

    PubMed Central

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S.; Theis, Fabian J.; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  19. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM.

    PubMed

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S; Theis, Fabian J; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  20. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  1. Characterization of a human colorectal carcinoma cell line with acquired resistance to flavopiridol.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Raynaud, F; Workman, P; Kelland, L R

    2001-11-01

    Flavopiridol is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) and represents the first in this anticancer class to enter clinical trials. In anticipation of the likelihood that, as with other cancer drugs, acquired resistance may limit the drug's efficacy, an acquired resistance model has been established by in vitro drug exposure of the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116. This stably resistant line, possessing 8-fold resistance to flavopiridol, showed a lack of cross-resistance to the anticancer agents etoposide, doxorubicin, paclitaxel, topotecan, and cisplatin, and notably to other chemical classes of cdk inhibitors: the aminopurines roscovitine and purvalanol A, 9-nitropaullone, and hymenialdisine. Resistance did not seem to be related to differences in the levels of multidrug resistance drug efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein, and MRP1. Moreover, there were no changes in overall drug accumulation between the resistant and sensitive cell lines. Flavopiridol induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and inhibition of retinoblastoma gene product phosphorylation on serine 780 in both parental and resistant lines, but the latter required 8-fold higher concentrations to achieve these effects. Cyclin E protein levels and cyclin E-associated kinase activity were increased in the resistant line, suggesting that overexpression of cyclin E may be the mechanism of resistance to flavopiridol. However, transfection of cyclin E to increase expression of this protein did not result in an increase in resistance to flavopiridol. Thus, up-regulation of cyclin E alone does not seem to cause resistance to this cdk inhibitor. PMID:11641415

  2. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  3. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/Cyclin D1/Cdk4 Survival Signaling Pathway for Eradication of Tumor Radioresistance Acquired by Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kakuda, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yasushi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Takai, Yoshihiro; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Radioresistance is a major cause of treatment failure of radiotherapy (RT) in human cancer. We have recently revealed that acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by fractionated radiation is attributable to cyclin D1 overexpression as a consequence of the downregulation of GSK3{beta}-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis mediated by a constitutively activated serine-threonine kinase, AKT. This prompted us to hypothesize that targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1 pathway may improve fractionated RT by suppressing acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were exposed to X-rays after incubation with either an AKT inhibitor, AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor-2 (API-2), or a Cdk4 inhibitor (Cdk4-I). Cells were then subjected to immunoblotting, clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, and cell death analysis with TUNEL and annexin V staining. In vivo radiosensitivity was assessed by growth of human tumors xenografted into nude mice. Results: Treatment with API-2 resulted in downregulation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with acquired radioresistance. Cellular radioresistance disappeared completely both in vitro and in vivo with accompanying apoptosis when treated with API-2. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 by Cdk4-I was sufficient for abolishing radioresistance. Treatment with either API-2 or Cdk4-I was also effective in suppressing resistance to cis-platinum (II)-diamine-dichloride in the cells with acquired radioresistance. Interestingly, the radiosensitizing effect of API-2 was canceled by overexpression of cyclin D1 whereas Cdk4-I was still able to sensitize cells with cyclin D1 overexpression. Conclusion: Cyclin D1/Cdk4 is a critical target of the AKT survival signaling pathway responsible for tumor radioresistance. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway would provide a novel approach to improve fractionated RT and would have an impact on tumor

  4. Endemic carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa with acquired metallo-beta-lactamase determinants in European hospital.

    PubMed

    Lagatolla, Cristina; Tonin, Enrico A; Monti-Bragadin, Carlo; Dolzani, Lucilla; Gombac, Francesca; Bearzi, Claudia; Edalucci, Elisabetta; Gionechetti, Fabrizia; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2004-03-01

    Acquired metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) can confer broad-spectrum beta-lactam resistance (including carbapenems) not reversible by conventional beta-lactamase inhibitors and are emerging resistance determinants of remarkable clinical importance. In 2001, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying bla(VIM) MBL genes were found to be widespread (approximately 20% of all P. aeruginosa isolates and 70% of the carbapenem-resistant isolates) at Trieste University Hospital. Clonal diversity and heterogeneity of resistance determinants (either bla(VIM-1)-like or bla(VIM-2)-like) were detected among MBL producers. This evidence is the first that acquired MBLs can rapidly emerge and establish a condition of endemicity in certain epidemiologic settings. PMID:15109432

  5. Inhibition of mitochondrial glutaminase activity reverses acquired erlotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Caifeng; Jin, Jiangbo; Bao, Xujie; Zhan, Wei-Hua; Han, Tian-Yu; Gan, Mingxi; Zhang, Chengfu; Wang, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) erlotinib has been approved based on the clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients over the past decade. Unfortunately, cancer cells become resistant to this agent via various mechanisms, and this limits the improvement in patient outcomes. Thus, it is urgent to develop novel agents to overcome erlotinib resistance. Here, we propose a novel strategy to overcome acquired erlotinib resistance in NSCLC by inhibiting glutaminase activity. Compound 968, an inhibitor of the glutaminase C (GAC), when combined with erlotinib potently inhibited the cell proliferation of erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells HCC827ER and NCI-H1975. The combination of compound 968 and erlotinib not only decreased GAC and EGFR protein expression but also inhibited GAC activity in HCC827ER cells. The growth of erlotinib-resistant cells was glutamine-dependent as proved by GAC gene knocked down and rescue experiment. More importantly, compound 968 combined with erlotinib down-regulated the glutamine and glycolysis metabolism in erlotinib-resistant cells. Taken together, our study provides a valuable approach to overcome acquired erlotinib resistance by blocking glutamine metabolism and suggests that combination of EGFR-TKI and GAC inhibitor maybe a potential treatment strategy for acquired erlotinib-resistant NSCLC. PMID:26575584

  6. A Novel Plant Sesquiterpene Lactone Derivative, DETD-35, Suppresses BRAFV600E Mutant Melanoma Growth and Overcomes Acquired Vemurafenib Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jia-Hua; Nakagawa-Goto, Kyoko; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2016-06-01

    Acquired resistance to vemurafenib develops through reactivation of RAF/MEK/ERK signaling or bypass mechanisms. Recent combination therapies such as a MEK inhibitor combined with vemurafenib show improvement in major clinical end points, but the percentage of patients with adverse toxic events is higher than with vemurafenib monotherapy and most patients ultimately relapse. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new antimelanoma drugs and/or adjuvant agents for vemurafenib therapy. In this study, we created a novel semiorganically modified derivative, DETD-35, from deoxyelephantopin (DET), a plant sesquiterpene lactone demonstrated as an anti-inflammatory and anti-mammary tumor agent. Our results show that DETD-35 inhibited proliferation of a panel of melanoma cell lines, including acquired vemurafenib resistance A375 cells (A375-R) established in this study, with superior activities to DET and no cytotoxicity to normal melanocytes. DETD-35 suppressed tumor growth and reduced tumor mass as effectively as vemurafenib in A375 xenograft study. Furthermore, DETD-35 also reduced tumor growth in both acquired (A375-R) and intrinsic (A2058) vemurafenib resistance xenograft models, where vemurafenib showed no antitumor activity. Notably, the combination of DETD-35 and vemurafenib exhibited the most significant effects in both in vitro and in vivo xenograft studies due to synergism of the compound and the drug. Mechanistic studies suggested that DETD-35 overcame acquired vemurafenib resistance at least in part through deregulating MEK-ERK, Akt, and STAT3 signaling pathways and promoting apoptosis of cancer cells. Overall, our results suggest that DETD-35 may be useful as a therapeutic or adjuvant agent against BRAF(V600E) mutant and acquired vemurafenib resistance melanoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1163-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27048951

  7. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  8. Inhibition of Casein Kinase 1 Alpha Prevents Acquired Drug Resistance to Erlotinib in EGFR-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lantermann, Alexandra B; Chen, Dongshu; McCutcheon, Kaitlin; Hoffman, Greg; Frias, Elizabeth; Ruddy, David; Rakiec, Daniel; Korn, Joshua; McAllister, Gregory; Stegmeier, Frank; Meyer, Matthew J; Sharma, Sreenath V

    2015-11-15

    Patients with lung tumors harboring activating mutations in the EGF receptor (EGFR) show good initial treatment responses to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) erlotinib or gefitinib. However, acquired resistance invariably develops. Applying a focused shRNA screening approach to identify genes whose knockdown can prevent and/or overcome acquired resistance to erlotinib in several EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, we identified casein kinase 1 α (CSNK1A1, CK1α). We found that CK1α suppression inhibits the NF-κB prosurvival signaling pathway. Furthermore, downregulation of NF-κB signaling by approaches independent of CK1α knockdown can also attenuate acquired erlotinib resistance, supporting a role for activated NF-κB signaling in conferring acquired drug resistance. Importantly, CK1α suppression prevented erlotinib resistance in an HCC827 xenograft model in vivo. Our findings suggest that patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC might benefit from a combination of EGFR TKIs and CK1α inhibition to prevent acquired drug resistance and to prolong disease-free survival. PMID:26490646

  9. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation. PMID:25939061

  10. Acquired EGFR C797S mediates resistance to AZD9291 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M

    PubMed Central

    Thress, Kenneth S.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J. Carl; Jänne, Pasi A.; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for T790M prior to treatment, but at resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: 6 cases acquired the C797S mutation, 5 cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation, and 4 cases lost the T790M mutation despite detecting of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies able to overcome resistance mediated by EGFR C797S. PMID:25939061

  11. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  12. Increased CD271 expression by the NF-kB pathway promotes melanoma cell survival and drives acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Lehraiki, Abdelali; Cerezo, Michael; Rouaud, Florian; Abbe, Patricia; Allegra, Marilyne; Kluza, Jerome; Marchetti, Philippe; Imbert, Veronique; Cheli, Yann; Bertolotto, Corine; Ballotti, Robert; Rocchi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Specific BRAFV600E inhibitors (BRAFi) are highly effective in the treatment of melanoma. However, acquired drug resistances invariably develop after the initial response. Therefore, the identification of new mechanisms of acquired resistance gives important clues towards the development of therapies that could elicit long lasting responses. Here we report that CD271 confers resistance to BRAFi in melanoma cells. The expression of CD271 is increased by BRAFi through a stimulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secretion that leads to NF-κB signaling pathway activation. CD271 is upregulated in a subset of BRAFi-resistant melanoma cells. The inhibition of TNFα/NF-κB pathway and CD271 silencing restore the BRAFi sensitivity of resistant melanoma cells. Finally, increase of CD271 expression is validated in BRAFi-resistant xenografts tumors and also in tumors from the patients who relapsed under BRAFi. In summary, these results reveal a novel TNFα/NF-κB/CD271 axis whose activation contributes to the acquisition of resistance to BRAFi and therefore may represent a novel therapeutic target to improve the efficacy of therapy in melanoma.

  13. Oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization of renal cell tumors that developed in patients with acquired cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Eva; Yusenko, Maria V; Nagy, Anetta; Kovacs, Gyula

    2010-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma occurs at higher frequency in acquired cystic renal disease than in the general population. We have analyzed 4 tumors obtained from the kidneys of 2 patients with acquired cystic renal disease, including 2 conventional renal cell carcinomas and 2 acquired cystic renal disease-associated tumors, for genetic alterations. DNA changes were established by applying the 44K Agilent Oligonucleotide Array-Based CGH (Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany), and mutation of VHL gene was detected by direct sequencing of the tumor genome. DNA losses and mutation of the VHL gene, which are characteristic for conventional renal cell carcinomas, were seen in 2 of the tumors. The acquired cystic renal disease-associated eosinophilic-vacuolated cell tumor showed gain of chromosomes 3 and 16. No DNA alterations occurred in the papillary clear cell tumor. We suggest that not only the morphology but also the genetics of renal cell tumors associated with acquired cystic renal disease may differ from those occurring in the general population. PMID:20646738

  14. An Oral Formulation of YK-4-279: Preclinical Efficacy and Acquired Resistance Patterns in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lamhamedi-Cherradi, Salah-Eddine; Menegaz, Brian A; Ramamoorthy, Vandhana; Aiyer, Ramani A; Maywald, Rebecca L; Buford, Adrianna S; Doolittle, Dannette K; Culotta, Kirk S; O'Dorisio, James E; Ludwig, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a transcription factor-mediated pediatric bone tumor caused by a chromosomal translocation of the EWSR1 gene and one of several genes in the ETS family of transcription factors, typically FLI1 or ERG. Full activity of the resulting oncogenic fusion protein occurs only after binding RNA helicase A (RHA), and novel biologically targeted small molecules designed to interfere with that interaction have shown early promise in the preclinical setting. Herein, we demonstrate marked preclinical antineoplastic activity of an orally bioavailable formulation of YK-4-279 and identify mechanisms of acquired chemotherapy resistance that may be exploited to induce collateral sensitivity. Daily enteral administration of YK-4-279 led to significant delay in Ewing sarcoma tumor growth within a murine model. In advance of anticipated early-phase human clinical trials, we investigated both de novo and acquired mechanism(s) by which Ewing sarcoma cells evade YK-4-279-mediated cell death. Drug-resistant clones, formed by chronic in vitro exposure to steadily increased levels of YK-4-279, overexpressed c-Kit, cyclin D1, pStat3(Y705), and PKC isoforms. Interestingly, cross-resistance to imatinib and enzastaurin (selective inhibitors of c-Kit and PKC-β, respectively), was observed and the use of YK-4-279 with enzastaurin in vitro led to marked drug synergy, suggesting a potential role for combination therapies in the future. By advancing an oral formulation of YK-4-279 and identifying prominent mechanisms of resistance, this preclinical research takes us one step closer to a shared goal of curing adolescents and young adults afflicted by Ewing sarcoma. PMID:25964201

  15. CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles deliver sorafenib and overcome acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Yu; Lin, Ts-Ting; Sung, Yun-Chieh; Liu, Ya Chi; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Chun; Liu, Jia-Yu; Chen, Yunching

    2015-10-01

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, has been used as an anti-angiogenic agent against highly vascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - yet associated with only moderate therapeutic effect and the high incidence of HCC recurrence. We have shown intratumoral hypoxia induced by sorafenib activated C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) axis, resulting in polarization toward a tumor-promoting microenvironment and resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in HCC. Herein, we formulated sorafenib in CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 to systemically deliver sorafenib into HCC and sensitize HCC to sorafenib treatment. We demonstrated that CXCR4-targeted NPs efficiently delivered sorafenib into HCCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to achieve cytotoxicity and anti-angiogenic effect in vitro and in vivo. Despite the increased expression of SDF1α upon the persistent hypoxia induced by sorafenib-loaded CXCR4-targeted NPs, AMD3100 attached to the NPs can block CXCR4/SDF1α, leading to the reduced infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages, enhanced anti-angiogenic effect, a delay in tumor progression and increased overall survival in the orthotopic HCC model compared with other control groups. In conclusion, our results highlight the clinical potential of CXCR4-targeted NPs for delivering sorafenib and overcoming acquired drug resistance in liver cancer. PMID:26218745

  16. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  17. Aminoglycoside Resistance: The Emergence of Acquired 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    Aminoglycoside-producing Actinobacteria are known to protect themselves from their own aminoglycoside metabolites by producing 16S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase (16S-RMTase), which prevents them from binding to the 16S rRNA targets. Ten acquired 16S-RMTases have been reported from gram-negative pathogens. Most of them posttranscriptionally methylate residue G1405 of 16S rRNA resulting in high-level resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and plazomicin. Strains that produce 16S-RMTase are frequently multidrug-resistant or even extensively drug-resistant. Although the direct clinical impact of high-level aminoglycoside resistance resulting from production of 16S-RMTase is yet to be determined, ongoing spread of this mechanism will further limit treatment options for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant gram-negative infections. PMID:27208771

  18. A Convenient Cell Culture Model for CML Acquired Resistance Through BCR-ABL Mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, WenYong

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the effective treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, clinical resistance to TKIs that leads to patient relapse remains a challenge. Acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations is crucial in the resistance but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we describe a cell culture model for CML acquired resistance in which blast crisis CML cells undergo initial apoptosis upon treatment with therapeutically effective doses of TKIs, but the cells regrow quickly with development of resistance through BCR-ABL mutations. This model mimics the clinical process of acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations and will be an important tool to dissect molecular mechanisms of CML drug resistance and to explore strategies to overcome resistance. PMID:27581146

  19. Genomic Insights into Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  20. Acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of diverse cat populations.

    PubMed

    Moyaert, H; De Graef, E M; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the resident intestinal microbiota of cats and to identify significant differences between various cat populations. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium and Streptococcus canis were isolated as faecal indicator bacteria from rectal swabs of 47 individually owned cats, 47 cattery cats and 18 hospitalised cats, and submitted through antimicrobial sensitivity tests. The results revealed that bacteria isolated from hospitalised and/or cattery cats were more frequently resistant than those from individually owned cats. E. coli isolates from hospitalised cats were particularly resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline and sulfonamide. Both enterococci and streptococci showed high resistance to tetracycline and in somewhat lesser extent to erythromycin and tylosin. Most E. faecium isolates were resistant to lincomycin and penicillin. One E. faecalis as well as one E. faecium isolate from hospitalised cats showed 'high-level resistance' (MIC > 500 microg/ml) against gentamicin, a commonly used antimicrobial agent in case of human enterococcal infections. The results of this research demonstrate that the extent of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of cats depends on the social environment of the investigated population. It is obvious that the flora of healthy cats may act as a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:16330058

  1. Kinetics and maintenance of acquired resistance in mice to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Kearns, R J; Hinrichs, D J

    1977-06-01

    In the mouse system, acquired resistance to Listeria monocytogenes can only be demonstrated after immunization with viable microorganisms. A successful state of immunity cannot be elicited with formalin-killed organisms or bacterial cell-derived products. Viable, serologically cross-reactive organisms (not mouse pathogenic) do not induce a state of immunity as measured by acquired resistance. The duration of immunity, once established, is dose independent, and the absolute interval of its existence is not extended by secondary challenge with large numbers of viable organisms. The decline of immunity in actively immunized animals is not altered by antigenic challenge with formalin-killed cells or cell products. This indicates that the cellular requirements for the development of host resistance are similar for induction as well as maintenance. In vitro measurements of cellular immunity by migration inhibition indicate that formalin-killed organisms as well as cell products were recognized by actively sensitized lymphocytes obtained from immune animals. PMID:408273

  2. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  3. Identification of novel therapeutic target genes in acquired lapatinib-resistant breast cancer by integrative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Hwang, Sun Goo; Kim, Jin Ki; Park, Tae Hwan; Kim, Young Rae; Myeong, Ho Sung; Choi, Jong Duck; Kwon, Kang; Jang, Cheol Seong; Ro, Young Tae; Noh, Yun Hee; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib is a highly problematic clinical barrier that has to be overcome for a successful cancer treatment. Despite efforts to determine the mechanisms underlying acquired lapatinib resistance (ALR), no definitive genetic factors have been reported to be solely responsible for the acquired resistance in breast cancer. Therefore, we performed a cross-platform meta-analysis of three publically available microarray datasets related to breast cancer with ALR, using the R-based RankProd package. From the meta-analysis, we were able to identify a total of 990 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 406 upregulated, 584 downregulated) that are potentially associated with ALR. Gene ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that "response to organic substance" and "p53 signaling pathway" may be largely involved in ALR process. Of these, many of the top 50 upregulated and downregulated DEGs were found in oncogenesis of various tumors and cancers. For the top 50 DEGs, we constructed the gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks from a huge database of well-known molecular interactions. By integrative analysis of two systemic networks, we condensed the total number of DEGs to six common genes (LGALS1, PRSS23, PTRF, FHL2, TOB1, and SOCS2). Furthermore, these genes were confirmed in functional module eigens obtained from the weighted gene correlation network analysis of total DEGs in the microarray datasets ("GSE16179" and "GSE52707"). Our integrative meta-analysis could provide a comprehensive perspective into complex mechanisms underlying ALR in breast cancer and a theoretical support for further chemotherapeutic studies. PMID:26361955

  4. ZEB1 Mediates Acquired Resistance to the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Kinose, Fumi; Li, Jiannong; Ohaegbulam, Kim C.; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Qu, Xiaotao; Eschrich, Steven; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Nasarre, Patrick; Gemmill, Robert M.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.; Haura, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one mechanism of acquired resistance to inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinases (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The precise mechanisms of EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC remain unclear. We generated erlotinib-resistant HCC4006 cells (HCC4006ER) by chronic exposure of EGFR-mutant HCC4006 cells to increasing concentrations of erlotinib. HCC4006ER cells acquired an EMT phenotype and activation of the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, while lacking both T790M secondary EGFR mutation and MET gene amplification. We employed gene expression microarrays in HCC4006 and HCC4006ER cells to better understand the mechanism of acquired EGFR-TKI resistance with EMT. At the mRNA level, ZEB1 (TCF8), a known regulator of EMT, was >20-fold higher in HCC4006ER cells than in HCC4006 cells, and increased ZEB1 protein level was also detected. Furthermore, numerous ZEB1 responsive genes, such as CDH1 (E-cadherin), ST14, and vimentin, were coordinately regulated along with increased ZEB1 in HCC4006ER cells. We also identified ZEB1 overexpression and an EMT phenotype in several NSCLC cells and human NSCLC samples with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. Short-interfering RNA against ZEB1 reversed the EMT phenotype and, importantly, restored erlotinib sensitivity in HCC4006ER cells. The level of micro-RNA-200c, which can negatively regulate ZEB1, was significantly reduced in HCC4006ER cells. Our results suggest that increased ZEB1 can drive EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC. Attempts should be made to explore targeting ZEB1 to resensitize TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26789630

  5. Amphibians acquire resistance to live and dead fungus overcoming fungal immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Taegan A; Sears, Brittany F; Venesky, Matthew D; Bessler, Scott M; Brown, Jenise M; Deutsch, Kaitlin; Halstead, Neal T; Lentz, Garrett; Tenouri, Nadia; Young, Suzanne; Civitello, David J; Ortega, Nicole; Fites, J Scott; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Raffel, Thomas R; Rohr, Jason R

    2014-07-10

    Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing declines of many taxa, including bats, corals, bees, snakes and amphibians. Currently, there is little evidence that wild animals can acquire resistance to these pathogens. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a pathogenic fungus implicated in the recent global decline of amphibians. Here we demonstrate that three species of amphibians can acquire behavioural or immunological resistance to B. dendrobatidis. Frogs learned to avoid the fungus after just one B. dendrobatidis exposure and temperature-induced clearance. In subsequent experiments in which B. dendrobatidis avoidance was prevented, the number of previous exposures was a negative predictor of B. dendrobatidis burden on frogs and B. dendrobatidis-induced mortality, and was a positive predictor of lymphocyte abundance and proliferation. These results suggest that amphibians can acquire immunity to B. dendrobatidis that overcomes pathogen-induced immunosuppression and increases their survival. Importantly, exposure to dead fungus induced a similar magnitude of acquired resistance as exposure to live fungus. Exposure of frogs to B. dendrobatidis antigens might offer a practical way to protect pathogen-naive amphibians and facilitate the reintroduction of amphibians to locations in the wild where B. dendrobatidis persists. Moreover, given the conserved nature of vertebrate immune responses to fungi and the fact that many animals are capable of learning to avoid natural enemies, these results offer hope that other wild animal taxa threatened by invasive fungi might be rescued by management approaches based on herd immunity. PMID:25008531

  6. Adrenocortical tumors and insulin resistance: What is the first step?

    PubMed

    Altieri, Barbara; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Casa, Silvia Della; Ronchi, Cristina L; Balercia, Giancarlo; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-06-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the onset of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are still largely unknown. Recently, more attention has been paid to the role of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system on general tumor development and progression. Increased levels of insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-2 are associated with tumor cell growth and increased risk of cancer promotion and progression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia may play a role in adrenal tumor growth through the activation of insulin and IGF-1 receptors. Interestingly, apparently non-functioning ACTs are often associated with a high prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, it is unclear if ACT develops from a primary insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia or if insulin resistance is only secondary to the slight cortisol hypersecretion by ACT. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence regarding the relationship between hyperinsulinemia and adrenocortical tumors. PMID:26637955

  7. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Messerli, Shanta M; Miller, Daniel H; Medina, Jamie E; Hamilton, Joshua W; Messerli, Mark A; Brodsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  8. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel H.; Medina, Jamie E.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Messerli, Mark A.; Brodsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  9. Acquired Resistance to the Mutant-Selective EGFR Inhibitor AZD9291 Is Associated with Increased Dependence on RAS Signaling in Preclinical Models.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Catherine A; Stetson, Daniel; Markovets, Aleksandra A; Al-Kadhimi, Katherine J; Lai, Zhongwu; Fisher, Paul R; Meador, Catherine B; Spitzler, Paula; Ichihara, Eiki; Ross, Sarah J; Ahdesmaki, Miika J; Ahmed, Ambar; Ratcliffe, Laura E; O'Brien, Elizabeth L Christey; Barnes, Claire H; Brown, Henry; Smith, Paul D; Dry, Jonathan R; Beran, Garry; Thress, Kenneth S; Dougherty, Brian; Pao, William; Cross, Darren A E

    2015-06-15

    Resistance to targeted EGFR inhibitors is likely to develop in EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Early identification of innate or acquired resistance mechanisms to these agents is essential to direct development of future therapies. We describe the detection of heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance within populations of EGFR-mutant cells (PC9 and/or NCI-H1975) with acquired resistance to current and newly developed EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including AZD9291. We report the detection of NRAS mutations, including a novel E63K mutation, and a gain of copy number of WT NRAS or WT KRAS in cell populations resistant to gefitinib, afatinib, WZ4002, or AZD9291. Compared with parental cells, a number of resistant cell populations were more sensitive to inhibition by the MEK inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) when treated in combination with the originating EGFR inhibitor. In vitro, a combination of AZD9291 with selumetinib prevented emergence of resistance in PC9 cells and delayed resistance in NCI-H1975 cells. In vivo, concomitant dosing of AZD9291 with selumetinib caused regression of AZD9291-resistant tumors in an EGFRm/T790M transgenic model. Our data support the use of a combination of AZD9291 with a MEK inhibitor to delay or prevent resistance to AZD9291 in EGFRm and/or EGFRm/T790M tumors. Furthermore, these findings suggest that NRAS modifications in tumor samples from patients who have progressed on current or EGFR inhibitors in development may support subsequent treatment with a combination of EGFR and MEK inhibition. PMID:25870145

  10. Clinical Significance of Community- and Healthcare-Acquired Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Jyh-Jou; Lin, Yu-Hsiu; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chao, Chien-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the clinical significance, manifestations, microbiological characteristics and outcomes of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) isolates, and compare the clinical features of community- and healthcare-acquired CRE isolates. A total of 78 patients were identified to have CRE. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common pathogens (n = 42, 53.8%), followed by Enterobacter cloacae (n = 24, 30.8%), and Escherichia coli (n = 11, 14.1%). Most of the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings (n = 55, 70.5%), and other cases got CRE from community settings (n = 23, 29.5%). Nine cases (11.5%) were classified as CRE colonization. Among the remaining 69 cases of CRE infections, pneumonia (n = 28, 40.6%) was the most common type of infections, followed by urinary tract infection (n = 24, 34.8%), and intra-abdominal infection (n = 16, 23.2%). The patients acquired CRE from community settings were more likely to be elderly, female, and had more urinary tract infections than from healthcare settings. In contrast, the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings had more intra-abdominal infections, intra-abdominal surgery, and presence of indwelling device than from community settings. In conclusion, community-acquired CRE are not rare, and their associated clinical presentations are different from healthcare-acquired CRE. PMID:26999356

  11. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  12. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  13. MM-151 overcomes acquired resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab in colorectal cancers harboring EGFR extracellular domain mutations.

    PubMed

    Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Kearns, Jeffrey D; Wolf, Beni B; Misale, Sandra; Lazzari, Luca; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio; Adjei, Alex A; Montagut, Clara; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Nering, Rachel; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab are used to treat RAS wild-type colorectal cancers (CRCs), but their efficacy is limited by the emergence of acquired drug resistance. After EGFR blockade, about 20% of CRCs develop mutations in the EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) that impair antibody binding and are associated with clinical relapse. We hypothesized that EGFR ECD-resistant variants could be targeted by the recently developed oligoclonal antibody MM-151 that binds multiple regions of the EGFR ECD. MM-151 inhibits EGFR signaling and cell growth in preclinical models, including patient-derived cells carrying mutant EGFR. Upon MM-151 treatment, EGFR ECD mutations decline in circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) of CRC patients who previously developed resistance to EGFR blockade. These data provide molecular rationale for the clinical use of MM-151 in patients who become resistant to cetuximab or panitumumab as a result of EGFR ECD mutations. PMID:26843189

  14. Oncogene swap as a novel mechanism of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Sato, Katsuaki; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Shimoji, Masaki; Chiba, Masato; Sesumi, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Mutant selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), such as rociletinib and AZD9291, are effective for tumors with T790M secondary mutation that become refractory to first-generation EGFR-TKI. However, acquired resistance to these prospective drugs is anticipated considering the high adaptability of cancer cells and the mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here, CNX-2006 (tool compound of rociletinib) resistant sublines were established by chronic exposure of HCC827EPR cells harboring exon 19 deletion and T790M to CNX-2006. Through the analyses of these resistant subclones, we identified two resistant mechanisms accompanied by MET amplification. One was bypass signaling by MET amplification in addition to T790M, which was inhibited by the combination of CNX-2006 and MET-TKI. Another was loss of amplified EGFR mutant allele including T790M while acquiring MET amplification. Interestingly, MET-TKI alone was able to overcome this resistance, suggesting that oncogenic dependence completely shifted from EGFR to MET. We propose describing this phenomenon as an "oncogene swap." Furthermore, we analyzed multiple lesions from a patient who died of acquired resistance to gefitinib, then found a clinical example of an oncogene swap in which the EGFR mutation was lost and a MET gene copy was gained. In conclusion, an "oncogene swap" from EGFR to MET is a novel resistant mechanism to the EGFR-TKI. This novel mechanism should be considered in order to avoid futile inhibition of the original oncogene. PMID:26845230

  15. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Induces Acquired Docetaxel Resistance in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizumachi, T; Suzuki, S; Naito, A; Carcel-Trullols, J; Evans, TT; Spring, PM; Oridate, N; Furuta, Y; Fukuda, S; Higuchi, M

    2008-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against cancer; nevertheless, some patients develop resistance. Unfortunately, their causes and mechanisms remain unknown. We created docetaxel-resistant DRHEp2 from human laryngeal cancer HEp2 and investigated the roles of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and ROS on docetaxel resistance. DRHEp2 had greatly increased mtDNA content. Reduction of mtDNA content in DRHEp2 by ethidium bromide treatment reduced the resistance. These results indicate the possible roles of mtDNA-coded enzymes in mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) in resistant mechanisms. Oligomycin A, an Fo-ATPase inhibitor, eliminated docetaxel resistance in DRHEp2. In contrast, inhibitors of other MRC did not. RNA interference targeted to Fo-ATPase d-subunit restored docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity to DRHEp2. These results indicate the roles of Fo-ATPase for resistant mechanisms. Docetaxel induced ROS generation in HEp2 but not in DRHEp2 and antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting roles of ROS in docetaxel-induced cell death. Furthermore, inhibition of Fo-ATPase by Oligomycin A induced docetaxel–mediated ROS generation in DRHEp2. Taken together, DRHEp2 acquired docetaxel resistance through increasing Fo-ATPase, which led to diminish docetaxel-induced ROS generation and subsequently inhibited cell death. In conclusion, mtDNA plays an important role in developing docetaxel resistance through the reduction of ROS generation by regulating Fo-ATPase. PMID:17637738

  16. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  17. Inherent and Acquired Resistance to Paclitaxel in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Molecular Events Involved

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Avtar Singh; Sharma, Aanchal; Kumari, Ratna; Mohammad, Naoshad; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver and is a major cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Only 10 to 20% of HCC can be surgically excised. Therefore, chemotherapeutic intervention and treatment is essential for achieving favorable prognosis. However, therapeutic outcome of chemotherapy is generally poor owing to inherent resistance of cancer cells to the treatment or due to development of acquired resistance. To differentiate and delineate the molecular events, we developed drug resistant Hep3B cells (DRC) by treating cells with the increasing concentration of paclitaxel. We also developed a unique single cell clone of Hep3B cells (SCC) by selecting single cell colonies and screening them for resistant phenotype. Interestingly, both DRC and SCC were resistant to paclitaxel in comparison to parental Hep3B cells. We analyzed the contributory factors that may be involved in the development of resistance. As expected, level of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was elevated in DRC. In addition, Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) protein levels were elevated in DRC whereas in SCC, FASN and CYP450 levels were elevated. Downregulation of these molecules by respective siRNAs and/or by specific pharmacological inhibitors resensitized cells to paclitaxel. Interestingly, these drug resistant cells were also less sensitive to vinblastine, doxorubicin and methotrexate with the exception of cisplatin. Our results suggested that differential levels of P-gp, Cav-1 and FASN play a major role in acquired resistant phenotype whereas FASN level was associated with the presentation of inherent resistant phenotype in HCC. PMID:23613870

  18. PP2A inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to HER2 targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HER2 targeted therapies including trastuzumab and more recently lapatinib have significantly improved the prognosis for HER2 positive breast cancer patients. However, resistance to these agents is a significant clinical problem. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for resistance to trastuzumab, the mechanisms of lapatinib resistance remain largely unknown. In this study we generated new models of acquired resistance to HER2 targeted therapy and investigated mechanisms of resistance using phospho-proteomic profiling. Results Long-term continuous exposure of SKBR3 cells to low dose lapatinib established a cell line, SKBR3-L, which is resistant to both lapatinib and trastuzumab. Phospho-proteomic profiling and immunoblotting revealed significant alterations in phospho-proteins involved in key signaling pathways and molecular events. In particular, phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which inactivates eEF2, was significantly decreased in SKBR3-L cells compared to the parental SKBR3 cells. SKBR3-L cells exhibited significantly increased activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a phosphatase that dephosphorylates eEF2. SKBR3-L cells showed increased sensitivity to PP2A inhibition, with okadaic acid, compared to SKBR3 cells. PP2A inhibition significantly enhanced response to lapatinib in both the SKBR3 and SKBR3-L cells. Furthermore, treatment of SKBR3 parental cells with the PP2A activator, FTY720, decreased sensitivity to lapatinib. The alteration in eEF2 phosphorylation, PP2A activity and sensitivity to okadaic acid were also observed in a second HER2 positive cell line model of acquired lapatinib resistance, HCC1954-L. Conclusions Our data suggests that decreased eEF2 phosphorylation, mediated by increased PP2A activity, contributes to resistance to HER2 inhibition and may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in HER2 positive breast cancer which is resistant to HER2 targeted therapies. PMID:24958351

  19. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance. PMID:22030690

  20. Naturally occurring dominant drug resistance mutations occur infrequently in the setting of recently acquired hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Tanya L; Gaudieri, Silvana; Plauzolles, Anne; Chopra, Abha; Grebely, Jason; Lucas, Michaela; Hellard, Margaret; Luciani, Fabio; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail V

    2014-01-01

    Background Directly Acting Antivirals (DAAs) are predicted to transform hepatitis C (HCV) therapy, yet little is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring resistance mutations in recently acquired HCV. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and frequency of drug resistance mutations in the viral quasispecies among HIV positive and negative individuals with recent HCV. Methods The NS3 protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase genes were amplified from fifty genotype 1a participants of the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C. Amino acid variations at sites known to be associated with possible drug resistance were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Results Twelve percent of individuals harboured dominant resistance mutations, while 36% demonstrated non dominant resistant variants below that detectable by bulk sequencing (ie < 20%) but above a threshold of 1%. Resistance variants (< 1%) were observed at most sites associated with DAA resistance from all classes, with the exception of sofosbuvir. Conclusions Dominant resistant mutations were uncommonly observed in the setting of recent HCV. However, low level mutations to all DAA classes were observed by deep sequencing at the majority of sites, and in most individuals. The significance of these variants and impact on future treatment options remains to be determined. PMID:25105742

  1. A family cluster of tuberculosis cases, including a case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Holden, Julie; Trachtman, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Although the number of tuberculosis cases in the US is at an all-time low, with progressive declines seen for the past 17 years, many goals in the tuberculosis elimination process remain unrealized. This report describes a cluster of four tuberculosis cases in a family, including one case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis. It also underscores some important issues in tuberculosis control today, including significant disparities in the foreign-born population with multidrug resistant tuberculosis as a looming problem, as well as utilization of therapeutic drug level monitoring in complicated cases. PMID:22533114

  2. Acquired PIK3CA amplification causes resistance to selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huw, L-Y; O'Brien, C; Pandita, A; Mohan, S; Spoerke, J M; Lu, S; Wang, Y; Hampton, G M; Wilson, T R; Lackner, M R

    2013-01-01

    Agents targeting the PI3K/mTOR signaling axis have shown promise in early-phase clinical trials and are currently being studied in later stages of clinical development in multiple indications. Experience with other targeted agents suggests that clinical responses may be short-lived because of acquired resistance to therapy. Here, we report preclinical modeling of acquired resistance in a HER2-positive, PIK3CA mutant breast cancer cell line, KPL-4. We identified a heretofore-unreported mechanism of resistance, specifically high-level amplification of the mutant allele of PIK3CA, which resulted in a marked upregulation of PI3K signaling, enabling resistant cells to regain proliferative capacity at clinically relevant concentrations of the PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941. We show that knockdown of the amplified PIK3CA mutant allele in these cells by small interfering RNA restored pathway signaling and sensitivity to PI3K inhibition at levels comparable to parental cells. These novel preclinical findings suggest that, in addition to assessment of other previously reported mechanisms of resistance, evaluation of PI3K copy number variation should be integrated into the exploratory analysis of biopsies obtained at disease progression. PMID:24366379

  3. Physiological and Molecular Characteristics of Elicitin-Induced Systemic Acquired Resistance in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, H.; Blein, J. P.; Bonnet, P.; Ricci, P.

