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Sample records for acral volar skin

  1. Genetics Home Reference: acral peeling skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat, humidity and other forms of moisture, and friction. The underlying skin may be temporarily red and ... tend to be heavily exposed to moisture and friction. Learn more about the gene associated with acral ...

  2. Responses in acral and non-acral skin vasomotion and temperature during lowering of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Elstad, Maja; Vanggaard, Leif; Lossius, Astrid H; Walløe, Lars; Bergersen, Tone Kristin

    2014-10-01

    Arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) in acral skin (palms and soles) have a huge capacity to shunt blood directly from the arteries to the superficial venous plexus of the extremities. We hypothesized that acral skin, which supplies blood to the superficial venous plexus, has a stronger influence on blood flow adjustments during cooling in thermoneutral subjects than does non-acral skin. Thirteen healthy subjects were exposed to stepwise cooling from 32 °C to 25 °C and 17 °C in a climate chamber. Laser Doppler flux and skin temperature were measured simultaneously from the left and right third finger pulp and bilateral upper arm skin. Coherence and correlation analyses were performed of short-term fluctuations at each temperature interval. The flux from finger pulps showed the synchronous spontaneous fluctuations characteristic of skin areas containing AVAs. Fluctuation frequency, amplitude and synchronicity were all higher at 25 °C than at 32 °C and 17 °C (p<0.02). Bilateral flux from the upper arm skin showed an irregular, asynchronous vasomotor pattern with small amplitudes which were independent of ambient temperature. At 32 °C, ipsilateral median flux values from the right arm (95% confidence intervals) were 492 arbitrary units (au) (417, 537) in finger pulp and 43 au (35, 60) in upper arm skin. Flux values gradually decreased in finger pulp to 246 au (109, 363) at 25 °C, before an abrupt fall occurred at a median room temperature of 24 °C, resulting in a flux value of 79 au (31, 116) at 17 °C. In the upper arm skin a gradual fall throughout the cooling period to 21 au (13, 27) at 17 °C was observed. The fact that the response of blood flow to ambient cooling is stronger in acral skin than in non-acral skin suggests that AVAs have a greater capacity to adjust blood flow in thermoneutral zone than arterioles in non-acral skin. PMID:25436967

  3. A melanocyte--melanoma precursor niche in sweat glands of volar skin.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Natsuko; Aoto, Takahiro; Uhara, Hisashi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Saida, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Emi K

    2014-11-01

    Determination of the niche for early-stage cancer remains a challenging issue. Melanoma is an aggressive cancer of the melanocyte lineage. Early melanoma cells are often found in the epidermis around sweat ducts of human volar skin, and the skin pigmentation pattern is an early diagnostic sign of acral melanoma. However, the niche for melanoma precursors has not been determined yet. Here, we report that the secretory portion (SP) of eccrine sweat glands provide an anatomical niche for melanocyte-melanoma precursor cells. Using lineage-tagged H2B-GFP reporter mice, we found that melanoblasts that colonize sweat glands during development are maintained in an immature, slow-cycling state but renew themselves in response to genomic stress and provide their differentiating progeny to the epidermis. FISH analysis of human acral melanoma expanding in the epidermis revealed that unpigmented melanoblasts with significant cyclin D1 gene amplification reside deep in the SP of particular sweat gland(s). These findings indicate that sweat glands maintain melanocyte-melanoma precursors in an immature state in the niche and explain the preferential distribution of early melanoma cells around sweat glands in human volar skin. PMID:25065272

  4. Atypical dermoscopic presentation of an acral congenital melanocytic nevus in an adult: parallel ridge pattern and its histologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Marín, Rodrigo; González-de-Cossío-Hernández, Ana Cecilia; Lammoglia-Ordiales, Lorena; Martínez-Luna, Eduwiges; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Ferrara, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Acral melanoma is the most frequent subtype in the Asian and Mexican mestizo populations. Dermoscopy is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that helps the differential diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions on acral volar skin. We, herein, present a case of acral congenital melanocytic nevus with a parallel ridge dermoscopic pattern. Since the parallel ridge pattern in a melanocytic lesion of the acral skin is classically ascribed to melanoma, the present case can be definitely labeled as “atypical” and worth of being elucidated in its histopathological correlates. PMID:26693085

  5. Acral peeling skin syndrome associated with a novel CSTA gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Muttardi, K; Nitoiu, D; Kelsell, D P; O'Toole, E A; Batta, K

    2016-06-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, characterized by asymptomatic peeling of the skin of the hands and feet, often linked to mutations in the gene TGM5. However, more recently recessive loss of function mutations in CSTA, encoding cystatin A, have been linked with APSS and exfoliative ichthyosis. We describe the clinical features in two sisters with APSS, associated with a novel large homozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 of CSTA. PMID:26684698

  6. Hypercalciuria in a child with acral peeling skin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, Daiva; Węgłowska, Jolanta; Prescha, Anna; Woźniak, Zdzisław; Nesteruk, Dominika; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Śmigiel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 3-year-old Caucasian boy who developed monthly cyclic attacks of skin peeling of the palms and soles over 1.5 years. The skin peeling was associated with hypercalciuria. No mutation was present in TGM5 and CSTA genes, but the typical clinical picture and the biopsy from flaccid blisters on the feet confirmed the acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS). The possible associations of rare genetic disorders and metabolic conditions in the course of APSS need to be investigated. PMID:25969915

  7. Acral Peeling Skin Syndrome Resembling Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex in a 10-Month-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Kavaklieva, S.; Yordanova, I.; Bruckner-Tuderman, L.; Has, C.

    2013-01-01

    The acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by asymptomatic desquamation of the skin limited to the hands and feet and histologically by cleavage at the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum level [Kiritsi et al.: J Invest Dermatol 2010;130:1741–1746]. We report on a 10-month-old boy with a history of skin peeling limited to the hands and feet since 2 months of age. Clinical examination revealed erythematous erosions with peripheral desquamation and flaccid blisters. DNA mutation analysis detected two heterozygous TGM5 mutations: c.2T>C, p.M1T in exon 1 and c.337G>T, p.G113C in exon 3 in keeping with the diagnosis of APSS. The clinical presentation of APSS alone might be confusing and strongly resemble epidermolysis bullosa simplex making the differential diagnosis difficult. PMID:24019772

  8. Imatinib for Melanomas Harboring Mutationally Activated or Amplified KIT Arising on Mucosal, Acral, and Chronically Sun-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Hodi, F. Stephen; Corless, Christopher L.; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Zhu, Meijun; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Friedlander, Philip; Gonzalez, Rene; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; O'Day, Steven J.; Kim, Kevin B.; Lawrence, Donald; Flaherty, Keith T.; Luke, Jason J.; Collichio, Frances A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Beadling, Carol; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Demetri, George D.; Fisher, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Amplifications and mutations in the KIT proto-oncogene in subsets of melanomas provide therapeutic opportunities. Patients and Methods We conducted a multicenter phase II trial of imatinib in metastatic mucosal, acral, or chronically sun-damaged (CSD) melanoma with KIT amplifications and/or mutations. Patients received imatinib 400 mg once per day or 400 mg twice per day if there was no initial response. Dose reductions were permitted for treatment-related toxicities. Additional oncogene mutation screening was performed by mass spectroscopy. Results Twenty-five patients were enrolled (24 evaluable). Eight patients (33%) had tumors with KIT mutations, 11 (46%) with KIT amplifications, and five (21%) with both. Median follow-up was 10.6 months (range, 3.7 to 27.1 months). Best overall response rate (BORR) was 29% (21% excluding nonconfirmed responses) with a two-stage 95% CI of 13% to 51%. BORR was significantly greater than the hypothesized null of 5% and statistically significantly different by mutation status (7 of 13 or 54% KIT mutated v 0% KIT amplified only). There were no statistical differences in rates of progression or survival by mutation status or by melanoma site. The overall disease control rate was 50% but varied significantly by KIT mutation status (77% mutated v 18% amplified). Four patients harbored pretreatment NRAS mutations, and one patient acquired increased KIT amplification after treatment. Conclusion Melanomas that arise on mucosal, acral, or CSD skin should be assessed for KIT mutations. Imatinib can be effective when tumors harbor KIT mutations, but not if KIT is amplified only. NRAS mutations and KIT copy number gain may be mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to imatinib. PMID:23775962

  9. Loss-of-function mutations in CAST cause peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhimiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Nitoiu, Daniela; Scott, Claire A; Plagnol, Vincent; Smith, Frances J D; Wilson, Neil J; Cole, Christian; Schwartz, Mary E; McLean, W H Irwin; Wang, Huijun; Feng, Cheng; Duo, Lina; Zhou, Eray Yihui; Ren, Yali; Dai, Lanlan; Chen, Yulan; Zhang, Jianguo; Xu, Xun; O'Toole, Edel A; Kelsell, David P; Yang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Calpastatin is an endogenous specific inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. Here we show that loss-of-function mutations in calpastatin (CAST) are the genetic causes of an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by generalized peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads, which we propose to be given the acronym PLACK syndrome. In affected individuals with PLACK syndrome from three families of different ethnicities, we identified homozygous mutations (c.607dup, c.424A>T, and c.1750delG) in CAST, all of which were predicted to encode truncated proteins (p.Ile203Asnfs∗8, p.Lys142∗, and p.Val584Trpfs∗37). Immunohistochemistry shows that staining of calpastatin is reduced in skin from affected individuals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed widening of intercellular spaces with chromatin condensation and margination in the upper stratum spinosum in lesional skin, suggesting impaired intercellular adhesion as well as keratinocyte apoptosis. A significant increase of apoptotic keratinocytes was also observed in TUNEL assays. In vitro studies utilizing siRNA-mediated CAST knockdown revealed a role for calpastatin in keratinocyte adhesion. In summary, we describe PLACK syndrome, as a clinical entity of defective epidermal adhesion, caused by loss-of-function mutations in CAST. PMID:25683118

  10. Forty-Year Follow-up of Full-Thickness Skin Graft After Thermal Burn Injury to the Volar Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. Methods: We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner. The patient subsequently underwent scar contracture release and full-thickness skin grafting. Results: Eleven years after reconstruction, further contractures developed associated with the patient's growth, which were reconstructed with repeat full-thickness skin graft from the inguinal region. No recurrence was witnessed afterward and 40 years after initial injury, the patient maintains full activities of daily living and use of his hand in his occupation. Conclusions: There is debate regarding the superiority of split-thickness versus full-thickness grafts during reconstruction. Our case strengthens the argument for durability of a full-thickness skin graft following thermal burn injury. PMID:27555888

  11. Superficial acral fibromyxoma.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Jennifer L; Khachemoune, Amor

    2015-01-01

    Superficial acral fibromyxoma (SAF), also known as digital fibromyxoma, is a rare soft tissue tumor with a predilection for acral surfaces. Superficial acral fibromyxoma classically presents as a pink to flesh-colored nodule located on the subungual or periungual region of the hands or feet. It is typically slow-growing and asymptomatic, which, coupled with its nonspecific clinical appearance, presents a diagnostic dilemma to the dermatologist. As these features overlap with those of a multitude of differential diagnoses, it is imperative to have a good understanding of the characteristics on which the diagnosis of SAF is based. Superficial acral fibromyxoma was initially described in 2001, since when several case reports and literature reviews have contributed to our current understanding of these tumors. In this article, we will review the history, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of SAF. It is our hope that this systematic approach will help to facilitate the recognition and management of this distinct dermatologic entity. PMID:25772615

  12. Expression of soluble adenylyl cyclase in acral melanomas.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Kim, S M; Savkovic, V; Jin, S A; Choi, Y D; Yun, S J

    2016-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates melanocytic cells, and is a diagnostic marker for pigmented skin lesions. Because only a few studies on sAC expression in acral melanomas have been performed, we investigated the histopathological significance of sAC expression in 33 cases of acral melanoma, and assessed its diagnostic value in distinguishing melanoma in situ (MIS, n = 17) from acral invasive melanomas (n = 16) and melanocytic naevi (n = 11). Acral melanomas exhibited more marked nuclear immunopositivity compared with acral melanocytic naevi. sAC expression significantly correlated with the nuclear morphology of melanocytes and melanoma cells, namely, hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli within vesicular nuclei. sAC expression was predominantly observed in the hyperchromatic nuclei of MIS and the prominent nucleoli invasive melanomas, respectively. In vitro culture models of melanocytes and melanoma cell lines exhibited sAC staining patterns similar to those of acral melanomas. Differentiation induction showed that nuclear and nucleolar expression varied depending on cell morphology. sAC immunostaining may be useful for the differential diagnosis of acral melanocytic lesions, and sAC expressed in the nucleus and nucleolus might be related to cytological and nuclear changes associated with invasion and progression of acral melanomas. PMID:26290224

  13. Dermoscopy of acral angioma serpiginosum.

    PubMed

    Freites-Martinez, Azael; Martinez-Sanchez, Diego; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Huerta-Brogeras, Maria; Borbujo, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Angioma serpiginosum (AS) is an unusual vascular disorder that typically affects female patients, begins in childhood and stabilizes in adulthood and not frequently involve acral skin. We herein present a 13 year-old girl with an asymptomatic erythematous punctuate first noticed on the right palm three years ago, with a proximal serpiginous progression up to the forearm. On examination there was a nonblanching erythematous punctuate on the palm and the inner aspect of right hand and forearm. Dermoscopy showed an erythematous parallel ridge pattern with some red globules and dots spreading on a linear arrangement, and the acrosyringia openings were not affected. Histopathological study showed dilated capillaries in the dermal papillae. This feature is consistent with angioma serpiginosum (AS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that shows a dermoscopic image of a palmar AS. The dermoscopic pattern described in this case could aid in the diagnosis of AS and could add a value in the differential diagnosis with vascular lesions on acral skin. PMID:25756486

  14. [Acral acanthosis nigricans associated with taking growth hormone].

    PubMed

    Peña Irún, A

    2014-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans is a skin lesion characterized by the presence of a hyperpigmented, velvety cutaneous thickening that usually appears in flexural areas. Less frequently, it can occur in other locations, such as the dorsum of hands and feet. In this case it is called acral acanthosis nigricans. It is a dermatological manifestation of systemic disease. It is often associated with insulin resistance-mediated endocrine diseases. A case is presented on a patient with acanthosis nigricans secondary to the use of growth hormone. PMID:23746703

  15. Acral Lentiginous Melanoma: A Case Control Study and Guidelines Update

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Christoforos; Efthimiadis, Christoforos; Anthimidis, Georgios; Grigoriou, Marios; Vasiliadou, Kalliopi; Ioannidou, Georgia; Makedou, Fotini; Baka, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Background. Malignant melanoma incidence is increasing dramatically. We report herein a case of the rarest acral lentiginous type. Case Report. A 58-year-old man presented with a melanoma resembling lesion over the sole of his right foot, measuring 15–20 mm in diameter. An excisional biopsy with a narrow (2 mm) margin of surrounding skin was obtained. Histological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of acral lentiginous melanoma. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was also performed and micrometastases were not identified in frozen-section examination. According to the AJCC system, the tumor stage was IB (T2aN0M0). A wide local excision of the biopsy scar with a margin of 2 cm was performed. A split-thickness thick skin graft was used to reconstruct the excisional defect. During an 18-month followup, no local or distant recurrence has been observed. This paper aims to extract an updated rational approach to the management of this disease out of an enormous body of knowledge. PMID:21541184

  16. Skin cancer and photoaging in ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Halder, Rebat M; Ara, Collette J

    2003-10-01

    Skin cancer prevalence in ethnic skin is low. Squamous cell carcinoma, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, and acral lentiginous melanoma are the most serious types of skin cancer noted in the darker-skinned population. Photoaging occurs less frequently and is less severe in ethnic skin. PMID:14717413

  17. Acral, Superficial Spreading Melanoma Arising on Melanocytic Nevus in a Pregnant Woman: A Case Report with Review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Gupta, Vivek; Thakur, Alpna

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM) on left palm of a 37-year-old pregnant housewife. She had a small acquired melanocytic nevus on her left palm since childhood, which changed its consistency and color in the last 4 months. Dermoscopy of the lesion indicated malignant changes. The lesion was managed surgically using split-thickness skin graft. The histopathology report was suggestive of SSM with positive HMB-45 cells. SSM is very rare on the acral site, and it is very difficult to differentiate it from acral lentiginous melanoma. The rarity of the site (acral nonchronic sun damage) with evolution during pregnancy and importance of management approach are reasons for publishing this case. PMID:26677279

  18. Maintenance of sweat glands by stem cells located in the acral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Shuichi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Kanno, Shohei; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Atsumi, Naho; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Yamazaki, Fumikazu; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-10-23

    The skin is responsible for a variety of physiological functions and is critical for wound healing and repair. Therefore, the regenerative capacity of the skin is important. However, stem cells responsible for maintaining the acral epithelium had not previously been identified. In this study, we identified the specific stem cells in the acral epithelium that participate in the long-term maintenance of sweat glands, ducts, and interadnexal epidermis and that facilitate the regeneration of these structures following injury. Lgr6-positive cells and Bmi1-positive cells were found to function as long-term multipotent stem cells that maintained the entire eccrine unit and the interadnexal epidermis. However, while Lgr6-positive cells were rapidly cycled and constantly supplied differentiated cells, Bmi1-positive cells were slow to cycle and occasionally entered the cell cycle under physiological conditions. Upon irradiation-induced injury, Bmi1-positive cells rapidly proliferated and regenerated injured epithelial tissue. Therefore, Bmi1-positive stem cells served as reservoir stem cells. Lgr5-positive cells were rapidly cycled and maintained only sweat glands; therefore, we concluded that these cells functioned as lineage-restricted progenitors. Taken together, our data demonstrated the identification of stem cells that maintained the entire acral epithelium and supported the different roles of three cellular classes. PMID:26362184

  19. Seronegative necrolytic acral erythema: A report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Vishalakshi S.; Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema (NAE) is a newly described entity, seen in patients infected with hepatitis C virus. It is characterized by its distinguishing acral distribution, psoriasiform skin eruption and histological features. Its etiopathogenesis is not fully understood though hypo amino academia, hyperglucagonemia and zinc deficiency are considered as probable causes. In 1996, El Darouti and Abu el Ela first described this entity in seven Egyptian patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Since then, several small studies and cases have been reported around the world. Nevertheless, it may occur independently without HCV association as a few cases have been reported recently. We report two seronegative cases of NAE, which responded dramatically with oral zinc therapy. This suggests that NAE could be an isolated clinical subset. PMID:27559510

  20. Distal Radius Volar Rim Fracture Fixation Using DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate.

    PubMed

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Tarabochia, Matthew; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-03-01

    Background To assess the results of distal radius fractures with the involvement of the volar rim fixed with the DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate. Case Description We searched for the patients with volar rim fracture and/or volar rim fractures as part of a complex fracture fixed with a volar rim plate. Ten patients met the inclusion criteria: three patients with type 23B3, six patients with type 23C, and one patient with very distal type 23A. The mean follow-up was 14 months (range: 2-26). Fractures healed in all patients. Of the three patients with isolated volar rim fractures (type 23B3), two patients had no detectable deficits in motion. These patients had an average Gartland and Werley score of 9 (range: 2-14). Of the other seven patients (six with type 23C and one with type 23A fracture), three patients healed with full range of motion and four had some deficits in range of motion. Two patients had excellent results, three had good results, and two had fair results using the Gartland and Werley categorical rating. One patient healed with a shortened radius and ulnar impingement requiring a second surgery for ulnar head resection arthroplasty. Literature Review Results after nonoperative treatment of volar rim fractures are not satisfactory and often require subsequent corrective osteotomy. Satisfactory outcomes are achieved when the fragments are well reduced and secured regardless of the device type. Clinical Relevance Volar rim plates give an adequate buttress of the volar radius distal to volar projection of the lunate facet and do not interfere with wrist mobility. Furthermore, the dorsal fragments can be fixed securely through the volar approach eliminating the need for a secondary posterior incision. However, patients should be informed of the potential problems and the need to remove the plate if symptoms develop. PMID:26855829

  1. Acral keratoses and leucocytoclastic vasculitis occurring during treatment of essential thrombocythaemia with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Worley, B; Glassman, S J

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used in essential thrombocythaemia to lower thromboembolic risk. Cutaneous adverse effects from hydroxyurea are diverse. Small vessel vasculitis has been rarely reported, and the coexistence of several different morphologies has not been described. We report a case of acral keratoses, psoriasiform plaques and leucocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) in a patient with essential thrombocythaemia. A 69-year-old woman developed a confusing array of skin lesions including keratotic papules, psoriasiform plaques and keratoderma 4 years after commencing hydroxyurea therapy. The initial diagnosis was hand and foot psoriasis, but lesions were resistant to therapy. With an increase in the dose of hydroxyurea, the lesions ulcerated. Skin biopsies taken from different sites indicated different diagnoses, including LCV. Discontinuation of hydroxyurea yielded rapid improvement. Although the most commonly reported cutaneous adverse effect from hydroxyurea is leg ulceration, this can be preceded or accompanied by less dramatic skin lesions. Unless recognized, delayed diagnosis and lesion progression can occur. PMID:26269121

  2. MAP Kinase Pathways: Molecular Roads to Primary Acral Lentiginous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ricardo; de Freitas, Luiz A. R.; Brandao, Miguel A. R.; Lourenço, Silvia V.; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The etiology and pathogenesis of lentiginous acral melanomas are poorly understood. Recent studies have postulated that DNA repair mechanisms and cell growth pathways are involved in the development of melanoma, particularly changes in the MAPK pathways (RAS, BRAF, MEK 1/2, and ERK 1/2). The aim of this study is to assess the status of the MAP kinase pathways in the pathogenesis of acral melanomas. The authors examined the components of the RAS–RAF–MEK–ERK cascades by immunohistochemistry in a series of 16 primary acral melanomas by tissue microarray. The expression of MAP kinase cascade proteins changed in most cases. The authors observed that 57.14% of cases were BRAF positive and that 61.53%, 71.42%, and 71.42% of cases were positive for MEK2, ERK1, and ERK2, respectively; RAS was not expressed in 92.31%, and all cases were negative for MEK1. The absence of RAS and positivity for MEK2, ERK1, and ERK2 were most seen in invasive cases with high thickness. These aspects of the MAPK pathway require further examination in acral melanomas between different populations. Nevertheless, the results highlight significant alterations in the MAP kinase cascades that are related to histological indicators of prognosis in primary acral melanomas. PMID:26588333

  3. MAP Kinase Pathways: Molecular Roads to Primary Acral Lentiginous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brandao, Miguel A R; Lourenço, Silvia V; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of lentiginous acral melanomas are poorly understood. Recent studies have postulated that DNA repair mechanisms and cell growth pathways are involved in the development of melanoma, particularly changes in the MAPK pathways (RAS, BRAF, MEK 1/2, and ERK 1/2). The aim of this study is to assess the status of the MAP kinase pathways in the pathogenesis of acral melanomas. The authors examined the components of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK cascades by immunohistochemistry in a series of 16 primary acral melanomas by tissue microarray. The expression of MAP kinase cascade proteins changed in most cases. The authors observed that 57.14% of cases were BRAF positive and that 61.53%, 71.42%, and 71.42% of cases were positive for MEK2, ERK1, and ERK2, respectively; RAS was not expressed in 92.31%, and all cases were negative for MEK1. The absence of RAS and positivity for MEK2, ERK1, and ERK2 were most seen in invasive cases with high thickness. These aspects of the MAPK pathway require further examination in acral melanomas between different populations. Nevertheless, the results highlight significant alterations in the MAP kinase cascades that are related to histological indicators of prognosis in primary acral melanomas. PMID:26588333

  4. Locked volar distal radioulnar joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Bouri, Fadi; Fuad, Mazhar; Elsayed Abdolenour, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Volar dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint is a rare injury which is commonly missed in the emergency departments. A thorough review of literature showed very few reported cases and the cause for irreducibility varied in different cases, Lack of suspicion and improper X-ray can delay the diagnosis. Case presentation Our article discusses a case 40 year old construction worker, who presented to the Emergency with work-related injury, complaining of left wrist pain, deformity and inability to rotate his forearm. X-rays revealed a volar dislocation of distal ulna which was reducible after manipulation under General Anesthesia (GA). The joint was stable after the reduction. Discussion Isolated dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint can be either volar or dorsal, although dorsal dislocation is more common. The distal radioulnar articulation plays an important role in the rotational movement of the forearm. It allows pronation and supination which are essential for the function of the upper limb. Pronator Quadratus muscle spasm is an important blockade to reduction and was preventing reduction in this case. Methods The work has been reported in line with the CARE criteria [9]. Conclusion Volar locked dislocation of Distal Radio ulnar joint is a rare injury. High degree of clinical suspicion and proper X-ray is required for prompt detection. The importance of this case is to raise the awareness among physicians in treating these kind of injuries by careful assessment of the patient and radiographs, and to consider pronator quadratus as an important cause for the blockade to reduction. PMID:27016647

  5. Cytological diagnosis of superficial acral fibromyxoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathi, Divakar Sullery; Krishnamurthy, Jayashree; Kakoti, Lopa Mudra

    2015-01-01

    Superficial acral fibromyxoma (SAF) is a rare, distinctive benign soft tissue lesion that often involves the fingers and toes, with the great toe being the most frequently affected site. We report a case of SAF diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology and confirmed by histopathology. The pre-operative cytological diagnosis will help the surgeon to plan for a wider excision that prevents recurrence. PMID:25948945

  6. Acral lick dermatitis in a jackal (Canis aureus).

    PubMed

    Yeruham, I; Nyska, A

    1998-06-01

    Acral lick dermatitis was diagnosed in a 6-mo-old female jackal (Canis aureus) that was born and housed in a zoological garden in Hafez-Haim, Israel. Other dermatologic diseases were ruled out. Although the lesions were presumed to be psychogenic in origin, they resolved with topical therapy using an ointment containing benzocaine, neomycin sulfate, and hydrocortisone acetate. No recurrence has been observed. PMID:9732044

  7. Radiographic Outcomes of Volar Locked Plating for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Megan E.; Byram, Ian R.; Wolfe, Carmen C.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koehler, Elizabeth A.; Block, John J.; Jordanov, Martin I.; Watson, Jeffry T.; Weikert, Douglas R.; Lee, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of volar locked plating to achieve and maintain normal radiographic parameters for articular stepoff, volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, and radial height in distal radius fractures. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 185 distal radius fractures that underwent volar locked plating with a single plate design over a 5-year period. We reviewed radiographs and recorded measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, radial height, and articular stepoff. We used logistic regression to determine the association between return to radiographic standard norms and fracture type. Results At the first and final postoperative follow-up visits, we observed articular congruence less than 2 mm in 92% of fractures at both times. Normal volar tilt (11°) was restored in 46% at the first follow-up and 48% at the final one. Radial inclination (22°) was achieved in 44% at the first follow-up and 43% at the final one, and ulnar variance (01 ± 2 mm) was achieved in 53% at the first follow-up and 53% at the final one. In addition, radial height (14 ± 1mm) was restored in 14% at the first follow-up and 12% at the final one. More complex, intra-articular fractures (AO class B and C and Frykman types 3, 4, 7, and 8) were less likely to be restored to normal radiographic parameters. However, because of the small sample size for some fracture types, it was difficult to discover significant associations between fracture type and radiographic outcome. Conclusions Volar locked plating for distal radius fractures achieved articular stepoff less than 2 mm in most fractures but only restored and maintained normal radiographic measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance in 50% of fractures. The ability of volar locked plating to restore and maintain ulnar variance and volar tilt decreased with more complex intra-articular fracture types. PMID:23218558

  8. Equivalence of face and volar forearm for the testing of moisturizing and firming effect of cosmetics in hydration and biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Bazin, R; Fanchon, C

    2006-12-01

    The objective of the study was to compare measurements of skin hydration and of biomechanical properties performed on different zones of face and volar forearm. Two short-term (1 h) and two long-term (3 weeks) studies were conducted with a moisturizing and a firming product, respectively, on groups of female volunteers with dry skin. Measurements (Corneometer) and Dermal Torque Meter or DTM were performed on different zones of the face and of the volar forearm, 1 h after product application, and after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of repeated twice daily application. While the sebaceous-gland rich T-zone behaves differently, probably due to sebum/skin, sebum/product and/or sebum/measuring device interactions, there are no statistically significant differences between measurements made on temple, cheek, maxilla and volar forearm. The volar forearm is representative of the face for measuring skin hydration and biomechanical properties, and relevant for the assessment of the efficacy of cosmetic products destined for facial use. PMID:18489290

  9. Articular ganglia of the volar aspect of the wrist: arthroscopic resection compared with open excision. A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Canal, Alessandra; Fanfani, Francesco; Catalano, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to compare two methods of treatment of ganglia on the volar aspect of the wrist (the open excision done through a longitudinal volar skin incision and the arthroscopic resection through two or three dorsal ports), to see if arthroscopy could reduce the risks of operating in this area and the time to healing. Twenty radiocarpal and five midcarpal volar ganglia were operated on by open approach and an equivalent group was treated by arthroscopy. Fifteen radiocarpal and five midcarpal ganglia were treated with good results in the open group and 18 radiocarpal and one midcarpal ganglia in the arthroscopic group (no visible or palpable ganglion, a full range of active wrist movement, grip strength equal to preoperatively, no pain, and a cosmetically acceptable scar). In the open group there were four injuries to a branch of the radial artery, two cases of partial stiffness of the wrist associated with a painful scar, one case of neuropraxia, and one recurrence (all of which were among the 20 radiocarpal ganglia). In the arthroscopic group there was one case of neuropraxia, one injury to a branch of the radial artery, and three recurrences (three of the complications were among the five midcarpal ganglia). The mean functional recovery time was equal to 15 (6) days in the open group and 6 (2) days in the arthroscopic group. The mean time lost from work was equal to 23 (11) days in the open group and 10 (5) days in the arthroscopic group. Our results suggest that arthroscopic resection is a reasonable alternative to open excision in treating radiocarpal volar ganglia because it has less postoperative morbidity and a better cosmetic result. Midcarpal volar ganglia, however, should still be treated by open operation. PMID:18791910

  10. Volar, Intramedullary, and Percutaneous Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Alluri, Ram; Longacre, Matthew; Pannell, William; Stevanovic, Milan; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2015-11-01

    Background The management of extra-articular distal radius fractures is highly variable, with no clear consensus regarding their optimal management. Purpose To assess comparatively the biomechanical stability of Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation, volar plating, and intramedullary nailing for unstable, extra-articular distal radius fractures with both (1) constant and (2) cyclical axial compression, simulating forces experienced during early postoperative rehabilitation. Methods Twenty-six volar locking plate, intramedullary nail, and K-wire bone-implant constructs were biomechanically assessed using an unstable extra-articular distal radius bone model. Bone implant models were created for each type of construct. Three samples from each construct underwent compressive axial loading until fixation failure. The remaining samples from each construct underwent fatigue testing with a 50-N force for 2,000 cycles followed by repeat compressive axial loading until fixation failure. Results Axial loading revealed the volar plate was significantly stiffer than the intramedullary nail and K-wire constructs. Both the volar plate and intramedullary nail required greater than 300 N of force for fixation failure, while the K-wire construct failed at less than 150 N. Both the volar plate and intramedullary nail demonstrated less than 1 mm of displacement during cyclic loading, while the K-wire construct displaced greater than 3 mm. Postfatigue testing demonstrated the volar plate was stiffer than the intramedullary nail and K-wire constructs, and both the volar plate and intramedullary nail required greater than 300 N of force for fixation failure while the K-wire construct failed at less than 150 N. Conclusions Volar plating of unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures is biomechanically stiffer than K-wire and intramedullary fixation. Both the volar plate and intramedullary nail demonstrated the necessary stability and stiffness to maintain anatomic

  11. [Volar dislocation of the fifth carpometacarpal joint: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsepelidis, D; Schuind, F

    2014-06-01

    Pure carpo-metacarpal dislocations without any fracture are rare, their volar component is exceptional. Untreated injuries can result in instability and early articular degeneration. We report a 72-year-old female patient who underwent an isolated closed volar dislocation of her fifth finger carpo-metacarpal joint after a fall. The clinical examination showed a 10°-defect in rotation with limited adduction (radial deviation). The X-rays showed a gap between the base of the fourth and the fifth metacarpal bones with volar dislocation of the base of the fifth carpometacarpal joint. The dislocation was successfully treated by closed reduction maintained with two K-wires. Immobilisation of the joint was applied for 6 weeks. At 2 years follow-up evaluation, the patient was pain free with no clinico-radiological evidence of instability and had returned to her previous level of activity. PMID:24880606

  12. Ultrastructure and histogenesis of the acral calcified angioleiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Alvarez-Argüelles, Hugo; González-Gómez, Miriam; García, Maria Del Pino; Díaz-Flores, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    We studied the ultrastructure, immunohistochemistry, and histogenesis of the acral calcified angioleiomyoma, observing three concentric zones: (a) pseudocapsular, thin, with spindle-shaped stromal cells (SCs), presenting scarce organelles and expressing CD34, (b) muscular, forming a ring, with smooth muscle cells of heterogenous phenotype (mainly in quantity and thickness of filaments, and in expression of h-caldesmon, αSMA, and desmin), and (c) central, extensive, calcified (spicular and/or star-shaped calcium deposits around collagen fibers), with pericytic involutive vasculature. The intratumoral vessels were thick (several layers of perivascular cells, with a continuum of phenotypes, resembling myopericytoma vessels) and thin (slit-like channels), without adventitial SCs or elastic material. The extratumoral vessels showed adventitial SCs (which contribute to form the tumor pseudocapsule), hyperplasia of the media and intima layers, and/or occlusion of the lumen by a wide, homogenous fibrotic central zone. Histogenetically, the collagenous matrix may act as a mineralization substrate and the calcifying modified pericytes as inductors; intratumoral vessels may originate from the peritumoral vessels or from the vessel where the tumor develops; and extratumoral vessel modifications, mimicking tumor features, concur with a minor repetitive trauma pathogenesis. PMID:26691377

  13. Reconstruction of large wounds using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and punch grafting after excision of acral lentiginous melanoma on the foot.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jimyung; Kim, Jihee; Nam, Kyoung Ae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Oh, Byung Ho; Chung, Kee Yang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma in darker-pigmented individuals often develops in an acral lentiginous fashion on the foot. After surgical removal of a tumor at this site, repair of the wound can be challenging. This is because there is an insufficient local skin pool and lack of mobility of the skin in this area. Moreover, functional aspects such as walking and weight bearing should be considered. We performed a combination treatment of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and punch grafting on 15 patients, after wide excision of acral lentiginous melanomas on the foot, and compared these to 26 patients who underwent either secondary intention healing (SIH, n = 13) or NPWT (n = 13) alone. The punch grafting with NPWT group showed significantly shorter healing times than those of the other two groups. Evaluation of completely healed wounds using the Vancouver Burn Scar Assessment Scale revealed that the punch grafting group had mean values better, or comparable, to the SIH or NPWT group in four of the five scales (except pigmentation). As for complications, only one patient developed a wound infection after punch grafting. Further, by utilizing NPWT for fixation of punch grafts, it was possible to treat all subjects as outpatients after punch grafting. These results show that a combination treatment of NPWT and punch grafting is an excellent therapeutic option for post-wide excision wounds on the feet, with significantly shortened healing times and favorable cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26173565

  14. Volar wrist ganglion excision through the flexor carpi radialis sheath.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Gregory A; DaSilva, Manuel F; Akelman, Edward

    2012-09-01

    Volar wrist ganglions are much less frequent than their dorsal counterparts but provide much more surgical trepidation due to their proximity to the radial artery. With the majority arising from the radiocarpal joint, we have found that entering the flexor carpi radialis sheath and accessing the ganglion through the floor of the sheath allows for a relatively safe excision of these benign hand tumors. PMID:22913995

  15. Volar dislocation of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint with acute repair of the ulnar collateral ligament

    PubMed Central

    Potini, Vishnu C.; Sood, Amit; Sood, Aditya; Mastromonaco, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Volar dislocations of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint are uncommon and can be associated with rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL). We report a case where a volar thumb dislocation was successfully closed reduced, but instability required open repair of the UCL. Early motion protocol helped achieve favorable results.

  16. Direct noninvasive observation of near infrared photobleaching of autofluorescence in human volar side fingertips in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Wright, Colin; Lewis-Clark, Eric; Shaheen, G.; Geier, Roman; Chaiken, J.

    2010-02-01

    Human transdermal in vivo spectroscopic applications for tissue analysis involving near infrared (NIR) light often must contend with broadband NIR fluorescence that, depending on what kind of spectroscopy is being employed, can degrade signal to noise ratios and dynamic range. Such NIR fluorescence, i.e. "autofluorescence" is well known to originate in blood tissues and various other endogenous materials associated with the static tissues. Results of recent experiments on human volar side fingertips in vivo are beginning to provide a relative ordering of the contributions from various sources. Preliminary results involving the variation in the bleaching effect across different individuals suggest that for 830 nm excitation well over half of the total fluorescence comes from the static tissues and remainder originates with the blood tissues, i.e. the plasma and the hematocrit. Of the NIR fluorescence associated with the static tissue, over half originates with products of well-known post-enzymatic glycation reactions, i.e. Maillard chemistry, in the skin involving glucose and other carbohydrates and skin proteins like collagen and cytosol proteins.

