Science.gov

Sample records for acquiring specially adapted

  1. 76 FR 63354 - Proposed Information Collection (Application in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing or Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Information Collection (Application in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing or Special Home Adaptation Grant... adapted housing or special home adaptation grant. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... Housing or Special Home Adaptation Grant, VA Form 26-4555. OMB Control Number: 2900-0132. Type of...

  2. 77 FR 323 - Agency Information Collection (Application in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing or Special Home...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Adaptation Grant) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... Adapted Housing or Special Home Adaptation Grant, VA Form 26-4555. OMB Control Number: 2900-0132. Type of... special home adaptation grant. VA will use the data collected to determine the veteran's eligibility....

  3. 75 FR 57859 - Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN21 Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation AGENCY... housing and special home adaptation grants. This final rule incorporates certain provisions from the... adapted housing (SAH) grants and special home adaptation (SHA) grants. The public comment period ended...

  4. 78 FR 10266 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Application for Assistance in Acquiring Special Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Adaptations) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... acquiring special housing and/or adaptations to their current resident. DATES: Written comments and... Acquiring Special Housing Adaptations, VA Form 26-4555d. OMB Control Number: 2900-0300. Type of...

  5. 75 FR 15494 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Application for Assistance in Acquiring Special Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Adaptations) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... acquiring special housing and/or adaptations to their current resident. DATES: Written comments and... Acquiring Special Housing Adaptations, VA Form 26-4555d. OMB Control Number: 2900-0300. Type of...

  6. Acquiring case adaptation knowledge: A hybrid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, D.B.; Kinley, A.; Wilson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The ability of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems to apply cases to novel situations depends on their case adaptation knowledge. However, endowing CBR systems with adequate adaptation knowledge has proven to be a very difficult task. This paper describes a hybrid method for performing case adaptation, using a combination of rule-based and case-based reasoning. It shows how this approach provides a framework for acquiring flexible adaptation knowledge from experiences with autonomous adaptation and suggests its potential as a basis for acquisition of adaptation knowledge from interactive user guidance. It also presents initial experimental results examining the benefits of the approach and comparing the relative contributions of case learning and adaptation learning to reasoning performance.

  7. 78 FR 40550 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Application for Assistance in Acquiring Special Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Adaptations) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Application for Assistance in Acquiring Special Housing Adaptations... housing and adaptations to dwellings. Under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b), grants are available to assist Veterans...

  8. 38 CFR 3.809a - Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special home adaptation... Special Benefits § 3.809a Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b). A certificate of eligibility for assistance in acquiring necessary special home adaptations, or, on or after October 28,...

  9. 38 CFR 3.809a - Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special home adaptation... Special Benefits § 3.809a Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b). A certificate of eligibility for assistance in acquiring necessary special home adaptations, or, on or after October 28,...

  10. 38 CFR 3.809a - Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special home adaptation... Special Benefits § 3.809a Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b). A certificate of eligibility for assistance in acquiring necessary special home adaptations, or, on or after October 28,...

  11. 38 CFR 3.809a - Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special home adaptation... Special Benefits § 3.809a Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b). A certificate of eligibility for assistance in acquiring necessary special home adaptations, or, on or after October 28,...

  12. 38 CFR 3.809a - Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special home adaptation... Special Benefits § 3.809a Special home adaptation grants under 38 U.S.C. 2101(b). A certificate of eligibility for assistance in acquiring necessary special home adaptations, or, on or after October 28,...

  13. Using Your Microcomputer to Acquire Special Education Information. 1984 Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazarro, Jean N.

    The digest answers basic questions about using microcomputers for professional development in special education. Use of the microcomputer as a self-contained unit is described and the types of information available on diskette from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources are considered. The microcomputer's application in networking is…

  14. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research facilities acquired by educational institutions. 235.015-70 Section 235.015-70 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 235.015-70 Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions. (a) Definitions. As used in this subsection— (1) Research...

  15. 75 FR 32540 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Application for Assistance in Acquiring Special Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Adaptations) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... Special Housing Adaptations, VA Form 26-4555d. OMB Control Number: 2900-0300. Type of Review: Extension of... veteran in making adaptations to their current residences or one they intend to live in as long as...

  16. Adaptive and Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Converge on the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengfei; Fu, Yujie; Chen, Minjiang; Jing, Ying; Wu, Jie; Li, Ke; Shen, Ying; Gao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Both adaptive and acquired resistance significantly limits the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors. However, the distinct or common mechanisms of adaptive and acquired resistance have not been fully characterized. Here, through systematic modeling of erlotinib resistance in lung cancer, we found that feedback reactivation of MAPK signaling following erlotinib treatment, which was dependent on the MET receptor, contributed to the adaptive resistance of EGFR inhibitors. Interestingly, acquired resistance to erlotinib was also associated with the MAPK pathway activation as a result of CRAF or NRAS amplification. Consequently, combined inhibition of EGFR and MAPK impeded the development of both adaptive and acquired resistance. These observations demonstrate that adaptive and acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors can converge on the same pathway and credential cotargeting EGFR and MAPK as a promising therapeutic approach in EGFR mutant tumors. PMID:27279914

  17. 17 CFR 210.3-14 - Special instructions for real estate operations to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... General Instructions As to Financial Statements § 210.3-14 Special instructions for real estate operations... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special instructions for real estate operations to be acquired. 210.3-14 Section 210.3-14 Commodity and Securities Exchanges...

  18. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Mansell, J. D.; Gruetzner, James K.; Morgan, R.; Warren, Mial E.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using MLM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs are presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  19. Developing Adaptive Proficiency in Special Forces Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    personalities , etc. of the other parties involved. Understanding Oneself: A starting point for interpersonal adaptability is understanding...knowledge.’For example, rather than instructing students on how to communicate with someone of a different culture , students would practice the task in a ... interpersonal , physical, leading an adaptable team). Additionally, students are presented with a set of "Adaptability Rating Scales," and they are encouraged

  20. Adapting a Robot Hand to Specialized Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Keith H.

    1987-01-01

    Adaptor enables mechanical and electrical connections made easily between special-purpose end effector and arm of robot or remote mainpulator. Use in prosthetic devices also contemplatd. With adaptor, hand changed quickly from device designed to grasp objects of various sizes and shapes to device intended to do specific task efficiently.

  1. Adaptive Memory: Is Survival Processing Special?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2008-01-01

    Do the operating characteristics of memory continue to bear the imprints of ancestral selection pressures? Previous work in our laboratory has shown that human memory may be specially tuned to retain information processed in terms of its survival relevance. A few seconds of survival processing in an incidental learning context can produce recall…

  2. Adapting Aquatic Circuit Training for Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thome, Kathleen

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses how land activities can be adapted to water so that individuals with handicapping conditions can participate in circuit training activities. An initial section lists such organizational procedures as providing vocal and/or visual cues for activities, having assistants accompany the performers throughout the circuit, and…

  3. Compensatory Expressive Behavior for Facial Paralysis: Adaptation to Congenital or Acquired Disability

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Kathleen R.; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Ambady, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although there has been little research on the adaptive behavior of people with congenital compared to acquired disability, there is reason to predict that people with congenital conditions may be better adapted because they have lived with their conditions for their entire lives (Smart, 2008). We examined whether people with congenital facial paralysis (FP), compared to people with acquired FP, compensate more for impoverished facial expression by using alternative channels of expression (i.e. voice and body). Research Method/Design Participants with congenital (n = 13) and acquired (n = 14) FP were videotaped while recalling emotional events. Main Outcome Measures Expressive verbal behavior was measured using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (Pennebaker, Booth & Francis, 2007). Nonverbal behavior and FP severity were rated by trained coders. Results People with congenital FP, compared to acquired FP, used more compensatory expressive verbal and nonverbal behavior in their language, voices, and bodies. The extent of FP severity had little effect on compensatory expressivity. Conclusions/Implications This study provides the first behavioral evidence that people with congenital FP use more adaptations to express themselves than people with acquired FP. These behaviors could inform social functioning interventions for people with FP. PMID:22369116

  4. Special Physical Education: Adapted, Individualized, Developmental. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John M.

    This text on physical education for children and adolescents with disabilities attempts to bring together current research findings and best educational practices from the fields of adapted physical education, special education, psychology, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation. The book is organized into…

  5. Adaptive thinking & leadership simulation game training for special forces officers.

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, Elaine Marie; Mendini, Kip; Heneghan, Jerry; Deagle, Edwin

    2005-07-01

    Complex problem solving approaches and novel strategies employed by the military at the squad, team, and commander level are often best learned experimentally. Since live action exercises can be costly, advances in simulation game training technology offer exciting ways to enhance current training. Computer games provide an environment for active, critical learning. Games open up possibilities for simultaneous learning on multiple levels; players may learn from contextual information embedded in the dynamics of the game, the organic process generated by the game, and through the risks, benefits, costs, outcomes, and rewards of alternative strategies that result from decision making. In the present paper we discuss a multiplayer computer game simulation created for the Adaptive Thinking & Leadership (ATL) Program to train Special Forces Team Leaders. The ATL training simulation consists of a scripted single-player and an immersive multiplayer environment for classroom use which leverages immersive computer game technology. We define adaptive thinking as consisting of competencies such as negotiation and consensus building skills, the ability to communicate effectively, analyze ambiguous situations, be self-aware, think innovatively, and critically use effective problem solving skills. Each of these competencies is an essential element of leader development training for the U.S. Army Special Forces. The ATL simulation is used to augment experiential learning in the curriculum for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center & School (SWCS) course in Adaptive Thinking & Leadership. The school is incorporating the ATL simulation game into two additional training pipelines (PSYOPS and Civil Affairs Qualification Courses) that are also concerned with developing cultural awareness, interpersonal communication adaptability, and rapport-building skills. In the present paper, we discuss the design, development, and deployment of the training simulation, and emphasize how the

  6. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, Mohsen; Chai, Wern Chern; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-28

    Gram-negative bacteria are responsible for a large proportion of antimicrobial-resistant infections in humans and animals. Among this class of bacteria are also some of the most successful environmental organisms. Part of this success is their adaptability to a variety of different niches, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial drugs and their ability to rapidly acquire resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms of resistance are not exclusive and the interplay of several mechanisms causes high levels of resistance. In this review, we explore the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance in Gram-negative organisms and how these different mechanisms enable them to survive many different stress conditions.

  7. 43 CFR Appendix B to Part 2 - Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing... 2—Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands—Special Rules (a) Definitions. As... conduct coal exploration operations on land subject to the Mineral Leasing Act, under 30 U.S.C. 201(b),...

  8. 43 CFR Appendix F to Part 2 - Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules F Appendix F to Part 2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Pt. 2, App. F Appendix F to...

  9. 43 CFR Appendix F to Part 2 - Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules F Appendix F to Part 2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Pt. 2, App. F Appendix F to...

  10. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... research facilities acquired by educational institutions. 235.015-70 Section 235.015-70 Federal Acquisition... acquired by educational institutions. (a) Definitions. As used in this subsection— (1) Research facility... 31.3. (b) Policy. (1) Educational institutions are to furnish the facilities necessary to...

  11. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research facilities acquired by educational institutions. 235.015-70 Section 235.015-70 Federal Acquisition... acquired by educational institutions. (a) Definitions. As used in this subsection— (1) Research facility... 31.3. (b) Policy. (1) Educational institutions are to furnish the facilities necessary to...

  12. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... research facilities acquired by educational institutions. 235.015-70 Section 235.015-70 Federal Acquisition... acquired by educational institutions. (a) Definitions. As used in this subsection— (1) Research facility... 31.3. (b) Policy. (1) Educational institutions are to furnish the facilities necessary to...

  13. Symptoms of detachment from the self or from the environment in patients with an acquired deficiency of the special senses.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui-Renaud, Kathrine; Ramos-Toledo, Verónica; Aguilar-Bolaños, Miriam; Montaño-Velázquez, Bertha; Pliego-Maldonado, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    To compare the frequency of symptoms of detachment from the self or from the environment (DD) in patients with an acquired deficiency of the special senses, a questionnaire for DD symptoms [12] and the GHQ12 questionnaire for common mental disorders [16] were auto-administered to patients with hearing-loss (N = 40), peripheral vestibular disease (N = 40) or bilateral retinal disease (N = 40), and to 80 healthy subjects. Patients with retinal disease and patients with vestibular disease reported DD symptoms more frequently & severe than patients with hearing loss and healthy subjects. DD scores were related to the GHQ12 scores and to the type of sensory dysfunction. DD symptoms are more frequent & severe in patients with an acquired deficiency of the special senses, associated to symptoms of common mental disorders.

  14. Promoting Adaptive Behavior in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, Extensive Motor and Communication Disabilities, and Consciousness Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Badagliacca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    These two studies extended the evidence on the use of technology-based intervention packages to promote adaptive behavior in persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities. Study I involved five participants in a minimally conscious state who were provided with intervention packages based on specific arrangements of optic, tilt, or…

  15. 48 CFR 235.015-70 - Special use allowances for research facilities acquired by educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... means— (i) Real property, other than land; and (ii) Includes structures, alterations, and improvements... construction or acquisition of buildings, structures, and real property, other than land; and (ii) Where the... requirements practically or effectively; (3) The proposed agreement for special use allowances is a...

  16. 78 FR 72573 - Specially Adapted Housing Eligibility for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Beneficiaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO84 Specially Adapted Housing Eligibility for Amyotrophic Lateral... housing (SAH). The amendment authorizes automatic issuance of a certificate of eligibility for SAH to all... indicate that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO84--Specially Adapted Housing Eligibility...

  17. A Rural Special Education Teacher Training Program: Successful Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Greg; And Others

    The Rural Special Education Program (RSEP), a partnership between Northern Arizona University (NAU) and Kayenta Unified School District (KUSD), provides training for preservice special education teachers to work with Native American students and their families. To date, the program has provided training for 63 preservice special education…

  18. How to Help Special Needs Children Adapt According to Their Own Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Dawndria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore strategies of how to help special needs children adapt according to their own abilities. Contributing factors, such as discrimination practices, served as the foundational components that led to the formation of special education services. At one time, "special needs children," also referred to…

  19. 75 FR 56875 - Loan Guaranty: Assistance to Eligible Individuals in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... regulations; provide further detail about longstanding program policies; and address legislation, policy.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: William White, Acting Assistant Director for Loan Policy and... program policies and a regulation written with an easy-to-follow organizational structure will...

  20. Evolutionary perspectives on learning: conceptual and methodological issues in the study of adaptive specializations.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    Inquiry into evolutionary adaptations has flourished since the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology. Comparative methods, genetic techniques, and various experimental and modeling approaches are used to test adaptive hypotheses. In psychology, the concept of adaptation is broadly applied and is central to comparative psychology and cognition. The concept of an adaptive specialization of learning is a proposed account for exceptions to general learning processes, as seen in studies of Pavlovian conditioning of taste aversions, sexual responses, and fear. The evidence generally consists of selective associations forming between biologically relevant conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, with conditioned responses differing in magnitude, persistence, or other measures relative to non-biologically relevant stimuli. Selective associations for biologically relevant stimuli may suggest adaptive specializations of learning, but do not necessarily confirm adaptive hypotheses as conceived of in evolutionary biology. Exceptions to general learning processes do not necessarily default to an adaptive specialization explanation, even if experimental results "make biological sense". This paper examines the degree to which hypotheses of adaptive specializations of learning in sexual and fear response systems have been tested using methodologies developed in evolutionary biology (e.g., comparative methods, quantitative and molecular genetics, survival experiments). A broader aim is to offer perspectives from evolutionary biology for testing adaptive hypotheses in psychological science.

  1. Classroom Adaptations for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbage, Edith

    This paper offers practical tips found useful in meeting the needs of children with special health problems within the classroom. It describes feeding techniques for children with gastrostomies or using nasal or oral gastric tubes. It outlines the implications of having a child with a tracheostomy in the classroom. Classroom management suggestions…

  2. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military Flight...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring...

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military Flight...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring...

  4. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.115 - Are there special requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements for acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? 102-33.115 Section 102-33...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT OF GOVERNMENT AIRCRAFT Acquiring Government... acquiring military Flight Safety Critical Aircraft Parts (FSCAP)? Yes, when you acquire military...

  7. Integrating Adaptability into Special Operations Forces Intermediate Level Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    components of adaptability, as described in this report. In addition, we found that while some of the material covered by the ILE curriculum relates...19 APPENDIX A – ADVANCED MATERIALS ............................................................ A-1 APPENDIX B – INTERVIEW... MATERIALS ............................................................ B-1 APPENDIX C – INTERVIEW DATA

  8. Learning to be different: Acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation can cause behaviourally mediated foraging specializations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M.T.; Mangel, M.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Question: How does the ability to improve foraging skills by learning, and to transfer that learned knowledge, affect the development of intra-population foraging specializations? Features of the model: We use both a state-dependent life-history model implemented by stochastic dynamic programming (SDPM) and an individual-based model (IBM) to capture the dynamic nature of behavioural preferences in feeding. Variables in the SDPM include energy reserves, skill levels, energy and handling time per single prey item, metabolic rate, the rates at which skills are learned and forgotten, the effect of skills on handling time, and the relationship between energy reserves and fitness. Additional variables in the IBM include the probability of successful weaning, the logistic dynamics of the prey species with stochastic recruitment, the intensity of top-down control of prey by predators, the mean and variance in skill levels of new recruits, and the extent to which learned Information can be transmitted via matrilineal social learning. Key range of variables: We explore the effects of approaching the time horizon in the SDPM, changing the extent to which skills can improve with experience, increasing the rates of learning or forgetting of skills, changing whether the learning curve is constant, accelerating (T-shaped) or decelerating ('r'-shaped), changing both mean and maximum possible energy reserves, changing metabolic costs of foraging, and changing the rate of encounter with prey. Conclusions: The model results show that the following factors increase the degree of prey specialization observed in a predator population: (1) Experience handling a prey type can substantially improve foraging skills for that prey. (2) There is limited ability to retain complex learned skills for multiple prey types. (3) The learning curve for acquiring new foraging skills is accelerating, or J-shaped. (4) The metabolic costs of foraging are high relative to available energy reserves. (5

  9. Direction-specific adaptation effects acquired in a slow rotation room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Knepton, J.

    1972-01-01

    Thirty-eight subjects were required to execute 120 head movements in a slow rotation room at each 1-rpm increase in velocity of the room between 0 and 6 rpm and, after a single-step gradual return to zero velocity, execute 120 head movements either immediately after the return or after delay periods varying from 1 to 24 hours unless, at any time, more than mild symptoms of motion sickness were elicited. A second stress profile differed by the sequential addition of an incremental adaptation schedule in which the direction of rotation was reversed. The experimental findings demonstrated the acquisition of direction-specific adaptation effects that underwent spontaneous decay with a short time constant (hours). Speculations are presented which could account for the simultaneous acquisition of short-term and long-term adaptation effects. The findings support the theory that motion sickness, although a consequence of vestibular stimulation, has its immediate origin in nonvestibular systems, implying a faculative or temporary linkage between the vestibular and nonvestibular systems.

  10. Specialized adaptations for springtail predation in Mesozoic beetles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi-Wei; Cai, Chen-Yang; Huang, Di-Ying; Li, Li-Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Insects exhibit a variety of morphological specializations specific to particular behaviors, and these permit the reconstruction of palaeobiological traits. Despite the critical importance of predator-prey strategies in insect evolution, the appearance of particular aspects of predation are often difficult to determine from the fossil record of hexapods. Here we report the discovery of highly specialized, mid-Cretaceous ant-like stone beetles (Staphylinidae: Scydmaeninae) displaying morphological modifications unknown among living scydmaenids and associated with predation on springtails (Collembola), a widespread and abundant group of significantly greater geological age. Cascomastigus monstrabilis gen. et sp. nov. exhibits an extremely large body size, elongate clubbed maxillary palpi, toothed mandibles, and more importantly, slender and highly modified antennae that functioned as an antennal setal trap. Such an antennal modification is analogous to that of the modern ground beetle genus Loricera (Carabidae: Loricerinae), a group possessing a specialized antennal setal trap exclusively for the capture of springtails. The presence of an identical antennal setal trap in C. monstrabilis demonstrates a unique and dramatic form of obligate predation among the late Mesozoic insects.

  11. Acquiring Peak Samples from Phytoplankton Thin Layers and Intermediate Nepheloid Layers by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with Adaptive Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; McEwen, R.; Ryan, J. P.; Bellingham, J. G.; Harvey, J.; Vrijenhoek, R.

    2010-12-01

    Phytoplankton thin layers (PTLs) affect many fundamental aspects of coastal ocean ecology including primary productivity, development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and the survival and growth of zooplankton and fish larvae. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INLs) that contain suspended particulate matter transported from the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves and slopes also affect biogeochemistry and ecology of ocean margins. To better understand the impacts of these types of layers, we have developed an adaptive sampling method for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to detect a layer (adjusting detection parameters in situ), acquire water samples from peaks in the layer, and acquire control samples outside the layer. We have used the method in a number of field experiments with the AUV Dorado, which is equipped with ten water samplers (called "gulpers"). In real time, the algorithm tracks background levels of fluorescence and optical backscatter and the peaks' baseline to ensure that detection is tuned to the ambient conditions. The algorithm cross-checks fluorescence and backscatter signals to differentiate PTLs from INLs. To capture peak water samples with minimal delay, the algorithm exploits the AUV's sawtooth (i.e., yo-yo) trajectory: the vehicle crosses the detected layer twice in one yo-yo cycle. At the first crossing, it detects the layer's peak and saves its signal height. Sampling is triggered at the second crossing when the signal reaches the saved peak height plus meeting additional timing and depth conditions. The algorithm is also capable of triggering gulpers to acquire control samples outside the layer for comparison with ambient water. The sequence of peak and control samples can be set based on need. In recent AUV Dorado missions, the algorithm triggered the gulpers to acquire peak and control samples from INLs and PTLs in Monterey Bay. Zooplankton analysis of some peak samples showed very high concentrations of mussel and barnacle

  12. Language Adaptive LVCSR Through Polyphone Decision Tree Specialization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    15.0 fectiveness of porting multilingual recognition systems to new tar- French (Bref) FR 7143 74 123K 13.9 get languages with very limited adaptation...22.9 Korean KO 6335 80 301K 16.4 recognition results are presented based on mono- and multilingual Spanish SP 5419 82 138K 17.6 recognizers developed in...limitation in developing LVCSR systems in new lan- lingual phonemic inventories and multilingual phoneme mod- guages is the need of large training data

  13. Specialization in tolerance: innate CD(4+)CD(25+) versus acquired TR1 and TH3 regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cottrez, Françoise; Groux, Hervé

    2004-01-15

    The regulation of immune responses to self-antigens is a complex process that involves maintaining self-tolerance while retaining the capacity to mount robust immune responses against invading microorganisms. Over the past few years, many new insights into this process have been gained, leading to the reemergence of the idea that regulatory T cells (Treg) are key players in immune regulation. These insights have raised fundamental questions concerning the definition of a Treg and what exactly constitutes T-cell-mediated suppression, identification of the signals and the cellular environment that promote the development and differentiation of these cells, and which signals maintain the homeostasis of the immune system. Thus far, the different models where Treg have been characterized cannot fully account for CD(4+)CD(25+) T cells. In this article, the authors propose the coexistence of two specialized types of CD(4+) Treg-innate and acquired-that differ in terms of their development, specificity, mechanisms, and sites of action.

  14. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines.

  15. Effects of Bilingual and English as a Second Language Adaptations of Success for All on the Reading Achievement of Students Acquiring English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.; Madden, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Studied the effects of two adaptations of the Success for All program, a Spanish bilingual version (Exito para Todos) and an adaptation that integrates English-as-a-Second-Language strategies with English reading instruction using data from six studies. Notes substantially positive effects of both approaches on students acquiring English. (SLD)

  16. Phylogeny-based comparative methods question the adaptive nature of sporophytic specializations in mosses.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Sanna; Olsson, Sanna; Buchbender, Volker; Enroth, Johannes; Hedenäs, Lars; Quandt, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive evolution has often been proposed to explain correlations between habitats and certain phenotypes. In mosses, a high frequency of species with specialized sporophytic traits in exposed or epiphytic habitats was, already 100 years ago, suggested as due to adaptation. We tested this hypothesis by contrasting phylogenetic and morphological data from two moss families, Neckeraceae and Lembophyllaceae, both of which show parallel shifts to a specialized morphology and to exposed epiphytic or epilithic habitats. Phylogeny-based tests for correlated evolution revealed that evolution of four sporophytic traits is correlated with a habitat shift. For three of them, evolutionary rates of dual character-state changes suggest that habitat shifts appear prior to changes in morphology. This suggests that they could have evolved as adaptations to new habitats. Regarding the fourth correlated trait the specialized morphology had already evolved before the habitat shift. In addition, several other specialized "epiphytic" traits show no correlation with a habitat shift. Besides adaptive diversification, other processes thus also affect the match between phenotype and environment. Several potential factors such as complex genetic and developmental pathways yielding the same phenotypes, differences in strength of selection, or constraints in phenotypic evolution may lead to an inability of phylogeny-based comparative methods to detect potential adaptations.

  17. Phylogeny-Based Comparative Methods Question the Adaptive Nature of Sporophytic Specializations in Mosses

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Sanna; Olsson, Sanna; Buchbender, Volker; Enroth, Johannes; Hedenäs, Lars; Quandt, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive evolution has often been proposed to explain correlations between habitats and certain phenotypes. In mosses, a high frequency of species with specialized sporophytic traits in exposed or epiphytic habitats was, already 100 years ago, suggested as due to adaptation. We tested this hypothesis by contrasting phylogenetic and morphological data from two moss families, Neckeraceae and Lembophyllaceae, both of which show parallel shifts to a specialized morphology and to exposed epiphytic or epilithic habitats. Phylogeny-based tests for correlated evolution revealed that evolution of four sporophytic traits is correlated with a habitat shift. For three of them, evolutionary rates of dual character-state changes suggest that habitat shifts appear prior to changes in morphology. This suggests that they could have evolved as adaptations to new habitats. Regarding the fourth correlated trait the specialized morphology had already evolved before the habitat shift. In addition, several other specialized “epiphytic” traits show no correlation with a habitat shift. Besides adaptive diversification, other processes thus also affect the match between phenotype and environment. Several potential factors such as complex genetic and developmental pathways yielding the same phenotypes, differences in strength of selection, or constraints in phenotypic evolution may lead to an inability of phylogeny-based comparative methods to detect potential adaptations. PMID:23118967

  18. The evolution of intelligence: adaptive specializations versus general process.

    PubMed

    Macphail, E M; Bolhuis, J J

    2001-08-01

    -storing birds, and find evidence contrary to the view that hippocampal enlargement is associated with enhanced spatial memory; we are, however, unable to suggest a convincing alternative explanation for hippocampal enlargement. The failure to find solid support for the ecological view supports the view that there are no qualitative differences in cognition between animal species in the processes of learning and memory. We also argue that our review supports our contention that speculation about the phylogenetic development and function of behavioural processes does not provide a solid basis for gaining insight into the nature of those processes. We end by confessing to a belief in one major qualitative difference in cognition in animals: we believe that humans alone are capable of acquiring language, and that it is this capacity that divides our intelligence so sharply from non-human intelligence.

  19. [Preface to special issue: "Molecular mechanism of the adaptation of terrestrial plants to gravity environment on Earth"].

    PubMed

    Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2003-08-01

    Organisms borne in the primitive sea about 30 million years ago had evolved in water without a large influence of gravity on earth. About 4 million years ago, the first terrestrial organisms, plants appeared on the land from the sea. The terrestrial plants have adapted to and evolved on the land environment so that they can extend their roots downward in soil and their shoots upward against 1 g gravity. At least two functions that were acquired during the process of evolution helped the terrestrial plants to adapt to gravity environment on earth. One is gravitropism. The other is the reinforcement of the cell wall, particularly the secondary cell wall. In the present feature articles, the molecular mechanism of the adaptation of terrestrial plants to gravity environment on earth will be reviewed, paying special attention to the mechanism of the genetic control of the signaling of gravity stimulus in gravitropism, automorphogenesis, genes involved in auxin transport, gravity effect on cell wall properties and gravimorphogenesis in terrestrial plants.

  20. Overcoming Barriers in the Use of Adaptive and Assistive Technology in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushrow, Kathy M.; Turner, Keith D.

    This paper examines change and change facilitators as they affect full use of adaptive and assistive technology (AAT) in special education, and compares qualitative versus quantitative methods of researching the change process. Four administrators and two teachers from a rural school district completed the Stages of Concern Questionnaire, which…

  1. A Preliminary Evaluation of the Adaptation of Four Assessments for Offenders with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Jenny A.; Rose, John L.; Beech, Anthony R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Appropriate assessment is an essential part of treating sexual offenders. Few assessments exist that can be used with offenders who have lower levels of intellectual functioning and/or literacy deficits. Method: This study describes the adaptation of four self-report assessments for sexual offenders with special needs: (i) the "Social…

  2. Effects of Bilingual and English as a Second Language Adaptations of Success for All on the Reading Achievement of Students Acquiring English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.; Madden, Nancy A.