    1996-01-01

    Elicitins are low molecular weight proteins secreted by all Phytophthora species analyzed so far. Application of the purified proteins to tobacco Nicotiana tabacum leads to the induction of resistance to subsequent inoculations with the black shank-causing agent, Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae. In this paper, we describe the systemic characteristics of elicitin-induced acquired resistance in tobacco. Elicitin application is followed by the rapid translocation of the protein in the plant. The basic elicitin, cryptogein, induces necrosis formation in the leaves, which results from accumulation of the protein in these organs. Necrosis does not seem to be essential for the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), since resistance induced by the acidic elicitin, capsicein, is not accompanied by the development of visible symptoms on the leaves. Both elicitins trigger the coordinate accumulation of transcripts from nine genes, previously described to be expressed during establishment of SAR. Additionally, elicitin treatment leads to the activation of the multiple response gene str 246. In leaves, transcript accumulation was found to be higher in all cases in response to cryptogein compared to capsicein treatment. These results, along with northern hybridization analysis following infiltration of leaves with cryptogein, indicate that SAR genes appear to be expressed locally, corresponding to necrosis formation as well as systemically during induction of resistance. To our knowledge, elicitins are the only well-characterized, pathogen-derived molecules that trigger SAR in a plant. PMID:12226188

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor cooperates with Src family kinases in acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Deric L; Iida, Mari; Kruser, Tim J; Nechrebecki, Meghan M; Dunn, Emily F; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyhmin; Harari, Paul M

    2009-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a major role in oncogenesis. Cetuximab is an EGFR-blocking antibody that is FDA approved for use in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Although cetuximab has shown strong clinical benefit for a subset of cancer patients, most become refractory to cetuximab therapy. We reported that cetuximab-resistant NSCLC line NCI-H226 cells have increased steady-state expression and activity of EGFR secondary to altered trafficking/degradation and this increase in EGFR expression and activity lead to hyper-activation of HER3 and down stream signals to survival. We now present data that Src family kinases (SFKs) are highly activated in cetuximab-resistant cells and enhance EGFR activation of HER3 and PI(3)K/Akt. Studies using the Src kinase inhibitor dasatinib decreased HER3 and PI(3)K/Akt activity. In addition, cetuximab-resistant cells were resensitized to cetuximab when treated with dasatinib. These results indicate that SFKs and EGFR cooperate in acquired resistance to cetuximab and suggest a rationale for clinical strategies that investigate combinatorial therapy directed at both the EGFR and SFKs in patients with acquired resistance to cetuximab. PMID:19276677

  5. A Role for OCT4 in Tumor Initiation of Drug-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Douglas E.; Yang, Xi; Sun, Feng; Xie, Yingqiu; Chen, Hege; Jiang, Richeng; Chen, Hegang; Chumsri, Saranya; Burger, Angelika M.; Qiu, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a clinical challenge in cancer treatment due to poor understanding of underlying mechanisms. We have established several drug-resistant prostate cancer cell lines by long-term culture in medium containing chemotherapeutic drugs. These resistant lines displayed a significant increase in side population cells due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps including ABCG2/BCRP and MDR1/Pgp. To uncover potential mechanisms underlying drug resistance, we performed microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed genes in 2 drug-resistant lines. We observed that POU5F1/OCT4, a transcription factor key to regulating pluripotency in embryonic stem cells, was upregulated in drug-resistant lines and accompanied by transcriptional activation of a set of its known target genes. Upregulation of OCT4 in drug-resistant cells was validated by RT-PCR and sequencing of PCR products as well as confirmation by Western blot and specific shRNA knockdown. Analysis of the regulatory region of POU5F1/OCT4 revealed a reduction of methylation in drug-resistant cell lines. Furthermore, these drug-resistant cells exhibited a significant increase in tumorigenicity in vivo. Subcutaneous inoculation of as few as 10 drug-resistant cells could initiate tumor formation in SCID mice, whereas no detectable tumors were observed from the parental line under similar conditions, suggesting that these drug-resistant cells may be enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Knocking down OCT4 expression by specific shRNAs attenuated growth of drug-resistant cells. Our data suggest that OCT4 re-expression in cancer cells may play an important role in carcinogenesis and provide one possible mechanism by which cancer cells acquire/maintain a drug-resistant phenotype. PMID:21779471

  6. Molecular Characterization of Acquired Tolerance of Tumor Cells to Picropodophyllin (PPP)

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Jamileh; Worrall, Claire; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Fryknäs, Mårten; Sulaiman, Luqman; Karimi, Mohsen; Weng, Wen-Hui; Lui, Weng-Onn; Rudduck, Christina; Axelson, Magnus; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Girnita, Leonard; Larsson, Olle; Larsson, Catharina

    2011-01-01

    Background Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a promising novel anti-neoplastic agent that efficiently kills tumor cells in vitro and causes tumor regression and increased survival in vivo. We have previously reported that PPP treatment induced moderate tolerance in two out of 10 cell lines only, and here report the acquired genomic and expression alterations associated with PPP selection over 1.5 years of treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Copy number alterations monitored using metaphase and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses revealed largely overlapping alterations in parental and maximally tolerant cells. Gain/ amplification of the MYC and PVT1 loci in 8q24.21 were verified on the chromosome level. Abnormalities observed in connection to PPP treatment included regular gains and losses, as well as homozygous losses in 10q24.1-q24.2 and 12p12.3-p13.2 in one of the lines and amplification at 5q11.2 in the other. Abnormalities observed in both tolerant derivatives include amplification/gain of 5q11.2, gain of 11q12.1-q14.3 and gain of 13q33.3-qter. Using Nexus software analysis we combined the array-CGH data with data from gene expression profilings and identified genes that were altered in both inputs. A subset of genes identified as downregulated (ALDH1A3, ANXA1, TLR4 and RAB5A) or upregulated (COX6A1, NFIX, ME1, MAPK and TAP2) were validated by siRNA in the tolerant or parental cells to alter sensitivity to PPP and confirmed to alter sensitivity to PPP in further cell lines. Conclusions Long-term PPP selection lead to altered gene expression in PPP tolerant cells with increase as well as decrease of genes involved in cell death such as PTEN and BCL2. In addition, acquired genomic copy number alterations were observed that were often reflected by altered mRNA expression levels for genes in the same regions. PMID:21423728

  7. A highly tumor-targeted nanoparticle of podophyllotoxin penetrated tumor core and regressed multidrug resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Aniruddha; Ernsting, Mark J.; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) exhibited significant activity against P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant (MDR) tumor cell lines; however, due to its poor solubility and high toxicity, PPT cannot be dosed systemically, preventing its clinical use for MDR cancer. We developed a nanoparticle dosage form of PPT by covalently conjugating PPT and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with acetylated carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Ac) using one-pot esterification chemistry. The polymer conjugates self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs) of variable sizes (20–120 nm) depending on the PPT-to-PEG molar ratio (2–20). The conjugate with a low PPT/PEG molar ratio of 2 yielded NPs with a mean diameter of 20 nm and released PPT at ~5%/day in serum, while conjugates with increased PPT/PEG ratios (5 and 20) produced bigger particles (30 nm and 120 nm respectively) that displayed slower drug release (~2.5%/day and ~1%/day respectively). The 20 nm particles exhibited 2- to 5-fold enhanced cell killing potency and 5- to 20-fold increased tumor delivery compared to the larger NPs. The biodistribution of the 20 nm PPT-NPs was highly selective to the tumor with 8-fold higher accumulation than all other examined tissues, while the larger PPT-NPs (30 and 100 nm) exhibited increased liver uptake. Within the tumor, >90% of the 20 nm PPT-NPs penetrated to the hypovascular core, while the larger particles were largely restricted in the hypervascular periphery. The 20 nm PPT-NPs displayed significantly improved efficacy against MDR tumors in mice compared to the larger PPT-NPs, native PPT and the standard taxane chemotherapies, with minimal toxicity. PMID:25818440

  8. Targeting glucosylceramide synthase induction of cell surface globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in acquired cisplatin-resistance of lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Andreas; Johansson, Anders; Karlsson, Terese; Gudey, Shyam Kumar; Brännström, Thomas; Grankvist, Kjell; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz

    2015-08-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to cisplatin treatment is a caveat when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Ceramide increases in response to chemotherapy, leading to proliferation arrest and apoptosis. However, a tumour stress activation of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) follows to eliminate ceramide by formation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), the functional receptor of verotoxin-1. Ceramide elimination enhances cell proliferation and apoptosis blockade, thus stimulating tumor progression. GSLs transactivate multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression which further prevents ceramide accumulation and stimulates drug efflux. We investigated the expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 in NSCLC and MPM cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and if GCS activity or MDR1 pump inhibitors would reduce their expression and reverse cisplatin-resistance. Methods: Cell surface expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 and intracellular expression of MDR1 and MRP1 was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy on P31 MPM and H1299 NSCLC cells and subline cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. The effect of GCS inhibitor PPMP and MDR1 pump inhibitor cyclosporin A for 72 h on expression and cisplatin cytotoxicity was tested. Results: The cisplatin-resistant cells expressed increased cell surface Gb3. Cell surface Gb3 expression of resistant cells was annihilated by PPMP whereas cyclosporin A decreased Gb3 and MDR1 expression in H1299 cells. No decrease of MDR1 by PPMP was noted in using flow cytometry, whereas a decrease of MDR1 in H1299 and H1299res was indicated with confocal microscopy. No certain co-localization of Gb3 and MDR1 was noted. PPMP, but not cyclosporin A, potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in all cells. Conclusions: Cell surface Gb3 expression is a likely tumour biomarker for acquired cisplatin

  9. Bordetella pertussis Acquires Resistance to Complement-Mediated Killing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pishko, Elizabeth J.; Betting, David J.; Hutter, Christina S.; Harvill, Eric T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to initially colonize a host, bacteria must avoid various components of the innate immune system, one of which is complement. The genus Bordetella includes three closely related species that differ in their ability to resist complement-mediated killing. Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica resist killing in naïve serum, a characteristic that may aid in efficient respiratory tract colonization and has been attributed to expression of O antigen. Bordetella pertussis lacks O antigen and is sensitive to naïve serum in vitro, yet it also efficiently colonizes the respiratory tract. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that B. pertussis may have an alternate mechanism to resist complement in vivo. While a number of reports on serum sensitivity of the bordetellae have been published, we show here that serum concentration and growth conditions can greatly alter the observed level of sensitivity to complement and that all but one strain of B. pertussis observed were sensitive to some level of naïve serum in vitro, particularly when there was excess complement. However, B. pertussis rapidly acquires increased resistance in vivo to naïve serum that is specific to the alternative pathway. Resistance is not efficiently acquired by B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica mutants lacking O antigen. This B. pertussis-specific mechanism of complement resistance does not appear to be dependent on either brkA or other genes expressed specifically in the Bvg+ phase. This in vivo acquisition of alternative pathway resistance suggests that there is a novel O antigen-independent method by which B. pertussis evades complement-mediated killing. PMID:12933835

  10. Bordetella pertussis acquires resistance to complement-mediated killing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pishko, Elizabeth J; Betting, David J; Hutter, Christina S; Harvill, Eric T

    2003-09-01

    In order to initially colonize a host, bacteria must avoid various components of the innate immune system, one of which is complement. The genus Bordetella includes three closely related species that differ in their ability to resist complement-mediated killing. Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica resist killing in naïve serum, a characteristic that may aid in efficient respiratory tract colonization and has been attributed to expression of O antigen. Bordetella pertussis lacks O antigen and is sensitive to naïve serum in vitro, yet it also efficiently colonizes the respiratory tract. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that B. pertussis may have an alternate mechanism to resist complement in vivo. While a number of reports on serum sensitivity of the bordetellae have been published, we show here that serum concentration and growth conditions can greatly alter the observed level of sensitivity to complement and that all but one strain of B. pertussis observed were sensitive to some level of naïve serum in vitro, particularly when there was excess complement. However, B. pertussis rapidly acquires increased resistance in vivo to naïve serum that is specific to the alternative pathway. Resistance is not efficiently acquired by B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica mutants lacking O antigen. This B. pertussis-specific mechanism of complement resistance does not appear to be dependent on either brkA or other genes expressed specifically in the Bvg(+) phase. This in vivo acquisition of alternative pathway resistance suggests that there is a novel O antigen-independent method by which B. pertussis evades complement-mediated killing. PMID:12933835

  11. miR-200c/Bmi1 axis and epithelial–mesenchymal transition contribute to acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujing; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wang, Tao; Yang, Ruifeng; Xie, Lin; Zhang, Gao; Krepler, Clemens; Xiao, Min; Beqiri, Marilda; Xu, Wei; Karakousis, Giorgos; Schuchter, Lynn; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Xu, Weiting; Wei, Zhi; Herlyn, Meenhard; Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Litao; Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Resistance to BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) is one of the major challenges for targeted therapies for BRAF-mutant melanomas. However, little is known about the role of microRNAs in conferring BRAFi resistance. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-200c expression is significantly reduced whereas miR-200c target genes including Bmi1, Zeb2, Tubb3, ABCG5, and MDR1 are significantly increased in melanomas that acquired BRAFi resistance compared to pretreatment tumor biopsies. Similar changes were observed in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cell lines. Overexpression of miR-200c or knock-down of Bmi1 in resistant melanoma cells restores their sensitivities to BRAFi, leading to deactivation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling cascades, and acquisition of epithelial– mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes, including upregulation of E-cadherin, downregulation of N-cadherin, and ABCG5 and MDR1 expression. Conversely, knock-down of miR-200c or overexpression of Bmi1 in BRAFi-sensitive melanoma cells activates the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways, upregulates N-cadherin, ABCG5, and MDR1 expression, and downregulates E-cadherin expression, leading to BRAFi resistance. Together, our data identify miR-200c as a critical signaling node in BRAFi-resistant melanomas impacting the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways, suggesting miR-200c as a potential therapeutic target for overcoming acquired BRAFi resistance. PMID:25903073

  12. Amphibians acquire resistance to live and dead fungus overcoming fungal immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Taegan A.; Sears, Brittany F.; Venesky, Matthew D.; Bessler, Scott M.; Brown, Jenise M.; Deutsch, Kaitlin; Halstead, Neal T.; Lentz, Garrett; Tenouri, Nadia; Young, Suzanne; Civitello, David J.; Ortega, Nicole; Fites, J. Scott; Reinert, Laura K.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.; Raffel, Thomas R.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group1, causing declines of many taxa, including bats, corals, bees, snakes and amphibians1–4. Currently, there is little evidence that wild animals can acquire resistance to these pathogens5. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a pathogenic fungus implicated in the recent global decline of amphibians6. Here we demonstrate that three species of amphibians can acquire behavioural or immunological resistance to B. dendrobatidis. Frogs learned to avoid the fungus after just one B. dendrobatidis exposure and temperature-induced clearance. In subsequent experiments in which B. dendrobatidis avoidance was prevented, the number of previous exposures was a negative predictor of B. dendrobatidis burden on frogs and B. dendrobatidis-induced mortality, and was a positive predictor of lymphocyte abundance and proliferation. These results suggest that amphibians can acquire immunity to B. dendrobatidis that overcomes pathogen-induced immunosuppression7–9 and increases their survival. Importantly, exposure to dead fungus induced a similar magnitude of acquired resistance as exposure to live fungus. Exposure of frogs to B. dendrobatidis antigens might offer a practical way to protect pathogen-naive amphibians and facilitate the reintroduction of amphibians to locations in the wild where B. dendrobatidis persists. Moreover, given the conserved nature of vertebrate immune responses to fungi5 and the fact that many animals are capable of learning to avoid natural enemies10, these results offer hope that other wild animal taxa threatened by invasive fungi might be rescued by management approaches based on herd immunity. PMID:25008531

  13. Bacteraemia and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community acquired pneumonia: risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrús, Albert; Polverino, Eva; Villegas, Santiago; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Menéndez, Rosario; Niederman, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of blood cultures in the diagnosis of bacteraemia for community-acquired pneumonia is low. Recommendations, by guidelines, to perform blood cultures are discordant. We aimed to determine the incidence, microbial aetiology, risk factors and outcomes of bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia, including cases with antibiotic-resistant pathogens (ARP). A prospective, observational study was undertaken on consecutive adult patients admitted to the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain) with community-acquired pneumonia and blood cultures were obtained. Of the 2892 patients included, bacteraemia was present in 297 (10%) patients; 30 (10%) of whom had ARP (multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and an extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae). In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL(-1) and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. The risk factors for ARP bacteraemia were previous antibiotics and C-reactive protein <22.2 mg·dL(-1), while pleuritic pain was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis. Bacteraemia (excluding ARP), appropriate empiric treatment, neurological disease, arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction <250, pneumonia severity index risk classes IV and V, and intensive care unit admission were independently associated with a 30-day hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis. Inappropriate therapy was more frequent in ARP bacteraemia, compared with other bacteraemias (27% versus 3%, respectively, p<0.001). Antibiotic therapy protected against bacteraemia, but increased specifically the risk of bacteraemia from ARP due to the inappropriate coverage of these pathogens. Identifying patients at risk of ARP bacteraemia would help in

  14. Evading anti-angiogenic therapy: resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nandini; De, Pradip; Brian, Leyland-Jones

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) dependent tumor angiogenesis is an essential step for the initiation and promotion of tumor progression. The hypothesis that VEGF-driven tumor angiogenesis is necessary and sufficient for metastatic progression of the tumor, has been the major premise of the use of anti-VEGF therapy for decades. While the success of anti-VEGF therapy in solid tumors has led to the success of knowledge-based-therapies over the past several years, failures of this therapeutic approach due to the development of inherent/acquired resistance has led to the increased understanding of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. Today, tumor-angiogenesis is not a synonymous term to VEGF-dependent function. The extensive study of VEGF-independent angiogenesis has revealed several key factors responsible for this phenomenon including the role of myeloid cells, and the contribution of entirely new phenomenon like vascular mimicry. In this review, we will present the cellular and molecular factors related to the development of anti-angiogenic resistance following anti-VEGF therapy in different solid tumors. PMID:26692917

  15. Evading anti-angiogenic therapy: resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Nandini; De, Pradip; Brian, Leyland-Jones

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) dependent tumor angiogenesis is an essential step for the initiation and promotion of tumor progression. The hypothesis that VEGF-driven tumor angiogenesis is necessary and sufficient for metastatic progression of the tumor, has been the major premise of the use of anti-VEGF therapy for decades. While the success of anti-VEGF therapy in solid tumors has led to the success of knowledge-based-therapies over the past several years, failures of this therapeutic approach due to the development of inherent/acquired resistance has led to the increased understanding of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. Today, tumor-angiogenesis is not a synonymous term to VEGF-dependent function. The extensive study of VEGF-independent angiogenesis has revealed several key factors responsible for this phenomenon including the role of myeloid cells, and the contribution of entirely new phenomenon like vascular mimicry. In this review, we will present the cellular and molecular factors related to the development of anti-angiogenic resistance following anti-VEGF therapy in different solid tumors. PMID:26692917

  16. Mechanisms of resistance to etoposide and teniposide in acquired resistant human colon and lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Long, B H; Wang, L; Lorico, A; Wang, R C; Brattain, M G; Casazza, A M

    1991-10-01

    Stable acquired resistance to etoposide (VP-16) or teniposide (VM-26) in HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, was previously obtained by weekly 1-h exposures to either drug (B. H. Long, Natl. Cancer Inst. Monogr., 4: 123-127, 1987). The purpose of this study was to identify possible mechanisms of resistance present in these cells by using human mdr1 and topoisomerase II DNA probes, antibodies to these gene products, and P4 phage unknotting assay for topoisomerase II activities. HCT116(VP)35 cells were 9-, 7-, and 6-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin, respectively, and showed no cross-resistance to colchicine and actinomycin D. These cells had no differences in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels but displayed decreased levels of topoisomerase II mRNA and enzyme activity without any alteration of drug sensitivity displayed by the enzyme. HCT116(VM)34 cells were 5-, 7-, and 21-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin; were cross-resistant to colchicine (7-fold) and actinomycin D (18-fold); and possessed a 9-fold increase in mdr1 mRNA and increased P-glycoprotein without evidence of mdr1 gene amplification. No alterations in topoisomerase II gene or mRNA levels, enzyme activity, or drug sensitivity were observed. A549(VP)28 and A549(VM)28 cells were 8-fold resistant to VP-16 and VM-26 and 3-fold resistant to Adriamycin. Both lines were not cross-resistant to colchicine or actinomycin D but were hypersensitive to cis-platinum. No alterations in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels, but lower topoisomerase II mRNA levels and decreased enzyme activities, were observed. Of the four acquired resistant cell lines, resistance is likely related to elevated mdr1 expression in one line and to decreased topoisomerase II expression in the other three lines. PMID:1717144

  17. Acquired-resistance of bevacizumab treatment for radiation brain necrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayong; Bian, Jianliang; Chang, Joe Y.; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The case study reported on acquired bevacizumab resistance in one patient receiving re-treatment with bevacizumab following radiation brain necrosis progression after bevacizumab was discontinued. This case offers novel and additional insight for bevacizumab treatment. Low-dose bevacizumab is effective for radiation brain necrosis, and radiation brain necrosis may progress after bevacizumab discontinuation, whereas too many cycles of bevacizumab treatment may induce drug-resistance and re-treatment failure following the progression. Therefore, more rational administration for radiation brain necrosis with bevacizumab may include three aspects: short-course treatment, timely discontinuation upon obtaining satisfactory effects (to prevent long-term medication associated resistance) and re-treatment after brain necrosis progression. PMID:26933810

  18. Tumor cells can follow distinct evolutionary paths to become resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hata, Aaron N; Niederst, Matthew J; Archibald, Hannah L; Gomez-Caraballo, Maria; Siddiqui, Faria M; Mulvey, Hillary E; Maruvka, Yosef E; Ji, Fei; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Krishnamurthy Radhakrishna, Viveksagar; Siravegna, Giulia; Hu, Haichuan; Raoof, Sana; Lockerman, Elizabeth; Kalsy, Anuj; Lee, Dana; Keating, Celina L; Ruddy, David A; Damon, Leah J; Crystal, Adam S; Costa, Carlotta; Piotrowska, Zofia; Bardelli, Alberto; Iafrate, Anthony J; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Stegmeier, Frank; Getz, Gad; Sequist, Lecia V; Faber, Anthony C; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanisms of acquired resistance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small-cell lung cancers to EGFR inhibitors have been identified, little is known about how resistant clones evolve during drug therapy. Here we observe that acquired resistance caused by the EGFR(T790M) gatekeeper mutation can occur either by selection of pre-existing EGFR(T790M)-positive clones or via genetic evolution of initially EGFR(T790M)-negative drug-tolerant cells. The path to resistance impacts the biology of the resistant clone, as those that evolved from drug-tolerant cells had a diminished apoptotic response to third-generation EGFR inhibitors that target EGFR(T790M); treatment with navitoclax, an inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic factors BCL-xL and BCL-2 restored sensitivity. We corroborated these findings using cultures derived directly from EGFR inhibitor-resistant patient tumors. These findings provide evidence that clinically relevant drug-resistant cancer cells can both pre-exist and evolve from drug-tolerant cells, and they point to therapeutic opportunities to prevent or overcome resistance in the clinic. PMID:26828195

  19. Tumor cells can follow distinct evolutionary paths to become resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Aaron N; Niederst, Matthew J; Archibald, Hannah L; Gomez-Caraballo, Maria; Siddiqui, Faria M; Mulvey, Hillary E; Maruvka, Yosef E; Ji, Fei; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Radhakrishna, Viveksagar Krishnamurthy; Siravegna, Giulia; Hu, Haichuan; Raoof, Sana; Lockerman, Elizabeth; Kalsy, Anuj; Lee, Dana; Keating, Celina L; Ruddy, David A; Damon, Leah J; Crystal, Adam S; Costa, Carlotta; Piotrowska, Zofia; Bardelli, Alberto; Iafrate, Anthony J; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Stegmeier, Frank; Getz, Gad; Sequist, Lecia V; Faber, Anthony C; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Although mechanisms of acquired resistance of EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancers to EGFR inhibitors have been identified, little is known about how resistant clones evolve during drug therapy. Here, we observe that acquired resistance caused by the T790M gatekeeper mutation can occur either by selection of pre-existing T790M clones or via genetic evolution of initially T790M-negative drug tolerant cells. The path to resistance impacts the biology of the resistant clone, as those that evolved from drug tolerant cells had a diminished apoptotic response to third generation EGFR inhibitors that target T790M EGFR; treatment with navitoclax, an inhibitor of BCL-XL and BCL-2 restored sensitivity. We corroborated these findings using cultures derived directly from EGFR inhibitor-resistant patient tumors. These findings provide evidence that clinically relevant drug resistant cancer cells can both pre-exist and evolve from drug tolerant cells, and point to therapeutic opportunities to prevent or overcome resistance in the clinic. PMID:26828195

  20. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported. PMID:27620952

  1. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  2. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Druker, Brian J; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. Although in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients develop resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an IHC analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend toward increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multikinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of patients with GIST with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  3. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  4. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance. PMID:27514947

  5. Selinexor is effective in acquired resistance to ibrutinib and synergizes with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hing, Zachary A; Mantel, Rose; Beckwith, Kyle A; Guinn, Daphne; Williams, Erich; Smith, Lisa L; Williams, Katie; Johnson, Amy J; Lehman, Amy M; Byrd, John C; Woyach, Jennifer A; Lapalombella, Rosa

    2015-05-14

    Despite the therapeutic efficacy of ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), complete responses are infrequent, and acquired resistance to Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibition is being observed in an increasing number of patients. Combination regimens that increase frequency of complete remissions, accelerate time to remission, and overcome single agent resistance are of considerable interest. We previously showed that the XPO1 inhibitor selinexor is proapoptotic in CLL cells and disrupts B-cell receptor signaling via BTK depletion. Herein we show the combination of selinexor and ibrutinib elicits a synergistic cytotoxic effect in primary CLL cells and increases overall survival compared with ibrutinib alone in a mouse model of CLL. Selinexor is effective in cells isolated from patients with prolonged lymphocytosis following ibrutinib therapy. Finally, selinexor is effective in ibrutinib-refractory mice and in a cell line harboring the BTK C481S mutation. This is the first report describing the combined activity of ibrutinib and selinexor in CLL, which represents a new treatment paradigm and warrants further evaluation in clinical trials of CLL patients including those with acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25838351

  6. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  7. Targeting AKT with the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Campbell, David A; Starr, Megan M; Luthar, Neha; Traynor, Anne M; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Despite clinical success the majority of patients do not respond to cetuximab and those who initially respond frequently acquire resistance. To understand how tumor cells acquire resistance to cetuximab we developed a model of resistance using the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We found that cetuximab-resistant (Ctx (R) ) clones manifested strong activation of EGFR, PI3K/AKT and MAPK. To investigate the role of AKT signaling in cetuximab resistance we analyzed the activation of the AKT pathway effector molecules using a human AKT phospho-antibody array. Strong activation was observed in Ctx (R) clones for several key AKT substrates including c-jun, GSK3β, eIF4E, rpS6, IKKα, IRS-1 and Raf1. Inhibition of AKT signaling by siAKT1/2 or by the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 resulted in robust inhibition of cell proliferation in all Ctx (R) clones. Moreover, the combinational treatment of cetuximab and MK-2206 resulted in further decreases in proliferation than either drug alone. This combinatorial treatment resulted in decreased activity of both AKT and MAPK thus highlighting the importance of simultaneous pathway inhibition to maximally affect the growth of Ctx (R) cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that AKT activation is an important pathway in acquired resistance to cetuximab and suggests that combinatorial therapy directed at both the AKT and EGFR/MAPK pathways may be beneficial in this setting. PMID:23760490

  8. Targeting AKT with the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M.; Campbell, David A.; Starr, Megan M.; Luthar, Neha; Traynor, Anne M.; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a central regulator of tumor progression in human cancers. Cetuximab is an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody that has been approved for use in oncology. Despite clinical success the majority of patients do not respond to cetuximab and those who initially respond frequently acquire resistance. To understand how tumor cells acquire resistance to cetuximab we developed a model of resistance using the non-small cell lung cancer line NCI-H226. We found that cetuximab-resistant (CtxR) clones manifested strong activation of EGFR, PI3K/AKT and MAPK. To investigate the role of AKT signaling in cetuximab resistance we analyzed the activation of the AKT pathway effector molecules using a human AKT phospho-antibody array. Strong activation was observed in CtxR clones for several key AKT substrates including c-jun, GSK3β, eIF4E, rpS6, IKKα, IRS-1 and Raf1. Inhibition of AKT signaling by siAKT1/2 or by the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK-2206 resulted in robust inhibition of cell proliferation in all CtxR clones. Moreover, the combinational treatment of cetuximab and MK-2206 resulted in further decreases in proliferation than either drug alone. This combinatorial treatment resulted in decreased activity of both AKT and MAPK thus highlighting the importance of simultaneous pathway inhibition to maximally affect the growth of CtxR cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that AKT activation is an important pathway in acquired resistance to cetuximab and suggests that combinatorial therapy directed at both the AKT and EGFR/MAPK pathways may be beneficial in this setting. PMID:23760490

  9. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  10. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  11. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  12. Antiangiogenic therapy of experimental cancer does not induce acquired drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Thomas; Folkman, Judah; Browder, Timothy; O'Reilly, Michael S.

    1997-11-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Of the more than 500,000 annual deaths from cancer in the United States, many follow the development of resistance to chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance depends in part on the genetic instability, heterogeneity and high mutational rate of tumour cells. In contrast, endothelial cells are genetically stable, homogenous and have a low mutational rate. Therefore, antiangiogenic therapy directed against a tumour's endothelial cells should, in principle, induce little or no drug resistance. Endostatin, a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, was administered to mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, T241 fibrosarcoma or B16F10 melanoma. Treatment was stopped when tumours had regressed. Tumours were then allowed to re-grow and endostatin therapy was resumed. After 6, 4 or 2 treatment cycles, respectively, no tumours recurred after discontinuation of therapy. These experiments show that drug resistance does not develop in three tumour types treated with a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. An unexpected finding is that repeated cycles of antiangiogenic therapy are followed by prolonged tumour dormancy without further therapy.

  13. Surveillance for Travel and Domestically Acquired Multidrug-Resistant Human Shigella Infections-Pennsylvania, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Lung; Tewari, Deepanker; Yealy, Courtney C; Fardig, David; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis is a leading cause of enteric infections in the United States. We compared antimicrobial resistance in Shigella infections related to overseas travel (travel-associated) and in those acquired domestically by analyzing antimicrobial resistance patterns, geographic distributions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. We tested samples (n = 204) from a collection of isolates recovered from patients in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2014. Isolates were grouped into travel- and non-travel-associated categories. Eighty-one (79.4%) of the Shigella isolates acquired during international travel were resistant to multiple antibiotics compared to 53 (52.1%) of the infections transmitted in domestic settings. A majority (79.4%) of isolates associated with international travel demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines, whereas 47 (46.1%) of the infections acquired domestically were resistant to tetracycline. Almost all isolates (92.2%) transmitted in domestic settings were resistant to aminoglycosides, and 5 isolates from adult male patients were resistant to azithromycin, a drug often used for empiric treatment of severe shigellosis. Twenty (19.6%) isolates associated with illnesses acquired during overseas travel in 4 countries were resistant to quinolones. One S. sonnei PFGE pattern was traced to a multidrug-resistant isolate acquired overseas that had caused a multistate outbreak of shigellosis, suggesting global dissemination of a drug-resistant species. Resistance to certain drugs-for example, tetracycline-increased in both overseas- and domestic-acquired infections during the study period. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides (azithromycin) and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone) was less than 1%; however, efforts to better monitor changes in drug resistance over time combined with increased antimicrobial stewardship are essential at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:27314654

  14. Facet joint septic arthritis due to community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Inassi, Jojo; Marthya, Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of facet joint (SAFJ) is extremely rare. Only about sixty cases have been reported so far. A single case of SAFJ in a series of 491 cases of spinal infections was first reported by David-Chaussé in 1981. A case report of SAFJ was published by Halpin in 1987. With the growing availability and use of MRI, more and more cases are being reported. The most common organism that causes SAFJ is Staphylococcus aureus. We are reporting a case of SAFJ caused by community acquired, methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) successfully treated by Linezolid. PMID:26719620

  15. Systemic loxoscelism in the age of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karen M; Klotz, Carrie R; Jack, Meg; Seger, Donna

    2011-02-01

    The increase in cases of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as well as its isolation from the majority of skin and soft tissue abscesses in the emergency department, requires the emergency physician to consider this diagnosis in all skin or soft tissue infections. However, making the diagnosis of MRSA when the wound is actually a cutaneous lesion of a brown recluse spider bite may have untoward consequences. Furthermore, the clinical manifestations of systemic loxoscelism may be misdiagnosed as a systemic staphylococcal infection. We present a patient with systemic loxoscelism who was diagnosed with a systemic infection and received an unnecessary surgical procedure. PMID:20817348

  16. SFRP2 augments WNT16B signaling to promote therapeutic resistance in the damaged tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Chen, F; Qian, M; Wei, H; Chen, W; Xu, J

    2016-08-18

    Most tumors initially respond to cytotoxic treatments, but acquired resistance often follows. The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a major barrier to clinical success by compromising therapeutic efficacy, and pathological relevance of multiple soluble factors released by a therapeutically remodeled TME remains largely unexplored. Here we show that the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), a Wnt pathway modulator, is produced by human primary fibroblasts after genotoxic treatments. SFRP2 induction is remarkable in tumor stroma, with transcription mainly modulated by the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex, a property shared by several effectors of the DNA damage secretory program. Instead of directly altering canonical Wnt signaling, SFRP2 augments β-catenin activities initiated by WNT16B, another soluble factor from DNA-damaged stroma. WNT16B recognizes cancer cell surface receptors including frizzled (FZD) 3/4/6, a process enhanced by SFRP2, coordinated by the co-receptor LRP6 but subject to abrogation by DKK1. Importantly, we found WNT16B plays a central role in promoting advanced malignancies particularly acquired resistance by counteracting cell death, an effect that can be minimized by a neutralizing antibody co-administered with classical chemotherapy. Furthermore, DNA damage-triggered expression of WNT16B is systemic, imaged by significant induction among diverse solid organs and circulation in peripheral blood, thereby holding promise as not only a TME-derived anticancer target but also a novel biomarker for clinical evaluation of treatment efficacy. Overall, our study substantiates the biological complexity and pathological implication of a therapy-activated TME, and provides the proof of principle of co-targeting tumor and the TME to prevent acquired resistance, with the aim of improving intervention outcome in an era of precision medicine. PMID:26751775

  17. SFRP2 augments WNT16B signaling to promote therapeutic resistance in the damaged tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Zhu, D; Chen, F; Qian, M; Wei, H; Chen, W; Xu, J

    2016-01-01

    Most tumors initially respond to cytotoxic treatments, but acquired resistance often follows. The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a major barrier to clinical success by compromising therapeutic efficacy, and pathological relevance of multiple soluble factors released by a therapeutically remodeled TME remains largely unexplored. Here we show that the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), a Wnt pathway modulator, is produced by human primary fibroblasts after genotoxic treatments. SFRP2 induction is remarkable in tumor stroma, with transcription mainly modulated by the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex, a property shared by several effectors of the DNA damage secretory program. Instead of directly altering canonical Wnt signaling, SFRP2 augments β-catenin activities initiated by WNT16B, another soluble factor from DNA-damaged stroma. WNT16B recognizes cancer cell surface receptors including frizzled (FZD) 3/4/6, a process enhanced by SFRP2, coordinated by the co-receptor LRP6 but subject to abrogation by DKK1. Importantly, we found WNT16B plays a central role in promoting advanced malignancies particularly acquired resistance by counteracting cell death, an effect that can be minimized by a neutralizing antibody co-administered with classical chemotherapy. Furthermore, DNA damage-triggered expression of WNT16B is systemic, imaged by significant induction among diverse solid organs and circulation in peripheral blood, thereby holding promise as not only a TME-derived anticancer target but also a novel biomarker for clinical evaluation of treatment efficacy. Overall, our study substantiates the biological complexity and pathological implication of a therapy-activated TME, and provides the proof of principle of co-targeting tumor and the TME to prevent acquired resistance, with the aim of improving intervention outcome in an era of precision medicine. PMID:26751775

  18. Resistance to caspase-8 and -9 fragments in a malignant pleural mesothelioma cell line with acquired cisplatin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Janson, V; Johansson, A; Grankvist, K

    2010-01-01

    Apoptotic cysteine–aspartate proteases (caspases) are essential for the progression and execution of apoptosis, and detection of caspase fragmentation or activity is often used as markers of apoptosis. Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II)) is a chemotherapeutic drug that is clinically used for the treatment of solid tumours. We compared a cisplatin-resistant pleural malignant mesothelioma cell line (P31res1.2) with its parental cell line (P31) regarding the consequences of in vitro acquired cisplatin-resistance on basal and cisplatin-induced (equitoxic and equiapoptotic cisplatin concentrations) caspase-3, -8 and -9 fragmentation and proteolytic activity. Acquisition of cisplatin-resistance resulted in basal fragmentation of caspase-8 and -9 without a concomitant increase in proteolytic activity, and there was an increased basal caspase-3/7 activity. Similarly, cisplatin-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells, H1299res, had increased caspase-3 and -9 content compared with the parental H1299 cells. In P31 cells, cisplatin exposure resulted in caspase-9-mediated caspase-3/7 activation, but in P31res1.2 cells the cisplatin-induced caspase-3/7 activation occurred before caspase-8 or -9 activation. We therefore concluded that in vitro acquisition of cisplatin-resistance rendered P31res1.2 cells resistant to caspase-8 and caspase-9 fragments and that cisplatin-induced, initiator-caspase independent caspase-3/7 activation was necessary to overcome this resistance. Finally, the results demonstrated that detection of cleaved caspase fragments alone might be insufficient as a marker of caspase activity and ensuing apoptosis induction. PMID:21364680

  19. Risk Factors for Acquired Rifamycin and Isoniazid Resistance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Neesha; Abdullahi, Leila H.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies looking at acquired drug resistance (ADR) are diverse with respect to geographical distribution, HIV co-infection rates, retreatment status and programmatic factors such as regimens administered and directly observed therapy. Our objective was to examine and consolidate evidence from clinical studies of the multifactorial aetiology of acquired rifamycin and/or isoniazid resistance within the scope of a single systematic review. This is important to inform policy and identify key areas for further studies. Methods Case-control and cohort studies and randomised controlled trials that reported ADR as an outcome during antitubercular treatment regimens including a rifamycin and examined the association of at least 1 risk factor were included. Post hoc, we carried out random effects Mantel-Haenszel weighted meta-analyses of the impact of 2 key risk factors 1) HIV and 2) baseline drug resistance on the binary outcome of ADR. Heterogeneity was assessed used I2 statistic. As a secondary outcome, we calculated median cumulative incidence of ADR, weighted by the sample size of the studies. Results Meta-analysis of 15 studies showed increased risk of ADR with baseline mono- or polyresistance (RR 4.85 95% CI 3.26 to 7.23, heterogeneity I2 58%, 95% CI 26 to 76%). Meta-analysis of 8 studies showed that HIV co-infection was associated with increased risk of ADR (RR 3.02, 95% CI 1.28 to 7.11); there was considerable heterogeneity amongst these studies (I2 81%, 95% CI 64 to 90%). Non-adherence, extrapulmonary/disseminated disease and advanced immunosuppression in HIV co-infection were other risk factors noted. The weighted median cumulative incidence of acquired multi drug resistance calculated in 24 studies (assuming whole cohort as denominator, regardless of follow up DST) was 0.1% (5th to 95th percentile 0.07 to 3.2%). Conclusion Baseline drug resistance and HIV co-infection were significant risk factors for ADR. There was a trend of positive association with

  20. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  1. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  2. Non-invasive analysis of acquired resistance to cancer therapy by sequencing of plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Tsui, Dana W Y; Gale, Davina; Forshew, Tim; Piskorz, Anna M; Parkinson, Christine; Chin, Suet-Feung; Kingsbury, Zoya; Wong, Alvin S C; Marass, Francesco; Humphray, Sean; Hadfield, James; Bentley, David; Chin, Tan Min; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Rosenfeld, Nitzan

    2013-05-01

    Cancers acquire resistance to systemic treatment as a result of clonal evolution and selection. Repeat biopsies to study genomic evolution as a result of therapy are difficult, invasive and may be confounded by intra-tumour heterogeneity. Recent studies have shown that genomic alterations in solid cancers can be characterized by massively parallel sequencing of circulating cell-free tumour DNA released from cancer cells into plasma, representing a non-invasive liquid biopsy. Here we report sequencing of cancer exomes in serial plasma samples to track genomic evolution of metastatic cancers in response to therapy. Six patients with advanced breast, ovarian and lung cancers were followed over 1-2 years. For each case, exome sequencing was performed on 2-5 plasma samples (19 in total) spanning multiple courses of treatment, at selected time points when the allele fraction of tumour mutations in plasma was high, allowing improved sensitivity. For two cases, synchronous biopsies were also analysed, confirming genome-wide representation of the tumour genome in plasma. Quantification of allele fractions in plasma identified increased representation of mutant alleles in association with emergence of therapy resistance. These included an activating mutation in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha) following treatment with paclitaxel; a truncating mutation in RB1 (retinoblastoma 1) following treatment with cisplatin; a truncating mutation in MED1 (mediator complex subunit 1) following treatment with tamoxifen and trastuzumab, and following subsequent treatment with lapatinib, a splicing mutation in GAS6 (growth arrest-specific 6) in the same patient; and a resistance-conferring mutation in EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor; T790M) following treatment with gefitinib. These results establish proof of principle that exome-wide analysis of circulating tumour DNA could complement current invasive biopsy approaches to identify

  3. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Malaysian tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Bahari, Norazlah; Othman, Amizah; Jaafar, Roslinda; Mohamed, Nurul Azmawati; Jabbari, Idimaz; Sulong, Anita; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a pathogen recognized to be distinct in both phenotype and genotype from hospital-acquired MRSA. We have identified CA-MRSA cases in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, including their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genotypic characteristics. Cases were identified during January to December 2009 from routine clinical specimens, where culture and antibiotic susceptibility results yielded pauci-resistant MRSA isolates suspected as being CA-MRSA. The patients' clinical data were collected and their specimens were sent for molecular confirmation and analysis. Five cases of CA-MRSA were identified, which had a multi-sensitive pattern on antibiotic susceptibility tests and were resistant to only penicillin and oxacillin. All cases were skin and soft-tissue infections, including diabetic foot with gangrene, infected scalp hematoma, philtrum abscess in a healthcare worker, thrombophlebitis complicated with abscess and infected bedsore. All five cases were confirmed MRSA by detection of mecA. SCCmec typing (ccr and mec complex) revealed SCCmec type IV for all cases except the infected bedsore case. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene was positive in all isolates. As clinical features among methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA and "nosocomial CA-MRSA" are indistinct, early recognition is necessary in order to initiate appropriate antibiotics and infection control measures. Continual surveillance of pauci-resistant MRSA and molecular analysis are necessary in order to identify emerging strains as well as their epidemiology and transmission, both in the community and in healthcare setting. PMID:23682444

  4. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    SciTech Connect

    Tentes, I.K.; Schmidt, W.M.; Krupitza, G.; Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W.; Kortsaris, A.; Mader, R.M.

