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Sample records for acrb crystallisation highlighted

  1. A novel packing arrangement of AcrB in the lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Ly, K; Bartho, J D; Eicher, T; Pos, K M; Mitra, A K

    2014-12-20

    The central component AcrB of the Escherichia coli drug efflux complex AcrA-AcrB-TolC has been extensively investigated by X-ray crystallography of detergent-protein 3-D crystals. In these crystals, AcrB packs as trimers - the functional unit. We visualized the AcrB-AcrB interaction in its native environment by examining E. coli lipid reconstituted 2-D crystals, which were overwhelmingly formed by asymmetric trimers stabilized by strongly-interacting monomers from adjacent trimers. Most interestingly, we observed lattices formed by an arrangement of AcrB monomers distinct from that in traditional trimers. This hitherto unobserved packing, might play a role in the biogenesis of trimeric AcrB.

  2. The degassing and crystallisation behaviour of basaltic lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Tuffen, H.; Pinkerton, H.; James, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Degassing is a fundamental volcanic process that can play a major role in controlling eruptive styles. Volatile loss during magma ascent and decompression increases the liquidus temperature of the residual melt, resulting in undercooling that can trigger crystallisation (1,2). Late-stage crystallisation and vesiculation are significant factors in controlling the eruptive behaviour of volcanoes of intermediate composition (2), but their effects on basaltic volcanic activity have yet to be fully investigated. We present the results of experiments designed to measure the degassing and crystallisation behaviour of volcanic rocks at temperatures up to 1250°C, using thermo-gravimetric analysis coupled with differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS). During TGA-DSC-MS analysis, volatiles released from a sample under a controlled heating programme are identified in a mass spectrometer whilst changes to the sample weight and heat flow are simultaneously recorded. By subjecting samples of basaltic lava and bombs to two heating cycles, we have shown that the onset of degassing (mass loss) is systematically followed by crystallisation (exothermic events) on the first heating cycle. During the second cycle, when the sample has been fully degassed, no mass loss or crystallisation are recorded. Our results also highlight complexities in the processes; in some cases up to four pulses of degassing and crystallisation have been identified during a single heating cycle. Our results allow us to measure the total volatile content of samples, the onset temperatures of degassing and crystallisation and the time lag between the two processes, and the enthalpy, hence percentage, of crystallisation taking place. These results have important implications for our understanding of basaltic volcanic eruptions. During effusive basaltic eruptions, lava can travel many kilometres, threatening property and infrastructure. The final areal flow extent is partly dependent on

  3. Crystallising Experiences among Young Elite Dancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Angela; Bailey, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Crystallising experiences are defined as memorable reactions an individual has to some quality or feature of an activity or domain that yields a long-term change in the individual performance and their view of themselves (Walters & Gardner, 1986; Freeman, 1999). This paper explores the nature and consequences of crystallising experiences from…

  4. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    PubMed

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  5. Degassing-driven crystallisation in basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Tuffen, H.; James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2013-01-01

    Syn-eruptive crystallisation can drastically increase magma viscosity, with profound implications for conduit dynamics, lava emplacement and volcanic hazards. There is growing evidence that crystallisation is not only cooling-driven, but can also occur almost isothermally during decompression-induced degassing on ascent from depth. Here we review field and experimental evidence for degassing-driven crystallisation in a range of magma compositions. We then present new results showing, for the first time, experimental evidence for this process in basaltic magma. Our experiments use simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) to monitor degassing patterns and thermal events during heating and cooling of porphyritic basaltic samples from Mt. Etna, Italy. The partly degassed samples, which contained 0.39-0.81 wt.% total volatiles in the glass fraction, were subjected to two cycles of heating from ambient to 1250 °C. On the first heating, TGA data show that 30-60% of the total volatiles degassed slowly at < 1050 °C, and that the degassing rate increased rapidly above this temperature. DSC data indicate that this rapid increase in the degassing rate was closely followed (≤ 3.4 min) by a strongly exothermic event, which is interpreted as crystallisation. Enthalpies measured for this event suggest that up to 35% of the sample crystallises, a value supported by petrographic observations of samples quenched after the event. As neither degassing nor crystallisation was observed at high temperature during the second heating cycle we infer that the events on first heating constitute degassing-driven crystallisation. The rapidity and magnitude of the crystallisation response to degassing indicates that this process may strongly affect the rheology of basaltic magma in shallow conduits and lava flows, and thus influence the hazards posed by basaltic volcanism.

  6. Molecular Mechanism of MBX2319 Inhibition of Escherichia coli AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump and Comparison with Other Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) superfamily, such as AcrB, make a major contribution to multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The development of inhibitors of the RND pumps would improve the efficacy of current and next-generation antibiotics. To date, however, only one inhibitor has been cocrystallized with AcrB. Thus, in silico structure-based analysis is essential for elucidating the interaction between other inhibitors and the efflux pumps. In this work, we used computer docking and molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between AcrB and the compound MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine efflux pump inhibitor with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of Enterobacteriaceae species, as well as other known inhibitors (D13-9001, 1-[1-naphthylmethyl]-piperazine, and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide) and the binding of doxorubicin to the efflux-defective F610A variant of AcrB. We also analyzed the binding of a substrate, minocycline, for comparison. Our results show that MBX2319 binds very tightly to the lower part of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB, strongly interacting with the phenylalanines lining the hydrophobic trap, where the hydrophobic portion of D13-9001 was found to bind by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, MBX2319 binds to AcrB in a manner that is similar to the way in which doxorubicin binds to the F610A variant of AcrB. In contrast, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide appear to bind to somewhat different areas of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB than does MBX2319. However, all inhibitors (except D13-9001) appear to distort the structure of the distal pocket, impairing the proper binding of substrates. PMID:25114133