    Two adaptations of Success for All, a comprehensive instructional reform program for elementary schools, have been used with students acquiring English as a second language. One is a Spanish bilingual version called "Exito para Todos," in which students are taught to read in Spanish and then transitioned to English reading, usually in…

  3. Indians' Problems in Acquiring Development Capital. Four Corners Agriculture and Forestry Development Study. Special Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Stephen W.

    The difficulty with which American Indians acquire equity capital and an examination of selected Federal programs which make this type of credit available to this minority group are discussed in this report. Specifically, collateral, fractional heirship, ownership of chattels, managerial training, repayment, and servicing of loans are discussed as…

  4. Intelligent speed adaptation as an assistive device for drivers with acquired brain injury: a single-case field experiment.

    PubMed

    Klarborg, Brith; Lahrmann, Harry; NielsAgerholm; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) was tested as an assistive device for drivers with an acquired brain injury (ABI). The study was part of the "Pay as You Speed" project (PAYS) and used the same equipment and technology as the main study (Lahrmann et al., in press-a, in press-b). Two drivers with ABI were recruited as subjects and had ISA equipment installed in their private vehicle. Their speed was logged with ISA equipment for a total of 30 weeks of which 12 weeks were with an active ISA user interface (6 weeks=Baseline 1; 12 weeks=ISA period; 12 weeks=Baseline 2). The subjects participated in two semi-structured interviews concerning their strategies for driving with ABI and for driving with ISA. Furthermore, they gave consent to have data from their clinical journals and be a part of the study. The two subjects did not report any instances of being distracted or confused by ISA, and in general they described driving with ISA as relaxed. ISA reduced the percentage of the total distance that was driven with a speed above the speed limit (PDA), but the subjects relapsed to their previous PDA level in Baseline 2. This suggests that ISA is more suited as a permanent assistive device (i.e. cognitive prosthesis) than as a temporary training device. As ABI is associated with a multitude of cognitive deficits, we developed a conceptual framework, which focused on the cognitive parameters that have been shown to relate to speeding behaviour, namely "intention to speed" and "inattention to speeding". The subjects' combined status on the two independent parameters made up their "speeding profile". A comparison of the speeding profiles and the speed logs indicated that ISA in the present study was more efficient in reducing inattention to speeding than affecting intention to speed. This finding suggests that ISA might be more suited for some neuropsychological profiles than for others, and that customisation of ISA for different neuropsychological profiles may be required

  5. Effects of generalized and specialized adaptive defense by shared prey on intra-guild predation.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Yusuke; Ezoe, Hideo; Namba, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-07

    Intra-guild predation (IGP), predation on consumers which share common prey with the predators, is an important community module to understand a mechanism for persistence of complex food webs. However, classical theory suggests that persistence of an IGP system is unlikely particularly at high productivity, while empirical data do not support the prediction. Recently, adaptive defense by shared prey has been recognized to enhance coexistence of species and stability of the system. Some organisms having multiple predators in IGP systems employ two types of defenses; generalized defense that is effective against multiple predators and specialized one that is effective against only a specific predator species. We consider an IGP model including shared prey that can use the two types of defenses in combination against the consumer or omnivore. Assuming that the shared prey can change the allocation of defensive effort to increase its fitness, we show that the joint use of two types of adaptive defenses promotes three species coexistence and enhances stability of the IGP system when the specialized defense is more effective than the generalized one. When the system is unstable, a variety of oscillations appear and both the population densities and defensive efforts or only the population densities oscillate. Joint use of defenses against the consumer tends to increase the equilibrium population density of the shared prey with the defense efficiencies. In contrast, efficient generalized and specialized defenses against the omnivore often decrease the prey population. Consequently, adaptive defense by shared prey may not necessarily heighten the population size of the defender but sometimes increases densities of both the attackers and defender in IGP systems.

  6. Pre-adaptations and the evolution of pollination by sexual deception: Cope's rule of specialization revisited.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, Nicolas J; Wilson, Carol A; Hötling, Susann; Schulz, Stefan; Banketov, Sergey A; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2012-12-07

    Pollination by sexual deception is arguably one of the most unusual liaisons linking plants and insects, and perhaps the most illustrative example of extreme floral specialization in angiosperms. While considerable progress has been made in understanding the floral traits involved in sexual deception, less is known about how this remarkable mimicry system might have arisen, the role of pre-adaptations in promoting its evolution and its extent as a pollination mechanism outside the few groups of plants (primarily orchids) where it has been described to date. In the Euro-Mediterranean region, pollination by sexual deception is traditionally considered to be the hallmark of the orchid genus Ophrys. Here, we introduce two new cases outside of Ophrys, in plant groups dominated by generalized, shelter-mimicking species. On the basis of phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral pollination strategies, we provide evidence for independent and bidirectional evolutionary transitions between generalized (shelter mimicry) and specialized (sexual deception) pollination strategies in three groups of flowering plants, and suggest that pseudocopulation has evolved from pre-adaptations (floral colours, shapes and odour bouquets) that selectively attract male pollinators through shelter mimicry. These findings, along with comparative analyses of floral traits (colours and scents), shed light on particular phenotypic changes that might have fuelled the parallel evolution of these extraordinary pollination strategies. Collectively, our results provide the first substantive insights into how pollination sexual deception might have evolved in the Euro-Mediterranean region, and demonstrate that even the most extreme cases of pollinator specialization can reverse to more generalized interactions, breaking 'Cope's rule of specialization'.

  7. Building Adaptive Expertise and Practice-Based Evidence: Applying the Implementation Stages Framework to Special Education Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason-Williams, Loretta; Frederick, Jacqueline R.; Mulcahy, Candace A.

    2015-01-01

    Preparing pre-service special educators to meet classroom demands requires teacher preparation programs to design experiences for students to demonstrate routine expertise, while also building adaptive expertise. In this article, the authors describe a capstone project that meets these needs and prepares pre-service special educators for their…

  8. Colloquium paper: adaptive specializations, social exchange, and the evolution of human intelligence.

    PubMed

    Cosmides, Leda; Barrett, H Clark; Tooby, John

    2010-05-11

    Blank-slate theories of human intelligence propose that reasoning is carried out by general-purpose operations applied uniformly across contents. An evolutionary approach implies a radically different model of human intelligence. The task demands of different adaptive problems select for functionally specialized problem-solving strategies, unleashing massive increases in problem-solving power for ancestrally recurrent adaptive problems. Because exchange can evolve only if cooperators can detect cheaters, we hypothesized that the human mind would be equipped with a neurocognitive system specialized for reasoning about social exchange. Whereas humans perform poorly when asked to detect violations of most conditional rules, we predicted and found a dramatic spike in performance when the rule specifies an exchange and violations correspond to cheating. According to critics, people's uncanny accuracy at detecting violations of social exchange rules does not reflect a cheater detection mechanism, but extends instead to all rules regulating when actions are permitted (deontic conditionals). Here we report experimental tests that falsify these theories by demonstrating that deontic rules as a class do not elicit the search for violations. We show that the cheater detection system functions with pinpoint accuracy, searching for violations of social exchange rules only when these are likely to reveal the presence of someone who intends to cheat. It does not search for violations of social exchange rules when these are accidental, when they do not benefit the violator, or when the situation would make cheating difficult.

  9. Specialization of trophic position and habitat use by sticklebacks in an adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Blake; Marchinko, Kerry B; Bolnick, Daniel I; Mazumder, Asit

    2010-04-01

    Divergence in habitat use among closely related species is a common characteristic of adaptive radiations. Large differences in the size structure of prey between habitats could strengthen disruptive selection on generalist predators and lead to a divergence in trophic position among species in an adaptive radiation. Using threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in freshwater lakes as a model system, we examined whether divergence in habitat use coincides with shifts in trophic position. We examined the habitat use and trophic position of individual sticklebacks from divergent lake environments that have only one stickleback species (allopatric lakes) and from lakes that have a pair of benthic and limnetic stickleback species (sympatric lakes). In two sympatric lakes, the limnetic species had a higher trophic position than the benthic species, and in both allopatric and sympatric lakes, sticklebacks specializing on pelagic prey had a higher trophic position for a given size than sticklebacks specializing on benthic prey. Furthermore, the trophic position of pelagic specialists was correlated with individual variation in their gill raker length. Our results indicate that gill raker length is an important trait that underlies differentiation in both habitat use and trophic position among stickleback species, populations, and individuals.

  10. 78 FR 61002 - Loan Guaranty: Assistance to Eligible Individuals in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing; Cost-of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...-Construction Index AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans... annually based on a residential home cost-of-construction index. The Secretary uses the Turner Building Cost Index for this purpose. In the most recent quarter for which the Turner Building Cost Index...

  11. 75 FR 68669 - Loan Guaranty: Assistance to Eligible Individuals in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing; Cost-of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ...-Construction Index AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of... annually based on a residential home cost-of-construction index. The Secretary uses the Turner Building Cost Index for this purpose. During the most recent calendar year for which the Turner Building...

  12. Specialized hybrid learners resolve Rogers' paradox about the adaptive value of social learning.

    PubMed

    Kharratzadeh, Milad; Montrey, Marcel; Metz, Alex; Shultz, Thomas R

    2017-02-07

    Culture is considered an evolutionary adaptation that enhances reproductive fitness. A common explanation is that social learning, the learning mechanism underlying cultural transmission, enhances mean fitness by avoiding the costs of individual learning. This explanation was famously contradicted by Rogers (1988), who used a simple mathematical model to show that cheap social learning can invade a population without raising its mean fitness. He concluded that some crucial factor remained unaccounted for, which would reverse this surprising result. Here we extend this model to include a more complex environment and limited resources, where individuals cannot reliably learn everything about the environment on their own. Under such conditions, cheap social learning evolves and enhances mean fitness, via hybrid learners capable of specializing their individual learning. We then show that while spatial or social constraints hinder the evolution of hybrid learners, a novel social learning strategy, complementary copying, can mitigate these effects.

  13. An Overview of Intervention Options for Promoting Adaptive Behavior of Persons with Acquired Brain Injury and Minimally Conscious State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bosco, Andrea; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies directed at helping post-coma persons with minimally conscious state improve their adaptive behavior. Twenty-one studies were identified for the 2000-2010 period (i.e., a period in which an intense debate has occurred about diagnostic, rehabilitative, prognostic, and ethical issues concerning people…

  14. Adaptable bioinspired special wetting surface for multifunctional oil/water separation

    PubMed Central

    Kavalenka, Maryna N.; Vüllers, Felix; Kumberg, Jana; Zeiger, Claudia; Trouillet, Vanessa; Stein, Sebastian; Ava, Tanzila T.; Li, Chunyan; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the multifunctionality of biological surfaces necessary for the survival of an organism in its specific environment, we developed an artificial special wetting nanofur surface which can be adapted to perform different functionalities necessary to efficiently separate oil and water for cleaning accidental oil spills or separating industrial oily wastewater. Initial superhydrophobic nanofur surface is fabricated using a hot pulling method, in which nano- and microhairs are drawn out of the polymer surface during separation from a heated sandblasted steel plate. By using a set of simple modification techniques, which include microperforation, plasma treatment and subsequent control of storage environment, we achieved selective separation of either water or oil, variable oil absorption and continuous gravity driven separation of oil/water mixtures by filtration. Furthermore, these functions can be performed using special wetting nanofur made from various thermoplastics, including biodegradable and recyclable polymers. Additionally, nanofur can be reused after washing it with organic solvents, thus, further helping to reduce the environmental impacts of oil/water separation processes. PMID:28051163

  15. Adaptable bioinspired special wetting surface for multifunctional oil/water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavalenka, Maryna N.; Vüllers, Felix; Kumberg, Jana; Zeiger, Claudia; Trouillet, Vanessa; Stein, Sebastian; Ava, Tanzila T.; Li, Chunyan; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the multifunctionality of biological surfaces necessary for the survival of an organism in its specific environment, we developed an artificial special wetting nanofur surface which can be adapted to perform different functionalities necessary to efficiently separate oil and water for cleaning accidental oil spills or separating industrial oily wastewater. Initial superhydrophobic nanofur surface is fabricated using a hot pulling method, in which nano- and microhairs are drawn out of the polymer surface during separation from a heated sandblasted steel plate. By using a set of simple modification techniques, which include microperforation, plasma treatment and subsequent control of storage environment, we achieved selective separation of either water or oil, variable oil absorption and continuous gravity driven separation of oil/water mixtures by filtration. Furthermore, these functions can be performed using special wetting nanofur made from various thermoplastics, including biodegradable and recyclable polymers. Additionally, nanofur can be reused after washing it with organic solvents, thus, further helping to reduce the environmental impacts of oil/water separation processes.

  16. A new marine reptile from the Triassic of China, with a highly specialized feeding adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Long; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Shang, Qing-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Chun

    2014-03-01

    The Luoping fauna (Anisian, Middle Triassic) is probably the oldest of Triassic faunas in Guizhou-Yunnan area, China. The reptilian assemblage is comprised of ichthyosaurs, a number of sauropterygians (pachypleurosaur-like forms), saurosphargids, protorosaurs, and archosauriforms. Here, we report on a peculiar reptile, newly found in this fauna. Its dentition is fence or comb-like and bears more than 175 pleurodont teeth in each ramus of the upper and lower jaws, tooth crown is needle-like distally and blade-shaped proximally; its rostrum strongly bends downward and the anterior end of its mandible expands both dorsally and ventrally to form a shovel-headed structure; and its ungual phalanges are hoof-shaped. The specializations of the jaws and dentition indicate that the reptile may have been adapted to a way of bottom-filter feeding in water. It is obvious that such delicate teeth are not strong enough to catch prey, but were probably used as a barrier to filter microorganisms or benthic invertebrates such as sea worms. These were collected by the specialized jaws, which may have functioned as a shovel or pushdozer (the mandible) and a grasper or scratcher (the rostrum). Our preliminary analysis suggests that the new reptile might be more closely related to the Sauropterygia than to other marine reptiles.

  17. A new marine reptile from the Triassic of China, with a highly specialized feeding adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Long; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Shang, Qing-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Chun

    2014-03-01

    The Luoping fauna (Anisian, Middle Triassic) is probably the oldest of Triassic faunas in Guizhou-Yunnan area, China. The reptilian assemblage is comprised of ichthyosaurs, a number of sauropterygians (pachypleurosaur-like forms), saurosphargids, protorosaurs, and archosauriforms. Here, we report on a peculiar reptile, newly found in this fauna. Its dentition is fence or comb-like and bears more than 175 pleurodont teeth in each ramus of the upper and lower jaws, tooth crown is needle-like distally and blade-shaped proximally; its rostrum strongly bends downward and the anterior end of its mandible expands both dorsally and ventrally to form a shovel-headed structure; and its ungual phalanges are hoof-shaped. The specializations of the jaws and dentition indicate that the reptile may have been adapted to a way of bottom-filter feeding in water. It is obvious that such delicate teeth are not strong enough to catch prey, but were probably used as a barrier to filter microorganisms or benthic invertebrates such as sea worms. These were collected by the specialized jaws, which may have functioned as a shovel or pushdozer (the mandible) and a grasper or scratcher (the rostrum). Our preliminary analysis suggests that the new reptile might be more closely related to the Sauropterygia than to other marine reptiles.

  18. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    diCenzo, George C.; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M.; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  19. Adaptive selection on bracovirus genomes drives the specialization of Cotesia parasitoid wasps.

    PubMed

    Jancek, Séverine; Bézier, Annie; Gayral, Philippe; Paillusson, Corentin; Kaiser, Laure; Dupas, Stéphane; Le Ru, Bruno Pierre; Barbe, Valérie; Periquet, Georges; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Herniou, Elisabeth A

    2013-01-01

    The geographic mosaic of coevolution predicts parasite virulence should be locally adapted to the host community. Cotesia parasitoid wasps adapt to local lepidopteran species possibly through their symbiotic bracovirus. The virus, essential for the parasitism success, is at the heart of the complex coevolutionary relationship linking the wasps and their hosts. The large segmented genome contained in the virus particles encodes virulence genes involved in host immune and developmental suppression. Coevolutionary arms race should result in the positive selection of particular beneficial alleles. To understand the global role of bracoviruses in the local adaptation or specialization of parasitoid wasps to their hosts, we studied the molecular evolution of four bracoviruses associated with wasps of the genus Cotesia, including C congregata, C vestalis and new data and annotation on two ecologically differentiated populations of C sesamie, Kitale and Mombasa. Paired orthologs analyses revealed more genes under positive selection when comparing the two C sesamiae bracoviruses belonging to the same species, and more genes under strong evolutionary constraint between species. Furthermore branch-site evolutionary models showed that 17 genes, out of the 54 currently available shared by the four bracoviruses, harboured sites under positive selection including: the histone H4-like, a C-type lectin, two ep1-like, ep2, a viral ankyrin, CrV1, a ben-domain, a Serine-rich, and eight unknown genes. Lastly the phylogenetic analyses of the histone, ep2 and CrV1 genes in different African C sesamiae populations showed that each gene described differently the individual relationships. In particular we found recombination had happened between the ep2 and CrV1 genes, which are localized 37.5 kb apart on the wasp chromosomes. Involved in multidirectional coevolutionary interactions, C sesamiae wasps rely on different bracovirus mediated molecular pathways to overcome local host resistance.

  20. Adaptive Selection on Bracovirus Genomes Drives the Specialization of Cotesia Parasitoid Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Jancek, Séverine; Bézier, Annie; Gayral, Philippe; Paillusson, Corentin; Kaiser, Laure; Dupas, Stéphane; Le Ru, Bruno Pierre; Barbe, Valérie; Periquet, Georges; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Herniou, Elisabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The geographic mosaic of coevolution predicts parasite virulence should be locally adapted to the host community. Cotesia parasitoid wasps adapt to local lepidopteran species possibly through their symbiotic bracovirus. The virus, essential for the parasitism success, is at the heart of the complex coevolutionary relationship linking the wasps and their hosts. The large segmented genome contained in the virus particles encodes virulence genes involved in host immune and developmental suppression. Coevolutionary arms race should result in the positive selection of particular beneficial alleles. To understand the global role of bracoviruses in the local adaptation or specialization of parasitoid wasps to their hosts, we studied the molecular evolution of four bracoviruses associated with wasps of the genus Cotesia, including C congregata, C vestalis and new data and annotation on two ecologically differentiated populations of C sesamie, Kitale and Mombasa. Paired orthologs analyses revealed more genes under positive selection when comparing the two C sesamiae bracoviruses belonging to the same species, and more genes under strong evolutionary constraint between species. Furthermore branch-site evolutionary models showed that 17 genes, out of the 54 currently available shared by the four bracoviruses, harboured sites under positive selection including: the histone H4-like, a C-type lectin, two ep1-like, ep2, a viral ankyrin, CrV1, a ben-domain, a Serine-rich, and eight unknown genes. Lastly the phylogenetic analyses of the histone, ep2 and CrV1 genes in different African C sesamiae populations showed that each gene described differently the individual relationships. In particular we found recombination had happened between the ep2 and CrV1 genes, which are localized 37.5 kb apart on the wasp chromosomes. Involved in multidirectional coevolutionary interactions, C sesamiae wasps rely on different bracovirus mediated molecular pathways to overcome local host resistance

  1. Immigrants' adaptation to different cultural settings: A contextual perspective on acculturation: Introduction for the special section on immigration.

    PubMed

    Titzmann, Peter F; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    In modern multicultural societies more and more individuals deal with 2 or more cultures due to the unprecedented increase in international migration. This special section brings together research about immigrants' adaptation to various life domains, about the demands of dealing with different cultural scripts and about how immigrants can successfully bridge different cultural demands. This introduction to the special section provides a broader theoretical framework that links the different studies of the special section and demonstrates areas for further research. It also clearly illustrates the growing necessity for research in increasingly diverse societies.

  2. Persons with acquired profound hearing loss (APHL): how do they and their families adapt to the challenge?

    PubMed

    Hallam, Richard; Ashton, Paul; Sherbourne, Katerina; Gailey, Lorraine

    2008-07-01

    The study examined the impact of acquired profound hearing loss (APHL) on the relationship between the hearing impaired person and their normally hearing close family member, usually a partner, and identified the kinds of adjustment leading to maintenance or deterioration of the relationship. The participants were 25 people with APHL and 25 family members, interviewed separately in their own home. Analysis of the interview transcripts adopted a grounded theory methodology. The different levels of analysis were linked in terms of a core category based on the social construction of a committed relationship. The conceptual codes were grouped as: (a) aural impairments giving rise to the need for adjustment; (b) pragmatic adjustments to spoken communication and family activities; (c) managing the adjustments without negative consequences; (d) adjustments leading to negative interaction. The results suggest that APHL places considerable strain on relationships and increases their vulnerability to failure, consistent with previous research. They highlight the need for professional support and suggest that a systemic conceptual framework is needed that includes the public response to profound hearing impairment.

  3. Adaptive trade-off in floral morphology mediates specialization for flowers pollinated by bats and hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Muchhala, Nathan

    2007-04-01

    Evolution toward increased specificity in pollination systems is thought to have played a central role in the diversification of angiosperms. Theory predicts that the presence of trade-offs in adapting to different pollinator types will favor specialization, yet few studies have attempted to characterize such interactions in nature. I conducted flight cage experiments with bats, hummingbirds, and artificial flowers to examine effects of corolla width on pollination. I videotaped visits to analyze pollinator behavior and counted pollen grains transferred to stigmas. Results demonstrated that flower-pollinator fit is critical to effective pollination; wide corollas guided bat snouts better, and narrow corollas guided hummingbird bills better. Poor fit resulted in variable entry angles and decreased pollen transfer. A model using these results predicts that wide corollas will be selected for when bats make more than 44% of the visits and narrow corollas when they make fewer. Intermediate corollas are never favored (i.e., generalization is always suboptimal). This is the first study to clearly document a pollinator-mediated fitness trade-off in floral morphology.

  4. Established and Adapted Diagnostic Tools for Investigation of a Special Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Johannes; Lahres, Michael; Zimmermann, Stephan; Schein, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    In the LDS® ( Lichtbogendrahtspritzen) process, a twin-wire arc spraying (TWAS) process developed by Daimler AG, the gas injection and feed to the arc play a crucial role in separating the molten particles from the wire ends. This paper describes an investigation of the gas and particle behavior according to individual LDS® process parameters. Coating problems are not considered. The measurements are separated into two different parts: "cold" (without arc and particles) and "hot" (with arc and particles). The results provide the first detailed understanding of the effect of different LDS® process parameters. A correlation between the gas parameter settings and the particle beam properties was found. Using established and adapted diagnostic tools, as also applied for conventional TWAS processes, this special LDS® process was investigated and the results (gas and particle behavior) validated, thereby allowing explanation and comparison of the diagnostic methods, which is the main focus of this paper. Based on error analysis, individual instabilities, limits, and deviations during the gas determinations and particle measurements are explained in more detail. The paper concludes with presentation of the first particle-shadow diagnostic results and main statements regarding these investigations.

  5. "You have to hunt for the fruits, the vegetables": environmental barriers and adaptive strategies to acquire food in a low-income African American neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Zenk, Shannon N; Odoms-Young, Angela M; Dallas, Constance; Hardy, Elaine; Watkins, April; Hoskins-Wroten, Jacqueline; Holland, Loys

    2011-06-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand food acquisition behaviors and environmental factors that influence those behaviors among women in a low-income African American community with limited food resources. We drew on in-depth interviews with 30 women ages 21 to 45 years recruited from a community health center in Chicago, Illinois. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Emergent themes revealed that women identified multiple environmental barriers--material, economic, and social-interactional--to acquiring food in an acceptable setting. In response, they engaged in several adaptive strategies to manage or alter these challenges, including optimizing, settling, being proactive, and advocating. These findings indicate that efforts to improve neighborhood food environments should address not only food availability and prices but also the physical and social environments of stores.

  6. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1(-/-)) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1(+/+) ), rag1(-/-) acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1(-/-) fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1(-/-) zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1(-/-) zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies, it might

  7. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  9. Development and Use of Curricular Adaptations for Students Receiving Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Jennifer A.; Keegan, Lissa

    2014-01-01

    This study is a quasi-experimental descriptive design, with existing educator-made adaptations evaluated. The goals of this study were to (a) describe how educators develop adaptations and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of educator-made adaptations in facilitating the learning of students with disabilities. Findings suggest that (a) most…

  10. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, M.L.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S.; Ahmad, R.; Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix-uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix-uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% {+-} 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  11. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M.; Ortega-Villaizán, María del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1−/−) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1+/+), rag1−/− acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1−/− zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1−/− zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1−/− fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1−/− zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1−/− zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies

  12. Anxiety symptoms in young people with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools: Associations with gender, adaptive functioning and autism symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Magiati, Iliana; Ong, Clarissa; Lim, Xin Yi; Tan, Julianne Wen-Li; Ong, Amily Yi Lin; Patrycia, Ferninda; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng; Sung, Min; Poon, Kenneth K; Howlin, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety-related problems are among the most frequently reported mental health difficulties in autism spectrum disorder. As most research has focused on clinical samples or high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder, less is known about the factors associated with anxiety in community samples across the ability range. This cross-sectional study examined the association of gender, age, adaptive functioning and autism symptom severity with different caregiver-reported anxiety symptoms. Participants were caregivers of 241 children (6-18 years old) with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools in Singapore. Measures included the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and assessments of overall emotional, behavioural and adaptive functioning. Caregivers reported more anxiety symptoms in total, but fewer social anxiety symptoms, than Spence Children's Anxiety Scale Australian/Dutch norms. There were no gender differences. Variance in total anxiety scores was best explained by severity of repetitive speech/stereotyped behaviour symptoms, followed by adaptive functioning. Severity of repetitive speech/behaviour symptoms was a significant predictor of separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic/agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive subscale symptoms, but not of social phobia and physical injury fears. Adaptive functioning and chronological age predicted social phobia and generalized anxiety symptoms only. Severity of social/communication autism symptoms did not explain any anxiety symptoms, when the other variables were controlled for. Findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature. Limitations and possible implications for prevention, assessment and intervention are also discussed.

  13. Kansas Adapted/Special Physical Education Test Manual. Health Related Fitness and Psychomotor Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Lavay, Barry

    This manual was developed to address the need for health-related physical fitness testing of children with special needs. The first section defines the components of health-related physical fitness which consist of: (1)abdominal strength and endurance measured by a sit-up test; (2) flexibility, measured by a sit and reach test; (3) upper body…

  14. Emergent Literacy Activities, Instructional Adaptations and School Absence of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time…

  15. An Examination of Current Adapted Physical Activity Provision in Primary and Special Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Disability in Sport Taskforce report examining adapted physical activity (APA) in the Irish context (Department of Education and Science, 1999) found that teachers involved in primary mainstream and specialist settings expressed a grave lack of self-confidence, due to lack of training, in the delivery of APA programmes to children with special…

  16. Instructional Challenges: Understanding the Needs of Novice Special Education Teachers. Induction Insights. Supporting Special Education Teachers - Administrators [AII-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center to Inform Policy and Practice in Special Education Professional Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Novice special education teachers struggle with many of the same pedagogical challenges as their general education counterparts. They often need help learning the curriculum, acquiring and adapting necessary materials, and addressing challenging student behavior. A complicating factor is that novice special education teachers typically have…

  17. Adaptive radiations, ecological specialization, and the evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Leandro R; Nogueira, Marcelo R

    2010-03-01

    The evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures is a macroevolutionary pattern in which morphogenetic components evolve in a coordinated fashion, which can result from the interplay among processes of developmental, genetic integration, and different types of selection. We tested hypotheses of ecological versus developmental factors underlying patterns of within-species and evolutionary integration in the mandible of phyllostomid bats, during the most impressive ecological and morphological radiation among mammals. Shape variation of mandibular morphogenetic components was associated with diet, and the transition of integration patterns from developmental to within-species to evolutionary was examined. Within-species (as a proxy to genetic) integration in different lineages resembled developmental integration regardless of diet specialization, however, evolutionary integration patterns reflected selection in different mandibular components. For dietary specializations requiring extensive functional changes in mastication patterns or biting, such as frugivores and sanguivores, the evolutionary integration pattern was not associated with expected within-species or developmental integration. On the other hand, specializations with lower mastication demands or without major functional reorganization (such as nectarivores and carnivores), presented evolutionary integration patterns similar to the expected developmental pattern. These results show that evolutionary integration patterns are largely a result of independent selection on specific components regardless of developmental modules.