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  5. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  6. Valproic acid, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, reverses acquired Erlotinib-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells: a Connectivity Mapping analysis and an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Wenlei; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Yi; Xie, Qichao; Zhu, Bo; Chen, Zhengtang

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have been used as a powerful targeting therapeutic agent for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma for years. Nevertheless, the efficacy of TKI was hampered by the appearance of acquired TKI-resistance. In the present study, we aimed to search, predict, and screen the agents that can overcome the acquired TKI-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma by using the expression profiles of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and Connectivity map (CMAP). The profiles of DEGs were obtained by searching GEO microarray database, and then, they were submitted to CMAP for analysis in order to predict and screen the agent that might reverse the TKI-resistance of lung cancer cells. Next, the effects of the selected agent on TKI-resistant cancer cells were tested and the possible signaling pathways were also evaluated. As a result, valproic acid (VPA) was selected. Then, we used a low-concentration of VPA that has little effect on the cell growth for analysis. Interestingly, the results showed that treatment with a combination of VPA and Erlotinib significantly led to a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis for TKI-resistant HCC827-ER cells, relative to those treated with VPA or Erlotinib alone. Further experiments confirmed that inhibition of MAPK and AKT might be involved in this process. Analyzing the DEGs through the CMAP is a good strategy for exploitation of anti-tumor agents. VPA might markedly increase the sensitivity of TKI-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells to Erlotinib, thus reversing the acquired TKI-resistance of cancer cells and raising VPA as a potential agent for TKI-resistant lung cancer therapy. PMID:26328250

  7. Integrated genomic approaches identify upregulation of SCRN1 as a novel mechanism associated with acquired resistance to erlotinib in PC9 cells harboring oncogenic EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Cho, Ahye; Watanabe, Hideo; Choi, Yoon-La; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Joung, Je-Gun; Park, Angela KJ; Francis, Joshua M.; Bae, Joon Seol; Ahn, Soo-min; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Woong-Yang; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Koo, Jaehyung; Yin, Hongwei Holly; Cho, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been proven to be effective in treating a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Inevitably these patients develop resistance to the EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we performed integrated genomic analyses using an in vitro system to uncover alternative genomic mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Specifically, we identified 80 genes whose expression is significantly increased in the erlotinib-resistant clones. RNAi-based systematic synthetic lethal screening of these candidate genes revealed that suppression of one upregulated transcript, SCRN1, a secernin family member, restores sensitivity to erlotinib by enhancing inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased levels of SCRN1 in 5 of 11 lung tumor specimens from EGFR-TKIs resistant patients. Taken together, we propose that upregulation of SCRN1 is an additional mechanism associated with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and that its suppression serves as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in these patients. PMID:26883194

  8. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this. PMID:25511378

  9. NF-κB drives acquired resistance to a novel mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Elena; Sun, Jing; Leon, Leticia G.; Sciarrillo, Rocco; Narayan, Ravi S.; Tjin Tham Sjin, Robert; Lee, Kwangho; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Alfieri, Roberta R.; Heynen, Guus J.; Bernards, René; Smit, Egbert F.; Pao, William; Peters, Godefridus J.; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring activating EGFR mutations is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, mostly ascribed to the secondary EGFR-T790M mutation. Selective EGFR-T790M inhibitors have been proposed as a new, extremely relevant therapeutic approach. Here, we demonstrate that the novel irreversible EGFR-TKI CNX-2006, a structural analog of CO-1686, currently tested in a phase-1/2 trial, is active against in vitro and in vivo NSCLC models expressing mutant EGFR, with minimal effect on the wild-type receptor. By integration of genetic and functional analyses in isogenic cell pairs we provide evidence of the crucial role played by NF-κB1 in driving CNX-2006 acquired resistance and show that NF-κB activation may replace the oncogenic EGFR signaling in NSCLC when effective and persistent inhibition of the target is achieved in the presence of the T790M mutation. In this context, we demonstrate that the sole, either genetic or pharmacologic, inhibition of NF-κB is sufficient to reduce the viability of cells that adapted to EGFR-TKIs. Overall, our findings support the rational inhibition of members of the NF-κB pathway as a promising therapeutic option for patients who progress after treatment with novel mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26015408

  10. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics. PMID:26803407

  11. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  12. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  13. FDG-PET is a good biomarker of both early response and acquired resistance in BRAFV600 mutant melanomas treated with vemurafenib and the MEK inhibitor GDC-0973

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, has recently been approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients harboring BRAFV600 mutations. Currently, dual BRAF and MEK inhibition are ongoing in clinical trials with the goal of overcoming the acquired resistance that has unfortunately developed in some vemurafenib patients. FDG-PET measures of metabolic activity are increasingly employed as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for guiding single-agent or combination therapies by gauging initial drug response and monitoring disease progression. However, since tumors are inherently heterogeneous, investigating the effects of BRAF and MEK inhibition on FDG uptake in a panel of different melanomas could help interpret imaging outcomes. Methods 18 F-FDG uptake was measured in vitro in cells with wild-type and mutant (V600) BRAF, and in melanoma cells with an acquired resistance to vemurafenib. We treated the cells with vemurafenib alone or in combination with MEK inhibitor GDC-0973. PET imaging was used in mice to measure FDG uptake in A375 melanoma xenografts and in A375 R1, a vemurafenib-resistant derivative. Histological and biochemical studies of glucose transporters, the MAPK and glycolytic pathways were also undertaken. Results We demonstrate that vemurafenib is equally effective at reducing FDG uptake in cell lines harboring either heterozygous or homozygous BRAFV600 but ineffective in cells with acquired resistance or having WT BRAF status. However, combination with GDC-0973 results in a highly significant increase of efficacy and inhibition of FDG uptake across all twenty lines. Drug-induced changes in FDG uptake were associated with altered levels of membrane GLUT-1, and cell lines harboring RAS mutations displayed enhanced FDG uptake upon exposure to vemurafenib. Interestingly, we found that vemurafenib treatment in mice bearing drug-resistant A375 xenografts also induced increased FDG tumor uptake, accompanied by increases in Hif-1α, Sp1 and Ksr

  14. Long-distance communication and signal amplification in systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jyoti; Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism in plants that confers enhanced resistance against a variety of pathogens. SAR is activated in the uninfected systemic (distal) organs in response to a prior (primary) infection elsewhere in the plant. SAR is associated with the activation of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and the priming of defense responses for robust activation in response to subsequent infections. The activation of SAR requires communication by the primary infected tissues with the distal organs. The vasculature functions as a conduit for the translocation of factors that facilitate long-distance intra-plant communication. In recent years, several metabolites putatively involved in long-distance signaling have been identified. These include the methyl ester of SA (MeSA), the abietane diterpenoid dehydroabietinal (DA), the dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid (AzA), and a glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P)-dependent factor. Long-distance signaling by some of these metabolites also requires the lipid-transfer protein DIR1 (DEFECTIVE IN INDUCED RESISTANCE 1). The relative contribution of these factors in long-distance signaling is likely influenced by environmental conditions, for example light. In the systemic leaves, the AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (ALD1)-dependent production of the lysine catabolite pipecolic acid (Pip), FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1) signaling, as well as SA synthesis and downstream signaling are required for the activation of SAR. This review summarizes the involvement and interaction between long-distance SAR signals and details the recently discovered role of Pip in defense amplification and priming that allows plants to acquire immunity at the systemic level. Recent advances in SA signaling and perception are also highlighted. PMID:23440336

  15. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis. PMID:24393633

  16. JAK2-related pathway induces acquired erlotinib resistance in lung cancer cells harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor-activating mutation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Daijiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yasugi, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Ichihara, Eiki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Takata, Saburo; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, are effective for non-small cell lung cancer with activating EGFR mutations. However, even in patients with an initial dramatic response to such a drug, acquired resistance develops after 6-12 months. A secondary mutation of T790M in EGFR and amplification of the MET gene account for this resistance; however, the mechanism(s) of approximately 30% of acquired resistance cases remain unknown. We established an erlotinib-resistant lung cancer cell line named PC-9/ER3 that harbors an EGFR mutation after continuously exposing PC-9 cells to erlotinib. PC-9/ER3 cells were 136-fold more resistant to erlotinib than the parental cells. Although the PC-9/ER3 cells did not carry the T790M mutation or MET amplification and had similar levels of phosphorylated (p) STAT3, pJAK2 increased in the resistant cells. It was found in the present study that 3-12 h of exposure to erlotinib in both cell lines did not affect pJAK2 expression, but did result in increased pSTAT3 expression. pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells was less suppressed than in PC-9 cells, although pEGFR and pMAPK were markedly suppressed in both cell lines. The combined treatment of erlotinib plus a JAK2 inhibitor (JSI-124) suppressed pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells. Similarly, the combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 or siRNA against JAK2 restored sensitivity to erlotinib in PC-9/ER3 cells. The combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 was also effective for reducing PC-9/ER3 tumors in a murine xenograft model. Our results suggest that the activation of JAK2 partially accounts for acquired erlotinib resistance. PMID:22712764

  17. Methylbenzene-Containing Polyketides from a Streptomyces that Spontaneously Acquired Rifampicin Resistance: Structural Elucidation and Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Thong, Wei Li; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2016-04-22

    Conventional screening for novel bioactive compounds in actinomycetes often results in the rediscovery of known compounds. In contrast, recent genome sequencing revealed that most of the predicted gene clusters for secondary metabolisms are not expressed under standard cultivation conditions. To explore the potential metabolites produced by these gene clusters, we implemented a cryptic gene activation strategy by screening mutants that acquire resistance to rifampicin. The induction of rifampicin resistance in 11 actinomycete strains generated 164 rifampicin-resistant mutants (rif mutants). The comparison of the metabolic profiles between the rif mutants and their wild-type strains indicated that one mutant (TW-R50-13) overproduced an unidentified metabolite (1). During the isolation and structural elucidation of metabolite 1, an additional metabolite was found; both are unprecedented compounds featuring a C5N unit and a methylbenzene moiety. Of these partial structures, the biosynthesis of the latter has not been reported. A feeding experiment using (13)C-labeled precursors demonstrated that the methylbenzene moiety is most likely synthesized by the action of polyketide synthase. The gene deletion experiments revealed that the genes for the methylbenzene moiety are located at a different locus than the genes for the C5N unit. PMID:26905826

  18. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Banday, Zeeshan Z.; Nandi, Ashis K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants. PMID:25852723

  19. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Banday, Zeeshan Z; Nandi, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants. PMID:25852723

  20. Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Is Associated with a Manifestation of Stem cell–like Properties in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shien, Kazuhiko; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Jida, Masaru; Thu, Kelsie L.; Hashida, Shinsuke; Maki, Yuho; Ichihara, Eiki; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Gazdar, Adi F.; Lam, Wan L.; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is a critical problem in the treatment of lung cancer. Although several mechanisms have been shown to be responsible for acquired resistance, all mechanisms have not been uncovered. In this study, we investigated the molecular and cellular profiles of the acquired resistant cells to EGFR-TKI in EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Four EGFR-mutant cell lines were exposed to gefitinib by stepwise escalation and high-concentration exposure methods, and resistant sublines to gefitinib were established. The molecular profiles and cellular phenotypes of these resistant sublines were characterized. Although previously reported, alterations including secondary EGFR T790M mutation, MET amplification, and appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features were observed, these 2 drug-exposure methods revealed different resistance mechanisms. The resistant cells with EMT features exhibited downregulation of miRNA-200c by DNA methylation. Furthermore, the HCC827-derived subline characterized by the high-concentration exposure method exhibited not only EMT features but also stem cell–like properties, including aldehyde dehydrogenase isoform 1 (ALDH1A1) overexpression, increase of side-population, and self-renewal capability. Resistant sublines with stem cell–like properties were resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents but equally sensitive to histone deacetylase and proteasome inhibitors, compared with their parental cells. ALDH1A1 was upregulated in clinical samples with acquired resistance to gefitinib. In conclusion, our study indicates that the manner of EGFR-TKI exposure influences the mechanism of acquired resistance and the appearance of stem cell–like property with EGFR-TKI treatment. PMID:23542356

  1. Acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors is associated with a manifestation of stem cell-like properties in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shien, Kazuhiko; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Jida, Masaru; Thu, Kelsie L; Hashida, Shinsuke; Maki, Yuho; Ichihara, Eiki; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Gazdar, Adi F; Lam, Wan L; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2013-05-15

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is a critical problem in the treatment of lung cancer. Although several mechanisms have been shown to be responsible for acquired resistance, all mechanisms have not been uncovered. In this study, we investigated the molecular and cellular profiles of the acquired resistant cells to EGFR-TKI in EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Four EGFR-mutant cell lines were exposed to gefitinib by stepwise escalation and high-concentration exposure methods, and resistant sublines to gefitinib were established. The molecular profiles and cellular phenotypes of these resistant sublines were characterized. Although previously reported, alterations including secondary EGFR T790M mutation, MET amplification, and appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features were observed, these 2 drug-exposure methods revealed different resistance mechanisms. The resistant cells with EMT features exhibited downregulation of miRNA-200c by DNA methylation. Furthermore, the HCC827-derived subline characterized by the high-concentration exposure method exhibited not only EMT features but also stem cell-like properties, including aldehyde dehydrogenase isoform 1 (ALDH1A1) overexpression, increase of side-population, and self-renewal capability. Resistant sublines with stem cell-like properties were resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents but equally sensitive to histone deacetylase and proteasome inhibitors, compared with their parental cells. ALDH1A1 was upregulated in clinical samples with acquired resistance to gefitinib. In conclusion, our study indicates that the manner of EGFR-TKI exposure influences the mechanism of acquired resistance and the appearance of stem cell-like property with EGFR-TKI treatment. PMID:23542356

  2. The mechanism of acquired resistance to irreversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-afatinib in lung adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shang-Gin; Liu, Yi-Nan; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Chang, Yih-Leong; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are associated with favorable response in EGFR mutant lung cancer. Acquired resistance to reversible EGFR TKIs remains a significant barrier, and acquired EGFR T790M-mutation is the major mechanism. Second-generation irreversible EGFR TKI, afatinib, had also been approved for treating EGFR mutant lung cancer patients, but the mechanism of acquired resistance to afatinib has not been well studied. Results Forty-two patients had tissue specimens taken after acquiring resistance to afatinib. The sensitizing EGFR mutation were all consistent between pre- and post-afatinib tissues. Twenty patients (47.6%) had acquired T790M mutation. T790M rate was not different between first-generation EGFR TKI-naïve patients (50%) and first-generation EGFR TKI-treated patients (46.4%) (p = 0.827). No clinical characteristics or EGFR mutation types were associated with the development of acquired T790M. No other second-site EGFR mutations were detected. There were no small cell or squamous cell lung cancer transformation. Other genetic mutations were not identified in PIK3CA, BRAF, HER2, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, AKT2, LKB1 and JAK2. Methods Afatinib-prescription record of our department of pharmacy from January 2007 and December 2014 was retrieved. We investigated patients with tissue specimens available after acquiring resistance to afatinib. Enrolled patients should have partial response or durable stable disease of treatment response to afatinib. Various mechanisms of acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR TKIs were evaluated. Histology and cytology were reviewed. EGFR, PIK3CA, BRAF, HER2, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, AKT2, LKB1 and JAK2 genetic alterations were evaluated by sequencing. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier method. Conclusions T790M was detected in half of the lung adenocarcinoma after acquiring resistance to afatinib. T790M is still the major acquired

  3. Acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties in non-small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance to afatinib

    PubMed Central

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is an irreversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is known to be effective against the EGFR T790M variant, which accounts for half of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs. However, acquired resistance to afatinib was also observed in clinical use. Thus, elucidating and overcoming the mechanisms of resistance are important issues in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In this study, we established various afatinib-resistant cell lines and investigated the resistance mechanisms. EGFR T790M mutations were not detected using direct sequencing in established resistant cells. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines displayed MET amplification, and these cells were sensitive to the combination of afatinib plus crizotinib. As a further investigation, a cell line that acquired resistance to afatinib plus crizotinib, HCC827-ACR, was established from one of the MET amplified-cell lines. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines including HCC827-ACR displayed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which is a suppresser of EMT. In addition, these cell lines also exhibited overexpression of ALDH1A1 and ABCB1, which are putative stem cell markers, and resistance to docetaxel. In conclusion, we established afatinib-resistant cells and found that MET amplification, EMT, and stem cell-like features are observed in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. This finding may provide clues to overcoming resistance to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26202045

  4. Acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties in non-small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance to afatinib.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    Afatinib is an irreversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is known to be effective against the EGFR T790M variant, which accounts for half of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs. However, acquired resistance to afatinib was also observed in clinical use. Thus, elucidating and overcoming the mechanisms of resistance are important issues in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In this study, we established various afatinib-resistant cell lines and investigated the resistance mechanisms. EGFR T790M mutations were not detected using direct sequencing in established resistant cells. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines displayed MET amplification, and these cells were sensitive to the combination of afatinib plus crizotinib. As a further investigation, a cell line that acquired resistance to afatinib plus crizotinib, HCC827-ACR, was established from one of the MET amplified-cell lines. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines including HCC827-ACR displayed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which is a suppresser of EMT. In addition, these cell lines also exhibited overexpression of ALDH1A1 and ABCB1, which are putative stem cell markers, and resistance to docetaxel. In conclusion, we established afatinib-resistant cells and found that MET amplification, EMT, and stem cell-like features are observed in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. This finding may provide clues to overcoming resistance to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26202045

  5. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  6. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  7. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  8. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs. PMID:7909602

  9. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  10. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Rubin, Brian P.; Druker, Brian J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for GIST patients, but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. While in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients development resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend towards increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multi-kinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of GIST patients with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  11. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Community Acquired Uropathogens at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Jaipur, Rajasthan

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are amongst the most common infections described in outpatients setting. Objectives: A study was conducted to evaluate the uropathogenic bacterial flora and its antimicrobial susceptibility profile among patients presenting to the out-patient clinics of a tertiary care hospital at Jaipur, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: 2012 consecutive urine specimens from symptomatic UTI cases attending to the outpatient clinics were processed in the Microbiology lab. Bacterial isolates obtained were identified using biochemical reactions. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production was determined by the double disk approximation test and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (formerly NCCLS) confirmatory method. Results: Pathogens were isolated from 346 (17.16%) of the 2012 patients who submitted a urine sample. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated community acquired uropathogen accounting for 61.84% of the total isolates. ESBL production was observed in 23.83% of E. coli strains and 8.69% of Klebsiella strains. With the exception of Nitrofurantoin, resistance to agents commonly used as empiric oral treatments for UTI was quite high. Conclusion: The study revealed E. coli as the predominant bacterial pathogen for the community acquired UTIs in Jaipur, Rajasthan. An increasing trend in the production ESBLs among UTI pathogens in the community was noted. Nitrofurantoin should be used as empirical therapy for primary, uncomplicated UTIs. PMID:22529539

  13. Atypical variant of acquired von Willebrand syndrome in Wilms tumor: is hyaluronic acid secreted by nephroblastoma cells the cause?

    PubMed

    Michiels, J; Schroyens, W; Berneman, Z; van der Planken, M

    2001-04-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AvWS) has been reported in eight children with Wilms tumor (nephroblastoma in four boys and four girls) at a mean age of 3.3 years (range, 0.33-9 years). Only three of eight patients with AvWS in Wilms tumor presented with mild mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms. The AvWS in seven children with Wilms tumor featured either undetectable or very low von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF.Ag) levels (mean, 3%) and decreased values for vWF ristocetin cofactor (RCF) activity (mean, 20%) and factor VIII coagulant (VIIIc) activity (mean, 16%). The response to 1-desamino-8-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) was good in two and poor in one patient. Multimeric analysis of the vWF showed a normal pattern of type I von Willebrand disease (vWD) in three patients and an absence of multimers consistent with type III vWD in two patients. The higher functional levels, as compared with antigen levels, with increased ratios for factor VIIIc/vWFAg (mean, 5.3) and vWF.RCF/vWF.Ag (mean, 6.6) in seven patients with Wilms tumor are unexplained physiologically and are not consistent with type I vWF deficiency. The absence of vWD in the patient's family, and the return of factor VIII-vWF parameters to normal after chemotherapy or surgical removal of the Wilms tumor, support the diagnosis of AvWS causally related to the Wilms tumor. The causative agent is thought to be hyaluronic acid secreted by nephroblastoma cells of the Wilms tumor. Prospective studies to determine the nature of AvWS in children with Wilms tumor are warranted. PMID:11292185

  14. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are required for systemic acquired resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Wang, Caixia; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of broad-spectrum disease resistance that is induced in response to primary infection and that protects uninfected portions of the plant against secondary infections by related or unrelated pathogens. SAR is associated with an increase in chemical signals that operate in a collective manner to confer protection against secondary infections. These include, the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), azelaic acid (AzA) and more recently identified signals nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). NO, ROS, AzA and G3P function in the same branch of the SAR pathway, and in parallel to the SA-regulated branch. NO and ROS function upstream of AzA/G3P and different reactive oxygen species functions in an additive manner to mediate chemical cleavage of the C9 double bond on C18 unsaturated fatty acids to generate AzA. The parallel and additive functioning of various chemical signals provides important new insights in the overlapping pathways leading to SAR. PMID:26375184

  15. Significant Differences in the Development of Acquired Resistance to the MDM2 Inhibitor SAR405838 between In Vitro and In Vivo Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman-Luca, C. Gianna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Ziazadeh, Daniel; McEachern, Donna; Debussche, Laurent; Wang, Shaomeng

    2015-01-01

    SAR405838 is a potent and specific MDM2 inhibitor currently being evaluated in Phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human cancer. Using the SJSA-1 osteosarcoma cell line which harbors an amplified MDM2 gene and wild-type p53, we have investigated the acquired resistance mechanisms both in vitro and in vivo to SAR405838. Treatment of SJSA-1 cells with SAR405838 in vitro leads to dose-dependent cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and robust apoptosis. However, prolonged treatment of SJSA-1 cells in vitro with SAR405838 results in profound acquired resistance to the drug. Analysis of in vitro-derived resistant cell lines showed that p53 is mutated in the DNA binding domain and can no longer be activated by SAR405838. Treatment of the parental SJSA-1 xenograft tumors with SAR405838 in mice yields rapid tumor regression but the tumors eventually regrow. Culturing the regrown tumors established a number of sublines, which showed only modest (3–5 times) loss of sensitivity to SAR405838 in vitro. Sequencing of the p53 showed that it retains its wild-type status in these in vivo sublines, with the exception of one subline, which harbors a single heterozygous C176F p53 mutation. Using xenograft models of two in vivo derived sublines, which has either wild-type p53 or p53 containing a single heterozygous C176F mutation, we showed that while SAR405838 effectively achieves partial tumor regression in these models, it no longer induces complete tumor regression and tumors resume growth once the treatment is stopped. Harvesting and culturing tumors obtained from a prolonged treatment with SAR405838 in mice established additional in vivo sublines, which all contain a single heterozygous C176F mutation with no additional p53 mutation detected. Interestingly, SAR405838 can still effectively activate p53 in all sublines containing a single heterozygous C176F mutation, with a moderately reduced potency as compared to that in the parental cell line. Consistently, SAR

  16. Nasal colonization in children with community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Davoodabadi, Fazlollah; Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Koushki, Ali Mehrabi; Moghadasizadeh, Zahra; Meidani, Mohsen; Shirani, Kiana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of infections. The changing epidemiology of MRSA became evident in the 1990s when CA-MRSA cases were first reported. Nasal carriage of CA-MRSA is associated with an increased risk for development of infections in various populations. Materials and Methods: Anterior nares culture for the presence of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA was taken from 345 children attending kindergartens, who didn’t have any known risk factor for MRSA colonization. Also, children demographic variables were recorded. Identification of SA and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with standard microbiological test was performed. Finally, the susceptibility of isolated to various antibiotics determined. The data were analyzed with Whonet 5.6 software. Results: Of 345 children, 20 children (5.8%) were colonized with CA-MRSA, 86 children (24.9%) with MSSA and 239 cases (69.3%) didn’t have SA colonization. The highest rate of MSSA and MRSA colonization was obtained at the age of 6 years. The frequency distribution of SA (MSSA and MRSA) colonization prevalence didn’t have any significant differences based on age, gender and the admission time (P > 0.05); but it was significantly different in the urban areas (P < 0.001). The lowest resistance rate of CA-MRSA isolates, with a frequency of 10%, was detected with gentamicin, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Conclusions: In summary, CA-MRSA colonization was observed in child care centers remarkably. Therefore, by facing various infections due to SA especially in areas of low socio-economic status, it must be considered. Based on antibiogram test, empirical treatment with rifampin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin is recommended during CA-MRSA infections. PMID:27274501

  17. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  18. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C.; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vlot, A. Corina; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR. To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR. To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  19. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Carella, Philip; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Wilson, Daniel C; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M; Vlot, A Corina; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-06-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  20. Systemic Acquired Resistance in Moss: Further Evidence for Conserved Defense Mechanisms in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter S.; Bowman, Collin E.; Villani, Philip J.; Dolan, Thomas E.; Hauck, Nathanael R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular plants possess multiple mechanisms for defending themselves against pathogens. One well-characterized defense mechanism is systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In SAR, a plant detects the presence of a pathogen and transmits a signal throughout the plant, inducing changes in the expression of various pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Once SAR is established, the plant is capable of mounting rapid responses to subsequent pathogen attacks. SAR has been characterized in numerous angiosperm and gymnosperm species; however, despite several pieces of evidence suggesting SAR may also exist in non-vascular plants6–8, its presence in non-vascular plants has not been conclusively demonstrated, in part due to the lack of an appropriate culture system. Here, we describe and use a novel culture system to demonstrate that the moss species Amblystegium serpens does initiate a SAR-like reaction upon inoculation with Pythium irregulare, a common soil-borne oomycete. Infection of A. serpens gametophores by P. irregulare is characterized by localized cytoplasmic shrinkage within 34 h and chlorosis and necrosis within 7 d of inoculation. Within 24 h of a primary inoculation (induction), moss gametophores grown in culture became highly resistant to infection following subsequent inoculation (challenge) by the same pathogen. This increased resistance was a response to the pathogen itself and not to physical wounding. Treatment with β-1,3 glucan, a structural component of oomycete cell walls, was equally effective at triggering SAR. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that this important defense mechanism exists in a non-vascular plant, and, together with previous studies, suggest that SAR arose prior to the divergence of vascular and non-vascular plants. In addition, this novel moss – pathogen culture system will be valuable for future characterization of the mechanism of SAR in moss, which is necessary for a better understanding of the evolutionary history of SAR

  1. Plasma EGFR T790M ctDNA status is associated with clinical outcome in advanced NSCLC patients with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, D; Ye, X; Zhang, M Z; Sun, Y; Wang, J Y; Ni, J; Zhang, H P; Zhang, L; Luo, J; Zhang, J; Tang, L; Su, B; Chen, G; Zhu, G; Gu, Y; Xu, J F

    2016-01-01

    EGFR T790M mutation occurs in half of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with acquired EGFR-TKI (TKI) resistance, based on tumor re-biopsies using an invasive clinical procedure. Here, we dynamically monitored T790M mutation in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) using serial plasma samples from NSCLC patients receiving TKI through Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) method and the associations between overall survival (OS) starting from initial TKI treatment and the T790M ctDNA status detected in plasma were analyzed. Among 318 patients, 117 who acquired TKI resistance were eligible for the analysis. T790M ctDNA was detected in the plasma of 55/117 (47%) patients. Almost half of the T790M ctDNA positive patients were identified at a median time of 2.2 months prior to clinically progressive disease (PD). Furthermore, within the patients receiving TKI treatment at 2(nd) line or later, the T790M ctDNA positive group had significantly shorter OS than the negative group (median OS: 26.9 months versus NA, P = 0.0489). Our study demonstrates the feasibility of monitoring EGFR mutation dynamics in serial plasma samples from NSCLC patients receiving TKI therapy. T790M ctDNA can be detected in plasma before and after PD as a poor prognostic factor. PMID:26867973

  2. Downregulation of cytokeratin 18 is associated with paclitaxel‑resistance and tumor aggressiveness in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bo; Zhang, Mo; Zeng, Yu; Li, Youqiang; Zhang, Chao; Song, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Paclitaxel frequently serves as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for castration-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) patients. However, acquired paclitaxel-resistance almost always occurs after initial responses, and the mechanisms by which this occurs remain largely unknown. The goal of the present study was to identify differentially expressed protein(s) associated with paclitaxel-resistance and further explore the potential mechanisms involved in drug resistance. By comparing the nuclear matrix protein (NMP) patterns of DU145-TxR cells, the previously established stable paclitaxel-resistant PCa cells, with that of the parental DU145 cells using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we found that cytokeratin 18 (CK18) is downregulated in DU145-TxR cells. The downregulation of CK18 in DU145-TxR cells at mRNA, NMP and total cellular protein levels was validated by real-time RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, indicating that the downregulation of CK18 was a global effect in DU145-TxR cells due to paclitaxel-resistance. Furthermore, in vivo assay of xenograft transplantation confirmed the higher tumorigenicity of DU145-TxR cells, suggesting that these paclitaxel-resistant PCa cells possessed potent cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties and eventually developed paclitaxel-resistance. Moreover, we determined by immunohistochemistry that CK18 expression in PCa tissues was inversely correlated with tumor grade in a statistically significant fashion, indicating a potential association of the downregulation of CK18 with tumor aggressiveness. Therefore, further study to define the potential role of CK18 may lead to novel therapy strategies as well as clinically useful biomarker for PCa patients. PMID:26892177

  3. Molecular basis for primary and secondary tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Mrinal M.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecule kinase inhibitors have irrevocably altered cancer treatment. March 2010 marks the 10th anniversary of using imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a cardinal example of the utility of such targeted therapy in a solid tumor. Before imatinib, metastatic GIST was frustrating to treat due to its resistance to standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. Median survival for patients with metastatic GIST improved from 19 to 60 months with imatinib. In treating patients with GIST, two patterns of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance have been observed. In the first, ~9–14% of patients have progression within 3 months of starting imatinib. These patients are classified as having primary or early resistance. Median progression-free survival (PFS) on imatinib is approximately 24 months; patients with later progression are classified as having secondary or acquired resistance. Primary studies and a meta-analysis of studies of imatinib in GIST patients have identified prognostic features that contribute to treatment failure. One of the strongest predictors for success of therapy is KIT or PDGFRA mutational status. Patients with KIT exon 11 mutant GIST have better response rates, PFS, and overall survival compared to other mutations. A great deal has been learned in the last decade about sensitivity and resistance of GIST to imatinib; however, many unanswered questions remain about secondary resistance mechanisms and clinical management in the third- and fourth-line setting. This review will discuss the role of dose effects, and early and late resistance to imatinib and their clinical implications. Patients intolerant to imatinib (5%) and those who progress on imatinib are treated with sunitinib. The mechanism of resistance to sunitinib is unknown at this time but is also appears related to growth of clones with secondary mutations in KIT. Third- and fourth-line treatments of GIST and with future treatment strategies are also discussed. PMID:21116624

  4. Breast tumor cells isolated from in vitro resistance to trastuzumab remain sensitive to trastuzumab anti-tumor effects in vivo and to ADCC killing.

    PubMed

    Kute, Timothy E; Savage, Lori; Stehle, John R; Kim-Shapiro, Jung W; Blanks, Michael J; Wood, James; Vaughn, James P

    2009-11-01

    An understanding of model systems of trastuzumab (Herceptin) resistance is of great importance since the humanized monoclonal antibody is now used as first line therapy with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic Her2 overexpressing breast cancer, and the majority of their tumors has innate resistance or develops acquired resistance to the treatment. Previously, we selected trastuzumab-resistant clonal cell lines in vitro from trastuzumab-sensitive parental BT-474 cells and showed that cloned trastuzumab-resistant cell lines maintain similar levels of the extracellular Her2 receptor, bind trastuzumab as efficiently as the parental cells, but continue to grow in the presence of trastuzumab and display cell cycle profiles and growth rates comparable to parental cells grown in the absence of trastuzumab (Kute et al. in Cytometry A 57:86-93, 2004). We now show that trastuzumab-resistant and trastuzumab-sensitive cells both surprisingly display trastuzumab-mediated growth inhibition in athymic nude mice. This demonstrates that resistance developed in vitro is not predictive of resistance in vivo. The observation that in vitro resistant cells are sensitive to trastuzumab in vivo could be explained by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, both parental and trastuzumab-resistant cells were assayed for ADCC in real time on electroplates with and without trastuzumab in the presence of a natural killer cell line (NK-92), and granulocyte or mononuclear cellular fractions isolated from human peripheral blood. Mononuclear cells and NK-92 cells were more effective in killing both parental and trastuzumab-resistant cells in the presence of trastuzumab. Both trastuzumab-resistant cells and trastuzumab-sensitive cells showed similar susceptibility to ADCC despite displaying divergent growth responses to trastuzumab. The granulocyte fraction was able to kill these cells with equal efficacy in the presence or absence of trastuzumab. These results support a model

  5. Tumor promotion by caspase-resistant retinoblastoma protein

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Helena L.; Bird, Jeff; Wasson, Katherine; Cardiff, Robert D.; Varki, Nissi; Eckmann, Lars; Wang, Jean Y. J.

    2005-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein regulates cell proliferation and cell death. RB is cleaved by caspase during apoptosis. A mutation of the caspase-cleavage site in the RB C terminus has been made in the mouse Rb-1 locus; the resulting Rb-MI mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced apoptosis in the intestine. The Rb-MI mice do not exhibit increased tumor incidence, because the MI mutation does not disrupt the Rb tumor suppressor function. In this study, we show that Rb-MI can promote the formation of colonic adenomas in the p53-null genetic background. Consistent with this tumor phenotype, Rb-MI reduces colorectal epithelial apoptosis and ulceration caused by dextran sulfate sodium. By contrast, Rb-MI does not affect the lymphoma phenotype of p53-null mice, in keeping with its inability to protect thymocytes and splenocytes from apoptosis. The Rb-MI protein is expressed and phosphorylated in the tumors, thereby inactivating its growth suppression function. These results suggest that RB tumor suppressor function, i.e., inhibition of proliferation, is inactivated by phosphorylation, whereas RB tumor promoting function, i.e., inhibition of apoptosis, is inactivated by caspase cleavage. PMID:16227443

  6. DNA damage induces GDNF secretion in the tumor microenvironment with paracrine effects promoting prostate cancer treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland M.; Lucas, Jared M.; Gomez-Sarosi, Luis A.; Coleman, Ilsa; Zhao, Song; Coleman, Roger; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Though metastatic cancers often initially respond to genotoxic therapeutics, acquired resistance is common. In addition to cytotoxic effects on tumor cells, DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapy induce injury in benign cells of the tumor microenvironment resulting in the production of paracrine-acting factors capable of promoting tumor resistance phenotypes. In studies designed to characterize the responses of prostate and bone stromal cells to genotoxic stress, we found that transcripts encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) increased several fold following exposures to cytotoxic agents including radiation, the topoisomerase inhibitor mitoxantrone and the microtubule poison docetaxel. Fibroblast GDNF exerted paracrine effects toward prostate cancer cells resulting in enhanced tumor cell proliferation and invasion, and these effects were concordant with the expression of known GDNF receptors GFRA1 and RET. Exposure to GDNF also induced tumor cell resistance to mitoxantrone and docetaxel chemotherapy. Together, these findings support an important role for tumor microenvironment damage responses in modulating treatment resistance and identify the GDNF signaling pathway as a potential target for improving responses to conventional genotoxic therapeutics. PMID:25575823

  7. Anti-estrogen Resistance in Human Breast Tumors Is Driven by JAG1-NOTCH4-Dependent Cancer Stem Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Simões, Bruno M; O'Brien, Ciara S; Eyre, Rachel; Silva, Andreia; Yu, Ling; Sarmiento-Castro, Aida; Alférez, Denis G; Spence, Kath; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Chemi, Francesca; Acar, Ahmet; Gandhi, Ashu; Howell, Anthony; Brennan, Keith; Rydén, Lisa; Catalano, Stefania; Andó, Sebastiano; Gee, Julia; Ucar, Ahmet; Sims, Andrew H; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Farnie, Gillian; Landberg, Göran; Howell, Sacha J; Clarke, Robert B

    2015-09-29

    Breast cancers (BCs) typically express estrogen receptors (ERs) but frequently exhibit de novo or acquired resistance to hormonal therapies. Here, we show that short-term treatment with the anti-estrogens tamoxifen or fulvestrant decrease cell proliferation but increase BC stem cell (BCSC) activity through JAG1-NOTCH4 receptor activation both in patient-derived samples and xenograft (PDX) tumors. In support of this mechanism, we demonstrate that high ALDH1 predicts resistance in women treated with tamoxifen and that a NOTCH4/HES/HEY gene signature predicts for a poor response/prognosis in 2 ER+ patient cohorts. Targeting of NOTCH4 reverses the increase in Notch and BCSC activity induced by anti-estrogens. Importantly, in PDX tumors with acquired tamoxifen resistance, NOTCH4 inhibition reduced BCSC activity. Thus, we establish that BCSC and NOTCH4 activities predict both de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance and that combining endocrine therapy with targeting JAG1-NOTCH4 overcomes resistance in human breast cancers. PMID:26387946

  8. Evidence for the role of microRNA 374b in acquired cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, R; Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; McDonald, J F

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potentially significant players in the acquisition of cancer-drug resistance in pancreatic and other cancers. To evaluate the potential contribution of miRNAs in acquired resistance to cisplatin in pancreatic cancer, we compared levels of more than 2000 human miRNAs in a cisplatin-resistant cell line (BxPC3-R) derived from parental (BxPC3) cells by step-wise exposure to increasing concentrations of the drug over more than 20 passages. The acquired drug resistance was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of 57 miRNAs, of which 23 were downregulated and 34 were upregulated. Employing a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm, we identified downregulation of miR-374b as likely being directly involved in acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype. Consistent with this prediction, ectopic overexpression of miR-374b in the resistant BxPC3-R cells restored cisplatin sensitivity to levels approaching those displayed by the BxPC3 parental cells. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence implicating miRNAs in acquired cancer-drug resistance and with the potential therapeutic value of these small regulatory RNAs in blocking and/or reversing the process. PMID:27229158

  9. Evidence for the role of microRNA 374b in acquired cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, R; Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; McDonald, J F

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence has implicated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potentially significant players in the acquisition of cancer-drug resistance in pancreatic and other cancers. To evaluate the potential contribution of miRNAs in acquired resistance to cisplatin in pancreatic cancer, we compared levels of more than 2000 human miRNAs in a cisplatin-resistant cell line (BxPC3-R) derived from parental (BxPC3) cells by step-wise exposure to increasing concentrations of the drug over more than 20 passages. The acquired drug resistance was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of 57 miRNAs, of which 23 were downregulated and 34 were upregulated. Employing a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm, we identified downregulation of miR-374b as likely being directly involved in acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype. Consistent with this prediction, ectopic overexpression of miR-374b in the resistant BxPC3-R cells restored cisplatin sensitivity to levels approaching those displayed by the BxPC3 parental cells. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence implicating miRNAs in acquired cancer-drug resistance and with the potential therapeutic value of these small regulatory RNAs in blocking and/or reversing the process. PMID:27229158

  10. [3rd generation's TKI in lung cancer non-small cell EGFR-mutated having acquired a secondary T790M resistance].