  7. Multidrug binding properties of the AcrB efflux pump characterized by molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, to which multidrug efflux pumps such as the AcrB transporter makes a major contribution, is becoming a major public health problem. Unfortunately only a few compounds have been cocrystallized with AcrB, and thus computational approaches are essential in elucidating the interaction between diverse ligands and the pump protein. We used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the binding of nine substrates, two inhibitors, and two nonsubstrates to the distal binding pocket of AcrB, identified earlier by X-ray crystallography. This approach gave us more realistic views of the binding than the previously used docking approach, as the explicit water molecules contributed to the process and the flexible binding site was often seen to undergo large structural changes. We analyzed the interaction in detail in terms of the binding energy, hydrophobic surface-matching, and the residues involved in the process. We found that all substrates tested bound to the pocket, whereas the binding to this site was not preferred for the nonsubstrates. Interestingly, both inhibitors [Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide and 1-(1-naphtylmethyl)-piperazine] tended to move out of the pocket at least partially, getting into contact with a glycine-rich loop that separates the distal pocket from the more proximal region of the protein and is thought to control the access of substrates to the distal pocket. PMID:23175790

  8. Transport of lipophilic carboxylates is mediated by transmembrane helix 2 in multidrug transporter AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Christine; Tam, Heng-Keat; Pos, Klaas M.

    2016-01-01

    The deployment of multidrug efflux pumps is a powerful defence mechanism for Gram-negative bacterial cells when exposed to antimicrobial agents. The major multidrug efflux transport system in Escherichia coli, AcrAB–TolC, is a tripartite system using the proton-motive force as an energy source. The polyspecific substrate-binding module AcrB uses various pathways to sequester drugs from the periplasm and outer leaflet of the inner membrane. Here we report the asymmetric AcrB structure in complex with fusidic acid at a resolution of 2.5 Å and mutational analysis of the putative fusidic acid binding site at the transmembrane domain. A groove shaped by the interface between transmembrane helix 1 (TM1) and TM2 specifically binds fusidic acid and other lipophilic carboxylated drugs. We propose that these bound drugs are actively displaced by an upward movement of TM2 towards the AcrB periplasmic porter domain in response to protonation events in the transmembrane domain. PMID:27982032

  9. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-02-26

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call "transporter exchange." This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria.

  10. Statistical thermodynamics for functionally rotating mechanism of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Hirokazu; Oshima, Hiraku; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-02-26

    AcrB, a homotrimer, is the pivotal part of a multidrug efflux pump. A "functionally rotating" picture has been proposed for the drug transport by AcrB, but its mechanism remains unresolved. Here, we investigate the energetics of the whole functional rotation cycle using our theoretical methods. We find that the packing efficiency of AcrB is ununiform, and this ununiformity plays imperative roles primarily through the solvent-entropy effect. When a proton binds to or dissociates from a protomer, the packing properties of this protomer and its two interfaces are perturbed overall in the direction that the solvent translational entropy is lowered. The packing properties of the other two protomers are then reorganized with the recovery or maintenance of closely packed interfaces, so that the solvent-entropy loss can be compensated. The functional structural change by an isolated protomer would cause a seriously large free-energy increase. By forming a trimer, any free-energy increase caused by a protomer is always canceled out by the free-energy decrease brought by the other two protomers via the mechanism mentioned above. The functional structural rotation is thus accomplished using the free-energy decrease arising from the transfer of only a single proton per cycle. The similarities to F1-ATPase are also discussed.

  11. A study of the crystallisation of amorphous salbutamol sulphate using water vapour sorption and near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Columbano, Angela; Buckton, Graham; Wikeley, Philip

    2002-04-26

    The crystallisation of amorphous salbutamol sulphate prepared by spray drying was monitored using a humidity controlled microbalance (Dynamic Vapour Sorption apparatus, Surface Measurement Systems) combined with a near-infrared probe. Amorphous salbutamol sulphate was prepared by spray drying from a solution in water. The particles were then analysed using scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, isothermal microcalorimetry and water vapour sorption analysis combined with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). Isothermal microcalorimetry and water vapour sorption combined with NIR spectroscopy were able to detect the transition from the amorphous to crystalline state. However while the isothermal microcalorimeter showed only a classic crystallisation exotherm when the material was exposed at 75% RH, the DVS-NIR results at the same humidity highlighted a more complex process. When exposed at 75% RH, the uptake of water was followed by crystallisation that was detected using NIR. The expulsion of water after crystallisation was very slow and at a constant rate whether the material was exposed to 75 or 0% RH. The NIR and DVS studies indicated that the material had crystallised very soon after exposure to high RH. The water that was expelled during crystallisation was not displaced from the particles and remained associated with the particles for many days. This study showed that the use of gravimetric analysis together with NIR spectroscopy provided valuable information on the dynamics of the crystallisation of salbutamol sulphate. The retention of water within recently crystallised salbutamol is potentially important to the behaviour of dosage forms containing the amorphous (or partially amorphous) form of this drug.