  18. Special Session on Adaptive Optics in Russia and China. Volume 23

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    demonstrated experimentally and theoretically. electric heaters’ control parameters are discussed. Material and pa- Our method does not require boundary...results of control of the output parameters of CO 2, Physics and Computational Mathematics, China; Su Yi, Zhang Kai, excimer, copper-vapor and solid-state...Concepts interaction of adaptive optics design parameters and laser comm Don Walters, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, USA, Presider nication system

  19. Treatment of stem fractures in tumor prostheses by connecting different systems with a special adapter.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Streitbuerger, Arne; Ahrens, Helmut; Liem, Dennis; Vieth, Volker; Gosheger, Georg; Hardes, Jendrik

    2009-12-01

    In long-term survivors, oncologic surgeons are regularly faced with the problem of revising stem breakage of first generation Kotz modular femoral and tibial reconstruction system (KMFTR) prostheses. To avoid a whole prosthesis-exchange, we invented an adapter which allows connecting original KMFTR devices to new modular universal tumor and revision system (MUTARS) components. The adapter was used in 10 patients after a mean time span of 16.6 years after primary implantation of KMFTR prostheses. Reasons for revision included femoral stem breakage in five cases, breakage of tibial component in three cases and periprosthetic fracture in two cases (one femoral, one tibial). The femoral stem (three cases), the tibial stem (two cases) or the tibial plateau and body (two cases) were exchanged to MUTARS and connected to the remaining KMFTR parts. Three cases were converted to a total femur. Postoperative complications included one cone-dislocation and one aseptic loosening. In all patients, the pre-incidence function could be restored. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 81.7% of normal function. The presented adapter enables restoration of the long-term extremity function with relatively minor revision.

  20. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  1. Cold climate specialization: adaptive covariation between metabolic rate and thermoregulation in pregnant vipers.

    PubMed

    Lourdais, Olivier; Guillon, Michaël; Denardo, Dale; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    2013-07-02

    We compared thermoregulatory strategies during pregnancy in two congeneric viperid snakes (Vipera berus and Vipera aspis) with parapatric geographic ranges. V. berus is a boreal specialist with the largest known distribution among terrestrial snakes while V. aspis is a south-European species. Despite contrasted climatic affinities, the two species displayed identical thermal preferences (Tset) in a laboratory thermal gradient. Under identical natural conditions, however, V. berus was capable of maintaining Tset for longer periods, especially when the weather was constraining. Consistent with the metabolic cold adaptation hypothesis, V. berus displayed higher standard metabolic rate at all temperatures considered. We used the thermal dependence of metabolic rate to calculate daily metabolic profiles from body temperature under natural conditions. The boreal specialist experienced higher daily metabolic rate and minimized gestation duration chiefly because of differences in the metabolic reaction norms, but also superior thermoregulatory efficiency. Under cold climates, thermal constraints should make precise thermoregulation costly. However, a shift in the metabolic reaction norm may compensate for thermal constraints and modify the cost-benefit balance of thermoregulation. Covariation between metabolic rate and thermoregulation efficiency is likely an important adaptation to cold climates.

  2. Emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy in special education.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Marieke; de Moor, Jan; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of emergent literacy instruction. While time dedicated to storybook reading and independent picture-book reading was comparable, the children with CP received fewer opportunities to work with educational software and more time was dedicated to rhyming games and singing. For the children with CP, the level of speech, intellectual, and physical impairments were all related to the amount of time in emergent literacy instruction. Additionally, the amount of time reading precursors is trained and the number of specific reading precursors that is trained is all related to skills of emergent literacy.

  3. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  4. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  5. Evaluation of the acute electrophysiologic effects of intravenous dronedarone, an amiodarone-like agent, with special emphasis on ventricular repolarization and acquired torsade de pointes arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Verduyn, S C; Vos, M A; Leunissen, H D; van Opstal, J M; Wellens, H J

    1999-02-01

    In the anesthetized dog with complete chronic AV block (CAVB), we evaluated and compared the acute electrophysiologic effects of dronedarone i.v. (Dron, 2 times 2.5 mg/kg/10 min) and amiodarone i.v. (Amio, 2 times 5 mg/kg/10 min). This canine model with a high sensitivity for acquired torsade de pointes (TdP) provides an ideal substrate to evaluate ventricular repolarization abnormalities. Six ECG leads and two endocardial monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings in the left and right ventricle (LV and RV) were simultaneously recorded to measure QT time, action-potential duration (APD), interventricular dispersion (deltaAPD = LV(APD) - RV(APD)), early afterdepolarizations (EADs), ectopic beats (EBs), and TdP. Measurements were made at the spontaneous idioventricular rhythm (IVR) and 1,000-ms steady-state pacing. To investigate its short-term, antiarrhythmic properties, Dron was given after almokalant (0.12 mg/kg)-induced TdP. Furthermore, in another set of experiments, oral Dron (20 mg/kg, b.i.d) was given for 3 weeks to conscious CAVB dogs. Dron, i.v., shortened ventricular repolarization (QT, 435 +/- 60 to 360 +/- 55; LV(APD) 395 +/- 75 to 335 +/- 60 ms; p < 0.05), whereas IVR and ventricular effective refractory period (VERP, 225 +/- 30 to 230 +/- 30 ms) remained similar. Therefore the VERP/QT ratio increased (0.55 +/- 0.04 to 0.61 +/- 0.03; p < 0.05). Similar results were obtained with Amio, i.v.. Almokalant-induced TdP was characterized by an increased repolarization duration, deltaAPD, and EADs. Dron, i.v., suppressed the EADs, EBs, and TdP by a reduction and homogenization of repolarization (LV(APD), 505 +/- 110 to 455 +/- 80 ms, and deltaAPD, 110 +/- 55 to 65 +/- 40 ms). Long-term oral Dron increased the PP interval, CL-IVR, and QT(c) time. In contrast to oral treatment, Dron i.v. shortens ventricular repolarization parameters, resulting in suppression of EAD-dependent acquired TdP. The increased VERP/QT ratio after Dron i.v. may indicate an important

  6. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  7. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  8. Developmental specialization of the left parietal cortex for the semantic representation of Arabic numerals: an fMR-adaptation study.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephan E; Goffin, Celia; Ansari, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The way the human brain constructs representations of numerical symbols is poorly understood. While increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies has indicated that the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) becomes increasingly specialized for symbolic numerical magnitude representation over developmental time, the extent to which these changes are associated with age-related differences in symbolic numerical magnitude representation or with developmental changes in non-numerical processes, such as response selection, remains to be uncovered. To address these outstanding questions we investigated developmental changes in the cortical representation of symbolic numerical magnitude in 6- to 14-year-old children using a passive functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation design, thereby mitigating the influence of response selection. A single-digit Arabic numeral was repeatedly presented on a computer screen and interspersed with the presentation of novel digits deviating as a function of numerical ratio (smaller/larger number). Results demonstrated a correlation between age and numerical ratio in the left IPS, suggesting an age-related increase in the extent to which numerical symbols are represented in the left IPS. Brain activation of the right IPS was modulated by numerical ratio but did not correlate with age, indicating hemispheric differences in IPS engagement during the development of symbolic numerical representation.

  9. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    PubMed

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  10. ePortfolios: Promoting Special Educator Adaptive Expertise through Reflection in a Web-Based Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Arment, Serra T.; Wetzel, Angela P.; Reed, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    In an era of accountability, teachers must be prepared to adapt to the variability they encounter in today's classrooms. Instead of knowing only routine responses to the challenges of practice, teachers need a repertoire that is characterized by adaptive expertise. Preservice preparation can foster teacher candidates' adaptive expertise through…

  11. Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. Special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F.

    2012-07-01

    This Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) has been jointly coordinated by Working Groups I (WGI) and II (WGII) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report focuses on the relationship between climate change and extreme weather and climate events, the impacts of such events, and the strategies to manage the associated risks. This Special Report, in particular, contributes to frame the challenge of dealing with extreme weather and climate events as an issue in decision making under uncertainty, analyzing response in the context of risk management. The report consists of nine chapters, covering risk management; observed and projected changes in extreme weather and climate events; exposure and vulnerability to as well as losses resulting from such events; adaptation options from the local to the international scale; the role of sustainable development in modulating risks; and insights from specific case studies. (LN)

  12. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  13. Opinions of the General Education Teachers on the Adaptations for Students with Special Needs in General Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kargin, Tevhide; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Sahin, Feyzullah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the opinions of general education teachers with regard to the instructional adaptations that need to be made for inclusion and to evaluate them against several variables. The study group consists of 126 general education teachers. The opinions of the teachers with regard to the adaptations in their…

  14. Adaptive Epibiochemistry and Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Buryanov, Ya I

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reactions of post-synthetic modification of macromolecules occur in the cells of all organisms. These reactions, which can be designated as epibiochemical, are of a special type and, as discriminated from reactions with low molecular weight substrates, occur on the level of biopolymers, causing their covalent modification. The majority of epibiochemical modifications of proteins, DNA, and RNA are reversible and are carried out by modification transferases and de-modification enzymes, respectively. Epibiochemical, i.e. those located above the low molecular weight metabolites, modifications of proteins and nucleic acids perform various functions, including participation in molecular mechanisms of adaptive epigenetic heredity. This paper presents an overview of some adaptive epibiochemical modifications of macromolecules and the adaptive epigenetic processes on their basis. The features of epigenetic inheritance of acquired characteristics and the limits of biological evolution are discussed.

  15. [The influence of the length of work on the adaptation of the circulatory system of male teachers of different specialities].

    PubMed

    Kirilina, V M; Goranskiĭ, A I

    2010-01-01

    The problem of human adaptation to the social and biological conditions of the existence is placed at the center of attention of many natural and social sciences studying vital activity of a person in all forms it displays. The basis of the existence of the human population is considered to be a social and labor activity of people. Recently, the importance of researches has increased, which enables to evaluate the functional state of a person under the circumstances of adaptation to a particular occupation. These researches are the theoretical foundation to develop methods for improving the efficiency of people in many kinds of professions, and especially it is important for elderly people. The results of social and hygienic researches among the middle-aged and elderly people involved in different trades vary and are stipulated generally by the conditions of the working environment, difficulties and intensity of work processes. The study of the features of the circulatory system of a person in the process of working activities is a significant issue in physiology. It is found that the greatest changes in the functional parameters of the blood circulation are observed in young and elderly people. In the same way, it is shown that it depends on the type of adaptation, age characteristics, work experience which result in slowing down the rate of the processes of the nervous system, the regulation of blood circulation becomes inert, the level of physical health reduces, and age displacements accelerate. These changes are considered as a result of increased spending of physiological reserves of the organism in various environmental conditions.

  16. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a...

  17. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a...

  18. 7 CFR 770.8 - Use of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of acquired land. 770.8 Section 770.8 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDIAN TRIBAL LAND ACQUISITION LOANS § 770.8 Use of acquired land. (a) General. Subject to § 770.5(d) land acquired with loan funds, or other property serving as the security for a...

  19. Mobile Learning Technology Based on iOS Devices to Support Students with Special Education Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Lopez, Alvaro; Rodriguez-Fortiz, Maria Jose; Rodriguez-Almendros, Maria Luisa; Martinez-Segura, Maria Jose

    2013-01-01

    Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They could also need to improve their behavior, communication and relationships with their environment. The development of customizable and adaptable applications tailored to them provides many benefits as it helps mold the learning process…

  20. What kind of memory has evolution wrought? Introductory article for the special issue of memory: adaptive memory: the emergence and nature of proximate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    It is without question that our memory system evolved through a process of natural selection. However, basic research into the evolutionary foundations of memory has begun in earnest only recently. This is quite peculiar as the majority, perhaps even all, of memory research relates to whether memory is adaptive or not. In this Special Issue of Memory we have assembled a variety of papers that represent the cutting edge in research on the evolution of memory. These papers are centred on issues about the ultimate and proximate explanations of memory, the development of the adaptive functions of memory, as well as the positive consequences that arise from the current evolutionary form that our memory has taken. In this introductory article we briefly outline these different areas and indicate why they are vital for a more complete theory of memory. Further we argue that, by adopting a more applied stance in the area of the evolution of memory, one of the many future directions in this field could be a new branch of psychology that addresses questions in evolutionary legal psychology.

  1. Code Development of Three-Dimensional General Relativistic Hydrodynamics with AMR (Adaptive-Mesh Refinement) and Results from Special and General Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönmez, Orhan

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, the general procedure to solve the general relativistic hydrodynamical (GRH) equations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) is presented. In order to achieve, the GRH equations are written in the conservation form to exploit their hyperbolic character. The numerical solutions of GRH equations are obtained by high resolution shock Capturing schemes (HRSC), specifically designed to solve nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. These schemes depend on the characteristic information of the system. The Marquina fluxes with MUSCL left and right states are used to solve GRH equations. First, different test problems with uniform and AMR grids on the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations are carried out to verify the second-order convergence of the code in one, two and three dimensions. Results from uniform and AMR grid are compared. It is found that adaptive grid does a better job when the number of resolution is increased. Second, the GRH equations are tested using two different test problems which are Geodesic flow and Circular motion of particle In order to do this, the flux part of GRH equations is coupled with source part using Strang splitting. The coupling of the GRH equations is carried out in a treatment which gives second order accurate solutions in space and time.

  2. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  3. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED MYCOSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    laboratory- acquired mycoses . Insofar as possible, the etiological fungus, type of laboratory, classification of personnel, type of work conducted, and other...pertinent data have been listed in this study. More than 288 laboratory- acquired mycoses are described here, including 108 cases of

  4. Cooperative personalities and social niche specialization in female meerkats.

    PubMed

    Carter, A J; English, S; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2014-05-01

    The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that group-living animals should specialize in particular social roles to avoid social conflict, resulting in alternative life-history strategies for different roles. Social niche specialization, coupled with role-specific life-history trade-offs, should thus generate between-individual differences in behaviour that persist through time, or distinct personalities, as individuals specialize in particular nonoverlapping social roles. We tested for support for the social niche specialization hypothesis in cooperative personality traits in wild female meerkats (Suricata suricatta) that compete for access to dominant social roles. As cooperation is costly and dominance is acquired by heavier females, we predicted that females that ultimately acquired dominant roles would show noncooperative personality types early in life and before and after role acquisition. Although we found large individual differences in repeatable cooperative behaviours, there was no indication that individuals that ultimately acquired dominance differed from unsuccessful individuals in their cooperative behaviour. Early-life behaviour did not predict social role acquisition later in life, nor was cooperative behaviour before and after role acquisition correlated in the same individuals. We suggest that female meerkats do not show social niche specialization resulting in cooperative personalities, but that they exhibit an adaptive response in personality at role acquisition.

  5. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  6. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  7. International Student Adaptation to a U.S. College: A Mixed Methods Exploration of the Impact of a Specialized First-Year Foundations Course at a Large Midwestern Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovtun, Olena

    2010-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of a specialized first-year foundations course as an intervention for international students' academic and cultural adaptation at a large, Midwestern, public research institution (very high research activity). This was a quasi-experimental, mixed methods study, consisting of two quantitative and two…

  8. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  9. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  10. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  12. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  13. Metabolic Adaptation, a Specialized Leaf Organ Structure and Vascular Responses to Diurnal N2 Fixation by Nostoc azollae Sustain the Astonishing Productivity of Azolla Ferns without Nitrogen Fertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Paul; Bräutigam, Andrea; Buijs, Valerie A.; Tazelaar, Anne O. E.; van der Werf, Adrie; Schlüter, Urte; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bolger, Anthony; Usadel, Björn; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Schluepmann, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture demands reduced input of man-made nitrogen (N) fertilizer, yet N2 fixation limits the productivity of crops with heterotrophic diazotrophic bacterial symbionts. We investigated floating ferns from the genus Azolla that host phototrophic diazotrophic Nostoc azollae in leaf pockets and belong to the fastest growing plants. Experimental production reported here demonstrated N-fertilizer independent production of nitrogen-rich biomass with an annual yield potential per ha of 1200 kg−1 N fixed and 35 t dry biomass. 15N2 fixation peaked at noon, reaching 0.4 mg N g−1 dry weight h−1. Azolla ferns therefore merit consideration as protein crops in spite of the fact that little is known about the fern’s physiology to enable domestication. To gain an understanding of their nitrogen physiology, analyses of fern diel transcript profiles under differing nitrogen fertilizer regimes were combined with microscopic observations. Results established that the ferns adapted to the phototrophic N2-fixing symbionts N. azollae by (1) adjusting metabolically to nightly absence of N supply using responses ancestral to ferns and seed plants; (2) developing a specialized xylem-rich vasculature surrounding the leaf-pocket organ; (3) responding to N-supply by controlling transcripts of genes mediating nutrient transport, allocation and vasculature development. Unlike other non-seed plants, the Azolla fern clock is shown to contain both the morning and evening loops; the evening loop is known to control rhythmic gene expression in the vasculature of seed plants and therefore may have evolved along with the vasculature in the ancestor of ferns and seed plants.

  14. Acquiring Psychomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padelford, Harold E.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses levels of psychomotor skill acquisition: perceiving, motivating, imitating, performing, adapting, and innovating. How these skills interact and how they affect the learner's ability to learn are examined. (CT)

  15. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  16. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  17. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  18. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  19. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  20. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  1. Specialization and evolutionary branching within migratory populations.

    PubMed

    Torney, Colin J; Levin, Simon A; Couzin, Iain D

    2010-11-23

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive specialization and speciation within initially homogeneous populations is a fundamental challenge for evolutionary theory. It is an issue of relevance for significant open questions in biology concerning the generation and maintenance of biodiversity, the origins of reciprocal cooperation, and the efficient division of labor in social or colonial organisms. Several mathematical frameworks have been developed to address this question and models based on evolutionary game theory or the adaptive dynamics of phenotypic mutation have demonstrated the emergence of polymorphic, specialized populations. Here we focus on a ubiquitous biological phenomenon, migration. Individuals in our model may evolve the capacity to detect and follow an environmental cue that indicates a preferred migration route. The strategy space is defined by the level of investment in acquiring personal information about this route or the alternative tendency to follow the direction choice of others. The result is a relation between the migratory process and a game theoretic dynamic that is generally applicable to situations where information may be considered a public good. Through the use of an approximation of social interactions, we demonstrate the emergence of a stable, polymorphic population consisting of an uninformed subpopulation that is dependent upon a specialized group of leaders. The branching process is classified using the techniques of adaptive dynamics.

  2. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heather D; Macgregor, Jennifer L; Nord, Kristin M; Tyring, Stephen; Rady, Peter; Engler, Danielle E; Grossman, Marc E

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

  3. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  4. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  5. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  6. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  7. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  8. 26 CFR 1.1053-1 - Property acquired before March 1, 1913.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Property acquired before March 1, 1913. 1.1053-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rules § 1.1053-1 Property acquired before March 1, 1913. (a) Basis for determining gain. In the case of property acquired before March 1, 1913, the basis as of...

  9. Adapting the Physical Education Program for the Student with Special Needs: A Supplement to the K-12 Physical Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The booklet is designed to acquaint the physical education specialist, classroom teacher, special educator, and administrator with the importance of physical education for handicapped students. An initial chapter addresses movement's effects on cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development. A second section outlines definitions of the major…

  10. Special Days, Special Ways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    Presents unique ways to create special rituals that recognize individual students' achievements and milestones. Ideas include throwing a send-off party for a student who is moving; holding monthly birthday luncheons; choosing an ambassador to accompany new students around school; and making a lost tooth container that students can use to safely…

  11. Curriculum Adaptation in Special Schools for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (SID): A Case Study of Project Learning in One SID School in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jia-Wei; Wong, Lam; Chan, Tak-Hang; Chiu, Chi-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Using a qualitative case study approach, the authors analyzed the curriculum adaptation process for one project learning activity in School K, which is a SID school in the context of school-university collaboration. Multiple sources of data were collected for triangulation, including interviews, documents and observations. Curriculum adaptation…

  12. Adaptation of Education to the Needs of the Modern World in Rural Areas. International Education Year 1970. IEY Special Unit 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    One in a series of 12 documents devoted to the priority themes of International Education Year, this document provides basic information and suggests directions for study, discussion, and action in adapting education to the needs of the modern world in rural areas. The main emphasis in this essay revolves around the hypothesis that no effective…

  13. Second Year Validation Studies of the Brockton Battery: A Special Needs Assessment for Linguistic Minority Students. (The Tests of Reading Readiness and the Scales of Adaptive Behavior).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennett, Kenneth H.

    Procedures are described to determine reliability and validity of the Brockton (Massachusetts) Battery's Tests of Reading Readiness and the Adaptive Behavior Scales, which were developed to assess performance levels of Hispanic, Portuguese, and Cape Verdean normal and high risk children. Among reasons given for development of the instruments are…

  14. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  15. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  16. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  17. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  18. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  19. A Specialized Histone H1 Variant Is Required for Adaptive Responses to Complex Abiotic Stress and Related DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rutowicz, Kinga; Puzio, Marcin; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Lirski, Maciej; Kotliński, Maciej; Kroteń, Magdalena A.; Knizewski, Lukasz; Lange, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Śniegowska-Świerk, Katarzyna; Kościelniak, Janusz; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Buza, Krisztián; Janowiak, Franciszek; Żmuda, Katarzyna; Jõesaar, Indrek; Laskowska-Kaszub, Katarzyna; Fogtman, Anna; Kollist, Hannes; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Siedlecki, Paweł; Swiezewski, Szymon; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Koblowska, Marta; Archacki, Rafał; Wilczynski, Bartek; Rapacz, Marcin; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Linker (H1) histones play critical roles in chromatin compaction in higher eukaryotes. They are also the most variable of the histones, with numerous nonallelic variants cooccurring in the same cell. Plants contain a distinct subclass of minor H1 variants that are induced by drought and abscisic acid and have been implicated in mediating adaptive responses to stress. However, how these variants facilitate adaptation remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stress-inducible variant H1.3 occurs in plants in two separate and most likely autonomous pools: a constitutive guard cell-specific pool and a facultative environmentally controlled pool localized in other tissues. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses of h1.3 null mutants demonstrate that H1.3 is required for both proper stomatal functioning under normal growth conditions and adaptive developmental responses to combined light and water deficiency. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, we show that H1.3 has superfast chromatin dynamics, and in contrast to the main Arabidopsis H1 variants H1.1 and H1.2, it has no stable bound fraction. The results of global occupancy studies demonstrate that, while H1.3 has the same overall binding properties as the main H1 variants, including predominant heterochromatin localization, it differs from them in its preferences for chromatin regions with epigenetic signatures of active and repressed transcription. We also show that H1.3 is required for a substantial part of DNA methylation associated with environmental stress, suggesting that the likely mechanism underlying H1.3 function may be the facilitation of chromatin accessibility by direct competition with the main H1 variants. PMID:26351307

  20. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  1. A problem-solving task specialized for functional neuroimaging: validation of the Scarborough adaptation of the Tower of London (S-TOL) using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, Anthony C.; Rodrigo, Achala H.; Lam, Jaeger; Di Domenico, Stefano I.; Graves, Bryanna; Ayaz, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Problem-solving is an executive function subserved by a network of neural structures of which the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is central. Whereas several studies have evaluated the role of the DLPFC in problem-solving, few standardized tasks have been developed specifically for use with functional neuroimaging. The current study adapted a measure with established validity for the assessment of problem-solving abilities to design a test more suitable for functional neuroimaging protocols. The Scarborough adaptation of the Tower of London (S-TOL) was administered to 38 healthy adults while hemodynamic oxygenation of the PFC was measured using 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Compared to a baseline condition, problems that required two or three steps to achieve a goal configuration were associated with higher activation in the left DLPFC and deactivation in the medial PFC. Individuals scoring higher in trait deliberation showed consistently higher activation in the left DLPFC regardless of task difficulty, whereas individuals lower in this trait displayed less activation when solving simple problems. Based on these results, the S-TOL may serve as a standardized task to evaluate problem-solving abilities in functional neuroimaging studies. PMID:24734017

  2. A problem-solving task specialized for functional neuroimaging: validation of the Scarborough adaptation of the Tower of London (S-TOL) using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Anthony C; Rodrigo, Achala H; Lam, Jaeger; Di Domenico, Stefano I; Graves, Bryanna; Ayaz, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Problem-solving is an executive function subserved by a network of neural structures of which the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is central. Whereas several studies have evaluated the role of the DLPFC in problem-solving, few standardized tasks have been developed specifically for use with functional neuroimaging. The current study adapted a measure with established validity for the assessment of problem-solving abilities to design a test more suitable for functional neuroimaging protocols. The Scarborough adaptation of the Tower of London (S-TOL) was administered to 38 healthy adults while hemodynamic oxygenation of the PFC was measured using 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Compared to a baseline condition, problems that required two or three steps to achieve a goal configuration were associated with higher activation in the left DLPFC and deactivation in the medial PFC. Individuals scoring higher in trait deliberation showed consistently higher activation in the left DLPFC regardless of task difficulty, whereas individuals lower in this trait displayed less activation when solving simple problems. Based on these results, the S-TOL may serve as a standardized task to evaluate problem-solving abilities in functional neuroimaging studies.

  3. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  4. 8 CFR 306.2 - United States citizenship; when acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false United States citizenship; when acquired... SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY BE NATURALIZED: VIRGIN ISLANDERS § 306.2 United States citizenship... declarant shall be deemed to be a citizen of the United States. No certificate of naturalization or...

  5. Characterization of the Two-Speed Subgenomes of Fusarium graminearum Reveals the Fast-Speed Subgenome Specialized for Adaption and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinhu; Jiang, Cong; Wang, Chenfang; Chen, Changjun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most severe diseases on wheat and barley worldwide. Although the genomic data of several strains were published, the intragenomic variation of F. graminearum was not well characterized. Here, we sequenced three Chinese strains and conducted genome-wide comparisons. Our data revealed that all the sequenced strains were distinct from each other and over 350 genes were functionally lost in each of them. Variants of each strain were unevenly distributed in a highly conserved pattern along the chromosomes, resulting in a conserved two-speed genome. The fast subgenome has a lower GC content, shorter gene length, and higher variation of exon numbers than the slow subgenome. Genes related to interaction and pathogenicity, under positive selection, and up-regulated in planta were all significantly enriched in the fast subgenome. Furthermore, we found that the fast subgenome coincided with facultative heterochromatin regions that were repressed in vegetative stage but activated during infection as measured by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data, suggesting that the fast subgenome is epigenetically regulated. Taken together, our data demonstrated that F. graminearum has a highly conserved two-speed genome and the fast subgenome responsible for adaption and infection is under the control of heterochromatin. PMID:28261228

  6. Primary, Adaptive, and Acquired Resistance to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Padmanee; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Wargo, Jennifer A; Ribas, Antoni

    2017-02-09

    Cancer immunotherapy can induce long lasting responses in patients with metastatic cancers of a wide range of histologies. Broadening the clinical applicability of these treatments requires an improved understanding of the mechanisms limiting cancer immunotherapy. The interactions between the immune system and cancer cells are continuous, dynamic, and evolving from the initial establishment of a cancer cell to the development of metastatic disease, which is dependent on immune evasion. As the molecular mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy are elucidated, actionable strategies to prevent or treat them may be derived to improve clinical outcomes for patients.

  7. Tracing the History of the Energy Sector Related Applications Using Specially Adapted NASA Long-Term Climate Data Sets and Measures of Their Socio-Economic Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, P. W.; Hoell, J. M.; Chandler, W.; Westberg, D. J.; Zhang, T.