  17. Zinc-Responsive Necrolytic Acral Erythema in a Patient With Psoriasis: A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Chun; Wu, Chen-Yi

    2016-09-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema (NAE) is a recently recognized dermatosis almost exclusively associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and closely related to zinc deficiency. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of psoriasis and chronic HCV infection, who developed new lesions of NAE extending from previous elephantine psoriatic plaques on bilateral lower legs. According to previous reports, resolution of NAE has been successfully achieved by treatment of the underlying HCV infection, or the use of oral zinc therapy. Our patient exhibited good response to zinc therapy. By reporting this case, we would like to raise the awareness of physicians to this unique acrally distributed dermatosis, which is distinct from psoriasis by its pathological feature of aggregated necrotic keratinocytes and its good response to zinc therapy rather than topical corticosteroids. PMID:27272315

  18. Open volar radiocarpal dislocation with extensive dorsal ligament and extensor tendon damage: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jardin, E; Pechin, C; Rey, P-B; Gasse, N; Obert, L

    2016-04-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a rare combination of open volar radiocarpal dislocation and complete destruction of the dorsal capsule-ligament complex and tendons. The treatment consisted of open reduction and arthrorisis (temporary arthrodesis during 45 days) with four K-wires (radiocarpal and radioulnar). The capsule-ligament complex was fixed with anchors and the extensor tendons were repaired by suturing. A long-arm cast was applied for six weeks. After an 18-month follow-up, the Cooney-modified Green and O'Brien score was 70 and the wrist range of motion was 85°. Dynamic intraoperative X-rays are needed to look for bone or ligament (intracarpal or radioulnocarpal) injuries. Arthrography, arthroscopy or MRI may provide additional information. In cases of stable lesions without intracarpal ligament injuries, conservative treatment may be sufficient. Otherwise, surgical treatment is required, using temporary external fixation or arthrorisis (temporary arthrodesis) associated with anatomic repair of capsular ligaments. The average duration of postoperative immobilization is 6.6 weeks. An external fixator seems to be useful for reduction and for placing optimal tension on repaired ligament repair. Twenty-three cases of volar radiocarpal dislocation are described in published studies. None of them was associated with bone, tendon, skin or capsule-ligament complex injuries. Few studies describe the long-term functional and radiological outcomes of these injuries. PMID:27117127

  19. Ultrasonographic characteristics of volar-lateral ligament constrains after proximal interphalangeal joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Saito, Susumu; Sawabe, Kazuma; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-08-01

    Objective To characterise posttraumatic constrains of the volar-lateral ligaments by analysing volar plate (VP) dynamics after proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint injuries using ultrasonography. Materials and methods From the anatomical and biomechanical perspectives of the VP and its surrounding structures, posttraumatic constrains of the volar-lateral ligament were evaluated by analysing the changes of VP motion. Using ultrasound, VP motion during active flexion of 0-60° was recorded in the central sagittal plane at 12 weeks after injury. VP trajectories visualised by 5-point tracing on the VP were analysed qualitatively to detect differential patterns of the ligament constrains. Quantitatively, correlation between averaged constrain index determined by measuring volar locational values of the 5 points on the VP and limitation in extension at the final follow-up was assessed. Results Eleven patients with PIP joint injuries involving five VP avulsions, three volar intra-articular fractures, or three dorsal fracture-dislocations were included. All patients with VP avulsion revealed a totally-constrained pattern, whereas patients with intra-articular or fracture-dislocation injuries showed distally-constrained pattern or normal. Averaged constrain index was negatively correlated with limitation in extension, indicating positive contribution of volar-lateral ligament constrains to residual flexion contracture. Conclusion Ultrasonographic visualisation of VP motion characterised posttraumatic constrained conditions of the volar-lateral ligaments. Knowledge of the manner of ligament damages might be useful to set treatment strategies for PIP joint injuries. PMID:26981745

  20. Devising for a distal radius fracture fixation focus on the intra-articular volar dislocated fragment

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yoichi; Naito, Kiyohito; Obata, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Distal radius fracture (DRF) accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragment is difficult to reduce. This volar fragment remains when treated with a simple buttress effect alone, and V-shaped deformity may remain on the articular surface. We attempted to improve dorsal rotational deviation of volar fragment by osteosynthesis applying the condylar stabilizing technique. We report the surgical procedure and results. Materials and methods The subjects were 10 cases of DRF accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments surgically treated (mean age: 69 years old). The fracture type based on the AO classification was B3 in 1 case, C1 in 4, C2 in 2, and C3 in 3 cases. All cases were treated with a volar locking plate. Reduction was applied utilizing the angle stability of the volar locking plate, similarly to the condylar stabilizing technique. On the final follow-up, we evaluated clinical and radiologic evaluation. To evaluate V-shaped valley deformity of the articular surface, the depth of the lunate fossa of the radius was measured using computed tomography (CT). Results The duration of postoperative follow-up was 11 (6–24) months. Mayo wrist score was 93 (Excellent in 10 cases). No general complication associated with a volar locking plate was noted in any case. Volar tilt on radiography were 11° (4–14). The depth of the lunate fossa on CT was 3.9 ± 0.7 mm in the patients. Conclusion This procedure may be useful for osteosynthesis of distal radius fracture accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments. PMID:27144008

  1. Acral Melanoma in Chinese: A Clinicopathological and Prognostic Study of 142 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jiaojie; Dai, Bo; Kong, Yunyi; Shen, Xuxia; Kong, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Acral melanoma (AM), as a peculiar subgroup of melanoma, is rare in Caucasians but has higher incidence in Asians. Large series of study on AM with clinicopathological features and prognostic factors is still limited, especially in Asian population. We retrospectively collected clinical, pathological and follow-up data of 142 AM cases. All patients were Chinese, with the age ranging from 24 to 87 years (mean 62.0; median 62.0). The Breslow thickness of primary lesions ranged from 0.6 to 16.3 mm (mean 4.9; median 3.7). 85.9% of the patients had acral lentiginous histologic subtype. Plantar was the most frequently involved site, followed by heels. Statistically, duration of the lesion before diagnosis (≤2.5 years), Breslow thickness >4.0 mm (T4), high mitotic index (>15 mm−2), presence of vascular invasion, regional lymph node metastasis at diagnosis and pathologic stage (II/III/IV) were found to be independent prognostic factors in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The prognosis of AM in Chinese is extremely poor. Our 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 53.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Therefore, AM in Asians represents a more biologically aggressive melanoma subtype and is thought to carry a worse prognosis when compared with other races or cutaneous melanomas in other anatomic sites. PMID:27545198

  2. Acral Melanoma in Chinese: A Clinicopathological and Prognostic Study of 142 cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jiaojie; Dai, Bo; Kong, Yunyi; Shen, Xuxia; Kong, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Acral melanoma (AM), as a peculiar subgroup of melanoma, is rare in Caucasians but has higher incidence in Asians. Large series of study on AM with clinicopathological features and prognostic factors is still limited, especially in Asian population. We retrospectively collected clinical, pathological and follow-up data of 142 AM cases. All patients were Chinese, with the age ranging from 24 to 87 years (mean 62.0; median 62.0). The Breslow thickness of primary lesions ranged from 0.6 to 16.3 mm (mean 4.9; median 3.7). 85.9% of the patients had acral lentiginous histologic subtype. Plantar was the most frequently involved site, followed by heels. Statistically, duration of the lesion before diagnosis (≤2.5 years), Breslow thickness >4.0 mm (T4), high mitotic index (>15 mm(-2)), presence of vascular invasion, regional lymph node metastasis at diagnosis and pathologic stage (II/III/IV) were found to be independent prognostic factors in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The prognosis of AM in Chinese is extremely poor. Our 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 53.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Therefore, AM in Asians represents a more biologically aggressive melanoma subtype and is thought to carry a worse prognosis when compared with other races or cutaneous melanomas in other anatomic sites. PMID:27545198

  3. Simultaneous Volar Dislocation of Distal Interphalangeal Joint and Volar Fracture-Subluxation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint of Little Finger: A New Mechanism of Injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Bayatpour, Abdollah; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous volar dislocation of distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint and volar fracture-subluxation of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the same finger has not been reported yet. A 19-year-old man was referred due to pain on the deformed left little finger after a ball injury. Radiographs showed volar dislocation of the DIP joint and dorsal lip fracture of the middle phalanx with volar subluxation of PIP joint of the little finger. This case was unique in terms of the mechanism of injury which was hyperflexion type in two adjacent joints of the same finger. The patient was treated by closed reduction of DIP joint dislocation and open reduction and internal fixation of the PIP joint fracture-subluxation and application of dorsal external fixator due to instability. Finally, full flexion of the PIP joint and full extension of the DIP joint were obtained but with 10 degree extension lag at the PIP joint and DIP joint flexion ranging from 0 degree to 30 degrees. Some loss of motion in small joints of the fingers after hyperflexion injuries should be expected. PMID:27595966

  4. New Technique for Dorsal Fragment Reduction in Distal Radius Fractures by Using Volar Bone Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    TSUCHIYA, Fumika; NAITO, Kiyohito; MOGAMI, Atsuhiko; OBAYASHI, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For intra-articular distal radius fractures (AO Classification, type B2) with a displaced dorsal fragment, there remains much discussion on the fixation method for the dorsal fragment. To reduce the displaced dorsal fragment, we developed a new technique consisting of fenestration of the volar bone cortex, reduction using an intramedullary procedure, and fixation using a volar plate. This avoids necessity of dorsal approach. Technical Note: We performed this surgical technique in 2 patients and achieved a good reduced position without much injury to the bone cortex at the site of volar plate placement. This surgical technique allows reduction of the dorsal fragment using an intramedullary procedure by only a volar approach, and, therefore, does not affect the dorsal soft tissue (extensor tendon). For intra-articular distal radius fractures, complete reduction of the articular surface is extremely difficult, and, in patients with a remaining gap on the articular surface, a variable angle locking screw system may be useful. In the 2 patients, the angle of the locking screw was adjusted to catch the displaced dorsal fragment, and adequate reduction and fixation could be achieved. Conclusion: This technique using fenestration of the volar bone cortex allows reduction and fixation of the displaced dorsal fragment in distal radius fractures and thus avoids the necessity of a dorsal approach. PMID:27298898

  5. Nested Graft for Acral Lichen Sclerosus of the Feet: A Surgical Treatment for an Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Paola; Pelizzari, Laura; Cammalleri, Daniele; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The “nested graft” is an innovative and well-defined surgical technique used for chronic wound healing that induces the de-senescence of fibroblasts in the wound bed. We report a case of a 76-year-old man affected by plantar chronic wounds because of acral lichen sclerosus and atrophicus localized at both feet and treated for many years successfully with immunosuppressive agents. For cardiological dysfunction, systemic therapy was reduced to low dosage of steroids with an increase of ulcerations (5 × 2 cm). So we decided to perform the nested graft on the plantar region. After the surgical procedure, all the grafted ulcers healed, and at a 4-month follow-up, no signs of lichen sclerosus were present. PMID:27257563

  6. Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Fixation and Volar Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2007-01-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius. PMID:18780085

  7. Biomechanical Comparison of Different Volar Fracture Fixation Plates for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sobky, Kareem; Baldini, Todd; Thomas, Kenneth; Bach, Joel; Williams, Allison

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of four volar fixed-angle fracture fixation plate designs in a novel sawbones model as well as in cadavers. Four volar fixed angle plating systems (Hand Innovations DVR-A, Avanta SCS/V, Wright Medical Lo-Con VLS, and Synthes stainless volar locking) were tested on sawbones models using an osteotomy gap model to simulate a distal radius fracture. Based on a power analysis, six plates from each system were tested to failure in axial compression. To simulate loads with physiologic wrist motion, six plates of each type were then tested to failure following 10,000 cycles applying 100N of compression. To compare plate failure behavior, two plates of each type were implanted in cadaver wrists and similar testing applied. All plate constructs were loaded to failure. All failed with in apex volar angulation.The Hand Innovations DVR-A plate demonstrated significantly more strength in peak load to failure and failure after fatigue cycling (p value < 0.001 for single load and fatigue failure). However, there was no significant difference in stiffness among the four plates in synthetic bone. The cadaveric model demonstrated the same mode of failure as the sawbones. None of the volar plates demonstrated screw breakage or pullout, except the tine plate (Avanta SCS/V) with 1 mm of pullout in 2 of 12 plates. This study demonstrates the utility of sawbones in biomechanical testing and indicates that volar fixation of unstable distal radius fractures with a fixed angle device is a reliable means of stabilization. PMID:18780084

  8. Zinc-responsive acral hyperkeratotic dermatosis—A novel entity or a subset of some well-known dermatosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Aggarwal, Ishad; De, Abhishek; Samanta, Ayan; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Bala, Sanchaita; Biswas, Projna; Chowdhary, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: We are reporting a series of interesting cases, which presented to us with psoriasiform lesions distributed over the acral regions of the body. The cases are unusual because they were resistant to conventional treatment modalities like topical corticosteroids, tacrolimus and oral methotrexate but showed significant improvement on oral zinc therapy. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with characteristic clinical features of distinctive hyperkeratotic plaque in the acral areas, who were resistant to treatment by different modalities including potent topical steroids and oral methotrexate, were included for detailed investigations. A proper history was taken and relevant laboratory investigations were done which included blood count, urine, liver function, renal function, hepatitis-C virus serology and serum zinc levels. Patients were followed up every 2 weeks. Histopathological examinations of the lesional tissue were done at baseline and after 6 weeks of therapy. Patients were given oral zinc daily and no other treatment during the 6 weeks course. Results: All our patients were non-reactive to hepatitis-C. Of the ten patients only one patient (10%) showed low titer of serum zinc, another (10%) showed higher zinc level, while the rest of the patients had normal zinc level. Five of our patients had chronic renal failure, one had Grave's disease and the remaining had no associated systemic illness. Histopathology mostly showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, prominent granular layer, spongiosis and dermal infiltrate. After 6 weeks of follow up, all patients showed rapid and remarkable therapeutic response with zinc. Conclusions: We here report a series of patients, discernible because of their uniform clinical presentation of acral hypekeratotic plaques and in showing a noticeable response to zinc. Clinical, histopathological and laboratory investigations were done to rule out diseases of similar morphology including psoriasis, acral necrolytic erythema and

  9. Acral Vitiligo and Lichen Sclerosus - Association or a Distinct Pattern?: A Clinical and Histopathological Review of 15 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Venkat Ratnam; Attili, Sasi Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acral or acrofacial vitiligo (AFV) with bilateral lesions over the extremities and face is considered as a transitional form that may progress to generalized vitiligo. Oral and genital mucosal lesions are often integral to this pattern. Lichen sclerosus (LS) in a milder expression, results in oral and genital vitiligoid depigmentation without textural changes and thus needs to be differentiated from AFV. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 217 cases of AFV recorded over a period of 12 years. Results: One hundred and sixteen cases had associated oral/genital lesions. Among these, 15 patients demonstrated typical clinical as well as histological features of LS. Discussion: Coexistence of typical LS essentially among oral and genital lesions of acral vitiligo suggests that acral vitiligo might be a distinct sub-group of NSV. Since both the diseases have an autoimmune basis, the co-existence may be explained by epitope spreading, as a result of interface dermatitis seen in vitiligo. In addition, the possibility of a common genetic predisposition needs to be explored. PMID:26538715

  10. Pearls and Pitfalls of the Volar Locking Plating for Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Im, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Joo-Yup

    2016-06-01

    Volar locking plate fixation has been widely accepted method for the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Although the results of volar locking plate fixation are encouraging, it may cause implant-related complications such as flexor or extensor tendon injuries. In depth understanding of anatomy of the distal radius is mandatory in order to obtain adequate fixation of the fracture fragments and to avoid these complications. This article will review the anatomic characteristics of the distal radius because selecting proper implant and positioning of the plate is closely related to the volar surface anatomy of the distal radius. The number and the length of distal locking screws are also important to provide adequate fixation strength to maintain fracture fixation. We will discuss the pros and cons of the variable-angle locking plate, which was introduced in an effort to provide surgeons with more freedom for fixation. Finally, we will discuss about correcting radial length and volar tilt by using eccentric drill holes and distal locking first technique. PMID:27454625

  11. Results and complications in dorsal and volar wrist Ganglia arthroscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, L; Canal, A; Pelaez, J; Fanfani, F; Catalano, F

    2006-01-01

    The authors present the procedure and results of five years of arthroscopic treatment of wrist radiocarpal and midcarpal ganglia. Thirty cases of dorsal ganglia and seventeen cases of volar ganglia were operated on arthroscopically. The technique was easy to perform in all the radiocarpal ganglia, not easy in midcarpal dorsal ganglia and very difficult in midcarpal volar ganglia. The results were recorded with a mean follow-up of 15 months. Twenty-seven cases of dorsal ganglia and twelve cases of volar ganglia had excellent results with active motion recovery, no complications, absence of scars and no recurrence. Two cases had a recurrence. There were four complications: a case of injury of a radial artery branch, a case of extensive haematoma, and two cases of neuropraxia. In three cases the procedure was converted into open surgery: they had a longer time of healing and a residual scar. The arthroscopic resection has been in our experience effective and safe for the treatment of all radiocarpal ganglia. Good results have been obtained also in the treatment of dorsal midcarpal ganglia. Concerning the uncommon cases of volar midcarpal (STT) ganglia, an open approach seems still indicated. PMID:17080524

  12. Stabilization of Volar Ulnar Rim Fractures of the Distal Radius: Current Techniques and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Maureen A; Shin, Alexander Y; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    Background Distal radius fractures involving the lunate facet can be challenging to manage. Reports have shown the volar carpal subluxation/dislocation that can occur if the facet is not appropriately stabilized. Literature Review Recent emphasis in the literature has underscored the difficulty in managing this fracture fragment, suggesting standard volar plates may not be able to adequately stabilize the fragment. This article reviews the current literature with a special emphasis on fixation with a specifically designed fragment-specific hook plate to secure the lunate facet. Case Description An extended flexor carpi radialis volar approach was made which allows access to the distal volar ulnar fracture fragment. Once provisionally stabilized with Kirschner wire fixation, a volar hook plate was applied to capture this fragment. Additional fracture stabilization was used as deemed necessary to stabilize the remaining distal radius fracture. Clinical Relevance The volar marginal rim fragment remains a challenge in distal radius fracture management. Use of a hook plate to address the volar ulnar corner allows for stable fixation without loss of reduction at intermediate-term follow-up. PMID:27104076

  13. OSTEOTOMY OF THE DISTAL RADIUS USING A FIXED-ANGLE VOLAR PLATE

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ricardo Kaempf; Binz, Mário Arthur Rockenbach; Ferreira, Marco Tonding; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Serrano, Pedro Delgado; Praetzel, Rafael Pêgas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Skewed consolidation of the distal radius, due to sequelae of fractures, may cause functional incapacity, thus leading such patients to present pain, loss of strength and diminished mobility. Based on the excellent results obtained from surgical treatment of unstable fractures of the distal radius through a volar approach and use of rigid fixation with a fixed-angle volar plate, we started to use the same method for osteotomy of the distal radius. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted, and 20 patients treated between February 2002 and October 2009 were found. The mean length of follow-up was 43.9 months (range: 12 to 96 months). The surgical indications were persistent pain, deformity and functional limitation subsequent to a dorsally displaced fracture. Results: The mean preoperative deformity was 27° of dorsal tilt of the distal radius, 87° of ulnar tilt, and 7.3 mm of shortening of the radius. All the osteotomies consolidated and the final mean volar tilt was 6.2°, with ulnar tilt of 69.3° and shortening of 1 mm. The mean mobility of the wrist increased by 19.9° (flexion) and by 24° (extension). Mean forearm supination increased by 23.5° and pronation by 21.7°. Grip strength increased from 13.4 to 34.5 pounds. Conclusion: Use of a fixed-angle volar plate for a volar approach towards osteotomy of the distal radius enables satisfactory correction of the deformities and eliminates the need for removal of the synthesis material caused by tendon complications PMID:27042618

  14. Acral lentiginous melanoma treated with topical imiquimod cream: possible cooperation between drug and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Savarese, I; Papi, F; D'Errico, A; Gori, A; Grazzini, M; Vannucchi, M; Massi, D; De Giorgi, V

    2015-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman presented with a lesion on the sole of her right foot, which was histologically confirmed as acral lentiginous melanoma. Because of the large field involved and because the patient refused any invasive or painful treatment, topical treatment with imiquimod was commenced. At the 20-month follow-up, the patient was still continuing treatment with topical imiquimod, and no metastases to the lymph nodes or viscera were found, either clinically or in imaging studies. We believe that the success of the treatment cannot be explained only by the stimulation of the immune system induced by imiquimod. A possible explanation might be 'tumour dormancy', where a tumour grows very slowly because of a balance between the neoplasia and the immune (and nonimmune) mechanisms of tumour control. The use of imiquimod has so far allowed our patient to avoid surgery, and perturbation of the mechanisms of tumour regulation, such as local immunity and angiogenesis, has not taken place. PMID:25252087

  15. Clinico-pathologic, dermoscopic and ultrasound examination of a rare acral tumour involving the nail - case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    GRIGORE, LAVINIA ELENA; BAICAN, CORINA IULIA; BOTAR-JID, CAROLINA; ROGOJAN, LILIANA; LETCA, ALINA FLORENTINA; UNGUREANU, LOREDANA; COSGAREA, RODICA

    2016-01-01

    There is a large spectrum of tumors presenting as nodular lesions that may affect the subungual space. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman presenting with a rapidly growing nodular lesion under the nail of the first left toe. Non-invasive examinations using dermoscopy, ultrasonography and elastography were performed for the preoperative assessment of the lesion. The biopsy of the lesion revealed superficial acral fibromyxoma, a benign tumor with predisposition for acral sites. The patient underwent radical surgery with wide resection margins. This is the first case report of a superficial acral fibromyxoma affecting the subungual region characterized by dermoscopic, ultrasonographic and elastographic features. We also performed a short review of the literature. PMID:27004040

  16. Reconstruction of Extensive Volar Finger Defects with Double Cross-Finger Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Buehrer, Gregor; Arkudas, Andreas; Ludolph, Ingo; Horch, Raymund E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Cross-finger flaps still represent a viable option to reconstruct small- to medium-sized full-thickness finger defects but they are not commonly used if larger areas have to be covered. We present 2 cases showing a simple and pragmatic approach with homodigital double cross-finger flaps to reconstruct extensive volar finger soft-tissue defects. We observed very low donor-site morbidity and excellent functional and aesthetic outcomes. Furthermore, there is no need for microsurgical techniques or equipment when using this method. Although this case report only addresses volar defects, one might also think of applying this concept to dorsal defects using reversed double cross-finger flaps. PMID:27200255

  17. Correlation between KIT expression and KIT mutation in melanoma: a study of 173 cases with emphasis on the acral-lentiginous/mucosal type

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Wang, Wei-Lien; Trent, Jonathan; Yang, Dan; Chen, Su; Galbincea, John; Kim, Kevin B; Woodman, Scott; Davies, Michael; Plaza, Jose A; Nash, JW; Prieto, Victor G; Lazar, Alexander J; Ivan, Doina

    2014-01-01

    The role of immunohistochemistry in the assessment of KIT status in melanomas, especially acral lentiginous/mucosal, is not well established. Although the reported prevalence of KIT mutations in acral lentiginous/ mucosal melanomas is relatively low, detection of mutations in KIT can have profound therapeutic implications. We evaluated the efficacy of immunohistochemistry to predict mutations in KIT. One hundred seventy-three tumors, comprising primary and metastatic melanomas (141 acral lentiginous/mucosal, 5 nodular, 4 lentigo maligna, 3 superficial spreading, 2 uveal, 1 melanoma of soft parts, 8 metastases from unclassified primaries, and 9 metastases from unknown primaries) were studied. Immunohistochemical expression of KIT using an anti-CD117 antibody and KIT mutational analysis by gene sequencing of exons 11, 13, and 17 were performed. Eighty-one percent of acral lentiginous/mucosal melanomas, primary and metastatic, showed KIT expression by at least 5% of the tumor cells. The overall frequency of activating KIT gene mutations in acral lentiginous/ mucosal melanomas was 15% (14 out of 91 cases), being the L576P mutation in exon 11 the most frequently detected (4 of 14 cases). Cases showing less than 10% positive tumor cells were negative for KIT mutations. Eighty-two percent (12 of 14) of cases positive for KIT mutation showed KIT expression in more than 50% of the cells. An association between immunohistochemical expression of KIT and mutation status was found (P= 0.007). Immunohistochemical expression of KIT in less than 10% of the cells of the invasive component of acral lentiginous/mucosal melanomas appears to be a strong negative predictor of KIT mutation and therefore can potentially be used to triage cases for additional KIT genotyping. PMID:19718013

  18. Hyperalgesia after volar wrist tattoo: a case of complex regional pain syndrome?

    PubMed

    Morte, Paul D; Magee, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    Hyperalgesia after a volar wrist tattoo with features consistent with complex regional pain syndrome and a brief literature review is presented. This is the first case of disseminated hyperalgesia reported from a tattoo. It could be related to the increased pain associated with wrist tattooing and the proximity to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The response to prednisone was robust. Further cases may appear considering popularization of wrist tattoos by celebrities. PMID:21321489

  19. Volar Plate Fixation of Intra-Articular Distal Radius Fractures: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Margaret W. M.; Klausmeyer, Melissa A.; Fernandez, Diego L.; Orbay, Jorge L.; Bergada, Alex Lluch

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-articular fractures of the distal radius represent a therapeutic challenge as compared with the unstable extra-articular fractures. With the recent development of specifically designed internal fixation materials for the distal radius, treatment of these fractures by fragment-specific implants using two or more incisions has been advocated. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a fixed-angle locking plate applied through a single volar approach in maintaining the radiographic alignment of unstable intra-articular fractures as well as to report the clinical outcomes. We only excluded those with massive comminution, as is discussed in greater detail in the text. Patients and Methods This is a multicentered, retrospective study involving three hospitals situated in Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. In the period between January 2000 and March 2006, 97 patients with 101 intra-articular distal radius fractures, including 13 volarly displaced and 88 dorsally angulated fractures were analyzed. Over 80% were C2/C3 fractures, based on the AO classification. 16 open fractures were noted. Results With an average follow-up of 28 months (range 24-70 months), the range of movement of the wrist was very satisfactory, and the mean grip strength was 81% of the opposite wrist. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 8. The complications rate was < 5%, including loss of reduction in two patients. All fractures healed by 3 months postinjury. Conclusions Irrespective of the direction and amount of initial displacement, a great majority of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius can be managed with a fixed-angle volar plate through a single volar approach. Level IV retrospective case series PMID:24436824

  20. Biomechanical comparison of volar locked plate constructs using smooth and threaded locking pegs.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jeffrey; Park, Min Jung; Patel, Chirag S

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether there is any biomechanical difference in terms of construct strength with axial loading between volar fixed-angle locking plates with threaded locking vs smooth locking pegs. The control group comprised 7 cadaveric specimens with threaded locking pegs, and the test group comprised 7 cadaveric specimens from the same donor with smooth locking pegs. The DVR plate (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) was applied to the volar surface. A 15-mm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created near the level of Lister's tubercle. The radii were potted in polymethylmethacrylate for biomechanical testing. The loading protocol consisted of 3 parts: ramp loading, cyclic loading, and failure loading. The outcome measures of stiffness and failure were used to test the plates fixed with threaded and smooth locking pegs. When comparing each cycle, the difference in mean stiffness between threaded and smooth locking pegs was as follows: 122 N/mm, -9.09 N/mm, -14.7 N/mm, 49.4 N/mm, 57.4 N/mm, 71.9 N/mm, 52.3 N/mm, 35.8 N/mm. The difference in mean failure load between the threaded and smooth locking pegs was -11.3 N. There was no difference in stiffness throughout all cycles. Failure analysis showed no significant difference between the smooth (962 N) and threaded (951 N) locking pegs. The difference in stiffness between the 2 constructs (smooth minus threaded locking pegs) in ramp loading ranged from -122 to 15 N/mm. The results of this study showed no significant differences in stiffness and failure load between constructs consisting of threaded locking pegs or smooth locking pegs in the distal rows of the DVR distal radius volar locking plate. Based on the results of this study, there may be no benefit to using threaded locking pegs vs smooth locking pegs when treating distal radius fractures with a volar locking plate. PMID:24679204

  1. Trace metal analysis following locked volar plating for unstable fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Lucas S; Milbrandt, Joseph C; Armington, Evan; Wilson, Marty; Olysav, David J

    2010-01-01

    An increase in the utilization of metallic devices for orthopaedic interventions from joint replacement to fracture fixation has raised concern over local metal ion release and possible systemic sequelae due to dissemination of these ions. Our purpose was to determine whether serum titanium concentrations were elevated in patients who had previously received a locked volar distal radius plate. Our hypothesis was that the simple presence of titanium alone in a relatively fixed implant was not enough to raise serum titanium levels. Twenty-two potential subjects who had received a volar locked distal radius plate were identified through review of a single surgeon's operative logs. Eleven met inclusion criteria. Serum titanium levels were measured in these subjects and compared to both current and historical control groups. We found no difference between controls and our study group with the exception of one control subject who is employed as a welder. This is in contrast to previous studies from our institution which found increases in titanium levels in hip and spine implants. We conclude that a locking titanium volar distal radius plate does not raise serum titanium levels in this population. PMID:21045978

  2. [Volar transcaphocapitate perilunate disclocation of the carpus: a new variety, a new approach].

    PubMed

    Wodecki, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre; Masmejean, Emmanuel

    2002-03-01

    On the one hand, surgical treatment of dorsal perilunate fracture-dislocation is now well codified. The posterior approach is preferred by the majority of the authors. On the other hand, surgical schedule for volar perilunate dislocation is not well establish in the literature. The anterior approach is the most frequently recommended. In case of Fenton's syndrome (scaphocapitate fracture), the head of the capitatum is described with a rotation of 180 degrees. The authors reports a case of a volar transcaphocapitate perilunate fracture-dislocation of the carpus in a polytrauma. The head of the capitatum was in place onto the neck. By a posterior approach, a primary repair of all the elements has been performed including open reduction and internal fixation of the carpal scaphoid fracture in addition with a bone graft. The capitatum were fixed by wiring. At two years follow-up, the result were good. The patient did return at the same work. Clinically, there was a range of motion of 70 degrees in flexion-extension. Radiologically, all the fractures healed and there were no intracarpal desaxation. Volar perilunate fracture-dislocation of the carpus and Fenton's fracture (scaphocapitate fracture) are two exceptional entities in the literature. Association of both lesions has been found only twice in the literature. No similar case with a head of the capitatum in place has been already described. PMID:11980343

  3. Comparison of the Volar and Medial Approach in Peripheral Block of Ulnar Nerve at the Wrist – A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Praisy; Satyanandan, Cephas

    2014-01-01

    Context: Two standard approaches are described to block the ulnar nerve at wrist. These include a) the traditional Volar approach where the needle is inserted lateral to tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) b) Medial approach where the needle is inserted posterior to the tendon of FCU. Caution must be exercised to avoid puncture of the ulnar artery and/or intraneural injection of the ulnar nerve in both the approaches. Aim: This study compares the volar and medial approach to the peripheral block of ulnar nerve at the wrist. The objective was two fold: a) to analyze the position of the ulnar nerve and the ulnar artery in relation to the Flexor Carpi Ulnaris tendon b) to assess the risk of injury to ulnar artery in both the volar and medial approach. Settings and Designs: Twelve cadaveric upper limbs were used and both approaches compared by an observational study. Materials and Methods: Two 18 G needles were inserted up to a depth of 7 mm using the standard volar and medial approach. The pattern of arrangement and positions of the ulnar artery and nerve in relation to FCU tendon were observed. The distance between the tip of needle and its proximity to the ulnar artery, and risk of injury were determined. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0. Chicago, SPSS Inc. Results: Three patterns of arrangement and position of the ulnar nerve and artery were observed. Puncture of ulnar artery was seen in 50% of cases in the volar approach as compared to no injury at all in the medial approach. The ulnar artery is highly liable to injury during the volar approach in type I and II and safe only in type III arrangement of ulnar artery. The medial approach showed no injury to the ulnar artery or nerve at a penetration depth of 7mm. Conclusion: The medial approach is safer compared to volar approach for peripheral block of ulnar nerve at wrist. PMID:25584201

  4. Wrist function recovers more rapidly after volar locked plating than after external fixation but the outcomes are similar after 1 year

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Promising results have been reported after volar locked plating of unstable dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. We investigated whether volar locked plating results in better patient-perceived, objective functional and radiographic outcomes compared to the less invasive external fixation. Patients and methods 63 patients under 70 years of age, with an unstable extra-articular or non-comminuted intra-articular dorsally displaced distal radius fracture, were randomized to volar locked plating (n = 33) or bridging external fixation. Patient-perceived outcome was assessed with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire. Results At 3 and 6 months, the volar plate group had better DASH and PRWE scores but at 12 months the scores were similar. Objective function, measured as grip strength and range of movement, was superior in the volar plate group but the differences diminished and were small at 12 months. Axial length and volar tilt were retained slightly better in the volar plate group. Interpretation Volar plate fixation is more advantageous than external fixation, in the early rehabilitation period. PMID:21281262

  5. A New Technique for Volar Capsulodesis for Isolated Palmar Scapholunate Interosseous Ligament Injuries: A Cadaveric Study and Case Report.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, Robert J; Bayne, Christopher O; Moran, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    Introduction Most surgical techniques for scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) repair address only the dorsal component of the ligament, potentially leading to high surgical failure rates. We introduce a new technique to reconstruct the volar SLIL using a portion of the long radiolunate ligament (LRL). A biomechanical evaluation was performed to evaluate the rupture strength of this repair, and a subsequent anatomic study was performed to verify that this repair would not compromise the blood supply to either the scaphoid or the lunate. Methods A reconstruction of the volar SLIL was developed utilizing a lunate-based strip of the LRL. Fourteen cadaver arms were injected with red-colored epoxide and latex. The blood supply of the volar wrist capsule was dissected. The vascular supply to the ligaments, scaphoid, and lunate were investigated. The biomechanical strength of this reconstruction was tested on five cadaver arms by potting the scaphoid, lunate, and radius and subjecting the repair to a tensile load using a servohydraulic vertical displacement testing machine. Results In all arms, a branch of the radial artery or radiocarpal arch supplied the radioscapholunate ligament at the medial border of the LRL. The proximal half of the scaphoid was supplied by dorsal branches of the radial artery. In all cases, a vessel entered the lunate on its ulnar volar side, away from the repair. The average strength of the intact LRL strip was 97.4 N, and the average strength of the ligament-suture interface used for the capsulodesis was 43.5 N. Conclusion This volar approach to the SLIL does not compromise the vascularity of the scaphoid or the lunate. This approach allows the possibility of repairing or augmenting the volar SLIL. The strength of this repair appears to be less than the strength of the native SLIL. Further clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26539326

  6. Optimal Positioning for Volar Plate Fixation of a Distal Radius Fracture: Determining the Distal Dorsal Cortical Distance.

    PubMed

    Vosbikian, Michael M; Ketonis, Constantinos; Huang, Ronald; Ilyas, Asif M

    2016-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are currently among the most common fractures of the musculoskeletal system. With a population that is living longer, being more active, and the increasing incidence of osteoporosis, these injuries will continue to become increasingly prevalent. When operative fixation is indicated, the volar locking plate has recently become the treatment of choice. However, despite its success, suboptimal position of the volar locking plate can still result in radiographic loss of reduction. The distal dorsal cortical distance is being introduced as an intraoperative radiographic tool to help optimize plate position and minimize late loss of fracture reduction. PMID:26614937

  7. Stainless steel versus titanium volar multi-axial locking plates for fixation of distal radius fractures: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures are among the most common fractures seen in the hospital emergency department. Of these, over 40% are considered unstable and require some form of fixation. In recent years with the advent of low profile plating, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using volar plates has become the surgical treatment of choice in many hospitals. However, it is currently unknown which plating system has the lowest complication rate and/or superior clinical and radiological outcomes following surgery. Few studies have compared different types of plates, which may have various features, different plate and screw designs or may be manufactured from different materials (for example, stainless steel or titanium). This study will specifically investigate and compare the clinical and radiological outcomes and complication rates of two commonly used volar plating systems for fixation of distal radius fractures: one made from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate, Trimed™, California, USA) and the other made from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate, Medartis®, Basel, Switzerland). The primary aim of this study is to determine if there is a difference on the Patient Reported Wrist Evaluation six months following ORIF using a volar plate for adult patients with a distal radius fracture. Methods/Design This study will implement a randomized prospective clinical trial study design evaluating the outcomes of two different types of volar plates: one plate manufactured from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate) and one plate manufactured from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate). The surgery will be performed at a major trauma hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Outcome measures including function, adverse events, range of movement, strength, disability, radiological findings and health-related quality of life will be collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months following surgery. A parallel economic analysis will also be performed. This

  8. Optimization of volar percutaneous screw fixation for scaphoid waist fractures using traction, positioning, imaging, and an angiocatheter guide.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Knutsen, Elisa; Yao, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of nondisplaced or reducible scaphoid fractures has become more popular as techniques and implants have improved. Many authors have advocated for the dorsal approach, citing difficulties with adequate screw placement from the volar approach. We have developed a straightforward and reproducible technique for volar percutaneous scaphoid screw fixation that mitigates most of the drawbacks of the approach. The wrist is held in extension and ulnar deviation with traction through the thumb. A 14-gauge angiocatheter needle is then used to localize the starting point and as a cannula for the guide wire. Specific fluoroscopic views help to confirm optimal guide wire placement. PMID:21527146

  9. Is sparing the pronator quadratus muscle possible in volar plating of the distal radius?

    PubMed

    Heidari, N; Clement, H; Kosuge, D; Grechenig, W; Tesch, N P; Weinberg, A M

    2012-06-01

    We measured the length of the distal radius that can be exposed by mobilizing the distal edge of pronator quadratus (PQ) without detaching its radial attachment. Measurements were made in 20 cadaveric upper limbs from the distal margin of the radius in line with the scaphoid and lunate fossae to the distal margin of the PQ, before and after mobilization of the muscle from its distal attachment. The mean distance from the distal edge of the PQ to the scaphoid fossa was 13.1 mm and to the lunate fossa was 10.7 mm. This increased to a mean of 26.2 mm for the scaphoid and a mean of 23.8 mm for the lunate fossa following mobilization of PQ. Subperiosteal retrograde release of the PQ from its distal margin will allow for the placement of a volar plate and insertion of locking peri-articular screws in the great majority of volar locking plate systems on the market. PMID:22067296

  10. Multiple ruptures of the extensor tendons after volar fixation for distal radius fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Giancarlo; Vitali, Andrea; del Prete, Ferdinando

    2015-12-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after a bicycle accident with a displaced left (non-dominant) distal radius fracture. After closed reduction a long cast was applied. Due to loss of reduction, twenty-four days later open reduction internal fixation with locking compression plate (LCP) was performed. The patient returned to her normal activities but nineteen months after surgery showed functional impairment of the left thumb for Extensor Pollicis Longus (EPL) injury for which she necessitated transposition surgery. Twenty-six months after ORIF, functional deficit of the extension of the third and fourth left finger was noted secondary to injury of extensor tendons. Ultrasound and CT scan showed protrusion of the angular stability screws in LCP plate that caused a progressive wear resulting in rupture of the extensor tendons. Another tendon transposition surgery was performed with dorsal approach while the plate was removed utilising the original volar incision. Reconstruction of distal radius fractures with volar plating, requires accurate plate application with precise measurement of the length of the screws in order to prevent dorsal protrusion and thus avoiding tendon injuries. PMID:26738455

  11. Biomechanical Performance of Variable and Fixed Angle Locked Volar Plates for the Dorsally Comminuted Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, D; Shorez, J; Beran, C; Dass, A G; Atkinson, P

    2014-01-01

    Background The ideal treatment strategy for the dorsally comminuted distal radius fracture continues to evolve. Newer plate designs allow for variable axis screw placement while maintaining the advantages of locked technology. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of one variable axis plate with two traditional locked constructs. Methods Simulated fractures were created via a distal 1 cm dorsal wedge osteotomy in radius bone analogs. The analogs were of low stiffness and rigidity to create a worst-case strength condition for the subject radius plates. This fracture-gap model was fixated using one of three different locked volar distal radius plates: a variable axis plate (Stryker VariAx) or fixed axis (DePuy DVR, Smith & Nephew Peri-Loc) designs. The constructs were then tested at physiologic loading levels in axial compression and bending (dorsal and volar) modes. Construct stiffness was assessed by fracture gap motion during the different loading conditions. As a within-study control, intact bone analogs were similarly tested. Results All plated constructs were significantly less stiff than the intact control bone models in all loading modes (p<0.040). Amongst the plated constructs, the VariAx was stiffest axially (p=0.032) and the Peri-Loc was stiffest in bending (p<0.024). Conclusion In this analog bone fracture gap model, the variable axis locking technology was stiffer in axial compression than other plates, though less stiff in bending. PMID:25328471

  12. Arthroscopic management of volar lunate facet fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Chloros, George D; Lucas, Robert M; Kuzma, Gary R

    2006-09-01

    The clinical outcome of an intraarticular distal radius fracture is generally thought to be associated with the following factors: amount of radial deformity, joint congruity, and associated soft-tissue injuries. The proposed technique to manage this fracture pattern that involves a displaced volar lunate facet fragment uses wrist arthroscopy and pinning. Distraction of the fracture before arthroscopy is accomplished either by external fixation or by the arthroscopy tower. A freer elevator is introduced dorsally to disimpact the fragments, and next, a nerve hook is used to reduce the volar lunate facet, which is subsequently pinned to the radial styloid. The remaining fragments are reduced with interfragmentary pin fixation, and this anatomical articular construct is fixed to the radial metaphysis. The advantages of this technique are: (a) accurate assessment of articular congruency by direct visualization, (b) identification and repair of associated lesions, and (c) minimal soft tissue disruption. Potential disadvantages of external fixation supplemented by interfragmentary pins may be that it does not provide for rigid stable fixation, and therefore, does not allow for early motion compared to open reduction and internal fixation. Furthermore, it is technically challenging, and is therefore suggested as an alternative for the aforementioned fracture pattern. PMID:16974217

  13. Contribution of human skin topography to the characterization of dynamic skin tension during senescence: morpho-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahouani, H.; Djaghloul, M.; Vargiolu, R.; Mezghani, S.; Mansori, M. E. L.

    2014-03-01

    The structuring of the dermis with a network of collagen and elastic fibres gives a three-dimensional structure to the skin network with directions perpendicular and parallel to the skin surface. This three-dimensional morphology prints on the surface of the stratum corneum a three dimensional network of lines which express the mechanical tension of the skin at rest. To evaluate the changes of skin morphology, we used a three-dimensional confocal microscopy and characterization of skin imaging of volar forearm microrelief. We have accurately characterize the role of skin line network during chronological aging with the identification of depth scales on the network of lines (z <= 60μm) and the network of lines covering Langer's lines (z > 60 microns). During aging has been highlighted lower rows for elastic fibres, the decrease weakened the tension and results in enlargement of the plates of the microrelief, which gives us a geometric pertinent indicator to quantify the loss of skin tension and assess the stage of aging. The study of 120 Caucasian women shows that ageing in the volar forearm zone results in changes in the morphology of the line network organisation. The decrease in secondary lines (z <= 60 μm) is counterbalanced by an increase in the depth of the primary lines (z > 60 μm) and an accentuation of the anisotropy index.