  12. The influence of cooling, crystallisation and re-melting on the interpretation of geodetic signals in volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Luca; Biggs, Juliet; Annen, Catherine; Ebmeier, Susanna

    2014-02-01

    Deformation of volcanic edifices is typically attributed to the movement of magma within the volcanic plumbing system, but a wide range of magmatic processes are capable of producing significant volume variations and may also produce deformation. In order to understand the evolution of magmatic systems prior to eruption and correctly interpret monitoring signals, it is necessary to quantify the patterns and timescales of surface deformation that processes such as crystallisation, degassing and expansion of the hydrothermal system can produce. We show how the combination of petrology and thermal modelling can be applied to geodetic observations to identify the processes occurring in a magmatic reservoir during volcanic unrest. Thermal modelling and petrology were used to determine the timescales and volumetric variations associated with cooling, crystallisation and gas exsolution. These calculations can be performed rapidly and highlight the most likely processes responsible for the variation of a set of monitoring parameters. We then consider the magnitude and timescales of deformation produced by other processes occurring within the vicinity of an active magma system. We apply these models to a time series of geodetic data spanning the period between the 1997 and 2008 eruptions of Okmok volcano, Aleutians, examining scenarios involving crystallisation, degassing and remelting of the crystallising shallow magmatic body and including a viscoelastic shell or hydrothermal system. The geodetic observations are consistent with the injection of a water-saturated basalt, followed by minor crystallisation and degassing. Other scenarios are not compatible either with the magnitude or rate of the deformation signals.

  13. Reversal of the Drug Binding Pocket Defects of the AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump Protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soparkar, Ketaki; Kinana, Alfred D.; Weeks, Jon W.; Morrison, Keith D.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The AcrB protein of Escherichia coli, together with TolC and AcrA, forms a contiguous envelope conduit for the capture and extrusion of diverse antibiotics and cellular metabolites. In this study, we sought to expand our knowledge of AcrB by conducting genetic and functional analyses. We began with an AcrB mutant bearing an F610A substitution in the drug binding pocket and obtained second-site substitutions that overcame the antibiotic hypersusceptibility phenotype conferred by the F610A mutation. Five of the seven unique single amino acid substitutions—Y49S, V127A, V127G, D153E, and G288C—mapped in the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB, with the D153E and G288C mutations mapping near and at the distal drug binding pocket, respectively. The other two substitutions—F453C and L486W—were mapped to transmembrane (TM) helices 5 and 6, respectively. The nitrocefin efflux kinetics data suggested that all periplasmic suppressors significantly restored nitrocefin binding affinity impaired by the F610A mutation. Surprisingly, despite increasing MICs of tested antibiotics and the efflux of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine, the TM suppressors did not improve the nitrocefin efflux kinetics. These data suggest that the periplasmic substitutions act by influencing drug binding affinities for the distal binding pocket, whereas the TM substitutions may indirectly affect the conformational dynamics of the drug binding domain. IMPORTANCE The AcrB protein and its homologues confer multidrug resistance in many important human bacterial pathogens. A greater understanding of how these efflux pump proteins function will lead to the development of effective inhibitors against them. The research presented in this paper investigates drug binding pocket mutants of AcrB through the isolation and characterization of intragenic suppressor mutations that overcome the drug susceptibility phenotype of mutations affecting the drug binding pocket. The data reveal a remarkable structure

  14. Crystallisation and crystal forms of carbohydrate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Lorna

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and solid state analysis of carbohydrate derivatives, including many novel compounds. Although the synthetic chemistry surrounding carbohydrates is well established in the literature, the crystal chemistry of carbohydrates is less well studied. Therefore this research aims to improve understanding of the solid state properties of carbohydrate derivatives through gaining more information on their supramolecular bonding. Chapter One focuses on an introduction to the solid state of organic compounds, with a background to crystallisation, including issues that can arise during crystal growth. Chapter Two is based on glucopyranuronate derivatives which are understudied in terms of their solid state forms. This chapter reports on the formation of novel glucuronamides and utilising the functionality of the amide bond for crystallisation. TEMPO oxidation was completed to form glucopyranuronates by oxidation of the primary alcohol groups of glucosides to the carboxylic acid derivatives, to increase functionality for enhanced crystal growth. Chapter Three reports on the synthesis of glucopyranoside derivatives by O-glycosylation reactions and displays crystal structures, including a number of previously unsolved acetate protected and deprotected crystal structures. More complex glycoside derivatives were also researched in an aim to study the resultant supramolecular motifs. Chapter Four contains the synthesis of aryl cellobioside derivatives including the novel crystal structures that were solved for the acetate protected and deprotected compounds. Research was carried out to determine if 1-deoxycellodextrins could act as putative isostructures for cellulose. Our research displays the presence of isostructural references with 1-deoxycellotriose shown to be similar to cellulose III11, 1-deoxycellotetraose correlates with cellulose IV11 and 1-deoxycellopentose shows isostructurality similar to that of cellulose II. Chapter Five contains

  15. Drug uptake pathways of multidrug transporter AcrB studied by molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Murakami, Satoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-22

    Multidrug resistance has been a critical issue in current chemotherapy. In Escherichia coli , a major efflux pump responsible for the multidrug resistance contains a transporter AcrB. Crystallographic studies and mutational assays of AcrB provided much of structural and overall functional insights, which led to the functionally rotating mechanism. However, the drug uptake pathways are somewhat controversial because at least two possible pathways, the vestibule and the cleft paths, were suggested. Here, combining molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we addressed the uptake mechanism finding that the drug uptake pathways can be significantly different depending on the properties of drugs. First, in the computational free energy analysis of drug movements along AcrB tunnels, we found a ligand-dependent drug uptake mechanism. With the same molecular sizes, drugs that are both strongly hydrophobic and lipophilic were preferentially taken in via the vestibule path, while other drugs favored the cleft path. Second, direct simulations realized totally about 3500 events of drug uptake by AcrB for a broad range of drug property. These simulations confirmed the ligand-dependent drug uptake and further suggested that a smaller drug favors the vestibule path, while a larger one is taken in via the cleft path. Moreover, the direct simulations identified an alternative uptake path which is not visible in the crystal structure. Third, site-directed mutagenesis of AcrB in E. coli verified that mutations of residues located along the newly identified path significantly reduced the efflux efficiency, supporting its relevance in in vivo function.