    2012-12-01

    In the mid-1990's the National Renewable Energy Laboratory approached NASA Langley Research Center to gain information about the solar resource in Africa as estimated via early satellite based methods. From this began an effort that eventually involved collaboration with DOE NREL, Natural Resources Canada RETScreen International, and numerous other partners in industry and universities to make progressively improved data products available for the renewable energy and other energy related applications. In 2002, NASA Applied Science projects were initiated providing a more focused effort to accomplish the goal of empowering energy related decision support tools using NASA meteorological and climate related data sets. At this time, NASA Langley Research Center reorganized a project aimed to make long-term solar energy and meteorological data sets available to Energy sector related industries, including sustainable buildings and agroclimatology. This task involved the design and adaption of NASA derived data sets that these industries use, key partnerships, a commitment to validation, a commitment to expansion of parameters and data products over time, and a web based interface that allows energy industry specialists to obtained the needed data parameters in easy to use formats. This presentation shows the history of the NASA Langley Research Center effort to provide data sets for energy sector applications. This includes the development and usage of the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE, http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/) web interface that has been improved under the Prediction of Worldwide renewable Energy Resource Project (POWER, http://power.larc.nasa.gov). Through the years the data sets provided now span more than 30 years and since 2009 include global parameters released within about 4-6 days of real time. The history of usage of this web site is discussed in terms of key partnerships and new data releases. We will present ways of categorizing the

  8. Guidelines for prevention of hospital acquired infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Todi, Subhash; Myatra, SN; Samaddar, D. P.; Patil, Vijaya; Bhattacharya, Pradip Kumar; Ramasubban, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines, written for clinicians, contains evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of hospital acquired infections Hospital acquired infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity and provide challenge to clinicians. Measures of infection control include identifying patients at risk of nosocomial infections, observing hand hygiene, following standard precautions to reduce transmission and strategies to reduce VAP, CR-BSI, CAUTI. Environmental factors and architectural lay out also need to be emphasized upon. Infection prevention in special subsets of patients - burns patients, include identifying sources of organism, identification of organisms, isolation if required, antibiotic prophylaxis to be used selectively, early removal of necrotic tissue, prevention of tetanus, early nutrition and surveillance. Immunodeficient and Transplant recipients are at a higher risk of opportunistic infections. The post tranplant timetable is divided into three time periods for determining risk of infections. Room ventilation, cleaning and decontamination, protective clothing with care regarding food requires special consideration. Monitoring and Surveillance are prioritized depending upon the needs. Designated infection control teams should supervise the process and help in collection and compilation of data. Antibiotic Stewardship Recommendations include constituting a team, close coordination between teams, audit, formulary restriction, de-escalation, optimizing dosing, active use of information technology among other measure. The recommendations in these guidelines are intended to support, and not replace, good clinical judgment. The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of evidence supporting the recommendation, so that readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments. PMID:24701065

  9. Career Adaptability in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Porfeli, Erik J.; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood marks the dawn of vocational development, involving developmental tasks, transitions, and change. Children must acquire the rudiments of career adaptability to envision a future, make educational and vocational decisions, explore self and occupations, and problem solve. The authors situate child vocational development within human life…

  10. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct.

  11. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  13. The inheritance of acquired epigenetic variations.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eva; Lamb, Marion J

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence that the functional history of a gene in one generation can influence its expression in the next. In somatic cells, changes in gene activity are frequently associated with changes in the pattern of methylation of the cytosines in DNA; these methylation patterns are stably inherited. Recent work suggests that information about patterns of methylation and other epigenetic states can also be transmitted from parents to offspring. This evidence is the basis of a model for the inheritance of acquired epigenetic variations. According to the model, an environmental stimulus can induce heritable chromatin modifications which are very specific and predictable, and might result in an adaptive response to the stimulus. This type of response probably has most significance for adaptive evolution in organisms such as fungi and plants, which lack distinct segregation of the soma and germ line. However, in all organisms, the accumulation of specific and random chromatin modifications in the germ line may be important in speciation, because these modifications could lead to reproductive isolation between populations. Heritable chromatin variations may also alter the frequency and distribution of classical mutations and meiotic recombination. Therefore, inherited epigenetic changes in the structure of chromatin can influence neo-Darwinian evolution as well as cause a type of "Lamarckian" inheritance.

  14. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  15. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  16. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    PubMed

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  17. Specialized Science

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    As the body of scientific knowledge in a discipline increases, there is pressure for specialization. Fields spawn subfields that then become entities in themselves that promote further specialization. The process by which scientists join specialized groups has remarkable similarities to the guild system of the middle ages. The advantages of specialization of science include efficiency, the establishment of normative standards, and the potential for greater rigor in experimental research. However, specialization also carries risks of monopoly, monotony, and isolation. The current tendency to judge scientific work by the impact factor of the journal in which it is published may have roots in overspecialization, as scientists are less able to critically evaluate work outside their field than before. Scientists in particular define themselves through group identity and adopt practices that conform to the expectations and dynamics of such groups. As part of our continuing analysis of issues confronting contemporary science, we analyze the emergence and consequences of specialization in science, with a particular emphasis on microbiology, a field highly vulnerable to balkanization along microbial phylogenetic boundaries, and suggest that specialization carries significant costs. We propose measures to mitigate the detrimental effects of scientific specialism. PMID:24421049

  18. Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Ray, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on special needs instruction and technology: (1) "Hawaii Special Education Teacher Induction" (Kalena Oliva and Quinn Avery); (2) "The Impact of Group v Individual Use of Hypermedia-Based Instruction" (Lewis R. Johnson, Louis P. Semrau, and Gail E. Fitzgerald); (3) "Assistive…

  19. Meeting Our Responsibilities in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoy, C. H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and stages of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS); AIDS symptoms in children; special complications for children with disabilities; and responsibilities of special educators, including, among others, inclusion in schools, interdisciplinary team management, providing a family…

  20. Instruction of Circulating Endothelial Progenitors In Vitro towards Specialized Blood-Brain Barrier and Arterial Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ponio, Julie Boyer-Di; El-Ayoubi, Fida; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Driancourt, Catherine; Godet, Maeva; Perrière, Nicolas; Guillevic, Oriane; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Uzan, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Objective The vascular system is adapted to specific functions in different tissues and organs. Vascular endothelial cells are important elements of this adaptation, leading to the concept of ‘specialized endothelial cells’. The phenotype of these cells is highly dependent on their specific microenvironment and when isolated and cultured, they lose their specific features after few passages, making models using such cells poorly predictive and irreproducible. We propose a new source of specialized endothelial cells based on cord blood circulating endothelial progenitors (EPCs). As prototype examples, we evaluated the capacity of EPCs to acquire properties characteristic of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (blood-brain barrier (BBB)) or of arterial endothelial cells, in specific inducing culture conditions. Approach and Results First, we demonstrated that EPC-derived endothelial cells (EPDCs) co-cultured with astrocytes acquired several BBB phenotypic characteristics, such as restricted paracellular diffusion of hydrophilic solutes and the expression of tight junction proteins. Second, we observed that culture of the same EPDCs in a high concentration of VEGF resulted, through activation of Notch signaling, in an increase of expression of most arterial endothelial markers. Conclusions We have thus demonstrated that in vitro culture of early passage human cord blood EPDCs under specific conditions can induce phenotypic changes towards BBB or arterial phenotypes, indicating that these EPDCs maintain enough plasticity to acquire characteristics of a variety of specialized phenotypes. We propose that this property of EPDCs might be exploited for producing specialized endothelial cells in culture to be used for drug testing and predictive in vitro assays. PMID:24392113

  1. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal.

  2. Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Administered to Abolish Acquired Nystagmus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. John; Tomsak, Robert L.; Grant, Michael P.; Remler, Bernd F.; Yaniglos, Stacy S.; Lystad, Lisa; Dell'Osso, Louis F.

    1992-01-01

    We injected botulinum toxin into the horizontal rectus muscles of the right eyes of two patients who had acquired pendular nystagmus with horizontal, vertical, and torsional components. This treatment successfully abolished the horizontal component of the nystagmus in the injected eye in both patients for approximately 2 months. Both patients showed a small but measurable improvement of vision in the injected eye that may have been limited by coexistent disease of the visual pathways. The vertical and torsional components of the nystagmus persisted in both patients. In one patient, the horizontal component of nystagmus in the noninjected eye increased; we ascribe this finding to plastic-adaptive changes in response to paresis caused by the botulinum toxin. Such plastic-adaptive changes and direct side effects of the injections - such as diplopia and ptosis - may limit the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of acquired nystagmus. Neither patient elected to repeat the botulinum treatment.

  3. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  4. Adapting Lessons for the Special Needs Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, James J.; Sibit, Shawn A.

    2005-01-01

    The population of American schools has continually become more diverse over time and so too have the needs of the students as well as the responsibilities of teachers. One must include in this multicultural amalgam those who have learning disabilities (LD). Arguably, nowhere else in society are disabilities so openly recognized and acknowledged as…

  5. Adaptive Reorganization of German Special Operations Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943–5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...Scott Helfstein states: Violent extremism presents one of the greatest threats to the citizenry of the United States and its allies. It does not...Violent Extremism ,” Combatting Terrorism Center at West Point, West Point, New York, February 2012, 6. 4. Jake Hartigan, “Why the Weak Win Wars: A

  6. SPECIAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION--ADAPTED, CORRECTIVE, DEVELOPMENTAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FAIT, HOLLIS F.

    THIS BOOK, WRITTEN FOR PROSPECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN A VARIETY OF SETTINGS, HAS THREE OBJECTIVES--(1) TO INTRODUCE BRIEFLY THE NATURE OF VARIOUS HANDICAPPING CONDITIONS, (2) TO DELINEATE THEIR PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS, AND (3) TO SUGGEST SUITABLE GAMES AND ACTIVITIES. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND, A BASIS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE HANDICAPPED,…

  7. Smartphone adapters for digital photomicrography

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Somak; Pantanowitz, Liron; Amin, Milon; Seethala, Raja R.; Ishtiaque, Ahmed; Yousem, Samuel A.; Parwani, Anil V.; Cucoranu, Ioan; Hartman, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Photomicrographs in Anatomic Pathology provide a means of quickly sharing information from a glass slide for consultation, education, documentation and publication. While static image acquisition historically involved the use of a permanently mounted camera unit on a microscope, such cameras may be expensive, need to be connected to a computer, and often require proprietary software to acquire and process images. Another novel approach for capturing digital microscopic images is to use smartphones coupled with the eyepiece of a microscope. Recently, several smartphone adapters have emerged that allow users to attach mobile phones to the microscope. The aim of this study was to test the utility of these various smartphone adapters. Materials and Methods: We surveyed the market for adapters to attach smartphones to the ocular lens of a conventional light microscope. Three adapters (Magnifi, Skylight and Snapzoom) were tested. We assessed the designs of these adapters and their effectiveness at acquiring static microscopic digital images. Results: All adapters facilitated the acquisition of digital microscopic images with a smartphone. The optimal adapter was dependent on the type of phone used. The Magnifi adapters for iPhone were incompatible when using a protective case. The Snapzoom adapter was easiest to use with iPhones and other smartphones even with protective cases. Conclusions: Smartphone adapters are inexpensive and easy to use for acquiring digital microscopic images. However, they require some adjustment by the user in order to optimize focus and obtain good quality images. Smartphone microscope adapters provide an economically feasible method of acquiring and sharing digital pathology photomicrographs. PMID:25191623

  8. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2016-09-29

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  9. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  10. Special Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendel, Giuliana

    1977-01-01

    Discusses problems involved in maintaining special scientific or engineering libraries, including budget problems, remote storage locations, rental computer retrieval systems, protecting trade secrets, and establishing a magnetic tape library. (MLH)

  11. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  12. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood.

  13. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  14. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  15. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  16. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  17. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  18. Acquired haemophilia in recipients of depot thioxanthenes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A J; Manson, L M; Dasani, H; Beddall, A; Collins, P; Shima, M; Ludlam, C A

    2000-11-01

    We present two cases in which the occurrence of acquired haemophilia is associated with the use of depot preparations of the thioxanthenes zuclopenthixol and flupenthixol. These drugs have not previously been implicated in the aetiology of acquired haemophilia.

  19. Acquiring Evolving Technologies: Web Services Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards Harry L. Levinson Software Engineering Institute Carnegie...Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards © 2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring

  20. Genomics of adaptation to host-plants in herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jean-Christophe; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Guy, Endrick; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jaquiéry, Julie; Nouhaud, Pierre; Peccoud, Jean; Sugio, Akiko; Streiff, Réjane

    2015-11-01

    Herbivorous insects represent the most species-rich lineages of metazoans. The high rate of diversification in herbivorous insects is thought to result from their specialization to distinct host-plants, which creates conditions favorable for the build-up of reproductive isolation and speciation. These conditions rely on constraints against the optimal use of a wide range of plant species, as each must constitute a viable food resource, oviposition site and mating site for an insect. Utilization of plants involves many essential traits of herbivorous insects, as they locate and select their hosts, overcome their defenses and acquire nutrients while avoiding intoxication. Although advances in understanding insect-plant molecular interactions have been limited by the complexity of insect traits involved in host use and the lack of genomic resources and functional tools, recent studies at the molecular level, combined with large-scale genomics studies at population and species levels, are revealing the genetic underpinning of plant specialization and adaptive divergence in non-model insect herbivores. Here, we review the recent advances in the genomics of plant adaptation in hemipterans and lepidopterans, two major insect orders, each of which includes a large number of crop pests. We focus on how genomics and post-genomics have improved our understanding of the mechanisms involved in insect-plant interactions by reviewing recent molecular discoveries in sensing, feeding, digesting and detoxifying strategies. We also present the outcomes of large-scale genomics approaches aimed at identifying loci potentially involved in plant adaptation in these insects.

  1. Using a Team Approach When Mainstreaming Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines mainstreaming and discusses how business education teachers and special needs instructors can work as a team on instructional and materials adaptation to meet the special needs of students. (CH)

  2. Corticomotoneuronal function and hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Yiannikas, Con; Vincent, Angela; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    Acquired neuromyotonia encompasses a group of inflammatory disorders characterized by symptoms reflecting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, which may be clinically confused in the early stages with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite a clear peripheral nerve focus, it remains unclear whether the ectopic activity in acquired neuromyotonia receives a central contribution. To clarify whether cortical hyperexcitability contributes to development of clinical features of acquired neuromyotonia, the present study investigated whether threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation could detect cortical hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia, and whether this technique could differentiate acquired neuromyotonia from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken in 18 patients with acquired neuromyotonia and 104 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with results compared to 62 normal controls. Short-interval intracortical inhibition in patients with acquired neuromyotonia was significantly different when compared to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (averaged short interval intracortical inhibition acquired neuromyotonia 11.3 +/- 1.9%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2.6 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.001). In addition, the motor evoked potential amplitudes (acquired neuromyotonia 21.0 +/- 3.1%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 38.1 +/- 2.2%, P < 0.0001), intracortical facilitation (acquired neuromyotonia -0.9 +/- 1.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -2.3 +/- 0.6%, P < 0.0001), resting motor thresholds (acquired neuromyotonia 62.2 +/- 1.6%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 57.2 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05) and cortical silent period durations (acquired neuromyotonia 212.8 +/- 6.9 ms; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 181.1 +/- 4.3 ms, P < 0.0001) were significantly different between patients with acquired neuromyotonia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation established corticomotoneuronal integrity

  3. Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes six special reports: "Libraries and the National Information Infrastructure" (Peter R. Young and Jane Williams); "Library Cooperation and Networking" (JoAn Segal); "Mexican Information Resources in Electronic Format" (Shirley Ainsworth); "The International Role of U.S. Librarians" (Hannelore B.…

  4. Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiant, Sarah K.; Lynch, Clifford; Nevins, Kate; Juergens, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Contains three special reports: developments in copyright law, 1997 (World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) legislation, Ashcroft Bill, No Electronic Theft Act, database protection, Conference on Fair Use (CONFU), judicial decisions, principles for licensing electronic resources, and Uniform Commercial Code Article 2B); Internet2 and the…

  5. Special Advocate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Weele, Maribeth

    1992-01-01

    Thomas Hehir, special education chief of Chicago Public Schools, is evangelist of integrating children with disabilities into regular classrooms. By completely reorganizing department viewed as political patronage dumping ground, Hehir has made remarkable progress in handling large number of children awaiting evaluation and placement in special…

  6. Special Feature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Gary B., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The nine articles of this special section focus on the role of evaluation in the reform of the mental health system in Washington. The reform process is described from its inception through its design to the dissemination and utilization of evaluation results. The final article considers implications for statewide evaluations. (SLD)

  7. A Special Kind of Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Linda Brown

    2007-01-01

    Tutoring has long been recognized as superior to group instruction, especially for students with special needs. Tutors can adapt instruction to the learner's pace, learning style and level of understanding. Feedback and correction are immediate. Basic misunderstandings can be quickly identified and corrected. Tutoring also has emotional benefits:…

  8. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  9. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  10. [Acquired platelet function disorders: pathogenesis, classification, frequency, diagnosis, clinical management].

    PubMed

    Scharf, R E

    2008-12-01

    Given the high consumption of pharmacological agents in western societies, it is not surprising at all that drugs represent the most common cause of acquired platelet dysfunction. While acetylsalicylic acid, clopigogrel and integrin alphaIIbbeta3 (GPIIb-IIIa) receptor antagonists are well-known as prototypes of antiplatelet drugs, other widely used agents including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and volume expanders can also impair platelet function and cause or aggravate haemorrhages. Besides pharmacological agents, certain clinical conditions are often associated with qualitative platelet disorders and bleeding diathesis. Consequently, in contrast to inherited platelet disorders, acquired platelet function defects are much more frequent in clinical practice and deserve special attention. Their pathogenesis is widespread and heterogeneous with various, sometimes overlapping abnormalities. Moreover, acquired platelet dysfunctions can occur at any age and range in severity from mild to life-threatening haemorrhages. Due to their heterogeneity, acquired platelet function disorders will be classified and discussed according to the underlying clinical setting or disease.

  11. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  12. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  13. The mitochondrion: a perpetrator of acquired hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Erik C; Schacht, Jochen

    2013-09-01

    Age, drugs, and noise are major causes of acquired hearing loss. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hair cell death has long been discussed, but there is considerably less information available as to the mechanisms underlying ROS formation. Most cellular ROS arise in mitochondria and this review will evaluate evidence for mitochondrial pathology in general and dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in particular in acquired hearing loss. We will discuss evidence that different pathways can lead to the generation of ROS and that oxidative stress might not necessarily be causal to all three pathologies. Finally, we will detail recent advances in exploiting knowledge of aminoglycoside-mitochondria interactions for the development of non-ototoxic antibacterials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Annual Reviews 2013".

  14. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  15. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  16. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  17. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  18. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, Serena; Vucelja, Marija; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a ``winner-take-all'' scenario, leading to a specialized spacer distribution. Bacteria can interpolate between these limiting behaviors by actively tuning their overall acquisition rate.

  19. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  20. Acquiring and Managing Electronic Journals. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Donnelyn; Yue, Paoshan

    Electronic journals are both a blessing and a curse for libraries. To be meaningful in the current information environment--to meet users' ever-increasing demands--libraries must acquire as many appropriate full text resources as possible, as quickly as possible, and make them easy to use. This Digest provides tips for acquiring and providing…

  1. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Elise I; Mutasim, Diya F; Heaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) in a 56-year-old white woman. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is an exceedingly rare group of heterogeneous disorders that has been almost exclusively reported in young Japanese males. Our case is unique in that AlGA may be underrecognized in this patient population.

  2. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes.

  3. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  4. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  5. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  6. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably.

  7. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  8. Changing Roles of Special Education Administrators: Impact on Multicultural Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; O'Brian, Mary; Shelden, Debra L.

    2006-01-01

    It is imperative for special education administrators, and all administrators, to adapt to the changing demographic and educational environments. The field of special education has changed dramatically in the last three decades, and administrators can and should be leaders of the continued evolution of special education. One useful organizing…

  9. Migrant Adaptation - A Cross-Cultural Problem. A Review of Research on Migration, Minority Groups and Cultural Differences, with Special Regard to Children. Educational and Psychological Interactions, No. 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, L. H.

    Research pertinent to the adaptation of immigrant children is reviewed in a cross-cultural perspective. The report focuses on research that has yielded empirical data, although a number of other papers of basic importance have been included in the review. The first chapter discusses definitions and implications of various types of cross-cultural…

  10. Biofied room integrated with sensor agent robots to interact with residents and acquire environmental information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Fumi; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    Current smart buildings are based on scenarios, so they are not prepared for unexpected events. We focus our attention on high adaptability of living matters to environmental changes. "Biofication of Living Spaces" is the concept of creating pleasant living environments using this high adaptability. Biofied room is integrated with sensor agent robots to interact with residents and acquire environmental information. In this research, we propose a highly adaptive algorithm to control the devices automatically. Based on physiological adaption, we can make the algorithm very flexible. As the first step in this research, a prototype of the sensor agent robot is built. Camera, microphone, proximity sensor, laser range-finder are mounted on the robot. As a sensor agent robot follows the residents, it acquires environmental information, and records the interaction between the robot and human. In a suggested control model, a resident is built in the control loop and his/her uncomfortable feeling plays a role of control signal. Following its signal, devices are controlled. Results obtained from the computer simulation show that models are able to maintain the human comfort feeling adaptively. This research suggests an adaptive, fault-tolerant, and energy-saving control models for building spaces, using simple algorithms based on physiological adaption.

  11. [Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Cicinskaite, Ilona; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Macas, Andrius; Tamosiūnas, Ramūnas; Kinderyte, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are responsible for 40-60% of all hospital-acquired infections. Increased age of patients and comorbid diseases render hospitalized patients more susceptible to infection. Almost 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are associated with urinary catheters, and only 5-10% of urinary infections are caused by invasive manipulations in the urogenital tract. Pathogens of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are frequently multi-resistant, and antibiotic therapy can only be successful when the complicating factors are eliminated or urodynamic function is restored. For treatment of complicated hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, the antibiotics must exhibit adequate pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties: high renal clearance of unmetabolized form with good antimicrobial activity in both acidic and alkaline urine. For selection of empirical treatment of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, it is necessary to evaluate localization of infection, its severity, possible isolates, and the most frequent pathogens in the department where patient is treated. The best choice for the starting the antimicrobial therapy is the cheapest narrow-spectrum effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infection until microbiological evaluation of pathogens will be received. Adequate management of urinary tract infections lowers the rate of complications, requirements for antibacterial treatment, selection of multi-resistant isolates and is cost effective.

  12. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  13. Drug induced phospholipidosis: an acquired lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Shayman, James A; Abe, Akira

    2013-03-01

    There is a strong association between lysosome enzyme deficiencies and monogenic disorders resulting in lysosomal storage disease. Of the more than 75 characterized lysosomal proteins, two thirds are directly linked to inherited diseases of metabolism. Only one lysosomal storage disease, Niemann-Pick disease, is associated with impaired phospholipid metabolism. However, other phospholipases are found in the lysosome but remain poorly characterized. A recent exception is lysosomal phospholipase A2 (group XV phospholipase A2). Although no inherited disorder of lysosomal phospholipid metabolism has yet been associated with a loss of function of this lipase, this enzyme may be a target for an acquired form of lysosomal storage, drug induced phospholipidosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism.

  14. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed.

  15. [Trypanosoma cruzi: transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudio A; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Bouvier, León A; Cánepa, Gaspar E

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latin America. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on amino acid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases), because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  16. Curriculum Adaptation for Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Tom; And Others

    This manual on curriculum adaptation for inclusive classrooms was developed as part of the PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools) Project, a 5-year collaborative systems change project in California to facilitate the integration of students with severe disabilities previously at special centers into services at regular school…

  17. Adapted Minds and Evolved Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology raises questions about how cognitive adaptations might be related to the emergence of formal schooling. Is there a special role for natural domains of cognition such as folk physics, folk psychology and folk biology? These domains may vary from small fragments of reasoning to large integrated systems. This heterogeneity…

  18. Cost of hospital-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmud; Tuckman, Howard P; Patrick, Robert H; Kountz, David S; Kohn, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The authors assessed the costs of hospital-acquired infections using rigorous econometric methods on publicly available data, controlling for the interdependency of length of stay and the incidence of hospital acquired infection, and estimated the cost shares of different payers. They developed a system of equations involving length of stay, incidence of infection, and the total hospital care cost to be estimated using simultaneous equations system. The main data came from the State of New Jersey UB 92 for 2004, complimented with data from the Annual Survey of Hospitals by the American Hospital Association and the Medicare Cost Report of 2004. The authors estimated that an incidence of hospital acquired infection increases the hospital care cost of a patient by $10,375 and it increases the length of stay by 3.30 days, and that a disproportionately higher portion of the cost is attributable to Medicare. They conclude that reliable cost estimates of hospital-acquired infections can be made using publicly available data. Their estimate shows a much larger aggregate cost of $16.6 billion as opposed to $5 billion reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but much less than $29 billion as reported elsewhere in the literature.

  19. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  20. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  1. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  2. Acquired nasal deformities in fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Schreinemakers, Joyce R C; van Amerongen, Pieter; Kon, Moshe

    2010-07-01

    Fighter pilots may develop slowly progressive deformities of their noses during their flying careers. The spectrum of deformities that may be acquired ranges from soft tissue to osseous changes. The main cause is the varying pressure exerted by the oxygen mask on the skin and bony pyramid of the nose during flying.

  3. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  4. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  5. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  6. 7 CFR 989.17 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acquire. 989.17 Section 989.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  7. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  8. Acquiring a Second Language for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Virginia P.

    1995-01-01

    This report offers a conceptual model for use with language minority children who are entering a new school when they must acquire the language of the majority student population. The model has four development components or processes: sociocultural, linguistic, academic, and cognitive. These four components are described in detail. Research is…

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies.

  10. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  11. Adaptive Immunity Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-02-27

    A complex interplay between host and bacterial factors allows Staphylococcus aureus to occupy its niche as a human commensal and a major human pathogen. The role of neutrophils as a critical component of the innate immune response against S. aureus, particularly for control of systemic infection, has been established in both animal models and in humans with acquired and congenital neutrophil dysfunction. The role of the adaptive immune system is less clear. Although deficiencies in adaptive immunity do not result in the marked susceptibility to S. aureus infection that neutrophil dysfunction imparts, emerging evidence suggests both T cell- and B cell-mediated adaptive immunity can influence host susceptibility and control of S. aureus. The contribution of adaptive immunity depends on the context and site of infection and can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Furthermore, S. aureus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate adaptive immune responses to its advantage. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for the role of adaptive immunity during S. aureus infections. Further elucidation of this role will be important to understand how it influences susceptibility to infection and to appropriately design vaccines that elicit adaptive immune responses to protect against subsequent infections.

  12. Cardiovascular adaptation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    Millions of athletes train for and participate in competitive athletics each year. Many of these athletes will present to a cardiovascular specialist with signs or symptoms that might indicate heart disease and these athletes/patients will ask for advice on their ability to continue to train and compete safely. By virtue of their training, athletes׳ hearts may undergo significant structural and electrical change, presenting a special challenge for the cardiovascular specialist. It is important to understand normal adaptive changes in order to separate normal physiology from pathology.

  13. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  14. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  15. [Acquired paraneoplastic hypertrichosis lanuginosa associated with scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Valda Rodriguez, L; Torrico Velasco, J; Zeballos Vasconcellos, R

    1990-01-01

    Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa is universally recognized as an individual disease and seldom reported as a genuine paraneoplastic manifestation. We report the case of a 30-year old woman with acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa. Due to the finding of a cervical lymph node metastasis, she was investigated for an internal neoplasm, but the original tumour could not be found by the usual methods. A bronchogenic carcinoma was discovered at autopsy. Beside hypertrichosis, this patient had other disorders not described in the literature as associated with that disease, viz.: progressive systemic scleroderma, fissured and hyperpigmented tongue, thrombocytopenia, galactorrhoea, axillary and pubic alopecia and overcurvature of toe nails. A review of similar cases in the literature provided clinical arguments in favour of the hormonal origin of this paraneoplastic hypertrichosis.

  16. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota, Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations.

  17. Clinical laboratory data: acquire, analyze, communicate, liberate.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Elbehery, Ali H A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of portable healthcare devices, which can acquire and transmit medical data to remote experts would dramatically affect healthcare in areas with poor infrastructure. Smartphones, which feature touchscreen computer capabilities and sophisticated cameras, have become widely available with over billion units shipped in 2013. In the clinical laboratory, smartphones have recently brought the capabilities of key instruments such as spectrophotometers, fluorescence analyzers and microscopes into the palm of the hand. Several research groups have developed sensitive and low-cost smartphone-based diagnostic assay prototypes for testing cholesterol, albumin, vitamin D, tumor markers, and the detection of infectious agents. This review covers the use of smartphones to acquire, analyze, communicate, and liberate clinical laboratory data. Smartphones promise to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of healthcare offered in resource-limited areas.

  18. Subcortical infarction resulting in acquired stuttering.

    PubMed

    Ciabarra, A M; Elkind, M S; Roberts, J K; Marshall, R S

    2000-10-01

    Stuttering is an uncommon presentation of acute stroke. Reported cases have often been associated with left sided cortical lesions, aphasia, and difficulties with other non-linguistic tests of rhythmic motor control. Three patients with subcortical lesions resulting in stuttering are discussed. In one patient the ability to perform time estimations with a computerised repetitive time estimation task was characterised. One patient had a pontine infarct with clinical evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. A second patient had a left basal ganglionic infarct and a disruption of timing estimation. A third patient had a left subcortical infarct and a mild aphasia. These findings expand the reported distribution of infarction that can result in acquired stuttering. Subcortical mechanisms of speech control and timing may contribute to the pathophysiology of acquired stuttering.