  14. A report of two cases of volar and dorsal fractures of the middle phalanx caused by a basketball.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Ryouichi; Nakayama, Yoshihito; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Uesaka, Shinji; Tanaka, Kouichi; Ito, Hiromoto; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Yoshihara, Kiyoshi

    2002-08-01

    We present two rare cases of volar and dorsal fractures of the middle phalanx at the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ). The first case was a 16-year-old girl. She hurt her middle finger while playing basketball. A lateral radiograph revealed volar and dorsal fractures of the middle phalanx. She underwent external immobilization of the PIPJ in 30 degrees of flexion with a splint for 3 weeks. The fractures healed 7 weeks after the injury with neither tenderness nor limitation of range of motion. The second case was a 16-year-old boy. He injured his index finger while playing basketball, and underwent immobilization of the PIPJ for 3 weeks. At 10 weeks after the injury, the dorsal fracture was almost healed, but the displacement of the volar fragment had worsened. At a 3-year follow-up, the dorsal fragment was healed, but the volar fragment remained in a site of nonunion. However, there was neither residual deformity nor restriction of movement. PMID:12187371

  15. Comparison of Locked Volar Plating Versus Pinning and External Fixation in the Treatment of Unstable Intraarticular Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Katt, Brian A.; Carothers, Joshua T.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We retrospectively compared the outcomes of open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locking plate versus standard external fixation and percutaneous pinning in treating similar unstable distal radius fractures with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Methods The ORIF group included 41 patients with an average follow-up of 29 months. The external fixation group comprised 14 patients with an average follow-up of 33 months. Average age at presentation was 45 years in the external fixation group and 48 years in the ORIF group. The male/female ratios were 16:25 among the ORIF group and 6:8 in the external fixation group. The two groups were compared for clinical and functional outcomes measured by the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score. Pain scores were similar. Radiographic measurements were also evaluated between groups. Results Final ranges of motion and grip strengths were similar between the two groups. The mean DASH score of the locked volar plate group was 9 compared to 23 for the external fixation group. Radiographically, volar tilt and radial length were significantly better in the patients treated with ORIF. The ORIF group required less therapy visits. No complications occurred in the locked volar plate group whereas two patients had pin tract infections and one had prolonged finger stiffness in the external fixation group. Conclusion Locked volar plating compares favorably to external fixation and pinning for amenable fracture patterns. Whereas grip and range-of-motion data were similar, DASH scores, frequency of rehabilitation, and some radiographic parameters were superior in patients treated with ORIF. PMID:18780086

  16. Korean Type Distal Radius Anatomical Volar Plate System: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jihyeung; Kim, Min Bom; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is the most common fracture of the upper extremity, and approximately 60,000 distal radius fractures occur annually in Korea. Internal fixation with an anatomical volar locking plate is widely used in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. However, most of the currently used distal radius anatomical plate systems were designed based on the anatomical characteristics of Western populations. Recently, the Korean-type distal radius anatomical volar plate (K-DRAVP) system was designed and developed based on the anatomical characteristics of the distal radius of Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of the new K-DRAVP system, and to compare its radiologic and functional results with those of the other systems. Methods From March 2012 to October 2012, 46 patients with acute distal radius fractures who were treated with the K-DRAVP system at three hospitals were enrolled in this study. Standard posteroanterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing, and three radiographic parameters (volar tilt, radial inclination, and radial length) were assessed to evaluate radiographic outcomes. The range of motion and grip strength, the Gartland and Werley scoring system, and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Results All radiologic parameters were restored to normal values, and maintained without any loosening or collapse until the time of final follow-up. Grip strength was restored to 84% of the value for the unaffected side. The mean range of motion of the wrist at final follow-up was restored to 77%-95% of the value for the unaffected side. According to the Gartland and Werley scoring system, there were 16 excellent, 26 good, and 4 fair results. The mean DASH score was 8.4 points. There were no complications after surgery. Conclusions The newly developed K-DRAVP system could be used to

  17. Fixed-Angle Volar Plate Fixation for Distal Radius Fractures in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Erik D.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the outcome and complications following open reduction and internal fixed-angle plating of distal radius fractures for patients on chronic immunosuppression medications. A retrospective study identified 11 patients with distal radius fractures that had been on chronic immunosuppressive medication. The mean patient age was 59.9 years (40–82 years). According to the Orthopedic Trauma Association classification, there was one 23A3, one 23B3, and nine 23C type fractures. There were two open fractures. All patients received preoperative antibiotics and underwent reduction and fixation with a volar, fixed-angle plate. Postoperative measurements included postoperative and final radiographic indices, wrist flexion and extension, forearm rotation, and grip strength. Clinical follow-up averaged 13 months, and radiographic follow-up averaged 14.9 months. Statistical analysis was performed comparing means of various parameters with a two-sided t test with an alpha value ≤0.05. All fractures healed, and there were no infections. The final mean ulnar variance, volar tilt, and radial inclination were −0.1 mm (ulnar negative; −2.0 to +2.5 mm), 13° (5–23°), and 21° (15–27°), respectively. The mean articular gap or step was 0.4 mm. There was a small but significant decrease between the final and postoperative mean ulnar variance (p = 0.03). Mean wrist flexion was 47°, extension 47°, pronation 77°, and supination was 76°. Grip strength averaged 16.3 kg versus 25.1 kg for the opposite extremity. The one major complication included a postoperative carpal tunnel syndrome. Fixed-angle volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures in patients with chronic immunosuppression was associated with union (with acceptable radiographic alignment), no wound-healing problems or infections, and with functional wrist and forearm motion and grip strength. PMID:18780023

  18. [Multiple autoimmune syndrome. Reynolds-syndrome (acral scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, Sjögren syndrome) associated with the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Müller, F B; Groth, W; Mahrle, G

    2004-05-01

    A female patient presented with acral scleroderma, Sjögren syndrome, antibodies specific for primary biliary cirrhosis and clinical as well as histological features of lichen planus and subacute lupus erythematosus. In addition an euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis was found. Her findings correspond to type II of the multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and can be described as an association of Reynolds syndrome and the lupus erythematosus/lichen planus-overlap syndrome. PMID:15138654

  19. Acral vesicles and bullae in a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year-old black woman with rheumatoid arthritis who developed worsening fatigue, fever, weight loss, and a vesiculobullous skin eruption while being treated with certolizumab pegol for her arthritis. Microscopic findings confirmed the diagnosis of a neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:26424941

  20. Anatomic dorsal and volar radioulnar ligament reconstruction with Mersilene augmentation for distal radioulnar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew J; Adabi, Kian; Schofield, Jennifer L; Marsh, Mike; Paulo, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    Instability of the distal ulna is a fairly common problem after acute distal radius fracture (DRF), distal radius malunion, triangular fibrocartilage complex injury, and a host of other types of trauma. We present a new anatomic technique to stabilize the distal ulna with a tendon graft augmented with Mersilene tape, which has been used primarily to treat unidirectional (dorsal or volar) instability, but could be used for global instability as well. Of the 12 patients who underwent this procedure, 9 had stability fully restored and the remaining 3 had only mild instability after surgery. The procedure is an effective treatment for distal radioulnar joint instability and we believe that this surgical technique will be a valuable adjunct to the existing described procedures for hand surgeons. We present a retrospective single-surgeon case series with outcome measures. PMID:25575187

  1. Simultaneous Volar Dislocations of Carpometacarpal and Metacarpophalangeal Joints of the Thumb

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hayat; Darcy, Peter; Magnussen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple dislocations of joints in the hand are rare. Double dislocations of the thumb joints have only been reported on four previous occasions, in all cases reported to date, the joints have dislocated dorsally. Case Report: We present the case of a 26-year-old male patient with simultaneous volar dislocations of the carpometacarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints of the thumb. There was delayed operative treatment of this injury with ligament reconstruction and stabilization of the metacarpophalangeal joint. Conclusions: This rare case provides a mechanism to this type of injury, highlights the importance of initial, and repeated clinical and radiographic review, highlights the soft tissue component to this injury, and demonstrates how even delayed treatment can result in a good functional outcome.

  2. Percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate fixation in adults with dorsally displaced fracture of distal radius: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Griffin, Damian; Tubeuf, Sandy; Lamb, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the clinical effectiveness of Kirschner wire fixation with locking plate fixation for patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius. Design A multicentre two arm parallel group assessor blind randomised controlled trial with 1:1 treatment allocation. Setting 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. Participants 461 adults with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius within 3 cm of the radiocarpal joint that required surgical fixation. Patients were excluded if the surgeon thought that the surface of the wrist joint was so badly displaced it required open reduction. Interventions Kirschner wire fixation: wires are passed through the skin over the dorsal aspect of the distal radius and into the bone to hold the fracture in the correct anatomical position. Locking plate fixation: a locking plate is applied through an incision over the volar (palm) aspect of the wrist and secured to the bone with fixed angle locking screws. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure: validated patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE). This rates wrist function in two (equally weighted) sections concerning the patient’s experience of pain and disability to give a score out of 100. Secondary outcomes: disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, the EuroQol (EQ-5D), and complications related to the surgery. Results The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced, and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. The wrist function of both groups of patients improved by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the patient rated wrist score at three, six, or 12 months (difference in favour of the plate group was −1.3, 95% confidence interval −4.5 to 1.8; P=0.40). Nor was there a clinically relevant difference in health related quality of life or the number of complications in each group. Conclusions Contrary to the existing literature, and against the rapidly increasing use of locking plate

  3. Volar/dorsal compressive mechanical behavior of the transverse carpal ligament.

    PubMed

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E; Klocke, Noelle F; Brown, Thomas D

    2012-04-30

    Mechanical insult to the median nerve caused by contact with the digital flexor tendons and/or carpal tunnel boundaries may contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Since the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) comprises the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel, its mechanics in part govern the potential insult to the median nerve. Using unconfined compression testing in combination with a finite element-based optimization process, nominal stiffness measurements and first-order Ogden hyperelastic material coefficients (μ and α ) were determined to describe the volar/dorsal compressive behavior of the TCL. Five different locations on the TCL were tested, three of which were deep to the origins of the thenar and hypothenar muscles. The average (± standard deviation) low-strain and high-strain TCL stiffness values in compression sites outside the muscle attachment region were 3.6 N/mm (±2.7) and 28.0 N/mm (±20.2), respectively. The average stiffness values at compression sites with muscle attachments were notably lower, with low-strain and high-strain stiffness values of 1.2 N/mm (±0.5) and 9.7 N/mm (±4.8), respectively. The average Ogden coefficients for the muscle attachment region were 51.6 kPa (±16.5) for μ and 16.5 (±2.0) for α, while coefficients for the non-muscle attachment region were 117.8 kPa (±86.8) for μ and 17.2 (±1.6) for α. These TCL compressive mechanical properties can help inprove computational models, which can be used to provide insight into the mechanisms of median nerve injury leading to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms. PMID:22381735

  4. A comparative study of fragment specific versus volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Fuller, Douglas S.; Kim, Myra Hyungjin; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are many plating systems available for treating distal radius fractures (DRFs), and the decision of which type to use can be difficult. This is a prospective cohort study that compares outcomes of two commonly used fixation systems: fragment specific fixation (FSF) and a fixed-angle volar locking plate system (VLPS). Methods Two cohorts of consecutive DRFs were prospectively evaluated. The first cohort was treated with FSF and the second with a VLPS. Radiographic, functional, and patient-rated outcomes (MHQ) were collected immediately post-operatively, and at six and twelve months post-operatively. Complications were recorded and graded by severity. Results Fourteen DRFs treated with FSF and eighty-five DRFs treated with the VLPS were enrolled. At final follow-up, radial inclination was similar in both cohorts (23° vs. 25°); however, volar tilt was worse in the FSF cohort (−10° vs. 10°, p<0.05). Additionally, the majority of the FSF cohort demonstrated a loss of relative radial length (63% of cohort with positive ulnar variance). Grip strength, pinch strength, MHQ scores, and most ROM measurements were superior in the VLPS cohort at 6 months, although not all differences were statistically significant. By 12 months the differences in functional and patient-rated outcomes were smaller, suggesting that the FSF cohort tended to reach the outcomes of the VLPS cohort over time. Complications requiring re-operation were higher in the FSF cohort (p<0.05). Conclusions The VLPS results in more stable fixation and better objective and subjective outcomes early in the post-operative period. It has fewer complications requiring re-operation than FSF. PMID:18971728

  5. Volar Stabilization of the Distal Radioulnar Joint for Chronic Instability Using the Pronator Quadratus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Jae Won; Choy, Won Sik

    2016-04-01

    In cases of chronic distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability without DRUJ arthritis, reconstruction of the mechanical integrity of the radioulnar ligaments of the triangular fibrocartilage complex has been considered an ideal surgical treatment. However, reconstructive methods have several disadvantages.We evaluated volar stabilization of the DRUJ for chronic instability using the pronator quadratus (PQ) to determine whether it provided (1) proper stability, (2) restored wrist function, (3) was relatively convenient, and (4) was associated with a low complication rate. Altogether, 21 patients with chronic DRUJ instability (12 men, 9 women) with a mean age of 34 years (range, 17-65 years) were enrolled in the study. The diagnostic criteria were as follows: 3 months after the injury, greater than 8 mm of palmar-dorsal translation of the ulna relative to the radius, there was a lack of clear end point resistance compared with the contralateral side, and nonstressed computed tomographic scans provided supporting evidence. Follow-up was at least 12 months (range, 12-38 months). Palmar-dorsal translation of the ulna relative to the radius was decreased significantly from 10 to 4 mm (P = 0.028) and epicenter was increased significantly at the last follow-up [P = 0.015/0.026 (70 degrees of supination/neutral, respectively)]. Wrist range of motion was not significantly different, but grip strength had increased from 72% to 91%. Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand and patient-rated wrist evaluation were also decreased compared with preoperative measurements [34.4 to 12.5/42.7 to 14.7 (disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand/patient-rated wrist evaluation, respectively)]. Pronator quadratus advancement volar stabilization provided proper stability, restored wrist function, was relatively convenient, and was associated with few complications. Our experience indicates that it is an acceptable, effective treatment option to reverse DRUJ instability in patients

  6. Development and validation of a new method for measuring friction between skin and nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Cottenden, A M; Wong, W K; Cottenden, D J; Farbrot, A

    2008-07-01

    A new method for measuring the coefficient of friction between nonwoven materials and the curved surface of the volar forearm has been developed and validated. The method was used to measure the coefficient of static friction for three different nonwoven materials on the normal (dry) and over-hydrated volar forearms of five female volunteers (ages 18-44). The method proved simple to run and had good repeatability: the coefficient of variation (standard deviation expressed as a percentage of the mean) for triplets of repeat measurements was usually (80 per cent of the time) less than 10 per cent. Measurements involving the geometrically simpler configuration of pulling a weighted fabric sample horizontally across a quasi-planar area of volar forearm skin proved experimentally more difficult and had poorer repeatability. However, correlations between values of coefficient of static friction derived using the two methods were good (R = 0.81 for normal (dry) skin, and 0.91 for over-hydrated skin). Measurements of the coefficient of static friction for the three nonwovens for normal (dry) and for over-hydrated skin varied in the ranges of about 0.3-0.5 and 0.9-1.3, respectively. In agreement with Amontons' law, coefficients of friction were invariant with normal pressure over the entire experimental range (0.1-8.2 kPa). PMID:18756696

  7. Skin turgor

    MedlinePlus

    Doughy skin; Poor skin turgor; Good skin turgor; Decreased skin turgor ... Call your health care provider if: Poor skin turgor occurs with vomiting, diarrhea, or fever. The skin is very slow to return to normal, or the skin "tents" up ...

  8. Skin signs in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescent females and young women. AN is associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay, and developmental delay. Skin signs are almost always detectable in severe AN and awareness of them may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and diuretics, and of the psychiatric morbidity. They include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrhoeic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, acquired striae distensae, acral coldness. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell’s sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms due to laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions by drugs. Symptoms due to psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the “hidden” signs of eating disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder. PMID:20808514

  9. Skin signs in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2009-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescent females and young women. AN is associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay, and developmental delay. Skin signs are almost always detectable in severe AN and awareness of them may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and diuretics, and of the psychiatric morbidity. They include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrhoeic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, acquired striae distensae, acral coldness.The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms due to laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions by drugs. Symptoms due to psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the "hidden" signs of eating disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder. PMID:20808514

  10. Aspiration and methylprednisolone injection to the cavity with IV cannula needle in the treatment of volar wrist ganglia: New technique

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Murat; Ozturk, Hayati; Amanvermez Senarslan, Dilsad; Erdogan, Yalcin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: There are several types of treatment modalities for wrist ganglions. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of cyst aspiration and methyl prednisolone acetate injection with double IV cannula rather than sharp pointed needle, as a new technique in the treatment of volar ganglia. Methodology: The study involves total of 19 patients who received treatment by aspiration and methyl prednisolone injection into the cavity. Two IV cannulas are pricked to the cystic cavity. Cyst fluid is drained by the distally placed IV cannula meanwhile injecting methyl prednisolone by proximally placed IV cannula. The patient records and follow-up reports are retrospectively investigated. The patient age, sex, site of the cyst, the treatment that was applied, adjacency to the artery and the nerves and recurrence are recorded. Mean follow up time was 2.1±0.5 years. Results: The study involved 19 patients that received aspiration treatment for volar ganglion cysts between January 2004 and December 2009. There were 12 (63.2%) female and 7 (36.8%) male subject with volar wrist ganglion cyst. The mean age of patients was 27.63±6.6 years. Fourteen (73.7%) patients of total had cysts close to the artery. We didn’t observe any complication related to methyl prednisolone injection and arterial ischemia. Recurrence was observed in three (15.8%) patients. Conclusion: This method has lower recurrence rate than other aspiration therapy with sharp pointed needle. We prefer to use IV cannula needle for cyst aspiration and steroid injection in treatment of volar ganglia before any surgical intervention. PMID:24353517

  11. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES WITH A VOLAR LOCKED PLATE: CORRELATION OF CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Claudio Roberto Martins; Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; dos Santos, Rafael Mota Marins; dos Santos, Roberto Della Torre; Neto, Julio Cezar Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and correlate the clinical and radiographic results from patients with distal radius fractures who underwent surgical treatment with a fixed-angle volar locked plate. Methods: Sixty-four patients with distal radius fractures were evaluated. They all underwent surgical treatment with a volar locked plate for the distal radius, with a minimum of six months of postoperative follow-up. They underwent a physical examination that measured range of motion and grip strength, answered the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and underwent radiographic examination. Results: In the physical examination on the patients, all the range-of-motion measurements were reduced. Grip strength measured in kgf was on average 85.8% of the strength on the unaffected side. The mean DASH score was 15.99. A significant relationship was found between lower DASH scores and losses of extension and grip strength. On the radiographs, the mean values in relation to the unfractured side were 84.0% for radial inclination, 85.4% for radial length and 86.8% for volar deviation of the radius. Loss of radial length was correlated with losses of extension and grip strength. PMID:27027046

  12. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS ON FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC RESULTS AFTER USE OF LOCKED VOLAR PLATE FOR FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL RADIUS

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Gonçalves; da Cruz Cerqueira, Sergio Auto; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho; de Souza Araújo Netto, Carlos Alberto; de Mathias, Marcelo Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the functional results from using a fixed-angle locked volar plate for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, using the DASH (disorders of the arm, shoulder and hand) questionnaire and its radiographic correlation with the Lidström classification. Methods: Thirty patients with unstable fractures of the distal extremity of the radius were evaluated after they had undergone a surgical procedure consisting of open reduction and internal fixation using a fixed-angle locked volar plate, at the Military Police Central Hospital of Rio de Janeiro between 2008 and 2009. The results were assessed based on range of motion, DASH protocol scores and radiographies with the Lidström classification. Results: The mean age of the patients in the study was 51 years. The mean DASH score was 11.9 points. It was observed that the radiographic findings did not influence the DASH score. It was found that flexion, pronation, supination and radial deviation correlated with the DASH score. Conclusions: The study showed that subjective functional outcomes using the DASH protocol, obtained from using a locked volar plate to treat fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, are influenced by the range of motion, and especially by the flexion, supination, pronation and radial deviation of the wrist after surgery. There is no correlation between the radiological parameters of either the normal or the operated radius, and the subjective functional outcomes assessed using the DASH protocol. PMID:27042637

  13. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  14. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  15. The Effects of Screw Length on Stability of Simulated Osteoporotic Distal Radius Fractures Fixed with Volar Locking Plates

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Brodt, Michael D.; Silva, Matthew J.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Volar plating for distal radius fractures has caused extensor tendon ruptures secondary to dorsal screw prominence. This study was designed to determine the biomechanical impact of placing unicortical distal locking screws and pegs in an extra-articular fracture model. Methods Volar-locking distal radius plates were applied to 30 osteoporotic distal radius models. Radii were divided into 5 groups based on distal locking fixation: bicortical locked screws, 3 lengths of unicortical locked screws (abutting the dorsal cortex [full length], 75% length, and 50% length to dorsal cortex), and unicortical locked pegs. Distal radius osteotomy simulated a dorsally comminuted, extra-articular, fracture. Each constructs stiffness was determined under physiologic loads (axial compression, dorsal bending volar bending) before and after 1000 cycles of axial conditioning and prior to axial loading to failure (2mm of displacement) and subsequent catastrophic failure. Results Cyclic conditioning did not alter constructs stiffness. Stiffness to volar bending and dorsal bending forces were similar between groups. Final stiffness(N/mm) under axial load was statistically equivalent for all groups: bicortical screws(230), full-length unicortical screws(227), 75% length unicortical screws(226), 50% length unicortical screws(187), unicortical pegs(226). Force(N) at 2 mm displacement was significantly less for 50% length unicortical screws(311) compared to bicortical screws(460), full-length unicortical screws(464), 75% length unicortical screws(400), and unicortical pegs(356). Force(N) to catastrophic fracture was statistically equivalent between groups but mean values for pegs(749) and 50% length unicortical(702) screws were 16-21% less than means for bicortical(892), full-length unicortical(860), and 75% length(894) unicortical constructs. Discussion Locked unicortical distal screws of at least 75% length produce construct stiffness similar to bicortical fixation. Unicortical

  16. A new volar plate DiPhos-RM for fixation of distal radius fracture: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Luigi; Mugnai, Raffaele; Adani, Roberto; Catani, Fabio

    2013-03-01

    We analyzed the efficiency of a new plate DiPhos-RM in CFR-PEEK [carbon-fiber-reinforced poly (etheretherketone)] for the volar fixation of distal radius fractures. The new plate's composition has the advantage of x-ray absolute transparency, therefore allowing to monitor the healing of the fracture. The desired combination of high strength and low rigidity is obtained through the use of the polymer composites CFR-PEEK. In this preliminary study (from March 2012 to June 2012), 10 cases of intra-articular distal radius fractures were treated with DiPhos-RM produced by Lima Corporate (Italy). The fractures were classified according to the AO classification, 4 fractures were type C1, 3 type C2, and 3 were A2. A preoperative computed tomography scan was carried out in all patients. One patient also underwent a postoperative computed tomography scan. Grip strength, range of motion, and DASH score were evaluated at follow-up. There were no cases of hardware failure. Specifically, no loss of position or alignment of fixed-angle locking screws or breakage of the plate were observed. Radiographic union was present at an average of 6 weeks (range, 5 to 8 wk). The overall preliminary experience with this new plate is favorable. The new plate is easy to apply and provides the surgeon dual options of fixed-angle or variable-angle screws. It was rigid enough to maintain the reduction also in AO type C articular fractures. PMID:23423235

  17. Corrective distal radius osteotomy following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate.

    PubMed

    Opel, S; Konan, S; Sorene, E

    2014-05-01

    Post-traumatic distal radius deformity may cause severe morbidity, and corrective osteotomy is often necessary to realign the functional axis of the wrist to correct symptomatic malunion. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the short-term results of a single surgeon’s series of distalradius corrective osteotomies following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate for 20 patients(16 women) of an average age of 57 (range 19–83) years [corrected].At short-term follow up (average 14 months, range 12-15 months), no complications were noted and radiological union was confirmed in all cases at an average of 3 months. The average post-operative Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 13.48 (range 0-48.33) and an objective improvement was noted in movements at the wrist joint. A statistically significant improvement was achieved in ulnar variance, radial inclination, dorsal tilt, and supination. PMID:24051477

  18. Measuring skin aging using optical coherence tomography in vivo: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Richter, Claudia; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Dermal and epidermal structures in human skin change during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Epidermal thickness is one of the most often reported parameters for the assessment of skin aging in cross-sectional images captured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We aimed to identify further parameters for the noninvasive measurement of skin aging of sun-exposed and sun-protected areas utilizing OCT. Based on a literature review, seven parameters were inductively developed. Three independent raters assessed these parameters using four-point scales on images of female subjects of two age groups. All items could be detected and quantified in our sample. Interrater agreement ranged between 25.0% and 83.3%. The item scores "stratum corneum reflectivity," "upper dermal reflectivity," and "dermoepidermal contrast" showed significant differences between age groups on the volar and dorsal forearm indicating that they were best able to measure changes during skin aging. "Surface unevenness" was associated with the skin roughness parameters, Rz and Rmax, on the inner upper arm and volar forearm supporting the criterion validity of this parameter on sun-protected skin areas. Based on the interrater agreement and the ability to differentiate between age groups, these four parameters are being considered as the best candidates for measuring skin aging in OCT images.

  19. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  20. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  1. Eating disorders and the skin.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders, which include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and eating disorder not otherwise specified, are psychiatric disorders with physical complications. Several factors may contribute to the onset of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, including a familial predisposition to these disorders as well as individual personality characteristics. Dissatisfaction with body shape and an overwhelming desire to be thin are considered as risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and diuretics, and psychiatric morbidity. They include xerosis, lanugolike body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrheic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, acquired striae distensae, and acral coldness. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms due to laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions to drugs. Symptoms due to psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the "hidden" signs of eating disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder. PMID:23245978

  2. The cadaveric anatomy of the distal radius: implications for the use of volar plates

    PubMed Central

    McCann, PA; Clarke, D; Amirfeyz, R; Bhatia, R

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Fractures of the distal radius are common upper limb injuries, representing a substantial proportion of the trauma workload in orthopaedic units. With ever increasing advancements in implant technology, operative intervention is becoming more frequent. As growing numbers of surgeons are performing operative fixation of distal radial fractures, an accurate understanding of the relevant surgical anatomy is paramount. The flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendon forms the cornerstone of the Henry approach to the volar cortex of the distal radius. A number of key neurovascular structures around the wrist are potentially at risk during this approach, especially when the FCR is mobilised and placed under retractors. METHODS In order to clarify the safe margins of the FCR approach, ten fresh frozen human cadaver limbs were dissected. The location of the radial artery, the median nerve, the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve and the superficial branch nerve were measured with respect to the FCR tendon. Measurements were taken on a centre-to-centre basis in the coronal plane at the watershed level. In addition, the distances between the tendons of brachioradialis, abductor pollicis longus and flexor pollicis longus, and the radial artery and median nerve were measured to create a complete picture of the anatomy of the FCR approach to the distal radius. RESULTS The structure most at risk was the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. It was located on average 3.4mm from the FCR tendon. The radial artery and the main trunk of the median nerve were located 7.8mm and 8.9mm from the tendon. The superficial branch of the radial nerve was 24.4mm from the FCR tendon and 11.1mm from the brachioradialis tendon. CONCLUSIONS Operative intervention is not without complication. We believe a more accurate understanding of the surgical anatomy is key to the prevention of neurovascular damage arising from the surgical management of distal radial fractures. PMID

  3. Possibility of Fixation of a Distal Radius Fracture With a Volar Locking Plate Through a 10 mm Approach.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kiyohito; Zemirline, Ahmed; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Liverneaux, Philippe; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The management of distal radius fractures has dramatically improved due to the development of a locking plate system. In addition, mini-invasive surgery has been performed in a lot of surgical fields in recent years. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of fixation of a distal radius fracture with a volar locking plate through a 10 mm approach. Eighteen patients with distal radius fracture (mean age: 66 y; range, 28 to 88 y; 8 males and 10 females) were operated on using a volar locking plate. The incision for plating was always 10 mm long. The clinical, cosmetic, and radiologic outcomes were investigated. At 3 months' follow-up, the range of motion of the wrist joint was 67.5 degrees in flexion, 65.6 degrees in extension, 88.3 degrees in pronation, and 88.3 degrees in supination. The % grip strength compared to the healthy side ranged from 35% to 100%. The VAS, Q-DASH, and modified Mayo scores were 0.7, 8.5, and 93.3, respectively (excellent in all 18 patients). Bone union was achieved on plain x-ray radiography and cosmetic problems were satisfied in all patients. Our results suggest that it is possible to achieve fixation of a distal radius fracture with a volar locking plate through a 10 mm approach. However, its applicability to surgery must be carefully examined. If any difficulties in plate installation or approach occur during this intervention, it will be necessary to consider switching to a conventional approach. We believe that surgeons must not adhere to a mini-invasive approach. PMID:27015408

  4. [Volar dislocation of the second and third carpometacarpal joint three months after a fall during a soccer game].

    PubMed

    Mørup-Petersen, Anne; Ryge, Camilla; Engelund, Dorte

    2015-01-26

    Volar dislocation of the second and third carpometacarpal joint is extremely rare and most often caused by high-energy trauma. In this case a 15-year-old boy fell on his hand while playing soccer. The injury was undiagnosed for three months, perhaps due to an ipsilateral forearm fracture. He was treated with open reduction and Kirchner wire fixation for nine weeks. At two years follow-up he had a painfree hand with a 20% reduction in grip strength. PMID:25612953

  5. Dorsally Comminuted Fractures of the Distal End of the Radius: Osteosynthesis with Volar Fixed Angle Locking Plates

    PubMed Central

    Selhi, Harpal Singh; Devgan, Ashish; Magu, Narender Kumar; Yamin, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dorsally comminuted distal radius fractures are unstable fractures and represent a treatment challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of dorsally comminuted fractures of the distal radius fixed with a volar locking plate. Patients and Methods. Thirty-three consecutive patients with dorsally comminuted fractures of the distal end of the radius were treated by open reduction and internal fixation with AO 2.4 mm (n = 19)/3.5 mm (n = 14) volar locking distal radius plate (Synthes, Switzerland, marketed by Synthes India Pvt. Ltd.). There were 7 type A3, 8 type C2, and 18 type C3 fractures. The patients were followed up at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Subjective assessment was done as per Disabilities Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Functional evaluation was done by measuring grip strength and range of motion around the wrist; the radiological determinants were radial angle, radial length, volar angle, and ulnar variance. The final assessment was done as per Demerit point system of Saito. Results. There were 23 males and 10 females with an average age of 44.12 ± 18.63 years (18–61 years). Clinicoradiological consolidation of the fracture was observed in all cases at a mean of 9.6 weeks (range 7–12 weeks). The average final extension was 58.15° ± 7.83°, flexion was 54.62° ± 11.23°, supination was 84.23° ± 6.02°, and pronation was 80.92° ± 5.54°. Demerit point system of Saito yielded excellent results in 79% (n = 26), good in 18% (n = 6), and fair in 3% (n = 1) patients. Three patients had loss of reduction but none of the patients had tendon irritation or ruptures, implant failure, or nonunion at the end of an one-year followup. Conclusion. Volar locking plate fixation for dorsally comminuted distal radius fractures results in good to excellent functional outcomes despite a high incidence of loss of reduction and fracture collapse. PMID:24959352

  6. The complex problem of sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Marie; Holmes, Jo; Peters, Lisa; Cooper, Karen; Rowson, Matthew; Basketter, David A

    2005-08-01

    There exists within the population subsets of individuals who display heightened skin reactivity to materials the majority find tolerable. In a series of investigations, we have examined interrelationships between many of the endpoints associated with the term 'sensitive skin'. In the most recent work, 58 volunteers were treated with 10% lactic acid, 50% ethanol, 0.5% menthol and 1.0% capsaicin on the nasolabial fold, unoccluded, with sensory reactions recorded at 2.5 min, 5 min and 8 min after application. Urticant susceptibility was evaluated with 1 m benzoic acid and 125 mM trans-cinnamic acid applied to the volar forearm for 20 min. A 2 x 23-h patch test was also conducted using 0.1% and 0.3% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.3% and 0.6% cocamidopropyl betaine and 0.1% and 0.2% benzalkonium chloride to determine irritant susceptibility. As found in previous studies, increased susceptibility to one endpoint was not predictive of sensitivity to another. In our experience, nasolabial stinging was a poor predictor of general skin sensitivity. Nevertheless, it may be possible to identify in the normal population individuals who, coincidentally, are more generally sensitive to a range of non-immunologic adverse skin reactions. Whether such individuals are those who experience problems with skin care products remains to be addressed. PMID:16033403

  7. Development and preliminary testing of a standardized method for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin using evaporimetry.

    PubMed

    Fader, M; Clark-O'Neill, S R; Wong, W K R; Runeman, B; Farbrot, A; Cottenden, A M

    2011-03-01

    Although evaporimetry (the measurement of water vapour flux density from the skin) has often been used to study the impact on skin hydration of using products such as baby diapers and incontinence pads, it is difficult to interpret results and to compare data from different studies because of the diversity of unvalidated methodologies used. The aim of this work was to develop a robust methodology for measuring the excess water in over-hydrated skin and test it on volar forearm and hip skin which had been occluded with saline soaked patches. Three repeat measurements were made on the volar forearm and the hip of five young (31-44 years) and six older (67-85 years) women and moderately good within-subject repeatability was found for both skin sites for both subject groups. Measurements taken from the hip were significantly higher (P = 0.001) than those from the arm and had larger coefficients of variation (3.5-22.1%) compared to arms (3.0-14.0%). There were no significant differences between young and older skin, implying that women for future studies could be recruited without regard to age. This is the first time that a robust evaporimetric methodology for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin has been described and validated, and it will form a solid basis for future work. PMID:21285481

  8. Cost-effectiveness of volar locking plate versus percutaneous fixation for distal radial fractures: Economic evaluation alongside a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karantana, A; Scammell, B E; Davis, T R C; Whynes, D K

    2015-09-01

    This study compares the cost-effectiveness of treating dorsally displaced distal radial fractures with a volar locking plate and percutaneous fixation. It was performed from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) using data from a single-centre randomised controlled trial. In total 130 patients (18 to 73 years of age) with a dorsally displaced distal radial fracture were randomised to treatment with either a volar locking plate (n = 66) or percutaneous fixation (n = 64). The methodology was according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance for technology appraisals. . There were no significant differences in quality of life scores between groups at any time point in the study. Both groups returned to baseline one year post-operatively. NHS costs for the plate group were significantly higher (p < 0.001, 95% confidence interval 497 to 930). For an additional £713, fixation with a volar locking plate offered 0.0178 additional quality-adjusted life years in the year after surgery. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for plate fixation relative to percutaneous fixation at list price was £40 068. When adjusting the prices of the implants for a 20% hospital discount, the ICER was £31 898. Patients who underwent plate fixation did not return to work earlier. We found no evidence to support the cost-effectiveness, from the perspective of the NHS, of fixation using a volar locking plate over percutaneous fixation for the operative treatment of a dorsally displaced radial fracture. PMID:26330595

  9. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. ... absorbing and scattering the energy. People with more melanin have darker skin and better protection from UV ...

  10. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  11. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy ... Cryotherapy or cryosurgery may be used to: Remove warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare cases, ...

  12. Nerve conduction studies in upper extremities: skin temperature corrections.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Soine, T L

    1983-09-01

    The relationship of skin to near nerve (NN) temperature and to nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and distal latency (DL) was studied in 34 normal adult subjects before and after cooling both upper extremities. Median and ulnar motor and sensory NCV, DL, and NN temperature were determined at ambient temperature (mean X skin temp = 33 C) and after cooling, at approximately 26, 28, and 30 C of forearm skin temperature. Skin temperatures on the volar side of the forearm, wrist, palm, and fingers and NN temperature at the forearm, midpalm, and thenar or hypothenar eminence were compared with respective NCV and DL. Results showed a significant linear correlation between skin temperature and NN temperature at corresponding sites (r2 range, 0.4-0.84; p less than 0.005). Furthermore, both skin and NN temperatures correlated significantly with respective NCV and DL. Midline wrist skin temperature showed the best correlation to NCV and DL. Median motor and sensory NCV were altered 1.5 and 1.4m/sec/C degree and their DL 0.2 msec/C degree of wrist skin temperature change, respectively. Ulnar motor and sensory NCV were changed 2.1 and 1.6m/sec/C degree respectively, and 0.2 msec/C degree wrist temperature for motor and sensory DL. Average ambient skin temperature at the wrist (33 C) was used as a standard skin temperature in the temperature correction formula: NCV or DL(temp corrected) = CF(Tst degree - Tm degree) + obtained NCV or DL, where Tst = 33 C for wrist, Tm = the measured skin temperature, and CF = correction factor of tested nerve. Use of temperature correction formula for NCV and DL is suggested in patients with changed wrist skin temperature outside 29.6-36.4C temperature range. PMID:6615178

  13. Skin Barrier Function and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Vestibulum Nasi and Fauces in Healthy Infants and Infants with Eczema: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Carlsen, Karin Cecilie Lødrup; Mowinckel, Petter; Skjerven, Håvard Ove; Kvenshagen, Bente; Rolfsjord, Leif Bjarte; Bradley, Maria; Lieden, Agne; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Gaustad, Peter; Gjersvik, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization and skin barrier dysfunction, often measured by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In the present study, the primary aim was to see whether S. aureus colonization in the vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was associated with increased TEWL in infants with healthy skin and infants with eczema. Secondarily, we aimed to investigate whether TEWL measurements on non-lesional skin on the lateral upper arm is equivalent to volar forearm in infants. In 167 of 240 infants, recruited from the general population, TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm, using a DermaLab USB, fulfilled our environmental requirements. The mean of three TEWL measurements from each site was used for analysis. The infants were diagnosed with no eczema (n = 110), possible AE (n = 28) or AE (n = 29). DNA samples were analysed for mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Bacterial cultures were reported positive with the identification of at least one culture with S. aureus from vestibulum nasi and/or fauces. S. aureus colonization, found in 89 infants (53%), was not associated with increased TEWL (i.e. TEWL in the upper quartile), neither on the lateral upper arm or volar forearm (p = 0.08 and p = 0.98, respectively), nor with AE (p = 0.10) or FLG mutation (p = 0.17). TEWL was significantly higher on both measuring sites in infants with AE compared to infants with possible AE and no eczema. FLG mutation was significantly associated with increased TEWL, with a 47% difference in TEWL. We conclude that S. aureus in vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was not associated with TEWL, whereas TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm appear equally appropriate in infants. PMID:26070153

  14. Skin Barrier Function and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Vestibulum Nasi and Fauces in Healthy Infants and Infants with Eczema: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Carlsen, Karin Cecilie Lødrup; Mowinckel, Petter; Skjerven, Håvard Ove; Kvenshagen, Bente; Rolfsjord, Leif Bjarte; Bradley, Maria; Lieden, Agne; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Gaustad, Peter; Gjersvik, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization and skin barrier dysfunction, often measured by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In the present study, the primary aim was to see whether S. aureus colonization in the vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was associated with increased TEWL in infants with healthy skin and infants with eczema. Secondarily, we aimed to investigate whether TEWL measurements on non-lesional skin on the lateral upper arm is equivalent to volar forearm in infants. In 167 of 240 infants, recruited from the general population, TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm, using a DermaLab USB, fulfilled our environmental requirements. The mean of three TEWL measurements from each site was used for analysis. The infants were diagnosed with no eczema (n = 110), possible AE (n = 28) or AE (n = 29). DNA samples were analysed for mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Bacterial cultures were reported positive with the identification of at least one culture with S. aureus from vestibulum nasi and/or fauces. S. aureus colonization, found in 89 infants (53%), was not associated with increased TEWL (i.e. TEWL in the upper quartile), neither on the lateral upper arm or volar forearm (p = 0.08 and p = 0.98, respectively), nor with AE (p = 0.10) or FLG mutation (p = 0.17). TEWL was significantly higher on both measuring sites in infants with AE compared to infants with possible AE and no eczema. FLG mutation was significantly associated with increased TEWL, with a 47% difference in TEWL. We conclude that S. aureus in vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was not associated with TEWL, whereas TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm appear equally appropriate in infants. PMID:26070153

  15. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent compounds and autofluorescence in skin in vivo using a confocal instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttenschoen, K. K.; Sutton, E. E.; Daly, D.; Girkin, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using compact and affordable instrumentation based upon fluorescent confocal imaging we have tracked the movement of autofluorescent compounds through skin in near real time with high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. The ability to measure the diffusion of compounds through skin with such resolution plays an important role for applications such as monitoring the penetration of pharmaceuticals applied to skin and assessing the integrity of the skin barrier. Several measurement methods exist, but they suffer from a number of problems such as being slow, expensive, non-portable and lacking sensitivity. To address these issues, we adapted a technique that we previously developed for tracking fluorescent compounds in the eye to measure the autofluorescence and the diffusion of externally applied fluorescent compounds in skin in vivo. Results are presented that show the change in autofluorescence of the volar forearm over the course of a week. We furthermore demonstrate the ability of the instrument to measure the diffusion speed and depth of externally applied fluorescent compounds both in healthy skin and after the skin barrier function has been perturbed. The instrument is currently being developed further for increased sensitivity and multi-wavelength excitation. We believe that the presented instrument is suitable for a large number of applications in fields such as assessment of damage to the skin barrier, development of topical and systemic medication and tracking the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through skin constructs as well as monitoring effects of skin products and general consumer products which may come into contact with the skin.