  16. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A.; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The benefits of D{sub 2}O in screening for crystallisation was explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structures of the SefD pilin in both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O reveal differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallisation improvements are explained by altered interactions in D{sub 2}O crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D{sub 2}O is useful additive in sparse-matrix screening for crystallisation. -- Abstract: The use of heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D{sub 2}O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD.

  17. Crystallisation of minerals from concentrated saline dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Kezia, K; Lee, J; Zisu, B; Weeks, M; Chen, G; Gras, S; Kentish, S

    2016-09-15

    An understanding of crystallisation within saline effluents is important for the design of both brine crystallisers and brine disposal ponds. In this work, crystallisation of a saline effluent concentrate from the Australian dairy industry has been examined at 22 wt% and 30 wt% total solids and at temperatures between 10 and 70 °C. The precipitation occurs more rapidly at higher temperatures. This trend is dictated by precipitation of calcium phosphate salts, albeit the major constituents of the mixture are NaCl and lactose. The crystallisation induction time can be shortened by introducing cavitation induced by ultrasound. In particular, the use of two short acoustic pulses between 3.7 J/g and 16 J/g at 20 kHz spaced ten minutes apart has maximum impact upon both induction time and crystal size. It is believed that the first ultrasound pulse either generates new nuclei or enhances the mass transfer of solute toward the surface of sub-micron growing crystals. Conversely, the second pulse disrupts the growing crystals and forms secondary nuclei. The ultrasound cannot shift the solution equilibrium and so is not able to improve the low crystal yield. To increase this total yield, further evaporation is necessary. The work provides direction to personnel in the dairy industry of the feasibility of brine crystallisation with respect to energy demand and solid recovery.

  18. Evaluation of a series of 2-napthamide derivatives as inhibitors of the drug efflux pump AcrB for the reversal of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinhu; Mowla, Rumana; Guo, Liwei; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Rahman, Taufiq; De Barros Lopes, Miguel A; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-15

    Drug efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance to dangerous pathogens which makes these pumps important drug targets. We have synthesised a novel series of compounds based on a 2-naphthamide pharmacore aimed at inhibiting the efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria. The archeatypical transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli was used as model efflux pump as AcrB is widely conserved throughout Gram-negative organisms. The compounds were tested for their antibacterial action, ability to potentiate the action of antibiotics and for their ability to inhibit Nile Red efflux by AcrB. None of the compounds were antimicrobial against E. coli wild type cells. Most of the compounds were able to inhibit Nile Red efflux indicating that they are substrates of the AcrB efflux pump. Three compounds were able to synergise with antibiotics and reverse resistance in the resistant phenotype. Compound A3, 4-(isopentyloxy)-2-naphthamide, reduced the MICs of erythromycin and chloramphenicol to the MIC levels of the drug sensitive strain that lacks an efflux pump. A3 had no effect on the MIC of the non-substrate rifampicin indicating that this compound acts specifically through the AcrB efflux pump. A3 also does not act through non-specific mechanisms such as outer membrane or inner membrane permeabilisation and is not cytotoxic against mammalian cell lines. Therefore, we have designed and synthesised a novel chemical compound with great potential to further optimisation as inhibitor of drug efflux pumps.

  19. Crystallisation and fractionation of selected polyhydroxyalkanoates produced from mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Laycock, Bronwyn; Arcos-Hernandez, Monica V; Langford, Alexandra; Pratt, Steven; Werker, Alan; Halley, Peter J; Lant, Paul A

    2014-06-25

    Poly[R-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-(R-3-hydroxyvalerate)] (PHBV) copolymers were produced from mixed cultures of biomass (activated sludge) fed with acetic acid (HAc) and propionic acid (HPr). Feeding was performed in such a way as to produce materials with a wide range of monomer compositions and microstructures. Solvent-cast thin films of these materials have recently been shown to exhibit a narrow range of mechanical properties similar to those of the homopolymer poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) [1]. In this work, more detailed analyses of the thermal and crystallisation properties of these mixed-culture polyesters have revealed that they like comprise complex blends with broad compositional distribution of random and/or blocky copolymers of very different 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) contents and melting temperatures and thus have very different respective crystallisation kinetics. This blend complexity was confirmed by solvent fractionation of selected samples. The findings support the hypothesis that overall mechanical properties of these complex copolymer blend materials will be strongly influenced by the more rapidly crystallising components that form the matrix within which the slower crystallising components exist as microdomains. New opportunities in the material development of PHAs are likely to be found in establishing and exploiting such structure-function relationships.

  20. A model for simultaneous crystallisation and biodegradation of biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Jingzhe

    2009-01-01

    This paper completes the model of biodegradation for biodegradable polymers that was previously developed by Wang et al. (Wang Y, Pan J, Han X, Sinka, Ding L. A phenomenological model for the degradation of biodegradable polymers. Biomaterials 2008;29:3393-401). Crystallisation during biodegradation was not considered in the previous work which is the topic of the current paper. For many commonly used biodegradable polymers, there is a strong interplay between crystallisation and hydrolysis reaction during biodegradation - the chain cleavage caused by the hydrolysis reaction provides an extra mobility for the polymer chains to crystallise and the resulting crystalline phase becomes more resistant to further hydrolysis reaction. This paper presents a complete theory to describe this interplay. The fundamental equations in the Avrami's theory for crystallisation are modified and coupled to the diffusion-reaction equations that were developed in our previous work. The mathematical equations are then applied to three biodegradable polymers for which long term degradation data are available in the literature. It is shown that the model can capture the behavior of the major biodegradable polymers very well.