  19. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  20. Acquired versus familial demyelinative neuropathies in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Gutmann, L; Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1985-01-01

    The electrophysiologic differences between chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and the demyelinative form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease have recently been reported. The present report extends these observations to include the genetically determined demyelinating neuropathies seen in metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's leukodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome. The electrophysiologic features of metachromatic leukodystrophy (five patients), Krabbe's (four patients), and Cockayne's syndrome (three patients) were all similar. There was uniform slowing of conduction (both in different nerves and in different nerve segments), and conduction block was not seen. These findings are consistent with a uniform degree of demyelination in multiple nerves and throughout the entire length of individual axons. Thus, uniform slowing of nerve conduction constitutes strong evidence for a familial demyelinative neuropathy, as opposed to the multifocal slowing seen in acute and chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy.

  1. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota Jr., Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27777479

  2. Brucella abortus Infection Acquired in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Pier Luigi; Mastrandrea, Scilla; Rappelli, Paola; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2000-01-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated. PMID:10790142

  3. Acquiring Secure Systems Through Information Economics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Introduction “For all future weapons systems that DoD will acquire or procure, DoD will mandate specific cybersecurity standards for weapons...systems to meet. Acquisition and procurement policy and practice will be updated to promote effective cybersecurity throughout a system’s life cycle...physical damage or injury Motivating Contractor Efforts - Contractors have different priorities than the DOD when it comes to cybersecurity - Classic

  4. Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera on board the International Space Station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available on the web for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics, and social science.

  5. Acquired ciliary circumscribed grey hair (ACCG).

    PubMed

    Romero, A G; Calatayud, J C

    2001-12-01

    Grey-haired areas usually occur due to aging or inheritance. A case is described of abrupt occurrence of a focal circumscribed grey-hair in the eyebrow region (a single hair) in a 27-year-old woman. The phenomenon was named acquired ciliary circumscribed grey-hair (ACCG). Qualitative and semiquantitative findings were obtained by microanalytical studies. In addition to morphological differences from control hair, the ACCG hair showed a high percentage of sulfur (99.8%) and absence of oligoelements.

  6. Rare presentation of spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Bali, Roseleen Kaur; Das, Kamanasish; Sisodia, Anula; Dewan, R K; Singla, Rupak

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous acquired diaphragmatic hernia without any apparent history of trauma is a very rare condition and is very difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain for one month and four episodes of vomiting for one day. Clinical suspicion, chest radiography with nasogastric tube in situ and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the diagnosis. The diaphragmatic defect was repaired surgically. The patient had an uneventful post-operative recovery.

  7. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Chris G; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Serefoglu, Ege C; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-08-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE.

  8. The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Jannini, Emmanuele A.; Serefoglu, Ege C.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The second Ad Hoc International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation defined acquired premature ejaculation (PE) as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a the development of a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in ejaculation latency time in men with previous normal ejaculatory experiences, often to about 3 minutes or less, the inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations, and the presence of negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy. The literature contains a diverse range of biological and psychological etiological theories. Acquired PE is commonly due to sexual performance anxiety, psychological or relationship problems, erectile dysfunction (ED), and occasionally prostatitis and hyperthyroidism, consistent with the predominant organic etiology of acquired PE, men with this complaint are usually older, have a higher mean BMI and a greater incidence of comorbid disease including hypertension, sexual desire disorder, diabetes mellitus, chronic prostatitis, and ED compared to lifelong, variable and subjective PE. PMID:27652216

  9. Automated mechanical ventilation: adapting decision making to different disease states.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Zahonero, S; Gottlieb, D; Haberthür, C; Guttmann, J; Möller, K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a novel methodology for adapting and upgrading decision-making strategies concerning mechanical ventilation with respect to different disease states into our fuzzy-based expert system, AUTOPILOT-BT. The special features are: (1) Extraction of clinical knowledge in analogy to the daily routine. (2) An automated process to obtain the required information and to create fuzzy sets. (3) The controller employs the derived fuzzy rules to achieve the desired ventilation status. For demonstration this study focuses exclusively on the control of arterial CO(2) partial pressure (p(a)CO(2)). Clinical knowledge from 61 anesthesiologists was acquired using a questionnaire from which different disease-specific fuzzy sets were generated to control p(a)CO(2). For both, patients with healthy lung and with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the fuzzy sets show different shapes. The fuzzy set "normal", i.e., "target p(a)CO(2) area", ranges from 35 to 39 mmHg for healthy lungs and from 39 to 43 mmHg for ARDS lungs. With the new fuzzy sets our AUTOPILOT-BT reaches the target p(a)CO(2) within maximal three consecutive changes of ventilator settings. Thus, clinical knowledge can be extended, updated, and the resulting mechanical ventilation therapies can be individually adapted, analyzed, and evaluated.

  10. Genetic organization of the catabolic plasmid pJP4 from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) reveals mechanisms of adaptation to chloroaromatic pollutants and evolution of specialized chloroaromatic degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Trefault, N; De la Iglesia, R; Molina, A M; Manzano, M; Ledger, T; Pérez-Pantoja, D; Sánchez, M A; Stuardo, M; González, B

    2004-07-01

    Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) is a useful model for the study of bacterial degradation of substituted aromatic pollutants. Several key degrading capabilities, encoded by tfd genes, are located in the 88 kb, self-transmissible, IncP-1 beta plasmid pJP4. The complete sequence of the 87,688 nucleotides of pJP4, encoding 83 open reading frames (ORFs), is reported. Most of the coding sequence corresponds to a well-conserved IncP-1 beta backbone and the previously reported tfd genes. In addition, we found hypothetical proteins putatively involved in the transport of aromatic compounds and short-chain fatty acid oxidation. ORFs related to mobile elements, including the Tn501-encoded mercury resistance determinants, an IS1071-based composite transposon and a cryptic class II transposon, are also present in pJP4. These mobile elements are inefficient in transposition and are located in two regions of pJP4 that are rich in remnants of lateral gene transfer events. pJP4 plasmid was able to capture chromosomal genes and form hybrid plasmids with the IncP-1 alpha plasmid RP4. These observations are integrated into a model for the evolution of pJP4, which reveals mechanisms of bacterial adaptation to degrade pollutants.

  11. 48 CFR 1845.502-70 - Contractor-acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Contractor-acquired... Possession of Contractors 1845.502-70 Contractor-acquired property. All contractor-acquired property must be... contractor-acquired. (2) Submission of DD Form 1419, DOD Industrial Plant Requisition, or equivalent...

  12. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  13. A new multivariate statistical model for change detection in images acquired by homogeneous and heterogeneous sensors.

    PubMed

    Prendes, Jorge; Chabert, Marie; Pascal, Frederic; Giros, Alain; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-01

    Remote sensing images are commonly used to monitor the earth surface evolution. This surveillance can be conducted by detecting changes between images acquired at different times and possibly by different kinds of sensors. A representative case is when an optical image of a given area is available and a new image is acquired in an emergency situation (resulting from a natural disaster for instance) by a radar satellite. In such a case, images with heterogeneous properties have to be compared for change detection. This paper proposes a new approach for similarity measurement between images acquired by heterogeneous sensors. The approach exploits the considered sensor physical properties and specially the associated measurement noise models and local joint distributions. These properties are inferred through manifold learning. The resulting similarity measure has been successfully applied to detect changes between many kinds of images, including pairs of optical images and pairs of optical-radar images.

  14. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  15. Mississippi Special Olympics: Special Events Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Toni; Cooper, Walter E.

    Provided in the manual are organizational guidelines and suggested activities for a Special Evants segment of the Mississippi Special Olympics Program to encourage participation by low motor functioning, multihandicapped, mentally retarded persons. Information is provided concerning objectives, organizational set-up, guidelines, communication…

  16. SPECIAL CLASSES FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOWELL, G.L.

    A SPECIAL 3-YEAR TRAINING PROGRAM IN FARM POWER AND MACHINERY WAS DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE FOR DIFFERENT LEVELS OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND TO HELP MEET THE NEED FOR SKILLED WORKERS IN THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA AREA. CHANGES IN THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF STUDENTS TRANSFERRED FROM REGULAR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE CLASSES TO THE SPECIAL CLASSES PROVIDE A MORE…

  17. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  18. [The Landau-Kleffner syndrome: a special form of acquired childhood aphasia].

    PubMed

    Blouw-van Mourik, M; van Dongen, H R; Loonen, M C; Jannsen, A M

    1989-03-01

    The syndrome of "acuqired aphasia with convulsive disorder" occurs in children between 3 and 7 years of age and is characterized by a language disorder with heterogeneous epileptic manifestations. The pathogenesis is unknown. The course can show marked fluctuations. Our study of 6 children shows that the outcome can range from extremely unfavorable to complete recovery. The variables that possibly influence the course are discussed.

  19. 7 CFR 653.3 - Adaptation of technical standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adaptation of technical standards. 653.3 Section 653.3..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL STANDARDS § 653.3 Adaptation of technical standards. Technical standards and criteria developed on a national basis may require special adaptation to meet...

  20. 7 CFR 653.3 - Adaptation of technical standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adaptation of technical standards. 653.3 Section 653.3..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL STANDARDS § 653.3 Adaptation of technical standards. Technical standards and criteria developed on a national basis may require special adaptation to meet...

  1. 7 CFR 653.3 - Adaptation of technical standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adaptation of technical standards. 653.3 Section 653.3..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL STANDARDS § 653.3 Adaptation of technical standards. Technical standards and criteria developed on a national basis may require special adaptation to meet...

  2. 7 CFR 653.3 - Adaptation of technical standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adaptation of technical standards. 653.3 Section 653.3..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL STANDARDS § 653.3 Adaptation of technical standards. Technical standards and criteria developed on a national basis may require special adaptation to meet...

  3. 7 CFR 653.3 - Adaptation of technical standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adaptation of technical standards. 653.3 Section 653.3..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL STANDARDS § 653.3 Adaptation of technical standards. Technical standards and criteria developed on a national basis may require special adaptation to meet...

  4. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  5. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  6. The Marketplace: Report on Technology in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrmann, June, Ed.; Lahm, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Three reports on technology in special education identify major trends, describe availability and characteristics of adaptive hardware, and report on special education costs and demographic data. The first report notes the continuing interest of the Federal Government in technology, the changing federal policy toward hardware acquisition, and such…

  7. Acquiring neural signals for developing a perception and cognition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Li, Yunyi; Chen, Genshe; Shen, Dan; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh; Lynch, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The understanding of how humans process information, determine salience, and combine seemingly unrelated information is essential to automated processing of large amounts of information that is partially relevant, or of unknown relevance. Recent neurological science research in human perception, and in information science regarding contextbased modeling, provides us with a theoretical basis for using a bottom-up approach for automating the management of large amounts of information in ways directly useful for human operators. However, integration of human intelligence into a game theoretic framework for dynamic and adaptive decision support needs a perception and cognition model. For the purpose of cognitive modeling, we present a brain-computer-interface (BCI) based humanoid robot system to acquire brainwaves during human mental activities of imagining a humanoid robot-walking behavior. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model. The BCI system consists of a data acquisition unit with an electroencephalograph (EEG), a humanoid robot, and a charge couple CCD camera. An EEG electrode cup acquires brainwaves from the skin surface on scalp. The humanoid robot has 20 degrees of freedom (DOFs); 12 DOFs located on hips, knees, and ankles for humanoid robot walking, 6 DOFs on shoulders and arms for arms motion, and 2 DOFs for head yaw and pitch motion. The CCD camera takes video clips of the human subject's hand postures to identify mental activities that are correlated to the robot-walking behaviors. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model.

  8. Residual fMRI sensitivity for identity changes in acquired prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher J.; Iaria, Giuseppe; Duchaine, Bradley C.; Barton, Jason J. S.

    2013-01-01

    While a network of cortical regions contribute to face processing, the lesions in acquired prosopagnosia are highly variable, and likely result in different combinations of spared and affected regions of this network. To assess the residual functional sensitivities of spared regions in prosopagnosia, we designed a rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment that included pairs of faces with same or different identities and same or different expressions. By measuring the release from adaptation to these facial changes we determined the residual sensitivity of face-selective regions-of-interest. We tested three patients with acquired prosopagnosia, and all three of these patients demonstrated residual sensitivity for facial identity changes in surviving fusiform and occipital face areas of either the right or left hemisphere, but not in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus. The patients also showed some residual capabilities for facial discrimination with normal performance on the Benton Facial Recognition Test, but impaired performance on more complex tasks of facial discrimination. We conclude that fMRI can demonstrate residual processing of facial identity in acquired prosopagnosia, that this adaptation can occur in the same structures that show similar processing in healthy subjects, and further, that this adaptation may be related to behavioral indices of face perception. PMID:24151479

  9. [Iris heterochromia in acquired Horner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beynat, J; Soichot, P; Bidot, S; Dugas, B; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2007-09-01

    Horner's syndrome (HS) is related to an interruption of the oculosympathetic nerve pathway. The classic clinical findings associated with this condition are ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos. Heterochromia is typically described in congenital HS, but it is an uncommon finding in acquired HS. We report a case of post-traumatic HS associated with heterochromia. A literature review indicates that this type of heterochromia may be related to a reduction in the number of iris melanocytes. This mechanism may be the same in the physiological iris color modifications in adulthood.

  10. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  11. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  12. Common acquired causes of thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Jaszianne; Carpenter, Shannon L

    2013-08-01

    Compared to adults, venous thromboembolism in the pediatric population is a rare event. Cancer, cardiac disease, antiphospholipid antibodies, and indwelling catheters are established risk factors for thromboembolism in children. We examined the literature related to thrombophilia in children, childhood cancer and thrombosis, cardiac disease and thrombosis, and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in children. Citations in identified articles yielded additional articles for review. We found that studies of acquired thrombophilia in children are limited. Current treatment for thromboembolism in children is based on adult data therefore optimal treatment in this population remains unclear.

  13. Acquired Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ashley; Scher, Richard K.; Avarbock, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Congenital malalignment is the lateral deviation of the nail plate along the longitudinal axis due to the lateral rotation of the nail matrix. The nail plate grows out in ridges caused by repeated microtrauma to the nail. Common complications include onychomycosis, Pseudomonas infection and acute or chronic paronychia. Treatment options range from conservative management to surgical options including realignment and nail matrixectomy. Congenital malalignment usually presents in infancy or childhood, but we present two cases of acquired malalignment occurring in the teenage years. PMID:27171597

  14. Special human vulnerability to low-cost collective punishment.

    PubMed

    Ross, Don

    2012-02-01

    Guala notes that low-cost punishment is the main mechanism that deters free-riding in small human communities. This mechanism is complemented by unusual human vulnerability to gossip. Defenders of an evolutionary discontinuity supporting human sociality might seize on this as an alternative to enjoyment of moralistic aggression as a special adaptation. However, the more basic adaptation of language likely suffices.

  15. Special Education in Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrnjica, Sulejman

    1990-01-01

    This article describes Yugoslavia's education system, health and welfare services for children with disabilities, the nature and organization of special education services, the integration of disabled children in ordinary schools, models for training special educators, and problems. (DB)

  16. Acquired and congenital coronary artery abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Young, Ming-Lon; McLeary, Michael; Chan, Kak-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in approximately 20% of young athletes are due to acquired or congenital coronary artery abnormalities. Kawasaki disease is the leading cause for acquired coronary artery abnormalities, which can cause late coronary artery sequelae including aneurysms, stenosis, and thrombosis, leading to myocardial ischaemia and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery can develop adequate collateral circulation from the right coronary artery in the newborn period, which remains asymptomatic only to manifest in adulthood with myocardial ischaemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Anomalous origin of coronary artery from the opposite sinus occurs in 0.7% of the young general population aged between 11 and 15 years. If the anomalous coronary artery courses between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, sudden cardiac death may occur during or shortly after vigorous exercise, especially in patients where the anomalous left coronary artery originates from the right sinus of Valsalva. Symptomatic patients with evidence of ischaemia should have surgical correction. No treatment is needed for asymptomatic patients with an anomalous right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. At present, there is no consensus regarding how to manage asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva and interarterial course. Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in cardiac catheterisation and it rarely causes exercise-induced coronary syndrome or cardiac death. In symptomatic patients, refractory or β-blocker treatment and surgical un-bridging may be considered.

  17. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  18. [HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, J

    1997-05-01

    On June 4, 1981, MMWR published a report about Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homosexual men in Los Angeles. This was the first published report. A years later, this disease was named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the following year, Montangier et al in France discovered the causative agent, which they called lymphadenopathy virus (LAV), now known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1985, solid-phase enzymeimmunoassay for the detection of the antibody to HIV was developed. Since then, other new techniques for the identification of HIV infection have been become available. These include more sensitive methods (for example; polymerase chain reaction techniques). Although these techniques facilitate early and definite diagnosis of infection, these tests may fail to detect the antibody in sera during window period of infection or overdiagnose infection in sera contaminated with genes not related to HIV. Although preventing blood exposure is the primary means of preventing occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, appropriate post-exposure management is an important element of workplace safety. Information suggesting that zidovudine (ZDV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) may reduce the risk for HIV transmission after occupational exposure to HIV infected blood prompted a Public Health Service (PHS) interagency working group, with expert consultation, and recommendations on PEP and management of occupational exposure to HIV in relation to these findings were discussed.

  19. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  20. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hyperpigmentary disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired pigmentary disorders are group of heterogenous entities that share single, most significant, clinical feature, that is, dyspigmentation. Asians and Indians, in particular, are mostly affected. Although the classic morphologies and common treatment options of these conditions have been reviewed in the global dermatology literature, the value of histpathological evaluation has not been thoroughly explored. The importance of accurate diagnosis is emphasized here as the underlying diseases have varying etiologies that need to be addressed in order to effectively treat the dyspigmentation. In this review, we describe and discuss the utility of histology in the diagnostic work of hyperpigmentary disorders, and how, in many cases, it can lead to targeted and more effective therapy. We focus on the most common acquired pigmentary disorders seen in Indian patients as well as a few uncommon diseases with distinctive histological traits. Facial melanoses, including mimickers of melasma, are thoroughly explored. These diseases include lichen planus pigmentosus, discoid lupus erythematosus, drug-induced melanoses, hyperpigmentation due to exogenous substances, acanthosis nigricans, and macular amyloidosis.

  1. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Quagliarello, V.

    1982-01-01

    A recently recognized syndrome of acquired immunodeficiency (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-AIDS) has arisen since June 1981. It has received international attention. The clinical spectrum consists of repeated opportunistic infections, rare malignancies, and autoimmune phenomena, occurring in previously healthy adults with no history of an immunologic disorder. The population subset at risk for this syndrome appears to be predominantly homosexual American males and intravenous drug abusers with rare cases being reported in heterosexuals, hemophiliacs, and foreign patients, especially Haitians. The immunologic aberrancy in all patients described appears limited to T-lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and imbalance of T-helper and suppressor cells. This disordered immunoregulation is a consistent finding in all reported cases and appears to predispose to the opportunistic infections and malignancies which have been associated with a 40 percent mortality. The underlying factor responsible for the immunoregulatory defect is unknown but possible etiologies include a transmissible infectious agent, drug use, chronic antigen stimulation, and spermatozoa exposure. Treatment of the associated infections and malignancies has been a frustrating endeavor as many patients respond incompletely or relapse soon after successful treatment course. Preventive measures, including patient education, physician awareness, and immunomodulating agents, are discussed. PMID:6134399

  2. Food specialization and radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, Paul C.; Banko, Winston E.

    2006-01-01

    Hawaiian honeycreepers are renowned for adaptive radiation and diet specialization. Specialization arose from competition for the relatively few resources available in this remote archipelago and because arthropod prey sufficient to satisfy nestling protein requirements could only be captured by highly modified bills. Historically, most species fed their nestlings with larvae of the widespread geometrid moth genus, Scotorythra; but other invertebrates were important also. Thus the palila, Loxioides bailleui, a specialist on potentially toxic Sophora chrysophylla seeds, feeds its nestlings on Cydia moth larvae found inside Sophora seeds. Sophora seeds are also fed to the nestlings, and seed availability largely determines the timing and extent of breeding. By this and other means, food specialization contributed to reproductive isolation in Loxioides and possibly other honeycreepers. Alien threats to insect prey affect Loxioides populations and have hastened the extinction or decline of other specialized Hawaiian birds

  3. Assessing Special Educational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfendale, Sheila, Ed.

    This essays in this book contain valuable and up-to-date information about current issues and developments in assessing special educational needs. The context of the book is the mainstream setting in the United Kingdom. The aim of these chapters is to consider special needs in inclusive education, consistent with British special needs legislation.…

  4. Mentoring Special Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Keith E.; Edwards, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Mentorship is critical for career development. Members of special populations are at increased risk of information shortfalls and advice that is not framed with cultural sensitivity. Special knowledge and skills are needed to successfully mentor members of ethnic minority and other special populations. Midlevel and senior scientists need…

  5. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  6. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  7. Precision Grip in Congenital and Acquired Hemiparesis: Similarities in Impairments and Implications for Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with congenital and acquired hemiparesis incur long-term functional deficits, among which the loss of prehension that may impact their functional independence. Identifying, understanding, and comparing the underlying mechanisms of prehension impairments represent an opportunity to better adapt neurorehabilitation. Objective: The present review aims to provide a better understanding of precision grip deficits in congenital and acquired hemiparesis and to determine whether the severity and type of fine motor control impairments depend on whether or not the lesions are congenital or acquired in adulthood. Methods: Using combinations of the following key words: fingertip force, grip force, precision grip, cerebral palsy, stroke, PubMed, and Scopus databases were used to search studies from 1984 to 2013. Results: Individuals with both congenital and acquired hemiparesis were able to some extent to use anticipatory motor control in precision grip tasks, even if this control was impaired in the paretic hand. In both congenital and acquired hemiparesis, the ability to plan efficient anticipatory motor control when the less-affected hand is used provides a possibility to remediate impairments in anticipatory motor control of the paretic hand. Conclusion: Surprisingly, we observed very few differences between the results of studies in children with congenital hemiplegia and stroke patients. We suggest that the underlying specific strategies of neurorehabilitation developed for each one could benefit the other. PMID:25071502

  8. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  9. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  10. Adaptive interface for spoken dialog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusan, Sorin; Flanagan, James

    2002-05-01

    Speech has become increasingly important in human-computer interaction. Spoken dialog interfaces rely on automatic speech recognition, speech synthesis, language understanding, and dialog management. A main issue in dialog systems is that they typically are limited to pre-programmed vocabularies and sets of sentences. The research reported here focuses on developing an adaptive spoken dialog interface capable of acquiring new linguistic units and their corresponding semantics during the human-computer interaction. The adaptive interface identifies unknown words and phrases in the users utterances and asks the user for the corresponding semantics. The user can provide the meaning or the semantic representation of the new linguistic units through multiple modalities, including speaking, typing, pointing, touching, or showing. The interface then stores the new linguistic units in a semantic grammar and creates new objects defining the corresponding semantic representation. This process takes place during natural interaction between user and computer and, thus, the interface does not have to be rewritten and compiled to incorporate the newly acquired language. Users can personalize the adaptive spoken interface for different domain applications, or according to their personal preferences. [Work supported by NSF.

  11. Developments in special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2012-02-01

    We review the special geometry of Script N = 2 supersymmetric vector and hypermultiplets with emphasis on recent developments and applications. A new formulation of the local c-map based on the Hesse potential and special real coordinates is presented. Other recent developments include the Euclidean version of special geometry, and generalizations of special geometry to non-supersymmetric theories. As applications we disucss the proof that the local r-map and c-map preserve geodesic completeness, and the construction of four- and five-dimensional static solutions through dimensional reduction over time. The shared features of the real, complex and quaternionic version of special geometry are stressed throughout.

  12. Quantitative proteomics and terminomics to elucidate the role of ubiquitination and proteolysis in adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theo; Viner, Rosa I.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is the specialized defence mechanism in vertebrates that evolved to eliminate pathogens. Specialized lymphocytes recognize specific protein epitopes through antigen receptors to mount potent immune responses, many of which are initiated by nuclear factor-kappa B activation and gene transcription. Most, if not all, pathways in adaptive immunity are further regulated by post-translational modification (PTM) of signalling proteins, e.g. phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination and proteolytic processing. The importance of PTMs is reflected by genetic or acquired defects in these pathways that lead to a dysfunctional immune response. Here we discuss the state of the art in targeted proteomics and systems biology approaches to dissect the PTM landscape specifically regarding ubiquitination and proteolysis in B- and T-cell activation. Recent advances have occurred in methods for specific enrichment and targeted quantitation. Together with improved instrument sensitivity, these advances enable the accurate analysis of often rare PTM events that are opaque to conventional proteomics approaches, now rendering in-depth analysis and pathway dissection possible. We discuss published approaches, including as a case study the profiling of the N-terminome of lymphocytes of a rare patient with a genetic defect in the paracaspase protease MALT1, a key regulator protease in antigen-driven signalling, which was manifested by elevated linear ubiquitination. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644975

  13. [Clinical cases of acquired coagulation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Hino, M; Ota, K; Akahori, M; Hirai, M; Inoue, T; Mugitani, A; Tatsumi, N

    2000-12-01

    The acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are classified into alloantibodies, which appear in association with supplementary treatment for congenital coagulation factor deficiency, and autoantibodies, which are spontaneously produced. We report here 2 cases of acquired factor VIII inhibitor and 1 case of factor V inhibitor. Case 1: A 52-year-old woman noted swelling of the right parotid region in March 1988. Though contrast examination was scheduled, she was admitted for detailed examination due to a markedly prolonged coagulation time. An APTT correction test suggested that decreased factor VIII activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. Since antinuclear antibody and SS-A antibody were positive and infiltration by lymphocytes in the salivary gland acini in a lip biopsy specimen was detected, Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed. Case 2: A 33-year-old woman had normal delivery of her second child in February 1998. In June 1998, she suffered slight contusion in the left lower limb. The affected site became swollen and painful, making walking difficult. Since both upper limbs became markedly swollen after 1 week, she visited our hospital. Prolonged APTT and a marked decrease in factor VIII activity were observed. Factor VIII inhibitor titer was high at 19 Bethesda units. Case 3: A 64-year-old man had had asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria since the beginning of August 1998 but was placed under observation since no abnormal findings were observed on various imaging tests. However, he was admitted to Osaka City General Medical Center because of vesicular tamponade. Factor V activity was markedly decreased to 1.0%. PT correction test suggested that decreased factor V activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. The underlying disease could not be determined in this case. In patients with acquired coagulation inhibitors, bleeding symptoms are reported to be mild in many cases, and severe bleeding is rare. However, cases of death without severe bleeding or

  14. ACECARD. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E.E.

    1996-09-01

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  15. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E. E.

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  16. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  17. Innate and acquired bacteriophage-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    We recently described a novel, non-host-derived, phage-mediated immunity active at mucosal surfaces, the main site of pathogen entry in metazoans. In that work, we showed that phage T4 adheres to mucus glycoproteins via immunoglobulin-like domains displayed on its capsid. This adherence positions the phage in mucus surfaces where they are more likely to encounter and kill bacteria, thereby benefiting both the phage and its metazoan host. We presented this phage-metazoan symbiosis based on an exclusively lytic model of phage infection. Here we extend our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model to consider the undoubtedly more complex dynamics in vivo. We hypothesize how mucus-adherent phages, both lytic and temperate, might impact the commensal microbiota as well as protect the metazoan epithelium from bacterial invasion. We suggest that BAM may provide both an innate and an acquired antimicrobial immunity. PMID:24228227

  18. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Menon, V; Bharucha, K

    1994-01-01

    As health care professionals, we face a grave risk of acquiring HIV infection in the course of our work. But how many of us really know the precautions to be applied in the hospital set up in dealing with HIV infected patients? A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) study was conducted in Pune hospitals to assess the current status. Among the results 65% servants had not heard of AIDS, 85% nursing staff did not apply the Universal Safety Precautions (USP) approach, 13.5% resident thought that the HIV was not transmitted by blood, 30% consultants would avoid contact with an HIV positive patient. This study has shown that definite lacunae exist in knowledge specific to the particular population in question. A proposal for an education programme which is target specific and one of constant renewal is sought.

  19. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  20. Acquired Localized Hypertrichosis Induced by Rivastigmine

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrian; Podlipnik, Sebastian; Burgos, Fernando; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Cogolludo, Eva; Gallego-Valdes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is the excessive hair growth in any area of the skin surface. Acquired localized hypertrichosis may be secondary to multiple causes and there is a secondary form due to several drugs, which is usually reversible with discontinuation of the causative agent. Rivastigmine is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase used for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease. It has an adequate safety profile and cutaneous side effects are unusual. Irritant contact dermatitis, allergic dermatitis, baboon syndrome, and cutaneous rash due to rivastigmine have been reported. We report on a Caucasian 80-year-old male with personal history of Alzheimer's disease. The patient started therapy with oral rivastigmine one month prior to clinical presentation of localized hypertrichosis on both forearms. Norgalanthamine has been shown to promote hair growth activity via the proliferation of dermal papilla. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can induce hair growth. PMID:27073702

  1. Treatment of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Budde, Ulrich; Scheppenheim, Sonja; Dittmer, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) accounts for 22% of patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor. Most patients with known pathophysiological mechanisms suffer from cardiovascular, myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. Less frequent associations are of autoimmune origin, due to hyperfibrinolysis, adsorption to tumor cells, reduced synthesis and prolonged circulation. The mechanisms leading to aVWS is hitherto not known in patients with liver and kidney diseases, drug use, glycogen storage disease, virus infections and at least 18 other disease entities. Diagnosis is complicated by the battery of tests needed, and their inherent rather low sensitivity and specificity for aVWS. Thus, even in acute bleeding situations it may take days until a firm diagnosis is settled and specific therapies can be initiated. The main aim is to shed more light onto this, compared with inherited von Willebrand disease, rare disease which affects at least 2-3% of the older population.