  16. Arthroscopically assisted reduction with volar plating or external fixation for displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius in the elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yasunori; Doi, Kazuteru; Estrella, Emmanuel P; Chen, Guofen

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients older than 70 years with AO type C fracture of the distal radius were treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction combined with volar plating or external fixation. The patients were followed up for an average of 24.9 +/- 16.1 months. The average score was 80.1 +/- 10.5 according to the modified system of Green and O'Brien. Eight patients had an excellent result, 11 had a good result, seven had a fair result, and two had a poor result. Twenty-three patients were able to return to their previous activities level or occupation without any restriction. On the basis of these results, we concluded that arthroscopically assisted reduction combined with volar plating or external fixation is one of the useful options for the treatment of a displaced intra-articular fracture of the distal radius in elderly patients who are physiologically young or active. PMID:17613178

  17. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. PMID:24112695

  18. Skin Biomes.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:27056560

  19. Arthroscopic assistance does not improve the functional or radiographic outcome of unstable intra-articular distal radial fractures treated with a volar locking plate: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Uchiyama, S; Komatsu, M; Hashimoto, S; Kobayashi, Y; Sakurai, T; Kato, H

    2015-07-01

    There is no consensus on the benefit of arthroscopically assisted reduction of the articular surface combined with fixation using a volar locking plate for the treatment of intra-articular distal radial fractures. In this study we compared the functional and radiographic outcomes of fluoroscopically and arthroscopically guided reduction of these fractures. Between February 2009 and May 2013, 74 patients with unilateral unstable intra-articular distal radial fractures were randomised equally into the two groups for treatment. The mean age of these 74 patients was 64 years (24 to 92). We compared functional outcomes including active range of movement of the wrist, grip strength and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores at six and 48 weeks; and radiographic outcomes that included gap, step, radial inclination, volar angulation and ulnar variance. There were no significant differences between the techniques with regard to functional outcomes or radiographic parameters. The mean gap and step in the fluoroscopic and arthroscopic groups were comparable at 0.9 mm (standard deviation (SD) 0.7) and 0.7 mm (SD 0.7) and 0.6 mm (SD 0.6) and 0.4 mm (SD 0.5), respectively; p = 0.18 and p = 0.35). Arthroscopic reduction conferred no advantage over conventional fluoroscopic guidance in achieving anatomical reduction of intra-articular distal radial fractures when using a volar locking plate. PMID:26130352

  20. Skin hydration in postmenopausal women: argan oil benefit with oral and/or topical use

    PubMed Central

    Boucetta, Kenza Qiraouani; Charrouf, Zoubida; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Rahali, Younes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin hydration in postmenopausal women. Material and methods Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group absorbed alimentary argan oil (n = 30) and the control group olive oil (n = 30). Both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a sixty days’ period. Evaluation of skin hydration, i.e. transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and water content of the epidermis (WCE) on both volar forearms of the two groups, were performed during three visits at D0, D30 and after sixty days (D60) of oils treatment. Results The consumption of argan oil has led to a significant decrease in TEWL (p = 0.023) and a significant increase in WCE (p = 0.001). The application of argan oil has led to a significant decrease in TEWL (p = 0.01) and a significant increase in WCE (p < 0.001). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the daily consumption and application of argan oil have improved the skin hydration by restoring the barrier function and maintaining the water-holding capacity. PMID:26327867

  1. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  2. Skin Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your ...

  3. Skin lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... and contains fluid or semisolid material Benign skin growths such as seborrheic keratoses or neurofibromas Boils , painful, red bumps usually involving an infected hair follicle Corn or callus, caused by skin thickening in response ...

  4. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  5. Effects of skin blood flow and temperature on skin--electrode impedance and offset potential: measurements at low alternating current density.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C

    1992-01-01

    Skin--electrode impedance was determined at 100 Hz and 1 kHz between two disposable electrodes, 5 cm apart, at current densities < 65 microA.cm-2. Measurements were made on the volar skin of the forearm during cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the dorsum of the foot in the absence of skin blood flow during aortic aneurysm repair. Both the resistive and reactive components of the skin-electrode impedence showed an inverse linear relationship to temperature between 26 and 36 degrees C. The magnitude of the impedance change was different for each patient studied; resistance changes ranged from 0.03 to 23.2 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.03 to 2.7 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz, while reactance changes ranged from 0.4 to 2.1 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 100 Hz and from 0.04 to 0.18 k omega. Degrees C-1 at 1 kHz. Changes in skin-electrode impedance were not due to changes in skin blood flow. There was no consistent change in offset potential with temperature. Although the skin-electrode impedance increases as temperature falls, it is concluded that temperature effects at the skin-electrode interface are not responsible for the observed failure of evoked electromyography during clinical monitoring of neuromuscular function. PMID:1404312

  6. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused a large amount of skin loss Burns Cosmetic reasons or reconstructive surgeries where there has been skin damage or skin ... anesthesia are: Reactions to medicines Problems with breathing Risks for this surgery are: Bleeding Chronic pain (rarely) Infection Loss of ...

  7. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  8. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides.

    PubMed

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellgren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-11-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed to systemic alitretinoin treatment. The criteria for being ascribed to alitretinoin were chronic hand eczema and insufficient therapeutic response to potent topical corticosteroids. Before initiation and after 2 months of systemic treatment with 30 mg alitretinoin, a challenge with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months. No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum. PMID:20535487

  9. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  10. The effect of dietary and/or cosmetic argan oil on postmenopausal skin elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qiraouani Boucetta, Kenza; Charrouf, Zoubida; Aguenaou, Hassan; Derouiche, Abdelfattah; Bensouda, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Background During menopause, the decrease of estrogenic secretion induces the disruption of skin functioning, thus causing the decline in skin elasticity characteristic of skin aging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of daily consumption and/or application of argan oil on skin elasticity. Materials and methods Sixty postmenopausal women consumed butter during the stabilization period and were randomly divided into two groups for the intervention period: the treatment group of 30 participants received dietary argan oil, the control group of 30 participants received olive oil, and both groups applied cosmetic argan oil in the left volar forearm during a 60-day period. Assessments of skin elasticity parameters, ie, the three R-parameters (R2 or gross-elasticity of the skin, R5 or net elasticity of the skin, and R7 or biological elasticity), and the resonance running time (RRT) at both volar forearms of the two groups were performed during three visits: before starting oils consumption and application, after 30 days of oils consumption and application, and after 60 days of oils consumption and application. Results The consumption of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P<0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P=0.002). The application of argan oil led to a significant increase of gross-elasticity of the skin (R2) (P<0.001), net elasticity of the skin (R5) (P<0.001), biological elasticity (R7) (P=0.001), and a significant decrease of RRT (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the daily consumption and/or topical application of argan oil have an anti-aging effect on the skin demonstrated by the improvement of skin elasticity, characterized by an increase of R-parameters (R2, R5, and R7) and a decrease of RRT. PMID:25673976

  11. Skin aging and dry skin.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2004-08-01

    Skin aging appears to be the result of both scheduled and continuous "wear and tear" processes that damage cellular DNA and proteins. Two types of aging, chronological skin aging and photoaging, have distinct clinical and histological features. Chronological skin aging is a universal and inevitable process characterized primarily by physiologic alterations in skin function. In this case, keratinocytes are unable to properly terminally differentiate to form a functional stratum corneum, and the rate of formation of neutral lipids that contribute to the barrier function slows, causing dry, pale skin with fine wrinkles. In contrast, photoaging results from the UVR of sunlight and the damage thus becomes apparent in sun-exposed skin. Characteristics of this aging type are dry and sallow skin displaying fine wrinkles as well as deep furrows, resulting from the disorganization of epidermal and dermal components associated with elastosis and heliodermatitis. Understanding of the functions of the skin and the basic principles of moisturizer use and application is important for the prevention of skin aging. Successful treatment of dry skin with appropriate skin care products gives the impression of eternal youth. PMID:15492432

  12. Treatment of the distal fracture in radioulna based on the volar wrist dual channel approach and postoperative X-ray diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yu, Shaoxiao; Bai, Yinwei; Lin, Huixin; Zeng, Jinhao; Ye, Xuelang; Xu, Dachuan

    2015-12-01

    The fracture of the distal ulna and radius is a kind of fracture that results in high morbidity and occurrence rate and contributes to about one-sixth of the entire body's fracture. In this study, we implemented the improved palmar wrist surgery by a volar wrist dual channel approach. Between 2011 and 2014, we have treated 67 distal radius fracture patients. We divided them into two parts randomly, and treat them by the Carpometacarpal direct approach solution and dual wrist palmar surgical approach solution respectively. After the surgery, the differences in the incidence of median nerve irritation are significant (P < 0.01). With reference to the exposure time of fracture, the operation time and the pronator quadratus muscle repair rate, we find that the exposure time of fracture and the operation time in the dual wrist palmar surgical approach solution are much less than that as compared to the Carpometacarpal direct approach solution (P < 0.01). The improved dual wrist palmar surgical approach can lead to a successful treatment of the distal radius fractures volar distal radial ulnar by reducing the blind exposure problem. As such, the surgeon can complete treatment of fractures of the region under direct vision during operation. Furthermore, reducing the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and the structure of the stretch can decrease the incidence of postoperative complications. Postoperative X-ray diagnosis is then performed to examine the patients' recovery and assist in clinical follow-up. Our study proves that the volar wrist dual channel approach can be successfully achieved by a surface incision surgical implementation of the dual channel, and gives rise to a minimally invasive operation. PMID:26206398

  13. Fuel economy and exhaust emissions characteristics of diesel vehicles: Test results of a prototype Chrysler Volare, 225 CID (3.7-liter) automobile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The results obtained from fuel economy and emission tests conducted on a prototype Chrysler Volare diesel vehicle are documented. The vehicle was tested on a chassis dynamometer over selected drive cycles and steady-state conditions. The fuel used, was a DOE/BETC referee fuel. Particulate emission rates were calculated from dilution tunnel measurements and large volume particulate samples were collected for biological and chemical analysis. The vehicle obtained 32.7 mpg for the FTP urban cycle and 48.8 mpg for the highway cycle. The emissions rates were 0.42/1.58/1.17/0.28 g/mile of HC, CO, NOx and particulates respectively.

  14. Deposition of 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide on human skin.

    PubMed

    North-Root, H; Demetrulias, J; Wester, R; Maibach, H; Corbin, N

    1984-08-01

    For rinse-off products such as soaps, quantitating the deposition of ingredients left behind on the skin following rinsing may be important particularly if the ingredient is biologically active, e.g. germicides, perfumes. The residue comprises the major portion of material which is available for percutaneous penetration. A method is described for quantitating the deposition of the soap germicide, 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide (TCC) as the result of direct application of bar soap on human skin. A soap pellet containing 1.5% [14C]TCC was gently rubbed on a small area of the volar forearm for 30 s. 90 s after soap application the site was thoroughly rinsed with water. After rinsing, 1.4% of the applied [14C]TCC, or 0.33 micrograms/cm2, remained on the treated site as determined by cellophane tape stripping followed by scintillation counting. The amount of TCC deposited from a simulated wash with a bar soap onto human skin is compared to the amount deposited onto the skin of other species. PMID:6474513

  15. Skin optics

    SciTech Connect

    van Gemert, M.J.; Jacques, S.L.; Sterenborg, H.J.; Star, W.M.

    1989-12-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model representing skin geometry, as well as experimental methods to determine the optical properties of each skin layer. These activities are unified under the name skin optics. This paper first reviews the current status of tissue optics, distinguishing between the cases of: dominant absorption, dominant scattering, and scattering about equal to absorption. Then, previously published data as well as some current unpublished data on (human) stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, have been collected and/or (re)analyzed in terms of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor of scattering. The results are that the individual skin layers show strongly forward scattering (anisotropy factors between 0.7 and 0.9). The absorption and scattering data show that for all wavelengths considered scattering is much more important than absorption. Under such circumstances, solutions to the transport equation for a multilayer skin model and finite beam laser irradiation are currently not yet available. Hence, any quantitative dosimetry for skin treated with (laser) light is currently lacking.

  16. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  17. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancers in skin of color often present atypically or with advanced stage in comparison to Caucasian patients. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when examining skin lesions in skin of color. PMID:19691228

  18. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present?

  19. Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Movie: Skin Acne Myths Blisters, Calluses, and Corns Fungal ...

  20. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review. 17 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  1. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... nearby What to Do Teach kids not to pop, pick at, or scratch pimples, pus-filled infections, ... Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your ...

  2. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposure to ultraviolet light, which is found in sunlight and in lights used in tanning salons. What ... the safe-sun guidelines. 1. Avoid the sun. Sunlight damages your skin. The sun is strongest during ...

  3. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ... and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to ...

  4. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Alternative Names India ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  6. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  7. Photopneumatic Technology in Acne Treatment and Skin Rejuvenation: Histological Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Recent reports indicate that a variety of light-based devices have been used for acne treatment and skin rejuvenation. A new technology combining intense pulsed light with negative pressure, photopneumatic technology, has recently attracted interest. The present study assessed acne treatment and skin rejuvenation with this novel approach Subjects and Methods: Acne, 450 nm tip. Five Japanese volunteers (1 male, 4 female; mean age 28.6 yr; skin type III) with mild to moderate/moderate active acne participated. The face was treated with 2 sessions, 2 weeks apart. Biopsies were obtained immediately after the first session and 1 week after the second session, and routinely processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rejuvenation, profusion tip with topical preparation. In 5 Japanese volunteers (3 male, 2 female; mean age 37.6 yr, skin type III), the volar aspect of both forearms was treated with the 530 nm head at P6 (around 12 J/cm2). The left arm was then treated with a pre-infused profusion tip and vacuum only. Four sessions were given, 14-day intervals. Biopsies were taken from both arms 2 weeks after the 2nd session and 3 weeks after the 4th session. One-half of each biopsy was assessed with histo-and immunohistochemistry, and the other with TEM. Results Acne trial: A combination of physical extraction of comedones, mild photothermal damage of the follicle and damage to identified bacilli was noted post-treatment, with macroscopic improvement of the skin. Rejuvenation with profusion: Significant morphological and immunohistochemical differences were seen between the control and profusion-treated arms at the first assessment. These differences became less significant at the 2nd assessment. Conclusions Macroscopically and histologically, photopneumatic technology improved acne lesions, suggesting a synergistic effect between the components of the technology. In skin rejuvenation, the profusion therapy accelerated the regenerative

  8. Increased Levels of β-catenin, LEF-1, and HPA-1 Correlate with Poor Prognosis for Acral Melanoma with Negative BRAF and NRAS Mutation in BRAF Exons 11 and 15 and NRAS Exons 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sanxiong; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yongxin; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Hongjun; Liu, Xuefeng; Xu, Da; Chen, Yanjin; Yang, Yihao; Zhang, Ya; Li, Dongxu; Xia, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    To determine the expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1 (LEF-1), and heparanase-1 (HPA-1) and to evaluate these proteins' potential prognostic values in malignant acral melanoma without mutations in BRAF exons 11 and 15 and NRAS exons 1 and 2, specimens from 90 patients with wild-type BRAF and NRAS were assessed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The positive expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was observed in 36 (72%), 31 (62%), and 32 (64%) of the detected acral melanomas, respectively. The expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was not correlated with gender, age, or diseased body parts (p>0.05), but was significantly positively correlated with the tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage and metastasis (correlation=0.406 and 0.716, 0.397 and 0.582, 0.353 and 0.579; p=0.040 and 0.0001, 0.0040 and 0.0001, 0.0120 and 0.0001, respectively). We also observed that the increased expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was significantly correlated with decreased survival and poor prognosis (p=0.001, 0.010, and 0.023, respectively). A multifactorial analysis using Cox's regression model revealed that β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, heparanase-1, and the TNM stage were all independent factors in malignant melanoma (risk ratios were 7.294, 5.550, 5.622, and 4.794; p-values were 0.007, 0.018, 0.018, and 0.029, respectively). This study may provide the basis for the use of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 as novel targets in the treatment of malignant invasion and metastasis in acral melanoma cancer. The expression of β-catenin, LEF-1, and HPA-1 was assessed and compared in malignant melanoma with that of peritumoral tissue and benign nevus in the patients with negative mutations in BRAF exons 11 and 15 and NRAS exons 1 and 2. The study may provide the basis for

  9. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  10. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  11. Skin characteristics in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  12. Study of the vitamins A, E and C esters penetration into the skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevych, Borys; Isensee, Debora; Rangel, Joao L.; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Martinello, Valeska C. A.; Dieamant, Gustavo C.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Vitamins A, E and C play important role in skin homeostasis and protection. Hence, they are extensively used in many cosmetic and cosmeceutic products. However, their molecules are unstable, and do not easily penetrate into the skin, which drastically decreases its efficiency in topical formulations. Liposoluble derivative of the vitamin A - retinyl palmitate, vitamin E - tocopheryl acetate, and vitamin C - tetraisopalmitoyl ascorbic acid, are more stable, and are frequently used as an active ingredient in cosmetic products. Moreover, increased hydrophobicity of these molecules could lead to a higher skin penetration. The aim of this work is to track and compare the absorption of the liposoluble derivatives of the vitamins and their encapsulated form, into the healthy human skin in vivo. We used Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS) that is proven to be helpful in label-free non-destructive investigation of the biochemical composition and molecular conformational analysis of the biological samples. The measurements were performed in the volar forearm of the 10 healthy volunteers. Skin was treated with both products, and Raman spectra were obtained after 15 min, 3 hours, and 6 hours after applying the formulation. 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer (River Diagnostics, The Netherlands) with 785 nm laser excitation was used to acquire information in the fingerprint region. Significant difference in permeation of the products was observed. Whereas only free form of retinyl palmitate penetrate the skin within first 15 minutes, all three vitamin derivatives were present under the skin surface in case of nanoparticulated form.

  13. Age-related changes in skin barrier function - quantitative evaluation of 150 female subjects.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-04-01

    The protection against water loss and the prevention of substances and bacteria penetrating into the body rank as the most important functions of the skin. This so-called 'skin barrier function' is the natural frontier between the inner organism and the environment, and is primarily formed by the epidermis. An impairment of the skin barrier function is often found in diseased and damaged skin. An influence of ageing on skin barrier function is widely accepted, but has not been conclusively evaluated yet. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to assess the potential influence of ageing on skin barrier function, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, sebum content and pH value. One hundred and fifty healthy women aged 18-80, divided into five age groups with 30 subjects each, were evaluated in this study. TEWL, hydration level, sebum secretion and pH value of hydro-lipid acid film were measured with worldwide acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at cheek, neck, décolleté, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Whereas TEWL and stratum corneum hydration showed only very low correlation with subject's age, the sebum production decreased significantly with age, resulting in the lowest skin surface lipids levels measured in subjects older than 70 years. The highest skin surface pH was measured in subjects between 50 and 60 years, whereas the eldest age group had the lowest mean pH. The dorsum of the hand was the location with the highest TEWL and lowest stratum corneum hydration in all age groups. The results show that only some parameters related to skin barrier function are influenced by ageing. Whereas sebum production decreases significantly over lifetime and skin surface pH is significantly increased in menopausal woman, TEWL and stratum corneum hydration show only minor variations with ageing. PMID:23113564

  14. Approach to quantify human dermal skin aging using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Extracellular skin structures in human skin are impaired during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Assessment of these dermal changes is conducted by subjective clinical evaluation and histological and molecular analysis. We aimed to develop a new parameter for the noninvasive quantitative determination of dermal skin alterations utilizing the high-resolution three-dimensional multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) technique. To quantify structural differences between chronically sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, the respective collagen-specific second harmonic generation and the elastin-specific autofluorescence signals were recorded in young and elderly volunteers using the MPLSM technique. After image processing, the elastin-to-collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. Results show that the ELCOR parameter of volar forearm skin significantly increases with age. For elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area is significantly augmented compared to the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on the MPLSM technology, we introduce the ELCOR parameter as a new means to quantify accurately age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix.

  15. Influence of lidocaine hydrochloride and penetration enhancers on the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Mohammed, Diar; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-12-30

    Skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) are commonly employed in pharmaceutical and personal care products. These compounds transiently alter the barrier properties of the skin and we have previously investigated the effects of specific SPEs on skin barrier function in vivo. In the present study the effects of incorporation of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lidocaine hydrochloride (LID HCl) in the SPEs previously studied were investigated. Solutions of LID HCl were prepared and applied to the volar forearm of human subjects with occlusion for 24h. Subsequently, tape stripping and trans epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were conducted for treated and control sites. The activities of the desquamatory proteases, kallikrein 5 (KLK 5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK 7) and API content were also measured from the tape strips. The propylene glycol (PG) formulation increased TEWL significantly (p<0.05) compared with the other SPEs and a mixture of the SPEs. However, only the isopropyl myristate (IPM) solution altered protease activity with a significant observed increase in kallikrein 5 (KLK 5). Incorporation of LID HCl appeared to ameliorate the effects of some of the SPEs on TEWL measurements compared with our previous study. Overall uptake of LID HCl into skin from the various formulations correlated very well with changes in TEWL. The findings should have implications for the choice of SPEs in topical and transdermal formulations, particularly where the skin barrier function of patients is already impaired for example in atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:25305378

  16. In-vivo dynamic characterization of microneedle skin penetration using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enfield, Joey; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Lawlor, Kate; Jonathan, Enock; O'Mahony, Conor; Leahy, Martin

    2010-07-01

    The use of microneedles as a method of circumventing the barrier properties of the stratum corneum is receiving much attention. Although skin disruption technologies and subsequent transdermal diffusion rates are being extensively studied, no accurate data on depth and closure kinetics of microneedle-induced skin pores are available, primarily due to the cumbersome techniques currently required for skin analysis. We report on the first use of optical coherence tomography technology to image microneedle penetration in real time and in vivo. We show that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to painlessly measure stratum corneum and epidermis thickness, as well as microneedle penetration depth after microneedle insertion. Since OCT is a real-time, in-vivo, nondestructive technique, we also analyze skin healing characteristics and present quantitative data on micropore closure rate. Two locations (the volar forearm and dorsal aspect of the fingertip) have been assessed as suitable candidates for microneedle administration. The results illustrate the applicability of OCT analysis as a tool for microneedle-related skin characterization.

  17. In-vivo dynamic characterization of microneedle skin penetration using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Enfield, Joey; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Lawlor, Kate; Jonathan, Enock; O'Mahony, Conor; Leahy, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The use of microneedles as a method of circumventing the barrier properties of the stratum corneum is receiving much attention. Although skin disruption technologies and subsequent transdermal diffusion rates are being extensively studied, no accurate data on depth and closure kinetics of microneedle-induced skin pores are available, primarily due to the cumbersome techniques currently required for skin analysis. We report on the first use of optical coherence tomography technology to image microneedle penetration in real time and in vivo. We show that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to painlessly measure stratum corneum and epidermis thickness, as well as microneedle penetration depth after microneedle insertion. Since OCT is a real-time, in-vivo, nondestructive technique, we also analyze skin healing characteristics and present quantitative data on micropore closure rate. Two locations (the volar forearm and dorsal aspect of the fingertip) have been assessed as suitable candidates for microneedle administration. The results illustrate the applicability of OCT analysis as a tool for microneedle-related skin characterization. PMID:20799803

  18. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Cancer Types Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  19. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Purified protein derivative standard; TB skin test; Tuberculin skin test; Mantoux test ... Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, ...

  20. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  1. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, ...

  2. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  3. Pigmentation and skin reaction to sun as risk factors for cutaneous melanoma: Western Canada Melanoma Study.

    PubMed Central

    Elwood, J M; Gallagher, R P; Hill, G B; Spinelli, J J; Pearson, J C; Threlfall, W

    1984-01-01

    Between 1 April 1979 and 31 March 1981, 904 residents of the four western provinces of Canada (population 6.5 million), were diagnosed as suffering from primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. Of 801 patients aged 20-79 years, 665 (83%) were interviewed along with control subjects chosen at random from the general population and matched for age, sex, and province. After exclusion of 70 subjects with lentigo maligna or acral lentiginous melanoma, comparisons of the 595 case-control pairs showed that light hair, skin, and eye colour, a history of heavy freckling in adolescence, and a tendency to burn readily and tan poorly in the sun were significant risk factors for melanoma. The strongest primary associations were with blond hair (relative risk 7.1 compared with black hair), light colour of unexposed skin (relative risk 2.4), and severe freckling (relative risk 2.1). These associations were independent of ethnic origin and of recorded amount of exposure to the sun and were somewhat stronger for superficial spreading than for nodular melanoma. This study is the largest and most detailed of an incident series of melanomas to be published to date. The results were consistent with other studies reporting associations between melanoma and poor tanning ability, a tendency to burn easily, and a history of sunburn and showed that light hair colour was the strongest risk factor for the disease. PMID:6419839

  4. [Precision and economy of skin prick tests].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kupryś, Izabela; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Due to a rise in the number of cases of allergic disease and a need to increase financial resources for the diagnosis of these conditions, the possibility of reducing costs of skin pricks tests (SPT) was very welcome. In an attempt to reduce costs some practitioners use one lancet for several pricks in one patient. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this way of performing SPT influences the results. 52 subjects with (39) and without (13) atopy were tested with histamine, codeine and standard allergen extracts. SPT were applied to the volar surface of a randomly assigned forearm using two methods: one lancet-one prick on one forearm (single test method) and one lancet-multiple pricks ("multiple test" method) on the other. The false positive tests at the placebo site following allergen were recorded only in multiple test method, in 41 out of 72 pricks (p < 0.00001) when all reactions above baseline were considered and in 26 out of 72 (p = 0.00001) when a 3 mm cut-off was considered. The size of the false positive reaction depends on the intensity of the reaction to the preceding allergen (rang Spearman factor R = 0.706, p < 0.000001) and decreases in the second consecutive placebo test. Our data show that one lancet for multiple test method cannot be used to diagnose factors responsible for allergy, particularly in patients qualified for immunotherapy and in scientific studies. For financial reasons multiple test method can be used in screening and epidemiological studies where atopy is studied and there is no need to identify the specific allergen. PMID:12053585

  5. In vivo measurement of skin surface strain and sub-surface layer deformation induced by natural tissue stretching.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Raman; Gerhardt, Lutz-Christian; Lee, Zing S; Byers, Robert A; Woods, Daniel; Sanz-Herrera, José A; Franklin, Steve E; Lewis, Roger; Matcher, Stephen J; Carré, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Stratum corneum and epidermal layers change in terms of thickness and roughness with gender, age and anatomical site. Knowledge of the mechanical and tribological properties of skin associated with these structural changes are needed to aid in the design of exoskeletons, prostheses, orthotics, body mounted sensors used for kinematics measurements and in optimum use of wearable on-body devices. In this case study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC) were combined to determine skin surface strain and sub-surface deformation behaviour of the volar forearm due to natural tissue stretching. The thickness of the epidermis together with geometry changes of the dermal-epidermal junction boundary were calculated during change in the arm angle, from flexion (90°) to full extension (180°). This posture change caused an increase in skin surface Lagrange strain, typically by 25% which induced considerable morphological changes in the upper skin layers evidenced by reduction of epidermal layer thickness (20%), flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction undulation (45-50% reduction of flatness being expressed as Ra and Rz roughness profile height change) and reduction of skin surface roughness Ra and Rz (40-50%). The newly developed method, DIC combined with OCT imaging, is a powerful, fast and non-invasive methodology to study structural skin changes in real time and the tissue response provoked by mechanical loading or stretching. PMID:27310571

  6. Treatment of unstable distal radius fractures: non-invasive dynamic external fixator versus volar locking plate – functional and radiological outcome in a prospective case-controlled series

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ali S.; Rammappa, Manju; Lee, Ling; Nanda, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fracture (DRF) is a common injury and various treatment modalities including open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locking plate are available. More recently, a non-invasive external fixator has been used. Aims: To prospectively compare the use of a non-invasive external fixator with early dynamisation for DRF against ORIF with volar locking plate control group. Methods: Consecutive patients with closed DRF were included in a prospective case-controlled study. Patients were assigned to non-invasive external fixator or ORIF. Minimum follow-up was two years. Follow-up was at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 26 and at one and two-year post-operatively. The outcome measures included demographic details, injury mechanism, AO fracture type, risk factors, body mass index (BMI), ulnar styloid fracture and dorsal comminution, radiographs, grip strength and DASH score. Results: Consecutive 50 patients were treated either with non-invasive external fixator (25/50) or with ORIF (25/50) and the mean age of the two groups was 53 years (SD 17.1) and 49 years (SD 19.5), respectively. Demographics were matched in two groups. In the non-invasive external fixator group, there were 10 AO Type-A, 5 Type-B and 10 Type-C fractures. The ORIF group included 8 Type-A, 6 Type-B and 11 Type-C fractures. The mean DASH score at three-months and one-year post-injury in non-invasive fixator group was 12.2 (SD 3.1) and 3.5 (SD 0.7), respectively, significantly greater than those of ORIF group 14.5 (SD 5.6) and 11.2 (SD 4.4), respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: DRF treated with non-invasive external fixator can give functional results superior to ORIF at three-months and the trend is maintained at one and two-year post-operatively. PMID:27163089

  7. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin.

    PubMed

    Sauerstein, K; Klede, M; Hilliges, M; Schmelz, M

    2000-12-15

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 microl min(-1). After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  8. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sauerstein, Katja; Klede, Monika; Hilliges, Marita; Schmelz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 μl min−1. After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  9. Analysis of the in vivo confocal Raman spectral variability in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevych, Borys; dos Santos, Laurita; Rangel, Joao L.; Grancianinov, Karen J. S.; Sousa, Mariane P.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Biochemical composition of the skin changes in each layer and, therefore, the skin spectral profile vary with the depth. In this work, in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy studies were performed at different skin regions and depth profile (from the surface down to 10 μm) of the stratum corneum, to verify the variability and reproducibility of the intra- and interindividual Raman data. The Raman spectra were collected from seven healthy female study participants using a confocal Raman system from Rivers Diagnostic, with 785 nm excitation line and a CCD detector. Measurements were performed in the volar forearm region, at three different points at different depth, with the step of 2 μm. For each depth point, three spectra were acquired. Data analysis included the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation and residual) and Pearson's correlation coefficient calculation. Our results show that inter-individual variability is higher than intraindividual variability, and variability inside the SC is higher than on the skin surface. In all these cases we obtained r values, higher than 0.94, which correspond to high correlation between Raman spectra. It reinforces the possibility of the data reproducibility and direct comparison of in vivo results obtained with different study participants of the same age group and phototype.

  10. Skin Keratins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. PMID:26795476

  11. Is minimally invasive application by intramedullary osteosynthesis in comparison with volar plating real benefit in the treatment of distal radius fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Vlček, Martin; Jaganjac, Edib; Pech, Jan; Jonáš, David; Kebrle, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Can minimally invasive intramedullary osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures provide better therapeutic results than multidirectional locking plates. Retrospective study of 68 patients operated for distal radius fractures, 18 were treated with intramedullary X-screw (XSCR) fixation and 50 with the multidirectional angle-stable plate system (APTUS). The evaluation at 1-year follow-up included functional status of the wrist and hand, and radiographic findings. In the XSCR group, the functional outcomes of the treated extremity did not achieve values comparable with those of the uninjured side in any of the parameters measured. The radiographic findings did not meet the requirements of successful healing due to failure to restore an anatomical volar tilt in 22.2% cases. In the APTUS group, comparable values of the injured and the uninjured side were achieved in radial deviation, ulnar deviation, pronation, supination and grip strength. The radiographic criteria of successful healing were met by all fractures treated by locking plate osteosynthesis. Implant migration associated with secondary displacement of bone fragments was recorded in 33.3 % of the XSCR patients and only in 4.0 % of the APTUS patients. The overall evaluation show that intramedullary osteosynthesis does not produce better treatment outcomes compared with plate osteosynthesis in indicated types of fractures. PMID:24856379

  12. Assessment of pepper spray product potency in Asian and Caucasian forearm skin using transepidermal water loss, skin temperature and reflectance colorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pershing, Lynn K; Reilly, Christopher A; Corlett, Judy L; Crouch, Dennis J

    2006-01-01

    Historically, pepper spray product potency has been established using a taste test evaluation. A taste test is subjective and may not be appropriate for assessing pepper potency in skin. The current study evaluated chemically diverse pepper sprays in human forearm skin using three objective, noninvasive parameters: transepidermal water loss, skin surface temperature and erythema, as a means for assessing dermal pharmacology, toxicology and product potency. Five commercial pepper spray products containing various capsaicinoid analogs at various concentrations were evaluated in duplicate on volar forearms of six Caucasians and six Asians using a 10 min exposure. Mean surface skin temperature, transepidermal water loss results were highly variable and therefore did not demonstrate dose responsive behavior to increasing capsaicinoid concentrations. Erythema, as measured by increases in a* (reflected light in the red-to-green color spectrum) of the L*a*b* uniform color scale, was superior among parameters evaluated in discriminating pepper spray potency and correlated well with the relative and total capsaicinoid concentration in the products. Products containing greater than 16 mg ml(-1) capsaicinoid concentration produced greater erythema responses in Caucasians than Asians. Asians responded greater to the synthetic analog, nonivamide, than to mixtures of capsaicinoids, while Caucasians responded equally to both capsaicinoid analogs. Thus, pepper spray product potency in human skin reflects the total capsaicinoid concentration, the specific capsaicin analog(s) present, and the race of the individual exposed. The finding that the reflectance colorimeter a* scale can differentiate these parameters in skin will have a significant impact on evaluating the use and efficacy of pepper spray products in humans. PMID:16220469

  13. Tips and tricks in the dermoscopy of pigmented lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a useful, widely used tool for examining pigmented lesions, especially helpful in cases of an uncertain nature. Nevertheless, doctors may experience diagnostic difficulties while using this method. An example of this may be found in the examination of subcorneal hematoma, dark nevi with black lamella or lesions of acral volar skin. In such cases, a few diagnostic tricks have proven to be helpful in achieving diagnostic accuracy. This paper reviews various methods of performing dermoscopy, suggesting a number of simple, yet helpful tests. These include the adhesive tape test, the skin scraping test and the ink furrow test. The adhesive tape test is helpful in differentiating between dark melanocytic nevi and melanoma. Hematoma may be more easily differentiated with the use of the so-called skin scraping test. The confirmation of benign and melanocytic lesions of acral volar skin, on the other hand, is more accurate when using the ink furrow test. These methods have been discussed here based upon a series of literature reviews, the authors’ own experience and, also, iconography. The present article describes novel methods used in dermoscopy, helping to bring about a faster, more accurate diagnostics of those lesions which have proven to be more difficult to recognize. Helpful tricks, such as have been known to professional literature, as well as the authors’ own experience (for instance, applying urea cream to hyperkeratotic lesions or using photographs of skin lesions taken with the aid of a mobile phone camera – all prior to surgery) will surely be considered beneficial to the practitioner, be it dermatologist or any other physician. PMID:22916721

  14. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  15. Layers of the Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin, which gives skin its tan or brown color ... Sun exposure causes melanocytes to increase production of melanin in order to protect the skin from damaging ...

  16. Learning about Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... have red or blond hair and blue or light-colored eyes - although anyone can get skin cancer. Skin cancer is related to lifetime exposure to UV radiation, therefore most skin cancers appear after age ...

  17. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  18. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  19. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, which may bleed if severe. Chapped or cracked lips. When dry skin cracks, germs can get ... cause the skin to become dry, raw, and cracked. Swimming : Some pools have high levels of chlorine, ...

  20. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  1. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  2. Keratolysis exfoliativa.

    PubMed

    Hausauer, Amelia K; Cohen, David E

    2015-01-01

    Keratolysis exfoliativa (KE) is a palmoplantar eruption of air-filled bullae on an erythematous base, which results in lamellar peeling with hallmark superficial collarettes of scale. It is distinct from other diseases of volar skin, such as dyshidrosis, contact dermatitis, tinea, epidermolysis bullosa, and acral skin peeling. We present a 55-year-old woman with extensive disease on the hands and feet, who failed to respond to standard topical therapy but showed a marked dose-response improvement with the use of oral acitretin. Recent histopathologic and molecular studies have linked KE to premature corneo-desmosomal disruption. Acitretin has previously been used to treat diseases of abnormal corneocyte desquamation, for example Netherton's disease. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first that documents the efficacy of the use of systemic acitretin in KE. PMID:26990340

  3. Blood stasis contributions to the perception of skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Stamatas, Georgios N; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2004-01-01

    The chromatic characteristics of skin color arise from the interactions of light (primarily absorption and scattering) with the epidermis and the dermis. The primary light absorbers in skin are hemoglobin and melanin. Most of scattering is attributed to collagen fibers and in pigmented skin to melanosomes. Traditionally skin redness is considered to arise due to locally elevated concentrations of hemoglobin, whereas skin pigmentation is attributed to melanin. In this study we attempt to understand better the contributions of these chromophores to the perceived skin color using spectral analysis of skin color reactions induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation or pressure. In the first experiment 12 individuals with skin phototypes III-IV were irradiated on the back using a solar simulator with doses ranging from 0.7 to 3 MED. The skin reactions were evaluated on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 after irradiation. Evaluations included diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and clinical assessment of the erythema and the pigment reaction. Apparent concentrations of melanin, oxy-, and deoxy-hemoglobin were calculated from the absorption spectra. In the second experiment the levels of deoxy-hemoglobin of the volar forearm of ten volunteers were selectively altered by either application of a pressure cuff or by topical application of 3% H(2)O(2). Changes in skin color appearance were documented by photography, colorimetry, and DRS. In the UV exposure experiment all reactions were dose dependent. Oxy-hemoglobin values increased to a maximum on day 1, correlating well with the clinical evaluation of erythema, and then decreased exponentially to base line. Melanin showed a significant increase on day 7 and remained relatively constant for the next 3 weeks, correlating well with the clinical evaluation of pigmentation (tanning). Deoxy-hemoglobin increased slightly on day 1 and remained elevated for the next 2 weeks. Thus, deoxy-hemoglobin correlated moderately with the clinical erythema

  4. Prevalence of dermatoses and skin sensitisation associated with use of pesticides in fruit farmers of southern Taiwan.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y L; Wang, B J; Lee, C C; Wang, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Agricultural workers are known to have occupational skin diseases. The prevalence and pattern of skin diseases are unknown in Taiwanese fruit farmers. The objective of this study is to determine the work exposure, prevalence of skin diseases, and sensitivity to common skin allergens and agricultural chemicals in fruit farmers of southern Taiwan. METHODS: 122 fruit farmers who regularly prepared and sprayed pesticides and a group of 63 printing press workers with no known exposure to pesticides were examined and patch tested with common skin allergens and agricultural chemicals. The farmers were also interviewed for their work habits, use of protective clothing, and exposure to pesticides. RESULTS: Most farmers reported regular use of hat, boots, and mask, but not gloves, raincoat, and goggles. This resulted in frequent skin contact with pesticides especially on the hands and face. About 30% of farmers had hand dermatitis, and more than two thirds had pigmentation and thickening on the hands. Fungal infection of the skin was noted in a quarter of subjects. By patch test, farmers and the printing press workers had a similar rate of sensitivity to common skin allergens. 40% of farmers were sensitive to agricultural chemical allergens, which was about twofold higher than that of the comparison group. Farmers were most frequently sensitive to Captofol, Folpet, and Captan which were associated with dermatitis on the volar aspects of the hands. CONCLUSIONS: Fruit farmers in southern Taiwan had a high prevalence of skin diseases related to use of pesticides, and appropriate protective measures and work practices should be taken to prevent such problems. PMID:8758040

  5. Development of photochemoprotective herbs containing cosmetic formulations for improving skin properties.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Swarnlata; Chhabra, Sumit Kour; Kaur, Chanchal Deep; Saraf, Shailendra

    2012-01-01

    Botanical photochemoprotectives are used because they act on various stages to prevent skin cancer and photoaging. The aim of this study was to prepare herbal creams from various photochemoprotective herbs and to perform efficacy studies on them by using physicochemical, microbiological, safety, psychometric, biophysical, and sun protection factor measurements. Herbal creams were prepared by incorporating hydroalcoholic extracts of Curcuma caesia (rhizome), Areca catechu (seeds), Centella asiatica (leaves) Cinnamon zeylanicum (dried bark), and Tamarindus indica (fruit pulp) in varied concentrations (1-5% w/w) in a base cream. The efficacy of all formulations was checked out for four weeks on 60 normal subjects on the volar forearm for evaluation of biophysical properties, and for psychometric evaluations (fragrance, lathery feel, softness, irritation, stickiness, smoothness, and aftereffect on the skin) and safety measurements. In the biophysical characterization, a cutometer for viscoelasticity, a mexameter for melanin content, a corneometer for hydration, and a sebumeter for sebum determination were used. All the cream formulations with 1% and 3% w/w extracts showed positive results and passed physicochemical, microbiological, and safety tests. The SPF values increased as the concentration of extract was increased up to a limit in the formulations. The SPF values were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in formulations with 3% herbal extract than with 1% herbal extract. Increased skin hydration, sebum levels, viscoelasticity, and decreased melanin values were obtained. The Cinnamon, Centella, and Tamarindus formulations were found more effective as photoprotectives than the Areca and Curcuma formulations. PMID:22591563

  6. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Sascha; Marintschev, Ivan; Graul, Isabel; Wilharm, Arne; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Florian Gras, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volar locking plate fixation has become the gold standard in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Juxta-articular screws should be placed as close as possible to the subchondral zone, in an optimized length to buttress the articular surface and address the contralateral cortical bone. On the other hand, intra-articular screw misplacements will promote osteoarthritis, while the penetration of the contralateral bone surface may result in tendon irritations and ruptures. The intraoperative control of fracture reduction and implant positioning is limited in the common postero-anterior and true lateral two-dimensional (2D)-fluoroscopic views. Therefore, additional 2D-fluoroscopic views in different projections and intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy were recently reported. Nevertheless, their utility has issued controversies. Objectives: The following questions should be answered in this study; 1) Are the additional tangential view and the intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy useful in the clinical routine to detect persistent fracture dislocations and screw misplacements, to prevent revision surgery? 2) Which is the most dangerous plate hole for screw misplacement? Patients and Methods: A total of 48 patients (36 females and 13 males) with 49 unstable distal radius fractures (22 x 23 A; 2 x 23 B, and 25 x 23 C) were treated with a 2.4 mm variable angle LCP Two-Column volar distal radius plate (Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) during a 10-month period. After final fixation, according to the manufactures' technique guide and control of implant placement in the two common perpendicular 2D-fluoroscopic images (postero-anterior and true lateral), an additional tangential view and intraoperative 3D fluoroscopic scan were performed to control the anatomic fracture reduction and screw placements. Intraoperative revision rates due to screw misplacements (intra-articular or overlength) were evaluated. Additionally, the number of surgeons

  7. In vivo quantification of human dermal skin aging using SHG and autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    There are visible changes during skin aging. In the extracellular matrix these changes referred to as intrinsic aging (skin areas not exposed to sunlight) and extrinsic aging can be measured using various methods, such as subjective clinical evaluation, histology and molecular analysis. In this study we developed a new parameter for the non-invasive quantitative determination of dermal skin aging utilizing a five-dimensional intravital tomography (5D-IVT). This device, also known as 5D - multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, is a powerful tool to investigate (photo)aging-associated alterations in vivo. Structural alterations in the dermis of extrinsically aged (chronically sun-exposed) and intrinsically aged (sun-protected) human skin were recorded utilizing the collagen-specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and the elastin-specific autofluorescence (AF) signal. Recording took place in young and elderly volunteers. The resulting images were processed in order to gain the elastin percentage and the collagen percentage per image. Then, the elastin - to - collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. With respect to volar forearm skin, the ELCOR significantly increased with age. In elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area was significantly augmented compared with the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on 5D-IVT we introduce the ELCOR as a new means to quantify age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix of in vivo human skin. This novel parameter is compared to the currently used "SHG to AF aging index" of the dermis (SAAID).