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Solenn; Viala, Marie; Varga, Andréa; Planchard, David; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-09-01

    Activating EGFR mutations discovery and efficacy of 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as erlotinib or gefitinib, inaugurated the beginning of personalized medicine in the treatment of EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, all patients showed a tumor progression of 10 to 16 months after the onset of TKI therapy related to molecular resistance mechanisms as T790M mutation. Till now, patients suffering from EGFR-mutated NSCLC with acquired resistance have conventional treatment options. Two new 3rd generations' TKI, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are currently being studied in phases 1-3 studies. Preliminary results show relevant therapeutic properties in patients with T790M mutated-EGFR NSCLC. This review aims to highlight these new molecules, their effectiveness and their clinical toxicities in the treatment of advanced stages of NSCLC expressing the T790M mutation. PMID:26235419

  11. Overcoming tumor resistance by heterologous adeno-poxvirus combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Tähtinen, Siri; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Taipale, Kristian; Saha, Dipongkor; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Ahonen, Marko; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Hirvinen, Mari; Veckman, Ville; Matikainen, Sampsa; Zhao, Fang; Pakarinen, Päivi; Salo, Jarmo; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer. PMID:27119097

  12. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, MasamichI; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  13. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  14. A molecular model for the mechanism of acquired tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Agboke, Fadeke A.; Cunliffe, Heather E.; Ramos, Pilar; Jordan, V. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Estrogen (E2)-stimulated growth re-emerges after a c-Src inhibitor blocking E2-induced apoptosis. A resulting cell line, MCF-7:PF, is selected with features of functional estrogen receptor (ER) and over-expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor beta (IGF-1Rβ). We addressed the question of whether the selective ER modulator (SERM), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) or other SERMs could target ER to prevent E2-stimulated growth in MCF-7:PF cells. Methods: Protein levels of receptors and signaling pathways were examined by immunoblotting. Expression of mRNA was measured through real-time RT-PCR. Recruitment of ER or nuclear receptor coactivator 3 (SRC3) to the promoter of ER-target gene was detected by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Results: 4-OHT and other SERMs stimulated cell growth in an ER-dependent manner. However, unlike E2, 4-OHT suppressed classical ER-target genes as does the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI). ChIP assay indicated that 4-OHT did not recruit ER or SRC3 to the promoter of ER-target gene, pS2. Paradoxically, 4-OHT reduced total IGF-1Rβ but increased phosphorylation of IGF-1Rβ. Mechanistic studies revealed that 4-OHT functioned as an agonist to enhance the non-genomic activity of ER and activate focal adhesion molecules to further increase phosphorylation of IGF-1Rβ. Disruption of membrane-associated signaling, IGF-1R and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), completely abolished 4-OHT-stimulated cell growth. Conclusions: This study is the first to recapitulate a cellular model in vitro of acquired tamoxifen resistance developed in athymic mice in vivo. Importantly, it provides a rationale that membrane-associated pathways may be valuable therapeutic targets for tamoxifen resistant patients in clinic. PMID:25204804

  15. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii acquired before liver transplantation: Impact on recipient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Pierrotti, Ligia Câmera; Oshiro, Isabel Cristina Villela Soares; Bonazzi, Patrícia Rodrigues; Oliveira, Larissa Marques de; Machado, Anna Silva; Van Der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Rossi, Flavia; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2016-05-01

    Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with high mortality. This study aimed to identify risk factors for post-LT CRAB infection, as well as to evaluate the impact of pre-LT CRAB acquisition on the incidence of post-LT CRAB infection. This was a prospective cohort study of all patients undergoing LT at our facility between October 2009 and October 2011. Surveillance cultures (SCs) were collected immediately before LT and weekly thereafter, until discharge. We analyzed 196 patients who were submitted to 222 LTs. CRAB was identified in 105 (53.6%); 24 (22.9%) of these patients were found to have acquired CRAB before LT, and 85 (81.0%) tested positive on SCs. Post-LT CRAB infection occurred in 56 (28.6%), the most common site being the surgical wound. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for developing CRAB infection were prolonged cold ischemia, post-LT dialysis, LT due to fulminant hepatitis, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition with pre-LT CRAB acquisition showing a considerable trend toward significance (P = 0.06). Among the recipients with CRAB infection, 60-day mortality was 46.4%, significantly higher than among those without (P < 0.001). Mortality risk factors were post-LT infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, LT performed because of fulminant hepatitis, retransplantation, prolonged cold ischemia, longer LT surgical time, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition, the last showing a trend toward significance (P = 0.08). In conclusion, pre-LT CRAB acquisition appears to increase the risk of post-LT CRAB infection, which has a negative impact on recipient survival. Liver Transplantation 22 615-626 2016 AASLD. PMID:26684547

  16. Length of stay an important mediator of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wong, J G; Chen, M I; Win, M K; Ng, P Y; Chow, A

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) is becoming increasingly established in Asian hospitals. The primary aim of this study was to decompose the risk factors for HA-MRSA based on conceptual clinical pathways. The secondary aim was to show the amount of effect attributable to antibiotic exposure and total length of stay before outcome (LBO) so that institutions can manage at-risk patients accordingly. A case-control study consisting of 1200 inpatients was conducted in a large tertiary hospital in Singapore between January and December 2006. Results from the generalized structural equation model (GSEM) show that LBO [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 14·9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8·7-25·5], prior hospitalization (aOR 6·2, 95% CI 3·3-11·5), and cumulative antibiotic exposure (aOR 3·5, 95% CI 2·3-5·3), directly affected HA-MRSA acquisition. LBO accounted for the majority of the effects due to age (100%), immunosuppression (67%), and surgery (96%), and to a lesser extent for male gender (22%). Our model enabled us to account and quantify effects of intermediaries. LBO was found to be an important mediator of age, immunosuppression and surgery on MRSA infection. Traditional regression approaches will not only give different conclusions but also underestimate the effects. Hospitals should minimize the hospital stay when possible to reduce the risk of MRSA. PMID:26538070

  17. Anti-tumor effect via passive anti-angiogenesis of PEGylated liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin in drug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Sato, Yusuke; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-25

    The PEGylated liposomal (PEG-LP) Doxorubicin, PEG-LP (DOX), with a diameter of around 100nm, accumulates in tumors via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and is used clinically for the treatment of several types of cancer. However, there are a number of tumor types that are resistant to DOX. We report herein on a unique anti-tumor effect of PEG-LP (DOX) in a DOX-resistant tumor xenograft model. PEG-LP (DOX) failed to suppress the growth of the DOX-resistant tumors (ex. non-small cell lung cancer, H69AR; renal cell carcinoma, OSRC-2) as observed in the xenograft model. Unexpectedly, tumor growth was suppressed in a DOX-resistant breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenograft model. We investigated the mechanism by which PEG-LP (DOX) responses differ in different drug resistant tumors. In hyperpermeable OSRC-2 tumors, PEG-LP was distributed to deep tumor tissues, where it delivers DOX to drug-resistant tumor cells. In contrast, extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen, pericytes, cancer-associated fibroblasts render MDA-MB-231 tumors hypopermeable, which limits the extent of the penetration and distribution of PEG-LP, thereby enhancing the delivery of DOX to the vicinity of the tumor vasculature. Therefore, a remarkable anti-angiogenic effect with a preferential suppression in tumor growth is achieved. Based on the above findings, it appears that the response of PEG-LP (DOX) to drug-resistant tumors results from differences in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27234700

  18. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  19. FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, overcomes irinotecan and topotecan resistance in human tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhong, Kai; Smith, Nicholas; Prey, Joshua; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan and topotecan are the only camptothecin analogues approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. However, inherent and/or acquired irinotecan and topotecan resistance is a challenging issue in clinical practice. In this report, we showed that FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, effectively obliterated human xenograft tumors that acquire irinotecan and topotecan resistance. Consistent with this finding, Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that FL118 rapidly clears from circulation, while effectively accumulating in tumors with a long elimination half-life. Consistent with our previous studies on irinotecan, FL118 exhibited ≥25 fold more effectiveness than topotecan at inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation; we further showed that although topotecan can inhibit the expression of survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2, its effectiveness is about 10-100 fold weaker than FL118. Lastly, in contrast to both SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) and topotecan are substrates of the efflux pump proteins P-gp/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP, FL118 is not a substrate of P-gp and ABCG2. Consistently, sildenafil, a multiple efflux pump inhibitor, sensitized SN-38 much more than these of the ABCG2-selective inhibitor KO143 in growth inhibition of SW620 and HCT-8 cells. In contrast, both inhibitors showed no effect on FL118 efficacy. Given that both P-gp and ABCG2 express in SW620 and HCT-8 cells and FL118 is not a substrate for P-gp and ABCG2, this suggests that FL118 appears to bypass multiple efflux pump protein-induced resistance, which may contribute to FL118 overcoming irinotecan and topotecan resistance in vivo. These new findings provide renewed perspectives for further development of FL118 for clinical applications. PMID:26692923

  20. The novel ATP-competitive MEK/Aurora kinase inhibitor BI-847325 overcomes acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance through suppression of Mcl-1 and MEK expression

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali S.; Sini, Patrizia; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to BRAF inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Here we evaluate BI-847325, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of MEK and Aurora kinases, in treatment-naïve and drug-resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma models. BI-847325 potently inhibited growth and survival of melanoma cell lines that were both BRAF inhibitor naïve and resistant in 2D culture, 3D cell culture conditions and in colony formation assays. Western blot studies showed BI-847325 to reduce expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-histone 3 in multiple models of vemurafenib resistance. Mechanistically, BI-847325 decreased the expression of MEK and Mcl-1 while increasing the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM. Strong suppression of MEK expression was observed after 48 h of treatment, with no recovery following >72 h of washout. siRNA mediated knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the effects of BI-847325, whereas Mcl-1 overexpression reversed this in both 2D cell culture and 3D spheroid melanoma models. In vivo, once weekly BI-847325 (70 mg/kg) led to durable regression of BRAF-inhibitor naive xenografts with no regrowth seen (>65 days of treatment). In contrast, treatment with the vemurafenib analog PLX4720 was associated with tumor relapse at >30 days. BI-847325 also suppressed the long-term growth of xenografts with acquired PLX4720 resistance. Analysis of tumor samples revealed BI-847325 to induce apoptosis associated with suppression of phospho-ERK, total MEK, phospho-Histone3 and Mcl-1 expression. Our studies indicate that BI-847325 is effective in overcoming BRAF inhibitor resistance and has long-term inhibitory effects upon BRAF-mutant melanoma in vivo, through a mechanism associated with the decreased expression of both MEK and Mcl-1. PMID:25873592

  1. The Novel ATP-Competitive MEK/Aurora Kinase Inhibitor BI-847325 Overcomes Acquired BRAF Inhibitor Resistance through Suppression of Mcl-1 and MEK Expression.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Manali S; Sini, Patrizia; Smalley, Keiran S M

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to BRAF inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Here, we evaluate BI-847325, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of MEK and Aurora kinases, in treatment-naïve and drug-resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma models. BI-847325 potently inhibited growth and survival of melanoma cell lines that were both BRAF inhibitor naïve and resistant in 2D culture, 3D cell culture conditions, and in colony formation assays. Western blot studies showed BI-847325 to reduce expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-histone 3 in multiple models of vemurafenib resistance. Mechanistically, BI-847325 decreased the expression of MEK and Mcl-1 while increasing the expression of the proapoptotic protein BIM. Strong suppression of MEK expression was observed after 48 hours of treatment, with no recovery following >72 hours of washout. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the effects of BI-847325, whereas Mcl-1 overexpression reversed this in both 2D cell culture and 3D spheroid melanoma models. In vivo, once weekly BI-847325 (70 mg/kg) led to durable regression of BRAF-inhibitor naïve xenografts with no regrowth seen (>65 days of treatment). In contrast, treatment with the vemurafenib analog PLX4720 was associated with tumor relapse at >30 days. BI-847325 also suppressed the long-term growth of xenografts with acquired PLX4720 resistance. Analysis of tumor samples revealed BI-847325 to induce apoptosis associated with suppression of phospho-ERK, total MEK, phospho-Histone3, and Mcl-1 expression. Our studies indicate that BI-847325 is effective in overcoming BRAF inhibitor resistance and has long-term inhibitory effects upon BRAF-mutant melanoma in vivo, through a mechanism associated with the decreased expression of both MEK and Mcl-1. PMID:25873592

  2. An intact cuticle in distal tissues is essential for the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) immunizes distal tissues of plants against secondary infections. We report that an acyl carrier protein, ACP4, is essential for perception but not generation of the SAR signal in Arabidopsis. A mutation in acp4 reduces the fatty acid flux, resulting in impaired cut...

  3. Growth response and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia Orechromis niloticus following infection or vaccination with Streptococcus iniae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the third power, 8.8 x 10 to the fourth power and 8.8 x 10 to the fifth power CFU fish-1 f...

  4. GROWTH RESPONSE AND ACQUIRED RESISTANCE OF NILE TILAPIA OREOCHROMIS NILOTICUS FOLLOWING INFECTION OR VACCINATION WITH STREPTOCOCCUS INIAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the 3rd power, 8.8 x 10 to the 4th power and 8.8 x 10 to the 5th power CFU fish-1 for ...

  5. Saccharin-induced systemic acquired resistance against rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) infection in soybean: Effects on growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effect of saccharin on the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response of soybean to the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of soybean rust. Plants were grown hydroponically in half-strength Hoagland’s solution and were challenged with the pathogen 1, 5, 10 and 15 days af...

  6. Growth Response and Acquired Resistance of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Following Infection or Vaccination with Streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth performance and acquired resistance of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.) that survived Streptococcus iniae infection was determined. Tilapia were challenged with three doses of S. iniae (8.8 x 10 to the 3rd power, 8.8 x 10 to the 4th power and 8.8 x 10 to the 5th power CFU fish-1 for ...

  7. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Shamira J.; Moura, Natalia S.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. PMID:26269619

  8. Atypical Cell Populations Associated with Acquired Resistance to Cytostatics and Cancer Stem Cell Features: The Role of Mitochondria in Nuclear Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  9. Overcoming tumor resistance to cisplatin through micelle-mediated combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongfang; Cong, Yuwei; Qi, Yanxin; He, Shasha; Xiong, Hejian; Wu, Yanjuan; Xie, Zhigang; Chen, Xuesi; Jing, Xiabin; Huang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    The main obstacles to cancer therapy are the inability to target cancer cells and the acquired drug resistance after a period of chemotherapy. Reduced drug uptake and DNA repair are the two main mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance. In the present investigation, canthaplatin, a Pt(iv) pro-drug of cisplatin and a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor (4-(3-carboxy-7-oxa-bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carbonyl)piperazine-1-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester), was designed and delivered using PEG-b-PLGA micelles for combination chemotherapy. Polymer/canthaplatin micelles facilitated the delivery of the drug into cancer cells through endocytosis and diminished DNA repair by PP2A inhibition, resulting in enhanced anti-tumor efficiency and excellent reversal ability of tumor resistance to cisplatin both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the polymer/canthaplatin micelles could prolong drug residence in the blood and decrease the side effects when compared to cisplatin. PMID:26214201

  10. Overcoming tumor resistance to cisplatin by cationic lipid-assisted prodrug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhi-Ting; Chen, Zhi-Yao; Sun, Chun-Yang; Li, Hong-Jun; Wang, Hong-Xia; Cheng, Qin-Qin; Zuo, Zu-Qi; Wang, Ji-Long; Liu, Yang-Zhong; Wang, Yu-Cai; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy resistance has become a major challenge in the clinical treatment of lung cancer which is the leading cancer type for the estimated deaths. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles as drug carriers can raise intracellular drug concentration by achieving effectively cellular uptake and rapid drug release, and therefore reverse the acquired chemoresistance of tumors. In this context, nanoparticles-based chemotherapy represents a promising strategy for treating malignancies with chemoresistance. In the present study, we developed cationic lipid assisted nanoparticles (CLAN) to deliver polylactide-cisplatin prodrugs to drug resistant lung cancer cells. The nanoparticles were formulated through self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactide) (PEG-PLA), a hydrophobic polylactide-cisplatin prodrug, and a cationic lipid. The cationic nanoparticles were proven to significantly improve cell uptake of cisplatin, leading to an increased DNA-Pt adduct and significantly promoted DNA damage in vitro. Moreover, our study reveals that cationic nanoparticles, although are slightly inferior in blood circulation and tumor accumulation, are more effective in blood vessel extravasation. The CLANs ultimately enhances the cellular drug availability and leads to the reversal of cisplatin resistance. PMID:27088406

  11. Leucine Supplementation Improves Acquired Growth Hormone Resistance in Rats with Protein-Energy Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinying; Zhao, Jie; Wan, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Chao; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    the MC-L and MC-H groups than in the MC-CON group. Conclusion/Significance Our data are the first to demonstrate that long-term supplementation with leucine improved acquired growth hormone resistance in rats with protein-energy malnutrition. Leucine might promote skeletal muscle protein synthesis by regulating downstream anabolic signaling transduction. PMID:25909895

  12. Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Elia; Bellwon, Patricia; Huber, Stefan; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Vallat-Michel, Armelle; Mauch, Felix; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR. PMID:26802249

  13. Comparison of rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Hein, John W; Wolfe, Gordon V; Blee, Kristopher A

    2008-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible systemic plant defense against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, with the potential to secrete antimicrobial compounds into the soil. However, its impact on rhizosphere bacteria is not known. In this study, we examined fingerprints of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the effect of SAR on bacterial community structure and diversity. We compared Arabidopsis mutants that are constitutive and non-inducible for SAR and verified SAR activation by measuring pathogenesis-related protein activity via a beta-glucoronidase (GUS) reporter construct driven by the beta-1-3 glucanase promoter. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of MspI- and HaeIII-digested 16S rDNA to estimate bacterial rhizosphere community diversity, with Lactobacillus sp. added as internal controls. T-RFLP analysis showed a clear rhizosphere effect on community structure, and diversity analysis of both rhizosphere and bulk soil operational taxonomic units (as defined by terminal restriction fragments) using richness, Shannon-Weiner, and Simpson's diversity indices and evenness confirmed that the presence of Arabidopsis roots significantly altered bacterial communities. This effect of altered soil microbial community structure by plants was also seen upon multivariate cluster analysis of the terminal restriction fragments. We also found visible differences in the rhizosphere community fingerprints of different Arabidopsis SAR mutants; however, there was no clear decrease of rhizosphere diversity because of constitutive SAR expression. Our study suggests that SAR can alter rhizosphere bacterial communities, opening the door to further understanding and application of inducible plant defense as a driving force in structuring soil bacterial assemblages. PMID:17619212

  14. New Fks Hot Spot for Acquired Echinocandin Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Its Contribution to Intrinsic Resistance of Scedosporium Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael E.; Katiyar, Santosh K.; Edlind, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Echinocandins represent a new antifungal group with potent activity against Candida species. These lipopeptides inhibit the synthesis of β-1,3-glucan, the major cell wall polysaccharide. Acquired resistance or reduced echinocandin susceptibility (RES) is rare and associated with mutations in two “hot spot” regions of Fks1 or Fks2, the probable β-1,3-glucan synthases. In contrast, many fungi demonstrate intrinsic RES for reasons that remain unclear. We are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae to understand the basis for RES by modeling echinocandin-Fks interaction. Previously characterized mutations confer cross-RES; we screened for mutations conferring differential RES, implying direct interaction of that Fks residue with a variable echinocandin side chain. One mutant (in an fks1Δ background) exhibited ≥16-fold micafungin and anidulafungin versus caspofungin RES. Sequencing identified a novel Fks2 mutation, W714L/Y715N. Equivalent W695L/Y696N and related W695L/F/C mutations in Fks1 generated by site-directed mutagenesis and the isolation of a W695L-equivalent mutation in Candida glabrata confirmed the role of the new “hot spot 3” in RES. Further mutagenesis expanded hot spot 3 to Fks1 residues 690 to 700, yielding phenotypes ranging from cross-RES to differential hypersusceptibility. Fks1 sequences from intrinsically RES Scedosporium species revealed W695F-equivalent substitutions; Fks1 hybrids expressing Scedosporium prolificans hot spot 3 confirmed that this substitution imparts RES. PMID:21576441

  15. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: Study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Mishra, Shrawan K.; Rhim, Johng S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans. PMID:24752651

  16. Acquired resistance to ABT-737 in lymphoma cells that up-regulate MCL-1 and BFL-1

    PubMed Central

    Yecies, Derek; Carlson, Nicole E.; Deng, Jing

    2010-01-01

    ABT-737 is a small-molecule antagonist of BCL-2 currently under evaluation in clinical trials in the oral form of ABT-263. We anticipate that acquired resistance to this promising drug will inevitably arise. To study potential mechanisms of resistance to ABT-737, we derived resistant lines from initially sensitive OCI-Ly1 and SU-DHL-4 lymphoma cell lines via long-term exposure. Resistance was based in the mitochondria and not due to an inability of the drug to bind BCL-2. Resistant cells had increased levels of BFL-1 and/or MCL-1 proteins, which are not targeted by ABT-737. Proapoptotic BIM was displaced from BCL-2 by ABT-737 in both parental and resistant cells, but in resistant cells, BIM was sequestered by the additional BFL-1 and/or MCL-1. Decreasing MCL-1 levels with flavopiridol, PHA 767491, or shRNA restored sensitivity to ABT-737 resistant cells. MCL-1 was up-regulated not by protein stabilization but rather by increased transcript levels. Surprisingly, in addition to stable increases in MCL-1 transcript and protein in resistant cells, there was a dynamic increase within hours after ABT-737 treatment. BFL-1 protein and transcript levels in resistant cells were similarly dynamically up-regulated. This dynamic increase suggests a novel mechanism whereby modulation of antiapoptotic protein function communicates with nuclear transcriptional machinery. PMID:20197552

  17. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  18. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  19. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  20. Selective inhibition of tumor cell associated Vacuolar-ATPase 'a2' isoform overcomes cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Arpita; Katara, Gajendra K; Ginter, Jordyn; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Ibrahim, Safaa A; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Sandulescu, Corina; Periakaruppan, Ramayee; Dolan, James; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2016-06-01

    Development of resistance to platinum compounds significantly hinders successful ovarian cancer (OVCA) treatment. In tumor cells, dysregulated pH gradient across cell membranes is a key physiological mechanism of metastasis/chemo-resistance. These pH alterations are mediated by aberrant activation of key multi-subunit proton pumps, Vacuolar-ATPases (V-ATPases). In tumor cells, its 'a2' isoform (V-ATPase-V0a2) is a component of functional plasma-membrane complex and promotes tumor invasion through tumor-acidification and immuno-modulation. Its involvement in chemo-resistance has not been studied. Here, we show that V-ATPase-V0a2 is over-expressed in acquired-cisplatin resistant OVCA cells (cis-A2780/cis-TOV112D). Of all the 'a' subunit isoforms, V-ATPase-V0a2 exhibited an elevated expression on plasma membrane of cisplatin-resistant cells compared to sensitive counterparts. Immuno-histochemistry revealed V-ATPase-V0a2 expression in both low grade (highly drug-resistant) and high grade (highly recurrent) human OVCA tissues indicating its role in a centralized mechanism of tumor resistance. In cisplatin resistant cells, shRNA mediated inhibition of V-ATPase-V0a2 enhanced sensitivity towards both cisplatin and carboplatin. This improved cytotoxicity was mediated by enhanced cisplatin-DNA-adduct formation and suppressed DNA-repair pathway, leading to enhanced apoptosis. Suppression of V0a2 activity strongly reduced cytosolic pH in resistant tumor cells, which is known to enhance platinum-associated DNA-damage. As an indicator of reduced metastasis and chemo-resistance, in contrast to plasma membrane localization, a diffused cytoplasmic localization of acidic vacuoles was observed in V0a2-knockdown resistant cells. Interestingly, pre-treatment with monoclonal V0a2-inhibitory antibody enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity in resistant cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the isoform specific inhibition of V-ATPase-V0a2 could serve as a therapeutic strategy for chemo-resistant

  1. Comparison of local and systemic induction of acquired disease resistance in cucumber plants treated with benzothiadiazoles or salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Y; Narusaka, M; Horio, T; Ishii, H

    1999-04-01

    The accumulation of chitinase and its involvement in systemic acquired disease resistance was analyzed using acibenzolar-S-methyl and salicylic acid (SA). Resistance against scab (pathogen: Cladosporium cucumerinum) and the accumulation of chitinase were rapidly induced in cucumber plants after treatment with acibenzolar-S-methyl. In contrast, SA protected the plants from C. cucumerinum and the accumulation of chitinase was induced only on the treated leaves. The accumulation of chitinase in response to inoculation with the pathogen was induced more rapidly in cucumber plants previously treated with acibenzolar-S-methyl than in plants pretreated with SA or water. Thus, it appears that a prospective signal(s), that induces systemic resistance, can be transferred from leaves treated with acibenzolar-S-methyl to the untreated upper and lower leaves where systemic resistance is elicited. In contrast, exogenously applied SA is not likely to function as a mobile, systemic resistance-inducing signal, because SA only induces localized acquired resistance. PMID:10394634

  2. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  3. Benznidazole-Resistance in Trypanosoma cruzi Is a Readily Acquired Trait That Can Arise Independently in a Single Population

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Ana Maria; Hall, Belinda S.; Taylor, Martin C.; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés; Wilkinson, Shane R.; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Kelly, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Benznidazole is the frontline drug used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. However, treatment failures are often reported. Here, we demonstrate that independently acquired mutations in the gene encoding a mitochondrial nitroreductase (TcNTR) can give rise to distinct drug-resistant clones within a single population. Following selection of benznidazole-resistant parasites, all clones examined had lost one of the chromosomes containing the TcNTR gene. Sequence analysis of the remaining TcNTR allele revealed 3 distinct mutant genes in different resistant clones. Expression studies showed that these mutant proteins were unable to activate benznidazole. This correlated with loss of flavin mononucleotide binding. The drug-resistant phenotype could be reversed by transfection with wild-type TcNTR. These results identify TcNTR as a central player in acquired resistance to benznidazole. They also demonstrate that T. cruzi has a propensity to undergo genetic changes that can lead to drug resistance, a finding that has implications for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22551809

  4. A Nexus Consisting of Beta-Catenin and Stat3 Attenuates BRAF Inhibitor Efficacy and Mediates Acquired Resistance to Vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Makino, Elena; Krueger, Marcel A; Velic, Ana; Macek, Boris; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Groll, Nicola; Pötz, Oliver; Czemmel, Stefan; Niessner, Heike; Meier, Friedegund; Ikenberg, Kristian; Garbe, Claus; Schittek, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Acquired resistance to second generation BRAF inhibitors (BRAFis), like vemurafenib is limiting the benefits of long term targeted therapy for patients with malignant melanomas that harbor BRAF V600 mutations. Since many resistance mechanisms have been described, most of them causing a hyperactivation of the MAPK- or PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, one potential strategy to overcome BRAFi resistance in melanoma cells would be to target important common signaling nodes. Known factors that cause secondary resistance include the overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), alternative splicing of BRAF or the occurrence of novel mutations in MEK1 or NRAS. In this study we show that β-catenin is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus in approximately half of the melanomas that were analyzed and which developed secondary resistance towards BRAFi. We further demonstrate that β-catenin is involved in the mediation of resistance towards vemurafenib in vitro and in vivo. Unexpectedly, β-catenin acts mainly independent of the TCF/LEF dependent canonical Wnt-signaling pathway in resistance development, which partly explains previous contradictory results about the role of β-catenin in melanoma progression and therapy resistance. We further demonstrate that β-catenin interacts with Stat3 after chronic vemurafenib treatment and both together cooperate in the acquisition and maintenance of resistance towards BRAFi. PMID:27428425

  5. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  6. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  7. Differential involvement of glutathione S-transferase mu 1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 in melanoma acquired resistance to vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Attaoua, Chaker; Vincent, Laure-Anaïs; Abdel Jaoued, Aida; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Baï, Qiang; De Vos, John; Vian, Laurence; Cuq, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    On account of its extreme intrinsic resistance to apoptosis and of its strong ability to become chemoresistant after a primary response to drugs, malignant melanoma (MM) is still a therapeutic challenge. We previously showed that glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) acts in synergy with multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) to protect GSTM1-transfected human CAL1 melanoma cells from toxic effects of vincristine (VCR). Herein, we investigated the role of these proteins in the acquired resistance of CAL1 cells to vinca alkaloids (VAs). Resistant lines were established by continuous exposure (>1 year) of parental CAL1-wt cells to VCR, vindesine (VDS), or vinorelbine (VRB): CAL1R-VCR, CAL1R-VDS, CAL1R-VRB, respectively. All resistant lines displayed more than 10-fold increase in resistance to their selection VA, and specifically expressed GSTM1. Suggesting a direct interaction between this protein and VAs, each VA specifically decreased the GSTM1-mediated glutathione conjugation activity in cell lysates. Curcumin (GSTM1 inhibitor), BSO (glutathione synthesis inhibitor), and MK571 (MRP1 inhibitor) considerably reversed the acquired resistance to VCR and VDS, but not to VRB. Microarray data analysis revealed similar gene expression patterns of CAL1R-VCR and CAL1R-VDS, and a distinct one for CAL1R-VRB. These data suggest a differential involvement of GSTM1 and MRP1 in acquired resistance to VAs. A coordinated expression and activity of GSTM1 and MRP1 is required to protect CAL1 cells from VCR and VDS, while the simple expression of GSTM1 is sufficient, possibly by a direct drug/protein interaction, to confer resistance against VRB. PMID:25283245

  8. Nasopharyngeal carriage of community-acquired, antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Zambian paediatric population.

    PubMed Central

    Woolfson, A.; Huebner, R.; Wasas, A.; Chola, S.; Godfrey-Faussett, P.; Klugman, K.

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is an international health problem. Apart from South Africa few data on pneumococcal resistance are available for sub-Saharan Africa. This study examines the nasopharyngeal carriage and prevalence of antibiotic resistance in pneumococci isolated from 260 Zambian children aged < 6 years. Pneumococci were isolated from 71.9% of the children; the odds of carrying organisms were twice as high among children < 2 years of age compared with older children. Antibacterial resistance was found in 34.1% of the isolates; resistance to tetracycline, penicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol occurred in 23.0%, 14.3%, 12.7%, and 3.9% of the isolates, respectively. Only 4% of the isolates were resistant to three drugs. High-level resistance was found in all isolates resistant to tetracycline; but only intermediate level penicillin resistance was found. A total of 11.1% of the isolates demonstrated intermediate resistance to sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim. Children aged < 6 months were less likely to carry antibiotic-resistant organisms. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae appears to be an emerging public health problem in Zambia, and the national policy for the empirical treatment of pneumococcal meningitis and acute respiratory tract infections may need to be re-evaluated. The establishment of ongoing surveillance to monitor trends in pneumococcal resistance should be considered. PMID:9447779

  9. Porous biodegradable EW62 medical implants resist tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, O; Ventura, Y; Goldman, J; Vago, R; Aghion, E

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely investigated for biodegradable medical applications. However, the shielding of harmful cells (eg. bacteria or tumorous cells) from immune surveillance may be compounded by the increased porosity of biodegradable materials. We previously demonstrated the improved corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of a novel EW62 (Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr)) magnesium alloy by rapid solidification followed by extrusion (RS) compared to its conventional counterpart (CC). The present in vitro study evaluated the influence of rapid solidification on cytotoxicity to murine osteosarcoma cells. We found that CC and RS corrosion extracts significantly reduced cell viability over a 24-h exposure period. Cell density was reduced over 48 h following direct contact on both CC and RS surfaces, but was further reduced on the CC surface. The direct presence of cells accelerated corrosion for both materials. The corroded RS material exhibited superior mechanical properties relative to the CC material. The data show that the improved corrosion resistance of the rapidly solidified EW62 alloy (RS) resulted in a relatively reduced cytotoxic effect on tumorous cells. Hence, the tested alloy in the form of a rapidly solidified substance may introduce a good balance between its biodegradation characteristics and cytotoxic effect towards cancerous and normal cells. PMID:26838879

  10. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W; Buckley, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Reference/Citation: Salgado CD, Farr BM, Calfee DP. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a meta-analysis of prevalence and risk factors. Clin Infect Dis.20033613113912522744. Clinical Question: What are the prevalence rates and risk factors associated with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)? Data Sources: Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (January 1966–February 2002) and abstracts from scientific meetings (1996–2001). Reviews of citations and reference lists were performed to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included Staphylococcus aureus , infection, colonization, methicillin resistance, community-acquired, community-onset, prevalence, frequency, and risk factors. Study Selection: The search was limited to English-language investigations identified from the electronic and manual searches. Studies were divided into 2 groups, as follows: group 1, retrospective or prospective studies that reported the prevalence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) among hospital patients who were colonized (presence of bacteria without infection) or infected with MRSA; and group 2, studies that reported the prevalence of MRSA colonization in the community. The studies were evaluated independently by 2 authors, and case reports were excluded. Data Extraction: Data extraction and study quality assessment procedures were not fully explained. The outcome measures for hospital patients were definitions of CA-MRSA used in the study, prevalence of CA-MRSA, sample size, number and type of risk factors assessed, and number of patients with ≥1 health care–associated risk factor. The studies were grouped based on type, retrospective or prospective. The pooled prevalence of CA-MRSA was calculated for each group (retrospective or prospective) and was limited to the prevalence among patients with MRSA. The proportion of patients who reported ≥1 health care–associated risk factor was also

  11. Spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals in Taipei, Taiwan in 2005, and comparison of its drug resistance with previous hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Saito, Kohei; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (PVL+ MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in the community worldwide. The incidence of PVL+ MRSA in Taipei, Taiwan was 23.3% for hospital MRSA. PVL+ MRSA was isolated from both outpatients and inpatients. Some PVL+ (mecA+) strains (36.8%) showed low MIC values (resistance pattern was oxacillin and clindamycin resistance (81%). There was no multidrug resistance over three drugs, in contrast to patient PVL- MRSA with resistance to five drugs as a major resistance pattern. The majority of PVL+ MRSA belonged to multilocus sequence (ST) type 59, while PVL+ MRSA belonged to ST239, ST59 and ST5. The data suggests that although PVL+ CA-MRSA is isolated at a high incidence from hospitals in Taipei, the drug resistance is mostly selected in the community and less prominent compared with previous PVL- hospital-acquired MRSA. PMID:17579274

  12. Plasmonic Nanobubbles Rapidly Detect and Destroy Drug-Resistant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Townley, Debra; Wu, Xiangwei; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of residual cancer cells after oncological resection to adjuvant chemoradiotherapies results in both high recurrence rates and high non-specific tissue toxicity, thus preventing the successful treatment of such cancers as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The patients' survival rate and quality of life therefore depend upon the efficacy, selectivity and low non-specific toxicity of the adjuvant treatment. We report a novel, theranostic in vivo technology that unites both the acoustic diagnostics and guided intracellular delivery of anti-tumor drug (liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, Doxil) in one rapid process, namely a pulsed laser-activated plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). HNSCC-bearing mice were treated with gold nanoparticle conjugates, Doxil, and single near-infrared laser pulses of low energy. Tumor-specific clusters of gold nanoparticles (solid gold spheres) converted the optical pulses into localized PNBs. The acoustic signals of the PNB detected the tumor with high specificity and sensitivity. The mechanical impact of the PNB, co-localized with Doxil liposomes, selectively ejected the drug into the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Cancer cell-specific generation of PNBs and their intracellular co-localization with Doxil improved the in vivo therapeutic efficacy from 5-7% for administration of only Doxil or PNBs alone to 90% thus demonstrating the synergistic therapeutic effect of the PNB-based intracellular drug release. This mechanism also reduced the non-specific toxicity of Doxil below a detectable level and the treatment time to less than one minute. Thus PNBs combine highly sensitive diagnosis, overcome drug resistance and minimize non-specific toxicity in a single rapid theranostic procedure for intra-operative treatment. PMID:23139725

  13. Hippo pathway effector YAP inhibition restores the sensitivity of EGFR-TKI in lung adenocarcinoma having primary or acquired EGFR-TKI resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Lee, Dahye; Yoo, Geon; Kim, Tackhoon; Jeon, Haeyon; Yeo, Min-Kyung; Lee, Choong-Sik; Moon, Jae Young; Jung, Sung Soo; Kim, Ju Ock; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Dong Il; Park, Yeon Hee; Lee, Jae Cheol; Oh, In-Jae; Lim, Dae Sik; Chung, Chaeuk

    2016-05-20

    The efficacy of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is significantly limited by various resistance mechanisms to those drugs. The resistance to EGFR-TKI is largely divided by two classes; acquired resistance after EGFR-TKI treatment, and primary resistance marked by cancer cell's dependence on other oncogene, such as KRAS. YAP has emerged as critical oncogene in conferring drug resistance against targeted therapy. In this study, we evaluated the role of YAP in primary and acquired EGFR-TKI resistance using gefitinib-resistant A549 and PC9 cells and their parental cell lines. Our study revealed that EGFR-TKI resistance is associated with enhanced YAP activity. Notably, YAP activation was independent of the Hippo pathway. We confirmed that AXL is a downstream target of YAP that confers EGFR-TKI resistance. And our results showed that YAP can induce ERK activation in lung adenocarcinoma. The combination of YAP inhibition with EGFR-TKI overcomes primary and acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. We also found increased YAP expression in human lung cancer after acquiring EGFR-TKI resistance. Collectively, we suggest a novel EGFR-TKI resistance mechanism involving YAP activation and suggest targeting YAP and EGFR simultaneously may be a breakthrough treatment of primary and acquired EGFR-TKI resistant lung cancer. PMID:27105908

  14. Bioengineering approaches to study multidrug resistance in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Fallica, Brian; Makin, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cancer cells to become resistant to chemotherapeutic agents is a major challenge for the treatment of malignant tumors. Several strategies have emerged to attempt to inhibit chemoresistance, but the fact remains that resistance is a problem for every effective anticancer drug. The first part of this review will focus on the mechanisms of chemoresistance. It is important to understand the environmental cues, transport limitations and the cellular signaling pathways associated with chemoresistance before we can hope to effectively combat it. The second part of this review focuses on the work that needs to be done moving forward. Specifically, this section focuses on the necessity of translational research and interdisciplinary directives. It is critical that the expertise of oncologists, biologists, and engineers be brought together to attempt to tackle the problem. This discussion is from an engineering perspective, as the dialogue between engineers and other cancer researchers is the most challenging due to non-overlapping background knowledge. Chemoresistance is a complex and devastating process, meaning that we urgently need sophisticated methods to study the process of how cells become resistant. PMID:21387035

  15. The Viriato study: update on antimicrobial resistance of microbial pathogens responsible for community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Melo-Cristino, José; Santos, Letícia; Silva-Costa, Catarina; Friães, Ana; Pinho, Marcos D; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-06-29

    The Viriato study is a prospective, multicentre laboratory-based surveillance study of antimicrobial susceptibility in which 30 microbiology laboratories throughout Portugal are asked to isolate, identify and submit to a central laboratory for testing Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis responsible for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and Streptococcus pyogenes from tonsillitis. To monitor changes in antimicrobial resistance patterns of these frequent respiratory pathogens. Susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) or using Etest strips following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. From 1999 to 2007 over 13 900 isolates were analysed. Among S. pneumoniae penicillin non-susceptibility decreased from 25% in 1999 to 18% in 2007 (p = 0.002) but resistance to macrolides showed a steady increase, reaching 20% in the last 6 years. Resistance to amoxicillin and the quinolones remained stable and very low (1-2%) throughout the study period. Antimicrobial resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis remained stable. The most significant resistance was to ampicillin, of 10-12% and greater than 80%, respectively, as a result of the production of beta-lactamases. Macrolide resistance among S. pyogenes was stable during 1999-2003 (20-23%) but after 2003 there was a steady decline in resistance, which in 2007 reached 10%. The Viriato surveillance study showed that penicillin remains the most active antimicrobial agent against S. pyogenes causing tonsillitis, and amoxicillin-clavulanate and the quinolones are the most active in vitro simultaneously against S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis responsible for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in Portugal. PMID:20590169

  16. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E.; Cutuli, María Teresa; Fermín, María Luisa; Daza, María Ángeles; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance. PMID:26949597

  17. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Cutuli, María Teresa; Fermín, María Luisa; Daza, María Ángeles; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-03-01

    Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance. PMID:26949597

  18. Ligand associated ERBB2/3 activation confers acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in FGFR3 dependent cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Mikse, Oliver; Liao, Rachel G.; Li, Yvonne; Tan, Li; Janne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wong, Kwok-kin; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic alterations of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) have been described in a wide range of malignancies. A number of anti-FGFR therapies are currently under investigation in clinical trials for subjects with FGFR gene amplifications, mutations and translocations. Here, we develop cell line models of acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition by exposure of cell lines harboring FGFR3 gene amplification and translocation to the selective FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and multi-targeted FGFR inhibitor ponatinib. We show that the acquisition of resistance is rapid, reversible and characterized by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a switch from dependency on FGFR3 to ERBB family members. Acquired resistance was associated with demonstrable changes in gene expression including increased production of ERBB2/3 ligands which were sufficient to drive resistance in the setting of FGFR3 dependency but not dependency on other FGFR family members. These data support the concept that activation of ERBB family members is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR3 and suggest that concurrent inhibition of these two pathways may be desirable when targeting FGFR3 dependent cancers. PMID:24909170

  19. Ligand-associated ERBB2/3 activation confers acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in FGFR3-dependent cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Mikse, O; Liao, R G; Li, Y; Tan, L; Janne, P A; Gray, N S; Wong, K-k; Hammerman, P S

    2015-04-23

    Somatic alterations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been described in a wide range of malignancies. A number of anti-FGFR therapies are currently under investigation in clinical trials for subjects with FGFR gene amplifications, mutations and translocations. Here, we develop cell line models of acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition by exposure of cell lines harboring FGFR3 gene amplification and translocation to the selective FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and multitargeted FGFR inhibitor ponatinib. We show that the acquisition of resistance is rapid, reversible and characterized by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a switch from dependency on FGFR3 to ERBB family members. Acquired resistance was associated with demonstrable changes in gene expression including increased production of ERBB2/3 ligands, which were sufficient to drive resistance in the setting of FGFR3 dependency but not dependency on other FGFR family members. These data support the concept that activation of ERBB family members is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR3 and suggest that concurrent inhibition of these two pathways may be desirable when targeting FGFR3-dependent cancers. PMID:24909170

  20. Proteomic Signatures of Acquired Letrozole Resistance in Breast Cancer: Suppressed Estrogen Signaling and Increased Cell Motility and Invasiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Townley, Ian; Zhong, Qiu; Carriere, Patrick P.; Zou, Jin; Llopis, Shawn D.; Preyan, Lynez C.; Williams, Christopher C.; Skripnikova, Elena; Bratton, Melyssa R.; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors, such as letrozole, have become the first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with estrogen-dependent breast cancer. However, acquired resistance remains a major clinical obstacle. Previous studies demonstrated constitutive activation of the MAPK signaling, overexpression of HER2, and down-regulation of aromatase and ERα in letrozole-resistant breast cancer cells. Given the complex signaling network involved in letrozole-refractory breast cancer and the lack of effective treatment for hormone resistance, further investigation of aromatase inhibitor resistance by a novel systems biology approach may reveal previously unconsidered molecular changes that could be utilized as therapeutic targets. This study was undertaken to characterize for the first time global proteomic alterations occurring in a letrozole-resistant cell line. A quantitative proteomic analysis of the whole cell lysates of LTLT-Ca (resistant) versus AC-1 cells (sensitive) was performed to identify significant protein expression changes. A total of 1743 proteins were identified and quantified, of which 411 were significantly up-regulated and 452 significantly down-regulated (p < 0.05, fold change > 1.20). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that acquired letrozole resistance is associated with a hormone-independent, more aggressive phenotype. LTLT-Ca cells exhibited 84% and 138% increase in migration and invasion compared with the control cells. The ROCK inhibitor partially abrogated the enhanced migration and invasion of the letrozole-resistant cells. Flow cytometric analyses also demonstrated an increase in vimentin and twist expression in letrozole-resistance cells, suggesting an onset of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, targeted gene expression arrays confirmed a 28-fold and sixfold up-regulation of EGFR and HER2, respectively, whereas ERα and pS2 were dramatically reduced by 28-fold and 1100-fold, respectively. Taken together, our study revealed global

  1. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Miki, Kanji; Sono, Yumi; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Jumpei; Tomii, Keisuke; Haruta, Tsunekazu

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants) in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly. PMID:24899822

  3. Reversal of multidrug resistance by 7-O-benzoylpyripyropene A in multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rho, M C; Hayashi, M; Fukami, A; Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Tomoda, H; Komiyama, K; Omura, S

    2000-10-01

    7-O-Benzoylpyripyropene A (7-O-BzP), a semi-synthetic analog of pyripyropene, was investigated for its reversing effect on multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) completely reversed resistance against vincristine and adriamycin in vincristine-resistant KB cells (VJ-300) and adriamycin-resistant P388 cells (P388/ADR), respectively. 7-O-BzP alone had no effect on the growth of drug sensitive and drug-resistant cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) significantly enhanced accumulation of [3H]vincristine in VJ-300 cells and completely inhibited the binding of [3H]azidopine to the P-glycoprotein in VJ-300 cells and P388/ADR cells. The result suggests that 7-O-BzP effectively reverses P-glycoprotein-related MDR by interacting directly with P-glycoprotein in drug resistant VJ-300 and P388/ADR cells. PMID:11132967

  4. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  5. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  6. Recall of acquired cellular resistance in mice by antigens from killed Brucella.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, B L; Hinsdill, R D

    1972-01-01

    Mice infected with Brucella abortus 19 were challenged intravenously with Listeria monocytogenes. Spleen assays to determine the number of viable Listeria cells present revealed that these mice were highly resistant to Listeria when challenged on day 17 of the Brucella infection. Resistance was absent in mice challenged on the 5th day and was declining in mice challenged on the 33rd day. Resistance could not be detected by day 49 of the Brucella infection but could be recalled by the injection of antigens from smooth B. abortus 2308. Thus, extracted antigens appeared to be as effective in recall as the live cells used in earlier studies. Similar injections of extracts from rough B. abortus 45/20, or from B. ovis REO 198, were also effective in recalling resistance; this suggests that the smooth surface agglutinogen may be relatively unimportant in recall. PMID:4632467

  7. Interplay between intrinsic and acquired resistance to quinolones in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Salgado, Fabiola; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    To analyse whether the mutation-driven resistance-acquisition potential of a given bacterium might be a function of its intrinsic resistome, quinolones were used as selective agents and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was chosen as a bacterial model. S. maltophilia has two elements - SmQnr and SmeDEF - that are important in intrinsic resistance to quinolones. Using a battery of mutants in which either or both of these elements had been removed, the apparent mutation frequency for quinolone resistance and the phenotype of the selected mutants were found to be related to the intrinsic resistome and also depended on the concentration of the selector. Most mutants had phenotypes compatible with the overexpression of multidrug efflux pump(s); SmeDEF overexpression was the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Whole genome sequencing showed that mutations of the SmeRv regulator, which result in the overexpression of the efflux pump SmeVWX, are the cause of quinolone resistance in mutants not overexpressing SmeDEF. These results indicate that the development of mutation-driven antibiotic resistance is highly dependent on the intrinsic resistome, which, at least for synthetic antibiotics such as quinolones, did not develop as a response to the presence of antibiotics in the natural ecosystems in which S. maltophilia evolved. PMID:24447641