  2. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Horn, J; Hermans, G

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is most often seen in surviving critically ill patients with sepsis or extensive inflammatory response which results in increased duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay. Patients with ICUAW often do not fully recover and the disability will seriously impact on their quality of life. In this chapter we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology and risk factors of ICUAW. Tools to diagnose ICUAW, how to separate ICUAW from other disorders, and which possible treatment strategies can be employed are also described. ICUAW is finally receiving the attention it deserves and the expectation is that it can be better understood and prevented.

  3. Severe acquired anaemia in Africa: new concepts.

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, Michael B; Jonker, Femkje; Bates, Imelda

    2011-09-01

    Severe anaemia is common in Africa. It has a high mortality and particularly affects young children and pregnant women. Recent research provides new insights into the mechanisms and causes of severe acquired anaemia and overturns accepted dogma. Deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin A, but not of iron or folic acid, are associated with severe anaemia. Bacterial infections and, in very young children, hookworm infections are also common in severe anaemia. Irrespective of the aetiology, the mechanism causing severe anaemia is often red cell production failure. Severe anaemia in Africa is therefore a complex multi-factorial syndrome, which, even in an individual patient, is unlikely to be amenable to a single intervention. Policies and practices concerning anaemia diagnosis, treatment and prevention need to be substantially revised if we are to make a significant impact on the huge burden of severe anaemia in Africa.

  4. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries.

  6. Preschoolers Acquire General Knowledge by Sharing in Pretense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Children acquire general knowledge about many kinds of things, but there are few known means by which this knowledge is acquired. In this article, it is proposed that children acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play. In Experiment 1, twenty-two 3- to 4-year-olds watched pretense in which a puppet represented a "nerp" (an unfamiliar…

  7. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  8. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  9. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  10. 19 CFR 148.38 - Sale of articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sale of articles acquired abroad. 148.38 Section... § 148.38 Sale of articles acquired abroad. An article brought in under the $800 or $1,600 exemption for articles acquired abroad for personal or household use and subsequently sold is not dutiable or subject...

  11. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of...

  12. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that...

  13. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of...

  14. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of...

  15. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that...

  16. 43 CFR 4110.1-1 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acquired lands. 4110.1-1 Section 4110.1-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... and Preference § 4110.1-1 Acquired lands. Where lands have been acquired by the Bureau of...

  17. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that...

  18. 30 CFR 879.14 - Management of acquired land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Management of acquired land. 879.14 Section 879... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS AND WATER § 879.14 Management of acquired land. Land acquired under this part may be used for any lawful purpose that...

  19. 48 CFR 11.303 - Special requirements for paper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paper. 11.303 Section 11.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Acceptable Material 11.303 Special requirements for paper. (a) The following applies when agencies acquire paper in the United States (as defined in 23.001):...

  20. 48 CFR 11.303 - Special requirements for paper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... paper. 11.303 Section 11.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Acceptable Material 11.303 Special requirements for paper. (a) The following applies when agencies acquire paper in the United States (as defined in 23.001):...

  1. HIV/AIDS Education for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colson, Steven E.; Carlson, Judith K.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses human immune deficiency disease, the role of education as a prevention tool, a rationale for the inclusion of students with special needs in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education, a scope and sequence of skills related to AIDS, suggestions for implementing objectives across curricular areas, and multimedia…

  2. Adolescent Sexuality Special Subject Bibliography, 1988-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document consists of three annual issues of a special subject bibliography combining adolescent sexuality, for the years 1988, 1989, and 1990, respectively. Citations for books, journal articles, and reports concerned with adolescent sexuality are grouped under such topics as: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and Human Immunodeficiency…

  3. HIV/AIDS Guidelines for Special Education Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Dept. of Education, Santa Fe.

    This report presents guidelines for implementing human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) curriculum with New Mexico students receiving special education services. The guidelines are organized by grade level, noting content themes, objectives, disciplines/subjects, and resources available. The guidelines are intended…

  4. Functional diversification and specialization of cytosolic 70-kDa heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    McCallister, Chelsea; Siracusa, Matthew C; Shirazi, Farzaneh; Chalkia, Dimitra; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2015-03-20

    A fundamental question in molecular evolution is how protein functional differentiation alters the ability of cells and organisms to cope with stress and survive. To answer this question we used two paralogous Hsp70s from mouse and explored whether these highly similar cytosolic molecular chaperones, which apart their temporal expression have been considered functionally interchangeable, are differentiated with respect to their lipid-binding function. We demonstrate that the two proteins bind to diverse lipids with different affinities and therefore are functionally specialized. The observed lipid-binding patterns may be related with the ability of both Hsp70s to induce cell death by binding to a particular plasma-membrane lipid, and the potential of only one of them to promote cell survival by binding to a specific lysosomal-membrane lipid. These observations reveal that two seemingly identical proteins differentially modulate cellular adaptation and survival by having acquired specialized functions via sequence divergence. Therefore, this study provides an evolutionary paradigm, where promiscuity, specificity, sub- and neo-functionalization orchestrate one of the most conserved systems in nature, the cellular stress-response.

  5. Stimulus relevance modulates contrast adaptation in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas J; Houlton, Rachael; Kampa, Björn M; Lesica, Nicholas A; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D; Keller, Georg B; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2017-01-01

    A general principle of sensory processing is that neurons adapt to sustained stimuli by reducing their response over time. Most of our knowledge on adaptation in single cells is based on experiments in anesthetized animals. How responses adapt in awake animals, when stimuli may be behaviorally relevant or not, remains unclear. Here we show that contrast adaptation in mouse primary visual cortex depends on the behavioral relevance of the stimulus. Cells that adapted to contrast under anesthesia maintained or even increased their activity in awake naïve mice. When engaged in a visually guided task, contrast adaptation re-occurred for stimuli that were irrelevant for solving the task. However, contrast adaptation was reversed when stimuli acquired behavioral relevance. Regulation of cortical adaptation by task demand may allow dynamic control of sensory-evoked signal flow in the neocortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21589.001 PMID:28130922

  6. The Career and Work Adaptability Questionnaire (CWAQ): A First Contribution to Its Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nota, Laura; Ginevra, Maria Cristina; Soresi, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, occupational changes have the rapidly changing job market has begun to demand that people more actively construct their professional lives and acquire career adaptability. The aim of the present study was to develop a specific, new instrument, "Career and Work Adaptability", to assess degree of adaptability in…

  7. The Development of Adaptive Skills in Young People with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duijn, G.; Dijkxhoorn, Y.; Scholte, E. M.; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, I. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To help children with Down syndrome reach optimum levels of adaptive behaviour, caretakers need to know how and to what extent children with Down syndrome acquire adaptive skills. Method: The adaptive levels of motor, daily living, communicative and social behavioural skills were determined in a group of 984 Dutch children with Down…

  8. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  9. The Differentiation of Adaptive Behaviours: Evidence from High and Low Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Harrison; Oakland, Thomas David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professionals who use measures of adaptive behaviour when working with special populations may assume that adaptive behaviour is a consistent and linear construct at various ability levels and thus believe the construct of adaptive behaviour is the same for high and low performers. That is, highly adaptive people simply are assumed to…

  10. Special Activities for Very Special Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Developed by 41 Bureau of Indian Affairs special education teachers, this booklet presents 25 teaching activities which they found very helpful in their classrooms. The purpose, materials needed, and procedures are given for each activity. The activities cover the alphabet letters, letter recognition, vocabulary development, sentence structure,…

  11. Purinergic signaling in special senses.

    PubMed

    Housley, Gary D; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We consider the impact of purinergic signaling on the physiology of the special senses of vision, smell, taste and hearing. Purines (particularly ATP and adenosine) act as neurotransmitters, gliotransmitters and paracrine factors in the sensory retina, nasal olfactory epithelium, taste buds and cochlea. The associated purinergic receptor signaling underpins the sensory transduction and information coding in these sense organs. The P2 and P1 receptors mediate fast transmission of sensory signals and have modulatory roles in the regulation of synaptic transmitter release, for example in the adaptation to sensory overstimulation. Purinergic signaling regulates bidirectional neuron-glia interactions and is involved in the control of blood supply, extracellular ion homeostasis and the turnover of sensory epithelia by modulating apoptosis and progenitor proliferation. Purinergic signaling is an important player in pathophysiological processes in sensory tissues, and has both detrimental (pro-apoptotic) and supportive (e.g. initiation of cytoprotective stress-signaling cascades) effects.

  12. Free radicals mediate systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Navarre, Duroy; Wendehenne, David; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2014-04-24

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of resistance that protects plants against a broad spectrum of secondary infections. However, exploiting SAR for the protection of agriculturally important plants warrants a thorough investigation of the mutual interrelationships among the various signals that mediate SAR. Here, we show that nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as inducers of SAR in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, genetic mutations that either inhibit NO/ROS production or increase NO accumulation (e.g., a mutation in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase [GSNOR]) abrogate SAR. Different ROS function additively to generate the fatty-acid-derived azelaic acid (AzA), which in turn induces production of the SAR inducer glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Notably, this NO/ROS→AzA→G3P-induced signaling functions in parallel with salicylic acid-derived signaling. We propose that the parallel operation of NO/ROS and SA pathways facilitates coordinated regulation in order to ensure optimal induction of SAR.

  13. Acquiring synaesthesia: insights from training studies

    PubMed Central

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Synaesthesia denotes a condition of remarkable individual differences in experience characterized by specific additional experiences in response to normal sensory input. Synaesthesia seems to (i) run in families which suggests a genetic component, (ii) is associated with marked structural and functional neural differences, and (iii) is usually reported to exist from early childhood. Hence, synaesthesia is generally regarded as a congenital phenomenon. However, most synaesthetic experiences are triggered by cultural artifacts (e.g., letters, musical sounds). Evidence exists to suggest that synaesthetic experiences are triggered by the conceptual representation of their inducer stimuli. Cases were identified for which the specific synaesthetic associations are related to prior experiences and large scale studies show that grapheme-color associations in synaesthesia are not completely random. Hence, a learning component is inherently involved in the development of specific synaesthetic associations. Researchers have hypothesized that associative learning is the critical mechanism. Recently, it has become of scientific and public interest if synaesthetic experiences may be acquired by means of associative training procedures and whether the gains of these trainings are associated with similar cognitive benefits as genuine synaesthetic experiences. In order to shed light on these issues and inform synaesthesia researchers and the general interested public alike, we provide a comprehensive literature review on developmental aspects of synaesthesia and specific training procedures in non-synaesthetes. Under the light of a clear working definition of synaesthesia, we come to the conclusion that synaesthesia can potentially be learned by the appropriate training. PMID:24624072

  14. Transfusion-acquired AIDS in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yao, C; Wang, W W; Chung, Y M; Su, Y L; Liu, C Y; Chen, Y M

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be transmitted through blood transfusion. The first transfusion-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient in Taiwan was a 46-year-old woman who received two units of whole blood during a hysterectomy at a provincial hospital in 1985. In 1991, she experienced a herpes zoster infection. In March 1993, she had extensive herpetic gingivostomatitis and another herpes zoster attack, and was treated at the same hospital. Two months later, she had oral candidiasis and was treated at a medical center. She was not tested for HIV-1 infection until she developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in June 1993. In February 1994, and developed cytomegalovirus retinitis and died 6 months later. Donor blood given to the patients during the hysterectomy was HIV-1 positive. The donor's HIV infection was discovered in 1991 and he died of AIDS in 1993. As blood centers in Taiwan did not start screening for HIV-1 until January 1988, it is urgently recommended that any individual who received a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 in Taiwan and who currently experiences repeated episodes of opportunistic infections have an HIV-1 blood test. The receipt of a blood transfusion between 1984 and 1987 should be listed by the Department of Health as an indication for HIV-1 screening.

  15. [Thoracic manifestations of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, A; Zompatori, M; Chiodo, F; Costigliola, P; Ricchi, E; Colangeli, V; Canini, R; Gavelli, G

    1989-11-01

    AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) seems to be related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is characterized by severe T-helpers lymphocyte dysfunction. Many of the AIDS patients (47-70%) develop pulmonary manifestations, both infectious and neoplastic, in the course of their disease. In the Department of Infectious Diseases of our Hospital are studied many patients HIV+. Every year 246 seropositive new patients have been discovered. Among them we have studied 25 subjects with respiratory disease, by chest radiographs; successively, according to clinical picture, we have performed thoracic computed tomography, Gallium scintigraphy, fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy (TBB), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); the majority of these patients (68%) had AIDS, only 28% had ARC and 4% had PGL. In our experience, the diagnosed diseases were mainly infections (92%), and most frequently (52%) due to Pneumocystis carinii, alone or in association with other etiologic agents. We have not found pathognomonic radiographic abnormalities, but chest X-ray evaluated with clinical and laboratory data, may often be useful to obtain diagnostic indications and in order to determine a more specific and aggressive diagnostic approach.

  16. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities.

  18. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  19. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended. PMID:28218726

  20. Identification of acquired DNA in Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; Bart, Aldert; Luyf, Angela C M; van Kampen, Antoine H C; van der Ende, Arie

    2006-09-01

    Anomalous DNA (aDNA) in prokaryotic genomes, identified by its aberrant nucleotide composition, generally represents horizontally acquired DNA. Previous studies showed that frequent DNA transfer occurs between commensal Neisseriae and Neisseria meningitidis. Currently, it is unknown whether aDNA regions are also transferred between these species. The genome of Neisseria lactamica strain 892586 was assessed by a strategy that enables the selective isolation of aDNA, using endonucleases with recognition sites that are overrepresented in aDNA. Of eight regions with aDNA, five displayed similarity to virulence-associated meningococcal sequences. Of three aDNA fragments with limited or no similarity to neisserial sequences, one encodes a novel putative autotransporter/adhesin. The remaining two fragments are adjacent in the N. lactamica genome, and encode a novel putative ATPase/subtilisin-like protease operon. A similar operon is present in the genomes of different respiratory tract pathogens. The identification of aDNA from N. lactamica with similarity to meningococcal aDNA shows that genetic exchange between the Neisseriae is not limited to the neisserial core genome. The discovery of aDNA in N. lactamica similar to a locus in other pathogens substantially expands the neisserial gene pool.

  1. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC.

  2. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  3. The complex pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y; Katsanis, E

    2015-06-01

    Immune-mediated destruction of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of acquired aplastic anaemia (aAA). Dysregulated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, CD4(+) T cells including T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, regulatory T cells and Th17 cells, natural killer (NK) cells and NK T cells, along with the abnormal production of cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, induce apoptosis of HSPCs, constituting a consistent and defining feature of severe aAA. Alterations in the polymorphisms of TGF-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α genes, as well as certain human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, may account for the propensity to immune-mediated killing of HSPCs and/or ineffective haematopoiesis. Although the inciting autoantigens remain elusive, autoantibodies are often detected in the serum. In addition, recent studies provide genetic and molecular evidence that intrinsic and/or secondary deficits in HSPCs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may underlie the development of bone marrow failure.

  4. Male body image following acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Howes, Hannah; Edwards, Stephen; Benton, David

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate body image concerns and psycho-emotional health in males with acquired brain injury (ABI). Using a between subjects study of 25 males with ABI and 25 matched controls, variables were analysed using correlations and 2 x 2 analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with head injury and injury type as independent variables. Body image and psycho-emotional health were evaluated using self-report questionnaires. Disability and cognitive impairment were measured using a mixture of self-report, cognitive testing and clinical notes. Results indicated that males with ABI had significantly lower self-esteem and body dissatisfaction on a number of items relating to physical and sexual functioning. There were significant differences in body image between stroke and TBI, but there was no corresponding relationship with psycho-emotional health. These body image differences might be explained by age. The finding that ABI has a negative effect on body image and that this relates to psycho-emotional health should be investigated further, perhaps being included in future rehabilitation strategies.

  5. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy. PMID:26343530

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Funnyé, Allen S; Akhtar, Abbasi J; Biamby, Gisele

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if older African Americans are disproportionately affected by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and to review the clinical impact of AIDS and the importance of prevention and treatment efforts. A review of the literature and statistics was obtained using Medline and the AIDS Public Information Data Set offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Twenty-seven percent of the U.S. population is above the age of 50, and the number of AIDS cases in this group is growing, with African Americans accounting for the highest proportion of cases and deaths. Testing for HIV may be delayed and symptoms attributed to other illnesses. Though 5% of new cases occur in those over 50, prevention programs, testing, and the perception of risk by providers may be insufficient. There are few research studies on HIV treatment in older patients and no specific guidelines for antiretroviral treatments available. Although death rates for AIDS has been declining, adults over 50 still have the highest mortality rate. Co-morbid conditions, such as heart disease and hypertension, may require taking multiple drugs, which may complicate treatment. Increasing heterosexual transmission rates and a lack of information on HIV reinforces the need for specific prevention programs targeted toward older African Americans.

  7. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2016-02-15

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy.

  8. Acquired prosopagnosia: structural basis and processing impairments.

    PubMed

    Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Pancaroglu, Raika; Barton, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models propose a hierarchy of parallel processing stages in face perception, and functional neuroimaging shows a network of regions involved in face processing. Reflecting this, acquired prosopagnosia is not a single entity but a family of disorders with different anatomic lesions and different functional deficits. One classic distinction is between an apperceptive variant, in which there is impaired perception of facial structure, and an associative/amnestic variant, in which perception is relatively intact, with subsequent problems matching perception to facial memories, because of either disconnection or loss of those memories. These disorders also have to be distinguished from people-specific amnesia, a multimodal impairment, and prosop-anomia, in which familiarity with faces is preserved but access to names is disrupted. These different disorders can be conceived as specific deficits at different processing stages in cognitive models, and suggests that these functional stages may have distinct neuroanatomic substrates. It remains to be seen whether a similar anatomic and functional variability is present in developmental prosopagnosia.

  9. Evolutionary Specialization of Tactile Perception in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eve R; Gracheva, Elena O; Bagriantsev, Slav N

    2016-05-01

    Evolution has endowed vertebrates with the remarkable tactile ability to explore the world through the perception of physical force. Yet the sense of touch remains one of the least well understood senses at the cellular and molecular level. Vertebrates specializing in tactile perception can highlight general principles of mechanotransduction. Here, we review cellular and molecular adaptations that underlie the sense of touch in typical and acutely mechanosensitive vertebrates.

  10. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  11. Innovative Methods to Acquire and Adapt Soldier Skills (INMASS) in the Operational Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    developing skills needed to perform complex, cognitively-loaded tasks . The method addresses problem solving skills when critical thinking might be... developed as a result of experience, trial and error, or creative thinking . We will take a Knowledge Audit approach in order to elicit a collection of...need for innovative training approaches to develop the required Soldier knowledge , skills , abilities, and attitudes (KSAAs). The primary goal of this

  12. Strengthened Adapted Education for All: No More Special Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nes, Kari; Stromstad, Marit

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we will present some proposals by a committee whose mandate was to review basic education in Norway, and more importantly, we will discuss the reactions to these proposals. The committee made more than one hundred different suggestions. Our focus will be on inclusion in a broad sense. The proposal to receive the most attention was a…

  13. Superior voice recognition in a patient with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Adria E N; Démonet, Jean-François; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2010-11-01

    Anecdotally, it has been reported that individuals with acquired prosopagnosia compensate for their inability to recognize faces by using other person identity cues such as hair, gait or the voice. Are they therefore superior at the use of non-face cues, specifically voices, to person identity? Here, we empirically measure person and object identity recognition in a patient with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia. We quantify person identity (face and voice) and object identity (car and horn) recognition for visual, auditory, and bimodal (visual and auditory) stimuli. The patient is unable to recognize faces or cars, consistent with his prosopagnosia and object agnosia, respectively. He is perfectly able to recognize people's voices and car horns and bimodal stimuli. These data show a reverse shift in the typical weighting of visual over auditory information for audiovisual stimuli in a compromised visual recognition system. Moreover, the patient shows selectively superior voice recognition compared to the controls revealing that two different stimulus domains, persons and objects, may not be equally affected by sensory adaptation effects. This also implies that person and object identity recognition are processed in separate pathways. These data demonstrate that an individual with acquired prosopagnosia and object agnosia can compensate for the visual impairment and become quite skilled at using spared aspects of sensory processing. In the case of acquired prosopagnosia it is advantageous to develop a superior use of voices for person identity recognition in everyday life.

  14. Challenges Facing Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 selected papers from recent issues of the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," concerning current and emerging challenges facing the field of special education. The book is organized in two parts. Part 1, "Contemporary Challenges," includes the following articles: "Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education: Issues…

  15. Handbook of Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M., Ed.; Hallahan, Daniel P., Ed.

    Intended to serve as a basic reference work for students and professionals in special education, the book contains 34 author contributed chapters concerned with the conceptual foundations of special education, service delivery systems, curriculum and methods, and child and child/environmental management. Chapters have the following titles and…

  16. Special Education in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hamour, Bashir; Al-Hmouz, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a brief background about special education system in Jordan and particularly describes the present types of programmes and legislation provided within the country to students with special needs, as well as integration movement. Jordan has historically provided a limited number of educational opportunities…

  17. Perspectives on Sport Specialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Jay

    2002-01-01

    For high school athletes, the pressure increases each year to specialize and focus on their best sport, and if they do not, they risk being surpassed by other athletes who have focused on one sport. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of sport specialization and looks at the rising danger of club sports for high school athletes.…

  18. Special Education Teacher Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was special education teachers, who remained in the teaching field 5 or more years. Through the use of qualitative mixed-methods study, variables contributing to their longevity were explored. Research indicates that 50% of special education teachers leave the field within five years of employment (Alliance for Education,…

  19. Assessing Special Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Special events defined as being "newsworthy events" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special events that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of events; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some event in an organization.…

  20. Preface: ISBB Special Issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue is published for the International Society of Biocatalysis and Biotechnology (ISBB). The ISBB special issue is devoted to all areas of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology in which biological systems are developed and/or used for the provision of commercial goods or serv...

  1. Special Awareness Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granstrom, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The article reports on the organization and implementation of a "Special Needs Awareness Month" in Quincy, Massachusetts. Noted are the heavy involvement of parents in the multiagency planning committee, and the resulting citywide displays, publications, programs, and publicity on children with special needs. (DB)

  2. Special Education Resource System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampert, George J.

    The guide to the Special Education Resource System (SERS) of the Flour Bluff (Texas) school system contains policies and procedures regarding organization, services, and process of the system. Noted is the SERS purpose of providing information and access to appropriate instructional media and materials for special education personnel. Briefly…

  3. Quantum gauge freedom in very special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Yokoyama gaugeon formalism for the Abelian one-form gauge (Maxwell) as well as for Abelian two-form gauge theory in the very special relativity (VSR) framework. In VSR scenario, the extended action due to introduction of gaugeon fields also possesses form invariance under quantum gauge transformations. It is observed that the gaugeon field together with gauge field naturally acquire mass, which is different from the conventional Higgs mechanism. The quantum gauge transformation implements a shift in gauge parameter. Further, we analyze the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism in VSR which embeds only one subsidiary condition rather than two.

  4. Numerosity perception after size adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Eckart; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    While some researchers propose the existence of a special numerosity sense, others challenge this view and argue that numerosity is derived from low-level features as density information. Here, we used size adaptation to manipulate the apparent area size of an object set without changing its physical density. After size adaptation, two probe patches were shown, each of which contained a specific numerosity of dots. Subjects were required to report, which probe patch contained more dots. Numerosity perception was compared between conditions where probe patches were adapted to appear smaller or larger. Size adaptation affected numerosity perception in a logarithmic fashion, increasing with the numerosity in the probe patch. No changes in density perception were found after size adaptation. Data suggest that size and density information play only a minor role in the estimation of low numerosities. In stark contrast, high numerosities strongly depend on size and density information. The data reinforce recent claims of separate mechanism for the perception of low and high numerosities. PMID:27650296

  5. Community-Acquired Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Viasus, Diego; Di Yacovo, Silvana; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Verdaguer, Ricard; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and an important public health problem worldwide. We conducted the present study to assess trends in epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of sporadic community-acquired L. pneumophila pneumonia requiring hospitalization at a university hospital over a 15-year period (1995–2010). Among 3934 nonimmunosuppressed hospitalized patients with CAP, 214 (5.4%) had L. pneumophila pneumonia (16 cases were categorized as travel-associated pneumonia, and 21 were part of small clusters). Since the introduction of the urinary antigen test, the diagnosis of L. pneumophila using this method remained stable over the years (p = 0.42); however, diagnosis by means of seroconversion and culture decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The median age of patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia was 58.2 years (SD 13.8), and 76.4% were male. At least 1 comorbid condition was present in 119 (55.6%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia, mainly chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease. The frequency of older patients (aged >65 yr) and comorbidities among patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia increased over the years (p = 0.06 and p = 0.02, respectively). In addition, 100 (46.9%) patients were classified into high-risk classes according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (groups IV–V). Twenty-four (11.2%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy at hospital admission. Compared with patients who received appropriate empirical antibiotic, patients who received inappropriate therapy more frequently had acute onset of illness (p = 0.004), pleuritic chest pain (p = 0.03), and pleural effusion (p = 0.05). The number of patients who received macrolides decreased over the study period (p < 0.001), whereas the number of patients who received levofloxacin increased (p

  6. [Acquired pendular nystagmus after pontine hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yokota, J; Kosaka, K; Yoshimoto, Y; Amakusa, T

    1999-12-01

    A 60-year-old hypertensive woman had a pontine hemorrhage that caused slight right hemiplegia, deep sensory disturbance on her right side and dysarthria. Three months after the stroke, she was transferred to our hospital for rehabilitation. Approximately 6 months later, she gradually began to complain of the visual oscillation. Continual, unceasing conjugate vertical/rotatory eye movements were observed. Fixation was momentary at best because of an inability to dampen the spontaneous eye movements. Electrooculography (EOG) showed bilateral vertical/rotatory sinusoidal eye movements of 2.5 Hz frequency and 10- to 35-degree amplitude. Both vertical and horizontal optokinetic nystagmus were absent. Caloric stimulation did not evoke any responses bilaterally. There were no rhythmical movements at similar frequencies in other parts of the body such as palatal myoclonus. MRI revealed not only hematoma mainly at the dorsal pontine tegmentum but also hypertrophy of the inferior olive nucleus, suggesting disruption of the central tegmental tract. Lesions of this tract may be one cause of pendular nystagmus. Several drug therapies were investigated for the nystagmus. There was no response to baclofen 15 mg. Trihexyphenidyl 4 mg was discontinued because of drug-induced hallucinations. Tiapride 600 mg and phenobarbital 90 mg were each slightly effective in reducing both frequency and amplitude of nystagmus. Treatment with clonazepam 1 mg resulted in the striking disappearance of nystagmus. She was aware of this and no longer experienced oscillopsia. Despite the visual benefit, however, the patient did not wish to continue this drug because of drowsiness and muscle relaxation. The potential long-term therapeutic application of clonazepam should be further investigated. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of successful treatment in acquired pendular nystagmus with clonazepam. Therefore, based on this favorable experience, it is suggested that clonazepam should be added

  7. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia. Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Marrie, T J; Slayter, K L

    1996-05-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, and antimicrobial therapy represents only 1 facet of the treatment of this disease. The nursing home population consists of a mixture of well, frail and dependent elderly. For some residents, supportive care may be the best therapeutic option. A variety of antimicrobial regimens have been proposed for the empirical therapy of NHAP; however, there are still very few data from controlled clinical trials that assess outcome. The clinical trials that have been completed support the concept that an early switch from intravenous to oral therapy can be successfully used to treat pneumonia affecting frail, often seriously ill, groups of patients. Annual influenza vaccine should be offered to all nursing home residents. This practice is about 50% effective in preventing hospitalisation and pneumonia, and about 80% effective in preventing death. The same level of evidence is not available to support the use of pneumococcal vaccine in this group; however, current practice suggests that all nursing home residents receive this vaccine on admission and once every 6 years thereafter. Frequently, knowledge about pneumonia is not applied as optimally as should be done. Care maps have been shown to reduce length of stay and shorten the time from emergency room entry until administration of antibiotic therapy by up to 3 hours. Areas for urgent research attention in patients with NHAP are: (a) proper studies to define the microbiological aetiology of NHAP (this requires bronchoscopy with sampling of the distal airways using a protected bronchial brush); (b) randomised controlled clinical trials of sufficient size to determine whether one antibiotic regimen is superior to another (currently most trials are designed to show that the agent under study is equivalent to a currently used agent); and (c) end-of-life decision making in the nursing home population.