  8. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may include deep layers of skin and fat. The area is closed with stitches to place the skin back together. If a large area is biopsied, the surgeon may use a skin graft or flap to replace the skin that was ...

  9. Stiff skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  10. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients

  11. Changes in acral blood flux under local application of ropivacaine and lidocaine with and without an adrenaline additive: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Hans-Martin; Schmid, Ute; Moehrle, Matthias; Strölin, Anke; Breuninger, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Vascular effects of local anesthetics are especially important in dermatological surgery. In particular, adequate perfusion must be ensured in order to offset surgical manipulations during surgical interventions at the acra. However, the use of adrenaline additives appears fraught with problems when anesthesia affects the terminal vascular system, particularly during interventions at the fingers, toes, penis, outer ears, and tip of the nose. We studied skin blood flux at the fingerpads via laser Doppler flowmetry over the course of 24 hours in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with 20 vascularly healthy test persons following Oberst's-method anesthetic blocks. In each case, 6 ml ropivacaine (7.5 mg/ml) (A), lidocaine 1% without an additive (B), and lidocaine 1% with an adrenaline additive (1:200,000) (C) was used respectively as a verum. Isotonic saline solution was injected as a placebo (D). Measurements were carried out with the aid of a computer simultaneously at D II and D IV on both hands. Administration of (A) led to increased blood flux (+155.2%); of (B) initially to a decrease of 27%; of (C) to a reduction of 55% which was reversible after 40 minutes and of (D) to no change.(A) resulted in sustained vasodilatation which was still demonstrable after 24 h. (B) had notably less vasodilative effect, although comparison with (D) clearly showed that (B) is indeed vasodilative. (C) resulted in only a passing decrease in perfusion; this was no longer measurable when checked after 6 and 24 h. This transient inadequacy of blood flux also appeared after administration of (D). These tests show that adrenaline additive in local anesthesia does not decrease blood flow more than 55% for a period of 16 min. Following these results an adrenaline additive can be safely used for anesthetic blocks at the acra in healthy persons. PMID:18334782

  12. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  13. Treatment of reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius: randomized clinical study comparing the locked volar plate and external fixator methods: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Various treatments are available for reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius, such as closed reduction combined with fixation by external fixator (EF), and rigid internal fixation using a locked volar plate (VP). Although there are studies comparing these methods, there is no conclusive evidence indicating which treatment is best. The hypothesis of this study is that surgical treatment with a VP is more effective than EF from the standpoint of functional outcome (patient-reported). Methods/Design The study is randomized clinical trial with parallel groups and a blinded evaluator and involves the surgical interventions EF and VP. Patients will be randomly assigned (assignment ratio 1:1) using sealed opaque envelopes. This trial will include consecutive adult patients with an acute (up to 15 days) displaced, unstable fracture of the distal end of the radius of type A2, A3, C1, C2 or C3 by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen–Association for the Study of Internal Fixation classification and type II or type III by the IDEAL32 classification, without previous surgical treatments of the wrist. The surgical intervention assigned will be performed by three surgical specialists familiar with the techniques described. Evaluations will be performed at 2, and 8 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months, with the primary outcomes being measured by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and measurement of pain (Visual Analog Pain Scale and digital algometer). Secondary outcomes will include radiographic parameters, objective functional evaluation (goniometry and dynamometry), and the rate of complications and method failure according to the intention-to-treat principle. Final postoperative evaluations (6 and 12 months) will be performed by independent blinded evaluators. For the Student’s t-test, a difference of 10 points in the DASH score, with a 95% confidence interval, a statistical power of 80%, and 20% sampling error

  14. Scaly Skin (Ichthyosis Vulgaris)

    MedlinePlus

    ... should improve by restoring moisture (hydration) to the skin. Creams and ointments are better moisturizers than lotions, and ... Physician May Prescribe To treat the dry, scaly skin of ichthyosis ... cream or lotion containing the following: Prescription-strength alpha- ...

  15. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  16. CSD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003385.htm CSD skin test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help ...

  17. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  18. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  19. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fungal Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis Overview of Dermatophytoses (Ringworm, Tinea) Athlete's Foot Jock ... are caused by yeasts (such as Candida —see Candidiasis ) or dermatophytes, such as Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton ( ...

  20. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injury Exposure to radiation (such as from the sun) Exposure to heavy metals Changes in hormone levels Exposure ... example, lighter-skinned people are more sensitive to sun exposure and damage, which raises the risk of skin ...

  1. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs and strengthens the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives ...

  2. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  3. Friction induced skin tags.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01

    Skin tags are common benign neoplasm located predominantly in intertriginous skin. Generally of cosmetic concern, they can be easily treated with cryotherapy, electrodessication or snip-excision. Despite their high incidence data about their etiopathogenesis are scarce in the medical literature. We describe a patient who developed multiple skin tags arranged in a linear fashion suggesting an etiopathogenic role for friction. PMID:18627719

  4. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is no ...

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases. PMID:27282344

  6. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. PMID:24838227

  7. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  8. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Experts do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is ...

  9. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... it well before you attach the pouch. Avoid skin care products that contain alcohol. These can make your ... the pouch to your skin. Use fewer special skin care products. This will make problems with your skin ...

  10. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  11. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    PubMed

    Webb, R Chad; Pielak, Rafal M; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions. PMID:25658947

  12. Thermal Transport Characteristics of Human Skin Measured In Vivo Using Ultrathin Conformal Arrays of Thermal Sensors and Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R. Chad; Pielak, Rafal M.; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions. PMID:25658947

  13. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  14. Skin Exposure and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures that increase asthma risk have been identified. Research and prevention have focused primarily on the respiratory tract. However, recent studies suggest that the skin may also be an important route of exposure and site of sensitization that contributes to asthma development. Factors that impair skin barrier function, such as filaggrin gene mutations or skin trauma, may facilitate allergen entry and promote Th2-like sensitization and subsequent asthma. Animal studies demonstrate that skin exposure to chemical and protein allergens is highly effective at inducing sensitization, with subsequent inhalation challenge eliciting asthmatic responses. A similar role for human skin exposure to certain sensitizing agents, such as isocyanates, is likely. Skin exposure methodologies are being developed to incorporate skin exposure assessment into epidemiology studies investigating asthma risk factors. PMID:20427586

  15. A new method to evaluate the effects of shear on the skin.

    PubMed

    de Wert, Luuk A; Bader, Dan L; Oomens, Cees W J; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Poeze, Martijn; Bouvy, Nicole D

    2015-01-01

    Currently, pressure ulcer preventive strategies focus mainly on pressure redistribution. Little attention is paid to reduce the harmful effects of shear-force, because little is known about pathophysiological aspects of shear-force. Even today, no method to measure the effects of shear-force on the skin is available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the response to shear-forces in terms of analyzing a noninvasive biomarker and reactive hyperemic parameter measured at the skin of healthy participants. A physical model was developed to produce a combination of pressure and shear or pressure alone on the skin. Ten healthy male participants were included and pressure (3.9 kPa) and a combined loading of pressure and shear (2.4 kPa + 14.5 N) was applied at the volar aspect of the forearms for 15 and 30 minutes. A Sebutape sample was used to collect IL-1α and total protein (TP) noninvasively. The reactive hyperemic parameter was derived from a laser Doppler flowmeter. The increase in IL-1α/TP-ratio after a combined loading of pressure and shear for 30 minutes of 6.2 ± 2.5 was significantly higher compared with all other test conditions (p < 0.05). The increase in cutaneous blood cell flux was already significantly higher when a combined loading of pressure and shear was applied for 15 minutes compared with pressure alone. These results shows that the IL-1α/TP-ratio and cutaneous blood cell flux can be used as robust measures of the effect of shear-force on skin in humans. Therefore, this model can be used to evaluate materials aimed at the reduction of shear. PMID:26426393

  16. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  17. Immunohistochemistry of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Berger, U; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The present paper reports immunohistological findings in porcine skin, which were obtained by use of mono- and polyclonal antihuman antibodies and either alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) or peroxidase (POX) technique. Epidermal staining was observed with antibodies to keratins (K 8.12, RSKE 60), filaggrin, and calmodulin (ACAM). Staining of connective tissue and vessels was achieved using antibodies to vimentin (V9(1)), collagen type IV, and fibronectin. In general, these antibodies gave a staining pattern similar to that of normal human skin. The similarities of immunoreactivity to poly- and monoclonal antihuman antibodies in porcine and human skin render porcine skin a reliable model in biomedical research. PMID:1710864

  18. About Skin: Your Body's Largest Organ

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  19. Shark skin: function in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, S A; Vosburgh, F; Hebrank, J H

    1978-11-17

    Hydrostatic pressure under the skin of sharks varies with swimming speed. Stress in the skin varies with the internal pressure, and the skin stress controls skin stiffness. Locomotory muscles attach to the skin which is thus a whole-body exotendon whose mechanical advantage in transmitting muscular contraction is greater than that of the endoskeleton. PMID:17807247

  20. Use of imiquimod for residual acral melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sue, Gloria R; Hanlon, Allison; Lazova, Rossitza; Narayan, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that topical imiquimod cream is an effective treatment option for certain types of melanomas. No reports exist on the efficacy of using imiquimod cream to treat melanoma located on the plantar surface of the foot. We present two patients with a melanoma of the foot who had residual melanoma following surgical excision with acceptable margins. The patients were then treated with topical imiquimod for 8 weeks after which a repeat biopsy of the affected region showed no evidence of residual melanoma in situ. The use of topical imiquimod cream should be considered in the management of residual melanoma in situ of the plantar surface of the foot. PMID:25188932

  1. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nevi Melanoma Merkel Cell Carcinoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Facts & Statistics Ask the Experts Early Detection ... About Us | Store The Skin Cancer ... prevention, early detection, and prompt treatment of the world’s most common cancer. Take your ...

  2. Skin Problems in Construction

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Keep skin clean Wash with soap and clean water if your skin comes in contact with hazardous ... caustics like wet cement. DO NOT use the water in the bucket used to clean your tools. DO NOT use hand sanitizers. Wash ...

  3. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  4. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is something as simple as ...

  5. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  6. Male skin care needs.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen M; Ford, Kay

    2008-08-01

    Male skin care has undergone significant development over the past decade, with many companies now marketing skin care products directly to the male consumer. Despite the claims of many of these companies, few over-the-counter products have data to support their efficacy at a clinical level. A basic, effective regimen for preventive male skin care should include twice-daily facial cleansing and twice-daily moisturizer application, which should include sunscreen during the day. This article focuses on topical therapies directed at the maintenance and repair of photoaged male skin. The future holds promise for new developments in skin care. However, in the absence of significant scientific breakthroughs, the most cost-effective intervention will continue to be prevention. PMID:18620985

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  8. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Stage IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Acral Lentiginous Malignant Melanoma; Lentigo Maligna Malignant Melanoma; Nodular Malignant Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Solar Radiation-related Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Superficial Spreading Malignant Melanoma

  9. Transitions in skin blood flow fractal scaling: the importance of fluctuation amplitude in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Esen, Hamza; Ata, Necmi; Esen, Ferhan

    2015-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) time series from volar skin reveals three scaling regions: cardiac, cardio-respiratory and local. Scaling exponents, slopes (αC, αCR and αL) of the straight lines, in these regions indicate correlation properties of LDF signal. Transitions from uncorrelated to positive in cardiac (αC) and positive to negative correlations in the cardio-respiratory (αCR) exponent have been observed for vasodilatation signals in response to local heating. However, positive correlation in local region (αL) did not change with vasodilatation. We studied whether the transitions in scaling exponents are correlated with the increase in peak to peak fluctuation amplitude (AF) of LDF signal. LDF signals were normalized to unity using average values of their pulsatile parts: baseline and saturation signals. If AF of normalized LDF signal is ≥0.5, we observed transitions in αC and in αCR but not in αL, in healthy subjects. It is suggested that the transition from positive to negative correlation in αCR with increasing amplitude may be explained by intact arteriolar myogenic activity in healthy young (Y) and middle aged (MA) subjects. In contrast, we did not observe transition in αCR suggesting impaired myogenic activity in patients with essential hypertension (EHT). PMID:25241251

  10. Occupational skin disease.

    PubMed

    Peate, W E

    2002-09-15

    Contact dermatitis, the most common occupational skin disease, is characterized by clearly demarcated areas of rash at sites of exposure. The rash improves on removal of the offending agent. In allergic contact dermatitis, even minute exposures to antigenic substances can lead to a skin rash. Common sensitizing agents include nickel and members of the Rhus genus (e.g., poison ivy, poison oak). Severe skin irritants tend to cause immediate red blisters or burns, whereas weaker irritants produce eczematous skin changes over time. An occupational cause should be suspected when rash occurs in areas that are in contact with oil, grease, or other substances. Direct skin testing (patch or scratch) or radioallergosorbent testing may help to identify a specific trigger. Skin cancer can have an occupational link in workers with prolonged exposure to sunlight and certain chemicals, although it can take decades for lesions to develop. In workers with occupational skin disease, workplace changes and protective measures are important to prevent future exposure. PMID:12358214

  11. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  12. Environment and the skin.

    PubMed

    Suskind, R R

    1977-10-01

    The skin is an important interface between man and his environment; it is an important portal of entry for hazardous agents and a vulnerable target tissue as well. It is a uniquely accessible model system for detecting hazards and for studying mechanisms of a wide variety of biologic funcitons. Environmental causes of skin reactions comprise a vast array of physical, chemical and biological agents. To appreciate the role of the skin as an interface with man's environment, it is necessary to understand the multiple adaptive mechanisms, and the defenses of the skin against the environmental stresses. The skin is endowed with a versatile group of defenses against penetration, fluid loss from the body, thermal stress, solar radiation, physical trauma and microbial agents. Patterns of adverse response range in quality and intensity from uncomplicated itching to metastatic neoplasia. Environmental problems comprise a large segment of disabling skin disease. Although critical epidemiologic data is limited, cutaneous illnesses comprise a significant segment of occupational disease. This represents a significant loss in productivity and a major cause of disability. The most serious research needs include the development of surveillance systems for identifying skin hazards and determining frequency of environmental skin disease; the development of new models for studying cutaneous penetration; the elucidation of the mechanisms of nonallergic inflammatory reactions (primary irritation) and of the accommodation phenomenon; the development of more sensitive models for predicting adverse responses to marginal irritants; the utilization of modern skills of immunobiology and immunochemistry to elucidate mechanisms of allergic responses; the launching of epidemiologic studies to determine the long term effects of PCBs and associated compounds such as dioxins; and the expansion of research in the mechanisms of skin cancer in relation to susceptibility, genetic and metabolic

  13. Environment and the skin

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Raymond R.

    1977-01-01

    The skin is an important interface between man and his environment; it is an important portal of entry for hazardous agents and a vulnerable target tissue as well. It is a uniquely accessible model system for detecting hazards and for studying mechanisms of a wide variety of biologic funcitons. Environmental causes of skin reactions comprise a vast array of physical, chemical and biological agents. To appreciate the role of the skin as an interface with man's environment, it is necessary to understand the multiple adaptive mechanisms, and the defenses of the skin against the environmental stresses. The skin is endowed with a versatile group of defenses against penetration, fluid loss from the body, thermal stress, solar radiation, physical trauma and microbial agents. Patterns of adverse response range in quality and intensity from uncomplicated itching to metastatic neoplasia. Environmental problems comprise a large segment of disabling skin disease. Although critical epidemiologic data is limited, cutaneous illnesses comprise a significant segment of occupational disease. This represents a significant loss in productivity and a major cause of disability. The most serious research needs include the development of surveillance systems for identifying skin hazards and determining frequency of environmental skin disease; the development of new models for studying cutaneous penetration; the elucidation of the mechanisms of nonallergic inflammatory reactions (primary irritation) and of the accommodation phenomenon; the development of more sensitive models for predicting adverse responses to marginal irritants; the utilization of modern skills of immunobiology and immunochemistry to elucidate mechanisms of allergic responses; the launching of epidemiologic studies to determine the long term effects of PCBs and associated compounds such as dioxins; and the expansion of research in the mechanisms of skin cancer in relation to susceptibility, genetic and metabolic

  14. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  15. Skin disorders at sea.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ray; Boniface, Keith; Hite, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the types of skin disorders occurring at sea requiring acute treatment. The case logs of a tele-medicine service for US flagged ships at sea were reviewed from March 1, 2006 until March 1, 2009. Of 1844 total cases, 10% (n = 183) were for skin disorders. Sixty-eight percent (n = 125) were infections, 14% (n = 25) were inflammatory, 7% (n = 13) were environmental, and 11% (n = 20) were non-specific rashes. Cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis (n = 84) were the most common acute skin disorders encountered. In some cases (n = 81), still digital photographs aided in the diagnosis. PMID:20496321

  16. Detection of monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and F2-isoprostanes in microdialysis samples of human UV-irradiated skin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, J-U; Wiswedel, I; Hirsch, D; Gollnick, H P M

    2004-01-01

    UV irradiation of the human skin leads to induction of oxidative stress and inflammation mediated by reactive oxygen radicals, lipid peroxidation, liberation of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and formation of prostaglandins and leucotrienes. We investigated "lipid mediators", such as F(2)-isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF(2alpha), 9alpha,11alpha-PGF(2alpha)) and monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) in the dermal interstitial fluid obtained by a cutaneous microdialysis technique. Defined areas on the volar forearm of 10 healthy volunteers were exposed to UVB irradiation (20-60 mJ/cm(2)). Microdialysis membranes were cutaneously inserted beneath the irradiated area. The probes were perfused with isotonic saline solution, and microdialysate samples were collected at 20-min intervals up to 4-5 h. Oxidized arachidonic acid derivatives (2-, 3-, 5-, 8-12- and 15-HETEs, 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) and 9alpha,11alpha-PGF(2alpha)) could be detected and quantified in microdialysates of normal skin in the picomole (HETEs) and femtomole (isoprostanes) range and after UVB irradiation using sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/negative ion chemical ionization. UVB irradiation enhanced the levels of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) after 24 h significantly, whereas the HETE levels were slightly increased within shorter time intervals (3 h after UVB irradiation). Further investigations have to show whether these new findings are relevant to validate therapeutic strategies for topical and systemic UV prevention agents or for monitoring of specific therapeutic strategies in inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:14755126

  17. Radiation therapy - skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... red, peel, or itch. You should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. ... When you have radiation treatment, a health care provider draws ... they come off, do not redraw them. Tell your provider instead. ...

  18. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  19. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy? • What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? • What is prurigo of pregnancy? • ... itchy skin. What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? In this condition, small, red ...

  20. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with immunity against foreign invaders like germs and bacteria. The very bottom layer of the skin is ... glands also helps to soften hair and kill bacteria that get in the skin’s pores. These oil ...

  1. CSD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    The cat scratch disease (CSD) skin test was once used to help diagnose CSD. The test is no longer used today. ... LN, Welch DF, Koehler JE. Bartonella, including cat-scratch disease. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  2. Skin Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... is the body’s largest organ . It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection . Skin also helps control ...

  3. Genetics and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Bekou, Vassiliki; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex process and underlies multiple influences with the probable involvement of heritable and various environmental factors. Several theories have been conducted regarding the pathomechanisms of aged skin, however fundamental mechanisms still remain poorly understood. This article addresses the influence of genetics on skin aging and in particular deals with the differences observed in ethnic populations and between both genders. Recent studies indicate that male and female aged skin differs as far as the type, the consistency and the sensitivity to external factors is concerned. The same has been also documented between elderly people of different origin. Consequently, the aging process taking place in both genders and in diverse ethnic groups should be examined separately and products specialized to each population should be developed in order to satisfy the special needs. PMID:23467395

  4. An elastic second skin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Gilchrest, Barbara A; Anderson, R Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings. PMID:27159017

  5. Tuberculin Skin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... perpendicular to the long axis). How Are TST Reactions Interpreted? Skin test interpretation depends on two factors: ... among high-risk groups. What Are False-Positive Reactions? Some persons may react to the TST even ...

  6. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... hematomas ) may form after even a minor injury. Pressure ulcers can be caused by skin changes, loss of ... up to 4 times slower. This contributes to pressure ulcers and infections. Diabetes , blood vessel changes, lowered immunity, ...

  7. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  8. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by medical conditions, such as atopic dermatitis and malnutrition. Dry skin develops due to a decrease in ... Diabetes Hypothyroidism Down syndrome Liver or kidney disease Malnutrition HIV/AIDS Lymphoma Signs and Symptoms The most ...

  9. Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's largest organ . It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection . Skin also helps control body ... cancer risk factors include: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  10. Healthy Skin Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... don’t offer a safe alternative to natural sunlight. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV ) (uhl-truh-VYE-uh- ... the exposure comes from tanning beds or natural sunlight. This damage increases the risk of skin cancer ...

  11. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are allergic to bee venom or penicillin. Or it may be used if the skin ... sore, or swollen after contact with the substance Penicillin allergy Venom allergy Allergies to penicillin and closely ...

  12. Regionalisation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jeanette A; Headon, Denis J

    2014-01-01

    The skin displays marked anatomical variation in thickness, colour and in the appendages that it carries. These regional distinctions arise in the embryo, likely founded on a combinatorial positional code of transcription factor expression. Throughout adult life, the skin's distinct anatomy is maintained through both cell autonomous epigenetic processes and by mesenchymal-epithelial induction. Despite the readily apparent anatomical differences in skin characteristics across the body, several fundamental questions regarding how such regional differences first arise and then persist are unresolved. However, it is clear that the skin's positional code is at the molecular level far more detailed than that discernible at the phenotypic level. This provides a latent reservoir of anatomical complexity ready to surface if perturbed by mutation, hormonal changes, ageing or experiment. PMID:24361971

  13. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hair Small blood vessels in the skin Tattoos CRYOTHERAPY Cryotherapy is a method of super-freezing tissue in ... warts, actinic keratoses, solar keratoses, and molluscum contagiosum. Cryotherapy is done using a cotton swab that has ...

  14. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a method used to diagnose silent (latent) tuberculosis (TB) infection. PPD stands for purified protein derivative. ... derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. ...

  15. [Skin-picking disorder].

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Peters, E; Gieler, U

    2015-10-01

    The disorder is characterized by compulsive repetitive skin-picking (SP), resulting in skin lesions. The patients must have undertaken several attempts to reduce or stop SP. The disorder must have led to clinically significant limitations in social, professional, or other important areas of life. The symptoms cannot be better explained by another emotional disorder or any other dermatological disease. In the new DSM-V, skin-picking disorder has been included in the diagnostic system as an independent disorder and describes the self-injury of the skin by picking or scratching with an underlying emotional disorder. SP is classified among the impulse-control disorders and is, thus, differentiated from compulsive disorders as such. There are often emotional comorbidities. In cases of pronounced psychosocial limitation, interdisciplinary cooperation with a psychotherapist and/or psychiatrist is indicated. PMID:26391325

  16. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  17. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Spots and Skin Tags Click for more information Age spots, once called "liver spots," are flat, brown ... surface. They are a common occurrence as people age, especially for women. They are ... options, specific conditions, and related issues. ...

  18. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the tissue in larger flat areas (called purpura ), or in a very large bruised area (called ... in the newborn) Aging skin (ecchymosis) Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (petechiae and purpura) Henoch-Schonlein purpura (purpura) Leukemia ( ...

  19. Skin lesion KOH exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... is present. The fungus may be related to ringworm , athlete's foot , jock itch , or another fungal infection. ... foot Candida infection of the skin Jock itch Ringworm Tinea corporis Update Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  20. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... special types of cells: Melanocytes produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. All people have ... the epidermis). Hair also contains a yellow-red pigment; people who have blonde or red hair have ...

  1. Lepromin skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin up. The lump indicates that the antigen has been injected at the correct depth. The ... When the antigen is injected, there may be a slight stinging or burning. There may also be mild itching at the ...

  2. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  3. Nicotinamide and the skin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3, boosts cellular energy and regulates poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1, an enzyme with important roles in DNA repair and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide shows promise for the treatment of a wide range of dermatological conditions, including autoimmune blistering disorders, acne, rosacea, ageing skin and atopic dermatitis. In particular, recent studies have also shown it to be a potential agent for reducing actinic keratoses and preventing skin cancers. PMID:24635573

  4. Ballistic skin simulant.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Jorma; Leppäniemi, Ari; Paronen, Mikael; Kulomäki, Erkki

    2005-05-28

    Hydrogels prepared from water solutions containing 10-20 mass% gelatine are generally accepted muscle tissue simulants in terminal ballistic research. They, however, do not have a surface layer which simulates the effect of human skin. The purpose of this research was to find a suitable skin simulant for enhancing the testing fidelity and the credibility of the results with gelatine-based materials when assessing the injury potential of not only high energy bullets, but also especially that of non-penetrating "less lethal" kinetic impact ammunition and relatively low energy ricochet fragments. A skin simulant also permits the simulation and assessment of exit wounds. The mechanical and ballistic properties of human skin and target simulant were established on the basis of results found in the literature. Some errors in these were found. The corrected values are included in this paper for comparison. The target values of the mechanical properties of the skin simulant were the following: threshold velocity v(th)=94+/-4 m/s, tensile strength 18+/-2 N/mm2 and elongation at break 65+/-5%. A selection of synthetic and natural materials was evaluated as skin simulants by analysing their mechanical and ballistic properties. The results were compared to literature values obtained with human cadavers. The tests showed that the best skin simulant of the ones evaluated was semi-finished chrome tanned upholstery "crust" cowhide of 0.9-1.1 mm nominal thickness. Its threshold velocity was 90.7 m/s, tensile strength 20.89+/-4.11 MPa and elongation at break 61+/-9%. These values are the same as the average values of human skin. Of the synthetic materials evaluated, 1mm thick natural rubber can be used on impact side as a threshold velocity filter with some reservations although its theoretical threshold velocity is only 82.9 m/s. PMID:15837009

  5. [Improvement of skin moisture and skin texture with urea therapy].

    PubMed

    Puschmann, M; Gogoll, K

    1989-01-01

    A significant increase in skin moisture and an improvement in skin smoothness after application of a urea-containing cream was noticed in a large number of volunteers with healthy skin and in neurodermitis patients compared with untreated skin and with vehicle. The effect was shown after one application (short-term test) as well as after repeated application (long-term test). Regular application of preparation containing urea increases the moisture of a the skin and improves the skin's smoothness compared with its previous condition, with untreated skin, and with placebo preparations. PMID:2807927

  6. Skin penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E

    2013-04-15

    The skin has evolved to prevent excessive water loss from the internal organs and to limit the ability of xenobiotics and hazardous substances to enter the body. Notwithstanding this barrier function, a number of strategies have been developed by scientists to deliver drugs to and through the skin. The aim of this review is to consider the various types of chemical penetration enhancers (CPEs) which have been investigated in the scientific literature. Potential pathways for CPEs to exert their action are examined with reference to the physical chemistry of passive skin transport. The emphasis is on those studies which have focussed on human and porcine skin because of the limitations associated with skin permeation data collated from other species. Where known, the mechanisms of action of these compounds are also discussed. Examples of enhancers used in commercial topical and transdermal formulations are provided. It is proposed that overall the effects of CPEs on the skin barrier may best be explained by a Diffusion-Partition-Solubility theory. Finally, some of the limitations of studies in the literature are considered and the importance of monitoring the fate of the penetration enhancer as well as the active is highlighted. PMID:23462366

  7. Pregnancy and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Rita V.; Gupta, Rajat; Mehta, Malay J.; Chaudhari, Arvind H.; Pilani, Abhishek P.; Patel, Nidhi

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with complex of endocrinological, immunological, metabolic, and vascular changes that may influence the skin and other organs in various ways. Pregnancy is a period in which more than 90% women have significant and complex skin changes that may have great impact on the woman's life. The dermatoses of pregnancy represent a heterogeneous group of skin diseases related to pregnancy and/or the postpartum period. The dermatoses of pregnancy can be classified into the following three groups: Physiologic skin changes in pregnancy, pre-existing dermatoses affected by pregnancy, and specific dermatoses of pregnancy. Though most of these skin dermatoses are benign and resolve in postpartum period, a few can risk fetal life and require antenatal surveillance. Most of the dermatoses of pregnancy can be treated conservatively but a few require intervention in the form of termination of pregnancy. Correct diagnosis is essential for the treatment of these disorders. This article discusses the current knowledge of various skin changes during pregnancy and the evaluation of the patient with pregnancy dermatoses with special emphasis on clinical features, diagnostic tests, maternal and fetal prognosis, therapy, and management. PMID:25657937

  8. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body. PMID:27152354

  9. On the orthogonal anisotropy of human skin as a function of anatomical region.

    PubMed

    Reihsner, R; Menzel, E J

    1996-01-01

    Skin samples were obtained from 8 anatomical sites of 6 human deceased at ages ranging from 30 to 80 years 24 hours post mortem. As shown by biochemical analysis the collagen content varied between 71% and 78% depending on the anatomical location of the skin samples. The content of collagen type III was in the range of 19.2% to 22.2% of the total collagen concentration. As to the biomechanical analysis the axes of minimum and maximum shrinkage after excision were determined and correlated with Langer cleavage line drawn on the specimen with a marker after incision. Two-dimensional biomechanical tests were conducted with a multiaxial tensile testing device consisting of 12 loading axes. The in vivo configuration was a circle with 30 mm diameter. The in vivo stresses were determined by restoring the original shape of the specimen. According to the nonlinear stress-strain relationship incremental strains were applied to the sample with the in vivo configuration and states of uniform extension as reference. The corresponding stresses were recorded after stress relaxation was completed and the equilibrium stresses were regarded as the elastic contribution to the viscoelastic biomechanical behavior. The elastic parameters as a function of the initial strain level were calculated using a set of different incremental strains and stresses. The highest in vivo stresses were found in patella, and upper and lower back. The maximum deviation of the direction of maximum in vivo stress from the Langer cleavage line was found in upper back, the volar part of thigh, and sternum. In vivo orthogonal anisotropy was most pronounced in patella and hollow of the knee. PMID:8909877

  10. Effect of barrier perturbation on cutaneous salicylic acid penetration in human skin: in vivo pharmacokinetics using microdialysis and non-invasive quantification of barrier function.

    PubMed

    Benfeldt, E; Serup, J; Menné, T

    1999-04-01

    We have used microdialysis in the dermis for assessing penetration kinetics of salicylic acid (SA) in healthy volunteers (n = 18), following application on the volar aspect of the left forearm. Penetration was monitored at four locations: in normal (unmodified) skin and in skin with perturbed barrier function from (i) repeated tape stripping (ii) irritant dermatitis from 1 or 2% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) for 24 h and (iii) delipidization by acetone. The order of the treatments was randomized according to a latin square design. Epidermal barrier function and skin irritation were assessed in each location using evaporimetry and colorimetry. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) values confirmed that both mild (acetone), moderate (1% SLS) and severe barrier damage (tape stripping and 2% SLS) had occurred. Microdialysis sampling with two parallel probes in the dermis was performed in each of the four treatment areas for every subject. SA (5% in ethanol) was applied in a chamber glued to the skin overlying the microdialysis probes and sampling was continued for 4 h. SA was detectable in all samples and measurable in all samples from penetration through perturbed skin. Comparing the SA penetration in barrier-perturbed skin with the penetration in unmodified skin in the same subject, the mean SA penetration increase was 2.2-fold in acetone-treated skin (P = 0.012), 46-fold in mild dermatitis and 146- and 157-fold in severe dermatitis and tape stripped skin, respectively (P < 0.001). The penetration of SA significantly correlated with the measurements of barrier perturbation by TEWL (P = 0.01) and erythema (P = 0.02) for each individual. Microdialysis sampling of SA penetration was more sensitive than non-invasive measuring techniques in detecting significant barrier perturbation in acetone-treated skin. A positive dose-response relationship for the percutaneous penetration of SA in response to increasing SLS pretreatment concentrations and thus the degree of irritant

  11. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  12. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  13. Cost effectiveness of treatment with percutaneous Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate for adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius: analysis from the DRAFFT trial.

    PubMed

    Tubeuf, S; Yu, G; Achten, J; Parsons, N R; Rangan, A; Lamb, S E; Costa, M L

    2015-08-01

    We present an economic evaluation using data from the Distal Radius Acute Fracture Fixation Trial (DRAFFT) to compare the relative cost effectiveness of percutaneous Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation and volar locking-plate fixation for patients with dorsally-displaced fractures of the distal radius. The cost effectiveness analysis (cost per quality-adjusted life year; QALY) was derived from a multi-centre, two-arm, parallel group, assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial which took place in 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. Data from 460 patients were available for analysis, which includes both a National Health Service cost perspective including costs of surgery, implants and healthcare resource use over a 12-month period after surgery, and a societal perspective, which includes the cost of time off work and the need for additional private care. There was only a small difference in QALYs gained for patients treated with locking-plate fixation over those treated with K-wires. At a mean additional cost of £714 (95% confidence interval 588 to 865) per patient, locking-plate fixation presented an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £89,322 per QALY within the first 12 months of treatment. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the ICER of locking-plate fixation compared with K-wires. These were greater than £30,000. Compared with locking-plate fixation, K-wire fixation is a 'cost saving' intervention, with similar health benefits. PMID:26224825

  14. Skin conditions: common skin rashes in infants.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Infants exhibit many skin rashes. Erythema toxicum neonatorum presents as erythematous macules, papules, and pustules on the face, trunk, and extremities; it typically resolves spontaneously within 1 week. Neonatal acne presents as comedones or erythematous papules on the face, scalp, chest, and back. Infantile acne is similar but starts after the neonatal period. Both conditions typically resolve spontaneously; failure to resolve within 1 year warrants evaluation for androgen excess. Neonatal cephalic pustulosis is an acne variant caused by hypersensitivity to Malassezia furfur. It is typically self-limited, but severe cases are managed with topical ketoconazole. Miliaria and milia are caused by sweat retention and present as tiny vesicles or papules; they resolve spontaneously. Contact diaper dermatitis is managed by keeping the diaper area clean and with open air exposure. Diaper dermatitis due to Candida albicans is managed with topical antifungals. Seborrheic dermatitis causes scaling on the scalp. Management involves shampooing and removing scales with a soft brush after applying mineral oil or petrolatum; severe cases are managed with tar or ketoconazole shampoo. Atopic dermatitis is related to food allergy in approximately one-third of children. Food allergy can be confirmed with oral food challenges or skin prick tests. Management includes elimination of irritants and triggers and use of low-potency topical steroids. PMID:23600337

  15. Environment and the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suskind, R.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The skin is an important organ of defense adaptation and a portal of entry for xenobiotics. It is vulnerable to physical, chemical, and biologic agents and capable of expressing responses to these agents in a variety of pathologic patterns. These patterns are characterized by morphologic and functional features which are elicited by careful examination and test procedures. Cutaneous cancer may result from exposure to nonionizing as well as ionizing radiation, to specific identifiable chemical hazards, and may be enhanced by trauma. Cutaneous hazards of chemical sources are largely found in the workplace and among consumer products, including drugs and toilet goods. Environmental skin diseases and injuries are preventable. Prior to use assessment for safety and for possible risks from exposure to an agent, product, or process is of primary importance in the prevention and control of environmental skin disease and injury.

  16. Epidermal skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Hughes, Olivia B; Macquhae, Flor; Rakosi, Adele; Kirsner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Autologous skin grafts, such as full- and split-thickness, have long been part of the reconstructive ladder as an option to close skin defects. Although they are effective in providing coverage, they require the need for a trained surgeon, use of anaesthesia and operating room and creation of a wound at the donor site. These drawbacks can be overcome with the use of epidermal skin grafts (ESGs), which can be harvested without the use of anaesthesia in an office setting and with minimal to no scarring at the donor site. ESGs consist only of the epidermal layer and have emerged as an appealing alternative to other autologous grafts for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. In this article, we provide an overview of epidermal grafting and its role in wound management. PMID:27547964

  17. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  18. Skin friction balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ping, Tcheng (Inventor); Supplee, Frank H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A skin friction balance uses a parallel linkage mechanism to avoid inaccuracies in skin friction measurement attributable to off-center normal forces. The parallel linkage mechanism includes a stationary plate mounted in a cage, and an upper and lower movable plate which are linked to each other and to the stationary plate throught three vertical links. Flexure pivots are provided for pivotally connecting the links and the plates. A sensing element connected to the upper plate moves in response to skin friction, and the lower plate moves in the opposite direction of the upper plate. A force motor maintains a null position of the sensing element by exerting a restoring force in response to a signal generated by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT).

  19. [Skin and hand disinfection].

    PubMed

    Mathis, U

    1991-04-01

    In modern medicine, hygiene has become an issue of ever increasing importance. Disinfection of hands is crucial, since hands are the main vector of bacteria. Successful disinfection depends not only on the appropriate choice of an active agent, but equally so on proper techniques and skin care. The spectre and the time profile of activity as well as the skin-protecting properties of the chosen disinfectant must be known. Basic knowledge of disinfection is necessary for a rational interpretation of the information given in the glossy printed material of advertisement. PMID:1858061

  20. Neck skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Duplechain, J Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The author of this article uses the pulsed ablative CO2 laser for resurfacing of the neck and face, based on the gold standard status of the CO2 laser and a novel post-treatment plan that greatly reduces adverse effects traditionally associated with fully ablative resurfacing. The croton oil peel is an inexpensive and effective modality for rejuvenating neck skin. The use of either technique as an adjunct to neck lift surgery, with or without facelift surgery, permits surgeons to fulfill the expectations of patients who want the skin of their face and neck to be homogeneous and more attractive. PMID:24745383

  1. Skin disorders during menopause.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Gleison V; Trigo, Ana Cm; Paim de Oliveira, Mária de Fátima

    2016-02-01

    Menopause is the cessation of menstrual periods due to the loss of ovarian function. Among the various phases of a woman's life, menopause has the greatest impact on health and has been one of the most neglected areas of research. Hormonal changes caused by menopause can lead to problems in the skin and its annexes, and despite the high frequency of dermatologic signs and symptoms, studies on this topic are limited. In this article, we review the skin disorders that result from the hormonal changes of menopause and other common dermatoses observed during this period and assess possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:26919507

  2. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  3. Clinical applications of skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nyame, Theodore T; Chiang, H Abraham; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-08-01

    A unique understanding of the components of mammalian skin has led to the development of numerous skin substitutes. These skin substitutes attempt to compensate for functional and physiologic deficits present in damaged tissue. Skin substitutes, when appropriately applied in optimized settings, offer a promising solution to difficult wound management. The body of literature on skin substitutes increases as the understanding of tissue engineering and molecular biology expands. Given the high cost of these products, future randomized large prospective studies are needed to guide the clinical applications of skin substitutes. PMID:25085091

  4. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share About Skin-to-Skin Care Page Content Article Body You may be able ... care, also called kangaroo care. What is Kangaroo Care? Kangaroo care was developed in South America as ...