  1. Kinetics of the reversible reaction of struvite crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Crutchik, D; Garrido, J M

    2016-07-01

    The crystallisation of struvite could be a sustainable and economical alternative for recovering phosphorus from wastewater streams with high phosphate concentrations. Knowledge regarding the kinetics and thermodynamics that are involved in the crystallisation of struvite is the key to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining an efficient process. This study was conducted in a continuous stirred batch reactor. Different sets of experiments were performed in which struvite was either dissolved (undersaturated) or precipitated (oversaturated). These experiments were conducted at different temperatures (25, 30 and 35 °C) and pH values (8.2, 8.5 and 8.8) to determine the kinetics of struvite precipitation and dissolution. Struvite crystallisation was modelled as a reversible reaction. The kinetic rate parameters of struvite precipitation were 1.03·10(-4), 1.25·10(-4) and 1.54·10(-4) mol m(-2) min(-1) at 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Similar kinetic rate parameters were determined for struvite dissolution. Struvite heterogeneous crystallisation can be represented by a first-order kinetic model that fitted well the experimental data.

  2. Improving olefin tolerance and production in E. coli using native and evolved AcrB.

    PubMed

    Mingardon, Florence; Clement, Camille; Hirano, Kathleen; Nhan, Melissa; Luning, Eric G; Chanal, Angelique; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2015-05-01

    Microorganisms can be engineered for the production of chemicals utilized in the polymer industry. However many such target compounds inhibit microbial growth and might correspondingly limit production levels. Here, we focus on compounds that are precursors to bioplastics, specifically styrene and representative alpha-olefins; 1-hexene, 1-octene, and 1-nonene. We evaluated the role of the Escherichia coli efflux pump, AcrAB-TolC, in enhancing tolerance towards these olefin compounds. AcrAB-TolC is involved in the tolerance towards all four compounds in E. coli. Both styrene and 1-hexene are highly toxic to E. coli. Styrene is a model plastics precursor with an established route for production in E. coli (McKenna and Nielsen, 2011). Though our data indicates that AcrAB-TolC is important for its optimal production, we observed a strong negative selection against the production of styrene in E. coli. Thus we used 1-hexene as a model compound to implement a directed evolution strategy to further improve the tolerance phenotype towards this alpha-olefin. We focused on optimization of AcrB, the inner membrane domain known to be responsible for substrate binding, and found several mutations (A279T, Q584R, F617L, L822P, F927S, and F1033Y) that resulted in improved tolerance. Several of these mutations could also be combined in a synergistic manner. Our study shows efflux pumps to be an important mechanism in host engineering for olefins, and one that can be further improved using strategies such as directed evolution, to increase tolerance and potentially production.

  3. Improving olefin tolerance and production in E. coli using native and evolved AcrB

    DOE PAGES

    Mingardon, Florence; Clement, Camille; Hirano, Kathleen; ...

    2015-01-20

    Microorganisms can be engineered for the production of chemicals utilized in the polymer industry. However many such target compounds inhibit microbial growth and might correspondingly limit production levels. Here, we focus on compounds that are precursors to bioplastics, specifically styrene and representative alpha-olefins; 1-hexene, 1-octene, and 1-nonene. We evaluated the role of the Escherichia coli efflux pump, AcrAB-TolC, in enhancing tolerance towards these olefin compounds. AcrAB-TolC is involved in the tolerance towards all four compounds in E. coli. Both styrene and 1-hexene are highly toxic to E. coli. Styrene is a model plastics precursor with an established route for productionmore » in E. coli (McKenna and Nielsen, 2011). Though our data indicates that AcrAB-TolC is important for its optimal production, we observed a strong negative selection against the production of styrene in E. coli. Thus we used 1-hexene as a model compound to implement a directed evolution strategy to further improve the tolerance phenotype towards this alpha-olefin. We focused on optimization of AcrB, the inner membrane domain known to be responsible for substrate binding, and found several mutations (A279T, Q584R, F617L, L822P, F927S, and F1033Y) that resulted in improved tolerance. Several of these mutations could also be combined in a synergistic manner. Our study shows efflux pumps to be an important mechanism in host engineering for olefins, and one that can be further improved using strategies such as directed evolution, to increase tolerance and potentially production.« less

  4. Research Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Melbourne.

    This report presents highlights of the research activities of the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). The ACER is a national independent research body that specializes in collecting and interpreting information to shape strategic decision making. In addition to being a national center for educational policy research and advice,…

  5. Shear-induced smectic ordering and crystallisation of isotactic polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangbin; de Jeu, Wim H