  8. Chapter 22: Hereditary and acquired angioedema.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Mary S; Pongracic, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder defined by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Acquired angioedema (AAE) is caused by either consumption (type 1) or inactivation (type 2) of CI-INH. Both HAE and AAE can be life-threatening. The screening test for both conditions is complement component C4, which is low to absent at times of angioedema or during quiescent periods. A useful test to differentiate HAE from AAE is C1q protein, which is normal in HAE and low in AAE. There are three types of HAE: type 1 HAE is most common, occurring in ∼85% of patients and characterized by decreased production of C1-INH, resulting in reduced functional activity to 5-30% of normal. In type 2, which occurs in 15% of cases, C1-INH is detectable in normal or elevated quantities but is dysfunctional. Finally, type 3, which is rare and almost exclusively occurs in women, is estrogen dependent and associated with normal CI-INH and C4 levels. One-third of these patients have a gain-of-function mutation in clotting factor XII leading to kallikrein-driven bradykinin production. Although the anabolic steroid, danazol, is useful in increasing the concentration of C4 and reducing the episodes of angioedema in HAE and AAE, it has expected adverse effects. Fortunately, disease-specific therapies are available and include C1-INH enzyme for i.v. infusion either acutely or empirically, ecallantide, an inhibitor of kallikrein, and icatibant, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, both approved for acute angioedema and administered, subcutaneously.

  9. Impact of lactobacilli on orally acquired listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Archambaud, Cristel; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Bécavin, Christophe; Laval, Laure; Lechat, Pierre; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe; Lecuit, Marc; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier and disseminates within the host. Here, we report a unique comprehensive analysis of the impact of two Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-3689 and Lactobacillus casei BL23, on L. monocytogenes and orally acquired listeriosis in a gnotobiotic humanized mouse model. We first assessed the effect of treatment with each Lactobacillus on L. monocytogenes counts in host tissues and showed that each decreases L. monocytogenes systemic dissemination in orally inoculated mice. A whole genome intestinal transcriptomic analysis revealed that each Lactobacillus changes expression of a specific subset of genes during infection, with IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) being the most affected by both lactobacilli. We also examined microRNA (miR) expression and showed that three miRs (miR-192, miR-200b, and miR-215) are repressed during L. monocytogenes infection. Treatment with each Lactobacillus increased miR-192 expression, whereas only L. casei association increased miR-200b and miR-215 expression. Finally, we showed that treatment with each Lactobacillus significantly reshaped the L. monocytogenes transcriptome and up-regulated transcription of L. monocytogenes genes encoding enzymes allowing utilization of intestinal carbon and nitrogen sources in particular genes involved in propanediol and ethanolamine catabolism and cobalamin biosynthesis. Altogether, these data reveal that the modulation of L. monocytogenes infection by treatment with lactobacilli correlates with a decrease in host gene expression, in particular ISGs, miR regulation, and a dramatic reshaping of L. monocytogenes transcriptome. PMID:23012479

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.105 - What special requirements must we put into our CAS contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special requirements must we put into our CAS contracts? 102-33.105 Section 102-33.105 Public Contracts and Property... to Acquire Government Aircraft § 102-33.105 What special requirements must we put into our...

  11. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-15

    Adaptive Systems: A Ji . Fixed-Point Analysis", submitted, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems; Special Issue on Adaptive Systems, Sept. 1987. I.M.Y...Shaped Cost Functionals: Extensions of LQG Methods," *.. AIAA J. of Guidance and Control, pp. 529-535, Nov-Dec. 1980. [81 C.A. Desoer , R.W. Liu, J. Murray...for Parameter Conver- gence in Adaptive Control," Memo No. UCB/ERL M84/25, Univ. of California, Berke- ley, 1984. [19] C.A. Desoer and M. Vidyasagar

  12. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-06

    Point Analy- sis", submitted, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems; Special Issue on Adaptive Systems, Sept. 1987. I.M.Y. Mareels, R.R. Bitmead, M. Gevers...adaptive system with unmodelled dynamics," Proc. IFAC Workshop on Adaptive Systems, San Francisco, CA. C.A. Desoer , R.W. Liu, J. Murray and R. Sacks...June 1980. C.A. Desoer and M. Vidyasagar, Feedback Systems: Input-Output Properties, Academic Press, * 1975. J.C. Doyle and G. Stein (1981

  13. Molecular evolution and thermal adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peiqiu

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we address problems in molecular evolution, thermal adaptation, and the kinetics of adaptation of bacteria and viruses to elevated environmental temperatures. We use a nearly neutral fitness model where the replication speed of an organism is proportional to the copy number of folded proteins. Our model reproduces the distribution of stabilities of natural proteins in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that species with high mutation rates tend to have less stable proteins compared to species with low mutation rate. We found that a broad distribution of protein stabilities observed in the model and in experiment is the key determinant of thermal response for viruses and bacteria. Our results explain most of the earlier experimental observations: striking asymmetry of thermal response curves, the absence of evolutionary trade-off which was expected but not found in experiments, correlation between denaturation temperature for several protein families and the Optimal Growth Temperature (OGT) of their carrier organisms, and proximity of bacterial or viral OGTs to their evolutionary temperatures. Our theory quantitatively and with high accuracy described thermal response curves for 35 bacterial species. The model also addresses the key to adaptation is in weak-link genes (WLG), which encode least thermodynamically stable essential proteins in the proteome. We observe, as in experiment, a two-stage adaptation process. The first stage is a Luria-Delbruck type of selection, whereby rare WLG alleles, whose proteins are more stable than WLG proteins of the majority of the population (either due to standing genetic variation or due to an early acquired mutation), rapidly rise to fixation. The second stage constitutes subsequent slow accumulation of mutations in an adapted population. As adaptation progresses, selection regime changes from positive to neutral: Selection coefficient of beneficial mutations scales as a negative power of number of

  14. Laboratory-Acquired Parasitic Infections from Accidental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Herwaldt, Barbara L.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are receiving increasing attention in developed countries in part because of their importance in travelers, immigrants, and immunocompromised persons. The main purpose of this review is to educate laboratorians, the primary readership, and health care workers, the secondary readership, about the potential hazards of handling specimens that contain viable parasites and about the diseases that can result. This is accomplished partly through discussion of the occupationally acquired cases of parasitic infections that have been reported, focusing for each case on the type of accident that resulted in infection, the length of the incubation period, the clinical manifestations that developed, and the means by which infection was detected. The article focuses on the cases of infection with the protozoa that cause leishmaniasis, malaria, toxoplasmosis, Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis), and African trypanosomiasis. Data about 164 such cases are discussed, as are data about cases caused by intestinal protozoa and by helminths. Of the 105 case-patients infected with blood and tissue protozoa who either recalled an accident or for whom the likely route of transmission could be presumed, 47 (44.8%) had percutaneous exposure via a contaminated needle or other sharp object. Some accidents were directly linked to poor laboratory practices (e.g., recapping a needle or working barehanded). To decrease the likelihood of accidental exposures, persons who could be exposed to pathogenic parasites must be thoroughly instructed in safety precautions before they begin to work and through ongoing training programs. Protocols should be provided for handling specimens that could contain viable organisms, using protective clothing and equipment, dealing with spills of infectious organisms, and responding to accidents. Special care should be exercised when using needles and other sharp objects. PMID:11585780

  15. Development of force adaptation during childhood.

    PubMed

    Konczak, Jürgen; Jansen-Osmann, Petra; Kalveram, Karl-Theodor

    2003-03-01

    Humans learn to make reaching movements in novel dynamic environments by acquiring an internal motor model of their limb dynamics. Here, the authors investigated how 4- to 11-year-old children (N = 39) and adults (N = 7) adapted to changes in arm dynamics, and they examined whether those data support the view that the human brain acquires inverse dynamics models (IDM) during development. While external damping forces were applied, the children learned to perform goal-directed forearm flexion movements. After changes in damping, all children showed kinematic aftereffects indicative of a neural controller that still attempted to compensate the no longer existing damping force. With increasing age, the number of trials toward complete adaptation decreased. When damping was present, forearm paths were most perturbed and most variable in the youngest children but were improved in the older children. The findings indicate that the neural representations of limb dynamics are less precise in children and less stable in time than those of adults. Such controller instability might be a primary cause of the high kinematic variability observed in many motor tasks during childhood. Finally, the young children were not able to update those models at the same rate as the older children, who, in turn, adapted more slowly than adults. In conclusion, the ability to adapt to unknown forces is a developmental achievement. The present results are consistent with the view that the acquisition and modification of internal models of the limb dynamics form the basis of that adaptive process.

  16. Effects of YM155 on survivin levels and viability in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Voges, Yvonne; Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Schaller, Torsten; Schneider, Constanze; Politt, Katharina; Mernberger, Marco; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Wass, Mark N; Rödel, Franz; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    Resistance formation after initial therapy response (acquired resistance) is common in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. YM155 is a drug candidate that was introduced as a survivin suppressant. This mechanism was later challenged, and DNA damage induction and Mcl-1 depletion were suggested instead. Here we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of YM155 in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance. The efficacy of YM155 was determined in neuroblastoma cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to clinically relevant drugs. Survivin levels, Mcl-1 levels, and DNA damage formation were determined in response to YM155. RNAi-mediated depletion of survivin, Mcl-1, and p53 was performed to investigate their roles during YM155 treatment. Clinical YM155 concentrations affected the viability of drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells through survivin depletion and p53 activation. MDM2 inhibitor-induced p53 activation further enhanced YM155 activity. Loss of p53 function generally affected anti-neuroblastoma approaches targeting survivin. Upregulation of ABCB1 (causes YM155 efflux) and downregulation of SLC35F2 (causes YM155 uptake) mediated YM155-specific resistance. YM155-adapted cells displayed increased ABCB1 levels, decreased SLC35F2 levels, and a p53 mutation. YM155-adapted neuroblastoma cells were also characterized by decreased sensitivity to RNAi-mediated survivin depletion, further confirming survivin as a critical YM155 target in neuroblastoma. In conclusion, YM155 targets survivin in neuroblastoma. Furthermore, survivin is a promising therapeutic target for p53 wild-type neuroblastomas after resistance acquisition (neuroblastomas are rarely p53-mutated), potentially in combination with p53 activators. In addition, we show that the adaptation of cancer cells to molecular-targeted anticancer drugs is an effective strategy to elucidate a drug's mechanism of action. PMID:27735941

  17. Hypertension in special populations.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2005-07-01

    Hypertension is a multifaceted disease that may present somewhat differently in various populations. It is clear that hypertensive treatment reduces cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular outcomes for all patients, yet recent clinical trial data suggest that some groups may benefit more than others from specific drug intervention. Furthermore, these data justify specific approaches for some special populations. This article reviews important features of the presentation, rationale for treatment, and treatment recommendations for the treatment of hypertension in special populations. The special populations addressed include diabetic patients, the elderly, and women.

  18. SOS mutator DNA polymerase IV functions in adaptive mutation and not adaptive amplification.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, G J; Lee, P L; Lombardo, M J; Hastings, P J; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-03-01

    Adaptive point mutation and amplification are induced responses to environmental stress, promoting genetic changes that can enhance survival. A specialized adaptive mutation mechanism has been documented in one Escherichia coli assay, but its enzymatic basis remained unclear. We report that the SOS-inducible, error-prone DNA polymerase (pol) IV, encoded by dinB, is required for adaptive point mutation in the E. coli lac operon. A nonpolar dinB mutation reduces adaptive mutation frequencies by 85% but does not affect adaptive amplification, growth-dependent mutation, or survival after oxidative or UV damage. We show that pol IV, together with the major replicase, pol III, can account for all adaptive point mutations at lac. The results identify a role for pol IV in inducible genetic change.

  19. Admixture facilitates genetic adaptations to high altitude in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Choongwon; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Basnyat, Buddha; Neupane, Maniraj; Witonsky, David B.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Beall, Cynthia M.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Admixture is recognized as a widespread feature of human populations, renewing interest in the possibility that genetic exchange can facilitate adaptations to new environments. Studies of Tibetans revealed candidates for high-altitude adaptations in the EGLN1 and EPAS1 genes, associated with lower hemoglobin concentration. However, the history of these variants or that of Tibetans remains poorly understood. Here, we analyze genotype data for the Nepalese Sherpa, and find that Tibetans are a mixture of ancestral populations related to the Sherpa and Han Chinese. EGLN1 and EPAS1 genes show a striking enrichment of high-altitude ancestry in the Tibetan genome, indicating that migrants from low altitude acquired adaptive alleles from the highlanders. Accordingly, the Sherpa and Tibetans share adaptive hemoglobin traits. This admixture-mediated adaptation shares important features with adaptive introgression. Therefore, we identify a novel mechanism, beyond selection on new mutations or on standing variation, through which populations can adapt to local environments. PMID:24513612

  20. Morphological and morphometric specializations of the lung of the Andean goose, Chloephaga melanoptera: A lifelong high-altitude resident.

    PubMed

    Maina, John N; McCracken, Kevin G; Chua, Beverly; York, Julia M; Milsom, William K

    2017-01-01

    High altitude flight in rarefied, extremely cold and hypoxic air is a very challenging activity. Only a few species of birds can achieve it. Hitherto, the structure of the lungs of such birds has not been studied. This is because of the rarity of such species and the challenges of preparing well-fixed lung tissue. Here, it was posited that in addition to the now proven physiological adaptations, high altitude flying birds will also have acquired pulmonary structural adaptations that enable them to obtain the large amounts of oxygen (O2) needed for flight at high elevation, an environment where O2 levels are very low. The Andean goose (Chloephaga melanoptera) normally resides at altitudes above 3000 meters and flies to elevations as high as 6000 meters where O2 becomes limiting. In this study, its lung was morphologically- and morphometrically investigated. It was found that structurally the lungs are exceptionally specialized for gas exchange. Atypically, the infundibulae are well-vascularized. The mass-specific volume of the lung (42.8 cm3.kg-1), the mass-specific respiratory surface area of the blood-gas (tissue) barrier (96.5 cm2.g-1) and the mass-specific volume of the pulmonary capillary blood (7.44 cm3.kg-1) were some of the highest values so far reported in birds. The pulmonary structural specializations have generated a mass-specific total (overall) pulmonary morphometric diffusing capacity of the lung for oxygen (DLo2) of 0.119 mlO2.sec-1.mbar-1.kg-1, a value that is among some of the highest ones in birds that have been studied. The adaptations of the lung of the Andean goose possibly produce the high O2 conductance needed to live and fly at high altitude.

  1. Morphological and morphometric specializations of the lung of the Andean goose, Chloephaga melanoptera: A lifelong high-altitude resident

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kevin G.; Chua, Beverly; York, Julia M.; Milsom, William K.

    2017-01-01

    High altitude flight in rarefied, extremely cold and hypoxic air is a very challenging activity. Only a few species of birds can achieve it. Hitherto, the structure of the lungs of such birds has not been studied. This is because of the rarity of such species and the challenges of preparing well-fixed lung tissue. Here, it was posited that in addition to the now proven physiological adaptations, high altitude flying birds will also have acquired pulmonary structural adaptations that enable them to obtain the large amounts of oxygen (O2) needed for flight at high elevation, an environment where O2 levels are very low. The Andean goose (Chloephaga melanoptera) normally resides at altitudes above 3000 meters and flies to elevations as high as 6000 meters where O2 becomes limiting. In this study, its lung was morphologically- and morphometrically investigated. It was found that structurally the lungs are exceptionally specialized for gas exchange. Atypically, the infundibulae are well-vascularized. The mass-specific volume of the lung (42.8 cm3.kg-1), the mass-specific respiratory surface area of the blood-gas (tissue) barrier (96.5 cm2.g-1) and the mass-specific volume of the pulmonary capillary blood (7.44 cm3.kg-1) were some of the highest values so far reported in birds. The pulmonary structural specializations have generated a mass-specific total (overall) pulmonary morphometric diffusing capacity of the lung for oxygen (DLo2) of 0.119 mlO2.sec-1.mbar-1.kg-1, a value that is among some of the highest ones in birds that have been studied. The adaptations of the lung of the Andean goose possibly produce the high O2 conductance needed to live and fly at high altitude. PMID:28339478

  2. Adaptation to climate change in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Ole; Halsnaes, Kirsten; Olesen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2009-05-01

    Adaptation to climate change is given increasing international attention as the confidence in climate change projections is getting higher. Developing countries have specific needs for adaptation due to high vulnerabilities, and they will in this way carry a great part of the global costs of climate change although the rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are mainly the responsibility of industrialized countries. This article provides a status of climate change adaptation in developing countries. An overview of observed and projected climate change is given, and recent literature on impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation are reviewed, including the emerging focus on mainstreaming of climate change and adaptation in development plans and programs. The article also serves as an introduction to the seven research articles of this special issue on climate change adaptation in developing countries. It is concluded that although many useful steps have been taken in the direction of ensuring adequate adaptation in developing countries, much work still remains to fully understand the drivers of past adaptation efforts, the need for future adaptation, and how to mainstream climate into general development policies.

  3. Specialized Investment Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Robert S.

    1970-01-01

    The informational needs of the investing public should be met by the public library. Suggestions for specialized investment information services with broad appeal, technical charts, and advisory services which public libraries might consider purchasing. (JS)

  4. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  5. A Very Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Hilda B.

    1973-01-01

    Granite School District, a suburb of Salt Lake City, Utah, has a staff of 349 teachers and other professional personnel who provide career education and job experience for more than 5,000 special children. (DS)

  6. Online Learning: Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This special section includes "The View from the Middle" (Dick Schaaf); "Crossing the Channel" (Dawn Garrett); and "Bandwidth Basics" (Dick Schaaf). Sidebars look at bandwidth and management issues as well as courseware development. (JOW)

  7. 2015 Special Operations Essays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Intelligence Agency Relationship since Desert Storm and its Prospects for the Future , May 2014, David P. Oakley Countering the al-Shabaab Insurgency...01 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2015 Special Operations Essays 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...The JSOU Press MacDill Air Force Base, Florida 2015 2015 Special Operations Essays This monograph and other JSOU publications can be found at https

  8. Early surgery for hospital-acquired and community-acquired active infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-06-01

    Active infective endocarditis (IE) is classified into two groups; hospital acquired IE (HIE) and IE other than HIE, which was defined as community-acquired IE (CIE). Eighty-two patients underwent surgical treatment for active IE. Seventy-one cases were CIE group and eleven were HIE. There were six patients with native valve endocarditis and five cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis in the HIE group. We compared the surgical outcome of both types of active IE retrospectively. The preoperative status of the patients in the HIE group was more critical than that in the CIE group. Streptococcus spp. were the major micro-organisms in the CIE group (39%), while 82% of the HIE cases were caused by Staphylococcus spp. All Staphylococcus organisms in the HIE group were methicillin resistant. There were 10 hospital deaths, three in the CIE group and seven in the HIE group. Operative mortality in the HIE group was significantly higher than in the CIE group (63.6% vs. 4.2%, P<0.001). The outcome of early operation was satisfactory for active CIE, but poor for HIE. These types of active IE should be considered separately.

  9. [Report of 2 cases with acquired von Willebrand disease and one with acquired hemophilia A].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Murillo, C; Quintana González, S; Ambriz Fernández, R; Domínguez García, V; Rodríguez Moyado, H; Arias Aranda, A; Collazo Jaloma, J; Gutiérrez Romero, M

    1995-01-01

    We report three patients with acquired inhibitors against F VIII:C/F vW:Ag complex. Two patients had acquired hemophilia A. The three patients presented with bleeding diathesis. Case 1 was a 19 years old woman with Graves-Basedow disease; case 2 was a 40 years old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus of four years; and case 3 a 38 years old woman who had had rheumatoid arthritis for five years and was in her 3d month postpartum. The F VIII:C level was below 8 U/dL in all cases. The F vW:Ag, ristocetin cofactor and platelet aggregation with ristocetin were diminished in the two cases with von Willebrand. Inhibitor to F VIII:C was 50, 38 and 20 Bethesda units, respectively, for cases 1, 2 and 3. The three patients showed clinical response to DDAVP and cryoprecipitates with partial response in laboratory tests. All patients responded to corticosteroid treatment, but immunosuppressive treatment was necessary in case 3.

  10. Sport Specialization, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Jayanthi, Neeru; Difiori, John P.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Logerstedt, David; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: There is increased growth in sports participation across the globe. Sports specialization patterns, which include year-round training, participation on multiple teams of the same sport, and focused participation in a single sport at a young age, are at high levels. The need for this type of early specialized training in young athletes is currently under debate. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: Sports specialization is defined as year-round training (greater than 8 months per year), choosing a single main sport, and/or quitting all other sports to focus on 1 sport. Specialized training in young athletes has risks of injury and burnout, while the degree of specialization is positively correlated with increased serious overuse injury risk. Risk factors for injury in young athletes who specialize in a single sport include year-round single-sport training, participation in more competition, decreased age-appropriate play, and involvement in individual sports that require the early development of technical skills. Adults involved in instruction of youth sports may also put young athletes at risk for injury by encouraging increased intensity in organized practices and competition rather than self-directed unstructured free play. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:26502420

  11. Adaptation to chromatic aberration by the human visual system.

    PubMed

    HAY, J C; PICK, H L; ROSSER, E

    1963-07-12

    Prolonged exposure to the chromatic dispersion produced by prism spectacles leads to a perceptual adaptation. The adaptation develops rapidly in the first two days of the wearing of the spectacles, and seems to be a special reac ion to the relative change in illuminance at intensity gradients on the retina.

  12. Introduction: Reflexions on Interdisciplinarity in Adapted Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causgrove Dunn, Janice; Goodwin, Donna; Bouffard, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    The articles included in this special issue of Quest emerged from a research workshop entitled "Thinking About Our Thinking in Adapted Physical Activity," held at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, from June 18-19, 2013. The aim of the workshop was to examine different worldviews that contribute to the adapted physical…

  13. Bacterial gene import and mesophilic adaptation in archaea.

    PubMed

    López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David

    2015-07-01

    It is widely believed that the archaeal ancestor was hyperthermophilic, but during archaeal evolution, several lineages - including haloarchaea and their sister methanogens, the Thaumarchaeota, and the uncultured Marine Group II and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota (MGII/III) - independently adapted to lower temperatures. Recent phylogenomic studies suggest that the ancestors of these lineages were recipients of massive horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Many of the acquired genes, which are often involved in metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis, were convergently acquired by distant mesophilic archaea. In this Opinion article, we explore the intriguing hypothesis that the import of these bacterial genes was crucial for the adaptation of archaea to mesophilic lifestyles.

  14. Adaptive boxcar/wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Osman G.; Altunbasak, Yucel

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive Boxcar/Wavelet transform for image compression. Boxcar/Wavelet decomposition emphasizes the idea of average-interpolation representation which uses dyadic averages and their interpolation to explain a special case of biorthogonal wavelet transforms (BWT). This perspective for image compression together with lifting scheme offers the ability to train an optimum 2-D filter set for nonlinear prediction (interpolation) that will adapt to the context around the low-pass wavelet coefficients for reducing energy in the high-pass bands. Moreover, the filters obtained after training is observed to posses directional information with some textural clues that can provide better prediction performance. This work addresses a firrst step towards obtaining this new set of training-based fillters in the context of Boxcar/Wavelet transform. Initial experimental results show better subjective quality performance compared to popular 9/7-tap and 5/3-tap BWTs with comparable results in objective quality.

  15. Three-dimensional rendering of computer-generated holograms acquired from point-clouds on light field displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidou, Athanasia; Blinder, David; Ceulemans, Beerend; Munteanu, Adrian; Schelkens, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Holograms, either optically acquired or simulated numerically from 3D datasets, such as point clouds, have special rendering requirements for display. Evaluating the quality of hologram generation techniques is not straightforward, since high-quality holographic display technologies are still immature, In this paper we present a framework for three-dimensional rendering of colour computer-generated holograms (CGHs) acquired from point-clouds, on high-end light field displays. This allows for the rendering of holographic content with horizontal parallax and wide viewing angle. We deploy prior work, namely a fast CGH method that inherently handles occlusion problems to acquire high quality colour holograms from point clouds. Our experiments showed that rendering holograms with the proposed framework provides 3D effect with depth disparity and horizontal-only with wide viewing angle. Therefore, it allows for the evaluation of CGH techniques regarding functional properties such as depth cues and efficient occlusion handling.

  16. Adaptive evolution of Mediterranean pines.

    PubMed

    Grivet, Delphine; Climent, José; Zabal-Aguirre, Mario; Neale, David B; Vendramin, Giovanni G; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2013-09-01

    Mediterranean pines represent an extremely heterogeneous assembly. Although they have evolved under similar environmental conditions, they diversified long ago, ca. 10 Mya, and present distinct biogeographic and demographic histories. Therefore, it is of special interest to understand whether and to what extent they have developed specific strategies of adaptive evolution through time and space. To explore evolutionary patterns, the Mediterranean pines' phylogeny was first reconstructed analyzing a new set of 21 low-copy nuclear genes with multilocus Bayesian tree reconstruction methods. Secondly, a phylogenetic approach was used to search for footprints of natural selection and to examine the evolution of multiple phenotypic traits. We identified two genes (involved in pines' defense and stress responses) that have likely played a role in the adaptation of Mediterranean pines to their environment. Moreover, few life-history traits showed historical or evolutionary adaptive convergence in Mediterranean lineages, while patterns of character evolution revealed various evolutionary trade-offs linking growth-development, reproduction and fire-related traits. Assessing the evolutionary path of important life-history traits, as well as the genomic basis of adaptive variation is central to understanding the past evolutionary success of Mediterranean pines and their future response to environmental changes.

  17. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  18. 33 CFR 211.2 - Authority to acquire real estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROJECTS Real Estate; General § 211.2 Authority to acquire real estate. (a) Congressional authority... of the Army to acquire real estate for river and harbor improvements, flood control projects and allied purposes, is based upon enactments of the Congress authorizing the particular projects...

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Antimicrobial Peptides against Naturally Acquired Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Alberola, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Francino, O.; Roura, X.; Rivas, L.; Andreu, D.

    2004-01-01

    Leishmaniases, which are important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and dogs, are extremely difficult to treat. Antimicrobial peptides are rarely used as alternative treatments for naturally acquired parasitic diseases. Here we report that the acylated synthetic antimicrobial peptide Oct-CA(1-7)M(2-9) is safe and effective for treating naturally acquired canine leishmaniasis. PMID:14742227

  20. 14 CFR 1274.402 - Contractor acquired property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contractor acquired property. 1274.402 Section 1274.402 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Property § 1274.402 Contractor acquired property. As provided in §...

  1. Acquiring Knowledge of Derived Nominals and Derived Adjectives in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinellie, Sally A.; Kneile, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigated children's ability to acquire semantic and syntactic knowledge of derived nominals and derived adjectives in the context of short passages. The study also investigated the relation of morphological awareness and the ability to acquire knowledge of derived words in context. Method: A total of 106 children in…

  2. 34 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should be assigned to...

  3. 43 CFR 3471.4 - Future interest, acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Future interest, acquired lands. 3471.4 Section 3471.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... Coal Management Provisions and Limitations § 3471.4 Future interest, acquired lands. An application...

  4. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  5. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  6. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  7. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  8. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and..., Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), articles for his personal or household...

  9. 33 CFR 211.2 - Authority to acquire real estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to acquire real estate..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Real Estate; General § 211.2 Authority to acquire real estate. (a) Congressional...

  10. 33 CFR 211.27 - Method of acquiring Federal jurisdiction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Federal Jurisdiction over Real Estate § 211.27 Method of acquiring Federal jurisdiction. Jurisdiction is acquired in accordance with the laws of the various States....

  11. Acquired Clitoromegaly: A Gynaecological Problem or an Obstetric Complication?

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vandana; Poddar, Anju; Kumari, Supriya; Maitra, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Acquired non-hormonal clitoromegaly is a rare condition and is due to benign or malignant tumours and sometimes idiopathic. Few cases of clitoral abscesses have been reported after female circumcision. We hereby report a case of clitoral abscess causing acquired clitoromegaly following an obstetrical surgery. PMID:28208951

  12. 45 CFR 7.4 - Option to acquire foreign rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Option to acquire foreign rights. 7.4 Section 7.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.4 Option to acquire foreign rights. In any case where it is determined that all domestic rights should be assigned to the Government, it...