  5. Noninvasive Skin Tightening Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive skin tightening has become one of the most common cosmetic aesthetic procedures being performed today. The use of radiofrequency devices for these procedures has been at the forefront of this trend for the past several years. Newer and more sophisticated radiofrequency devices are being brought to the market and presented here are the Venus Freeze and Venus Legacy. PMID:26155322

  6. Flexible electronics: Sophisticated skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Siegfried

    2013-10-01

    Advances in materials science and layout design have enabled the realization of flexible and multifunctional electronic devices. Two demonstrations of electronic skins, which combine temperature and pressure sensing with integrated thermal actuators and organic displays, unveil the potential of these devices for robotics and clinical applications.

  7. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy. PMID:25182982

  8. Sun Safety: Save Your Skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... all types of skin damage caused by sunlight water resistance—sunscreen that stays on your skin longer, even if it gets wet. Reapply water-resistant sunscreens as instructed on the label back ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer This page lists cancer ... in skin cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Basal Cell Carcinoma Aldara (Imiquimod) Efudex ( ...

  10. Methodologies in creating skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    The creation of skin substitutes has significantly decreased morbidity and mortality of skin wounds. Although there are still a number of disadvantages of currently available skin substitutes, there has been a significant decline in research advances over the past several years in improving these skin substitutes. Clinically most skin substitutes used are acellular and do not use growth factors to assist wound healing, key areas of potential in this field of research. This article discusses the five necessary attributes of an ideal skin substitute. It comprehensively discusses the three major basic components of currently available skin substitutes: scaffold materials, growth factors, and cells, comparing and contrasting what has been used so far. It then examines a variety of techniques in how to incorporate these basic components together to act as a guide for further research in the field to create cellular skin substitutes with better clinical results. PMID:27154041

  11. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cancers of the feet are: Basal Cell Carcinoma : Basal cell carcinoma frequently is seen on sun-exposed skin surfaces. ... damage but only rarely spreads beyond the skin. Basal cell cancers may appear as pearly white bumps or patches ...

  12. Dry skin - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... or showers frequently Washing your hands often Some soaps and detergents Skin conditions, such as eczema and ... apply your moisturizer. Avoid skin care products and soaps that contain alcohol, fragrances, dyes, or other chemicals. ...

  13. What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can become melanoma. They make a brown pigment called melanin , which gives the skin its tan ... to the sun, melanocytes make more of the pigment, causing the skin to tan or darken. Melanoma ...

  14. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  15. Preparation and characterization of herbal creams for improvement of skin viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ahshawat, M S; Saraf, S; Saraf, S

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate herbal cosmetic creams for their improvement of skin viscoelastic and hydration properties. The cosmetic cream formulations were designed by using ethanolic extracts of Glycyrriza glabra, Curcuma longa (roots), seeds of Psorolea corlifolia, Cassia tora, Areca catechu, Punica granatum, fruits of Embelica officinale, leaves of Centella asiatica, dried bark of Cinnamon zeylanicum and fresh gel of Aloe vera in varied concentrations (0.12-0.9%w/w) and characterized using physicochemical and physiological measurements. The ethanolic extracts of herbs were incorporated in a cream base that is prepared by a phase inversion emulsification technique. The cream base was prepared by utilizing oil of Prunus amagdalus, Sesamum indicum, honey, cetyl alcohol, stearic acid, polysorbate monoleate, sorbitan monostearate, propylene glycol and glycerin. Physicochemical assessments and microbiological testing were completed for all formulations according to the methods of the Indian Standard Bureau. The studies were carried out for 6 weeks on normal subjects (6 males and 12 females, between 22 and 50 years) on the back of their volar forearm for evaluation of viscoelastic properties in terms of extensibility via a suction measurement, firmness using laboratory fabricated instruments such as ball bouncing and skin hydration using electric (resistance) measurement methods. The physicochemical parameters of formulations CAA1-CAA6, i.e. pH, acid value, saponification value, viscosity, spreadability, layer thickness microbial count and skin sensitivity were found to be in the range of 5.01 +/- 0.4-6.07 +/- 0.6, 3.3-5.1 +/- 0.2, 20-32, 5900-6755 cps, 60-99%, 25-50 mum, 31-46 colony-forming units (CFU) and a 0-1 erythema score. The formulations, CAA4 and CAA5, showed an increase in percentage extensibility (32.27 +/- 1.7% and 29.89 +/- 1.64%, respectively), firmness (28.86 +/- 0.86% and 29.89 +/- 2.8%, respectively) and improved skin

  16. [Skin manifestations of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Néel, A; Connault, J; Graveleau, J; Durant, C; Decaux, O; Hamidou, M

    2014-01-01

    Whatever their aetiology, monoclonal gammopathies can be associated to several clinical features. Mechanisms are various and sometimes unknown. Skin is frequently involved and may represent a challenging diagnosis. Indeed, skin manifestations are either the presenting features and isolated, or at the background of a systemic syndrome. Our objective was to review the various skin manifestations that have been associated with monoclonal gammopathies. PMID:24070793

  17. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... doesn't matter whether you consider your skin light, dark, or somewhere in between. You are at risk for skin cancer. Being in the sun can damage your skin. Sunlight causes damage through ultraviolet, or UV rays, (they make up just one part of ...

  18. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  19. Polyamines and nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Susan K.

    2007-11-01

    Elevated levels of polyamines have long been associated with skin tumorigenesis. Tightly regulated metabolism of polyamines is critical for cell survival and normal skin homeostasis, and these controls are dysregulated in skin tumorigenesis. A key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is upregulated in skin tumors compared to normal skin. Use of transgenic mouse models has demonstrated that polyamines play an essential role in the early promotional phase of skin tumorigenesis. The formation of skin tumors in these transgenic mice is dependent upon polyamine biosynthesis, especially putrescine, since treatment with inhibitors of ODC activity blocks the formation of skin tumors and causes the rapid regression of existing tumors. Although the mechanism by which polyamines promote skin tumorigenesis are not well understood, elevated levels of polyamines have been shown to stimulate epidermal proliferation, alter keratinocyte differentiation status, increase neovascularization, and increase synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in a manner similar to that seen in wound healing. It is becoming increasingly apparent that elevated polyamine levels activate not only epidermal cells but also underlying stromal cells in the skin to promote the development and progression of skin tumors. The inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis has potential to be an effective chemoprevention strategy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  20. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  1. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  2. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  3. Skin contamination dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Hamby, David M.; Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Cazalas, Edward

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  4. UK DRAFFT - A randomised controlled trial of percutaneous fixation with kirschner wires versus volar locking-plate fixation in the treatment of adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius are extremely common injuries in adults. However, the optimal management remains controversial. In general, fractures of the distal radius are treated non-operatively if the bone fragments can be held in anatomical alignment by a plaster cast or orthotic. However, if this is not possible, then operative fixation is required. There are several operative options but the two most common in the UK, are Kirschner-wire fixation (K-wires) and volar plate fixation using fixed-angle screws (locking-plates). The primary aim of this trial is to determine if there is a difference in the Patient-Reported Wrist Evaluation one year following K-wire fixation versus locking-plate fixation for adult patients with a dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius. Methods/design All adult patients with an acute, dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius, requiring operative fixation are potentially eligible to take part in this study. A total of 390 consenting patients will be randomly allocated to either K-wire fixation or locking-plate fixation. The surgery will be performed in trauma units across the UK using the preferred technique of the treating surgeon. Data regarding wrist function, quality of life, complications and costs will be collected at six weeks and three, six and twelve months following the injury. The primary outcome measure will be wrist function with a parallel economic analysis. Discussion This pragmatic, multi-centre trial is due to deliver results in December 2013. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31379280 UKCRN portfolio ID 8956 PMID:21914196

  5. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Types Skin Cancer Research Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  6. Skin care in ethnic populations.

    PubMed

    Cole, Patrick D; Hatef, Daniel A; Taylor, Susan; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2009-08-01

    Use of over-the-counter cosmetics, approaches to hygiene, and many basic dermatologic principles differ between individuals with Caucasian skin and ethnic skin. Still, comparatively few publications highlight these variations or discuss appropriate management. Among many ethnic patients, issues related to skin hydration, restoration of even pigmentation, hair removal, and acne care remain problematic yet not fully addressed. As well, there are some dermatologic conditions that may be rare in Caucasian skin but are much more common in the ethnic patient. Here, we discuss various aspects of skin hydration, dyschromia, sunscreen use, and chemical depilatories in the ethnic population. PMID:20676310

  7. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives. PMID:20883261

  8. [Dry skin and black skin: what are the facts?].

    PubMed

    Mahé, A

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the data in the literature on the potential specificities of the stratum corneum of so-called "black" skin, together with the afferent cutaneous hydration regulation process. The methodology of the studies is often debatable, not only for basic (absence of definition of "black skin") but also for technical reasons. Their results are often contradicting. Other than certain subtle differences, related to potentially enhanced preservation of the epidermis of dark skin from heliodermal xerosis, we conclude in the similarity of the physicochemical characteristics of the stratum corneum in the different color of skin. Moreover, the data available do not suggest a predisposition of certain skin colors to the occurrence of pathological states involving the stratum corneum. However, dark skin is characterized by its semiologic capacity of taking on a "ashy" aspect related to a better assessment of normal or xerotic stratum corneum because of melanic pigmentation. PMID:11976544

  9. Experimental results using a three-layer skin model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömberg, Tomas; Karlsson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    We have previously presented an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm based on a three-layer semi-infinite skin model for analyzing diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) data. The algorithm includes pre-simulated Monte Carlo data for a range of physiologically relevant epidermal thicknesses and tissue scattering levels. The simulated photon pathlength distributions in each layer are stored and the absorption effect from tissue chromophores added in the post-processing. Recorded DRS spectra at source-detector distances of 0.4 and 1.2 mm were calibrated for the relative intensity between the two distances and matched to simulated spectra in a non-linear optimization algorithm. This study evaluates the DRS spectral fitting accuracy and presents data on the main output parameters; the tissue fraction of red blood cells and local oxygenation (SO2). As a reference, the microcirculatory perfusion (Perf) was measured simultaneously in the same probe using laser Doppler Flowmetry. Data were recorded on the volar forearm of three healthy subjects in a protocol involving a 5 min systolic occlusion. The DRS spectra were modeled with an rms-error < 2%. In two subjects, SO2 decreased during occlusion to <10%, and increased to above baseline after hyperemia, while Perf increased >7 times compared to baseline. In the third subject the SO2 decreased less during occlusion and increased to baseline values at hyperemia with only a 2-fold increase in Perf. The observed difference could be due to different microvascular beds being probed. It is concluded that integrating DRS and LDF enables new possibilities to deduce microcirculation status.

  10. The Lancet Weight Determines Wheal Diameter in Response to Skin Prick Testing with Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Elberling, Jesper; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin prick test (SPT) is a common test for diagnosing immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies. In clinical routine, technicalities, human errors or patient-related biases, occasionally results in suboptimal diagnosis of sensitization. Objective Although not previously assessed qualitatively, lancet weight is hypothesized to be important when performing SPT to minimize the frequency of false positives, false negatives, and unwanted discomfort. Methods Accurate weight-controlled SPT was performed on the volar forearms and backs of 20 healthy subjects. Four predetermined lancet weights were applied (25 g, 85 g, 135 g and 265 g) using two positive control histamine solutions (1 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL) and one negative control (saline). A total of 400 SPTs were conducted. The outcome parameters were: wheal size, neurogenic inflammation (measured by superficial blood perfusion), frequency of bleeding, and the lancet provoked pain response. Results The mean wheal diameter increased significantly as higher weights were applied to the SPT lancet, e.g. from 3.2 ± 0.28 mm at 25 g to 5.4 ± 1.7 mm at 265 g (p<0.01). Similarly, the frequency of bleeding, the provoked pain, and the neurogenic inflammatory response increased significantly. At 265 g saline evoked two wheal responses (/160 pricks) below 3 mm. Conclusion and clinical relevance The applied weight of the lancet during the SPT-procedure is an important factor. Higher lancet weights precipitate significantly larger wheal reactions with potential diagnostic implications. This warrants additional research of the optimal lancet weight in relation to SPT-guidelines to improve the specificity and sensitivity of the procedure. PMID:27213613

  11. Application of vibration to wrist and hand skin affects fingertip tactile sensation.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Lauer, Abigail W; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Webster, John G; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-07-14

    A recent study showed that fingertip pads' tactile sensation can improve by applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to the skin at the wrist or dorsum of the hand in stroke patients. This study further examined this behavior by investigating the effect of both imperceptible and perceptible white-noise vibration applied to different locations within the distal upper extremity on the fingertip pads' tactile sensation in healthy adults. In 12 healthy adults, white-noise vibration was applied to one of four locations (dorsum hand by the second knuckle, thenar and hypothenar areas, and volar wrist) at one of four intensities (zero, 60%, 80%, and 120% of the sensory threshold for each vibration location), while the fingertip sensation, the smallest vibratory signal that could be perceived on the thumb and index fingertip pads, was assessed. Vibration intensities significantly affected the fingertip sensation (P < 0.01) in a similar manner for all four vibration locations. Specifically, vibration at 60% of the sensory threshold improved the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01), while vibration at 120% of the sensory threshold degraded the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01) and the 80% vibration did not significantly change the fingertip sensation (P > 0.01), all compared with the zero vibration condition. This effect with vibration intensity conforms to the stochastic resonance behavior. Nonspecificity to the vibration location suggests the white-noise vibration affects higher level neuronal processing for fingertip sensing. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural pathways for distal upper extremity vibration to impact fingertip pad tactile sensation. PMID:26177959

  12. Application of vibration to wrist and hand skin affects fingertip tactile sensation

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Lauer, Abigail W; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Webster, John G; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-01-01

    A recent study showed that fingertip pads’ tactile sensation can improve by applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to the skin at the wrist or dorsum of the hand in stroke patients. This study further examined this behavior by investigating the effect of both imperceptible and perceptible white-noise vibration applied to different locations within the distal upper extremity on the fingertip pads’ tactile sensation in healthy adults. In 12 healthy adults, white-noise vibration was applied to one of four locations (dorsum hand by the second knuckle, thenar and hypothenar areas, and volar wrist) at one of four intensities (zero, 60%, 80%, and 120% of the sensory threshold for each vibration location), while the fingertip sensation, the smallest vibratory signal that could be perceived on the thumb and index fingertip pads, was assessed. Vibration intensities significantly affected the fingertip sensation (P < 0.01) in a similar manner for all four vibration locations. Specifically, vibration at 60% of the sensory threshold improved the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01), while vibration at 120% of the sensory threshold degraded the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (P < 0.01) and the 80% vibration did not significantly change the fingertip sensation (P > 0.01), all compared with the zero vibration condition. This effect with vibration intensity conforms to the stochastic resonance behavior. Nonspecificity to the vibration location suggests the white-noise vibration affects higher level neuronal processing for fingertip sensing. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural pathways for distal upper extremity vibration to impact fingertip pad tactile sensation. PMID:26177959

  13. Climate change and skin.

    PubMed

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many

  14. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  15. Alkalis and Skin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  16. Skin disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Soutou, Boutros; Aractingi, Sélim

    2015-07-01

    Skin manifestations during pregnancy are common and diversified. This review will focus on the most important entities to be recognized by obstetricians. These are, on the one hand, physiological changes, where unnecessary investigations should be avoided, and on the other, the specific dermatoses of pregnancy. These develop electively in pregnancy, and they are currently grouped into three disorders: polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, atopic eczema of pregnancy, and pemphigoid gestationis. Arguments for recognition of these are presented including detection of anti-BP180 antibodies. Follow-up and treatment depend on the precise diagnosis. Risks in fetal prognosis may occur in rare pemphigoid gestationis cases. PMID:25862358

  17. [Skin problems in joggers].

    PubMed

    Itin, P; Rufli, T

    1986-08-30

    Reports on skin problems in joggers are rare in medical literature. Jogger dermatoses are caused by repeated trauma, mechanic overuse, thermic effects, allergic-toxic reactions and infectious processes. Most common are bullosis mechanica, piezogenic papules, hyperkeratosis haemorrhagica and subungual haematomas. Contact allergies and infections such as athlete's foot, pitted keratolysis and pyoderma are well-known complications in joggers. Frostbite and actinic damage, abrasions of the nipples, collisions with vehicles and injuries by buzzards are further possible incidents to be reckoned with occasionally. In most cases, prophylaxis is possible by training adaptation and use of adequate footwear. Jogger dermatoses usually clear after a suitable jogging-free interval. PMID:3764389

  18. Memristance in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.; Lütken, C. A.; Johnsen, G. K.

    2010-04-01

    The memristor is basically a resistor with memory, so that the resistance is dependent on the net amount of charge having passed through the device. It is the regarded the fourth fundamental component, in addition to the resistor, capacitor and inductor, that can be deduced from the four basic circuit variables; current, voltage, charge and magnetic flux. We show that memristors can be used for modelling electrical properties of human skin. In particular is electro-osmosis in human sweat ducts of memristive nature.

  19. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  20. Feasibility of skin surface elastography by tracking skin surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutts, Louise V.; Miller, Naomi R.; Harland, Christopher C.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances have led to a multitude of image modalities being used for visualization of tissue stiffness. High-resolution images of tissue stiffness are desirable, as they have the potential to provide useful diagnostic information. A noncontact optical imaging method has the attractions of low cost, simplicity, and utility when skin contact is undesirable. However, previous optical techniques have required the application of paint or ink to the surface of the skin and so have required contact. Therefore, the present study assessed the feasibility of tracking skin surface topography to produce elastograms. The study showed, by analyzing a variety of silicone skin surface replicas from various body sites of subjects of different ages, that skin surface elastography by tracking surface topography would be feasible. The study further showed that the quality of the strain images can be optimized by measuring skin line pattern frequency. Skin samples with high skin line frequency will achieve best spatial resolution, in the order of 1 mm, comparable to contact techniques reported previously. A mechanically inhomogeneous silicone replica was then imaged, illustrating the technique's ability to detect strain contrast. Finally, the feasibility of implementing the technique in vivo was illustrated using a single pigmented skin lesion.

  1. [Youth Healthcare guideline 'Skin disorders'].

    PubMed

    Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Gameren-Oosterom, Helma B M; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    There is a high incidence of skin disorders; these are also frequently encountered within Youth Healthcare (YHC). Some skin disorders are caused by an underlying disease, syndrome or child abuse. Therefore, detection of these causes in an early stage is important. Skin disorders can have a huge psychosocial impact on both child and parents. This is one of the reasons why prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, referral, and uniform advice and guidance are of great importance. The YHC Guideline examines counselling and advice, criteria for referral to primary or secondary healthcare, and skincare in general. It also describes the disorders that should be actively detected. The Guideline also looks at specific aspects of dark skins and ethnic diversity, and the impact of skin disorders on general wellbeing. The accompanying web-based tool includes argumentation and opinions from experts on more than 75 skin disorders, including illustrations and decision trees, to aid the drawing up of a treatment plan. PMID:23151335

  2. Wnt signaling in skin organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Widelitz, Randall B

    2008-04-01

    While serving as the interface between an organism and its environment, the skin also can elaborate a wide range of skin appendages to service specific purposes in a region-specific fashion. As in other organs, Wnt signaling plays a key role in regulating the proliferation, differentiation and motility of skin cells during their morphogenesis. Here I will review some of the recent work that has been done on skin organogenesis. I will cover dermis formation, the development of skin appendages, cycling of appendages in the adult, stem cell regulation, patterning, orientation, regional specificity and modulation by sex hormone nuclear receptors. I will also cover their roles in wound healing, hair regeneration and skin related diseases. It appears that Wnt signaling plays essential but distinct roles in different hierarchical levels of morphogenesis and organogenesis. Many of these areas have not yet been fully explored but are certainly promising areas of future research. PMID:19279724

  3. Wnt signaling in skin organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    While serving as the interface between an organism and its environment, the skin also can elaborate a wide range of skin appendages to service specific purposes in a region-specific fashion. As in other organs, Wnt signaling plays a key role in regulating the proliferation, differentiation and motility of skin cells during their morphogenesis. Here I will review some of the recent work that has been done on skin organogenesis. I will cover dermis formation, the development of skin appendages, cycling of appendages in the adult, stem cell regulation, patterning, orientation, regional specificity and modulation by sex hormone nuclear receptors. I will also cover their roles in wound healing, hair regeneration and skin related diseases. It appears that Wnt signaling plays essential but distinct roles in different hierarchical levels of morphogenesis and organogenesis. Many of these areas have not yet been fully explored but are certainly promising areas of future research. PMID:19279724

  4. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  5. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination. PMID:22851522

  6. [Caring for perilesional skin or skin having a lesion risk].

    PubMed

    Segovia, Gómez T; Javares, Curto T; Barahona, M; Verdú, Soriano J

    2007-10-01

    In order to increase the clinical and scientific evidence of the Hyperoxygenated Fatty Acids (HFA) in emulsion preparation for skin care, this study considers to evaluate prospectively how it influences in the state of the periwound skin (when there are active lesions) or in which it presents a high risk of lesion production. PMID:18274396

  7. UK DRAFFT: a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking-plate fixation in the treatment of adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Plant, Caroline; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Tubeuf, Sandy; Yu, Ge; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In high-income countries, 6% of all women will have sustained a fracture of the wrist (distal radius) by the age of 80 years and 9% by the age of 90 years. Advances in orthopaedic surgery have improved the outcome for patients: many such fractures can be treated in a plaster cast alone, but others require surgical fixation to hold the bone in place while they heal. The existing evidence suggests that modern locking-plate fixation provides improved functional outcomes, but costs more than traditional wire fixation. METHODS In this multicentre trial, we randomly assigned 461 adult patients having surgery for an acute dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius to either percutaneous Kirschner-wire fixation or locking-plate fixation. The primary outcome measure was the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation© (PRWE) questionnaire at 12 months after the fracture. In this surgical trial, neither the patients nor the surgeons could be blind to the intervention. We also collected information on complications and combined costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) to assess cost-effectiveness. RESULTS The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. Both groups of patients recovered wrist function by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the PRWE questionnaire score at 3 months, 6 months or 12 months [difference at 12 months: -1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.5 to 1.8; p=0.398]. There was no difference in the number of complications in each group and small differences in QALY gains (0.008; 95% CI -0.001 to 0.018); Kirschner-wire fixation represents a cost-saving intervention (-£727; 95% CI -£588 to -£865), particularly in younger patients. CONCLUSIONS Contrary to the existing literature, and against the increasing use of locking-plate fixation, this trial shows that there is no difference between Kirschner wires and volar locking plates for patients with dorsally displaced

  8. Characteristics of the Aging Skin

    PubMed Central

    Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Although most researches into the changes in skin with age focus on the unwelcome aesthetic aspects of the aging skin, skin deterioration with age is more than a merely cosmetic problem. Although mortality from skin disease is primarily restricted to melanoma, dermatological disorders are ubiquitous in older people with a significant impact on quality of life. The structural and functional deterioration of the skin that occurs with age has numerous clinical presentations, ranging from benign but potentially excruciating disorders like pruritus to the more threatening carcinomas and melanomas. Recent Advances The degenerative changes that occur in the aging skin are increasingly understood at both the molecular and cellular level, facilitating a deeper understanding of the structural and functional deterioration that these changes produce. Critical Issues A loss of both function and structural stability in skin proceeds unavoidably as individuals age, which is the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. Intrinsic aging proceeds at a genetically determined pace, primarily caused by the buildup of damaging products of cellular metabolism as well as an increasing biological aging of the cells. Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity in women as well; falling levels in midlife, therefore, produce premature aging as compared with similarly aged men. Extrinsic insults from the environment add to the dermatological signs of aging. Future Directions A deeper understanding of the physiological basis of skin aging will facilitate progress in the treatment of the unwelcome sequelae of aging skin, both cosmetic and pathogenic. PMID:24527317

  9. Skin equivalents: skin from reconstructions as models to study skin development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Hosseini, M; Vainio, S; Taïeb, A; Cario-André, M; Rezvani, H R

    2015-08-01

    While skin is readily available for sampling and direct studies of its constituents, an important intermediate step is to design in vitro and/or in vivo models to address scientific or medical questions in dermatology and skin biology. Pioneered more than 30 years ago, human skin equivalents (HSEs) have been refined with better cell culture techniques and media, together with sophisticated cell biology tools including genetic engineering and cell reprogramming. HSEs mimic key elements of human skin biology and have been instrumental in demonstrating the importance of cell-cell interactions in skin homeostasis and the role of a complex cellular microenvironment to coordinate epidermal proliferation, differentiation and pigmentation. HSEs have a wide field of applications from cell biology to dermocosmetics, modelling diseases, drug development, skin ageing, pathophysiology and regenerative medicine. In this article we critically review the major current approaches used to reconstruct organotypic skin models and their application with a particular emphasis on skin biology and pathophysiology of skin disorders. PMID:25939812

  10. The Sensitive Skin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Tov, Hadar; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive skin syndrome (SSS) is a common and challenging condition, yet little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. Patients with SSS often present with subjective complaints of severe facial irritation, burning, and/or stinging after application of cosmetic products. These complaints are out of proportion to the objective clinical findings. Defined as a self-diagnosed condition lacking any specific objective findings, SSS is by definition difficult to quantify and, therefore, the scientific community has yet to identify an acceptable objective screening test. In this overview we review recent epidemiological studies, present current thinking on the pathophysiology leading to SSS, discuss the challenges SSS presents, and recommend a commonsense approach to management. PMID:23248357

  11. Keratins and skin disease.

    PubMed

    Knöbel, Maria; O'Toole, Edel A; Smith, Frances J D

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in keratin genes cause a diverse spectrum of skin, hair and mucosal disorders. Cutaneous disorders include epidermolysis bullosa simplex, palmoplantar keratoderma, epidermolytic ichthyosis and pachyonychia congenita. Both clinical and laboratory observations confirm a major role for keratins in maintaining epidermal cell-cell adhesion. When normal tissue homeostasis is disturbed, for example, during wound healing and cancer, keratins play an important non-mechanical role. Post-translational modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation of keratins play an important role in protection of epithelial cells from injury. Keratins also play a role in modulation of the immune response. A current focus in the area of keratins and disease is the development of new treatments including small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) to mutant keratins and small molecules to modulate keratin expression. PMID:25620412

  12. [Travel and skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1992-02-20

    The problem "travelling and dermatological diseases" is presented as a temporary change of place with associated changes in ecological conditions. Latent dermatoses may be provoked--but full-blown dermatoses may also improve with no specific treatment (climatic therapy of neurodermatitis). Physiological changes at the surface of the skin brought about by, for example, temperature or the effects of solar radiation, may allow fungal, bacterial or viral infections to develop. Direct contact with the living environment on land or in the water, in particular in the tropics, can lead to the development of diseases. Some dermatoses have a lengthy latency and develop only later at home. Recommendations for general and specific prophylaxis and treatment are made. PMID:1544613

  13. Quiz: Test Your Skin Cancer IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin is usually the first step in skin cancer treatment and may have already occurred in the process ... Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early / NIH Research ...

  14. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  15. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  16. Skin grafting of the horse.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Hanselka, D V

    1989-12-01

    Free autogenous skin grafting of the horse is indicated for wounds too large to heal by contraction and epithelization. Techniques of pinch, punch, tunnel, and sheet grafting are described. Allografting and storage of skin for delayed grafting are discussed. PMID:2691033

  17. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria

    2013-03-10

    The four most common bacterial skin infections are impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, and folliculitis. This article summarizes current information about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and implications for primary care practice needed to effectively diagnose and treat common bacterial skin infections. PMID:23361375

  18. Aging Differences in Ethnic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Buainain De Castro Maymone, Mayra; Kundu, Roopal V.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and complex process that can be described clinically as features of wrinkles, sunspots, uneven skin color, and sagging skin. These cutaneous effects are influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors and often are varied based on ethnic origin given underlying structural and functional differences. The authors sought to provide updated information on facets of aging and how it relates to ethnic variation given innate differences in skin structure and function. Publications describing structural and functional principles of ethnic and aging skin were primarily found through a PubMed literature search and supplemented with a review of textbook chapters. The most common signs of skin aging despite skin type are dark spots, loss of elasticity, loss of volume, and rhytides. Skin of color has many characteristics that make its aging process unique. Those of Asian, Hispanic, and African American descent have distinct facial structures. Differences in the concentration of epidermal melanin makes darkly pigmented persons more vulnerable to dyspigmentation, while a thicker and more compact dermis makes facial lines less noticeable. Ethnic skin comprises a large portion of the world population. Therefore, it is important to understand the unique structural and functional differences among ethnicities to adequately treat the signs of aging. PMID:26962390

  19. Moisturizing Different Racial Skin Types

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ involved in thermoregulation, gas exchange, protection against pathogens, and barrier function to maintain proper hydration. When dry, the ability for skin to execute these tasks becomes impaired. Dry skin affects almost everyone as we age, but it is also dependent on external factors, such as dry climate, colder temperatures, and repeated washing. In addition, increasing evidence has shown racial variability in the physiological properties of skin, which directly impacts water content of the stratum corneum and sensitivity to exogenously applied agents. A multitude of products have been developed to treat dry skin, and as a group, moisturizers have been designed to either impart or restore hydration in the stratum corneum. Given the large number of moisturizers presently available, depending on individual components, several different mechanisms may be employed to promote skin hydration. As there exists dramatic racial variability in skin properties, certain moisturizers may thus be more effective in some and less effective in others to treat the common condition of dry skin. PMID:25013536

  20. Occupational Skin Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Skin disease is the most common occupational disease, but the reported number is small in Korea due to a difficulty of detection and diagnosis in time. We described various official statistics and data from occupational skin disease surveillance system, epidemiological surveys and cases published in scientific journals. Until 1981, 2,222 cases of occupational skin disease were reported by Korean employee's regular medical check-up, accounting for 4.9% of the total occupational diseases. There was no subsequent official statistics to figure out occupational skin diseases till 1998. From 1999, the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) published the number of occupational skin diseases through the statistics of Cause Investigation for Industrial Accidents. A total of 301 cases were reported from 1999 to 2007. Recent one study showed the figures of compensated occupational skin diseases. Many of them belonged to daily-paid workers in the public service, especially forestry workers. Also, it described the interesting cases such as vitiligo and trichloroethylene-induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Skin diseases are still important though the number of cases has decreased, and therefore it is recommended to grasp the status of occupational skin diseases through continuous surveillance system and to make policy protecting high-risk group. PMID:21258591

  1. Common skin conditions during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tunzi, Marc; Gray, Gary R

    2007-01-15

    Common skin conditions during pregnancy generally can be separated into three categories: hormone-related, preexisting, and pregnancy-specific. Normal hormone changes during pregnancy may cause benign skin conditions including striae gravidarum (stretch marks); hyperpigmentation (e.g., melasma); and hair, nail, and vascular changes. Preexisting skin conditions (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infections, cutaneous tumors) may change during pregnancy. Pregnancy-specific skin conditions include pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy, prurigo of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, pemphigoid gestationis, impetigo herpetiformis, and pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy. Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy are the most common of these disorders. Most skin conditions resolve postpartum and only require symptomatic treatment. However, there are specific treatments for some conditions (e.g., melasma, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy). Antepartum surveillance is recommended for patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, and pemphigoid gestationis. PMID:17263216

  2. Conservative procedures in skin reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Skin exerts a number of essential protective functions ensuring homeostasis of the whole body. In the present review barrier function of skin and its expression of antimicrobial peptides are discussed. Barrier function is provided by the dynamic stratum corneum structure composed of lipids and corneocytes. Stratum corneum is a conditio sine qua non for terrestrial life. Impairment of barrier function can be due to injury and inflammatory skin diseases. Therapeutic options are discussed with special emphasis of radiodermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis in patients with hearing device. The use of antimicrobial peptides is illustrated by facial inflammatory skin diseases. In wound healing new developments include biotechnological developments of matrix- and growth factors and tissue-engineered skin substitutes. In everyday wound care of chronic wounds the concept of wound bed preparation (TIME) constitutes the base of successful treatment. PMID:22073065

  3. Folate in Skin Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J.D.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.; Jacobson, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Skin, the largest, most exposed organ of the body, provides a protective interface between humans and the environment. One of its primary roles is protection against exposure to sunlight, a major source of skin damage where the UV radiation (UVR) component functions as a complete carcinogen. Melanin pigmentation and the evolution of dark skin is an adaptive protective mechanism against high levels of UVR exposure. Recently, the hypothesis that skin pigmentation balances folate preservation and Vitamin D production has emerged. Both micronutrients are essential for reproductive success. Photodegradation of bioactive folates suggests a mechanism for the increased tendency of populations of low melanin pigmentation residing in areas of high UV exposure to develop skin cancers. Folate is proposed as a cancer prevention target for its role in providing precursors for DNA repair and replication, as well as its ability to promote genomic integrity through the generation of methyl groups needed for control of gene expression. The cancer prevention potential of folate has been demonstrated by large-scale epidemiological and nutritional studies indicating that decreased folate status increases the risk of developing certain cancers. While folate deficiency has been extensively documented by analysis of human plasma, folate status within skin has not been widely investigated. Nevertheless, inefficient delivery of micronutrients to skin and photolysis of folate argue that documented folate deficiencies will be present if not exacerbated in skin. Our studies indicate a critical role for folate in skin and the potential to protect sun exposed skin by effective topical delivery as a strategy for cancer prevention. PMID:22116700

  4. Skin decontamination of glyphosate from human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhai, H; Chan, H P; Hui, X; Maibach, H I

    2008-06-01

    This study compared three model decontaminant solutions (tap water, isotonic saline, and hypertonic saline) for their ability to remove a model herbicide (glyphosate) from an in vitro human skin model. Human cadaver skin was dosed (approximately 375microg) of [14C]-glyphosate on 3cm2 per skin. After each exposure time (1, 3, and 30min post-dosing, respectively), the surface skin was washed three times (4ml per time) with each solution. After washing, the skin was stripped twice with tape discs. Lastly, the wash solutions, strippings, receptor fluid, and remainder of skin were liquid scintillation analyzer counted to determine the amount of glyphosate. There were no statistical differences among these groups at any time points. The total mass balance recovery at three time exposure points was between 94.8% and 102.4%. The wash off rates (glyphosate in wash solutions) at three different exposure times is 79-101.2%. Thus the three tested decontaminants possess similar effectiveness in removing glyphosate from skin. This in vitro model is not only economic and rapid, but also provides quantitative data that may aid screening for optimal decontaminants. PMID:18407393

  5. Survey of skin pigmentation of yellow-skinned broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Sirri, F; Petracci, M; Bianchi, M; Meluzzi, A

    2010-07-01

    The appearance of whole carcass and skin-on cut-up products is an important attribute that deeply affects the consumer's choice. Skin pigmentation is affected mainly by genetics, concentration and dietary source of pigments, health status of the birds, and scalding-plucking conditions during slaughtering, although other factors might play an important role. Retailers request batches of broiler chicken carcasses characterized by uniform skin pigmentation to be sold as whole carcass or parts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of skin color of yellow-skinned broilers reared under intensive conditions. For the study, a total of 2,300 medium size broiler chickens (2,300 to 2,500 g of live weight) from 23 flocks (100 birds/flock; n = 12 flocks of males and n = 11 flocks of females; n = 12 flocks of Ross 508 and n = 11 flocks of Ross 308) were randomly selected in a single slaughterhouse. The color measurements were carried out on both breast and thigh pterylae as well as on shank skin adopting the L* a* b* system and using a Minolta colorimeter CR 300. The overall range in measured yellowness (b*) was fairly large for all skin color measurement positions. For breast, a mean value of 22.77 (SD = 5.12) was observed, with values ranging from 7.45 to 39.12. Average values of thigh and shank were 20.23 (SD = 5.02; range 1.99 to 37.82) and 53.99 (SD = 8.13; range 24.22 to 78.65), respectively. A higher skin yellowness was observed in females in all body parts as well as in Ross 308. Yellowness values of breast and thigh were significantly correlated (r = 0.85; P < 0.01), suggesting that the color evaluation may be carried out only on one measurement position of the skin. PMID:20548087

  6. Integral skin electrode for electrocardiography is expendable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Inexpensive, expendable skin electrode for use in electrocardiography combines an electrical contact, conductive paste, and a skin-attachment adhesive. Application of the electrode requires only degreasing of the skin area.

  7. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  8. Itchy, Scaly Skin? Living with Psoriasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Itchy, Scaly Skin? Living With Psoriasis The thick, red, scaly skin of psoriasis can ... Diet Itchy, Scaly Skin? Wise Choices Links Treating Psoriasis Doctors often use a trial-and-error approach ...

  9. Applications of skin grafting in large animals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D G

    1990-09-01

    Injuries involving full-thickness skin wounds are common in large animals. Skin grafting can shorten the healing time and improve the cosmetic result. Techniques that have been used successfully in the management of full-thickness skin wounds include full-thickness skin grafts, split-thickness skin grafts, tunnel grafts, pinch/punch grafts, and immediate split-thickness skin grafts. The technical aspects of each of these procedures are detailed and representative cases are presented. PMID:2134606

  10. Ultraviolet Light and Skin Cancer in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Shannon C.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet light exposure is the most important risk factor for cutaneous melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive skin color and genetic factors, as well as immunological factors, play a role in the development of skin cancer. Ultraviolet light also causes sunburn and photoaging damage to the skin. PMID:23015891

  11. Skin cancer prevention and screening.

    PubMed

    Holm, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common and recognizable of all cancers. The human dermis can turn malignant due to excessive solar exposure and chronic injury, with the influence of genetic risk and inherited pigmentation. Basal cell carcinoma, the most common skin cancer in lighter pigmented individuals, spreads locally, and usually appears pearly and often ulcerative. Squamous cell carcinoma, the most common skin cancer in darker pigmented people, metastasizes to lymph nodes 2-5 percent of the time, appears often scaly, smooth, nodular, ulcerative, or even pigmented. Malignant melanoma accounts for 2 percent of skin cancers, but for the vast majority of skin cancer deaths. All three can mimic each other. Solar or ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is the most common carcinogen; however, any chronic irritant can increase the risk, and efforts to avoid such exposure is apropos. Though not yet absolutely proven, skin cancer research strongly supports the following statements: sunscreen is protective, tanning devices are causative, and the routine screening of high-risk individuals is preventative. Authorities strongly recommend avoiding excess sun and UV light, using sunscreen, and keeping a watchful eye for unusual skin lesions. PMID:25985614

  12. Lyme Borreliosis and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  13. Development of prosthetic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  14. [Smoking and the skin].

    PubMed

    Just-Sarobé, M

    2008-04-01

    Smoking is the main modifiable cause of disease and death in the developed world. Tobacco consumption is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, chronic bronchitis, and many malignant diseases. Tobacco also has many cutaneous effects, most of which are harmful. Smoking is closely associated with several dermatologic diseases such as psoriasis, pustulosis palmoplantaris, hidrosadenitis suppurativa, and systemic and discoid lupus erythematosus, as well as cancers such as those of the lip, oral cavity, and anogenital region. A more debatable relationship exists with melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma, and acne. In contrast, smoking seems to protect against mouth sores, rosacea, labial herpes simplex, pemphigus vulgaris, and dermatitis herpetiformis. In addition to the influence of smoking on dermatologic diseases, tobacco consumption is also directly responsible for certain dermatoses such as nicotine stomatitis, black hairy tongue, periodontal disease, and some types of urticaria and contact dermatitis. Furthermore, we should not forget that smoking has cosmetic repercussions such as yellow fingers and fingernails, changes in tooth color, taste and smell disorders, halitosis and hypersalivation, and early development of facial wrinkles. PMID:18358192

  15. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  16. Skin spiradenocarcinoma - case presentation.