  8. Multipronged Design of Light-Triggered Nanoparticles To Overcome Cisplatin Resistance for Efficient Ablation of Resistant Tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Deng, Yibin; Tian, Xin; Ke, Hengte; Guo, Miao; Zhu, Aijun; Yang, Tao; Guo, Zhengqing; Ge, Zhishen; Yang, Xiangliang; Chen, Huabing

    2015-10-27

    Chemotherapeutic drugs frequently encounter multiple drug resistance in the field of cancer therapy. The strategy has been explored with limited success for the ablation of drug-resistant tumor via intravenous administration. In this work, the rationally designed light-triggered nanoparticles with multipronged physicochemical and biological features are developed to overcome cisplatin resistance via the assembly of Pt(IV) prodrug and cyanine dye (Cypate) within the copolymer for efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor. The micelles exhibit good photostability, sustained release, preferable tumor accumulation, and enhanced cellular uptake with reduced efflux on both A549 cells and resistant A549R cells. Moreover, near-infrared light not only triggers the photothermal effect of the micelles for remarkable photothermal cytotoxicity, but also leads to the intracellular translocation of the micelles and reduction-activable Pt(IV) prodrug into cytoplasm through the lysosomal disruption, as well as the remarkable inhibition on the expression of a drug-efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) for further reversal of drug resistance of A549R cells. Consequently, the multipronged effects of light-triggered micelles cause synergistic cytotoxicity against both A549 cells and A549R cells, and thus efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor without regrowth. The multipronged features of light-triggered micelles represent a versatile synergistic approach for the ablation of resistant tumor in the field of cancer therapy. PMID:26365698

  9. Combine therapy of gefitinib and fulvestrant enhances antitumor effects on NSCLC cell lines with acquired resistance to gefitinib.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruitong; Shen, Hua; Guo, Renhua; Sun, Jing; Gao, Wen; Shu, Yongqian

    2012-07-01

    Gefitinib, an EGFR receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is approved for clinical use in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the emergence of mutations resistant to these inhibitors, such as T790M, has become a clinical problem. According to statistics, female patients, the presence of adenocarcinoma or non-smokers experienced a higher response rate. This may be involved in interaction between the estrogen receptor (ER) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To test whether inhibition of the ER signaling pathway affects the antitumor effect of gefitinib, gefitinib and an ER antagonist, fulvestrant, were administered to NSCLC cell lines with acquired resistance to gefitinib. Compared with treatment of either fulvestrant or gefitinib alone, drug combination obviously decreased proliferation of H1976, H1650 and PC-9 cells coming from adenocarcinoma. Rapid activations of EGFR pathway by E2β were observed in H1975 cells with T790M mutation. Additionally, EGFR and ERs expression were down-regulated respectively in response to estrogen and EGF but up-regulated in response to fulvestrant and gefitinib in vitro. These results suggest that there is a functional cross-signaling between the EGFR/ER pathways in NSCLC with acquired resistance to gefitinib, possibly providing rationale for combining gefitinib with anti-estrogen therapy for advanced NSCLC treatment. PMID:22560634

  10. Combined Targeting of JAK2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL to Cure Mutant JAK2-Driven Malignancies and Overcome Acquired Resistance to JAK2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Waibel, Michaela; Solomon, Vanessa S.; Knight, Deborah A.; Ralli, Rachael A.; Kim, Sang-Kyu; Banks, Kellie-Marie; Vidacs, Eva; Virely, Clemence; Sia, Keith C.S.; Bracken, Lauryn S.; Collins-Underwood, Racquel; Drenberg, Christina; Ramsey, Laura B.; Meyer, Sara C.; Takiguchi, Megumi; Dickins, Ross A.; Levine, Ross; Ghysdael, Jacques; Dawson, Mark A.; Lock, Richard B.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary To design rational therapies for JAK2-driven hematological malignancies, we functionally dissected the key survival pathways downstream of hyperactive JAK2. In tumors driven by mutant JAK2, Stat1, Stat3, Stat5, and the Pi3k and Mek/Erk pathways were constitutively active, and gene expression profiling of TEL-JAK2 T-ALL cells revealed the upregulation of prosurvival Bcl-2 family genes. Combining the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 with JAK2 inhibitors mediated prolonged disease regressions and cures in mice bearing primary human and mouse JAK2 mutant tumors. Moreover, combined targeting of JAK2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL was able to circumvent and overcome acquired resistance to single-agent JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Thus, inhibiting the oncogenic JAK2 signaling network at two nodal points, at the initiating stage (JAK2) and the effector stage (Bcl-2/Bcl-xL), is highly effective and provides a clearly superior therapeutic benefit than targeting just one node. Therefore, we have defined a potentially curative treatment for hematological malignancies expressing constitutively active JAK2. PMID:24268771

  11. Candidate DNA methylation drivers of acquired cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer identified by methylome and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Zeller, C; Dai, W; Steele, N L; Siddiq, A; Walley, A J; Wilhelm-Benartzi, C S M; Rizzo, S; van der Zee, A; Plumb, J A; Brown, R

    2012-10-18

    Multiple DNA methylation changes in the cancer methylome are associated with the acquisition of drug resistance; however it remains uncertain how many represent critical DNA methylation drivers of chemoresistance. Using isogenic, cisplatin-sensitive/resistant ovarian cancer cell lines and inducing resensitizaton with demethylating agents, we aimed to identify consistent methylation and expression changes associated with chemoresistance. Using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling across 27 578 CpG sites, we identified loci at 4092 genes becoming hypermethylated in chemoresistant A2780/cp70 compared with the parental-sensitive A2780 cell line. Hypermethylation at gene promoter regions is often associated with transcriptional silencing; however, expression of only 245 of these hypermethylated genes becomes downregulated in A2780/cp70 as measured by microarray expression profiling. Treatment of A2780/cp70 with the demethylating agent 2-deoxy-5'-azacytidine induces resensitization to cisplatin and re-expression of 41 of the downregulated genes. A total of 13/41 genes were consistently hypermethylated in further independent cisplatin-resistant A2780 cell derivatives. CpG sites at 9 of the 13 genes (ARHGDIB, ARMCX2, COL1A, FLNA, FLNC, MEST, MLH1, NTS and PSMB9) acquired methylation in ovarian tumours at relapse following chemotherapy or chemoresistant cell lines derived at the time of patient relapse. Furthermore, 5/13 genes (ARMCX2, COL1A1, MDK, MEST and MLH1) acquired methylation in drug-resistant ovarian cancer-sustaining (side population) cells. MLH1 has a direct role in conferring cisplatin sensitivity when reintroduced into cells in vitro. This combined genomics approach has identified further potential key drivers of chemoresistance whose expression is silenced by DNA methylation that should be further evaluated as clinical biomarkers of drug resistance. PMID:22249249

  12. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  13. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    SciTech Connect

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M. )

    1991-02-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors.

  14. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-06-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  15. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-01-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  16. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. as carriers and potential tracers of acquired antibiotic resistance in hospital and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ana Rita; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-01-15

    Members of the genus Aeromonas are recognized carriers of antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments. However, their importance on the spread of resistance from hospital effluents to the environment is poorly understood. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. (n = 112) isolated from hospital effluent (HE) and from raw (RWW) and treated wastewater (TWW) of the receiving urban wastewater treatment plant (UWTP) were characterized. Species identification and genetic intraspecies diversity were assessed based on the 16S rRNA, cpn60 and gyrB genes sequence analysis. The antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, qnrVC; qepA; oqxAB; aac(6′)-Ib-cr; blaOXA; incU) were analyzed in function of the origin and taxonomic group. Most isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas hydrophila (50% and 41%, respectively). The quinolone and the beta-lactamase resistance genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA, including gene blaOXA-101, identified for the first time in Aeromonas spp., were detected in 58% and 56% of the isolates, respectively, with identical prevalence in HE and UWTP wastewater. In contrast, the gene qnrS2 was observed mainly in isolates from the UWTP (51%) and rarely in HE isolates (3%), suggesting that its origin is not the clinical setting. Bacterial groups and genes that allow the identification of major routes of antibiotic resistance dissemination are valuable tools to control this problem. In this study, it was concluded that members of the genus Aeromonas harboring the genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA are relevant tracers of antibiotic resistance dissemination in wastewater habitats, while those yielding the gene qnrS2 allow the traceability from non-clinical sources. PMID:26546762

  17. mTOR Inhibitors Control the Growth of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer Even after Acquiring Resistance by HGF

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Shinji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sano, Takako; Nakade, Junya; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Zhao, Lu; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kunio; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Yano, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib, is a critical problem in the treatment of EGFR mutant lung cancer. Several mechanisms, including bypass signaling by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-triggered Met activation, are implicated as mediators of resistance. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a downstream conduit of EGFR and MET signaling, and is thus considered a therapeutically attractive target in the treatment of various types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 2 clinically approved mTOR inhibitors, temsirolimus and everolimus, overcome HGF-dependent resistance to EGFR-TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer cells. Both temsirolimus and everolimus inhibited the phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1, which are downstream targets of the mTOR pathway, and reduced the viability of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells, PC-9, and HCC827, even in the presence of HGF in vitro. In a xenograft model, temsirolimus suppressed the growth of PC-9 cells overexpressing the HGF-gene; this was associated with suppression of the mTOR signaling pathway and tumor angiogenesis. In contrast, erlotinib did not suppress this signaling pathway or tumor growth. Multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production by tumor cells and suppression of endothelial cell viability, contribute to the anti-angiogenic effect of temsirolimus. These findings indicate that mTOR inhibitors may be useful for controlling HGF-triggered EGFR-TKI resistance in EGFR mutant lung cancer, and they provide the rationale for clinical trials of mTOR inhibitors in patients stratified by EGFR mutation and HGF expression status. PMID:23690929

  18. Long non-coding RNA UCA1 induces non-T790M acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs by activating the AKT/mTOR pathway in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shengxiang; Li, Xuefei; Wang, Qi; Pan, Hui; Zhao, Mingchuan; Li, Jiayu; Zhang, Yishi; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Xiaoxia; Fei, Ke; Zhou, Caicun; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of long non-coding RNA UCA1 (urothelial cancer-associated 1) in acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, UCA1 expression was significantly increased in lung cancer cells and patients with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Over-expression of UCA1 was significantly associated with a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) [13.0 vs. 8.5 months, P < 0.01] in tumors with respond to EGFR-TKIs. The significant relationship was not observed in patients with T790M mutation (10.5 vs. 12.0 months, P = 0.778), but in patients with non-T790M (19.0 vs. 9.0 months, P = 0.023). UCA1 knockdown restored gefitinib sensitivity in acquired resistant cells with non-T790M and inhibited the activation of the AKT/mTOR pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The mTOR inhibitor was effective in UCA1-expressing cell PC9/R. Inhibiting mTOR could change the expression of UCA1, although there was no significant difference. In conclusion, the influence of over-expression of UCA1 on PFS for patients with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs was from the subgroup with non-T790M mutation. UCA1 may induce non-T790M acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs by activating the AKT/mTOR pathway and EMT. PMID:26160838

  19. Defense Responses in Infected and Elicited Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Hypocotyl Segments Exhibiting Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, J.; Jeblick, W.; Kauss, H.

    1994-01-01

    Segments from dark-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyls were used to study defense reactions occurring upon fungal infection and induced by elicitors in the same tissue. The segments were rendered resistant to infection by Colletotrichum lagenarium either by growing the seedlings in the presence of dichloroisonicotinic acid (DCIA) or by preincubation of the cut segments with DCIA, salicylic acid (SA), or 5-chlorosalicylic acid (5CSA). This resistance appears to be due mainly to inhibition of fungal penetration into epidermal cells. In the resistant hypocotyl segments, the fungus induced, at the time of attempted penetration, an increased deposition of phenolics, which were visualized by autofluorescence. These phenolics were located mainly in the epidermal cell wall around and in the emerging papillae below appressoria and were quantified either as lignin-like polymers by the thioglycolic acid method or as 4-OH-benzaldehyde, 4-OH-benzoic, or 4-coumaric acid liberated upon treatment with alkali at room temperature. Pretreatment with DCIA, SA, and 5CSA induced little chitinase activity, but this activity greatly increased in resistant tissues upon subsequent infection. These observations indicate that resistance is associated with an improved perception of the pathogen stimulus resulting in the enhanced induction of diverse defense reactions. When the cut segments were pretreated with DCIA, SA, or 5CSA and then split and incubated with chitosan fragments, the deposition of cell wall phenolics was also enhanced. These pretreated and split segments also exhibited an increase in the rapid production of activated oxygen species induced by an elicitor preparation from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. Glya. Pretreatment of the segments with methyl jasmonate neither induced resistance nor enhanced induction of cell wall phenolics upon fungal infection, although we observed in the corresponding split segments some increase in chitosan-induced cell wall phenolics and

  20. Defense Responses in Infected and Elicited Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Hypocotyl Segments Exhibiting Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J.; Jeblick, W.; Kauss, H.

    1994-08-01

    Segments from dark-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyls were used to study defense reactions occurring upon fungal infection and induced by elicitors in the same tissue. The segments were rendered resistant to infection by Colletotrichum lagenarium either by growing the seedlings in the presence of dichloroisonicotinic acid (DCIA) or by preincubation of the cut segments with DCIA, salicylic acid (SA), or 5-chlorosalicylic acid (5CSA). This resistance appears to be due mainly to inhibition of fungal penetration into epidermal cells. In the resistant hypocotyl segments, the fungus induced, at the time of attempted penetration, an increased deposition of phenolics, which were visualized by autofluorescence. These phenolics were located mainly in the epidermal cell wall around and in the emerging papillae below appressoria and were quantified either as lignin-like polymers by the thioglycolic acid method or as 4-OH-benzaldehyde, 4-OH-benzoic, or 4-coumaric acid liberated upon treatment with alkali at room temperature. Pretreatment with DCIA, SA, and 5CSA induced little chitinase activity, but this activity greatly increased in resistant tissues upon subsequent infection. These observations indicate that resistance is associated with an improved perception of the pathogen stimulus resulting in the enhanced induction of diverse defense reactions. When the cut segments were pretreated with DCIA, SA, or 5CSA and then split and incubated with chitosan fragments, the deposition of cell wall phenolics was also enhanced. These pretreated and split segments also exhibited an increase in the rapid production of activated oxygen species induced by an elicitor preparation from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. Glya. Pretreatment of the segments with methyl jasmonate neither induced resistance nor enhanced induction of cell wall phenolics upon fungal infection, although we observed in the corresponding split segments some increase in chitosan-induced cell wall phenolics and

  1. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder. PMID:22736441

  2. Acquired resistance to Giardia muris in X-linked immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Skea, D L; Underdown, B J

    1991-01-01

    A previous study from this laboratory (D. P. Snider, D. Skea, and B. J. Underdown, Infect. Immun. 56:2838-2842, 1988) indicated that immunodeficient mice expressing the xid gene develop prolonged infections with Giardia muris, unlike immunocompetent mice, which eliminate the intestinal protozoan parasite in 8 to 10 weeks. In this study, CBA/N (xid) and CBA/Ca mice were infected with G. muris cysts and at various times following this primary infection were cured by treatment with metronidazole. In contrast to the marked differences in the ability of xid and normal mice to eliminate a primary infection, mice of both strains were resistant to a secondary challenge of G. muris cysts. These data imply that the mechanism(s) responsible for elimination of a primary infection is not identical to those required to resist a secondary challenge infection. Splenocytes from immunocompetent CBA/Ca mice (but not immunodeficient CBA/N mice) could transfer the ability to eliminate a primary G. muris infection to irradiated mice of either strain. In contrast, splenocytes from previously infected CBA/Ca mice could not transfer resistance to a challenge infection, further supporting the hypothesis that there are differences between mechanisms required to eliminate a primary infection and those necessary to resist a second challenge infection. PMID:2019439

  3. Antimicrobial activity of tigecycline against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from North American medical centers.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Deshpande, Lalitagauri; Jones, Ronald N

    2008-04-01

    A total of 1989 community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) were susceptibility tested by broth microdilution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, SCCmec type, and polymerase chain reaction for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were also performed. The overall tigecycline susceptibility rate was 98.2%. Glycopeptides, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, and chloramphenicol were also active against this collection (< or =0.7% resistant). The vast majority (70.8%) of the CA-MRSA was SCCmec type IV, from which 88.4% belonged to the USA300-0114 clone and 94.7% were PVL positive. Tigecycline showed in vitro activity comparable with other highly active parenteral agents and represents an option for treating complicated infections caused by CA-MRSA. PMID:18068326

  4. Novel characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to multilocus sequence type 59 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Zaraket, Hassan; Otsuka, Taketo; Baranovich, Tatiana; Enany, Shymaa; Saito, Kohei; Isobe, Hirokazu; Dohmae, Soshi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Shibuya, Michiko; Okubo, Takeshi; Yabe, Shizuka; Shi, Da; Reva, Ivan; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains, which often produce Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), are increasingly noted worldwide. In this study, we examined 42 MRSA strains (25 PVL-positive [PVL+] strains and 17 PVL-negative [PVL(-)] strains) isolated in Taiwan for their molecular characteristics. The PVL+ MRSA strains included CA-MRSA strains with multilocus sequence type (ST) 59 (major PVL+ MRSA in Taiwan), its variants, and worldwide CA-MRSA ST30 strains. The PVL(-) MRSA strains included the pandemic Hungarian MRSA ST239 strain, the Hungarian MRSA ST239 variant, MRSA ST59 (largely hospital-acquired MRSA strains) and its variants, the pandemic New York/Japan MRSA ST5 strain (Japanese type), and the MRSA ST8 strain. The major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed a tetracycline resistance-conferring (tetK positive) penicillinase plasmid and a drug resistance gene cluster (a possible composite transposon) for multidrug resistance. Moreover, it carried a novel staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) with two distinct ccrC genes (ccrC2-C8). This SCCmec (previously named SCCmec type V(T)) was tentatively designated SCCmec type VII. Sequencing of the PVL genes revealed the polymorphisms, and the PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed the ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. The data suggest that a significant amount of clonal spread is occurring in Taiwan and that the major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 Taiwan strain exhibits unique genetic characteristics, such as a novel SCCmec type and an ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. PMID:18086843

  5. Acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells triggers transcriptome reprogramming toward a degradome-related metastatic stem-like profile.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on metabolic inhibitor-based therapies are expected to be less prone to acquired resistance. However, there has not been any study assessing the possibility that the targeting of the tumor cell metabolism may result in unforeseeable resistance. We recently established a pre-clinical model of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells that were chronically adapted to grow (> 10 months) in the presence of graded, millimolar concentrations of the anti-diabetic biguanide metformin, an AMPK agonist/mTOR inhibitor that has been evaluated in multiple in vitro and in vivo cancer studies and is now being tested in clinical trials. To assess what impact the phenomenon of resistance might have on the metformin-like "dirty" drugs that are able to simultaneously hit several metabolic pathways, we employed the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software to functionally interpret the data from Agilent whole-human genome arrays in the context of biological processes, networks, and pathways. Our findings establish, for the first time, that a "global" targeting of metabolic reprogramming using metformin certainly imposes a great selective pressure for the emergence of new breast cancer cellular states. Intriguingly, acquired resistance to metformin appears to trigger a transcriptome reprogramming toward a metastatic stem-like profile, as many genes encoding the components of the degradome (KLK11, CTSF, FREM1, BACE-2, CASP, TMPRSS4, MMP16, HTRA1), cancer cell migration and invasion factors (TP63, WISP2, GAS3, DKK1, BCAR3, PABPC1, MUC1, SPARCL1, SEMA3B, SEMA6A), stem cell markers (DCLK1, FAK), and key pro-metastatic lipases (MAGL and Cpla2) were included in the signature. Because this convergent activation of pathways underlying tumor microenvironment interactions occurred in low-proliferative cancer cells exhibiting a notable downregulation of the G 2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulators that maintain genome stability (CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC20, CDC25C, AURKA

  6. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  7. Influence of infection of cotton by Rotylenchulus Reniformis and Meloidogyne Incognita on the production of enzymes involved in systemic acquired resistance.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which results in enhanced defense mechanisms in plants, can be elicited by virulent and avirulent strains of pathogens including nematodes. Recent studies of nematode reproduction strongly suggest that Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis induce SAR ...

  8. In Vitro Activity of ASP2397 against Aspergillus Isolates with or without Acquired Azole Resistance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ASP2397 is a new compound with a novel and as-yet-unknown target different from that of licensed antifungal agents. It has activity against Aspergillus and Candida glabrata. We compared its in vitro activity against wild-type and azole-resistant A. fumigatus and A. terreus isolates with that of amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Thirty-four isolates, including 4 wild-type A. fumigatus isolates, 24 A. fumigatus isolates with alterations in CYP51A TR/L98H (5 isolates), M220 (9 isolates), G54 (9 isolates), and HapE (1 isolate), and A. terreus isolates (2 wild-type isolates and 1 isolate with an M217I CYP51A alteration), were analyzed. EUCAST E.Def 9.2 and CLSI M38-A2 MIC susceptibility testing was performed. ASP2397 MIC50 values (in milligrams per liter, with MIC ranges in parentheses) determined by EUCAST and CLSI were 0.5 (0.25 to 1) and 0.25 (0.06 to 0.25) against A. fumigatus CYP51A wild-type isolates and were similarly 0.5 (0.125 to >4) and 0.125 (0.06 to >4) against azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates, respectively. These values were comparable to those for amphotericin B, which were 0.25 (0.125 to 0.5) and 0.25 (0.125 to 0.25) against wild-type isolates and 0.25 (0.125 to 1) and 0.25 (0.125 to 1) against isolates with azole resistance mechanisms, respectively. In contrast, MICs for the azole compounds were elevated and highest for itraconazole: >4 (1 to >4) and 4 (0.5 to >4) against isolates with azole resistance mechanisms compared to 0.125 (0.125 to 0.25) and 0.125 (0.06 to 0.25) against wild-type isolates, respectively. ASP2397 was active against A. terreus CYP51A wild-type isolates (MIC 0.5 to 1), whereas MICs of both azole and ASP2397 were elevated for the mutant isolate. ASP2397 displayed in vitro activity against A. fumigatus and A. terreus isolates which was independent of the presence or absence of azole target gene resistance mutations in A. fumigatus. The findings are promising at a time when azole-resistant A. fumigatus

  9. Acquired Activated Protein C Resistance, Thrombophilia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Study Performed in an Irish Cohort of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Sedano-Balbás, Sara; Lyons, Mark; Cleary, Brendan; Murray, Margaret; Gaffney, Geraldine; Maher, Majella

    2011-01-01

    The combination of thrombophilia and pregnancy increases the risk of thrombosis and the potential for adverse outcomes during pregnancy. The most significant common inherited risk factor for thrombophilia is activated protein C resistance (APCR), a poor anticoagulant response of APC in haemostasis, which is mainly caused by an inherited single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), factor V G1691A (FV Leiden) (FVL), referred as inherited APCR. Changes in the levels of coagulation factors: FV, FVIII, and FIX, and anticoagulant factors: protein S (PS) and protein C (PC) can alter APC function causing acquired APCR. Prothrombin G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T are prothrombotic SNPs which in association with APCR can also increase the risk of thrombosis amongst Caucasians. In this study, a correlation between an acquired APCR phenotype and increased levels of factors V, VIII, and IX was demonstrated. Thrombophilic mutations amongst our acquired APCR pregnant women cohort are relatively common but do not appear to exert a severe undue adverse effect on pregnancy. PMID:21869933

  10. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. PMID:25096655

  11. Let-7 modulates acquired resistance of ovarian cancer to Taxanes via IMP-1-mediated stabilization of MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Boyerinas, Benjamin; Park, Sun-Mi; Murmann, Andrea E.; Gwin, Katja; Montag, Anton G.; Zillardt, Marion R.; Hua, You-Jia; Lengyel, Ernst; Peter, Marcus E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ovarian cancer patients frequently develop resistance to chemotherapy regiments utilizing Taxol and carboplatin. One of the resistance factors that protects cancer cells from Taxol-based therapy is multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1). micro(mi)RNAs are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate protein expression. Members of the let-7 family of miRNAs are downregulated in many human cancers, and low let-7 expression has been correlated with resistance to microtubule targeting drugs (Taxanes), although little is known that would explain this activity. We now provide evidence that, while let-7 is not a universal sensitizer of cancer cells to Taxanes, it affects acquired resistance of cells to this class of drugs by targeting IMP-1, resulting in de-stabilization of the mRNA of MDR1. Introducing let-7g into ADR-RES cells expressing both IMP-1 and MDR1 reduced expression of both proteins rendering the cells more sensitive to treatment with either Taxol or vinblastine without affecting the sensitivity of the cells to carboplatin, a non-MDR1 substrate. This effect could be reversed by reintroducing IMP-1 into let-7g high/MDR1 low cells causing MDR1 to again become stabilized. Consistently, many relapsed ovarian cancer patients tested before and after chemotherapy were found to downregulate let-7 and to co-upregulate IMP-1 and MDR1, and the increase in the expression levels of both proteins after chemotherapy negatively correlated with disease-free time before recurrence. Our data point at IMP-1 and MDR1 as indicators for response to therapy, and at IMP-1 as a novel therapeutic target for overcoming multidrug resistance of ovarian cancer. PMID:21618519

  12. Estimating Trends in the Proportion of Transmitted and Acquired HIV Drug Resistance in a Long Term Observational Cohort in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schülter, Eugen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Jensen, Björn-Erik Ole; Stoll, Matthias; Bogner, Johannes R.; Eberle, Josef; Meixenberger, Karolin; Kücherer, Claudia; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed trends in the proportion of transmitted (TDR) and acquired (ADR) HIV drug resistance and associated mutations between 2001 and 2011 in the German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study. Method The German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study is a subset of the German ClinSurv-HIV Cohort. For the ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study all available sequences isolated from patients in five study centres of the long term observational ClinSurv-HIV Cohort were included. TDR was estimated using the first viral sequence of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve patients. One HIV sequence/patient/year of ART experienced patients was considered to estimate the proportion of ADR. Trends in the proportion of HIV drug resistance were calculated by logistic regression. Results 9,528 patients were included into the analysis. HIV-sequences of antiretroviral naïve and treatment experienced patients were available from 34% (3,267/9,528) of patients. The proportion of TDR over time was stable at 10.4% (95% CI 9.1–11.8; p for trend = 0.6; 2001–2011). The proportion of ADR among all treated patients was 16%, whereas it was high among those with available HIV genotypic resistance test (64%; 1,310/2,049 sequences; 95% CI 62–66) but declined significantly over time (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.77–0.83; p for trend<0.001; 2001–2011). Viral load monitoring subsequent to resistance testing was performed in the majority of treated patients (96%) and most of them (67%) were treated successfully. Conclusions The proportion of TDR was stable in this study population. ADR declined significantly over time. This decline might have been influenced by broader resistance testing, resistance test guided therapy and the availability of more therapeutic options and not by a decline in the proportion of TDR within the study population. PMID:25148412

  13. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  14. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  15. Delivery of tumor-homing TRAIL sensitizer with long-acting TRAIL as a therapy for TRAIL-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yumin; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Sung Mook; Eom, Ha Na; Park, Jae Hyung; Na, Dong Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Kang Choon; Pomper, Martin G; Lee, Seulki

    2015-12-28

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has attracted great interest as a cancer therapy because it selectively induces death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells while sparing normal tissue. However, recombinant human TRAIL demonstrates limited therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials, possibly due to TRAIL-resistance of primary cancers and its inherent short half-life. Here we introduce drug delivery approaches to maximize in vivo potency of TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant tumor xenografts by (1) extending the half-life of the ligand with PEGylated TRAIL (TRAILPEG) and (2) concentrating a TRAIL sensitizer, selected from in vitro screening, in tumors via tumor-homing nanoparticles. Antitumor efficacy of TRAILPEG with tumor-homing sensitizer was evaluated in HCT116 and HT-29 colon xenografts. Western blot, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and cell viability assays were employed to investigate mechanisms of action and antitumor efficacy of the combination. We discovered that doxorubicin (DOX) sensitizes TRAIL-resistant HT-29 colon cancer cells to TRAIL by upregulating mRNA expression of DR5 by 60% in vitro. Intravenously administered free DOX does not effectively upregulate DR5 in tumor tissues nor demonstrate synergy with TRAILPEG in HT-29 xenografts, but rather introduces significant systemic toxicity. Alternatively, when DOX was encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles (HAC/DOX) and intravenously administered with TRAILPEG, DR-mediated apoptosis was potentiated in HT-29 tumors by upregulating DR5 protein expression by 70% and initiating both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways with reduced systemic toxicity compared to HAC/DOX or free DOX combined with TRAILPEG (80% vs. 40% survival rate; 75% vs. 34% tumor growth inhibition). This study demonstrates a unique approach to overcome TRAIL-based therapy drawbacks using sequential administration of a tumor-homing TRAIL sensitizer and long-acting TRAILPEG. PMID:26381901

  16. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Miltefosine Resistance in Leishmania infantum Strains with Either Natural or Acquired Resistance through Experimental Selection of Intracellular Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Sarah; Eberhardt, Eline; Garcia-Hernandez, Raquel; Lachaud, Laurence; Cotton, James; Sanders, Mandy; Cuypers, Bart; Imamura, Hideo; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Delputte, Peter; Cos, Paul; Caljon, Guy; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade miltefosine (MIL) has been used as first-line treatment for visceral leishmaniasis in endemic areas with antimonial resistance, but a decline in clinical effectiveness is now being reported. While only two MIL-resistant Leishmania infantum strains from HIV co-infected patients have been documented, phenotypic MIL-resistance for L. donovani has not yet been identified in the laboratory. Hence, a better understanding of the factors contributing to increased MIL-treatment failure is necessary. Given the paucity of defined MIL-resistant L. donovani clinical isolates, this study used an experimental amastigote-selected MIL-resistant L. infantum isolate (LEM3323). In-depth exploration of the MIL-resistant phenotype was performed by coupling genomic with phenotypic data to gain insight into gene function and the mutant phenotype. A naturally MIL-resistant L. infantum clinical isolate (LEM5159) was included to compare both datasets. Phenotypically, resistance was evaluated by determining intracellular amastigote susceptibility in vitro and actual MIL-uptake. Genomic analysis provided supportive evidence that the resistance selection model on intracellular amastigotes can be a good proxy for the in vivo field situation since both resistant strains showed mutations in the same inward transporter system responsible for the acquired MIL-resistant phenotype. In line with previous literature findings in promastigotes, our data confirm a defective import machinery through inactivation of the LiMT/LiRos3 protein complex as the main mechanism for MIL-resistance also in intracellular amastigotes. Whole genome sequencing analysis of LEM3323 revealed a 2 base pair deletion in the LiMT gene that led to the formation an early stop codon and a truncation of the LiMT protein. Interestingly, LEM5159 revealed mutations in both the LiMT and LiRos3 genes, resulting in an aberrant expression of the LiMT protein. To verify that these mutations were indeed accountable for

  17. Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Miltefosine Resistance in Leishmania infantum Strains with Either Natural or Acquired Resistance through Experimental Selection of Intracellular Amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Mondelaers, Annelies; Sanchez-Cañete, Maria P; Hendrickx, Sarah; Eberhardt, Eline; Garcia-Hernandez, Raquel; Lachaud, Laurence; Cotton, James; Sanders, Mandy; Cuypers, Bart; Imamura, Hideo; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Delputte, Peter; Cos, Paul; Caljon, Guy; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago; Maes, Louis

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade miltefosine (MIL) has been used as first-line treatment for visceral leishmaniasis in endemic areas with antimonial resistance, but a decline in clinical effectiveness is now being reported. While only two MIL-resistant Leishmania infantum strains from HIV co-infected patients have been documented, phenotypic MIL-resistance for L. donovani has not yet been identified in the laboratory. Hence, a better understanding of the factors contributing to increased MIL-treatment failure is necessary. Given the paucity of defined MIL-resistant L. donovani clinical isolates, this study used an experimental amastigote-selected MIL-resistant L. infantum isolate (LEM3323). In-depth exploration of the MIL-resistant phenotype was performed by coupling genomic with phenotypic data to gain insight into gene function and the mutant phenotype. A naturally MIL-resistant L. infantum clinical isolate (LEM5159) was included to compare both datasets. Phenotypically, resistance was evaluated by determining intracellular amastigote susceptibility in vitro and actual MIL-uptake. Genomic analysis provided supportive evidence that the resistance selection model on intracellular amastigotes can be a good proxy for the in vivo field situation since both resistant strains showed mutations in the same inward transporter system responsible for the acquired MIL-resistant phenotype. In line with previous literature findings in promastigotes, our data confirm a defective import machinery through inactivation of the LiMT/LiRos3 protein complex as the main mechanism for MIL-resistance also in intracellular amastigotes. Whole genome sequencing analysis of LEM3323 revealed a 2 base pair deletion in the LiMT gene that led to the formation an early stop codon and a truncation of the LiMT protein. Interestingly, LEM5159 revealed mutations in both the LiMT and LiRos3 genes, resulting in an aberrant expression of the LiMT protein. To verify that these mutations were indeed accountable for

  18. Molecular Characterization of Acquired Enrofloxacin Resistance in Mycoplasma synoviae Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gerchman, I.; Mikula, I.; Gobbo, F.; Catania, S.; Levisohn, S.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro activity of enrofloxacin against 73 Mycoplasma synoviae field strains isolated in Israel and Europe was determined by broth microdilution. Decreased susceptibility to enrofloxacin was identified in 59% of strains, with the MICs ranging from 1 to >16 μg/ml. The estimated MIC50 and MIC90 values for enrofloxacin were 2 and 8 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, this study showed that 92% of recent Israeli field isolates (2009 to 2011) of M. synoviae have MICs of ≥2 μg/ml to enrofloxacin. Comparison of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) in M. synoviae isolates revealed a clear correlation between the presence of one of the amino acid substitutions Asp79-Asn, Thr80-Ala/Ile, Ser81-Pro, and Asp84-Asn/Tyr/His of the ParC QRDR and decreased susceptibility to enrofloxacin (MIC, ≥1 μg/ml). Amino acid substitutions at positions GyrA 87, GyrB 401/402, and ParE 420/454 were also identified, but there was no clear-cut correlation with susceptibility to enrofloxacin. Comparison of vlhA molecular profiles revealed the presence of 9 different genotypes in the Israeli M. synoviae field isolates and 10 genotypes in the European isolates; only one vlhA genotype (type 4) was identified in both cohorts. Based on results of vlhA molecular typing, several mechanisms for emergence and dissemination of Israeli enrofloxacin-resistant M. synoviae isolates are suggested. PMID:23612192

  19. Benzoylsalicylic acid isolated from seed coats of Givotia rottleriformis induces systemic acquired resistance in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kamatham, Samuel; Neela, Kishore Babu; Pasupulati, Anil Kumar; Pallu, Reddanna; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Gudipalli, Padmaja

    2016-06-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a whole plant defense response to a broad spectrum of pathogens, is characterized by a coordinated expression of a large number of defense genes. Plants synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites to protect themselves from the invading microbial pathogens. Several studies have shown that salicylic acid (SA) is a key endogenous component of local and systemic disease resistance in plants. Although SA is a critical signal for SAR, accumulation of endogenous SA levels alone is insufficient to establish SAR. Here, we have identified a new acyl derivative of SA, the benzoylsalicylic acid (BzSA) also known as 2-(benzoyloxy) benzoic acid from the seed coats of Givotia rottleriformis and investigated its role in inducing SAR in tobacco and Arabidopsis. Interestingly, exogenous BzSA treatment induced the expression of NPR1 (Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene-1) and pathogenesis related (PR) genes. BzSA enhanced the expression of hypersensitivity related (HSR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and WRKY genes in tobacco. Moreover, Arabidopsis NahG plants that were treated with BzSA showed enhanced resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as evidenced by reduced leaf necrosis and TMV-coat protein levels in systemic leaves. We, therefore, conclude that BzSA, hitherto unknown natural plant product, is a new SAR inducer in plants. PMID:26988727

  20. Plasmodesmata-located protein overexpression negatively impacts the manifestation of systemic acquired resistance and the long-distance movement of Defective in Induced Resistance1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Carella, P; Isaacs, M; Cameron, R K

    2015-03-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defence response that provides immunity to distant uninfected leaves after an initial localised infection. The lipid transfer protein (LTP) Defective in Induced Resistance1 (DIR1) is an essential component of SAR that moves from induced to distant leaves following a SAR-inducing local infection. To understand how DIR1 is transported to distant leaves during SAR, we analysed DIR1 movement in transgenic Arabidopsis lines with reduced cell-to-cell movement caused by the overexpression of Plasmodesmata-Located Proteins PDLP1 and PDLP5. These PDLP-overexpressing lines were defective for SAR, and DIR1 antibody signals were not observed in phloem sap-enriched petiole exudates collected from distant leaves. Our data support the idea that cell-to-cell movement of DIR1 through plasmodesmata is important during long-distance SAR signalling in Arabidopsis. PMID:25296648

  1. Apparent Acquired Resistance by a Weevil to Its Parasitoid Is Influenced by Host Plant.

    PubMed

    Goldson, Stephen L; Tomasetto, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Field parasitism rates of the Argentine stem weevil Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Microctonus hyperodae Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are known to vary according to different host Lolium species that also differ in ploidy. To further investigate this, a laboratory study was conducted to examine parasitism rates on tetraploid Italian Lolium multiflorum, diploid Lolium perenne and diploid hybrid L. perenne ×L. multiflorum; none of which were infected by Epichloë endophyte. At the same time, the opportunity was taken to compare the results of this study with observations made during extensive laboratory-based research and parasitoid-rearing in the 1990s using the same host plant species. This made it possible to determine whether there has been any change in weevil susceptibility to the parasitoid over a 20 year period when in the presence of the tetraploid Italian, diploid perennial and hybrid host grasses that were commonly in use in the 1990's. The incidence of parasitism in cages, in the presence of these three grasses mirrored what has recently been observed in the field. When caged, weevil parasitism rates in the presence of a tetraploid Italian ryegrass host were significantly higher (75%) than rates that occurred in the presence of either the diploid perennial (46%) or the diploid hybrid (52%) grass, which were not significantly different from each other. This is very different to laboratory parasitism rates in the 1990s when in the presence of both of the latter grasses high rates of parasitism (c. 75%) were recorded. These high rates are typical of those still found in weevils in the presence of both field and caged tetraploid Italian grasses. In contrast, the abrupt decline in weevil parasitism rates points to the possibility of evolved resistance by the weevil to the parasitoid in the diploid and hybrid grasses, but not so in the tetraploid. The orientation of plants in the laboratory cages had no significant effect on

  2. Apparent Acquired Resistance by a Weevil to Its Parasitoid Is Influenced by Host Plant

    PubMed Central

    Goldson, Stephen L.; Tomasetto, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Field parasitism rates of the Argentine stem weevil Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Microctonus hyperodae Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are known to vary according to different host Lolium species that also differ in ploidy. To further investigate this, a laboratory study was conducted to examine parasitism rates on tetraploid Italian Lolium multiflorum, diploid Lolium perenne and diploid hybrid L. perenne ×L. multiflorum; none of which were infected by Epichloë endophyte. At the same time, the opportunity was taken to compare the results of this study with observations made during extensive laboratory-based research and parasitoid-rearing in the 1990s using the same host plant species. This made it possible to determine whether there has been any change in weevil susceptibility to the parasitoid over a 20 year period when in the presence of the tetraploid Italian, diploid perennial and hybrid host grasses that were commonly in use in the 1990’s. The incidence of parasitism in cages, in the presence of these three grasses mirrored what has recently been observed in the field. When caged, weevil parasitism rates in the presence of a tetraploid Italian ryegrass host were significantly higher (75%) than rates that occurred in the presence of either the diploid perennial (46%) or the diploid hybrid (52%) grass, which were not significantly different from each other. This is very different to laboratory parasitism rates in the 1990s when in the presence of both of the latter grasses high rates of parasitism (c. 75%) were recorded. These high rates are typical of those still found in weevils in the presence of both field and caged tetraploid Italian grasses. In contrast, the abrupt decline in weevil parasitism rates points to the possibility of evolved resistance by the weevil to the parasitoid in the diploid and hybrid grasses, but not so in the tetraploid. The orientation of plants in the laboratory cages had no significant effect

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khdair, Ayman; Chen, Di; Patil, Yogesh; Ma, Linan; Dou, Q. Ping; Shekhar, Malathy P.V.; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor drug resistance significantly limits the success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Tumor cells utilize multiple mechanisms to prevent the accumulation of anticancer drugs at their intracellular site of action. In this study, we investigated the anticancer efficacy of doxorubicin in combination with photodynamic therapy using methylene blue in a drug-resistant mouse tumor model. Surfactant-polymer hybrid nanoparticles formulated using an anionic surfactant, Aerosol-OT™ (AOT), and a naturally occurring polysaccharide polymer, sodium alginate, were used for synchronized delivery of the two drugs. Balb/c mice bearing syngeneic JC tumors (mammary adenocarcinoma) were used as a drug-resistant tumor model. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved animal survival. Nanoparticle-mediated combination treatment resulted in enhanced tumor accumulation of both doxorubicin and methylene blue, significant inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, and increased induction of apoptosis. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy using doxorubicin and methylene blue has significant therapeutic potential against drug-resistant tumors. PMID:19751777