    2005-01-01

    Shear-induced smectic ordering and crystallisation of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) has been studied with in-situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Shear-induced smectic bundles with a periodicity of about 4 nm have been observed at temperatures below as well as above the melting point. This applies to iPP of different molecular weight and from different sources. An increase in the average molecular weight leads to a larger periodicity of the smectic layers. The smectic layers assemble in a fibrillar morphology with a length and a width up to 200 and 10 microm, respectively. After crystallisation, the smectic bundles show upon heating higher melting temperatures than their crystalline counterparts. In agreement with this behaviour, the correlation length along the smectic layer normal is of the order of tens of nanometers, much larger than the crystal thickness. We present an anisotropic drop model of smectic domains forming a conserved system in which the smectic layers can rotate. On the basis of this model we can explain the relative orientation of the smectic layers, the crystalline lamellae and the long axis of the drop, as well as the reversibility of the smectic periodicity during cooling and heating. In the supercooled melt, the smectic ordering is followed by crystallisation; during this process crystals grow epitaxially on the surface of the smectic bundles. This leads to a new picture of the shish-kebab structure in which smectic bundles rather than extended-chain crystals play the role of the shish. The crystallisation process of the smectic regions themselves indicates that the 'mesophase' previously reported in fast-quenched iPP, is a metastable state formed during the transition from the high-temperature smectic phase to a crystal. Moreover smectic domains rather than alpha crystallites form the nuclei for crystallisation of the beta phase. The high-temperature smectic phase presents an ideal model system to study the coupling between density

  6. Interactions in protein solutions near crystallisation: a colloid physics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    I present a review of current ideas from colloid physics which might be relevant in order to understand the onset of crystallisation and amorphous aggregation processes in protein solution. In particular, the inadequacy of DLVO theory to account for all phenomenological aspects of crystallisation, such as salt-specificity, and for the basic features of the phase diagram, such as the presence of a metastable fluid-fluid separation, is discussed. The fundamental role of additional short-range attractive forces, microscopically orginating from the salting-out effect, is conversely stressed. In order to establish a simple model of protein interparticle interactions near crystallisation, I discuss some recent results obtained by our group for the osmotic compressibility of the metastable fluid phase of hen egg-white lysozyme. Light scattering measurements were performed in an extended volume fraction range at pH=4.7 as a function of temperature, adding NaC1 to screen the electrostatic interactions. The experimental compressibility up to particle volume fractions Φ≈0.23 is very successfully compared to the theoretical expression for a model of adhesive ("sticky") hard spheres. This surprising quantitative agreement, obtained using a very simple form for the effective interparticle force, suggests that the thermodynamics of the system in the fluid phase is mainly determined by the very short-range nature of the interactions, and is rather insensitive to the detailed form of the potential.

  7. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  8. 3D structure of AcrB: the archetypal multidrug efflux transporter of Escherichia coli likely captures substrates from periplasm.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Christopher A; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances in structural biology have extended our understanding of the multiple drug efflux complex, AcrAB-TolC, of Escherichia coli. This tripartite complex and its homologs are the major mechanisms that give most Gram-negative bacteria their characteristic intrinsic resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs, dyes, and detergents. Most recently, the structure of the transporter AcrB was elucidated at high resolution [Nature 419(2002)587]. It is a particularly significant achievement since integral membrane proteins are notoriously elusive structures for crystallography. The striking features of this trimeric pump, such as the presence of potential substrate-binding sites in the periplasmic domain and the possibility of direct interaction with the end of TolC tunnel, refine our understanding of the mode of action of this tripartite efflux transport complex.

  9. A fluorescent microplate assay quantifies bacterial efflux and demonstrates two distinct compound binding sites in AcrB.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-04-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux.

  10. A Fluorescent Microplate Assay Quantifies Bacterial Efflux and Demonstrates Two Distinct Compound Binding Sites in AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R.; Erwin, Alice L.

    2015-01-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux. PMID:25645845

  11. Raghunathpura: An early crystallised IIAB iron with sulphide micro nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Ray, D.; Murty, S. V. S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a set of new data on microtextures, mineral composition, bulk composition and microhardness (Hv) of kamacite, phosphide and sulphide in Raghunathpura IIAB iron (structurally hexahedrite). Based on textural studies, we find Raghunathpura comprises of a single kamacite grain studded with exsolved inclusions of tiny schreibersites and trapped melt inclusions of troilite often superposed with numerous sets of Neumann lines. Compositional data further suggest that Raghunathpura is an early crystallised IIAB iron with low Ni, low P, low S and high Ir. Metallographic cooling rate of 7 °C/Ma has been estimated from phosphide composition-size relationship of this rare group of iron.

  12. Evidence of a Substrate-Discriminating Entrance Channel in the Lower Porter Domain of the Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Vavra, Martina; Kern, Winfried V.

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) transporter family, such as AcrB of Escherichia coli, play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance, but the molecular basis for their substrate promiscuity is not yet completely understood. From a collection of highly clarithromycin-resistant AcrB periplasmic domain mutants derived from in vitro random mutagenesis, we identified variants with an unusually altered drug resistance pattern characterized by increased susceptibility to many drugs of lower molecular weight, including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and oxazolidinones, but unchanged or increased resistance to drugs of higher molecular weight, including macrolides. Sequencing of 14 such “divergent resistance” phenotype mutants and 15 control mutants showed that this unusual phenotype was associated with mutations at residues I38 and I671 predominantly to phenylalanine and threonine, respectively, both conferring a similar susceptibility pattern. Reconstructed I38F and I671T single mutants as well as an engineered I38F I671T double mutant with proved efflux competence revealed an equivalent phenotype with enhanced or unchanged resistance to many large AcrB substrates but increased susceptibility to several lower-molecular-weight drugs known to bind within the distal binding pocket. The two isoleucines located in close vicinity to each other in the lower porter domain of AcrB beneath the bottom of the proximal binding pocket may be part of a preferential small-drug entrance pathway that is compromised by the mutations. This finding supports recent indications of distinct entrance channels used by compounds with different physicochemical properties, of which molecular size appears to play a prominent role. PMID:27161641