    PubMed

    Rebegea, Laura Florentina; Firescu, Dorel; Dumitru, Mihaela; Pătraşcu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Malignant eccrine spiradenoma is an extremely rare skin tumor of sweat gland origin. The available literature data indicates that spiradenocarcinoma nearly uniformly arises from a benign preexisting spiradenoma. Etiology is unknown but previous trauma is believed being an implicated factor. The article presents the clinical observation of a 34-year-old female patient, diagnosed with cutaneous spiradenocarcinoma of the left thigh, treated multidisciplinary: surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The presentation includes clinical, histopathological and therapeutic diagnosis aspects, arisen difficulties of histological diagnosis and literature data regarding treatment options for this type of tumor. In this case, surgery followed by second surgery intervention was performed due to the continuing development of local disease. After surgery, the patient performed external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to tumoral bed (total dose of 50 Gy) and inguinal lymph nodes (total dose of 50 Gy), followed by six cycles of chemotherapy (CMT) (Carboplatin + Paclitaxel) with complete response. At the moment, the patient shows no evidence of recurrence or metastatic disease during the follow-up. PMID:27151731

  17. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAMS) has a wide range of topics under study and through funding of research outside NIAMS. These include disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other chronic inflammatory skin disorders, acne, and many others. Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 ...

  18. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    PubMed Central

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Nazemi, Berouz; Choe, Chun Sik; Darvin, Maxim E; Hadam, Sabrina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Loza, Kateryna; Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica) versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide) or antiseptics (silver). Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles. PMID:25551064

  19. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  20. Eldercare at Home: Skin Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... still leave the skin moist. Then apply a lotion, body oil, or moisturizer that is high in ... itching Try colloidal oatmeal (AveenoTM) baths. Use calamine lotion or cortisone creams on the itchy areas. Let ...

  1. Taking Care of Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... using the product whenever redness or irritation happens. Screening Your Skin From Damage There is one product ... of your parents about whether to use an antibiotic (say: an-tie-bye-AH-tik) cream or ...

  2. Dry skin - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequently Washing your hands often Some soaps and detergents Skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis Certain ... Avoid rough fabrics like wool. Wash clothes with detergents that are free of dyes or fragrances. Drink ...

  3. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrine diseases such as Addison disease Hemochromatosis (iron overload) Sun exposure Pregnancy Causes of hypopigmentation include: Skin ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  4. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... and nutrients from flowing to the body tissues. Edema , or swelling caused by fluid collecting in the ... feet, legs and hands). Skin over areas of edema becomes thin and pale and injures easily because ...

  5. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's largest organ . It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection . Skin also helps control body ... cancer risk factors include: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  6. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  7. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Intertrigo and secondary skin infections.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Kinney, Bruce S

    2014-04-01

    Intertrigo is a superficial inflammatory dermatitis occurring on two closely opposed skin surfaces as a result of moisture, friction, and lack of ventilation. Bodily secretions, including perspiration, urine, and feces, often exacerbate skin inflammation. Physical examination of skin folds reveals regions of erythema with peripheral scaling. Excessive friction and inflammation can cause skin breakdown and create an entry point for secondary fungal and bacterial infections, such as Candida, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. Candidal intertrigo is commonly diagnosed clinically, based on the characteristic appearance of satellite lesions. Diagnosis may be confirmed using a potassium hydroxide preparation. Resistant cases require oral fluconazole therapy. Bacterial superinfections may be identified with bacterial culture or Wood lamp examination. Fungal lesions are treated with topical nystatin, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, oxiconazole, or econazole. Secondary streptococcal infections are treated with topical mupirocin or oral penicillin. Corynebacterium infections are treated with oral erythromycin. PMID:24695603

  9. Skin smoothing surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dermabrasion may be offered to patients with: Facial scars from acne, accidents, and previous surgery Fine facial ... is used to gently and carefully "sand" the scar tissue off down to normal, healthy skin. The ...

  10. Skin penetration of silica microparticles.

    PubMed

    Boonen, J; Baert, B; Lambert, J; De Spiegeleer, B

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge about skin penetration of nano- and microparticles is essential for the development of particle-core drug delivery systems and toxicology. A large number of studies have been devoted to metallic particle penetration. However, little work has been published about the importance of chemical material properties of the particles and the skin penetration effect of the applied formulation. Here, we investigated the penetration of 3 microm silica particles in water and in a 65% ethanolic plant extract on ex vivo human skin using scanning electron microscopy. Contrary to most other microsphere skin studies, we observed for the first time that 3 microm silica particles can penetrate the living epidermis. Moreover, when formulated in the ethanolic medium, particles even reach the dermis. The deviating chemical properties of silica compared to previously investigated microparticles (titanium dioxide, zinc oxide) and confounding effect of the formulation in which the silica microparticles are presented, is thus demonstrated. PMID:21699089

  11. Common Skin Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Taradash, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Six common pediatric skin problems are discussed through the use of case histories. Problems of differential diagnosis are outlined, and the various steps and pitfalls in therapy itemized. PMID:21308018

  12. Skin Diseases and the Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Marjorie

    1970-01-01

    Discusses such concerns as acne, syphilis, drug abuse, and tatoos. Indicates need for physician not only to treat skin diseases but to help adolescents to accept themselves and find constructive directions. (CJ)

  13. Noninfectious skin diseases of cattle.

    PubMed

    Manning, T O

    1984-03-01

    The noninfectious bovine skin disorders can best be summarized by four factors: environmental, nutritional, congenital, and neoplastic. This article has attempted to address the etiology, treatment, and prevention of most of these noninfectious diseases. PMID:6740876

  14. Scaly-skinned Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The style of erosion along the highlands-lowlands boundary of southern Elysium Planitia has produced a strange pattern of troughs that look like the skin of a reptile. In reality, a very clear process of landscape degradation is evident in this image. Some process has produced polygon-shaped troughs that create zones of weakness in the uppermost crust. It is likely that wind-blown particles deepen and widen the troughs, producing isolated knobs and mesas. Ultimately, the erosional reworking of the landscape is so complete that all signs of the upper layer are removed, leaving the smooth lowland surface to the north.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Parkinson's disease and the skin.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Ralph; Miller, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    The concept that the skin is a mirror of Parkinson's disease dates to the start of the last century. Despite dermatological disorders being recognised as a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease, they are often overlooked. This article reviews the various skin disorders seen in Parkinson's disease and addresses the other dermatological questions that are frequently raised by those attending Parkinson's disease clinics. PMID:25862733

  16. [Environmentally induced (extrinsic) skin aging].

    PubMed

    Krutmann, J; Schikowski, T; Hüls, A; Vierkötter, A; Grether-Beck, S

    2016-02-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, particularly as a component of natural sunlight, is a major cause of environmentally induced aging of the skin. In addition, other environmental factors for premature skin aging include longer wavelength radiation in the visible light region and in particular in the shortwave infrared radiation region. Furthermore, particulate and gaseous components of air pollution significantly contribute to the aging process. PMID:26769311

  17. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  18. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  19. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  20. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  1. 19 CFR 12.63 - Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. 12.63 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Fur-Seal Or Sea-Otter Skins § 12.63 Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste. Seal-skin or sea-otter-skin waste composed of small pieces not large enough to...

  2. Protective Skins for Composite Airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.; Boone, Richard L.; Jones, Shannon; Pendse, Vandana; Hayward, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Traditional composite aircraft structures are designed for load bearing and then overdesigned for impact damage and hot humid environments. Seeking revolutionary improvement in the performance and weight of composite structures, Cessna Aircraft Company, with sponsorship from the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program/Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, has developed and tested a protective skin concept which would allow the primary composite structure to carry only load and would meet the impact, hot and humid, and other requirements through protective skins. A key requirement for the protective skins is to make any impact damage requiring repair visible. Testing from the first generation of skins helped identify the most promising materials which were used in a second generation of test articles. This report summarizes lessons learned from the first generation of protective skins, the design and construction of the second-generation test articles, test results from the second generation for impact, electromagnetic effects, aesthetics and smoothing, thermal, and acoustic (for the first time), and an assessment of the feasibility of the protective skin concept.

  3. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  4. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  5. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. PMID:27021875

  6. Concepts in skin care maintenance.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2005-12-01

    The correct use of moisturizers and cleansers is an integral component of the skin care regimen for any patient with dermatologic disease. As discussed in this article, moisturizers that contain certain ingredients, including occlusives and humectants, offer the most complete benefits with regard to repair of the damaged stratum corneum. When used appropriately, these products not only improve skin hydration by reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL) but also help to restore the skin barrier and improve the aesthetic appearance of the skin, which is an important concern from the patient's perspective. The use of skin cleansers also is a central consideration in patients with dermatologic disease, but these agents vary widely and must be selected carefully on the basis of the patient's clinical presentation. In most cases, syndets, combars, and lipid-free cleansers offer clear advantages over true soaps. In addition, a variety of cleansing implements such as mesh sponges, particulate abrasive scrubs, and woven face cloths are available, though most are not well suited for use by patients with barrier damage. Because improper skin care can worsen the condition or impede the treatment outcome, proper moisturizing and cleansing are essential components of an overall treatment plan to ensure a satisfactory therapeutic outcome in patients with any barrier defect. PMID:16869178

  7. How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of skinning whenever description may...

  11. Skin transcriptome profiles associated with skin color in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Liu, Fuzhu; Cao, Junting; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional and medicinal benefits have been attributed to the consumption of tissues from the black-boned chickens in oriental countries. Lueyang black-boned chicken is one of the native chicken breeds. However, some birds may instead have white or lighter skin, which directly causes economic losses every year. Previous studies of pigmentation have focused on a number of genes that may play important roles in coat color regulation. Illumina2000 sequencing technology was used to catalog the global gene expression profiles in the skin of the Lueyang chicken with white versus black skin. A total of 18,608 unigenes were assembled from the reads obtained from the skin of the white and black chickens. A total of 649 known genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, with 314 genes that were up regulated and 335 genes that were down-regulated, and a total of 162 novel genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, consisting of 73 genes that were up-regulated (including 4 highly expressed genes that were expressed exclusively in the skin of the black chickens) and 89 genes that were down-regulated. There were also a total of 8 known coat-color genes expressed in previous studies (ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R). In this study, 4 of which showed greater expression in the black chickens, and several were up-regulated, such as KIT, ASIP, TYR and OCA2. To our surprise, KITLG, MITF and MC1R showed no significant difference in expression between the black- and white-skinned chickens, and the expression of TYRP1 was not detected in either skin color. The expression of ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R was validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the results of the qPCR were consistent with the RNA-seq. This study provides several candidate genes that may be associated with the development of black versus white skin. More importantly, the fact that the MC1R

  12. Skin Transcriptome Profiles Associated with Skin Color in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqin; Liu, Fuzhu; Cao, Junting; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional and medicinal benefits have been attributed to the consumption of tissues from the black-boned chickens in oriental countries. Lueyang black-boned chicken is one of the native chicken breeds. However, some birds may instead have white or lighter skin, which directly causes economic losses every year. Previous studies of pigmentation have focused on a number of genes that may play important roles in coat color regulation. Illumina2000 sequencing technology was used to catalog the global gene expression profiles in the skin of the Lueyang chicken with white versus black skin. A total of 18,608 unigenes were assembled from the reads obtained from the skin of the white and black chickens. A total of 649 known genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, with 314 genes that were up regulated and 335 genes that were down-regulated, and a total of 162 novel genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, consisting of 73 genes that were up-regulated (including 4 highly expressed genes that were expressed exclusively in the skin of the black chickens) and 89 genes that were down-regulated. There were also a total of 8 known coat-color genes expressed in previous studies (ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R). In this study, 4 of which showed greater expression in the black chickens, and several were up-regulated, such as KIT, ASIP, TYR and OCA2. To our surprise, KITLG, MITF and MC1R showed no significant difference in expression between the black- and white-skinned chickens, and the expression of TYRP1 was not detected in either skin color. The expression of ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R was validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the results of the qPCR were consistent with the RNA-seq. This study provides several candidate genes that may be associated with the development of black versus white skin. More importantly, the fact that the MC1R

  13. Novel living skin replacement biotherapy approach for wounded skin tissues.

    PubMed

    LaFrance, M L; Armstrong, D W

    1999-04-01

    A novel living skin replacement (LSR) biotherapy concept, addressing the challenging problems related to tissue regeneration and wound healing, is presented for the treatment of skin burns, traumatic injuries and ulcerations. LSR combines elements of cell therapy along with those of tissue engineering to allow for the regeneration of wounded skin. It takes advantage of biodegradable microspheres onto which donor skin epidermal and dermal cells can be attached and expanded in vitro for subsequent direct application down to the deepest recesses of the wound bed. The key element of the biotherapy is the ability of the skin cells to migrate freely from the microspheres into the wound for regeneration of the tissues. The large surface to volume ratio of the microspheres allows for the delivery of appropriate cell numbers while minimizing the amount of biomaterial to be resorbed. This novel approach presents a number of advantages over existing therapies including facilitated cell manipulations, ease of storage and transportation, rapid clinical intervention due to the elimination of any surgical suturing or stapling, and a more natural three-dimensional tissue remodeling and anatomical compliance. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo evidence of the LSR functionality and its potential benefits is presented. PMID:10358222

  14. Skin interaction with absorbent hygiene products.

    PubMed

    Runeman, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Skin problems due to the use of absorbent hygiene products, such as diapers, incontinence pads, and feminine sanitary articles, are mostly due to climate or chafing discomfort. If these conditions are allowed to prevail, these may develop into an irritant contact dermatitis and eventually superficial skin infections. Skin humidity and aging skin are among the most significant predisposing and aggravating factors for dermatitis development. Improved product design features are believed to explain the decline in observed diaper dermatitis among infants. Where adult incontinence-related skin problems are concerned, it is very important to apply a holistic perspective to understand the influences due to the individual's incontinence level and skin condition, as well as the hygiene and skin care measures provided. Individuals with frail, sensitive skin or with skin diseases may preferably have to use high-quality products, equipped with superabsorbent polymers and water vapor-permeable back sheets, to minimize the risk of skin complications. PMID:18280904

  15. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:24063883

  16. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  17. Human Skin Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Bickers, David R.; Kappas, Attallah

    1978-01-01

    Coal tar products, which are widely used in treating dermatologic disease, contain numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, including 3,4-benzo[a]pyrene (BP). BP is among the most potent environmental chemical carcinogens and is known to evoke tumors in the skin of experimental animals and perhaps also of man. In this study the effect of cutaneous application of coal tar solution (U. S. Pharmacopeia) on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity in the skin of patients usually treated with this drug was investigated. AHH, a cytochrome P-450 dependent carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme appears to play an important role in the activation of polycyclic hydrocarbons into reactive moieties that can bind to DNA and that may directly induce cancer. Application of coal tar solution to human skin caused a two to five-fold induction of cutaneous AHH in nine subjects. In further studies, the incubation of human skin with coal tar solution in vitro also caused variable induction of cutaneous AHH. Maximum responses in both systems occurred after 24 h and enzyme activity in vitro was time- and tissue- and substrate-concentration dependent. Studies in experimental animals showed that topical application of coal tar solution caused induction of AHH in skin and, after percutaneous absorption, in liver as well. Assay of several defined constituents of coal tar for AHH induction showed that BP was the most potent inducer of AHH tested. These studies indicate that topical application of coal tar solution in doses ordinarily used in treating dermatologic disease causes induction of AHH in human skin and suggest that such induced enzymatic activity could relate to carcinogenic responses to this agent in skin or, after percutaneous absorption, in other tissues as well. PMID:711851

  18. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  19. Skin Cancer in the Crosshairs

    PubMed Central

    Sinnya, Sudipta; Zwald, Fiona O.; Colegio, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative (ITSCC) is an organization comprising of physicians; transplant surgeons and basic science research scientists dedicated in providing optimal care and ongoing research advancements in solid organ transplant recipients to improve patient outcome and quality of life. As medical advances occur, it is anticipated that the sheer number of solid organ transplantations occurring worldwide will continue to increase. The long-term medication associated immunosuppression improves graft survival, but as a consequence, these individuals become increasingly susceptible to various cutaneous malignancies, lymphoproliferative disorders and infections. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most frequently encountered skin cancer and increases 65- to 250-fold [Jensen et al., Skin cancer in kidney and heart transplant recipients and different long-term immunosuppressive therapy regimens. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999;40:177-186; Lindelöf et al., Incidence of skin cancer in 5356 patients following organ transplantation. Br J Dermatol. 2000; 143:513-519]. However, the rates of basal cell carcinoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma also increase in organ transplant recipients leading to significant morbidity as well as mortality [Berg and Otley. Skin cancer in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002; 47:1-20]. In October 2014, the International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and its equivalent European counterpart, Skin Care in Organ Transplant Recipients Europe held its 10th biennial meeting in Essex, MA to discuss the clinical conundrums and the evolving research pertinent to the field. This meeting report provides a synthesis of all the clinical and research data presented at the 4-day meeting.

  20. Removing bonded skin from a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    Metal skin is peeled off like sardine-can cover with key. Method is useful in removing bonded skins from any substrate where substrate is strong enough not to buckle or tear when bonded skin is rolled free. Also, it is useful for removing sections of damaged skin where bladders of other equipment below substrate might be damaged if saw or router were used to cut completely through skin.

  1. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  2. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  3. Smart Skin Patterns Protect Springtails

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ralf; Nickerl, Julia; Neinhuis, Christoph; Werner, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Springtails, arthropods who live in soil, in decaying material, and on plants, have adapted to demanding conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust anti-adhesive skin patterns. However, details of these unique properties and their structural basis are still unknown. Here we demonstrate that collembolan skin can resist wetting by many organic liquids and at elevated pressures. We show that the combination of bristles and a comb-like hexagonal or rhombic mesh of interconnected nanoscopic granules distinguish the skin of springtails from anti-adhesive plant surfaces. Furthermore, the negative overhang in the profile of the ridges and granules were revealed to be a highly effective, but as yet neglected, design principle of collembolan skin. We suggest an explanation for the non-wetting characteristics of surfaces consisting of such profiles irrespective of the chemical composition. Many valuable opportunities arise from the translation of the described comb-like patterns and overhanging profiles of collembolan skin into man-made surfaces that combine stability against wear and friction with superior non-wetting and anti-adhesive characteristics. PMID:21980383

  4. Skin lesions in returning travellers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Juszczak, Dariusz; Jerzemowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers. PMID:26394319

  5. Hyperspectral imaging of bruised skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Baarstad, Ivar; Løke, Trond; Kaspersen, Peter; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-02-01

    Bruises can be important evidence in legal medicine, for example in cases of child abuse. Optical techniques can be used to discriminate and quantify the chromophores present in bruised skin, and thereby aid dating of an injury. However, spectroscopic techniques provide only average chromophore concentrations for the sampled volume, and contain little information about the spatial chromophore distribution in the bruise. Hyperspectral imaging combines the power of imaging and spectroscopy, and can provide both spectroscopic and spatial information. In this study a hyperspectral imaging system developed by Norsk Elektro Optikk AS was used to measure the temporal development of bruised skin in a human volunteer. The bruises were inflicted by paintball bullets. The wavelength ranges used were 400 - 1000 nm (VNIR) and 900 - 1700 nm (SWIR), and the spectral sampling intervals were 3.7 and 5 nm, respectively. Preliminary results show good spatial discrimination of the bruised areas compared to normal skin. Development of a white spot can be seen in the central zone of the bruises. This central white zone was found to resemble the shape of the object hitting the skin, and is believed to develop in areas where the impact caused vessel damage. These results show that hyperspectral imaging is a promising technique to evaluate the temporal and spatial development of bruises on human skin.

  6. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  7. Skin problems in sugar artists.

    PubMed

    Bangha, E; Elsner, P

    1996-11-01

    Sugar artistry is a growing profession amongst bakers and confectioners and an increasingly common hobby in amateur cooks. The main work consists of manual manipulation of sugar which is formed into figures and objects for table and food decoration. The sugar must be warmed up to 50 degrees C in order to be liquid and malleable and so the artists suffer from diverse thermally induced skin problems on their hands. Such changes have not to date been reported in the dermatological literature. In this study we report our experience in 50 Swiss sugar artists who have suffered from skin problems. The study took the form of a questionnaire survey. The response rate was 30 out of 50. Twenty-six reported no chronic skin disorder. Four suffered from a palmar vesicular relapsing type of chronic eczema. The main skin problems on the hands during work with hot sugar were increased sweating, seen in 20 out of 30 (67%), and burning with erythema and blistering, seen in 12 out of 30 (40%). Most participants (83%) were highly irritated by the skin problems during their work, and applied a protective cream before working with sugar, or wore rubber gloves. Topical therapy with a preparation containing 10% aluminium chloride hexahydrate, used once daily for 3 weeks, evaluated in 14 participants, decreased sweating in 10 (71%) and reduced the thermally induced erythema in one (7%). PMID:8977679

  8. Mosquito repellents in frog skin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.R; Smith, B.P.C; Best, S.M; Tyler, M.J

    2006-01-01

    The search for novel insect repellents has been driven by health concerns over established synthetic compounds such as diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). Given the diversity of compounds known from frog skin and records of mosquito bite and ectoparasite infestation, the presence of mosquito repellents in frogs seemed plausible. We investigated frog skin secretions to confirm the existence of mosquito repellent properties. Litoria caerulea secretions were assessed for mosquito repellency by topical application on mice. The secretions provided protection against host-seeking Culex annulirostris mosquitoes. Olfactometer tests using aqueous washes of skin secretions from L. caerulea and four other frog species were conducted to determine whether volatile components were responsible for repellency. Volatiles from Litoria rubella and Uperoleia mjobergi secretions were repellent to C. annulirostris, albeit not as repellent as a DEET control. The demonstration of endogenous insect repellents in amphibians is novel, and demonstrates that many aspects of frog chemical ecology remain unexplored. PMID:17148373

  9. Direct Measurements of Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Satish

    1953-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure local skin friction on a flat plate by measuring the force exerted upon a very small movable part of the surface of the flat plate. These forces, which range from about 1 milligram to about 100 milligrams, are measured by means of a reactance device. The apparatus was first applied to measurements in the low-speed range, both for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The measured skin-friction coefficients show excellent agreement with Blasius' and Von Karman's results. The device was then applied to high-speed subsonic flow and the turbulent-skin-friction coefficients were determined up to a Mach number of about 0.8. A few measurements in supersonic flow were also made. This paper describes the design and construction of the device and the results of the measurements.

  10. Skin Problems: How to Protect Yourself from Job-Related Skin Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin irritation. Contact with acids, alkalis or heavy metals can cause painful burns. Skin Allergies. Contact with even small amounts of some substances can cause skin allergies. Common causes of work- ...

  11. [Skin cancers and environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Autier, P

    1998-09-01

    In the fair skinned populations of the industrialised nations, the number of cutaneous melanoma doubles every ten to twenty years. Currently, each year in Belgium, about 1,000 new cases of cutaneous melanoma and 15 to 20,000 basal cell or spinal cell epitheliomas are diagnosed. In Europe and in North America, the increase is essentially attributable to the considerable changes in sun exposure habits that took place after World War II. The type of ultraviolet radiation implicated in skin cancers is not known yet, but both the ultraviolet A and the ultraviolet B radiation could be involved in their occurrence. The impact of the stratospheric ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence remains uncertain. The impact of the stratospheric ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence remains uncertain. The sunbed tanning fashion represents another potential source of hazards for skin cancers. Their use must be discouraged. Some European countries have now adopted regulations about their commercialisation and utilisation. Current sun protection messages insist on the physical sun protection (wearing of clothes, staying in the shade), rather than on the use of a sunscreen. In fact, nearly all epidemiological studies done so far have found sunscreen use to be associated with a higher risk of melanoma or non-melanoma skin cancer. Because of their ability to delay sunburns, sunscreens could encourage excessive sun exposure. Sunscreen users should be told to voluntarily limit their sun exposure. New sun protection methods include the measurement of the individual exposure to ultraviolet radiation, with the emission of a signal when a critical level of exposure has been reached. PMID:9805971

  12. Neurophysiology of Skin Thermal Sensations.

    PubMed

    Filingeri, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly, adjusting our thermoregulatory behavior represents the most effective mechanism to maintain thermal homeostasis and ensure survival in the diverse thermal environments that we face on this planet. Remarkably, our thermal behavior is entirely dependent on the ability to detect variations in our internal (i.e., body) and external environment, via sensing changes in skin temperature and wetness. In the past 30 years, we have seen a significant expansion of our understanding of the molecular, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological mechanisms that allow humans to sense temperature and humidity. The discovery of temperature-activated ion channels which gate the generation of action potentials in thermosensitive neurons, along with the characterization of the spino-thalamo-cortical thermosensory pathway, and the development of neural models for the perception of skin wetness, are only some of the recent advances which have provided incredible insights on how biophysical changes in skin temperature and wetness are transduced into those neural signals which constitute the physiological substrate of skin thermal and wetness sensations. Understanding how afferent thermal inputs are integrated and how these contribute to behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory responses under normal brain function is critical to determine how these mechanisms are disrupted in those neurological conditions, which see the concurrent presence of afferent thermosensory abnormalities and efferent thermoregulatory dysfunctions. Furthermore, advancing the knowledge on skin thermal and wetness sensations is crucial to support the development of neuroprosthetics. In light of the aforementioned text, this review will focus on the peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning skin thermal and wetness sensations in humans. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1279-1294, 2016.2016. PMID:27347898

  13. Tropical Skin Infections Among Israeli Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Michal; Benenson, Shmuel; Baum, Sharon; Schwartz, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Infectious skin disorders are common dermatologic illnesses in travelers. Knowledge of post-travel–related infectious skin disorders will allow for effective pre- and post-travel counseling. All cases of returning travelers seen in our center seeking care for infectious skin diseases were included in this study. For a comparison, data on returned travelers with non-infectious skin diseases and healthy travelers who had pre-travel consultations in our institution were also analyzed. Altogether, skin-related diagnosis was reported in 540 ill travelers, and among them, 286 (53%) had infectious skin diseases. Tropical skin infection was diagnosed in 64% of the infectious cases. Travelers returning from Latin America were significantly more ill with tropical skin infections than those traveling to Asia and Africa, The most common diagnoses were cutaneous leishmaniasis, myiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans. In conclusion, tropical skin infections are common among Israeli travelers, especially among those who visited Latin America. PMID:22049040

  14. Biopolymeric agents for skin wrinkle treatment.

    PubMed

    Lourith, Nattaya; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree

    2016-10-01

    Skin aging is caused by several factors capable of deteriorating dermal matrix and is visibly noticed in skin color and skin contour deformities. In addition to the prevention of skin aging by application of antioxidants and sunscreens, treatment of skin wrinkles with those of dermal fillers is also recommended. Dermal filler products with enhanced injectability and longer duration are being developed continuously. Biodegradable polymers such as skin elastic fibers and dermal matrix mimetic used for treatment of skin wrinkle are summarized in this article. Additionally, the importance of amino acids, enzymes, and proteins in aesthetic of skin is addressed. Thus, elective agents are proposed for the dermatologists, cosmetic formulators, and the individuals facing skin aging problems. The candidate natural peptides from marine sources are additionally presented for widening the choice of actives application for treating aging. PMID:26963365

  15. Skin cancer in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    Skin cancer is a major concern in geriatric populations. Cumulative exposure to carcinogens and age-related factors both contribute to the high prevalence of cutaneous malignancy in the elderly. Although mortality rates from skin cancer are relatively low, morbidity can be significant, particularly if lesions are neglected. Physicians can have a major impact on the course of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma by nurturing a high index of suspicion for malignancy when unexplained cutaneous lesions are encountered. 56 references.

  16. Sexual hormones in human skin.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Chen, W-C; Thornton, M J; Qin, K; Rosenfield, R

    2007-02-01

    The skin locally synthesizes significant amounts of sexual hormones with intracrine or paracrine actions. The local level of each sexual steroid depends upon the expression of each of the androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes in each cell type, with sebaceous glands and sweat glands being the major contributors. Sebocytes express very little of the key enzyme, cytochrome P450c17, necessary for synthesis of the androgenic prohormones dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione, however, these prohormones can be converted by sebocytes and sweat glands, and probably also by dermal papilla cells, into more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Five major enzymes are involved in the activation and deactivation of androgens in skin. Androgens affect several functions of human skin, such as sebaceous gland growth and differentiation, hair growth, epidermal barrier homeostasis and wound healing. Their effects are mediated by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor. Changes of isoenzyme and/or androgen receptor levels may have important implications in the development of hyperandrogenism and the associated skin diseases such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. On the other hand, estrogens have been implicated in skin aging, pigmentation, hair growth, sebum production and skin cancer. Estrogens exert their actions through intracellular receptors or via cell surface receptors, which activate specific second messenger signaling pathways. Recent studies suggest specific site-related distribution of ERalpha and ERbeta in human skin. In contrast, progestins play no role in the pathogenesis of skin disorders. However, they play a major role in the treatment of hirsutism and acne vulgaris, where they are prescribed as components of estrogen-progestin combination pills and as anti-androgens. These combinations enhance gonadotropin suppression of ovarian androgen production. Estrogen-progestin treatment can reduce the need for shaving

  17. Skin anti-aging strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall “well-being” and the perception of “health” in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in hand, including including preventive measurements, cosmetological strategies, topical and systemic therapeutic agents and invasive procedures. PMID:23467476

  18. Rare emerging malignant skin tumours.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F; Ferreli, C; Pinna, A L; Atzori, L

    2015-08-01

    As clinical skills improve and innovative diagnostic techniques become available in the field of dermatology and dermatopathology, new types or additional variants of malignant skin tumors are described. This article reviews the current nomenclature, clinico-pathological features, differential diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic implications of some new dermato(patho)logical rare emerging skin tumors, including epithelial tumors (squamous cell carcinoma with mucinous metaplasia), adnexal tumors (endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma), soft tissue tumors of vascular differentiation (pseudolymphomatous cutaneous angiosarcoma, pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma), hematopoietic tumors (blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm) and mixed epithelial/melanocytic tumor (squamomelanocytic tumor). PMID:26086411

  19. Topical Steroid-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anil; Roga, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Topical steroids, commonly used for a wide range of skin disorders, are associated with side effects both systemic and cutaneous. This article aims at bringing awareness among practitioners, about the cutaneous side effects of easily available, over the counter, topical steroids. This makes it important for us as dermatologists to weigh the usefulness of topical steroids versus their side effects, and to make an informed decision regarding their use in each individual based on other factors such as age, site involved and type of skin disorder. PMID:25284849

  20. [Skin and soft tissue infections].

    PubMed

    Piso, R J; Bassetti, S

    2012-03-14

    Skin- and Soft tissue infections are a frequent problem in hospital as well as in ambulatory care. Diagnostic procedures and treatment principles have to include the most frequent pathogens. While the acute forms of skin and soft tissue infections, with, necrotising fasciitis as important exception, rarely cause diagnostic or therapeutic problem, the treatment of patients with recurrent furunculosis, chronic wounds and diabetic feet is often difficult and frustration for patients and physicians. This article gives an overview of the most important problems and treatment strategies. PMID:22419138

  1. Zebrafish for modeling skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The experimental advantages of zebrafish make this model system highly amenable to the field of dermatology. Zebrafish skin development is similar to humans and its genome is ~70% orthologous to the human genome. Its external developmental process allows for genetic manipulation and analysis of embryogenesis within a short time frame with all important internal organs and skin compartments formed within 6 days. Zebrafish models of cutaneous human diseases offer insight into pathogenesis and a unique platform for testing of potential therapies. This review details the specific advantages of zebrafish and highlights its use in dermatological research. PMID:27617951

  2. Xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in human skin and SkinEthic reconstructed human skin models.

    PubMed

    Eilstein, Joan; Léreaux, Guillaume; Arbey, Eric; Daronnat, Edwige; Wilkinson, Simon; Duché, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Skin metabolism is becoming a major consideration in the development of new cosmetic ingredients, skin being the first organ exposed to them. In order to replace limited samples of Excised human skin (EHS), in vitro engineered human skins have been developed. 3D models are daily used to develop and evaluate new cosmetic ingredients and have to be characterized and compared with EHS in terms of metabolic capabilities. This work presents the determination of apparent catalytic parameters (apparent Vmax, Km and the ratio Vmax/Km) in 3D models compared with EHS for cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase isoforms involved in drug metabolism, esterases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldehyde dehydrogenases, peroxidases, glutathione S-transferases, N-acetyl transferases, uridinyl diphosphate glucuronyl transferases and sulfotransferases. Results show that all these enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics are expressed and functional in the EHS and 3D models. Also, the Vmax/Km ratios (estimating the intrinsic metabolic clearances) show that the metabolic abilities are the most often comparable between the skin models and EHS. These results indicate that the 3D models can substitute themselves for EHS to select cosmetic ingredients on the basis of their metabolism, efficacy or/and safety. PMID:25808006

  3. Does the sailfish skin reduce the skin friction like the shark skin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagong, Woong; Choi, Sangho; Kim, Chulkyu; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Choi, Haecheon

    2007-11-01

    The shape of shark skin - riblet - reduces the skin friction up to 8% in a turbulent boundary layer, as compared to a smooth surface. The sailfish is the fastest sea animal, reaching its maximum speed of 110km/h. On the sailfish skin, we observe a number of V-shaped protrusions pointing downstream. So, we investigate the possibility of skin-friction reduction using this shape. We perform an extensive parametric study by varying the width and height of V-shaped protrusion, the spanwise and streamwise spacings between adjacent ones, and the overall distribution pattern (parallel, staggered and random), respectively. For all the cases considered, drag is either increased or unchanged. Each surface protrusion generates a pair of streamwise vortices, producing low and high shear stresses at the center and side of the protrusion, respectively, but total skin friction is nearly same as or higher than that of a smooth surface. Since this shape is very similar to but opposite in direction to that used in Sirovich & Karlsson (Nature 1997), we perform another experiment on the V-shaped protrusions pointing upstream following their study. Unlike their result, we do not obtain any drag reduction even with random distribution of these V-shaped protrusions.

  4. Low skin temperatures produced by new skin refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Strick, R A; Moy, R L

    1985-12-01

    Temperatures produced by Cryosthesia -30 degrees C, Cryosthesia -60 degrees C, and Frigiderm were measured in minipigs. Cryosthesia -60 degrees C and Cryosthesia -30 degrees C were both found to rapidly lower skin temperatures to levels that have been shown to cause cell injury, necrosis, and loss of melanocytes. Use of these agents requires extreme caution in dermabrasion. PMID:3905895

  5. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  6. [Experimental models of human skin aging].

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, G; Zoschke, C; Makrantonaki, E; Hausmann, C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    The skin is a representative model for the study of human aging. Despite the high regenerative capacity of the skin, skin physiology changes over the course of life. Medical and cosmetic research is trying to prevent aging, to slow, to stop, or to reverse it. Effects of age-related DNA damage and of changing skin structure on pharmacological parameters are largely unknown. This review article summarizes the state of scientific knowledge in the field of experimental models of human skin aging and shows approaches to improve organotypic skin models, to develop predictive models of aging, and improve aging research. PMID:26743051

  7. Histopathology of laser skin resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Baldwin, Bonnie; Chi, Eric; Ellard, Jeff; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed carbon-dioxide laser skin resurfacing is a purportedly 'non-thermal' procedure enjoying wide application as a cosmetic treatment for skin wrinkles. Treatment success has been based on clinical assessments of skin smoothness. Skin lesions (1 cm2) created by one, two or three superimposed carbon-dioxide laser passes were placed on the backs of 28 'fuzzy' Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. The variable laser irradiation parameters included measured energies ranging from 112 to 387/pulse with pulse widths of 65 and 125 microseconds and a repetition rate of 8 Hz. The square, flat laser beam measured 3 mm2 at the focal point. The lesions were collected from 0 to 10 days after treatment for qualitative and quantitative histopathology. Thermal damage and treatment effect tended to increase in severity and, to a lesser extent, depth with increased delivery parameters. In acute lesions, the vacuolated and fragmented, desiccated and thermally coagulated epidermis was partially removed exposing the underlying thermally coagulated dermal collagen and cells. Epidermal and dermal necrosis and slough occurred between 24 to 72 hours after treatment. Epithelial regeneration originated from the adnexa and the lesion edges. Dermal fibrous scar formation began at 5 days below the regenerated epidermis and became more prominent at 7 and 10 days.

  8. Climate change and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Leun, Jan C; de Gruijl, Frank R

    2002-05-01

    Depletion of the ozone layer and climate change by the increasing greenhouse effect are distinctly different processes. It is becoming quite clear, however, that the two global environmental problems are interlinked in several ways [D. L. Albritton, P. J Aucamp, G. Mégie, R. T. Watson, Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, 1998, World Meteorological Organization, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project, Report No. 44 (WMO, Geneva, 1998)]. In the present analysis we deal with the possibility of such an interlinkage within one effect on human health, namely, skin cancer. The increase in the incidence of skin cancer is one of the most extensively studied effects of increasing ultraviolet radiation by ozone depletion (F. R. de Gruijl, Skin cancer and solar radiation, Eur. J Cancer, 1999, 35, 2003-2009). We wondered if this impact could also be influenced by increasing environmental temperatures. Here we show that it is likely that such an influence will occur. For the same reason, it is likely that the baseline incidence of skin cancer will be augmented by rising temperatures, which may become significant in magnitude. PMID:12653470

  9. Moon Technology for Skin Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Estee Lauder uses digital image analyzer and software based on NASA lunar research in evaluation of cosmetic products for skincare. Digital image processing brings out subtleties otherwise undetectable, and allows better determination of product's effectiveness. Technique allows Estee Lauder to quantify changes in skin surface form and structure caused by application of cosmetic preparations.

  10. Nothing but skin and bone

    PubMed Central

    Ross, F. Patrick; Christiano, Angela M.

    2006-01-01

    Skin and bone — what comes to mind at hearing this phrase? While certainly a metaphor for disease, it also defines two very different tissues, one a flexible and contiguous outer covering, the other a morphologically diverse hard tissue distributed at over 200 sites in the body. As the accompanying series of Reviews highlights, these tissues are indeed diverse, but there are also surprising similarities. Skin is the interface between the internal organs and the environment, and as such plays a crucial role in the body’s defense mechanism. The skin and its many appendages are responsible for functions as diverse as epidermal barrier and defense, immune surveillance, UV protection, thermoregulation, sweating, lubrication, pigmentation, the sensations of pain and touch, and, importantly, the protection of various stem cell niches in the skin. Bone serves a number of purposes: it provides protection for vital organs, a lever for locomotion, a reservoir for calcium, and the site of adult hematopoiesis. The tissue is composed of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and their individual precursors plus a complex mixture of mesenchymal, myeloid, and lymphoid cells in the marrow space. Finally, the endothelial microenvironment provides nutrition and is a conduit for the influx and emigration of cells that impact bone biology in several important ways. This Review series guides the reader through these various facets of 2 diverse, yet interdependent, tissues. PMID:16670754

  11. Skin Failure: An Emerging Concept.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Skin failure is an emerging concept that clarifies trends in clinical practice. Its recognition provides common nomenclature, opens research directions, and questions assumptions regarding pressure ulcers as a quality measure. Adoption of the term is a step toward uniform terminology in compliance with a value based payment system. PMID:27161850

  12. Quantitative assessment of skin aging.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, J L

    2001-11-01

    Noninvasive methods have allowed physicians to give an objective description of aged skin in terms of functional and esthetic properties. The relative influence of environment (mainly sun) on the true aging process can be assessed through the obtained data. It is also possible to measure the efficacy of topical preparations (cosmetics or drugs) designed for treating the various cutaneous aging marks. PMID:11535423

  13. Vitamin D and the skin.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mona; Kerr, Philip E; Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane E

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that humans obtain through the diet and by synthesis in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B. Vitamin D is then converted by the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D, its major circulating form. This form is the best indicator of vitamin D nutritional status and is easily measured. Under the influence of parathyroid hormone, the kidney then converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically active, hormonal form of the nutrient that is important in the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus and is critical in building and maintaining healthy bones. Many cell types outside of the skeletal system, including various cells in the skin, also express the vitamin D receptor. In addition, many cell types convert circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D for local use. This metabolite has been shown to exert potent effects on cellular differentiation, cellular proliferation, and immune regulation. It is theorized that by these mechanisms vitamin D and its analogues are effective treatment options for psoriasis and other skin diseases. Insufficient vitamin D nutritional status has been associated with a host of other diseases, most notably cancer. There is evidence that supplementation with vitamin D reduces the overall incidence of cancer, although current evidence is insufficient to prove a causative effect. Sunscreen use blocks the ability of the skin to photosynthesize vitamin D, although the effect this has on the vitamin D status of the general population is unclear. PMID:21034990

  14. Breast skin and nipple changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... WITH LARGE PORES This is called peau d'orange because the skin looks like an orange peel. An infection in the breast or inflammatory ... provider will talk to you about your medical history and recent changes you have noticed in your ...

  15. Breastfeeding - skin and nipple changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... with large pores . This is called peau d'orange because the skin looks like an orange peel. This can be caused by an infection ... provider will talk to you about your medical history and the recent changes you have noticed in ...