  4. Convergence of Acquired Mutations and Alternative Splicing of CD19 Enables Resistance to CART-19 Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sotillo, Elena; Barrett, David M.; Black, Kathryn L; Bagashev, Asen; Oldridge, Derek; Wu, Glendon; Sussman, Robyn; Lanauze, Claudia; Ruella, Marco; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Martinez, Nicole M.; Harrington, Colleen T.; Chung, Elaine Y.; Perazzelli, Jessica; Hofmann, Ted J.; Maude, Shannon L.; Raman, Pichai; Barrera, Alejandro; Gill, Saar; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Allman, David; Jacoby, Elad; Fry, Terry; Mackall, Crystal; Barash, Yoseph; Lynch, Kristen W.; Maris, John M.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Thomas-Tikhonenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The CD19 antigen, expressed on most B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL), can be targeted with chimeric antigen receptor–armed T cells (CART-19), but relapses with epitope loss occur in 10% to 20% of pediatric responders. We detected hemizygous deletions spanning the CD19 locus and de novo frameshift and missense mutations in exon 2 of CD19 in some relapse samples. However, we also discovered alternatively spliced CD19 mRNA species, including one lacking exon 2. Pull-down/siRNA experiments identified SRSF3 as a splicing factor involved in exon 2 retention, and its levels were lower in relapsed B-ALL. Using genome editing, we demonstrated that exon 2 skipping bypasses exon 2 mutations in B-ALL cells and allows expression of the N-terminally truncated CD19 variant, which fails to trigger killing by CART-19 but partly rescues defects associated with CD19 loss. Thus, this mechanism of resistance is based on a combination of deleterious mutations and ensuing selection for alternatively spliced RNA isoforms. Significance CART-19 yield 70% response rates in patients with B-ALL, but also produce escape variants. We discovered that the underlying mechanism is the selection for preexisting alternatively spliced CD19 isoforms with the compromised CART-19 epitope. This mechanism suggests a possibility of targeting alternative CD19 ectodomains, which could improve survival of patients with B-cell neoplasms. PMID:26516065

  5. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. PMID:24965864

  6. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  7. Lemierre Syndrome Secondary to Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Associated with Cavernous Sinus Thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Craig; Josiah, Anne F.; Fortes, Manuel; Menaker, Jay; Cole, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lemierre’s Syndrome (LS) is a highly aggressive rare disease process with a predilection for young, healthy adolescents. Often beginning with a primary cervicofacial infection, LS rapidly progresses to thrombophlebitis of the cerebral vasculature, metastatic infection, and septicemia. Untreated LS can be rapidly fatal. Thrombus within the cerebral vasculature can have devastating neurological effects. Advances in antibacterial therapy have resulted in a global decline in the incidence of LS, and clinicians may not consider LS early in the disease process. While the mortality of LS has declined, the morbidity associated with the disease has increased, particularly the neurological sequelae. Objectives This report will provide readers with a better understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, evaluation methods, and appropriate treatment of LS. Case Report We present an atypical case of LS secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection progressing to bilateral cavernous sinus and ophthalmic vein thromboses with resultant binocular vision loss secondary to optic nerve and retinal ischemia. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of early recognition of LS in the setting of a community-acquired MRSA infection as the unifying condition in a young patient with multiple acute neurologic impairments. PMID:22989693

  8. Differential Distribution and Expression of Panton-Valentine Leucocidin among Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Saïd-Salim, Battouli; Mathema, Barun; Braughton, Kevin; Davis, Stacy; Sinsimer, Daniel; Eisner, William; Likhoshvay, Yekaterina; DeLeo, Frank R.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2005-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging threat worldwide. CA-MRSA strains differ from hospital-acquired MRSA strains in their antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic backgrounds. Using several genotyping methods, we clearly define CA-MRSA at the genetic level and demonstrate that the prototypic CA-MRSA strain, MW2, has spread as a homogeneous clonal strain family that is distinct from other CA-MRSA strains. The Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-encoding genes, lukF and lukS, are prevalent among CA-MRSA strains and have previously been associated with CA-MRSA infections. To better elucidate the role of PVL in the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we first analyzed the distribution and expression of PVL among different CA-MRSA strains. Our data demonstrate that PVL genes are differentially distributed among CA-MRSA strains and, when they are present, are always transcribed, albeit with strain-to-strain variability of transcript levels. To directly test whether PVL is critical for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we evaluated the lysis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during phagocytic interaction with PVL-positive and PVL-negative CA-MRSA strains. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between PVL expression and PMN lysis, suggesting that additional virulence factors underlie leukotoxicity and, thus, the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA. PMID:16000462

  9. GLP-1 responses are heritable and blunted in acquired obesity with high liver fat and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina; Bogl, Leonie H; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesper; Lundbom, Nina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Holst, Jens J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired incretin response represents an early and uniform defect in type 2 diabetes, but the contributions of genes and the environment are poorly characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 35 monozygotic (MZ) and 75 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (discordant and concordant for obesity) to determine the heritability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the influence of acquired obesity to GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) during OGTT or meal test. RESULTS The heritability of GLP-1 area under the curve was 67% (95% CI 45-80). Cotwins from weight-concordant MZ and DZ pairs and weight-discordant MZ pairs but concordant for liver fat content demonstrated similar glucose, insulin, and incretin profiles after the OGTT and meal tests. In contrast, higher insulin responses and blunted 60-min GLP-1 responses during the OGTT were observed in the heavier as compared with leaner MZ cotwins discordant for BMI, liver fat, and insulin sensitivity. Blunted GLP-1 response to OGTT was observed in heavier as compared with leaner DZ cotwins discordant for obesity and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS Whereas the GLP-1 response to the OGTT is heritable, an acquired unhealthy pattern of obesity characterized by liver fat accumulation and insulin resistance is closely related to impaired GLP-1 response in young adults. PMID:23990519

  10. Induction of acquired resistance to anti estrogen by reversible mitochondrial DNA depletion in breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Akihiro; Carcel-Trullols, Jaime; Xie, Cheng-hui; Evans, Teresa T; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Although the net benefits of tamoxifen in adjuvant breast cancer therapy have been proven, the recurrence of the cancer in an aggressive and hormone independent form has been highly problematic. We previously demonstrated the important role mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) plays in hormone-independence in prostate cancer. Here, the role of mtDNA in breast cancer progression was investigated. We established hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) resistant HTRMCF by growing MCF-7, a human breast adenocarcinoma cells, in the presence of 4-OHT. HTRMCF was cross-resistant to 4-OHT and ICI182,780 concurrent with the depletion of mtDNA. To further investigate the role of mtDNA depletion, MCF-7 was depleted of mtDNA by treatment with ethidium bromide. MCFρ0 was resistant to both 4-OHT and ICI182,780. Furthermore, cybrid (MCFcyb) prepared by fusion MCFρ0 with platelet to transfer mtDNA showed susceptibility to anti-estrogen. Surprisingly, after withdrawal of 4-OHT for 8 weeks, HTRMCF and their clones became susceptible to both drugs concurrent with a recovery of mtDNA. Herein, our results substantiated the first evidence that the depletion of mtDNA induced by hormone therapy triggers a shift to acquired resistance to hormone therapy in breast cancer. In addition, we showed that mtDNA depletion can be reversed, rendering the cancer cells susceptible to anti-estrogen. The hormone independent phenotype can be reversed should be a step toward more effective treatments for estrogen-responsive breast cancer. PMID:17990320

  11. Low inducible expression of p21Cip1 confers resistance to paclitaxel in BRAF mutant melanoma cells with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun-Hee; Kim, Na-Yeon; Lee, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of oncogenic BRAF inhibitor is limited by the onset of acquired resistance. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of the mitotic inhibitor paclitaxel on three melanoma cell lines with differing sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor. Of the two BRAF inhibitor-resistant cell lines, A375P/Mdr cells harboring the BRAF V600E mutant were resistant and the wild-type BRAF SK-MEL-2 cells were sensitive to paclitaxel. In particular, paclitaxel caused the growth inhibition of SK-MEL-2 cells to a much greater extent than it caused growth inhibition of A375P cells. Paclitaxel exhibited no significant effect on the phosphorylation of MEK-ERK in any cell lines tested, regardless of both the BRAF mutation and the drug resistance, implying that paclitaxel activity is independent of MEK-ERK inhibition. In A375P cells, paclitaxel treatment resulted in a marked emergence of apoptotic cells after mitotic arrest, concomitant with a remarkable induction of p21(Cip1). However, paclitaxel only moderately increased the levels of p21(Cip1) in A375P/Mdr cells, which exhibited a strong resistance to paclitaxel. The p21(Cip1) overexpression partially conferred paclitaxel sensitivity to A375P/Mdr cells. Interestingly, we found an extremely low background expression level of p21(Cip1) in SK-MEL-2 cells lacking normal p53 function, which caused much greater G2/M arrest than that seen in A375P cells. Taken together, these results suggest that paclitaxel may be an effective anticancer agent through regulating the expression of p21(Cip1) for the treatment of BRAF mutant melanoma cells resistant to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:25912549

  12. Increased thymidylate synthase in L1210 cells possessing acquired resistance to N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717): development, characterization, and cross-resistance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, A.L.; Alison, D.L.; Calvert, A.H.; Harrap, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    The properties are described of a mutant L1210 cell line (L1210:C15) with acquired resistance (greater than 200-fold) to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. TS was overproduced 45-fold and was accompanied by a small increase in the activity of dihydrofolate reductase (2.6-fold). Both the level of resistance and enzyme activities were maintained in drug-free medium (greater than 300 generations). Failure of N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid to suppress the (/sup 3/H)-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the acid-precipitable material of the resistant line supported the evidence that TS overproduction was the mechanism of resistance; consequently the L1210:C15 cells were largely cross-resistant to another (but weaker) TS inhibitor, 5,8-dideazafolic acid. Minimal cross-resistance was observed to the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors methotrexate and 5-methyl-5,8-dideazaaminopterin (5- and 2-fold, respectively). L1210 and L1210:C15 cells were, however, equally sensitive to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), an unexpected finding since a metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, is a potent TS inhibitor; however, this cytotoxicity against the L1210:C15 cells was antagonized by coincubation with 5 microM folinic acid although folinic acid potentiated the cytotoxicity of FdUrd to the N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid-sensitive L1210 line. Thymidine was much less effective as a FdUrd protecting agent in the L1210:C15 when compared with the L1210 cells; however, a combination of thymidine plus hypoxanthine was without any additional effect (compared with thymidine alone) against the sensitive line but effectively protected L1210:C15 cells.

  13. Metabolomic analysis reveals the relationship between AZI1 and sugar signaling in systemic acquired resistance of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Dian-Zhen; Li, Qi; Ma, Yan-Qin; Yao, Jing-Wen; Huang, Xuan; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-10-01

    The function of AZI1 in systemic acquired resistance of Arabidopsis was confirmed by investigation of the phenotypic features of wild-type Col-0, AZI1 T-DNA knockout and AZI1 overexpressing plants after infection with virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae. Real-time quantitative PCR and Northern blotting analyses showed that the transcript abundances of PR genes increased significantly in local and systemic leaves of wild-type Col-0 and AZI1 overexpressing plants challenged with avirulent P. syringae, whereas the mRNA accumulation of PR genes was obviously attenuated in local and systemic leaves of AZI1 T-DNA knockout plants after localized infiltration with avirulent Psm avrRpm1. The changes of metabolomic profiles in distal leaves of three types of materials infected with avirulent P. syringae were determined by (1)H NMR spectrometry and data mining showed that the soluble carbonhydrates might function as signal substances in the systemic immunity of Arabidopsis. At the same time, the expression of the sugar signaling genes in local and distal leaves after infection of avirulent P. syringae was compared. As a result, it was found that the transcript abundances of sugar signaling genes, including SUS1, SUS2, SUS3, SUS6, SUT1, HXK1, HXK2, SNRK1.2, ERD6, TPS1, TOR, SNRK1.1, SNRK1.3 and bZIP11, were obviously changed in distal leaves of different materials with the modulated AZI1 activities, indicating sugar-related genes are involved in regulation of the systemic immunity mediated by AZI1. These results also illustrated that the immune system associated with sugar molecules probably was an important part of the systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27337039

  14. Tumor cells chronically treated with a trastuzumab-maytansinoid antibody-drug conjugate develop varied resistance mechanisms but respond to alternate treatments.

    PubMed

    Loganzo, Frank; Tan, Xingzhi; Sung, Matthew; Jin, Guixian; Myers, Jeremy S; Melamud, Eugene; Wang, Fang; Diesl, Veronica; Follettie, Maximillian T; Musto, Sylvia; Lam, My-Hanh; Hu, William; Charati, Manoj B; Khandke, Kiran; Kim, Kenny Sung Kyoo; Cinque, Mike; Lucas, Judy; Graziani, Edmund; Maderna, Andreas; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Arndt, Kim T; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are emerging as clinically effective therapy. We hypothesized that cancers treated with ADCs would acquire resistance mechanisms unique to immunoconjugate therapy and that changing ADC components may overcome resistance. Breast cancer cell lines were exposed to multiple cycles of anti-Her2 trastuzumab-maytansinoid ADC (TM-ADC) at IC80 concentrations followed by recovery. The resistant cells, 361-TM and JIMT1-TM, were characterized by cytotoxicity, proteomic, transcriptional, and other profiling. Approximately 250-fold resistance to TM-ADC developed in 361-TM cells, and cross-resistance was observed to other non-cleavable-linked ADCs. Strikingly, these 361-TM cells retained sensitivity to ADCs containing cleavable mcValCitPABC-linked auristatins. In JIMT1-TM cells, 16-fold resistance to TM-ADC developed, with cross-resistance to other trastuzumab-ADCs. Both 361-TM and JIMT1-TM cells showed minimal resistance to unconjugated mertansine (DM1) and other chemotherapeutics. Proteomics and immunoblots detected increased ABCC1 (MRP1) drug efflux protein in 361-TM cells, and decreased Her2 (ErbB2) in JIMT1-TM cells. Proteomics also showed alterations in various pathways upon chronic exposure to the drug in both cell models. Tumors derived from 361-TM cells grew in mice and were refractory to TM-ADC compared with parental cells. Hence, acquired resistance to trastuzumab-maytansinoid ADC was generated in cultured cancer cells by chronic drug treatment, and either increased ABCC1 protein or reduced Her2 antigen were primary mediators of resistance. These ADC-resistant cell models retain sensitivity to other ADCs or standard-of-care chemotherapeutics, suggesting that alternate therapies may overcome acquired ADC resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(4); 952-63. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25646013

  15. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  16. Resistance Development: A Major Piece in the Jigsaw Puzzle of Tumor Size Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, N; Girard, P; Klinkhardt, U; Munafo, A

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of tumor size (TS) dynamics and tumor growth inhibition (TGI) need to place more emphasis on resistance development, given its relevant implications for clinical outcomes. A deeper understanding of the underlying processes, and effective data integration at different complexity levels, can foster the incorporation of new mechanistic aspects into modeling approaches, improving anticancer drug effect prediction. As such, we propose a general framework for developing future semi-mechanistic TS/TGI models of drug resistance. PMID:26225260

  17. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. ); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. ); Gazdar, A.F. ); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. ); Von Hoff, D.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  18. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  19. Targeting anthracycline-resistant tumor cells with synthetic aloe-emodin glycosides.

    PubMed

    Breiner-Goldstein, Elinor; Evron, Zoharia; Frenkel, Michael; Cohen, Keren; Meiron, Keren Nir; Peer, Dan; Roichman, Yael; Flescher, Eliezer; Fridman, Micha

    2011-07-14

    The cytotoxic activity of aloe-emodin (AE), a natural anthranoid that readily permeates anthracycline-resistant tumor cells, was improved by the attachment of an amino-sugar unit to its anthraquinone core. The new class of AE glycosides (AEGs) showed a significant improvement in cytotoxicity-up to more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than those of AE and the clinically used anthracycline doxorubicin (DOX)-against several cancer cell lines with different levels of DOX resistance. Incubation with the synthetic AEGs induced cell death in less than one cell cycle, indicating that these compounds do not directly target the cell division mechanism. Confocal microscopy provided evidence that unlike DOX, AEGs accumulated in anthracycline-resistant tumor cells in which resistance is conferred by P-glycoprotein efflux pumps. The results of this study demonstrate that AEGs may serve as a promising scaffold for the development of cytotoxic agents capable of overcoming anthracycline resistance in tumor cells. PMID:24900344

  20. Synergistic inhibitory effects by the combination of gefitinib and genistein on NSCLC with acquired drug-resistance in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hang; Cheng, Hua; Ren, Yuan; Liu, Zhan Guo; Zhang, Yi Fang; De Luo, Bing

    2012-04-01

    In clinical practice, most patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors eventually progress because of an acquired resistance mutation, T790M, in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Thus, it is important to identify a new drug to reduce resistance. The aim of this study was to test whether genistein combined with gefitinib is effective against NSCLC in a cell line carrying T790M, and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. The human lung cancer cell line H1975 was used as an in vitro and in vivo model. Cells were treated with gefitinib, genistein, or a combination at a range of concentrations. Cell proliferation was calculated to assess the anticancer effects of the compounds in vitro. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were employed to determine the inhibitory effects on proliferation and the induction of apoptosis. The in vivo effects of the compounds were examined using a xenografted nude mouse model for validation. Gefitinib together with genistein enhanced both growth inhibition and apoptosis; however, the greatest synergistic effect was observed at low concentrations. p-EGFR, p-Akt, and p-mTOR expressions in vitro were reduced more by the combined use of the drugs, whereas caspase-3 and PARP activities were increased. Significantly more tumor growth inhibition was detected following combination treatment in the in vivo model. These findings suggest that genistein enhanced the antitumor effects of gefitinib in a NSCLC cell line carrying the T790M mutation. This synergistic activity may be due to increased inhibition of the downstream molecular and pro-apoptotic effects of EGFR. PMID:22160570

  1. Tumor endothelial expression of P-glycoprotein upon microvesicular transfer of TrpC5 derived from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, YePing; Pan, QiongXi; Jiang, Li; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, FangFang; Liu, YanJun; Xing, Hui; Shi, Mei; Li, Jiao; Li, XiYuan; Zhu, YaoDan; Chen, Yun; Bruce, Iain C.; Jin, Jian Ma, Xin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TrpC5 was mainly accumulated in microvesicles of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells. • Microvesicles from MCF-7/ADM transferred TrpC5 to endothelial cells. • TrpC5 inhibition reduced P-glycoprotein accumulation on tumor blood vessels in vivo. - Abstract: Treatment of carcinoma commonly fails due to chemoresistance. Studies have shown that endothelial cells acquire resistance via the tumor microenvironment. Microvesicle (MV) shedding from the cell membrane to the microenvironment plays an important role in communication between cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MCF-7 adriamycin-resistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) shed MVs that alter the characteristics of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMECs). MVs from tumor cells transferred a Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channel TrpC5 to HMECs, inducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by activation of the transcription factor NFATc3 (nuclear factor of activated T cells isoform c3). Expression of the mdr1 gene was blocked by the TrpC5-blocking antibody T5E3, and the production of P-gp in HMECs was reduced by blockade of TrpC5. Thus, we postulate that endothelial cells acquire the resistant protein upon exposure to TrpC5-containg MVs in the microenvironment, and express P-gp in the TrpC5–NFATc3 signal pathway.

  2. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  3. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E.; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A. Corina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation. PMID:25114016

  4. Tunable-combinatorial Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance Limit the Efficacy of BRAF/MEK Co-targeting but Result in Melanoma Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Gatien; Hugo, Willy; Hong, Aayoung; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Yu, Clarissa C.; Koya, Richard C.; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Khanlou, Negar; Braun, Jonathan; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Seifert, Heike; Larkin, James; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Algazi, Alain; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Combined BRAF and MEK targeted therapy improves upon BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy but is still beset by acquired resistance. We show that melanomas acquire resistance to combined BRAF and MEK inhibition by augmenting or combining mechanisms of single-agent BRAFi resistance. These double-drug resistance-associated genetic configurations significantly altered molecular interactions underlying MAPK pathway reactivation. V600EBRAF, expressed at supra-physiological levels because of V600EBRAF ultra-amplification, dimerized with and activated CRAF. In addition, MEK mutants enhanced interaction with over-expressed V600EBRAF via a regulatory interface at R662 of V600EBRAF. Importantly, melanoma cell lines selected for resistance to BRAFi+MEKi, but not those to BRAFi alone, displayed robust drug addiction, providing a potentially exploitable therapeutic opportunity. PMID:25600339

  5. Antagonistic human FcγRIIB (CD32B) antibodies have anti-tumor activity and overcome resistance to antibody therapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roghanian, Ali; Teige, Ingrid; Mårtensson, Linda; Cox, Kerry L; Kovacek, Mathilda; Ljungars, Anne; Mattson, Jenny; Sundberg, Annika; Vaughan, Andrew T; Shah, Vallari; Smyth, Neil R; Sheth, Bhavwanti; Chan, H T Claude; Li, Zhan-Chun; Williams, Emily L; Manfredi, Giusi; Oldham, Robert J; Mockridge, C Ian; James, Sonya A; Dahal, Lekh N; Hussain, Khiyam; Nilsson, Björn; Verbeek, J Sjef; Juliusson, Gunnar; Hansson, Markus; Jerkeman, Mats; Johnson, Peter W M; Davies, Andrew; Beers, Stephen A; Glennie, Martin J; Frendéus, Björn; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-04-13

    Therapeutic antibodies have transformed cancer therapy, unlocking mechanisms of action by engaging the immune system. Unfortunately, cures rarely occur and patients display intrinsic or acquired resistance. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting human (h) FcγRIIB (CD32B), a receptor implicated in immune cell desensitization and tumor cell resistance. FcγRIIB-blocking antibodies prevented internalization of the CD20-specific antibody rituximab, thereby maximizing cell surface accessibility and immune effector cell mediated antitumor activity. In hFcγRIIB-transgenic (Tg) mice, FcγRIIB-blocking antibodies effectively deleted target cells in combination with rituximab, and other therapeutic antibodies, from resistance-prone stromal compartments. Similar efficacy was seen in primary human tumor xenografts, including with cells from patients with relapsed/refractory disease. These data support the further development of hFcγRIIB antibodies for clinical assessment. PMID:25873171

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12 contribute to resistance to the intracellular bacterium Brucella abortus by different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Liu, Z; Cheers, C

    1996-01-01

    Both interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) are produced early in intracellular bacterial infection. Depletion of either IL-12 or TNF-alpha by a single injection of specific antibody 4 h before the injection of Brucella abortus 19 led to the exacerbation of infection 2 weeks later. Whereas the effect of IL-12 depletion on resistance was persistent and exacerbation was still significant 6 weeks later, the bacterial numbers in mice depleted of TNF-alpha were similar to the bacterial numbers in control infected mice by 6 weeks postinfection. Massive splenomegaly, which is often seen in 2-week Brucella-infected mice, was not observed in IL-12- or TNF-alpha-depleted mice. Both IL-12- and TNF-alpha-depleted mice showed reduced cell accumulation in the spleen compared with the massive cell accumulation in control infected mice. Granuloma formation in livers was much reduced in IL-12-depleted mice but not in TNF-alpha-depleted mice. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by cells from TNF-alpha-depleted mice was not significantly different from that of cells from control infected mice. In contrast, the production of IFN-gamma by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from IL-12-depleted mice was greatly reduced, compared with that from control infected mice. This effect was still observed when the antibody injection was delayed for up to 7 days postinfection, but injections of anti-IL-12 antibody into mice with established Brucella infection had no significant effect on IFN-gamma production by T cells. Taken together, these results suggested that IL-12 contributed to resistance mainly via an IFN-gamma-dependent pathway and had a profound effect on the induction of acquired cellular resistance. In contrast, TNF-alpha was involved in resistance possibly via direct action on effector cells and may not be essential for the induction of acquired cellular resistance. PMID:8698508

  7. Expression of the Homeobox Gene HOXA9 in Ovarian Cancer Induces Peritoneal Macrophages to Acquire an M2 Tumor-Promoting Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Song Yi; Ladanyi, Andras; Lengyel, Ernst; Naora, Honami

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) exhibit an M2 macrophage phenotype that suppresses anti-tumor immune responses and often correlates with poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer frequently present with peritoneal carcinomatosis, but the mechanisms that induce naïve peritoneal macrophages into TAMs are poorly understood. In this study, we found an increased abundance of TAMs in mouse i.p. xenograft models of ovarian cancer that expressed HOXA9, a homeobox gene that is associated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. HOXA9 expression in ovarian cancer cells stimulated chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages and induced macrophages to acquire TAM-like features. These features included induction of the M2 markers, CD163 and CD206, and the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and chemokine ligand 17, and down-regulation of the immunostimulatory cytokine, IL-12. HOXA9-mediated induction of TAMs was primarily due to the combinatorial effects of HOXA9-induced, tumor-derived transforming growth factor-β2 and chemokine ligand 2 levels. High HOXA9 expression in clinical specimens of ovarian cancer was strongly associated with increased abundance of TAMs and intratumoral T-regulatory cells and decreased abundance of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Levels of immunosuppressive cytokines were also elevated in ascites fluid of patients with tumors that highly expressed HOXA9. HOXA9 may, therefore, stimulate ovarian cancer progression by promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment via paracrine effects on peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24332016

  8. T Cells Expressing Constitutively Active Akt Resist Multiple Tumor-associated Inhibitory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiali; Dotti, Gianpietro; Huye, Leslie E; Foster, Aaron E; Savoldo, Barbara; Gramatges, Maria M; Spencer, David M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has shown promise for the therapy of cancer. However, tumor-specific T cells are susceptible to diverse inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. The Akt/protein kinase B plays a central role in T-cell proliferation, function, and survival and we hypothesized that expression of constitutively active Akt (caAkt) in T cells could provide resistance to many of these tumor-associated inhibitory mechanisms. caAkt expression in activated human T cells increased proliferation and cytokine production, a likely result of their sustained expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and provided resistance to apoptosis by upregulating antiapoptotic molecules. caAkt expressing T cells (caAkt-T-cells) were also relatively resistant to suppression by and conversion into regulatory T cells (Tregs). These characteristics provided a survival advantage to T cells cocultured with tumor cells in vitro; CD3/28-stimulated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for disialoganglioside (GD2) that redirected their activity to the immunosuppressive, GD2-expressing neuroblastoma cell line, LAN-1, resisted tumor-induced apoptosis when co-expressing transgenic caAkt. In conclusion, caAkt-transduced T cells showed resistance to several evasion strategies employed by tumors and may therefore enhance the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes. PMID:20842106

  9. Intracranial tumors: response and resistance to therapeutic endeavors, 1970-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, H.J.G.

    1982-07-01

    The response and resistance of various kinds of intracranial tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. Such tumors as germinomas in the pineal and suprasellar regions are very radiosensitive and highly curable. Medulloblastomas are also very radiosensitive, but the presence of local residual resistant tumor has restricted cure rates to approximately 40%. High grade astrocytomas remain resistant to radiotherapy and virtually incurable. Inoperable deep gliomas vary widely in the response to irradiation. In addition to tumor response to treatment, consideration must also be given to reaction of normal tissue to irradiation, to chemotherapy, and to a combination of these modalities: these may produce late effects leading to disturbance of neurological and endocrine function and of intellectual and emotion disorders. (JMT)

  10. Elevated Cellular PD1/PD-L1 Expression Confers Acquired Resistance to Cisplatin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Pang, Jiuxia; Peng, Yong; Molina, Julian R; Yang, Ping; Liu, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Although small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is highly responsive to chemotherapies (e.g., cisplatin-etoposide doublet), virtually almost all responsive SCLC patients experience disease recurrence characterized by drug resistance. The mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance remain elusive. Here we report that cell-intrinsic expression of PD1 and PD-L1, two immune checkpoints, is required for sustained expansion of SCLC cells under cisplatin selection. Indeed, PD1 and PD-L1 were expressed at a higher level in lung cancer cell lines, tumor tissues, and importantly, in SCLC cells resistant to cisplatin (H69R, H82R), when compared to respective controls. Genetic abrogation of PD1 and PD-L1 in H69R and H82R cells decreased their proliferation rate, and restored their sensitivity to cisplatin. Mechanistically, PD-L1 upregulation in H69R and H82R cells was attributed to the overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) or receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, as knockdown of DNMT1 or KIT in H69R and H82R cells led to PD-L1 downregulation. Consequently, combined knockdown of PD-L1 with KIT or DNMT1 resulted in more pronounced inhibition of H69R and H82R cell growth. Thus, cell intrinsic PD1/PD-L1 signaling may be a predictor for poor efficacy of cisplatin treatment, and targeting the cellular PD1/PD-L1 axis may improve chemosensitization of aggressive SCLC. PMID:27610620

  11. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Silvina; Murzicato, Sofía; Sandoval, Orlando; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Mollerach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient. PMID:25681265

  12. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mechanisms of tumor resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth A; Nasto, Rochelle E; Ratushny, Vladimir; Weiner, Louis M; Golemis, Erica A

    2009-01-01

    Background Much effort has been devoted to development of cancer therapies targeting EGFR, based on its role in regulating cell growth. Small-molecule and antibody EGFR inhibitors have clinical roles based on their efficacy in a subset of cancers, generally as components of combination therapies. Many cancers are either initially resistant to EGFR inhibitors or become resistant during treatment, limiting the efficacy of these reagents. Objective/Methods To review cellular resistance mechanisms to EGFR-targeted therapies. Results/Conclusions The best validated of these mechanisms include activation of classic ATP-binding casette (ABC) multidrug transporters; activation or mutation of EGFR; and overexpression or activation of signaling proteins operating in relation to EGFR. We discuss current efforts and potential strategies to override these sources of resistance. We describe emerging systems-biology-based concepts of alternative resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies, and discuss their implications for use of EGFR-targeted and other targeted therapies. PMID:19236156

  14. Comparative genomics of community-acquired ST59 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan: novel mobile resistance structures with IS1216V.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Khokhlova, Olga; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with ST59/SCCmecV and Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene is a major community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) lineage in Taiwan and has been multidrug-resistant since its initial isolation. In this study, we studied the acquisition mechanism of multidrug resistance in an ST59 CA-MRSA strain (PM1) by comparative genomics. PM1's non-β-lactam resistance was encoded by two unique genetic traits. One was a 21,832-bp composite mobile element structure (MES(PM1)), which was flanked by direct repeats of enterococcal IS1216V and was inserted into the chromosomal sasK gene; the target sequence (att) was 8 bp long and was duplicated at both ends of MES(PM1). MES(PM1) consisted of two regions: the 5'-end side 12.4-kb region carrying Tn551 (with ermB) and Tn5405-like (with aph[3']-IIIa and aadE), similar to an Enterococcus faecalis plasmid, and the 3'-end side 6,587-bp region (MES(cat)) that carries cat and is flanked by inverted repeats of IS1216V. MES(cat) possessed att duplication at both ends and additional two copies of IS1216V inside. MES(PM1) represents the first enterococcal IS1216V-mediated composite transposon emerged in MRSA. IS1216V-mediated deletion likely occurred in IS1216V-rich MES(PM1), resulting in distinct resistance patterns in PM1-derivative strains. Another structure was a 6,025-bp tet-carrying element (MES(tet)) on a 25,961-bp novel mosaic penicillinase plasmid (pPM1); MES(tet) was flanked by direct repeats of IS431, but with no target sequence repeats. Moreover, the PM1 genome was deficient in a copy of the restriction and modification genes (hsdM and hsdS), which might have contributed to the acquisition of enterococcal multidrug resistance. PMID:23071689

  15. Endothelial Side Population Cells Contribute to Tumor Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Naito, Hisamichi; Wakabayashi, Taku; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Takara, Kazuhiro; Eino, Daisuke; Yamane, Keitaro; Iba, Tomohiro; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in tumor growth, with an undisputed contribution of resident endothelial cells (EC) to new blood vessels in the tumor. Here, we report the definition of a small population of vascular-resident stem/progenitor-like EC that contributes predominantly to new blood vessel formation in the tumor. Although the surface markers of this population are similar to other ECs, those from the lung vasculature possess colony-forming ability in vitro and contribute to angiogenesis in vivo These specific ECs actively proliferate in lung tumors, and the percentage of this population significantly increases in the tumor vasculature relative to normal lung tissue. Using genetic recombination and bone marrow transplant models, we show that these cells are phenotypically true ECs and do not originate from hematopoietic cells. After treatment of tumors with antiangiogenic drugs, these specific ECs selectively survived and remained in the tumor. Together, our results established that ECs in the peripheral vasculature are heterogeneous and that stem/progenitor-like ECs play an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis as EC-supplying cells. The lack of susceptibility of these ECs to antiangiogenic drugs may account for resistance of the tumor to this drug type. Thus, inhibiting these ECs might provide a promising strategy to overcome antiangiogenic drug resistance. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3200-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197162

  16. Clinical features and molecular characteristics of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Taiwanese children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Wong, Kin-Sun; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2007-11-01

    Highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been associated with morbidity and mortality in various countries of the world. We characterized the clinical and molecular features of pediatric invasive CA-MRSA infections in Taiwan. Between July 2000 and June 2005, 31 previously healthy children with invasive CA-MRSA infections were identified from 423 children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The medical records were reviewed. The clinical isolates, if available, were collected for molecular characterization. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male, and the mean age was 5.7 years. Adolescents accounted for 9 (29%) cases. Eighteen children had bone and/or joint infections, 14 had deep-seated soft tissue infections, 11 had pneumonia, and 2 had central nervous system infections. Multiorgan involvement was identified in 8 of 20 bacteremic cases. Twenty-two patients (71%) required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 27.4 days. All of the 15 available isolates were classified as sequence type (ST) 59 or its single locus variant and belonged to 2 previously reported community-associated clones containing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or type V(T) in Taiwan. Most of the isolates were multiresistant to clindamycin (94%) and erythromycin (97%). Eleven (73.3%) isolates carried pvl genes, and the strains harboring pvl genes were significantly associated with lung involvement. In conclusion, invasive CA-MRSA infections in pediatric population were not limited to young children. Surgical interventions were often required, and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy was needed. A multiresistant CA-MRSA clone characterized as ST59 was identified from these children in Taiwan. PMID:17662565

  17. Lack of acquired resistance in dogs to successive infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks from Brazil and Argentina.

    PubMed

    Évora, Patricia Martinez; Sanches, Gustavo Seron; Jusi, Márcia Mariza Gomes; Alves, Lucas Bocchini Rodrigues; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies between brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus populations from Brazil (Jaboticabal, São Paulo) and Argentina (Rafaela, Santa Fé) showed significant biological, morphological and genetic differences between them. This work aimed to study, in a comparative way, the acquisition of resistance in domestic dogs to R. sanguineus from Jaboticabal and Rafaela, after successive and controlled infestations. Ticks were kept in a BOD incubator under controlled conditions (27 °C, 80 % relative humidity, 12-h photoperiod). Ten dogs, Dachshund breed, males and females, 6 months old, short- or long-haired, without prior contact with ticks, were used as hosts. They were distributed into two experimental groups composed of five animals each: G1 infested with ten adult couples of R. sanguineus (Jaboticabal) per animal, and G2 infested with ten adult couples of R. sanguineus (Rafaela) per animal. Ticks' biological parameters and titration of antibodies from the dogs' sera by ELISA test were used for comparison between the strains. Results of the biological parameters showed that the dogs did not acquire immunity to either of the R. sanguineus strains after repeated infestations. The ELISA test showed low antibody titers in sera of dogs from G2, in successive infestations, and higher antibody responses post second and third infestations in G1. It also demonstrated cross-reactivity between sera of dogs infested with R. sanguineus (Jaboticabal) and antigens from R. sanguineus (Rafaela) and vice versa. We conclude that Dachshund dogs did not develop resistance against neither Jaboticabal nor Rafaela strains of R. sanguineus. PMID:26063405

  18. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. PMID:26884428

  19. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  20. Comparing the epidemiology of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone groups in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, S; Bush, K; Leal, J; Kim, J; Vickers, D M; Rusk, A; Fathima, S; Li, V; Chui, L; Louie, M; Henderson, E

    2016-07-01

    Patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones, which were traditionally seen in the community setting (USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10), are often identified as hospital-acquired (HA) infections using Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) surveillance definitions. This study examined the demographics and healthcare risk factors of patients with HA-MRSA to help understand if community MRSA clones are from a source internal or external to the hospital setting. Despite USA300/CMRSA10 being the predominant clone in Alberta, hospital clones (USA100/CMRSA2) still dominated in the acute care setting. In the Alberta hospitalized population, patients with USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10 clones were significantly younger, had fewer comorbidities, and a greater proportion had none or ambulatory care-only healthcare exposure. These findings suggest that there are two distinct populations of HA-MRSA patients, and the patients with USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10 clones identified in hospital more greatly resemble patients affected by those clones in the community. It is possible that epidemiological assessment overidentifies HA acquisition of MRSA in patients unscreened for MRSA on admission to acute care. PMID:26947456

  1. Antagonistic Interaction between Systemic Acquired Resistance and the Abscisic Acid–Mediated Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Michiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Seki, Motoaki; Umezawa, Taishi; Asami, Tadao; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko; Kudo, Toshiaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Nakashita, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a potent innate immunity system in plants that is effective against a broad range of pathogens. SAR development in dicotyledonous plants, such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis thaliana, is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). Here, using two types of SAR-inducing chemicals, 1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one1,1-dioxide and benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester, which act upstream and downstream of SA in the SAR signaling pathway, respectively, we show that treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) suppresses the induction of SAR in Arabidopsis. In an analysis using several mutants in combination with these chemicals, treatment with ABA suppressed SAR induction by inhibiting the pathway both upstream and downstream of SA, independently of the jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. Suppression of SAR induction by the NaCl-activated environmental stress response proved to be ABA dependent. Conversely, the activation of SAR suppressed the expression of ABA biosynthesis–related and ABA-responsive genes, in which the NPR1 protein or signaling downstream of NPR1 appears to contribute. Therefore, our data have revealed that antagonistic crosstalk occurs at multiple steps between the SA-mediated signaling of SAR induction and the ABA-mediated signaling of environmental stress responses. PMID:18586869

  2. Systemic Induction of the Small Antibacterial Compound in the Leaf Exudate During Benzothiadiazole-elicited Systemic Acquired Resistance in Pepper.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Yi, Hwe-Su; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from diverse potential pathogens by induction of the immune systems such as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Most bacterial plant pathogens thrive in the intercellular space (apoplast) of plant tissues and cause symptoms. The apoplastic leaf exudate (LE) is believed to contain nutrients to provide food resource for phytopathogenic bacteria to survive and to bring harmful phytocompounds to protect plants against bacterial pathogens. In this study, we employed the pepper-Xanthomonas axonopodis system to assess whether apoplastic fluid from LE in pepper affects the fitness of X. axonopodis during the induction of SAR. The LE was extracted from pepper leaves 7 days after soil drench-application of a chemical trigger, benzothiadiazole (BTH). Elicitation of plant immunity was confirmed by significant up-regulation of four genes, CaPR1, CaPR4, CaPR9, and CaCHI2, by BTH treatment. Bacterial fitness was evaluated by measuring growth rate during cultivation with LE from BTH- or water-treated leaves. LE from BTH-treatment significantly inhibited bacterial growth when compared to that from the water-treated control. The antibacterial activity of LE from BTH-treated samples was not affected by heating at 100°C for 30 min. Although the antibacterial molecules were not precisely identified, the data suggest that small (less than 5 kDa), heat-stable compound(s) that are present in BTH-induced LE directly attenuate bacterial growth during the elicitation of plant immunity. PMID:25288963

  3. A Case Series of Acquired Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: An Emerging Public Health Concern in Rural Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gamell, Anna; Muri, Lukas; Ntamatungiro, Alex; Nyogea, Daniel; Luwanda, Lameck B.; Hatz, Christoph; Battegay, Manuel; Felger, Ingrid; Tanner, Marcel; Klimkait, Thomas; Letang, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistance mutations among African children living with in human immunodeficiency virus on antiretroviral treatment has been scarcely reported. This threatens the overall success of antiretroviral programs and the clinical outcomes of children in care. We present a well characterized series of children from rural Tanzania with acquired drug-resistance mutations to contribute to the better understanding of this emerging public health concern. PMID:26807427

  4. Facilitating T Cell Infiltration in Tumor Microenvironment Overcomes Resistance to PD-L1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haidong; Wang, Yang; Chlewicki, Lukasz K; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Jingya; Liang, Wei; Wang, Jieyi; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-03-14

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapies fail to induce responses in the majority of cancer patients, so how to increase the objective response rate becomes an urgent challenge. Here, we demonstrate that sufficient T cell infiltration in tumor tissues is a prerequisite for response to PD-L1 blockade. Targeting tumors with tumor necrosis factor superfamily member LIGHT activates lymphotoxin β-receptor signaling, leading to the production of chemokines that recruit massive numbers of T cells. Furthermore, targeting non-T cell-inflamed tumor tissues by antibody-guided LIGHT creates a T cell-inflamed microenvironment and overcomes tumor resistance to checkpoint blockade. Our data indicate that targeting LIGHT might be a potent strategy to increase the responses to checkpoint blockades and other immunotherapies in non-T cell-inflamed tumors. PMID:26977880

  5. Acquired resistance to HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG and increased metastatic potential are associated with MUC1 expression in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Ban, Li-Li; Luo, Gang; Li, Zhi-Yao; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Wang, Xi-Cai; Jin, Cong-Guo; Ye, Jia-Gui; Ma, Ding-Ding; Xie, Qing; Huang, You-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of many proteins. The chaperoning of oncoproteins by HSP90 enhances the survival, growth, and invasive potential of cancer cells. HSP90 inhibitors are promising new anticancer agents, in which the benzoquinone ansamycin 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is currently in clinical evaluation. However, the implications of acquired resistance to this class of drug remain largely unexplored. In the present study, we have generated isogenic human colon cancer cell lines that are resistant to 17-AAG by continued culturing in the compound. Cross-resistance was found with another HSP90 inhibitor 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. The resistant cells showed obvious morphology changes with a metastatic phenotype and significant increases in migration and adhesion to collagens. Western blotting analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition molecular markers found that expression of E-cadherin downregulated, whereas expression of N-cadherin and β-catenin upregulated in the resistant cells. Mucin 1 (MUC1) has been reported to mediate metastasis as well as chemical resistance in many cancers. Here, we found that MUC1 expression was significantly elevated in the acquired drug resistance cells. 17-AAG treatment could decrease MUC1 more in parental cells than in acquired 17-AAG-resistant cells. Further study found that knockdown of MUC1 expression by small interfering RNA could obviously re-sensitize the resistant cells to 17-AAG treatment, and decrease the cell migration and adhesion. These were coupled with a downregulation in N-cadherin and β-catenin. The results indicate that HSP90 inhibitor therapies in colon carcinomas could generate resistance and increase metastatic potential that might mediated by upregulation of MUC1 expression. Findings from this study further our understanding of the potential clinical effects of HSP90-directed therapies in

  6. IKK phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 contributes to acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhipeng; Yang, Zejia; Lapidus, Rena G; Liu, Xuefeng; Cullen, Kevin J; Dan, Han C

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment methods for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. For recurrent and metastatic HNSCC, cisplatin is the most common treatment option, but most of patients will eventually develop cisplatin resistance. Therefore, it is imperative to define the mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance and find novel therapeutic strategies to overcome this deadly disease. In order to determine the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in contributing to acquired cisplatin resistance in HNSCC, the expression and activity of NF-κB and its upstream kinases, IKKα and IKKβ, were evaluated and compared in three pairs of cisplatin sensitive and resistant HNSCC cell lines, including a pair of patient derived HNSCC cell line. The experiments revealed that NF-κB p65 activity was elevated in cisplatin resistant HNSCC cells compared to that in their parent cells. Importantly, the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 at serine 536 and the phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ at their activation loops were dramatically elevated in the resistant cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of NF-κB or overexpression of p65-S536 alanine (p65-S536A) mutant sensitizes resistant cells to cisplatin. Additionally, the novel IKKβ inhibitor CmpdA has been shown to consistently block the phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 while also dramatically improving the efficacy of cisplatin in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in the cisplatin resistant cancer cells. These results indicated that IKK/NF-κB plays a pivotal role in controlling acquired cisplatin resistance and that targeting the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway may provide a possible therapeutic method to overcome the acquired resistance to cisplatin in HNSCC. PMID:26693062

  7. 14-3-3σ regulation of and interaction with YAP1 in acquired gemcitabine resistance via promoting ribonucleotide reductase expression

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Dong, Zizheng; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine is an important anticancer therapeutics approved for treatment of several human cancers including locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Its clinical effectiveness, however, is hindered by existence of intrinsic and development of acquired resistances. Previously, it was found that 14-3-3σ expression associates with poor clinical outcome of PDAC patients. It was also found that 14-3-3σ expression is up-regulated in gemcitabine resistant PDAC cells and contributes to the acquired gemcitabine resistance. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 14-3-3σ function in gemcitabine resistance and found that 14-3-3σ up-regulates YAP1 expression and then binds to YAP1 to inhibit gemcitabine-induced caspase 8 activation and apoptosis. 14-3-3σ association with YAP1 up-regulates the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M1 and M2, which may mediate 14-3-3σ/YAP1 function in the acquired gemcitabine resistance. These findings suggest a possible role of YAP1 signaling in gemcitabine resistance. PMID:26894857

  8. Targeting chemotherapy-induced PTX3 in tumor stroma to prevent the progression of drug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Jhih-Ying; Hsiao, Yu-Wei; Li, Chien-Feng; Lo, Yu-Chih; Lin, Zu-Yau; Hong, Jhen-Yi; Liu, Yang-Ming; Han, Xiu; Wang, Shao-Ming; Chen, Ben-Kuen; Tsai, Kelvin K.; Wang, Ju-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has been suggested to participate in tumorigenesis, but the nature of the communication between cancer cells and the microenvironment, especially in response to anticancer drugs, remains obscure. We determined that activation of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (CEBPD) response to Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in cancer-associated macrophages and fibroblasts contributed to the metastasis, invasion, acquired chemoresistance and stemness of cancer cells by in vitro and in vivo assays. Specifically, reporter and in vivo DNA binding assays were used to determine that Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a CEBPD responsive gene and serves a protumor role upon anticancer drug treatment. Finally, a PTX3 peptide inhibitor RI37 was developed and assessed the antitumor effects by in vivo assays. RI37 could function as a promising inhibitor for preventing cancer progression and the metastasis, invasion and progression of drug-resistant cancers. The identification of PTX3 provided a new insight in the interaction between host and tumor and the RI37 peptide showed a great opportunity to largely reduce the risk of invasion and metastasis of cancer and drug-resistant cancers. PMID:26124179

  9. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK-cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-02-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B-Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug-resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines MEL-HO, COLO-38, SK-MEL-37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug-resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL-2-activated NK cells; and two BRAFi-resistant lines (BRAFi-R) became significantly more susceptible to NK-cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD-L1 upregulation on the drug-resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi-R and parental cells to NK-cell-mediated lysis, antibody-mediated inhibition of PD1-PD-L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi-R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK-cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK-cell-based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:26564811

  10. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK‐cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N.; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B‐Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug‐resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF‐mutant melanoma cell lines MEL‐HO, COLO‐38, SK‐MEL‐37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug‐resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL‐2‐activated NK cells; and two BRAFi‐resistant lines (BRAFi‐R) became significantly more susceptible to NK‐cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD‐L1 upregulation on the drug‐resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi‐R and parental cells to NK‐cell‐mediated lysis, antibody‐mediated inhibition of PD1–PD‐L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi‐R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK‐cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK‐cell‐based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:26564811

  11. The vitamin D receptor and inducible nitric oxide synthase associated pathways in the development of acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly resulting from prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immu...