  13. AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC multidrug efflux systems are involved in enterobactin export in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli produces the iron-chelating compound enterobactin to enable growth under iron-limiting conditions. After biosynthesis, enterobactin is released from the cell. However, the enterobactin export system is not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that the outer membrane channel TolC is involved in enterobactin export. There are several multidrug efflux transporters belonging to resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family that require interaction with TolC to function. Therefore, several RND transporters may be responsible for enterobactin export. In this study, we investigated whether RND transporters are involved in enterobactin export using deletion mutants of multidrug transporters in E. coli. Single deletions of acrB, acrD, mdtABC, acrEF, or mdtEF did not affect the ability of E. coli to excrete enterobactin, whereas deletion of tolC did affect enterobactin export. We found that multiple deletion of acrB, acrD, and mdtABC resulted in a significant decrease in enterobactin export and that plasmids carrying the acrAB, acrD, or mdtABC genes restored the decrease in enterobactin export exhibited by the ΔacrB acrD mdtABC mutant. These results indicate that AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC are required for the secretion of enterobactin.

  14. Direct interaction of multidrug efflux transporter AcrB and outer membrane channel TolC detected via site-directed disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norihisa; Murakami, Satoshi; Oyama, Yoshiaki; Ishiguro, Masaji; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2005-08-23

    The AcrAB-TolC system exports a wide variety of drugs and toxic compounds, and confers intrinsic drug tolerance on Escherichia coli. The crystal structures suggested that AcrB and TolC directly dock with each other. However, biochemical and biophysical evidence of their interaction has been contradictory until recently. In this study, we examine the interaction sites by means of in vivo disulfide cross-linking between cysteine residues introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the tops of the vertical hairpins of AcrB and the bottoms of the coiled coils of polyhistidine-tagged TolC molecules, which are structurally predicted docking sites. The AcrB-TolC complex formed through disulfide cross-linking was detected when a specific pair of mutants was coexpressed in E. coli. Our observations suggested that the AcrB-TolC complex may be formed through a two-step mechanism via transient tip-to-tip interaction of AcrB and TolC. The cross-linking was not affected by AcrA, the substrate, or a putative proton coupling site mutation.

  15. There is a baby in the bath water: AcrB contamination is a major problem in membrane-protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Veesler, David; Blangy, Stéphanie; Cambillau, Christian; Sciara, Giuliano

    2008-10-01

    In the course of a crystallographic study of the Methanosarcina mazei CorA transporter, the membrane protein was obtained with at least 95% purity and was submitted to crystallization trials. Small crystals (<100 microm) were grown that diffracted to 3.42 A resolution and belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.74, c = 514.0 A. After molecular-replacement attempts using available CorA structures as search models failed to yield a solution, it was discovered that the crystals consisted of an Escherichia coli contaminating protein, acriflavine resistance protein B (AcrB), that was present at less than 5% in the protein preparations. AcrB contamination is a major problem when expressing membrane proteins in E. coli since it binds naturally to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) resins. Here, the structure is compared with previously deposited AcrB structures and strategies are proposed to avoid this contamination.

  16. The application of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis to study drug crystallisation in the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choon Fu; Craig, Duncan Q M; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2017-02-01

    Drug permeation through the intercellular lipids, which pack around and between corneocytes, may be enhanced by increasing the thermodynamic activity of the active in a formulation. However, this may also result in unwanted drug crystallisation on and in the skin. In this work, we explore the combination of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis to study drug crystallisation in the skin. Ex vivo permeation studies of saturated solutions of diclofenac sodium (DF Na) in two vehicles, propylene glycol (PG) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), were carried out in porcine ear skin. Tape stripping and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy were conducted simultaneously to collect spectral data as a function of skin depth. Multivariate data analysis was applied to visualise and categorise the spectral data in the region of interest (1700-1500cm(-1)) containing the carboxylate (COO(-)) asymmetric stretching vibrations of DF Na. Spectral data showed the redshifts of the COO(-) asymmetric stretching vibrations for DF Na in the solution compared with solid drug. Similar shifts were evident following application of saturated solutions of DF Na to porcine skin samples. Multivariate data analysis categorised the spectral data based on the spectral differences and drug crystallisation was found to be confined to the upper layers of the skin. This proof-of-concept study highlights the utility of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis as a simple and rapid approach in the investigation of drug deposition in the skin. The approach described here will be extended to the study of other actives for topical application to the skin.

  17. Coalescence-induced crystallisation wave in Pd nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Cassidy, Cathal; Singh, Vidyadhar; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles offer an attractive alternative to bulk palladium for catalysis, hydrogen storage and gas sensing applications. Their performance depends strongly on surface structure; therefore, nanoparticle coalescence can play an important role, as it determines the resultant structure of the active sites where reactions (e.g. catalysis) actually take place, i.e. facets, edges, vertices or protrusions. With this in mind, we performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and magnetron-sputtering inert gas condensation depositions of palladium nanoparticles, supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), to study the mechanisms that govern their coalescence. Surface energy minimisation drove the interactions initially, leading to the formation of an interface/neck, as expected. Intriguingly, at a later stage, atomic rearrangements triggered a crystallisation wave propagating through the amorphous nanoparticles, leading to mono- or polycrystalline fcc structures. In the case of crystalline nanoparticles, almost-epitaxial alignment occurred and the formation of twins and surface protrusions were observed. PMID:25047807

  18. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid-crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Syme, Christopher D; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-17

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being "in between" the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  19. Optimising reaction coordinates for crystallisation by tuning the crystallinity definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Singraber, Andreas; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    We apply maximum likelihood analysis to optimise crystallisation measures based on Steinhardt bond order parameters. Assuming that the size of the largest cluster of crystalline particles serves as a good reaction coordinate for the freezing transition, we write down the likelihood to observe the committor values computed for a large number of configurations. We then maximise the likelihood function by varying the parameters that enter the definition of crystallinity. For the crystallinity definition considered here this parameter set consists of the thresholds for the next-neighbour distance, the strength of the crystalline bonds and the number of crystalline connections. The optimum parameter set found by the likelihood maximisation differs considerably from the parameters that are commonly used, but leads only to a marginal improvement of the quality of the reaction coordinate.