  16. Chronic Inflammation in Skin Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked to the development and progression of multiple cancers, including those of the lung, stomach, liver, colon, breast and skin. Inflammation not only drives the oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells under the stress of chronic infection and autoimmune diseases, but also promotes the growth, progression and metastatic spread of cancers. Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are comprised of a diverse population of myeloid and immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B cells, and others. Different myeloid and lymphoid cells within tumor microenvironment exert diverse, often contradicting, effects during skin cancer development and progression. The nature of tumor-immune interaction determines the rate of cancer progression and the outcome of cancer treatment. Inflammatory environment within skin tumor also inhibits naturally occurring anti-tumor immunity and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. In this article we aim to give an overview on the mechanism by which inflammation interferes with the development and therapeutic intervention of cancers, especially those of the skin.

  17. Langerhans Cells in Porcine Skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are resident dendritic cells (DCs) of the skin possessing intracellular Birbeck granules (BGs). Langerin, a surface protein unique to LCs, can be internalized resulting in BG formation. The standard for characterizing DCs as Langerhans cells is expression of the protein, lange...

  18. TRP channels in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöllősi, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as ‘polymodal cellular sensors’ on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24372189

  19. The Microbiota of the Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Egert, Markus; Simmering, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to sum up important progress in the field of human skin microbiota research that was achieved over the last years.The human skin is one of the largest and most versatile organs of the human body. Owing to its function as a protective interface between the largely sterile interior of the human body and the highly microbially contaminated outer environment, it is densely colonized with a diverse and active microbiota. This skin microbiota is of high importance for human health and well-being. It is implicated in several severe skin diseases and plays a major role in wound infections. Many less severe, but negatively perceived cosmetic skin phenomena are linked with skin microbes, too. In addition, skin microorganisms, in particular on the human hands, are crucial for the field of hygiene research. Notably, apart from being only a potential source of disease and contamination, the skin microbiota also contributes to the protective functions of the human skin in many ways. Finally, the analysis of structure and function of the human skin microbiota is interesting from a basic, evolutionary perspective on human microbe interactions.Key questions in the field of skin microbiota research deal with (a) a deeper understanding of the structure (species inventory) and function (physiology) of the healthy human skin microbiota in space and time, (b) the distinction of resident and transient skin microbiota members, PMID:27161351

  20. Enhanced chlorhexidine skin penetration with eucalyptus oil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) is a widely used skin antiseptic, however it poorly penetrates the skin, limiting its efficacy against microorganisms residing beneath the surface layers of skin. The aim of the current study was to improve the delivery of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) when used as a skin antiseptic. Method Chlorhexidine was applied to the surface of donor skin and its penetration and retention under different conditions was evaluated. Skin penetration studies were performed on full-thickness donor human skin using a Franz diffusion cell system. Skin was exposed to 2% (w/v) CHG in various concentrations of eucalyptus oil (EO) and 70% (v/v) isopropyl alcohol (IPA). The concentration of CHG (μg/mg of skin) was determined to a skin depth of 1500 μm by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results The 2% (w/v) CHG penetration into the lower layers of skin was significantly enhanced in the presence of EO. Ten percent (v/v) EO in combination with 2% (w/v) CHG in 70% (v/v) IPA significantly increased the amount of CHG which penetrated into the skin within 2 min. Conclusion The delivery of CHG into the epidermis and dermis can be enhanced by combination with EO, which in turn may improve biocide contact with additional microorganisms present in the skin, thereby enhancing antisepsis. PMID:20860796

  1. Mechanisms of imiquimod skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Telò, Isabella; Pescina, Silvia; Padula, Cristina; Santi, Patrizia; Nicoli, Sara

    2016-09-10

    Imiquimod (IMQ) ia an immunostimulating drug used for the treatment of neoplastic skin diseases, such as actinic keratosis (AK) and superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), and as adjuvant for vaccination. Imiquimod formulation and skin delivery is highly challenging because of its very low solubility in most pharmaceutical excipients and poor penetration properties. Objectives of the work were: (1) to evaluate IMQ solubility in different solvents and pharmaceutical excipients; (2) to evaluate IMQ skin retention after the application of simple saturated solutions; (3) to evaluate the role of stratum corneum and solvent uptake on IMQ skin retention and (4) to formulate IMQ in microemulsions - prepared using previously investigated components - and compare them with the commercial formulation. The results show that IMQ solubility is not related to the solubility parameter of the solvents considered. The highest solubility was found with oleic acid (74mg/ml); in the case of PEGs, the solubility increased linearly with MW (PEG 200: 1.9mg/ml; PEG 400 7.3mg/ml, PEG 600 12.8mg/ml). Imiquimod skin retention from saturated solutions (Tween 80, oleic acid, propylene glycol, PEG 200, PEG 400, PEG 600, Transcutol, 2-pyrrolidone, DMSO) resulted relatively similar, being 1.6μg/cm(2) in case of oleic acid (solubility 74mg/ml) and 0.18μg/cm(2) in case of propylene glycol (solubility 0.60mg/ml). Permeation experiments on stripped skin (no stratum corneum) and isolated dermis as well as uptake experiments on isolated stratum corneum sheets demonstrated that IMQ accumulation is related to skin solvent uptake. Finally, microemulsions (MEs) prepared with the above-studied components demonstrated a very good performance. In particular, a ME composed of 10% oleic acid, 35% Transcutol, 35% Tween 80 and 20% water is able to accumulate the same amount of drug as the commercial formulation but with far more efficiency, since its concentration was 12 times lower. PMID:27452419

  2. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  3. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be very detrimental. Within the skin's epidermal (outer) layer ...

  4. Fighting Back, Bedbugs Grow a Thicker Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grow a Thicker Skin It helps protect against pesticides and may explain why population is growing worldwide, ... developing thicker "skins" that help them resist common pesticides, a new study suggests. This might explain why ...

  5. Sunscreens, Skin Cancer, and Your Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Terence M.; Wolfe, Dana P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of sunlight on skin are described. The principal types of sunscreens and their properties are discussed. The three types of skin tumors, their cure rates, and treatment methods are examined. (Author/MT)

  6. What Causes Our Skin to Age?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a dermatologist What causes our skin to age? Many things cause our skin to age. Some ... Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2016 American Academy ...

  7. Skin Bioprinting: Impending Reality or Fantasy?

    PubMed

    Ng, Wei Long; Wang, Shuai; Yeong, Wai Yee; Naing, May Win

    2016-09-01

    Bioprinting provides a fully automated and advanced platform that facilitates the simultaneous and highly specific deposition of multiple types of skin cells and biomaterials, a process that is lacking in conventional skin tissue-engineering approaches. Here, we provide a realistic, current overview of skin bioprinting, distinguishing facts from myths. We present an in-depth analysis of both current skin bioprinting works and the cellular and matrix components of native human skin. We also highlight current limitations and achievements, followed by design considerations and a future outlook for skin bioprinting. The potential of bioprinting with converging opportunities in biology, material, and computational design will eventually facilitate the fabrication of improved tissue-engineered (TE) skin constructs, making bioprinting skin an impending reality. PMID:27167724

  8. Sun’s effect on skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The skin uses sunlight to help manufacture vitamin D, which is important for normal bone formation. But sometimes its ultraviolet light can be ... to age prematurely. Suntanning occurs because exposure to sunlight causes the skin to produce more melanin and ...

  9. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal After mastectomy or amputation Donor sites for grafts and flaps are chosen ... surgery than the wound due to newly exposed nerve endings.

  10. For Better Skin Cancer Checks, Partner Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159632.html For Better Skin Cancer Checks, Partner Up Melanoma survivors benefited when ... out: Getting a partner trained to spot potential skin cancers can be a lifesaver for melanoma survivors, ...

  11. 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158935.html 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer Researchers hope ... Scientists say they've identified a so-called "sunscreen" gene that may help protect against skin cancer. ...

  12. X-ray microanalysis of psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Grundin, T.G.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.; Lindberg, M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Electron probe x-ray microanalysis was used to study elemental distribution in uninvolved and involved skin from patients with psoriasis, and in skin from healthy controls. Significant differences were found between the involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin. In the involved skin, the concentrations of Mg, P, and K were higher in the stratum germinativum, spinosum, and granulosum, compared to the corresponding strata in uninvolved skin. Neither involved nor uninvolved psoriatic stratum germinativum differed markedly from nonpsoriatic control stratum germinativum. In uninvolved psoriatic skin only a lower level of K was noted. In comparison to uninvolved psoriatic skin, the elemental composition of the various strata of involved psoriatic skin shows a pattern typical for highly proliferative, nonneoplastic cells.

  13. Achieving skin to skin contact in theatre for healthy newborns.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The evidence base is supportive of early skin to skin contact (SSC) for optimal newborn-physiological adaptation, bonding and breastfeeding, and national guidelines encourage SSC as soon as possible, regardless of mode of birth. With an ever-rising caesarean (CS) rate, implementing SSC in theatre stands to benefit an increasing number of mothers and babies. While it may be best practice, in reality there is a lot of variation from trust to trust, and many hospitals do not facilitate it, citing numerous reasons as to why it is not possible. Midwives may feel that they should focus on norma birth, but it is our role to provide holistic care and normalise birth in all settings. This article looks at current evidence and the role of the midwife around facilitating SSC in theatre with an example from practice of how change has been implemented so that mothers and babies get the best start in life. PMID:26320329

  14. Disposable baby wipes: efficacy and skin mildness.

    PubMed

    Odio, M; Streicher-Scott, J; Hansen, R C

    2001-04-01

    The results of a series of four clinical studies demonstrated that disposable baby wipes were milder to the skin than use of a cotton washcloth and water, recognized as a "gold standard" for skin mildness. Importantly, the baby wipes caused no significant change from the baseline value in any of the skin parameters examined. This observation verified that the test wipes are minimally disruptive to the epidermal barrier and thus suitable for use on intact or compromised, irritated skin. PMID:11917305

  15. Color structured light imaging of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin; Reichenberg, Jason; Sacks, Michael; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-05-01

    We illustrate wide-field imaging of skin using a structured light (SL) approach that highlights the contrast from superficial tissue scattering. Setting the spatial frequency of the SL in a regime that limits the penetration depth effectively gates the image for photons that originate from the skin surface. Further, rendering the SL images in a color format provides an intuitive format for viewing skin pathologies. We demonstrate this approach in skin pathologies using a custom-built handheld SL imaging system.

  16. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2=0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. PMID:25560673

  17. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Alves, Vinicius M; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R(2)=0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q(2)ext=0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. PMID:25560673

  18. Skin contact electrodes for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Eggins, B R

    1993-04-01

    Skin contact electrodes require electrolyte gels between the skin and the electrode in order to ensure good electrical contact. The effect of different types of electrolyte gel on skin impedance was studied. The main types of gels used were wet gels, karaya-gum based hydrogels and synthetic copolymer-based hydrogels [2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) copolymers]. The effect of variation in gel composition on the impedance of the skin was investigated. PMID:8388179

  19. Automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Matorin, Oleg V.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the clinical symptoms and the malignization signs of pigmented skin neoplasms. We have estimated the complex of clinical parameters which could be measured for the purpose of skin screening diagnostic via digital image processing. Allowable errors of clinical parameter characterization have been calculated, and the origin of these errors has been discussed. Proposed technique for automated screening of pigmentary skin neoplasms should become an effective tool for early skin diagnostics.

  20. Electrochemical Skin Conductance Correlates with Skin Nerve Fiber Density

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) using reverse iontophoresis and chronoamperometry has been used to evaluate abnormal function of small fibers. How ESC correlates with loss of small fibers in skin is unclear. Methods: This was a prospective, blinded study. The primary outcome measure was the correlation between ESC at the feet and results of skin biopsies including epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) and sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) at the distal leg. ESC, ENFD, and SGNFD data were normalized by adjusting for weight. The secondary outcome measures were the correlation between ESC and the following variables: quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) and symptom scales (neuropathy, pain and autonomic). Results: Eighty-one patients (mean ± sd): age = 53.3 ± 17.3, men/women = 25/56 were enrolled in the study. ESC was reduced in subjects with abnormally low ENFD (ENFD normal/abnormal, ESC = 1.17 ± 0.27/0.87 ± 0.34 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0008) and abnormally low SGNFD (SGNFD normal/abnormal ESC = 1.09 ± 0.34/0.78 ± 0.3 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0003). ESC correlated with ENFD (ρ = 0.73, p = 0.0001) and SGNFD (ρ = 0.64, p = 0.0001). ESC did not correlate with symptom scales. Conclusion: ESC is diminished in subjects who have a reduced number of small fibers in the skin and the ESC reduction is proportional to ENFD and SGNFD. ESC can be useful in detecting loss of small nerve fibers. PMID:27605912

  1. Protecting Our Children from Skin Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Skin cancer in the United States is epidemic. About 90% of skin cancers are caused by sun exposure. The age of patients developing melanoma is dropping dramatically. Parents must protect their children from the sun during all outdoor activities year round. The article presents recommendations for preventing skin cancer. (SM)

  2. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1549 - Skinning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Skinning. 51.1549 Section 51.1549 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Skinning § 51.1549 Skinning. (a) The following definitions provide a basis for describing lots of potatoes as to the degree of...

  4. Review - Skin cancer: Etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, occurrence of skin cancer is very common in humans. It is reported that the most common cause of the skin cancer is excessive exposure to sunlight as it contains harmful radiations; the ultra violet rays. Different management strategies are used for different types of skin cancers, which are chemotherapy, radiation therapy. PMID:27166545

  5. Evaluation of Oil from Roasted Peanut Skins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skins from peanuts are a low-value material from peanut processing and literature suggests it is an excellent source of phenolic compounds. Peanut skins do not have any significant uses other than as a small component of animal feed. Studies indicate that the compounds in the skin have high anti...

  6. Teaching Nursing Students about Skin Cancer Using a Skin Analyzer Machine.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Victoria; Stone, Alicia; George, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are in an excellent position to perform skin assessments and teach the public about skin cancer prevention. Knowledgeable nurses can help reduce the incidence of skin cancer. Determining the best method to teach nursing students about skin cancer is thus important. PMID:27323471

  7. Tissue engineering of cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E; Kopp, Jürgen; Kneser, Ulrich; Beier, Justus; Bach, Alexander D

    2005-01-01

    Skin replacement has been a challenging task for surgeons ever since the introduction of skin grafts by Reverdin in 1871. Recently, skin grafting has evolved from the initial autograft and allograft preparations to biosynthetic and tissue-engineered living skin replacements. This has been fostered by the dramatically improved survival rates of major burns where the availability of autologous normal skin for grafting has become one of the limiting factors. The ideal properties of a temporary and a permanent skin substitute have been well defined. Tissue-engineered skin replacements: cultured autologous keratinocyte grafts, cultured allogeneic keratinocyte grafts, autologous/allogeneic composites, acellular biological matrices, and cellular matrices including such biological substances as fibrin sealant and various types of collagen, hyaluronic acid etc. have opened new horizons to deal with such massive skin loss. In extensive burns it has been shown that skin substitution with cultured grafts can be a life-saving measure where few alternatives exist. Future research will aim to create skin substitutes with cultured epidermis that under appropriate circumstances may provide a wound cover that could be just as durable and esthetically acceptable as conventional split-thickness skin grafts. Genetic manipulation may in addition enhance the performance of such cultured skin substitutes. If cell science, molecular biology, genetic engineering, material science and clinical expertise join their efforts to develop optimized cell culture techniques and synthetic or biological matrices then further technical advances might well lead to the production of almost skin like new tissue-engineered human skin products resembling natural human skin. PMID:16202208

  8. Hedgehog signaling in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengxin; Chi, Sumin; Xie, Jingwu

    2011-01-01

    An increasing progress on the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling for carcinogenesis has been achieved since the link of Hh pathway to human cancer was firstly established. In particular, the critical role of Hh signaling in the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been convincingly demonstrated by genetic mutation analyses, mouse models of BCCs, and successful clinical trials of BCCs using Hh signaling inhibitors. In addition, the Hh pathway activity is also reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), melanoma and Merkel Cell Carcinoma. These findings have significant new paradigm on Hh signaling transduction, its mechanisms in skin cancer and even therapeutic approaches for BCC. In this review, we will summarize the major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling transduction, the roles of Hh signaling in skin cancer development, and the current implications of “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21397013

  9. Skin Immunity to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic commensal fungus that colonizes healthy human skin, mucosa, and the reproductive tract. C. albicans is also a predominantly opportunistic fungal pathogen, leading to disease manifestations such as disseminated candidiasis and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The differing host susceptibilities for the sites of C. albicans infection have revealed tissue compartmentalization with tailoring of immune responses based on the site of infection. Furthermore, extensive studies of host genetics in rare cases of CMC have identified conserved genetic pathways involved in immune recognition and the response to the extracellular pathogen. We focus here on human and mouse skin as a site of C. albicans infection, and we review established and newly discovered insights into the cellular pathways that promote cutaneous antifungal immunity. PMID:27178391

  10. High temperature skin friction measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  11. [Genodermatoses with malignant skin tumors].

    PubMed

    Hübinger, L; Frank, J

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous malignancies can manifest as isolated and sporadic tumors as well as multiple and disseminated tumors. In the latter case they often point to a genetic disease, which either can be restricted to the skin exclusively or also involve extracutaneous organs in the context of a hereditary tumor syndrome. Such hereditary tumor syndromes are clinically and genetically very heterogeneous. Therefore, the prevailing specific skin tumors play an important diagnostic role in the case of complex symptom constellations. Elucidation of the genetic basis of rare monogenetically inherited disorders and syndromes can contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of frequently occurring cutaneous malignancies because the mutated genes often encode proteins, which have a key position in metabolic signaling pathways that are of high significance for the development of targeted therapies. Here we provide an overview of genodermatoses, which are associated with basal cell carcinomas, sebaceous carcinomas, keratoacanthomas, squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas. PMID:24898507

  12. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  13. Essentials of skin laceration repair.

    PubMed

    Forsch, Randall T

    2008-10-15

    Skin laceration repair is an important skill in family medicine. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Physicians should be familiar with various suturing techniques, including simple, running, and half-buried mattress (corner) sutures. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be more cost-effective. The tissue adhesive hair apposition technique also is effective in repairing scalp lacerations. The sting of local anesthesia injections can be lessened by using smaller gauge needles, administering the injection slowly, and warming or buffering the solution. Studies have shown that tap water is safe to use for irrigation, that white petrolatum ointment is as effective as antibiotic ointment in postprocedure care, and that wetting the wound as early as 12 hours after repair does not increase the risk of infection. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. PMID:18953970

  14. Febrile Illness with Skin Rashes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Skin rashes that appear during febrile illnesses are in fact caused by various infectious diseases. Since infectious exanthematous diseases range from mild infections that disappear naturally to severe infectious diseases, focus on and basic knowledge of these diseases is very important. But, these include non-infectious diseases, so that comprehensive knowledge of these other diseases is required. Usually, early diagnostic testing for a febrile illness with a rash is inefficient. For clinical diagnosis of diseases accompanied by skin rash and fever, a complete history must be taken, including recent travel, contact with animals, medications, and exposure to forests and other natural environments. In addition, time of onset of symptoms and the characteristics of the rash itself (morphology, location, distribution) could be helpful in the clinical diagnosis. It is also critical to understand the patient's history of specific underlying diseases. However, diagnostic basic tests could be helpful in diagnosis if they are repeated and the clinical course is monitored. Generally, skin rashes are nonspecific and self-limited. Therefore, it could be clinically meaningful as a characteristic diagnostic finding in a very small subset of specific diseases. PMID:26483989

  15. Common Skin Rashes in Children.

    PubMed

    Allmon, Amanda; Deane, Kristen; Martin, Kari L

    2015-08-01

    Because childhood rashes may be difficult to differentiate by appearance alone, it is important to consider the entire clinical presentation to help make the appropriate diagnosis. Considerations include the appearance and location of the rash; the clinical course; and associated symptoms, such as pruritus or fever. A fever is likely to occur with roseola, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), and scarlet fever. Pruritus sometimes occurs with atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, erythema infectiosum, molluscum contagiosum, and tinea infection. The key feature of roseola is a rash presenting after resolution of a high fever, whereas the distinguishing features in pityriasis rosea are a herald patch and a bilateral and symmetric rash in a Christmas tree pattern. The rash associated with scarlet fever usually develops on the upper trunk, then spreads throughout the body, sparing the palms and soles. Impetigo is a superficial bacterial infection that most commonly affects the face and extremities of children. Erythema infectiosum is characterized by a viral prodrome followed by the "slapped cheek" facial rash. Flesh-colored or pearly white papules with central umbilication occur with molluscum contagiosum, a highly contagious viral infection that usually resolves without intervention. Tinea is a common fungal skin infection in children that affects the scalp, body, groin, feet, hands, or nails. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition that may present with a variety of skin changes. PMID:26280141

  16. [Positive skin test and age

    PubMed

    Forte, W C; Júnior, F F; Filho, W D; Shibata, E; Henriques, L S; Mastroti, R A; Guedes, M da S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate positive responses to skin tests for immediate hypersensitivity to allergens in children with asthma and rhinitis at different ages. METHOD: We observed positive skin test reactivity in prick tests using fifteen allergens of same origin (total dust and Dermatophagoides sp.; Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Dermatophagoides farinae; Blomia tropicalis; Penicillium sp; Alternaria alternata; Cladosporium herbarium; Aspergillus fumigatus; Bermuda grass; forage grass; dog and cat epithelia; feathers; Blatella germanica and wool). We placed 713 selected patients into different age groups - Group I: 6 to 11 months; Group II: 1 to 3 years and 11 months; Group III: 4 to 8 years and 11 months; and Group IV: 9 to 15 years. We used the chi-square test for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The total significant differences between these groups were: I to II = 5; II to III = 5; II to IV = 5; III to IV = 6; I to III = 10; and I to IV = 10. CONCLUSION: Skin test reactivity is acquired progressively with age, and can be observed as early as at 12 months. Reactivity is significantly more positive from the age of 4 on. PMID:14647601

  17. Near real-time skin deformation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenjar, Steve; Chen, Suzie; Jafri, Madiha; Wall, Brian; Pedersen, Richard; Bezozo, Richard

    2013-02-01

    A novel in vivo approach is described that provides large area mapping of the mechanical properties of the skin in human patients. Such information is important in the understanding of skin health, cosmetic surgery[1], aging, and impacts of sun exposure. Currently, several methods have been developed to estimate the local biomechanical properties of the skin, including the use of a physical biopsy of local areas of the skin (in vitro methods) [2, 3, and 4], and also the use of non-invasive methods (in vivo) [5, 6, and 7]. All such methods examine localized areas of the skin. Our approach examines the local elastic properties via the generation of field displacement maps of the skin created using time-sequence imaging [9] with 2D digital imaging correlation (DIC) [10]. In this approach, large areas of the skin are reviewed rapidly, and skin displacement maps are generated showing the contour maps of skin deformation. These maps are then used to precisely register skin images for purposes of diagnostic comparison. This paper reports on our mapping and registration approach, and demonstrates its ability to accurately measure the skin deformation through a described nulling interpolation process. The result of local translational DIC alignment is compared using this interpolation process. The effectiveness of the approach is reported in terms of residual RMS, image entropy measures, and differential segmented regional errors.

  18. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  19. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers. PMID:23722495

  20. Skin lightening preparations and the hydroquinone controversy.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2007-01-01

    Skin lightening preparations are widely used in dermatology by persons of all Fitzpatrick skin types. Fitzpatrick skin types I-III require local pigment lightening for the treatment of hormonally induced melasma and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation caused by acne and trauma. Fitzpatrick skin types IV and darker have an even greater need for skin lightening for social reasons, as well as pigmentary changes that occur around the eyes, in the intertriginous areas, following dermatitis, or with acne and trauma. The gold standard dermatologic agent for skin lightening was hydroquinone, until regulatory agencies in Japan, Europe, and most recently in the United States questioned the safety of this substance. This has encouraged research into alternative agents to inhibit skin pigmentation such as retinoids, mequinol, azelaic acid, arbutin, kojic acid, aleosin, licorice extract, ascorbic acid, soy proteins, and N-acetyl glucosamine. The efficacy and safety of each of these ingredients is examined as possible topical alternatives to hydroquinone. PMID:18045355

  1. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  2. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  3. Skin and wound infections: an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, M L

    1998-05-15

    Skin infections are common and may be caused by bacteria, fungi or viruses. Breaks in the skin integrity, particularly those that inoculate pathogens into the dermis, frequently cause or exacerbate skin infections. Bacterial skin infections caused by corynebacteria include erythrasma, trichomycosis axillaris and pitted keratolysis. Staphylococci may cause impetigo, ecthyma and folliculitis. Streptococcal skin infections include impetigo and erysipelas. Human papillomavirus skin infections present as several different types of warts, depending on the surface infected and its relative moisture, and the patterns of pressure. The many dermatomycoses (skin infections caused by fungi or yeasts) include tinea capitis, tinea barbae, tinea cruris, tinea manus, tinea pedis and tinea unguium (onychomycosis). Candidal infections occur in moist areas, such as the vulva, mouth, penis, skinfolds and diaper area. Wounds caused by wood splinters or thorns may result in sporotrichosis. Animal bites may result in complex, serious infections, requiring tetanus and, possibly, rabies prophylaxis in addition to appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:9614412

  4. Does the sailfish skin reduce the skin friction like the shark skin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagong, Woong; Kim, Chulkyu; Choi, Sangho; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Choi, Haecheon

    2008-10-01

    The sailfish is the fastest sea animal, reaching its maximum speed of 110 km/h. On its skin, a number of V-shaped protrusions pointing downstream exist. Thus, in the present study, the possibility of reducing the skin friction using its shape is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer. We perform a parametric study by varying the height and width of the protrusion, the spanwise and streamwise spacings between adjacent ones, and their overall distribution pattern, respectively. Each protrusion induces a pair of streamwise vortices, producing low and high shear stresses at its center and side locations, respectively. These vortices also interact with those induced from adjacent protrusions. As a result, the drag is either increased or unchanged for most of the cases considered. Some of these cases show that the skin friction itself is reduced but the total drag including the form drag on the protrusion is larger than that of a smooth surface. In a few cases, the drag is decreased only slightly (˜1%) but this amount is within the experimental uncertainty. Since the shape of present protrusions is similar to that used by Sirovich and Karlsson [Nature (London) 388, 753 (1997)] where V-shaped protrusions pointing upstream were considered, we perform another set of experiments following their study. However, we do not obtain any drag reduction even with random distribution of those V-shaped protrusions.

  5. [Study on objectively evaluating skin aging according to areas of skin texture].

    PubMed

    Shan, Gaixin; Gan, Ping; He, Ling; Sun, Lu; Li, Qiannan; Jiang, Zheng; He, Xiangqian

    2015-02-01

    Skin aging principles play important roles in skin disease diagnosis, the evaluation of skin cosmetic effect, forensic identification and age identification in sports competition, etc. This paper proposes a new method to evaluate the skin aging objectively and quantitatively by skin texture area. Firstly, the enlarged skin image was acquired. Then, the skin texture image was segmented by using the iterative threshold method, and the skin ridge image was extracted according to the watershed algorithm. Finally, the skin ridge areas of the skin texture were extracted. The experiment data showed that the average areas of skin ridges, of both men and women, had a good correlation with age (the correlation coefficient r of male was 0.938, and the correlation coefficient r of female was 0.922), and skin texture area and age regression curve showed that the skin texture area increased with age. Therefore, it is effective to evaluate skin aging objectively by the new method presented in this paper. PMID:25997282

  6. Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Skin Health.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Hye; Lee, Chang Y; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-10-25

    Human skin is the first defense barrier against the external environment, especially microbial pathogens and physical stimulation. Many studies on skin health with Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been published for many years, including prevention of skin disease and improvement of skin conditions. LAB, a major group of gram-positive bacteria, are known to be beneficial to human health by acting as probiotics. Recent studies have shown that LAB and their extracts have beneficial effects on maintenance and improvement of skin health. Oral administration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii inhibits the development of atopic disease. In addition, LAB and LAB extracts are known to have beneficial effects on intestinal diseases, with Lactobacillus plantarum having been shown to attenuate IL-10 deficient colitis. In addition to intestinal health, L. plantarum also has beneficial effects on skin. pLTA, which is lipoteichoic acid isolated from L. plantarum, has anti-photoaging effects on human skin cells by regulating the expression matrix meralloprotionase-1 (MMP-1) expression. While several studies have proposed a relationship between diseases of the skin and small intestines, there are currently no published reviews of the effects of LAB for skin health through regulation of intestinal conditions and the immune system. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the effects of LAB on skin health and its potential applications in beauty foods. PMID:26287529

  7. Adaptive immunity to murine skin commensals

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Hixon, Julie A.; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Belkaid, Yasmine; Dzutzev, Amiran; Durum, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive immune system provides critical defense against pathogenic bacteria. Commensal bacteria have begun to receive much attention in recent years, especially in the gut where there is growing evidence of complex interactions with the adaptive immune system. In the present study, we observed that commensal skin bacteria are recognized by major populations of T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes of mice. Recombination activating gene 1 (Rag1)−/− mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, contained living skin-derived bacteria and bacterial sequences, especially mycobacteria, in their skin-draining lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes of normal mice were shown, in vitro, to specifically recognize bacteria of several species that were grown from Rag1−/− lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes, transferred into Rag1−/− mice proliferated in skin-draining lymph nodes, expressed a restricted T-cell receptor spectrotype and produced cytokines. Transfer of T cells into Rag1−/− mice had the effect of reducing bacterial sequences in skin-draining lymph nodes and in skin itself. Antibacterial effects of transferred T cells were dependent on IFNγ and IL-17A. These studies suggest a previously unrecognized role for T cells in controlling skin commensal bacteria and provide a mechanism to account for cutaneous infections and mycobacterial infections in T-cell–deficient patients. PMID:25002505

  8. Glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Oh, Jang-Hee; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs) are abundant structural components of the extracellular matrix in addition to collagen fibers. Hyaluronic acid (HA), one of GAGs, forms proteoglycan aggregates, which are large complexes of HA and HA-binding PGs. Their crosslinking to other matrix proteins such as the collagen network results in the formation of supermolecular structures and functions to increase tissue stiffness. Skin aging can be classified as intrinsic aging and photoaging based on the phenotypes and putative mechanism. While intrinsic aging is characterized by a thinned epidermis and fine wrinkles caused by advancing age, photoaging is characterized by deep wrinkles, skin laxity, telangiectasias, and appearance of lentigines and is mainly caused by chronic sun exposure. The major molecular mechanism governing skin aging processes has been attributed to the loss of mature collagen and increased matrix metalloproteinase expression. However, various strategies focusing on collagen turnover remain unsatisfactory for the reversal or prevention of skin aging. Although the expression of GAGs and PGs in the skin and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood, we and others have elucidated various changes in GAGs and PGs in aged skin, suggesting that these molecules are important contributors to skin aging. In this review, we focus on skin-abundant GAGs and PGs and their changes in human skin during the skin aging process. PMID:27378089

  9. Bacterial diseases of the skin.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    When considering common bacterial diseases of the skin, rather distinct clinical responses to a variety of bacterial infections have been identified. In these cases, it is the specific site of infection and the attendant inflammatory responses that provide the characteristic clinical picture. When the pyoderma extends just below the stratum corneum, it is called impetigo. Nonbullous impetigo is the most common pediatric skin infection. It usually starts in a traumatized area. The typical lesion begins as an erythematous papule, after which it becomes a unilocular vesicle. When the subcorneal vesicle becomes pustular, it ruptures and eventually becomes a yellow, golden crust that is a hallmark of the disease process. Bullous impetigo is a less common form of impetigo, accounting for fewer than 30% of all impetigo cases. It occurs in infants and is characterized by rapid progression of vesicles to the formation of bullae measuring larger than 5 mm in diameter in previously untraumatized skin. Treatment of nonbullous impetigo must include intervention against the pathogen as well as improvements in the hygiene and living conditions of the patient. A fundamental tenet is to debride the crust (scab) from the wound surface using poloxamer 188. If the lesions are not widespread, topical mupirocin is the treatment of choice. Treatment of bullous impetigo is similar, except that the local cleansing and topical antibiotic must be complemented by systemic antibiotics if there is evidence of disseminating infections. Ecthyma is usually a consequence of failure to treat effectively impetigo. The untreated infection extends deep into the tissue in shallow ulcerations that often heal without scar. Treatment for ecthyma usually requires systemic antibiotics against either staphylococcus or streptococcus. Folliculitis is a pyoderma located within a hair follicle, secondary to follicular occlusion by keratin, overhydration, or either bacterial or fungal infection. Folliculitis may

  10. Skin conditions: emerging drug-resistant skin infections and infestations.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Ramiro; Nguyen, Tam

    2013-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections are increasingly common. Automated microbiology systems are now available to detect MRSA and to determine antibiotic resistance patterns. Abscesses should be drained and antibiotics administered, with systemic antibiotics used to manage more severe infections. Until sensitivities are known and depending on local resistance rates, clindamycin is an option for empiric management of stable patients without bacteremia. For patients who are more ill, linezolid and vancomycin are alternatives, the latter being first-line treatment for children hospitalized with MRSA skin infections. Drug resistance also occurs in head lice management. Although topical permethrin is still the first-line drug management, its effectiveness has decreased due to permethrin-resistant strains. Patients who do not benefit from 2 applications of permethrin can be treated with topical malathion or topical ivermectin. Though not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating head lice, oral ivermectin is sometimes used for difficult-to-treat cases. Permethrin is also the first-line management for scabies, though there is a concern that permethrin-resistant scabies may soon occur. For patients with scabies who do not benefit from topical treatment, oral ivermectin is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, although it is not approved by the FDA for this purpose. PMID:23600335

  11. Moxifloxacin in the treatment of skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Guay, David RP

    2006-01-01

    Moxifloxacin is a recent addition to the fluoroquinolone class, differing from ciprofloxacin and other older agents in having much better in vitro activity against Gram-positive aerobes while retaining potent activity against Gram-negative aerobes. It is also active against the pathogens of human and animal bite wounds and those species of atypical mycobacteria associated with dermatologic infections. Its activity against anaerobes is quite variable. Moxifloxacin penetrates well into inflammatory blister fluid and muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissues. Moxifloxacin should thus be a reasonable option for the treatment of skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs). In 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), oral moxifloxacin was as effective as cephalexin in the treatment of uncomplicated SSSIs in adults while in 2 RCTs, intravenous/oral moxifloxacin was as effective as intravenous/oral β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor therapy in the treatment of complicated SSSIs in adults. Moxifloxacin does not inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes and thus interact with warfarin or methylxanthines. However, multivalent cations can reduce its oral bioavailability substantially. Dosage adjustment is not required in the presence of renal or hepatic impairment. The clinical relevance of its electrophysiologic effects (QTc prolongation) remains unresolved. PMID:18360653

  12. Oritavancin for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Julia A.; Fowler, Vance G.; Corey, G. Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) exerts a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. Oritavancin is a concentration-dependent, rapidly bactericidal agent approved for the treatment of ABSSSI. Its prolonged half-life with one-time intravenous (IV) dosing offers a potential solution to this burden. In addition, oritavancin represents an alternative therapy for Streptococci and multidrug resistant gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Animal models have also shown promising results with oritavancin for other disease states including those that require long courses of IV therapy. Areas covered This review covers oritavancin’s basic chemistry, spectrum of activity, pharmacodynamics/ pharmacokinetics, efficacy in clinical trials, and provides expert opinion on future directions. To compose this review, a search of PubMed was performed, and articles written in the English language were selected based on full text availability. Expert Opinion If oritavancin is proven to be a cost-effective strategy for outpatient treatment and prevents complications of prolonged IV therapy, it will be sought as an alternative antibiotic therapy for ABSSSI. In addition, further clinical data demonstrating efficacy in gram-positive infections requiring prolonged therapy such as endocarditis and osteomyelitis could support oritavancin’s success in the current market. PMID:25803197

  13. The optics of human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    An integrated review of the transfer of optical radiation into human skin is presented, aimed at developing useful models for photomedicine. The component chromophores of epidermis and stratum corneum in general determine the attenuation of radiation in these layers, moreso than does optical scattering. Epidermal thickness and melanization are important factors for UV wavelengths less than 300 nm, whereas the attenuation of UVA (320-400 nm) and visible radiation is primarily via melanin. The selective penetration of all optical wavelengths into psoriatic skin can be maximized by application of clear lipophilic liquids, which decrease regular reflectance by a refractive-index matching mechanism. Sensitivity to wavelengths less than 320 nm can be enhanced by prolonged aqueous bathing, which extracts urocanic acid and other diffusible epidermal chromophores. Optical properties of the dermis are modelled using the Kubelka-Munk approach, and calculations of scattering and absorption coefficients are presented. This simple approach allows estimates of the penetration of radiation in vivo using noninvasive measurements of cutaneous spectral remittance (diffuse reflectance). Although the blood chromophores Hb, HbO/sup 2/, and bilirubin determine dermal absorption of wavelengths longer than 320 nm, scattering by collagen fibers largely determines the depths to which these wavelengths penetrate the dermis, and profoundly modifies skin colors. An optical ''window'' exists between 600 and 1300 nm, which offers the possibility of treating large tissue volumes with certain long-wavelength photosensitizers. Moreover, whenever photosensitized action spectra extend across the near UV and/or visible spectrum, judicious choice of wavelengths allows some selection of the tissue layers directly affected.

  14. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  15. Evaluation of mild skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Wortzman, M S

    1991-01-01

    Each person makes the decision of how best to care for his or her own skin. Among the prime concerns, especially for facial skin, is the type of dirt, debris, or make-up to be removed. In most cases, all products do an adequate job in the removal of dirt; if not, the washing techniques can be modified to accomplish the task at hand. What cannot be controlled are the adverse side effects inherent in the use of that product. These adverse properties include damages to the barrier function of the skin; increased susceptibility to environmental sources of irritation and sensitization; frank irritation responses, such as erythema and edema; and reduction of the cosmetic qualities of the skin, such as degree of moisture and smoothness. Part of the problem is that most of these changes are subtle, occurring slowly over time. Often, the association of these problems with the use of a particular facial cleansing regimen is overlooked. The typical woman uses as many as 10 to 15 facial cosmetic and cleansing products each day, making the identification of a problem even more difficult. It is important to identify the risks associated with individual products and with product categories in general. Although the identification of a safe group of products to use for facial cleansing is desirable, the results of this investigation indicate that there are no simple answers. It has been assumed that because moisturizing cream formulations are routinely safe and mild in general use, a cleansing product in the same general form would share these attributes. We can see from the results in Table 2 and Figures 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 that cleansing creams are not uniformly superior to cleansing bars in the key attributes that are used to evaluate mildness. In each evaluation there were individual cleansing creams that demonstrated statistically weaker performance than did cleansing bars in general. As a group, cleansing creams did well in the cosmetic categories of dryness and texture but

  16. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-10-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body; a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid; water, with the surface of the body; and the hull of the marine vehicle.

  17. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body, e.g., a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid, e.g., water, with the surface of the body, e.g., the hull of the marine vehicle.

  18. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-09-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  19. BLACK LESIONS OF THE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Becker, S. William

    1958-01-01

    Benign melanocytic lesions include lentigo, ephelid (freckle), pigmented nevus, sacral spot, blue nevus, and combined nevus and blue nevus. Malignant melanocytic lesions are melanomas, which arise from melanocytes at the epidermodermal junction, or, rarely, from blue nevi. They usually originate in brown plaques known as lentigo maligna, in pigmented nevi, or in normal skin. Melanoma is diagnosed clinically in less than 50 per cent of instances. Biopsy is therefore of great importance, since practically all melanoma can be cured by adequate early resection. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:13511215

  20. HSP27 as a biomarker for predicting skin irritation in human skin and reconstructed organotypic skin model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxia; Li, Shuhua; Meng, Tian; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Taoli; Xiang, Qi; Su, Zhijian; Zhang, Qihao; Huang, Yadong

    2014-04-21

    In vitro alternative tests aiming at replacing the traditional animal test for predicting the irritant potential of chemicals have been developed, but the assessing parameters or endpoints are still not sufficient. To discover novel endpoints for skin irritation responses, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human skin exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) following the test protocol of the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) in the present study. HSP27 was up-regulated most significantly among the eight identified proteins, consistent with our previous reports. Acid and basic chemicals were applied on human skin for further validation and results showed that the up-regulated expression of HSP27 was induced in 24h after the exposure. Skin-equivalent constructed with fibroblasts, basement membrane and keratinocytes was used to investigate the potential of HSP27 as a biomarker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation. Our skin-equivalent (Reconstructed Organotypic Skin Model, ROSM) had excellent epidermal differentiation and was suitable for the skin irritation test. HSP27 also displayed an up-regulated expression in the ROSM in 24h after the irritants exposure for 15min. All these results suggest that HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products. PMID:24503015