  12. Acid-Responsive Therapeutic Polymer for Prolonging Nanoparticle Circulation Lifetime and Destroying Drug-Resistant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ji-Gang; Gao, Feng; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-13

    How to destroy drug-resistant tumor cells remains an ongoing challenge for cancer treatment. We herein report on a therapeutic nanoparticle, aHLP-PDA, which has an acid-activated hemolytic polymer (aHLP) grafted onto photothermal polydopamine (PDA) nanosphere via boronate ester bond, in efforts to ablate drug-resistant tumors. Upon exposure to oxidative stress and/or near-infrared laser irradiation, aHLP-PDA nanoparticle responsively releases aHLP, likely via responsive cleavage of boronate ester bond, and thus responsively exhibits acid-facilitated mammalian-membrane-disruptive activity. In vitro cell studies with drug-resistant and/or thermo-tolerant cancer cells show that the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle demonstrates preferential cytotoxicity at acidic pH over physiological pH. When administered intravenously, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle exhibits significantly prolonged blood circulation lifetime and enhanced tumor uptake compared to bare PDA nanosphere, likely owing to aHLP's stealth effects conferred by its zwitterionic nature at blood pH. As a result, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle effectively ablates drug-resistant tumors, leading to 100% mouse survival even on the 32nd day after suspension of photothermal treatment, as demonstrated with the mouse model. This work suggests that a combination of nanotechnology with lessons learned in bacterial antibiotic resistance may offer a feasible and effective strategy for treating drug-resistant cancers often found in relapsing patients. PMID:26654626

  13. Sulindac reversal of 15-PGDH-mediated resistance to colon tumor chemoprevention with NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Dawson, Dawn M.; Zhang, Yongyou; Kresak, Adam; Lawrence, Earl G.; Yang, Peiying; Chen, Yanwen; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Willis, Joseph E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prevent colorectal cancer by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes that synthesize tumor-promoting prostaglandins. 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is a tumor suppressor that degrades tumor-promoting prostaglandins. Murine knockout of 15-PGDH increases susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumors. It also renders these mice resistant to celecoxib, a selective inhibitor of inducible COX-2 during colon neoplasia. Similarly, humans with low colonic 15-PGDH are also resistant to colon adenoma prevention with celecoxib. Here, we used aspirin and sulindac, which inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2, in order to determine if these broader COX inhibitors can prevent colon tumors in 15-PGDH knockout (KO) mice. Unlike celecoxib, sulindac proved highly effective in colon tumor prevention of 15-PGDH KO mice. Significantly, however, aspirin demonstrated no effect on colon tumor incidence in either 15-PGDH wild-type or KO mice, despite a comparable reduction in colonic mucosal Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels by both sulindac and aspirin. Notably, colon tumor prevention activity by sulindac was accompanied by a marked induction of lymphoid aggregates and proximal colonic inflammatory mass lesions, a side effect seen to a lesser degree with celecoxib, but not with aspirin. These findings suggest that sulindac may be the most effective agent for colon cancer prevention in humans with low 15-PGDH, but its use may also be associated with inflammatory lesions in the colon. PMID:25503930

  14. Hypoxic Tumor Kinase Signaling Mediated by STAT5A in Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Røe, Kathrine; Bratland, Åse; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Ragnum, Harald Bull; Saelen, Marie Grøn; Olsen, Dag Rune; Marignol, Laure; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer, although initially efficient, induces changes in the tumor kinome, which subsequently promote development of castration-resistant (CR) disease. Recognizing the correlation between tumor hypoxia and poor prognosis in prostate cancer, we further hypothesized that such changes might be influenced by hypoxia. Microarrays with 144 kinase peptide substrates were applied to analyze CWR22 prostate carcinoma xenograft samples from ADT-naïve, androgen-deprived (AD), long-term AD (ADL), and CR disease stages. The impact of hypoxia was assessed by matching the xenograft kinase activity profiles with those acquired from hypoxic and normoxic prostate carcinoma cell cultures, whereas the clinical relevance was evaluated by analyzing prostatectomy tumor samples from patients with locally advanced disease, either in ADT-naïve or early CR disease stages. By using this novel peptide substrate microarray method we revealed high kinase activity mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) in CR prostate cancer. Additionally, we uncovered high STAT5A kinase activity already in regressing ADL xenografts, before renewed CR growth was evidenced. Finally, since increased STAT5A kinase activity also was detected after exposing prostate carcinoma cells to hypoxia, we propose long-term ADT to induce tumor hypoxia and stimulate STAT5A kinase activity, subsequently leading to renewed CR tumor growth. Hence, the study detected STAT5A as a candidate to be further investigated for its potential as marker of advanced prostate cancer and as possible therapeutic target protein. PMID:23675504

  15. Clinical approaches to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutations (EGFR Mut+) has determined a paradigm shift in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In several phase III studies, patients with NSCLC EGFR Mut+ achieved a significantly better progression-free survival when treated with a first- (gefitinib, erlotinib) or second-generation (afatinib) EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) compared with standard chemotherapy. However, despite these impressive results, most patients with NSCLC EGFR Mut+ develop acquired resistance to TKIs. This review will discuss both the mechanisms of resistance to TKIs and the therapeutic strategies to overcome resistance, including emerging data on third-generation TKIs. PMID:26016841

  16. The battle against multi-resistant strains: Renaissance of antimicrobial essential oils as a promising force to fight hospital-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Warnke, Patrick H; Becker, Stephan T; Podschun, Rainer; Sivananthan, Sureshan; Springer, Ingo N; Russo, Paul A J; Wiltfang, Joerg; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sherry, Eugene

    2009-10-01

    Hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to be major health concerns worldwide. Particularly problematic is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its ability to cause severe soft tissue, bone or implant infections. First used by the Australian Aborigines, Tea tree oil and Eucalyptus oil (and several other essential oils) have each demonstrated promising efficacy against several bacteria and have been used clinically against multi-resistant strains. Several common and hospital-acquired bacterial and yeast isolates (6 Staphylococcus strains including MRSA, 4 Streptococcus strains and 3 Candida strains including Candida krusei) were tested for their susceptibility for Eucalyptus, Tea tree, Thyme white, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Cinnamon, Grapefruit, Clove Bud, Sandalwood, Peppermint, Kunzea and Sage oil with the agar diffusion test. Olive oil, Paraffin oil, Ethanol (70%), Povidone iodine, Chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) served as controls. Large prevailing effective zones of inhibition were observed for Thyme white, Lemon, Lemongrass and Cinnamon oil. The other oils also showed considerable efficacy. Remarkably, almost all tested oils demonstrated efficacy against hospital-acquired isolates and reference strains, whereas Olive and Paraffin oil from the control group produced no inhibition. As proven in vitro, essential oils represent a cheap and effective antiseptic topical treatment option even for antibiotic-resistant strains as MRSA and antimycotic-resistant Candida species. PMID:19473851

  17. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Tomida, Shuta; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformation is a relatively rare acquired resistance mechanism that has lately attracted considerable attention. In the present study, through an in-depth analysis of multiple EGFR-TKI refractory lesions obtained from an autopsy case, we observed a complementary relationship between SCLC transformation and EGFR T790M secondary mutation (resistance mutation). We also identified analogies and differences in genetic aberration between a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation and one with EGFR T790M mutation. In particular, target sequencing revealed a TP53 P151S mutation in all pre- and post-treatment lesions. PTEN M264I mutation was identified only in a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation, while PIK3CA and RB1 mutations were identified only in pre-treatment primary tumour samples. These results provide the groundwork for understanding acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs via SCLC transformation. PMID:26400668

  18. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Tomida, Shuta; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformation is a relatively rare acquired resistance mechanism that has lately attracted considerable attention. In the present study, through an in-depth analysis of multiple EGFR-TKI refractory lesions obtained from an autopsy case, we observed a complementary relationship between SCLC transformation and EGFR T790M secondary mutation (resistance mutation). We also identified analogies and differences in genetic aberration between a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation and one with EGFR T790M mutation. In particular, target sequencing revealed a TP53 P151S mutation in all pre- and post-treatment lesions. PTEN M264I mutation was identified only in a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation, while PIK3CA and RB1 mutations were identified only in pre-treatment primary tumour samples. These results provide the groundwork for understanding acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs via SCLC transformation. PMID:26400668

  19. Systemic acquired resistance in Cavendish banana induced by infection with an incompatible strain of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanli; Yi, Ganjun; Peng, Xinxiang; Huang, Bingzhi; Liu, Ee; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-07-15

    Fusarium wilt of banana is caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). The fact that there are no economically viable biological, chemical, or cultural measures of controlling the disease in an infected field leads to search for alternative strategies involving activation of the plant's innate defense system. The mechanisms underlying systemic acquired resistance (SAR) are much less understood in monocots than in dicots. Since systemic protection of plants by attenuated or avirulent pathogens is a typical SAR response, the establishment of a biologically induced SAR model in banana is helpful to investigate the mechanism of SAR to Fusarium wilt. This paper described one such model using incompatible Foc race 1 to induce resistance against Foc tropical race 4 in an in vitro pathosystem. Consistent with the observation that the SAR provided the highest level of protection when the time interval between primary infection and challenge inoculation was 10d, the activities of defense-related enzymes such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) in systemic tissues also reached the maximum level and were 2.00-2.43 times higher than that of the corresponding controls on the tenth day. The total salicylic acid (SA) content in roots of banana plantlets increased from about 1 to more than 5 μg g⁻¹ FW after the second leaf being inoculated with Foc race 1. The systemic up-regulation of MaNPR1A and MaNPR1B was followed by the second up-regulation of PR-1 and PR-3. Although SA and jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling are mostly antagonistic, systemic expression of PR genes regulated by different signaling pathways were simultaneously up-regulated after primary infection, indicating that both pathways are involved in the activation of the SAR. PMID:23702248

  20. The combination of irreversible EGFR TKIs and SAHA induces apoptosis and autophagy-mediated cell death to overcome acquired resistance in EGFR T790M-mutated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Gul; Jeong, Eun-Hui; Kim, Seo Yun; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon

    2015-06-01

    To overcome T790M-mediated acquired resistance of lung cancer cells to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs), second generation TKIs such as BIBW2992 (afatinib) and third generation TKIs including WZ4002 have been developed. However, clinical data on their efficacy in treating T790M mutant tumors are lacking. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to arrest cell growth and to lead to differentiation and apoptosis of various cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we assessed whether the combination of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat), a potent HDAC inhibitor, and BIBW2992 or WZ4002 could overcome EGFR TKI resistance associated with T790M mutation in lung cancer cells. While treatment with BIBW2992 or WZ4002 alone slightly reduced the viability of PC-9G and H1975 cells, which possess T790M mutation, combining them with SAHA resulted in significantly decreased cell viability through the activation of the apoptotic pathway. This combination also enhanced autophagy occurrence and inhibition of autophagy significantly reduced the apoptosis induced by the combination treatment, showing that autophagy is required for the enhanced apoptosis. Caspase-independent autophagic cell death was also induced by the combination treatment with SAHA and either BIBW2992 or WZ4002. Finally, the combined treatment with SAHA and either BIBW2992 or WZ4002 showed an enhanced anti-tumor effect on xenografts of H1975 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the combination of new generation EGFR TKIs and SAHA may be a new strategy to overcome the acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in T790M mutant lung cancer. PMID:25382705

  1. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-11-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:22057987

  2. Arabidopsis TTR1 Causes LRR-Dependent Lethal Systemic Necrosis, rather than Systemic Acquired Resistance, to Tobacco Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L.; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F.; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-01-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:22057987

  3. Progress toward overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance to solid tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karakashev, Sergey V; Reginato, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor clinical outcome for multiple types of human cancer. This may be due, in part, to hypoxic cancer cells being resistant to anticancer therapy, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Hypoxia inducible factor 1, a major regulator of cellular response to hypoxia, regulates the expression of genes that are involved in multiple aspects of cancer biology, including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, invasion, and angiogenesis. Here, we review multiple pathways regulated by hypoxia/hypoxia inducible factor 1 in cancer cells and discuss the latest advancements in overcoming hypoxia-mediated tumor resistance. PMID:26316817

  4. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors alters the metabolism of human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells and xenograft tumours

    PubMed Central

    Beloueche-Babari, M; Box, C; Arunan, V; Parkes, H G; Valenti, M; De Haven Brandon, A; Jackson, L E; Eccles, S A; Leach, M O

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to molecularly targeted therapeutics is a key challenge in personalised cancer medicine, highlighting the need for identifying the underlying mechanisms and early biomarkers of relapse, in order to guide subsequent patient management. Methods: Here we use human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) models and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess the metabolic changes that follow acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and which could serve as potential metabolic biomarkers of drug resistance. Results: Comparison of NMR metabolite profiles obtained from control (CALS) and EGFR TKI-resistant (CALR) cells grown as 2D monolayers, 3D spheroids or xenograft tumours in athymic mice revealed a number of differences between the sensitive and drug-resistant models. In particular, we observed elevated levels of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) in CALR relative to CALS monolayers, spheroids and tumours, independent of the growth rate or environment. In addition, there was an increase in alanine, aspartate and creatine+phosphocreatine in resistant spheroids and xenografts, and increased levels of lactate, branched-chain amino acids and a fall in phosphoethanolamine only in xenografts. The xenograft lactate build-up was associated with an increased expression of the glucose transporter GLUT-1, whereas the rise in GPC was attributed to inhibition of GPC phosphodiesterase. Reduced glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and phosphocholine were observed in a second HNSCC model probably indicative of a different drug resistance mechanism. Conclusions: Our studies reveal metabolic signatures associated not only with acquired EGFR TKI resistance but also growth pattern, microenvironment and contributing mechanisms in HNSCC models. These findings warrant further investigation as metabolic biomarkers of disease relapse in the clinic. PMID:25742484

  5. Dopamine and Somatostatin Analogues Resistance of Pituitary Tumors: Focus on Cytoskeleton Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Giardino, Elena; Vitali, Eleonora; Lania, Andrea G.; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary tumors, that origin from excessive proliferation of a specific subtype of pituitary cell, are mostly benign tumors, but may cause significant morbidity in affected patients, including visual and neurologic manifestations from mass-effect, or endocrine syndromes caused by hormone hypersecretion. Dopamine (DA) receptor DRD2 and somatostatin (SS) receptors (SSTRs) represent the main targets of pharmacological treatment of pituitary tumors since they mediate inhibitory effects on both hormone secretion and cell proliferation, and their expression is retained by most of these tumors. Although long-acting DA and SS analogs are currently used in the treatment of prolactin (PRL)- and growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors, respectively, clinical practice indicates a great variability in the frequency and entity of favorable responses. The molecular basis of the pharmacological resistance are still poorly understood, and several potential molecular mechanisms have been proposed, including defective expression or genetic alterations of DRD2 and SSTRs, or an impaired signal transduction. Recently, a role for cytoskeleton protein filamin A (FLNA) in DRD2 and SSTRs receptors expression and signaling in PRL- and GH-secreting tumors, respectively, has been demonstrated, first revealing a link between FLNA expression and responsiveness of pituitary tumors to pharmacological therapy. This review provides an overview of the known molecular events involved in SS and DA resistance, focusing on the role played by FLNA. PMID:26733942

  6. Acquired resistance to mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor AZD9291 is associated with increased dependence on RAS signaling in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Catherine A.; Stetson, Daniel; Markovets, Aleksandra A.; Al-Kadhimi, Katherine J.; Lai, Zhongwu; Fisher, Paul R.; Meador, Catherine B.; Spitzler, Paula; Ichihara, Eiki; Ross, Sarah J.; Ahdesmaki, Miika J.; Ahmed, Ambar; Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Christey O’Brien, Elizabeth L.; Barnes, Claire H.; Brown, Henry; Smith, Paul D.; Dry, Jonathan R.; Beran, Garry; Thress, Kenneth S.; Dougherty, Brian; Pao, William; Cross, Darren A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to targeted EGFR inhibitors is likely to develop in EGFR mutant lung cancers. Early identification of innate or acquired resistance mechanisms to these agents is essential to direct development of future therapies. We describe the detection of heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance within populations of EGFR mutant cells (PC9 and/or NCI-H1975) with acquired resistance to current and newly developed EGFR TKIs including AZD9291. We report the detection of NRAS mutations, including a novel E63K mutation, and a gain of copy number of WT NRAS or WT KRAS in cell populations resistant to gefitinib, afatinib, WZ4002 or AZD9291. Compared to parental cells, a number of resistant cell populations were more sensitive to inhibition by the MEK inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) when treated in combination with the originating EGFR inhibitor. In vitro, a combination of AZD9291 with selumetinib prevented emergence of resistance in PC9 cells and delayed resistance in NCI-H1975 cells. In vivo, concomitant dosing of AZD9291 with selumetinib caused regression of AZD9291-resistant tumours in an EGFRm/T790M transgenic model. Our data support the use of a combination of AZD9291 with a MEK inhibitor to delay or prevent resistance to AZD9291 in EGFRm and/or EGFRm/T790M tumours. Further, these findings suggest that NRAS modifications in tumour samples from patients who have progressed on current or EGFR inhibitors in development may support subsequent treatment with a combination of EGFR and MEK inhibition. PMID:25870145

  7. Acquired Resistance in Barley (The Resistance Mechanism Induced by 2,6-Dichloroisonicotinic Acid Is a Phenocopy of a Genetically Based Mechanism Governing Race-Specific Powdery Mildew Resistance).

    PubMed Central

    Kogel, K. H.; Beckhove, U.; Dreschers, J.; Munch, S.; Romme, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of susceptible barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (DCINA) induces disease resistance against the powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei). A cytological analysis of the interaction reveals the hypersensitive cell collapse in attacked, short epidermal cells, along with the accumulation of fluorescent material in papillae, that appear at the time of fungal arrest. The cell-type-specific hypersensitive reaction occurs prior to formation of haustoria, reminiscent of the mechanism identified in genetically resistant barley plants containing the functionally active Mlg gene (R. Gorg, K. Hollricher, P. Schulze-Lefert [1993] Plant J 3: 857-866). This observation indicates that the mechanism of DCINA-induced resistance is a phenocopy of the mechanism governed by the Mlg locus. The onset of acquired resistance correlates with high-level transcript accumulation of barley defense-related genes encoding pathogenesis-related protein-1, peroxidase, and chitinase but not [beta]-1,3-glucanase. Subcellular localization of peroxidase activity shows an increase in enzyme activity in the epidermal cell layer and in the intercellular fluids of barley leaves. Four out of more than 10 identified extracellular isozymes are induced by DCINA. The epidermal cell layer contains a major constitutively formed isozyme, together with two isozymes specifically induced by DCINA. The data support the hypothesis that host cell death and high-level accumulation of defense-related gene transcripts are not only commonly controlled in certain types of race-specific resistance (A. Freialdenhoven, B. Scherag, K. Hollricher, D.B. Collinge, H. Thordal-Christensen, P. Schulze-Lefert [1994] Plant Cell 6: 983-994) but also in acquired resistance, which confers protection to a broad spectrum of different pathogens. PMID:12232407

  8. Leveraging Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs to Prevent Drug Resistance in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Danika; Garvey, Colleen M; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Foo, Jasmine

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that one key factor in driving the emergence of drug resistance in solid tumors is tumor hypoxia, which leads to the formation of localized environmental niches where drug-resistant cell populations can evolve and survive. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) are compounds designed to penetrate to hypoxic regions of a tumor and release cytotoxic or cytostatic agents; several of these HAPs are currently in clinical trial. However, preliminary results have not shown a survival benefit in several of these trials. We hypothesize that the efficacy of treatments involving these prodrugs depends heavily on identifying the correct treatment schedule, and that mathematical modeling can be used to help design potential therapeutic strategies combining HAPs with standard therapies to achieve long-term tumor control or eradication. We develop this framework in the specific context of EGFR-driven non-small cell lung cancer, which is commonly treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We develop a stochastic mathematical model, parametrized using clinical and experimental data, to explore a spectrum of treatment regimens combining a HAP, evofosfamide, with erlotinib. We design combination toxicity constraint models and optimize treatment strategies over the space of tolerated schedules to identify specific combination schedules that lead to optimal tumor control. We find that (i) combining these therapies delays resistance longer than any monotherapy schedule with either evofosfamide or erlotinib alone, (ii) sequentially alternating single doses of each drug leads to minimal tumor burden and maximal reduction in probability of developing resistance, and (iii) strategies minimizing the length of time after an evofosfamide dose and before erlotinib confer further benefits in reduction of tumor burden. These results provide insights into how hypoxia-activated prodrugs may be used to enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the clinic. PMID

  9. Leveraging Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs to Prevent Drug Resistance in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Danika; Garvey, Colleen M.; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Foo, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that one key factor in driving the emergence of drug resistance in solid tumors is tumor hypoxia, which leads to the formation of localized environmental niches where drug-resistant cell populations can evolve and survive. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) are compounds designed to penetrate to hypoxic regions of a tumor and release cytotoxic or cytostatic agents; several of these HAPs are currently in clinical trial. However, preliminary results have not shown a survival benefit in several of these trials. We hypothesize that the efficacy of treatments involving these prodrugs depends heavily on identifying the correct treatment schedule, and that mathematical modeling can be used to help design potential therapeutic strategies combining HAPs with standard therapies to achieve long-term tumor control or eradication. We develop this framework in the specific context of EGFR-driven non-small cell lung cancer, which is commonly treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We develop a stochastic mathematical model, parametrized using clinical and experimental data, to explore a spectrum of treatment regimens combining a HAP, evofosfamide, with erlotinib. We design combination toxicity constraint models and optimize treatment strategies over the space of tolerated schedules to identify specific combination schedules that lead to optimal tumor control. We find that (i) combining these therapies delays resistance longer than any monotherapy schedule with either evofosfamide or erlotinib alone, (ii) sequentially alternating single doses of each drug leads to minimal tumor burden and maximal reduction in probability of developing resistance, and (iii) strategies minimizing the length of time after an evofosfamide dose and before erlotinib confer further benefits in reduction of tumor burden. These results provide insights into how hypoxia-activated prodrugs may be used to enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the clinic. PMID

  10. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  11. Mortality among tuberculosis patients with acquired resistance to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs — United States, 1993–2008

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Julia V.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (SLD) severely compromises treatment options of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We assessed the association between acquisition of resistance (AR) to second-line injectable drugs (SLI) or fluoroquinolones (FQ) and mortality among TB cases confirmed by positive culture results with available initial and final drug susceptibility test (DST) results. Methods We analyzed data from U.S. National TB Surveillance System, 1993–2008. Acquired resistance was defined as drug susceptibility at initial DST but resistance to the same drug at final DST. We compared survival with Kaplan-Meier curves and analyzed the association between AR and mortality using a univariate extended Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age. Results Of 2,329 cases with both initial and final DST to SLI, 49 (2.1%) acquired resistance; 13/49 (26.5%) had treatment terminated by death versus 222 (10.0%) of those without AR to SLI (P<0.001). Of 1,187 cases with both initial and final DST to FQ, 32 (2.8%) acquired resistance; 12/32 (37.5%) had treatment terminated by death versus 121 (10.9%) of those without AR to FQ (P=0.001). Controlling for age, mortality was significantly greater among cases with AR to SLD than among cases without AR (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)[SLI], 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI),1.4–5.4; aHR[FQ], 1.9; 95% CI,1.0–3.5). MDR TB at treatment initiation, positive HIV status, and extrapulmonary disease were also significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion Mortality was significantly greater among TB cases with AR to SLD. Providers should consider AR to SLD early in treatment, monitor DST results, and avoid premature deaths. PMID:24846639

  12. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  13. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  14. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor causes acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer cells with the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy often provides a dramatic response in lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations. In addition, moderate clinical efficacy of the EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, has been shown in lung cancer patients with the wild-type EGFR. Numerous molecular mechanisms that cause acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations; however, few have been reported in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. We used H358 lung adenocarcinoma cells lacking EGFR mutations that showed modest sensitivity to erlotinib. The H358 cells acquired resistance to erlotinib via chronic exposure to the drug. The H358 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells do not have a secondary EGFR mutation, neither MET gene amplification nor PTEN downregulation; these have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations. From comprehensive screening of receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, we observed increased phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in H358ER cells compared with parental H358 cells. H358ER cells responded to combined therapy with erlotinib and NVP-AEW541, an IGF1R-TKI. Our results indicate that IGF1R activation is a molecular mechanism that confers acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. PMID:24458568

  15. Cloning and expression analysis of cDNAs corresponding to genes activated in cucumber showing systemic acquired resistance after BTH treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bovie, Catherine; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Dommes, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Background Infection of plants by necrotizing pathogens can lead to the rapid and localized induction of a complex set of defense responses resulting in a restriction of pathogen growth and spread. Subsequently, an increase of plant resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens is observed systemically. This plant immunity is known as Systemic Acquired Resistance. To identify components of the transduction pathway, we cloned and analysed the expression pattern of several mRNAs accumulating in cucumber plants after induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance. Results We tested on cucumber different compounds known to induce systemic acquired resistance. Among these, BTH (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester) proved to be very effective. mRNA RT-PCR differential display was used to identify mRNA sequences induced 24 hours after the application of 10 μM BTH to cucumber plants. A cDNA library constructed from cucumber plants sprayed with 10 μM BTH was screened to get corresponding full length cDNAs. Among the identified cDNAs were those coding for a putative ras-related GTP-binding protein, a putative beta-1,4-N-Acetylglucosaminyltranferase III and a putative pathogenesis related protein. The time course of accumulation of the three corresponding mRNAs was analysed by northern blotting in plants treated by BTH or in plants infected by Colletotrichum lagenarium. Conclusions The mRNA RT-PCR differential display technique allowed the identification of three genes possibly involved in Systemic Acquired Resistance in cucumber. Pathogenesis-related proteins are known to be involved in plant defence against pathogens. GTP-binding protein and N-acetylglucosaminyltranferase III have been reported to be components of signal transduction pathways in mammals and plants. PMID:15331019

  16. A novel mechanism of resistance to mouse mammary tumor virus infection.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T V

    2000-03-01

    Exogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is carried from the gut of suckling pups to the mammary glands by lymphocytes and induces mammary gland tumors. MMTV-induced tumor incidence in inbred mice of different strains ranges from 0 to as high as 100%. For example, mice of the C3H/HeN strain are highly susceptible, whereas mice of the I/LnJ strain are highly resistant. Of the different factors that together determine the susceptibility of mice to development of MMTV-induced mammary tumors, genetic elements play a major role, although very few genes that determine a susceptibility-resistance phenotype have been identified so far. Our data indicate that MMTV fails to infect mammary glands in I/LnJ mice foster nursed on viremic C3H/HeN females, even though the I/LnJ mammary tissue is not refractory to MMTV infection. Lymphocytes from fostered I/LnJ mice contained integrated MMTV proviruses and shed virus but failed to establish infection in the mammary glands of susceptible syngeneic (I x C3H.JK)F(1) females. Based on the susceptible-resistant phenotype distribution in N(2) females, both MMTV mammary gland infection and mammary gland tumor development in I/LnJ mice are controlled by a single locus. PMID:10684291

  17. Matrix Hyaluronan Promotes Specific MicroRNA Upregulation Leading to Drug Resistance and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor invasion, metastasis and therapeutic drug resistance are the common causes for serious morbidity and cancer recurrence in patients. A number of research studies have searched for malignancy-related biomarkers and drug targets that are closely linked to tumor cell properties. One of the candidates is matrix hyaluronan (HA), which is known as one of the major extracellular matrix (ECM) components. HA serves as a physiological ligand for surface CD44 molecule and also functions as a bio-regulator. The binding of HA to CD44 has been shown to stimulate concomitant activation of a number of oncogenic pathways and abnormal cellular processes in cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small RNAs containing ~20–25 nucleotides and are known to promote aberrant cellular functions in cancer cells. In this article, I have focused on the role of HA interaction with CD44 and several important signaling molecules in the regulation of unique miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-302 and miR-10b) and their downstream targets leading to multiple tumor cell-specific functions (e.g., tumor cell growth, drug resistance and metastasis) and cancer progression. This new knowledge could provide the groundwork necessary for establishing new tumor markers and developing important, novel drugs targeted against HA/CD44-associated tumor progression, which can be utilized in the therapeutic treatment of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:27070574

  18. 4th international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance: meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Varun V; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-01-01

    The fourth international conference on tumor progression and therapeutic resistance organized in association with GTCbio was held in Boston, MA from March 9 to 11, 2014. The meeting attracted a diverse group of experts in the field of cancer biology, therapeutics and medical oncology from academia and industry. The meeting addressed the current challenges in the treatment of cancer including tumor heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis along with the need for improved biomarkers of tumor progression and clinical trial design. Keynote speakers included Clifton Leaf, Editor at Fortune Magazine, Dr. Mina Bissell from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Dr. Levi Garraway from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The meeting featured cutting edge tools, preclinical models and the latest basic, translational and clinical research findings in the field. PMID:25782066

  19. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  20. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  1. Lack of dissemination of acquired resistance to β-lactams in small wild mammals around an isolated village in the Amazonian forest.

    PubMed

    Grall, Nathalie; Barraud, Olivier; Wieder, Ingrid; Hua, Anna; Perrier, Marion; Babosan, Ana; Gaschet, Margaux; Clermont, Olivier; Denamur, Erick; Catzeflis, François; Decré, Dominique; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Andremont, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the spread of resistance to β-lactams and of integrons in small rodents and marsupials living at various distances from a point of antibiotic's use. Rectal swabs from 114 animals were collected in Trois-Sauts, an isolated village in French Guiana, and along a 3 km transect heading through the non-anthropized primary forest. Prevalence of ticarcillin-resistant enterobacteria was 36% (41/114). Klebsiella spp., naturally resistant to ticarcillin, were found in 31.1% (23/73) of animals from the village and in an equal ratio of 31.7% (13/41) of animals trapped along the transect. By contrast Escherichia coli with acquired resistance to ticarcillin were found in 13.7% (10/73) of animals from the village and in only 2.4% (1/41) of those from the transect (600 m from the village). There was a huge diversity of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with very unique and infrequent sequence types. The overall prevalence of class 1 integrons carriage was 19.3% (22/114) homogenously distributed between animals from the village and the transect, which suggests a co-selection by a non-antibiotic environmental factor. Our results indicate that the anthropogenic acquired antibiotic resistance did not disseminate in the wild far from the point of selective pressure. PMID:25858231

  2. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  3. Drug resistance following irradiation of RIF-1 tumors: Influence of the interval between irradiation and drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Davies, B.M.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1990-09-01

    RIF-1 tumors contain a small number of cells (1 to 100 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or adriamycin. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors is highly variable. Radiation, delivered in vivo at doses of 3 to 12 Gy, increases the frequency of methotrexate- and 5-fluorouracil-resistant cells, but not the frequency of adriamycin-resistant cells. The magnitude of induction of 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance shows a complex dependence on the radiation dose and on the interval between irradiation and assessment of drug resistance. For a dose of 3 Gy, induced 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate resistance is seen only after an interval of 5 to 7 days, whereas for a dose of 12 Gy, high levels of induced resistance are observed 1 to 3 days after irradiation. The maximum absolute risk for induction of resistance is 4 per 10(4) cells per Gy for methotrexate, and 3 per 10(6) cells per Gy for 5-fluorouracil. These results indicate that tumor hypoxia may play a role in the increased levels of drug resistance seen after irradiation, and that both genetic and environmental factors may influence radiation-induction of drug resistance. These studies provide essential data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be caused by radiation-induced drug resistance.

  4. TrxR1 inhibition overcomes both hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance in multiple myeloma through NF-кβ inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raninga, Prahlad V; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-02-16

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Introduction of the proteasome-inhibitor bortezomib has improved MM prognosis and survival; however hypoxia-induced or acquired bortezomib resistance remains a clinical problem. This study highlighted the role of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in the hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance in MM. Higher TrxR1 gene expression correlated with high-risk disease, adverse overall survival, and poor prognosis in myeloma patients. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells and increased TrxR1 protein levels. Inhibition of TrxR1 using auranofin overcame hypoxia-induced bortezomib resistance and restored the sensitivity of hypoxic-myeloma cells to bortezomib. Hypoxia increased NF-кβ subunit p65 nuclear protein levels and TrxR1 inhibition decreased hypoxia-induced NF-кβ p65 protein levels in the nucleus and reduced the expression of NF-кβ-regulated genes. In addition, higher TrxR1 protein levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to the naïve cells, and its inhibition using either auranofin or TrxR1-specific siRNAs reversed bortezomib resistance. TrxR1 inhibition reduced p65 mRNA and protein expression in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells, and also decreased the expression of NF-кβ-regulated anti-apoptotic and proliferative genes. Thus, TrxR1 inhibition overcomes both hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance by inhibiting the NF-кβ signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated TrxR1 levels correlate with the acquisition of bortezomib resistance in MM. We propose considering TrxR1-inhibiting drugs, such as auranofin, either for single agent or combination therapy to circumvent bortezomib-resistance and improve survival outcomes of MM patients. PMID:26743692

  5. Cell-penetrating conjugates of pentaglutamylated methotrexate as potential anticancer drugs against resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ildikó; Orbán, Erika; Schlosser, Gitta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bánóczi, Zoltán

    2016-06-10

    The emerging resistance of tumor cells against methotrexate (MTX) is one of the major limitations of the MTX treatment of tumorous diseases. The disturbance in the polyglutamation which is a main step in the mechanism of methotrexate action is often the reason of the resistance. Delivery of polyglutamylated MTX into cells may evade the mechanisms that are responsible for drug resistance. In this study conjugates of methotrexate and its pentaglutamylated derivatives with cell-penetrating peptides - penetratin and octaarginine - were investigated. The cellular-uptake and in vitro cytostatic activity of conjugates were examined on breast cancer cell cultures (MDA-MB-231 as resistant and MCF-7 as sensitive cell culture). These cell cultures showed very different behaviour towards the conjugates. Although the presence of pentaglutamyl moiety significantly decreased the internalisation of conjugates, some of them were significantly active in vitro. All of the conjugates were able to penetrate in some extent into both cell types, but only the conjugates of penetratin showed in vitro cytostatic activity. The most effective conjugates were the MTX-Glu5-Penetratin(desMet) and MTX-Glu5-GFLG-Penetratin(desMet). The latter was effective on both cell cultures while the former was active only on the resistant tumor cells. Our results suggest that the translocation of polyglutamylated MTX may be a new way to treat sensitive and more importantly resistant tumors. While both penetratin and octaarginine peptides were successfully used to deliver several kinds of cargos earlier in our case the activity of penetratin conjugates was more pronounced. PMID:27031212

  6. Acquired resistance to rechallenge injury in rats recovered from subclinical renal damage with uranyl acetate-Importance of proliferative activity of tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuan; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Sakakima, Masanori; Hishida, Akira

    2010-02-15

    Animals recovered from acute renal failure are resistant to subsequent insult. We investigated whether rats recovered from mild proximal tubule (PT) injury without renal dysfunction (subclinical renal damage) acquire the same resistance. Rats 14 days after recovering from subclinical renal damage, which was induced by 0.2 mg/kg of uranyl acetate (UA) (sub-toxic dose), were rechallenged with 4 mg/kg of UA (nephrotoxic dose). Fate of PT cells and renal function were examined in response to nephrotoxic dose of UA. All divided cells after sub-toxic dose of UA insult were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days then the number of PT cells with or without BrdU-labeling was counted following nephrotoxic dose of UA insult. Rats recovered from subclinical renal damage gained resistance to nephrotoxic dose of UA with reduced renal dysfunction, less severity of peak damage (necrotic and TUNEL+ apoptotic cells) and accelerated PT cell proliferation, but with earlier peak of PT damage. The decrease in number of PT cells in the early phase of rechallenge injury with nephrotoxic UA was more in rats pretreated with sub-toxic dose of UA than vehicle pretreated rats. The exaggerated loss of PT cells was mainly caused by the exaggerated loss of BrdU+ divided cells. In contrast, accelerated cell proliferation in rats recovered from sub-toxic dose of UA was observed mainly in BrdU- non-divided cells. The findings suggest that rats recovered from subclinical renal damage showed partial acquired resistance to nephrotoxic insult. Accelerated recovery with increased proliferative activity of non-divided PT cells after subclinical renal damage may mainly contribute to acquired resistance.