  13. Free Reading: A Powerful Tool for Acquiring a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priya, J.; Ponniah, R. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The paper claims that free reading is a crucial ingredient in acquiring a second or foreign language. It contributes to the development of all measures of language competence which include grammar, vocabulary, spelling, syntax, fluency and style. The review supports the claim that readers acquire language subconsciously when they receive…

  14. 43 CFR 3101.2-2 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3101.2-2 Section 3101.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. An acreage limitation separate from, but equal to the acreage limitation for public...

  15. 43 CFR 3101.2-2 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3101.2-2 Section 3101.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. An acreage limitation separate from, but equal to the acreage limitation for public...

  16. 43 CFR 3101.2-2 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3101.2-2 Section 3101.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. An acreage limitation separate from, but equal to the acreage limitation for public...

  17. 43 CFR 3110.5-3 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3110.5-3 Section 3110.5-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. (a) If the lands applied for lie within and conform to the rectangular system of...

  18. 43 CFR 3110.5-3 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3110.5-3 Section 3110.5-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. (a) If the lands applied for lie within and conform to the rectangular system of...

  19. 43 CFR 3110.5-3 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3110.5-3 Section 3110.5-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. (a) If the lands applied for lie within and conform to the rectangular system of...

  20. 43 CFR 3110.5-3 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3110.5-3 Section 3110.5-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. (a) If the lands applied for lie within and conform to the rectangular system of...

  1. 43 CFR 3101.2-2 - Acquired lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acquired lands. 3101.2-2 Section 3101.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Acquired lands. An acreage limitation separate from, but equal to the acreage limitation for public...

  2. 26 CFR 1.471-9 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.471-9 Section 1.471-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Inventories § 1.471-9 Inventories of acquiring...

  3. 26 CFR 1.472-7 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.472-7 Section 1.472-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Inventories § 1.472-7 Inventories of acquiring...

  4. Botulinum toxin in the management of acquired motor fusion deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh; Kesarwani, Siddharth

    2009-01-01

    Acquired disruption of motor fusion is a rare condition characterized by intractable diplopia. Management of these patients is extremely difficult. Prisms in any combination or even surgery may not help relieve their symptoms. We describe a longstanding case of acquired motor fusion disruption which was managed successfully with botulinum toxin injection. PMID:19861751

  5. 27 CFR 6.45 - Assistance in acquiring license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assistance in acquiring license. 6.45 Section 6.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Furnishing Things of Value § 6.45 Assistance in acquiring license....

  6. 26 CFR 1.471-9 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.471-9 Section 1.471-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Inventories § 1.471-9 Inventories of acquiring corporations....

  7. 26 CFR 1.472-7 - Inventories of acquiring corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventories of acquiring corporations. 1.472-7 Section 1.472-7 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Inventories § 1.472-7 Inventories of acquiring corporations....

  8. 26 CFR 1.9002-6 - Acquiring corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acquiring corporation. 1.9002-6 Section 1.9002... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES General Actuarial Valuations § 1.9002-6 Acquiring corporation. Section 5(d) of the... corporation by another corporation in a distribution or transfer described in section 381(a) of the Code...

  9. Adaptive management of natural resources-framework and issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management, an approach for simultaneously managing and learning about natural resources, has been around for several decades. Interest in adaptive decision making has grown steadily over that time, and by now many in natural resources conservation claim that adaptive management is the approach they use in meeting their resource management responsibilities. Yet there remains considerable ambiguity about what adaptive management actually is, and how it is to be implemented by practitioners. The objective of this paper is to present a framework and conditions for adaptive decision making, and discuss some important challenges in its application. Adaptive management is described as a two-phase process of deliberative and iterative phases, which are implemented sequentially over the timeframe of an application. Key elements, processes, and issues in adaptive decision making are highlighted in terms of this framework. Special emphasis is given to the question of geographic scale, the difficulties presented by non-stationarity, and organizational challenges in implementing adaptive management. ?? 2010.

  10. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  11. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  12. Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Matérne, Marie; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Strandberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW). OBJECTIVE: The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI. METHOD: Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person’s cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW. PMID:28035941

  13. Face perception is category-specific: evidence from normal body perception in acquired prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Yovel, Galit; Barton, Jason J S; Duchaine, Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Does the human visual system contain perceptual mechanisms specialized for particular object categories such as faces? This question lies at the heart of a long-running debate in face perception. The face-specific hypothesis posits that face perception relies on mechanisms dedicated to faces, while the expertise hypothesis proposes that faces are processed by more generic mechanisms that operate on objects we have extended experience with. Previous studies that have addressed this question using acquired prosopagnosia are inconclusive because the non-face categories tested (e.g., cars) were not well-matched to faces in terms of visual exposure and perceptual experience. Here we compare perception of faces and bodies in four acquired prosopagnosics. Critically, we used face and body tasks that generate comparable inversion effects in controls, which indicates that our tasks engage orientation-specific perceptual mechanisms for faces and bodies to a similar extent. Three prosopagnosics were able to discriminate bodies normally despite their impairment in face perception. Moreover, they exhibited normal inversion effects for bodies, suggesting their body perception was carried out by the same mechanisms used by controls. Our findings indicate that the human visual system contains processes specialized for faces.

  14. Geometry of special Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    A theory known as special Galileon has recently attracted considerable interest due to its peculiar properties. It has been shown that it represents an extremal member of the set of effective field theories with an enhanced soft limit. This property makes its tree-level S -matrix fully on-shell reconstructible and representable by means of the Cachazo-He-Yuan representation. The enhanced soft limit is a consequence of new hidden symmetry of the special Galileon action; however, until now, the origin of this peculiar symmetry has remained unclear. In this paper we interpret this symmetry as a special transformation of the coset space GAL (D ,1 ) /S O (1 ,D -1 ) and show that there exists a three-parametric family of invariant Galileon actions. The latter family is closed under the duality which appears as a natural generalization of the above mentioned symmetry. We also present a geometric construction of the special Galileon action using a D -dimensional brane propagating in 2 D -dimensional flat pseudo-Riemannian space. Within such a framework, the special Galileon symmetry emerges as a U (1 ,D -1 ) symmetry of the target space, which can be treated as a D -dimensional Kähler manifold. Such a treatment allows for classification of the higher order invariant Lagrangians needed as counterterms on the quantum level. We also briefly comment on the relation between such higher order Lagrangians and the Lagrangians that are invariant with respect to the polynomial shift symmetry.

  15. Adaptive Technology for the Internet: Making Electronic Resources Accessible to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    This book seeks to guide information providers in establishing accessible World Wide Web sites and acquiring the hardware and software needed by people with disabilities, focusing on access to the Internet using large print, voice, and Braille. The book also covers how to acquire the funds for adaptive technology, what type of equipment to choose,…

  16. Improving the quality of radiographic images acquired with conical radiation beams through divergence correction and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvani, M. I.; Almeida, G. L.; Latini, R. M.; Bellido, A. V. B.; Souza, E. S.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-07-01

    Earlier works have shown the feasibility to correct the deformation of the attenuation map in radiographs acquired with conical radiation beams provided that the inspected object could be expressed into analytical geometry terms. This correction reduces the contribution of the main object in the radiograph, allowing thus the visualization of its otherwise concealed heterogeneities. However, the non-punctual character of the source demanded a cumbersome trial-and-error approach in order to determine the proper correction parameters for the algorithm. Within this frame, this work addresses the improvement of radiographs of specially tailored test-objects acquired with a conical beam through correction of its divergence by using the information contained in the image itself. The corrected images have afterwards undergone a filtration in the frequency domain aiming at the reduction of statistical fluctuation and noise by using a 2D Fourier transform. All radiographs have been acquired using 165Dy and 198Au gamma-ray sources produced at the Argonauta research reactor in Institutode Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN, and an X-ray sensitive imaging plate as detector. The processed images exhibit features otherwise invisible in the original ones. Their processing by conventional histogram equalization carried out for comparison purposes did not succeed to detect those features.

  17. Interacting Brain Modules for Memory: An Adaptive Representations Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    acquired memories for autobiographical events, sometimes collectively called episodic memory (e.g. Squire, 1987; Squire et al., 2004), as well as...AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2008-177 Final Technical Report June 2008 INTERACTING BRAIN MODULES FOR MEMORY : AN ADAPTIVE REPRESENTATIONS...FOR MEMORY : AN ADAPTIVE REPRESENTATIONS ARCHITECTURE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA8750-05-2-0273 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62304F

  18. Interactive rendering of acquired materials on dynamic geometry using frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Mahdi Mohammad; Soler, Cyril; Subr, Kartic; Belcour, Laurent; Holzschuch, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Shading acquired materials with high-frequency illumination is computationally expensive. Estimating the shading integral requires multiple samples of the incident illumination. The number of samples required may vary across the image, and the image itself may have high- and low-frequency variations, depending on a combination of several factors. Adaptively distributing computational budget across the pixels for shading is a challenging problem. In this paper, we depict complex materials such as acquired reflectances, interactively, without any precomputation based on geometry. In each frame, we first estimate the frequencies in the local light field arriving at each pixel, as well as the variance of the shading integrand. Our frequency analysis accounts for combinations of a variety of factors: the reflectance of the object projecting to the pixel, the nature of the illumination, the local geometry and the camera position relative to the geometry and lighting. We then exploit this frequency information (bandwidth and variance) to adaptively sample for reconstruction and integration. For example, fewer pixels per unit area are shaded for pixels projecting onto diffuse objects, and fewer samples are used for integrating illumination incident on specular objects.

  19. Urban Issues in Special Education. A Special Study Institute Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graeb, Thelma S., Ed.; Gaughan, Joseph P., Ed.

    Presented are the proceedings of a special study institute which field tested the Special Education Administration Simulator (SEASIM) to acquaint urban school administrators with the role of the Special Education Director and with information on current trends in special education. SEASIM is said to be based on 31 critical problems and issues…

  20. Valuing the recreational benefits of wetland adaptation to climate change: a trade-off between species' abundance and diversity.

    PubMed

    Faccioli, Michela; Riera Font, Antoni; Torres Figuerola, Catalina M

    2015-03-01

    Climate change will further exacerbate wetland deterioration, especially in the Mediterranean region. On the one side, it will accelerate the decline in the populations and species of plants and animals, this resulting in an impoverishment of biological abundance. On the other one, it will also promote biotic homogenization, resulting in a loss of species' diversity. In this context, different climate change adaptation policies can be designed: those oriented to recovering species' abundance and those aimed at restoring species' diversity. Based on the awareness that knowledge about visitors' preferences is crucial to better inform policy makers and secure wetlands' public use and conservation, this paper assesses the recreational benefits of different adaptation options through a choice experiment study carried out in S'Albufera wetland (Mallorca). Results show that visitors display positive preferences for an increase in both species' abundance and diversity, although they assign a higher value to the latter, thus suggesting a higher social acceptability of policies pursuing wetlands' differentiation. This finding acquires special relevance not only for adaptation management in wetlands but also for tourism planning, as most visitors to S'Albufera are tourists. Thus, given the growing competition to attract visitors and the increasing demand for high environmental quality and unique experiences, promoting wetlands' differentiation could be a good strategy to gain competitive advantage over other wetland areas and tourism destinations.

  1. Valuing the Recreational Benefits of Wetland Adaptation to Climate Change: A Trade-off Between Species' Abundance and Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccioli, Michela; Riera Font, Antoni; Torres Figuerola, Catalina M.

    2015-03-01

    Climate change will further exacerbate wetland deterioration, especially in the Mediterranean region. On the one side, it will accelerate the decline in the populations and species of plants and animals, this resulting in an impoverishment of biological abundance. On the other one, it will also promote biotic homogenization, resulting in a loss of species' diversity. In this context, different climate change adaptation policies can be designed: those oriented to recovering species' abundance and those aimed at restoring species' diversity. Based on the awareness that knowledge about visitors' preferences is crucial to better inform policy makers and secure wetlands' public use and conservation, this paper assesses the recreational benefits of different adaptation options through a choice experiment study carried out in S'Albufera wetland (Mallorca). Results show that visitors display positive preferences for an increase in both species' abundance and diversity, although they assign a higher value to the latter, thus suggesting a higher social acceptability of policies pursuing wetlands' differentiation. This finding acquires special relevance not only for adaptation management in wetlands but also for tourism planning, as most visitors to S'Albufera are tourists. Thus, given the growing competition to attract visitors and the increasing demand for high environmental quality and unique experiences, promoting wetlands' differentiation could be a good strategy to gain competitive advantage over other wetland areas and tourism destinations.

  2. Special Supplement Introduction: Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. PMID:24936079

  3. The evolution of resistance through costly acquired immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Michael; Bowers, Roger G.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the evolutionary dynamics of resistance to parasites through acquired immunity. Resistance can be achieved through the innate mechanisms of avoidance of infection and reduced pathogenicity once infected, through recovery from infection and through remaining immune to infection: acquired immunity. We assume that each of these mechanisms is costly to the host and find that the evolutionary dynamics of innate immunity in hosts that also have acquired immunity are quantitatively the same as in hosts that possess only innate immunity. However, compared with resistance through avoidance or recovery, there is less likely to be polymorphism in the length of acquired immunity within populations. Long-lived organisms that can recover at intermediate rates faced with fast-transmitting pathogens that cause intermediate pathogenicity (mortality of infected individuals) are most likely to evolve long-lived acquired immunity. Our work emphasizes that because whether or not acquired immunity is beneficial depends on the characteristics of the disease, organisms may be selected to only develop acquired immunity to some of the diseases that they encounter. PMID:15209105

  4. Next-generation sequencing reveals a conserved haplotype controlling parallel adaptation in geographically distant rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Local adaptation is the process by which different individuals of the same species are exposed to distinct forces of natural selection and populations adapt or acquire traits that provide an advantage in their local environment. Salmonid fishes exhibit extensive local adaptations due to an abundant ...

  5. Intra-plastid protein trafficking: how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition.

    PubMed

    Celedon, Jose M; Cline, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involve a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to the organelle to avoid aggregation in the aqueous compartments. Soluble proteins faced a different kind of problem since some had to be transported across three membranes to reach their destination. Early studies suggested that chloroplasts addressed these issues by adapting ancient-prokaryotic machineries and integrating them with novel-eukaryotic systems, a process called 'conservative sorting'. In the last decade, detailed biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have unraveled the mechanisms of protein targeting and localization in chloroplasts, suggesting a highly integrated scheme where ancient and novel systems collaborate at different stages of the process. In this review we focus on the differences and similarities between chloroplast ancestral translocases and their prokaryotic relatives to highlight known modifications that adapted them to the eukaryotic situation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  6. Simultaneous sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Overduin, Simon A; Richardson, Andrew G; Bizzi, Emilio; Press, Daniel Z

    2008-01-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning have often been treated as distinct forms of motor learning. But frequently the motor system must acquire both types of experience simultaneously. Here, we investigated the interaction of these two forms of motor learning by having subjects adapt to predictable forces imposed by a robotic manipulandum while simultaneously reaching to an implicit sequence of targets. We show that adaptation to novel dynamics and learning of a sequence of movements can occur simultaneously and without significant interference or facilitation. When both conditions were presented simultaneously to subjects, their trajectory error and reaction time decreased to the same extent as those of subjects who experienced the force field or sequence independently.

  7. Allopurinol in the treatment of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tilz, Hemma; Becker, Jürgen Christian; Legat, Franz; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Inzinger, Martin; Massone, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis is a perforating dermatosis usually associated with different systemic diseases, mainly diabetes mellitus and/or chronic renal insufficiency. Different therapies have been tried but treatment is not standardized yet and remains a challenge. In the last few years, allopurinol has been reported as a good therapeutic option for acquired reactive perforating collagenosis. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man affected by acquired reactive perforating collagenosis associated with diabetes type 1 and chronic renal failure with secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient was successfully treated with allopurinol 100mg once/day p.o.. PMID:23539010

  8. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carmen; Acharya, Sashi; Arumainayagam, Joseph T; Kasparis, Christos; Dhesi, I

    2016-10-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare dermatological manifestation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which causes distinctive skin lesions in sun-exposed areas. Both inherited and acquired forms exist. Immunocompromised individuals, such as HIV patients, are at risk of acquired EV. EV poses challenges in its management and variable responses are seen in different individuals. In addition, EV carries a significant risk of skin malignancy with certain HPV types that require skin surveillance. A case of acquired EV in a HIV-positive patient is presented in this report.

  9. Successful steroid treatment of acquired idiopathic partial hypohidrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoritaka, Asako; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Akagi, Kumiko; Kishida, Shuji

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic-acquired hypohidrosis remains unknown, and no specific causes have yet been established. We report a 34-year-old man with acquired idiopathic hypohidrosis successfully treated with prednisolone. The patient noticed heat intolerance and hypohidrosis of the pectoral and back during the summer. No systemic disease or neurological findings were identified. Eccrine sweat glands displayed infiltration by inflammatory cells, with immunoglobulin G and C3 deposition in the basement membrane. Steroid therapy improved the hypohidrosis. An immunological pathogenesis could be a major factor in idiopathic-acquired hypohidrosis.

  10. The electrodiagnostic distinctions between chronic familial and acquired demyelinative neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R A; Sumner, A J

    1982-06-01

    We compared the electrodiagnostic studies of 40 patients with chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy and 18 patients with familial demyelinative neuropathy. Patients with acquired neuropathy had differential slowing of conduction velocity when distal latencies were compared with more proximal conduction velocities in the same nerve, when equivalent segments of different nerves were compared, and when dispersion of compound motor action potentials was examined. Conduction block was noted in some patients. Patients with familial disease had uniform conduction slowly of all nerve segments, and conduction block was not seen. Chronic acquired demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by multifocal slowing of nerve conduction, whereas familial demyelinative neuropathy is characterized by uniform conduction slowing.

  11. 36 CFR 219.27 - Special designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning Special Considerations § 219.27 Special... permitted by law, adopt special designations through plan amendment or revision. Special designations...

  12. Adaptation in a rotating artificial gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1998-01-01

    The centripetal force generated by a rotating space vehicle is a potential source of artificial gravity. Minimizing the cost of such a vehicle dictates using the smallest radius and highest rotation rate possible, but head movements made at high rotation rates generate disorienting, nauseogenic cross-coupled semicircular canal stimulation. Early studies suggested 3 or 4 rpm as the highest rate at which humans could adapt to this vestibular stimulus. These studies neglected the concomitant Coriolis force actions on the head/neck system. We assessed non-vestibular Coriolis effects by measuring arm and leg movements made in the center of a rotating room turning at 10 rpm and found that movement endpoints and trajectories are initially deviated; however, subjects readily adapt with 10-20 additional movements, even without seeing their errors. Equilibrium point theories of motor control errantly predict that Coriolis forces will not cause movement endpoint errors so that subjects will not have to adapt their reaching movements during rotation. Adaptation of movement trajectory acquired during Coriolis force perturbations of one arm transfers to the unexposed arm but there is no intermanual transfer of endpoint adaptation indicating that neuromotor representations of movement endpoint and trajectory are separable and can adapt independently, also contradictory to equilibrium point theories. Touching a surface at the end of reaching movements is required for complete endpoint adaptation in darkness but trajectory adapts completely with or without terminal contact. We have also made the first kinematic measurements of unconstrained head movements during rotation, these movements show rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations. Our results point to methods for achieving full compensation for rotation up to 10 rpm. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. The Adaptive Edge: Introducing Adaptive Skills Techniques to Army Special Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    procedures (TTPs) vis-à-vis the Joint Combined Exchange and Training (JCET) program and other short duration real world missions. SF Soldiers were able...Services, 1990), 171. 21  Aim to exercise regularly. Exercise dissipates the adrenaline that builds up in stressful situations and leaves us with a

  14. Special Needs: A Philosophical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vehmas, Simo

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to illuminate a central concept and idea in special education discourse, namely, "special needs". It analyses philosophically what needs are and on what grounds they are defined as "special" or "exceptional". It also discusses whether sorting needs into ordinary and special is discriminatory. It is argued that individualistic…

  15. Special Feature: Graphic Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidhazy, Andrew; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Special feature includes "There's More to Blur than Meets the Eye" (Davidhazy), about photographic imaging; "Photography Lab's Silver Lining" (Borchers), about recycling silver; "Budget-Priced Layout Programs for School Publishing with DPT [Desktop Publishing]" (Dose); and "Good Learning and Good PR--All in One…

  16. Special Amnesty Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TESOL Adult Education and Refugee Concerns Interest Sections Newsletter, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of the newsletter of the Adult Education Interest Section (AEIS) of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), prepared in cooperation with TESOL's refugee concerns interest section, concerns the response of the English-as-a-Second-Language teaching profession to Immigration and Naturalization Service…

  17. Handbook of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M., Ed.; Hallahan, Daniel P., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Special education is now an established part of public education in the United States--by law and by custom. However, it is still widely misunderstood and continues to be dogged by controversies related to such things as categorization, grouping, assessment, placement, funding, instruction, and a variety of legal issues. The purpose of this…

  18. Online Learning. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Special section includes "World Wide Weeds" (Ann M. Bauer), about trainers as webmasters; "Get the Picture?" (Frank Jossi)--the role of digital video in computer-based training; and "The Reluctant Executive" (Anne K. Fredrickson), how to get administrators into the information age. (JOW)

  19. Fixing Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.

    2007-01-01

    The current system of educating disabled students provides financial incentives to schools to overidentify students as disabled and underserve those that are identified. The incentive to overidentify is caused by providing schools with additional funds as more students are placed in special education categories that are ambiguous to diagnose and…

  20. NASA's Getaway Special.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1978-01-01

    The "Getaway Special" is NASA's semiofficial program for low-budget researchers, who can arrange bookings for their own space experiments on regular flights of the space shuttle. Information about arranging for NASA to take individual experiment packages is presented. (LBH)

  1. Fitness in Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    This book examines fitness research among special populations, including research on fitness assessment, programming, and performance for persons with various forms of physical disabilities. The book covers such topics as diseases that complicate life in a wheelchair, disability classifications, physiological responses to training, positive…

  2. Communication With Special Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitzen, Maggie

    1977-01-01

    Phoenix College, Arizona, makes use of minority and special interest media to communicate with non-traditional students. Techniques are described for reaching minorities, senior citizens, elementary and secondary school students, parents with problems, nursing home workers, the handicapped, the economically deprived, and the general public. (RT)

  3. A Special Trinomial Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author takes up the special trinomial (1 + x + x[squared])[superscript n] and shows that the coefficients of its expansion are entries of a Pascal-like triangle. He also shows how to calculate these entries recursively and explicitly. This article could be used in the classroom for enrichment. (Contains 1 table.)

  4. Special Issue: Resumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes "Writing Effective Resumes" (Kursmark); "Writing Cover Letters with Credibility" (Davis); "Career Portfolios" (Miller); "Writing a Top-Flight Vitae" (Orlando); "Converting a Curriculum Vitae to a Resume" (Katz, Morahan); "Special Reports" (Chapman); "Every Job Searcher Needs an e-Resume" (Dixson); "Military Value" (Burns); "Key Words"…

  5. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  6. Spotlight on Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Lasky, Beth

    2009-01-01

    With the everyday juggling act principals perform, they have a daunting challenge to keep up the latest research in education. At the same time, the literature documents an intensive need for increased professional development of principals in special education (Goar, Schwenn, & Boyer, 1997; Lasky & Karge, 2006; McLaughlin & Nolet, 2004). To…

  7. Iranian Special Library Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purposes of these standards are: (1) to suggest the steps necessary for the establishment of special libraries; (2) for those recently established, to suggest the steps necessary to achieve satisfactory performance levels in all areas, and finally, (3) for well established libraries, to suggest the steps necessary to achieve excellence. These…

  8. Special Observance Planning Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Contests with prizes o Essay contest o Poster contest o Historical /cultural knowledge games • Dramatic reenactments of historical events o...detail and coordinating with command and support offices are critical from initial concept development to event completion and closing of the historical ...months to commemorate groups, causes, or events with special recognition and activities. From an equal opportunity and historical standpoint, most

  9. Special Milk Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Special Milk Program provides milk to children in schools, child care institutions and eligible camps that do not participate in other Federal child nutrition meal service programs. The program reimburses schools and institutions for the milk they serve. In 2008, 4,676 schools and residential child care institutions participated, along with…

  10. Specially Funded Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA.

    A total of eight specially funded programs designed to improve social and human conditions are described. These programs are Adult Basic Education (ABE), Adult Personal Traffic Safety (APTS), Emergency Employment Act (EEA), Industry Sponsored Programs (ISP), Manpower Development Training Act (MDTA), Model Cities Projects, Work Incentive Program…

  11. Elementary Teacher Training Specialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quincy Coll., IL.

    This specialized teacher training program, submitted by Quincy College, Quincy, Illinois as an entry in the 1973 Distinguished Achievement Award Program, provided perspective teachers with increased opportunities and experiences in specific areas of competency. These areas were early childhood education and remedial reading. The Remedial Reading…

  12. Special Needs Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Vocational Education, Boise.

    The curriculum guide was designed for Vocational Special Needs Programs in Idaho and concentrates on preparing handicapped and disadvantaged students to succeed in regular vocational programs. The subjects, pre-vocational in nature, include: Living Skills (self concept, life management, community resources, food and nutrition, clothing and…

  13. Special Education Law Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1989-01-01

    Due to an error made in printing Professor Zirkel's "Special Education Law; Recent Developments" in Volume 48 (October 13, 1988), these updates to the article are printed. Citations are organized under the following major sections: (1) diagnosis and placement; (2) treatment issues; (3) financial issues; and (4) gifted students. (MLF)

  14. Special Education: Procedural Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The guide is intended to provide information to administrators and regional and local case study committees on special education procedures within Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS). The manual addresses a step-by step approach from referral to the implementation of individualized education programs (IEP). The following topics are…

  15. Columbia Quincentenary. Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foard, Douglas, Ed.; Regoli, Michael, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This special theme issue of the OAH Magazine of History contains articles that present a variety of perspectives on the Columbian Quincentenary--the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's voyages of discovery. The articles include: "Exploring the Columbian Quincentenary through Historiography" (John Hebert); "Science, Religion,…

  16. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  17. Placental specializations in lecithotrophic viviparous squamate reptiles.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James R

    2015-09-01

    Squamate reptiles have been thought to be predisposed to evolution of viviparity because embryos of most oviparous species undergo considerable development in the uterus prior to oviposition. A related hypothesis proposes that prolonged intrauterine gestation, an intermediate condition leading to viviparity, requires little or no physiological adjustment, other than reduction in thickness of the eggshell. This logical framework is often accompanied by an assumption that mode of parity (oviparity, viviparity) and pattern of embryonic nutrition (lecithotrophy, placentotrophy) are independent traits that evolve in sequence. Thus, specializations for viviparity should be absent in some lecithotrophic viviparous species. Studies of species of lizards with geographic variation in mode of parity challenge this scenario by demonstrating that placental specializations are correlated with viviparity. Uterine specializations for placental transport of calcium to viviparous embryos alter uterine physiology compared to oviparous females. In addition, comparative studies of oviparous and viviparous species, i.e., in which gene flow is disrupted, reveal that both uterine and embryonic structural modifications are commonly associated with viviparity, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of placental specializations. Studies of squamate reproductive biology support two hypotheses: 1) evolution of viviparity requires physiological adjustments of the uterine environment, and 2) evolution of viviparity promotes relatively rapid adaptations for placentation. Models for the evolution of viviparity from oviparity, or for reversals from viviparity to oviparity, should reflect current understanding of squamate reproductive biology and future studies should be designed to challenge these models.

  18. Sports Specialization, Part II

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Jayanthi, Neeru; DiFiori, John P.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Logerstedt, David; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many coaches, parents, and children believe that the best way to develop elite athletes is for them to participate in only 1 sport from an early age and to play it year-round. However, emerging evidence to the contrary indicates that efforts to specialize in 1 sport may reduce opportunities for all children to participate in a diverse year-round sports season and can lead to lost development of lifetime sports skills. Early sports specialization may also reduce motor skill development and ongoing participation in games and sports as a lifestyle choice. The purpose of this review is to employ the current literature to provide evidence-based alternative strategies that may help to optimize opportunities for all aspiring young athletes to maximize their health, fitness, and sports performance. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review with critical appraisal of existing literature. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Conclusion: Based on the current evidence, parents and educators should help provide opportunities for free unstructured play to improve motor skill development and youth should be encouraged to participate in a variety of sports during their growing years to influence the development of diverse motor skills. For those children who do choose to specialize in a single sport, periods of intense training and specialized sport activities should be closely monitored for indicators of burnout, overuse injury, or potential decrements in performance due to overtraining. Last, the evidence indicates that all youth should be involved in periodized strength and conditioning (eg, integrative neuromuscular training) to help them prepare for the demands of competitive sport participation, and youth who specialize in a single sport should plan periods of isolated and focused integrative neuromuscular training to enhance diverse motor skill development and reduce injury risk factors. Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): B. PMID

  19. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    PubMed

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  20. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.