  7. Involvement of HMGB1 in Resistance to Tumor Vessel-Targeted, Monoclonal Antibody-Based Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolo, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a member of the “danger associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs) than can localize in various compartments of the cell (from the nucleus to the cell surface) and subserve different functions accordingly. HMGB1 is implicated in maintenance of genomic stability, autophagy, immune regulation, and tumor growth. HMGB1-induced autophagy promotes tumor resistance to chemotherapy, as shown in different models of malignancy, for example, osteosarcoma, leukemia, and gastric cancer. To the best of our knowledge, there is virtually no information on the relationships between HMGB1 and resistance to immunotherapy. A recent study from our group has shed new light on this latter issue. We have demonstrated that targeting of tumor-derived endothelial cells with an anti-human CD31 monoclonal antibody in a human neuroblastoma model was unsuccessful due to a complex chain of events involving the participation of HMGB1. These results are discussed in detail since they provide the first evidence for a role of HMGB1 in resistance of tumor cells to monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26925422

  8. Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy Is Associated with an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-De; Hoang, Anh; Zhou, Lijun; Kalra, Sarathi; Yetil, Alper; Sun, Mianen; Ding, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xuesong; Bai, Shanshan; German, Peter; Tamboli, Pheroze; Rao, Priya; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher; Matin, Surena; Zurita, Amado; Bex, Axel; Griffioen, Arjan W; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee; Tannir, Nizar; Sircar, Kanishka; Jonasch, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an immunogenic and proangiogenic cancer, and antiangiogenic therapy is the current mainstay of treatment. Patients with RCC develop innate or adaptive resistance to antiangiogenic therapy. There is a need to identify biomarkers that predict therapeutic resistance and guide combination therapy. We assessed the interaction between antiangiogenic therapy and the tumor immune microenvironment and determined their impact on clinical outcome. We found that antiangiogenic therapy-treated RCC primary tumors showed increased infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, which was inversely related to patient overall survival and progression-free survival. Furthermore, specimens from patients treated with antiangiogenic therapy showed higher infiltration of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and enhanced expression of checkpoint ligand programed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both immunosuppressive features were correlated with T-lymphocyte infiltration and were negatively related to patient survival. Treatment of RCC cell lines and RCC xenografts in immunodeficient mice with sunitinib also increased tumor PD-L1 expression. Results from this study indicate that antiangiogenic treatment may both positively and negatively regulate the tumor immune microenvironment. These findings generate hypotheses on resistance mechanisms to antiangiogenic therapy and will guide the development of combination therapy with PD-1/PD-L1-blocking agents. PMID:26014097

  9. Cancer stem cells: Role in tumor growth, recurrence, metastasis, and treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jenny C

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a class of pluripotent cells that have been observed in most types of solid and hematologic cancers. CSCs have been shown in numerous cancer models to be involved in tumor development, cell proliferation, and metastatic dissemination, while possessing a capacity for sustained self-renewal. CSCs, which typically represent a small proportion of total cells of a given tumor, also exhibit resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Indeed, exposure to these treatments may promote "stemness" in nonstem cancer cells, which may explain why successful therapeutic reduction of tumor bulk will often fail to produce clinical improvement. Acquisition of stemness involves epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which epithelial cells are transformed into a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by increased capacities for migration, invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis. EMT may also contribute to metastasis by driving dissemination of mesenchymal CSCs to distant locations, whereupon the CSCs revert to an epithelial phenotype to support metastatic tumor growth. Several different approaches to treatment aimed at overcoming the intrinsic resistance of CSCs to conventional therapies are currently being developed. These include agents targeting tumorigenic pathways, such as JAK2/STAT3 and PI3K/mTOR, and immunotherapies, including vaccines and natural killer cells employed to induce a T cell response. PMID:27611935

  10. Acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to treatment with gemcitabine and HER-inhibitors is accompanied by increased sensitivity to STAT3 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    IOANNOU, NIKOLAOS; SEDDON, ALAN M.; DALGLEISH, ANGUS; MACKINTOSH, DAVID; SOLCA, FLAVIO; MODJTAHEDI, HELMOUT

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistance is a major contributing factor for the poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer. We have shown previously that the irreversible ErbB family blocker afatinib, is more effective than the reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in inhibiting the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop human pancreatic cancer cell (BxPc3) variants with acquired resistance to treatment with gemcitabine, afatinib, or erlotinib, and to investigate the molecular changes that accompany the acquisition of a drug-resistant phenotype. We also investigated the therapeutic potential of various agents in the treatment of such drug-resistant variants. Three variant forms of BxPc3 cells with acquired resistance to gemcitabine (BxPc3GEM), afatinib (BxPc3AFR) or erlotinib (BxPc3OSIR) were developed following treatment with increasing doses of such drugs. The expression level, mutational and phosphorylation status of various growth factor receptors and downstream cell signaling molecules were determined by FACS, human phopsho-RTK array, and western blot analysis while the sulforhodamine B assay was used for determining the effect of various agents on the growth of such tumours. We found that all three BxPc3 variants with acquired resistance to gemcitabine (BxPc3GEM), afatinib (BxPc3AFR) or erlotinib (BxPc3OSIR) also become less sensitive to treatment with the two other agents. Acquisition of resistance to these agents was accompanied by upregulation of p-c-MET, p-STAT3, CD44, increased autocrine production of EGFR ligand amphiregulin and differential activation status of EGFR tyrosine residues as well as downregulation of total and p-SRC. Of all therapeutic interventions examined, including the addition of an anti-EGFR antibody ICR62, an anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody, and of STAT3 or c-MET inhibitors, only treatment with the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic produced a higher growth inhibitory effect in all three drug-resistant variants

  11. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    PASTOREK, MICHAL; SIMKO, VERONIKA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; BARATHOVA, MONIKA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; HUNAKOVA, LUBA; SEDLAKOVA, OLGA; HUDECOVA, SONA; KRIZANOVA, OLGA; DEQUIEDT, FRANCK; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; SEDLAK, JAN

    2015-01-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules. PMID:25955133

  12. Genomic profiling of acquired resistance to apoptosis in cells derived from human atherosclerotic lesions: potential role of STATs, cyclinD1, BAD, and Bcl-XL.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Dmitry; Yang, Zhaoqing; Butler, Jason; Wimmer, Monika; Du, Baoheng; Cahan, Patrick; McCaffrey, Timothy A

    2005-09-01

    Current theories suggest that atherosclerosis, plaque rupture, stroke, and restenosis after angioplasty may involve defective apoptotic mechanisms in vascular cells. Prior work has demonstrated that cells from human atherosclerotic lesions, and cells from the aorta of aged rats, exhibit functional resistance to apoptosis induced by TGF-beta and glucocorticoids. The present studies demonstrate that human lesion-derived cells (LDC) are also resistant to apoptosis induced by fas ligation compared to cells derived from the adjacent media, and that in vitro expansion of LDC causes acquired resistance to apoptosis. Microarray profiling of fas-resistant versus sensitive cells identified a set of genes including STATs, caspase 1, cyclin D1, Bcl-xL, VDAC2, and BAD. The STAT proteins have been implicated in resistance to apoptosis, potentially via their ability to modulate caspase 1 (ICE), Bcl-xL, and cyclin D1 expression. Western blot analysis of sensitive and resistant LDC clonal lines confirmed increases in cyclin D1, STAT6, Bcl-xL, and BAD, with decreased expression of caspase 1. Thus, transcript profiling has identified a potential pathway of apoptotic regulation in subsets of lesion cells. The resistant phenotype may contribute to plaque stability and excessive vascular repair, while sensitive cells may be involved in plaque rupture and infarction. The data suggests both genetic interventions and novel small-molecule inhibitors that may be effective modulators of apoptosis in atherosclerosis, angina, and in-stent restenosis. PMID:16005468

  13. Potential of L-Buthionine Sulfoximine to Enhance the Apoptotic Action of Estradiol to Reverse Acquired Antihormonal Resistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Swaby, Ramona; Kim, Helen; Jordan, V. Craig

    2010-01-01

    L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) is a potent inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and studies have shown that it is capable of enhancing the apoptotic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents. Previous studies have shown that long term antihormonal therapy leads to acquired drug resistance and that estrogen, which is normally a survival signal, is a potent apoptotic agent in these resistant cells. Interestingly, we have developed an antihormone resistant breast cancer cell line, MCF-7:2A, which is resistant to estrogen-induced apoptosis but has elevated levels of glutathione. In the present study, we examined whether BSO is capable of sensitizing antihormone resistant MCF-7:2A cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. Our results showed that treatment of MCF-7:2A cells with 1 nM E2 plus 100 μM BSO combination for 1 week reduced the growth of these cells by almost 80-90% whereas the individual treatments had no significant effect on growth. TUNEL and DAPI staining showed that the inhibitory effect of the combination treatment was due to apoptosis. Our data indicates that glutathione participates in retarding apoptosis in antihormone-resistant human breast cancer cells and that depletion of this molecule by BSO may be critical in predisposing resistant cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. PMID:19167492

  14. Intercellular transfer of small RNAs from astrocytes to lung tumor cells induces resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Menachem, Assaf; Makovski, Victoria; Bodner, Or; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Stein, Reuven; Shomron, Noam; Kloog, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are resistant to chemotherapy and carry a poor prognosis. Studies have shown that tumor cells are surrounded by activated astrocytes, whose cytoprotective properties they exploit for protection from chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The mechanism of such astrocytic protection is poorly understood. A non-mutational mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy that is receiving increased attention is the regulation of gene translation mediated by small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), and particularly microRNAs (miRNAs). With the aim of examining the role of astrocytic sRNAs in promoting resistance of human lung tumor PC14 cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, here we used a miRNA microarray to compare sRNA profiles of human lung tumor cells cultured with and without astrocytes. We found that sRNAs are transferred from astrocytes to PC14 cells in a contact-dependent manner. Transfer was rapid, reaching a plateau after only 6 hours in culture. The sRNA transfer was inhibited by the broad-spectrum gap-junction antagonist carbenoxolone, indicating that transfer occurs via gap junctions. Among the transferred sRNAs were several that are implicated in survival pathways. Enforced expression of these sRNAs in PC14 cells increased their resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These novel findings might be of clinical relevance for the treatment of patients with brain metastases. PMID:26871466

  15. EGFR-Mediated Reactivation of MAPK Signaling Induces Acquired Resistance to GSK2118436 in BRAF V600E-Mutant NSCLC Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Moo; Kim, Hwan; Jang, Kang Won; Kim, Min Hwan; Sohn, Jinyoung; Yun, Mi Ran; Kang, Han Na; Kang, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Ryun; Lim, Sun Min; Moon, Yong Wha; Kim, Joo Hang; Paik, Soonmyung; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-07-01

    Although treatment of BRAF V600E-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC(V600E)) with GSK2118436 has shown an encouraging efficacy, most patients develop resistance. To investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance to GSK2118436 in NSCLC(V600E), we established GSK2118436-resistant (GSR) cells by exposing MV522 NSCLC(V600E) to increasing GSK2118436 concentrations. GSR cells displayed activated EGFR-RAS-CRAF signaling with upregulated EGFR ligands and sustained activation of ERK1/2, but not MEK1/2, in the presence of GSK2118436. Treatment of GSR cells with GSK2118436 enhanced EGFR-mediated RAS activity, leading to the formation of BRAF-CRAF dimers and transactivation of CRAF. Interestingly, sustained activation of ERK1/2 was partly dependent on receptor-interacting protein kinase-2 (RIP2) activity, but not on MEK1/2 activity. Combined BRAF and EGFR inhibition blocked reactivation of ERK signaling and improved efficacy in vitro and in vivo Our findings support the evaluation of combined BRAF and EGFR inhibition in NSCLC(V600E) with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1627-36. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196768

  16. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induced cell-specific drug transporters with acquired cisplatin resistance in cisplatin sensitive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gotovdorj, Tuvshinjargal; Lee, Eunil; Lim, Yongchul; Cha, Eun Jeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Eunyoung; Kim, YunJeong; Oh, Min-Yeong

    2014-09-01

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can induce drug transporter genes such as the ATP-binding cassette G member 2 (ABCG2), which contributes to multidrug resistance. We investigated the effect of TCDD pretreatment on drug transporters induction from cancer cells of various origins. Cell viabilities after treatment of cisplatin were measured to evaluate acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD. Acquring cisplatin resistance was found only in cisplatin senstivie cancer cells including gastric SNU601, colon LS180, brain CRT-MG and lymphoma Jurkat cells which showed a significant increase in cell viability after combined treatment with TCDD and cisplatin. High increase of ABCG2 gene expression was found in SNU601 and LS180 cells with a mild increase in the expression of the ABCC3, ABCC5,and SLC29A2 genes in SNU601 cells, and of major vault protein (MVP) in LS180 cells. The AhR inhibitor kaempferol suppressed the upregulation of ABCG2 expression and reversed the TCDD-induced increase in cell viability in LS180 cells. However, in CRT-MG cells, other transporter genes including ABCC1, ABCC5, ABCA3, ABCA2, ABCB4, ABCG1, and SLC29A1 were up-regulated. These findings suggested the acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD associated with cancer cell-type-specific induction of drug transporters. PMID:25246735

  17. Superior in vitro activity of carbapenems over anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and some related antimicrobial agents for community-acquired MRSA but not for hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-02-01

    Eighty-eight strains of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive and -negative community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and 152 strains of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) were examined for susceptibility to carbapenems, oxacillin, and other antimicrobial agents. CA-MRSA strains were more susceptible to carbapenems (MIC(90), 1-4 microg/ml) than HA-MRSA strains (MIC(90), 32-64 microg/ml). Among the carbapenems examined, CA-MRSA strains were most susceptible to imipenem (MIC(50), 0.12 microg/ml; MIC(90), 1 microg/ml). A similar tendency was observed with oxacillin, but less markedly (MIC(90): 32 microg/ml for CA-MRSA and > or =256 microg/ml for HA-MRSA). This difference was also observed between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA in susceptibility levels to cephems, erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin, but not to ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin. The data indicate that, in terms of MIC(50) or MIC(90) values, CA-MRSA is 64-256 times more susceptible to imipenem than HA-MRSA, and for CA-MRSA, some carbapenems, e.g., imipenem, show better in vitro activity than anti-MRSA or some related agents. PMID:19280303

  18. Wildtype adult stem cells, unlike tumor cells, are resistant to cellular damages in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meifang; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Hanfei; Binari, Richard; Perrimon, Norbert; Li, Zhouhua

    2016-03-15

    Adult stem cells or residential progenitor cells are critical to maintain the structure and function of adult tissues (homeostasis) throughout the lifetime of an individual. Mis-regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation often leads to diseases including cancer, however, how wildtype adult stem cells and cancer cells respond to cellular damages remains unclear. We find that in the adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs), unlike tumor intestinal cells, are resistant to various cellular damages. Tumor intestinal cells, unlike wildtype ISCs, are easily eliminated by apoptosis. Further, their proliferation is inhibited upon autophagy induction, and autophagy-mediated tumor inhibition is independent of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of tumorigenesis by autophagy is likely through the sequestration and degradation of mitochondria, as compromising mitochondria activity in these tumor models mimics the induction of autophagy and increasing the production of mitochondria alleviates the tumor-suppression capacity of autophagy. Together, these data demonstrate that wildtype adult stem cells and tumor cells show dramatic differences in sensitivity to cellular damages, thus providing potential therapeutic implications targeting tumorigenesis. PMID:26845534

  19. Oncolytic Virus-Mediated Targeting of PGE2 in the Tumor Alters the Immune Status and Sensitizes Established and Resistant Tumors to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weizhou; Sampath, Padma; Rojas, Juan J; Thorne, Steve H

    2016-07-11

    Immunotherapies are highly promising cancer treatments, but understanding the factors mediating their resistance remains critical. Successes in randomized clinical testing have supported the growing appreciation that oncolytic virotherapies primarily act as immunotherapies. Here we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the tumor as a key mediator of resistance to immunotherapies, including oncolytic vaccinia virotherapy. Elevated levels of PGE2 coupled to suppressive chemokine profiles and high levels of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells resulted in loss of immunotherapeutic potential. Viral vectors engineered to target PGE2 were capable of overcoming localized immunosuppression leading to profound changes in the tumor's immune status. This allowed the viral vectors to raise robust anti-tumor adaptive immune responses and sensitized established and previously resistant tumors to immunotherapies. PMID:27374223

  20. Factors Determining Sensitivity and Resistance of Tumor Cells to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sertel, Serkan; Tome, Margaret; Briehl, Margaret M.; Bauer, Judith; Hock, Kai; Plinkert, Peter K.; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Previously, arsenic trioxide showed impressive regression rates of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Here, we investigated molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of cell lines of different tumor types towards arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide was the most cytotoxic compound among 8 arsenicals investigated in the NCI cell line panel. We correlated transcriptome-wide microarray-based mRNA expression to the IC50 values for arsenic trioxide by bioinformatic approaches (COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses, Ingenuity signaling pathway analysis). Among the identified pathways were signaling routes for p53, integrin-linked kinase, and actin cytoskeleton. Genes from these pathways significantly predicted cellular response to arsenic trioxide. Then, we analyzed whether classical drug resistance factors may also play a role for arsenic trioxide. Cell lines transfected with cDNAs for catalase, thioredoxin, or the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene were more resistant to arsenic trioxide than mock vector transfected cells. Multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing the MDR1, MRP1 or BCRP genes were not cross-resistant to arsenic trioxide. Our approach revealed that response of tumor cells towards arsenic trioxide is multi-factorial. PMID:22590507

  1. Chemical Proteomics Uncovers EPHA2 as a Mechanism of Acquired Resistance to Small Molecule EGFR Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Koch, Heiner; Busto, M Estela Del Castillo; Kramer, Karl; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become an important therapeutic option for treating several forms of cancer. Gefitinib, an inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is in clinical use for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring activating EGFR mutations. However, despite high initial response rates, many patients develop resistance to gefitinib. The molecular mechanisms of TKI resistance often remain unclear. Here, we describe a chemical proteomic approach comprising kinase affinity purification (kinobeads) and quantitative mass spectrometry for the identification of kinase inhibitor resistance mechanisms in cancer cells. We identified the previously described amplification of MET and found EPHA2 to be more than 10-fold overexpressed (p < 0.001) in gefitinib-resistant HCC827 cells suggesting a potential role in developing resistance. siRNA-mediated EPHA2 knock-down or treating cells with the multikinase inhibitor dasatinib restored sensitivity to gefitinib. Of all dasatinib targets, EPHA2 exhibited the most drastic effect (p < 0.001). In addition, EPHA2 knockdown or ephrin-A1 treatment of resistant cells decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration. These findings confirm EPHA2 as an actionable drug target, provide a rational basis for drug combination approaches, and indicate that chemical proteomics is broadly applicable for the discovery of kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:25963923

  2. Codelivery of Chemotherapeutics via Crosslinked Multilamellar Liposomal Vesicles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kye-Il; Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant challenge to effective cancer chemotherapy treatment. However, the development of a drug delivery system that allows for the sustained release of combined drugs with improved vesicle stability could overcome MDR in cancer cells. To achieve this, we have demonstrated codelivery of doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) via a crosslinked multilamellar vesicle (cMLV). This combinatorial delivery system achieves enhanced drug accumulation and retention, in turn resulting in improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells, including drug-resistant cells. Moreover, this delivery approach significantly overcomes MDR by reducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells, thus improving antitumor activity in vivo. Thus, by enhancing drug delivery to tumors and lowering the apoptotic threshold of individual drugs, this combinatorial delivery system represents a potentially promising multimodal therapeutic strategy to overcome MDR in cancer therapy. PMID:25330237

  3. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  4. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-26

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  5. National and Regional Assessment of Antimicrobial Resistance among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens Identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem Surveillance Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Ian A.; Brown, Steven D.; Traczewski, Maria M.; Tillotson, Glenn S.; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-01-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to β-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. β-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 μg/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 μg/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 μg/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections caused

  6. National and regional assessment of antimicrobial resistance among community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Ian A; Brown, Steven D; Traczewski, Maria M; Tillotson, Glenn S; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-12-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to beta-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. beta-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 mug/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 mug/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 mug/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections

  7. Expression of a multidrug-resistance gene in human tumors and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fojo, A.T.; Ueda, K.; Slamon, D.J.; Poplack, D.G.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The identification and cloning of a segment of a human multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) was reported recently. To examine, the molecular basis of one type of multidrug resistance, the authors have prepared RNA from human tumors and normal tissues and measured their content of mdr1 RNA. They find that the mdr1 gene is expressed at a very high level in the adrenal gland; at a high level in the kidney; at intermediate levels in the lung, liver, lower jejunum, colon, and rectum; and at low levels in many other tissues. The mdr1 gene is also expressed in several human tumors, including many but not all tumors derived from the adrenal gland and the colon. In addition, increased expression was detected in a few tumors at the time of relapse following initial chemotherapy. Although controlled clinical studies will be required, the results suggest that measurement of mdr1 RNA may prove to be a valuable tool in the design of chemotherapy protocols.

  8. Modulation of Cell Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress Signaling Contribute to Acquired Melphalan Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zub, Kamila Anna; de Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70–80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance. PMID:25769101

  9. Intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity in a vemurafenib-resistant melanoma patient and derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kristel; Krijgsman, Oscar; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Shahrabi, Aida; Weeber, Fleur; Song, Ji-Ying; Kuilman, Thomas; Vis, Daniel J; Wessels, Lodewyk F; Voest, Emile E; Schumacher, Ton NM; Blank, Christian U; Adams, David J; Haanen, John B; Peeper, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    The development of targeted inhibitors, like vemurafenib, has greatly improved the clinical outcome of BRAFV600E metastatic melanoma. However, resistance to such compounds represents a formidable problem. Using whole-exome sequencing and functional analyses, we have investigated the nature and pleiotropy of vemurafenib resistance in a melanoma patient carrying multiple drug-resistant metastases. Resistance was caused by a plethora of mechanisms, all of which reactivated the MAPK pathway. In addition to three independent amplifications and an aberrant form of BRAFV600E, we identified a new activating insertion in MEK1. This MEK1T55delinsRT mutation could be traced back to a fraction of the pre-treatment lesion and not only provided protection against vemurafenib but also promoted local invasion of transplanted melanomas. Analysis of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) from therapy-refractory metastases revealed that multiple resistance mechanisms were present within one metastasis. This heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumorally, caused an incomplete capture in the PDX of the resistance mechanisms observed in the patient. In conclusion, vemurafenib resistance in a single patient can be established through distinct events, which may be preexisting. Furthermore, our results indicate that PDX may not harbor the full genetic heterogeneity seen in the patient’s melanoma. PMID:26105199

  10. The Necrotic Signal Induced by Mycophenolic Acid Overcomes Apoptosis-Resistance in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Pinson, Benoît; Mahfouf, Walid; Pasquet, Jean-Max; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pourquier, Philippe; Moreau, Jean-François; Legembre, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP), is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA) are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA–mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL–overexpressing cells). All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA–mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. Conclusions/Significance These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells. PMID:19430526

  11. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that "accidental" tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  12. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S.

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  13. The impact of methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the pattern of hospital-acquired infection in an acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Meers, P D; Leong, K Y

    1990-10-01

    Infections due to methicillin- and aminoglycoside-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MARSA) appeared in a new teaching hospital shortly after it opened. The effect this had on the pattern of hospital-acquired infections in the four years that followed is described. No control measures were applied and MARSA became endemic. New infections appeared at a rate of about four for each 1000 patients discharged. It established itself at different levels of incidence in various specialist units, patients under intensive care being most severely affected. MARSA was implicated in half of all hospital-acquired infections due to S. aureus but it was not more pathogenic than its more sensitive counterpart. It had little impact on the life of the hospital. PMID:1979573

  14. Plasma Membrane Lesions In Anthracycline-Resistant Tumor Cells Probed Using A Fluorescent Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Doroshow, James H.

    1989-06-01

    Human cancer cells selected for resistance to several structurally unrelated cytotoxic drugs are known to display plasma membrane alterations such as amplified levels of a variety of glycoproteins, modifications in lipid composition, alterations in membrane fluidity and increased cellular fragility to osmotic shock. We have studied the plasma membrane fluidity of HL60 human leukemia cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that have been selected for acquired resistance against the cytocidal effects of the anthracycline anticancer drug Adriamycin. Fluidity measurements were accomplished by evaluating the fluorescence anisotropy of the plasma membrane specific probe trimethylamino-1,6-dipihenylhexatriene (TMA.DPH) bound to whole, living cells. TMA.DPH anisotropy values for MCF-7 sensitive and 12-fold resistant cells were 0.306 and 0.285, respectively, while anisotropy values for HL-60 sensitive and 80-fold resistant cells lines were 0.310 and 0.295, respectively. In all cases, cell viability exceeded 97% and anisotropy values were subject to a day-to-day uncertainty of +/-2%. Our results demonstrate that increased plasma membrane fluidity apparently accompanies the development of resistance in both cell lines. Because it is known that increased membrane fluidity results in significantly decreased Adriamycin binding in artificial membrane systems, we propose here that decreased drug associations with fluidized, plasma membrane lipid bilayer regions may be a mechanism which contributes, in part, to the reduced rates of drug accumulation observed in HL60 and MCF-7 cells resistant to Adriamycin.

  15. Role of OXA-23 and AdeABC efflux pump for acquiring carbapenem resistance in an Acinetobacter baumannii strain carrying the blaOXA-66 gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Chang-Ki; Yong, Dongeun; Jeon, Eun Hee; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Ahn, Jee Young; Lee, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the mechanisms for acquiring carbapenem resistance in six clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. All isolates showed similar SmaI-macrorestriction patterns with less than 3 band differences by PFGE. The isolates showed a high level resistance (>32 mg/L) to both imipenem and meropenem by Etest. Phe-Arg-beta-naphthylamide lowered the MICs of carbapenems. Real-time PCR experiments showed that expression levels of the adeB gene in the six A. baumannii isolates were 10- to 40-times higher than those of imipenem-susceptible strains. Direct sequencing of PCR products showed that all isolates carried the bla(OXA-23) gene, which was preceded by ISAba1. The bla(OXA-23) probe hybridized with approximately 500-kb I-CeuI chromosomal fragments, but not with a plasmid. These findings suggest that overexpression of the AdeABC efflux pump as well as chromosome-borne OXA-23 may play a role in acquiring carbapenem resistance in our A. baumannii isolates. PMID:20124329

  16. THE TREATMENT-RESISTANT MESENCHYMAL SIGNATURE IN GLIOBLASTOMA DERIVES FROM TUMOR CELLS INDEPENDENT OF STROMA

    PubMed Central

    Sulman, Erik P.; Wang, Qianghu; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Goodman, Lindsey D.; Gumen, Joy; Sun, Peng; Aldape, Ken; Alfred Yung, WK; Heffernan, Timothy; Draetta, Giulio F.; Lang, Frederick F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioma sphere-forming cells (GSCs) derived from surgical specimens are a fundamental resource to study glioblastoma (GBM) biology. Mesenchymal-expressing GSCs have been proposed as a source of treatment resistance and mesenchymal tumors correlate with poorer survival. Recently, we found that the anti-angiogensis drug bevacizumab appeared to provide no benefit to patients with mesenchymal tumors, in contradiction to expectations that a mesenchymal microenvironment may benefit from anti-angiogenesis therapy. We have developed a collection of GSCs that have undergone comprehensive genomic characterization, similar to that performed by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) for whole tumor specimens. We hypothesized that the genomic landscape of GSCs would recapitulate what was observed by TCGA. METHODS: 47 GSCs were obtained from primary culture of fresh tumor specimens obtained at surgery and cultured as 3-dimensional spheres in the absence of serum. All lines were subjected to RNAseq (75bp paired-end, 100X coverage), copy number analysis (Affymetrix Oncoscan 2.0), whole methylome (Illumina Infinium 450k bead array), and targeted resequencing of known cancer-associated genes. Whole exome sequencing was performed for 22 GSCs. Gene expression was determined by reads per kilobase per million (RPKM) using an RNA sequencing data analysis pipeline (PRADA) and somatic mutations identified by a commonly used detection method (MuTech). Consensus clustering based on none-negative matrix factorization (CNMF) was performed on expression data and correlation to TCGA clusters determined by single-sample gene set enrichment analysis (ssGSEA). RESULTS: While global copy number alterations such as gain of chromosome 7 at the EGFR locus or loss of chromosome 10 at the PTEN locus were shared between tumor and matched GSC, the rate of somatic events was significantly higher in GSCs compared to tumors (range 47-570, median 124 vs range 2-255, median 65). Optimization of CNMF

  17. Reciprocal positive regulation between Cx26 and PI3K/Akt pathway confers acquired gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells via GJIC-independent induction of EMT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Qin, G; Luo, M; Chen, J; Zhang, Q; Li, L; Pan, L; Qin, S

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib efficiency in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) therapy is limited due to development of drug resistance. The molecular mechanisms of gefitinib resistance remain still unclear. In this study, we first found that connexin 26 (Cx26) is the predominant Cx isoform expressed in various NSCLC cell lines. Then, two gefitinib-resistant (GR) NSCLC cell lines, HCC827 GR and PC9 GR, from their parental cells were established. In these GR cells, the results showed that gefitinib resistance correlated with changes in cellular EMT phenotypes and upregulation of Cx26. Cx26 was detected to be accumulated in the cytoplasm and failed to establish functional gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) either in GR cells or their parental cells. Ectopic expression of GJIC-deficient chimeric Cx26 was sufficient to induce EMT and gefitinib insensitivity in HCC827 and PC9 cells, while knockdown of Cx26 reversed EMT and gefitinib resistance in their GR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Cx26 overexpression could activate PI3K/Akt signaling in these cells. Cx26-mediated EMT and gefitinib resistance were significantly blocked by inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway. Specifically, inhibition of the constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt pathway substantially suppressed Cx26 expression, and Cx26 was confirmed to functionally interplay with PI3K/Akt signaling to promote EMT and gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells. In conclusion, the reciprocal positive regulation between Cx26 and PI3K/Akt signaling contributes to acquired gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells by promoting EMT via a GJIC-independent manner. PMID:26203858

  18. Influence of Infection of Cotton by Rotylenchulus Reniformis and Meloidogyne Incognita on the Production of Enzymes Involved in Systemic Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Sudarshan K.; Davis, Richard F.; Stevenson, Katherine L.; Timper, Patricia; Ji, Pingsheng

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which results in enhanced defense mechanisms in plants, can be elicited by virulent and avirulent strains of pathogens including nematodes. Recent studies of nematode reproduction strongly suggest that Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis induce SAR in cotton, but biochemical evidence of SAR was lacking. Our objective was to determine whether infection of cotton by M. incognita and R. reniformis increases the levels of P-peroxidase, G-peroxidase, and catalase enzymes which are involved in induced resistance. A series of greenhouse trials was conducted; each trial included six replications of four treatments applied to one of three cotton genotypes in a randomized complete block design. The four treatments were cotton plants inoculated with i) R. reniformis, ii) M. incognita, iii) BTH (Actigard), and iv) a nontreated control. Experiments were conducted on cotton genotypes DP 0935 B2RF (susceptible to both nematodes), LONREN-1 (resistant to R. reniformis), and M-120 RNR (resistant to M. incognita), and the level of P-peroxidase, G-peroxidase, and catalase activity was measured before and 2, 4, 6, 10, and 14 d after treatment application. In all cotton genotypes, activities of all three enzymes were higher (P ≤ 0.05) in leaves of plants infected with M. incognita and R. reniformis than in the leaves of control plants, except that M. incognita did not increase catalase activity on LONREN-1. Increased enzyme activity was usually apparent 6 d after treatment. This study documents that infection of cotton by M. incognita or R. reniformis increases the activity of the enzymes involved in systemic acquired resistance; thereby providing biochemical evidence to substantiate previous reports of nematode-induced SAR in cotton. PMID:23431029

  19. Detection of New Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Containing the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 Gene Responsible for Hospital- and Community-Acquired Infections in France

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Geraldine; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Helene; Enright, Mark C.; Forey, Françoise; Liassine, Nadia; Wenger, Aline; Kikuchi, Ken; Lina, Gerard; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones harboring the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst) gene have been detected in France and in Switzerland since 2002. During a passive survey conducted between 2002 and 2003, we collected 103 tst-positive S. aureus isolates from 42 towns in France, of which 27 were resistant to methicillin. The tst-positive MRSA belonged to two clones: a major clone comprising 25 isolates of sequence type (ST) 5 and agr group 2 and a minor clone comprising two isolates of ST30 and agr3. The tst-positive MRSA clones were associated with both hospital-acquired (12 cases) and community-acquired (8 cases) infections. The MRSA clones were mainly isolated from children (overall median age, 3 years). They caused a variety of clinical syndromes, including toxic shock syndrome and suppurative infections. Both clones were found to harbor a type IV staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) and to have similar antibiotic resistance profiles (usually resistant to oxacillin, kanamycin, and tobramycin and with intermediate resistance to fusidic acid). The origin of these clones is unclear. The tst-positive agr2 MRSA clone has the same sequence type (ST5) of two pandemic nosocomial MRSA clones, namely, the Pediatric clone and the New York/Japan clone. These findings suggest that all these clones are phylogenetically related. The pulsotype of the tst-positive MRSA clones differed from that of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) clones by a single band involving the SCCmec element. These findings suggest that the tst-positive MRSA clones may have emerged from their respective MSSA counterparts. PMID:16517865

  20. Cross-platform meta-analysis of multiple gene expression profiles identifies novel expression signatures in acquired anthracycline-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Ryu, Seung Won; Bae, Se Jong; Park, Tae Hwan; Kwon, Kang; Noh, Yun Hee; Kim, Sung Young

    2015-04-01

    Anthracyclines are among the most effective and commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. However, the development of acquired anthracycline resistance is a major limitation to their clinical application. The aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and biological processes associated with the acquisition of anthracycline resistance in human breast cancer cells. We performed a meta-analysis of publically available microarray datasets containing data on stepwise-selected, anthracycline‑resistant breast cancer cell lines using the RankProd package in R. Additionally, the gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases were used to analyze GO term enrichment and pathways, respectively. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was also generated using Cytoscape software. The meta-analysis yielded 413 DEGs related to anthracycline resistance in human breast cancer cells, and 374 of these were not involved in individual DEGs. GO analyses showed the 413 genes were enriched with terms such as 'response to steroid metabolic process', 'chemical stimulus', 'external stimulus', 'hormone stimulus', 'multicellular organismal process', and 'system development'. Pathway analysis revealed significant pathways including steroid hormone biosynthesis, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and arachidonic acid metabolism. The PPI network indicated that proteins encoded by TRIM29, VTN, CCNA1, and karyopherin α 5 (KPNA5) participated in a significant number of interactions. In conclusion, our meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of gene expression patterns associated with acquired resistance to anthracycline in breast cancer cells, and constitutes the basis for additional functional studies. PMID:25695524

  1. The Systemic Acquired Resistance Regulator OsNPR1 Attenuates Growth by Repressing Auxin Signaling through Promoting IAA-Amido Synthase Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaozun; Yang, Dong-Lei; Sun, Li; Li, Qun; Mao, Bizeng; He, Zuhua

    2016-09-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is a long-lasting and broad-spectrum disease resistance to pathogens. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (OsNPR1), a master gene for systemic acquired resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), greatly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae However, the growth and development of the OsNPR1 overexpression (OsNPR1-OX) plants were restrained, and the mechanism remained elusive. In this study, we dissected the OsNPR1-induced growth inhibition. We found that the OsNPR1-OX lines displayed phenotypes mimicking auxin-defective mutants, with decreases in root system, seed number and weight, internode elongation, and tiller number. Whole-genome expression analysis revealed that genes related to the auxin metabolism and signaling pathway were differentially expressed between the OsNPR1-OX and wild-type plants. Consistently, the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content was decreased and the auxin distribution pattern was altered in OsNPR1-OX plants. Importantly, we found that some GH3 family members, in particular OsGH3.8 coding IAA-amido synthetase, were constitutively up-regulated in OsNPR1-OX plants. Decreased OsGH3.8 expression by RNA interference could partially restore IAA level and largely rescue the restrained growth and development phenotypes but did not affect the disease resistance of OsNPR1-OX plants. Taken together, we revealed that OsNPR1 affects rice growth and development by disrupting the auxin pathway at least partially through indirectly up-regulating OsGH3.8 expression. PMID:27378815

  2. NDRG1 overexpressing gliomas are characterized by reduced tumor vascularization and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Wüstner, Marie; Harms, Christoph; Stange, Lena; Blaes, Jonas; Thomé, Carina; Harms, Ulrike; Mueller, Susanne; Weiler, Markus; Wick, Wolfgang; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-regulated molecules play an important role in vascular resistance to antiangiogenic treatment. N-myc downstream-regulated-gene 1 (NDRG1) is significantly upregulated during hypoxia in glioma. It was the aim of the present study to analyze the role of NDRG1 on glioma angiogenesis and on antiangiogenic treatment. Orthotopically implanted NDRG1 glioma showed reduced tumor growth and vessel density compared to controls. RT-PCR gene array analysis revealed a 30-fold TNFSF15 increase in NDRG1 tumors. Consequently, the supernatant from NDRG1 transfected U87MG glioma cells resulted in reduced HUVEC proliferation, migration and angiogenic response in tube formation assays in vitro. This effect was provoked by increased TNFSF15 promoter activity in NDRG1 cells. Mutations in NF-κB and AP-1 promoter response elements suppressed TNFSF15 promoter activity. Moreover, U87MG glioma NDRG1 knockdown supernatant contained multiple proangiogenic proteins and increased HUVEC spheroid sprouting. Sunitinib treatment of orhotopically implanted mice reduced tumor volume and vessel density in controls; in NDRG1 overexpressing cells no reduction of tumor volume or vessel density was observed. NDRG1 overexpression leads to reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental glioma via upregulation of TNFSF15. In NDRG1 overexpressing glioma antiangiogenic treatment does not yield a therapeutic response. PMID:26297987

  3. Periostin in tumor microenvironment is associated with poor prognosis and platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Jan, Yi-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hao; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying F.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between tumor microenvironment and cancer that causes chemoresistance remains unclear. By analyzing public available microarray datasets, we identified that periostin (POSTN) was overexpressed in cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed overexpression of stromal POSTN is a powerful independent poor prognostic predictor for EOC patients. Furthermore, patients with high levels of stromal POSTN tend to have higher percentage of cisplatin resistance compared to those with low levels of stromal POSTN. Moreover, we found POSTN treatment can induce cisplatin resistant and activate AKT pathway in A2780 cells in vitro. Inhibition of AKT activity by AKT inhibitor MK-2206 abolished POSTN-induced AKT activation and cisplatin resistance in vitro. Taken together, we found high POSTN expression in cancer microenvironment is correlated with poor prognosis in EOC patients and associated with platinum resistance. The effect of POSTN in cancer stroma cells may activate AKT pathway in tumor and AKT inhibitor can be beneficial to augment the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:26716408

  4. Periostin in tumor microenvironment is associated with poor prognosis and platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Jan, Yi-Hua; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Hao; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Twu, Nae-Fang; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2016-01-26

    The interplay between tumor microenvironment and cancer that causes chemoresistance remains unclear. By analyzing public available microarray datasets, we identified that periostin (POSTN) was overexpressed in cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed overexpression of stromal POSTN is a powerful independent poor prognostic predictor for EOC patients. Furthermore, patients with high levels of stromal POSTN tend to have higher percentage of cisplatin resistance compared to those with low levels of stromal POSTN. Moreover, we found POSTN treatment can induce cisplatin resistant and activate AKT pathway in A2780 cells in vitro. Inhibition of AKT activity by AKT inhibitor MK-2206 abolished POSTN-induced AKT activation and cisplatin resistance in vitro. Taken together, we found high POSTN expression in cancer microenvironment is correlated with poor prognosis in EOC patients and associated with platinum resistance. The effect of POSTN in cancer stroma cells may activate AKT pathway in tumor and AKT inhibitor can be beneficial to augment the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics. PMID:26716408

  5. Quality analysis of in vivo near-infrared fluorescence and conventional gamma images acquired using a dual-labeled tumor-targeting probe.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Li, Chun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic peptide, cyclopentapeptide cyclo(lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-phe) (c(KRGDf)), which is known to target alpha(v)beta3 integrin, is dual-labeled with a radiotracer, (111)indium, for gamma scintigraphy as well as with a near-infrared dye, IRDye800, for continuous-wave (cw) imaging of alpha(v)beta3 positive human M21 melanoma in xenografts. Twenty-four hours after administration of the dual-labeled peptide at a dose equivalent to 90 microCi of (111)In and 5 nmol of near-infrared (NIR) dye, whole-body gamma scintigraphy and cw imaging was conducted. Image acquisition time was 15 min for the gamma scintigraphy images and 800 ms for the optical images acquired using an NIR sensitive intensified charge-coupled device. The results show that while the target-to-background ratio (TBR) of nuclear and optical imaging were similar for surface regions of interest and consistent with the origin of gamma and NIR radiation from a common targeted peptide, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was significantly higher for optical than nuclear imaging. Furthermore, an analysis of SNR versus contrast showed greater sensitivity of optical over nuclear imaging for the subcutaneous tumor targets. While tomographic reconstructions are necessary to probe TBR, SNR, and contrast for interior tissues, this work demonstrates for the first time the direct comparison of molecular optical and planar nuclear imaging for surface and subsurface cancers. PMID:16292970

  6. Verapamil inhibits tumor progression of chemotherapy-resistant pancreatic cancer side population cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LU; ZHAO, YUE; SCHWARZ, BETTINA; MYSLIWIETZ, JOSEF; HARTIG, ROLAND; CAMAJ, PETER; BAO, QI; JAUCH, KARL-WALTER; GUBA, MAKUS; ELLWART, JOACHIM WALTER; NELSON, PETER JON; BRUNS, CHRISTIANE JOSEPHINE

    2016-01-01

    Tumor side population (SP) cells display stem-like properties that can be modulated by treatment with the calcium channel blocker verapamil. Verapamil can enhance the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and multi-drug resistance by targeting the transport function of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study focused on the therapeutic potential of verapamil on stem-like SP tumor cells, and further investigated its chemosensitizing effects using L3.6pl and AsPC-1 pancreatic carcinoma models. As compared to parental L3.6pl cells (0.9±0.22%), L3.6pl gemcitabine-resistant cells (L3.6plGres) showed a significantly higher percentage of SP cells (5.38±0.99%) as detected by Hoechst 33342/FACS assays. The L3.6plGres SP cells showed stable gemcitabine resistance, enhanced colony formation ability and increased tumorigenicity. Verapamil effectively inhibited L3.6plGres and AsPC-1 SP cell proliferation in vitro. A pro-apoptotic effect of verapamil was observed in L3.6pl cells, but not in L3.6plGres cells, which was linked to their differential expression of P-gp and equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (ENT-1). In an orthotopic pancreatic cancer mouse model, both low and high dose verapamil was shown to substantial