  20. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid–crystal phase

    PubMed Central

    Syme, Christopher D.; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being “in between” the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids. PMID:28209972

  1. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid–crystal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syme, Christopher D.; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-01

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being “in between” the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  2. Crystallisation Pathways of Polymorphic Triacylglycerols Induced by Mechanical Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. L.; Ristic, R. I.; DeMatos, L. L.; Martin, C. M.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of these studies is to establish sound scientific principles to guide nucleation rate and the selection of a desired polymorph via the application of mechanical energy - ultrasound (US) irradiation. When delivered to a metastable liquid, before the offset of nucleation and under constant temperature and supercooling conditions, the wave nature of this simple form of energy should be critical for defining different crystallisation pathways of polymorphic materials including polymorph selection. To test this hypothesis, we crystallized a melt-grown trilaurin (LLL), a typical polymorphic triacylglycerols (TGA's), with and without US by using in-situ simultaneous synchrotron radiation time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), SAXS/WAXS. Without US application, both polymorphic forms β' and β crystallized. With US treatment of the super cooled melt, the following effects were observed: (a) a marked decrease of induction times (b) an increased nucleation rate, and (c) selective crystallization of only β-form when crystallised at 25 and 30°C with input powers of 20 and 100 W and a sonication time of 2 s. Combining the existing knowledge on the dynamic nucleation of collapsing cavities and a qualitatively developed (P-T) phase diagram for the TGA's, it was possible to describe, for the first time, the behaviour of the most important parameters and the events that characterize the crystallization of these systems. It was shown that the interplay of sonication and the temperature of supercooled melts are critical to the selection of a stable β form.

  3. Effects of emulsion droplet sizes on the crystallisation of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuyen; Bansal, Nidhi; Sharma, Ranjan; Palmer, Martin; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2014-02-15

    The crystallisation properties of milk fat emulsions containing dairy-based ingredients as functions of emulsion droplet size, cooling rate, and emulsifier type were investigated using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Anhydrous milk fat and its fractions (stearin and olein) were emulsified with whey protein concentrate, sodium caseinate, and Tween80 by homogenisation to produce emulsions in various size ranges (0.13-3.10 μm). Particle size, cooling rate, and types of emulsifier all had an influence on the crystallisation properties of fat in the emulsions. In general, the crystallisation temperature of emulsified fats decreased with decreasing average droplet size and was of an exponent function of size, indicating that the influence of particle size on crystallisation temperature is more pronounced in the sub-micron range. This particle size effect was also verified by electron microscopy.

  4. Crystallisation of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the corresponding effect of 1-dodecanol addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerton, Emily; Zimbitas, Georgina; Britton, Melanie; Bakalis, Serafim

    2016-12-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) exhibits crystallisation upon exposure to low temperatures, which can pose a problem in terms of product stability. In this study, non-isothermal crystallisation of SDS is investigated via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at concentrations that are typical of those present in many industrial liquid detergents. At different low temperatures, the crystal structures are analysed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it is concluded that ice formation during the surfactant crystallisation process occurs below 0 °C. The capability of the alcohol precursor, 1-dodecanol, as a seeding material for SDS crystallisation is also investigated through the use of DSC and optical microscopy. These results show that 1-dodecanol can successfully act as a seed for SDS crystallisation. Upon cooling an SDS aqueous system, the crystallisation peak in the DSC thermogram shifts to a higher temperature in the presence of 1-dodecanol. Therefore, any remnant alcohol precursor in surfactant-based formulations could have a negative impact on the product stability upon exposure to cold climates.

  5. Improving olefin tolerance and production in E. coli using native and evolved AcrB

    SciTech Connect

    Mingardon, Florence; Clement, Camille; Hirano, Kathleen; Nhan, Melissa; Luning, Eric G.; Chanal, Angelique; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2015-01-20

    Microorganisms can be engineered for the production of chemicals utilized in the polymer industry. However many such target compounds inhibit microbial growth and might correspondingly limit production levels. Here, we focus on compounds that are precursors to bioplastics, specifically styrene and representative alpha-olefins; 1-hexene, 1-octene, and 1-nonene. We evaluated the role of the Escherichia coli efflux pump, AcrAB-TolC, in enhancing tolerance towards these olefin compounds. AcrAB-TolC is involved in the tolerance towards all four compounds in E. coli. Both styrene and 1-hexene are highly toxic to E. coli. Styrene is a model plastics precursor with an established route for production in E. coli (McKenna and Nielsen, 2011). Though our data indicates that AcrAB-TolC is important for its optimal production, we observed a strong negative selection against the production of styrene in E. coli. Thus we used 1-hexene as a model compound to implement a directed evolution strategy to further improve the tolerance phenotype towards this alpha-olefin. We focused on optimization of AcrB, the inner membrane domain known to be responsible for substrate binding, and found several mutations (A279T, Q584R, F617L, L822P, F927S, and F1033Y) that resulted in improved tolerance. Several of these mutations could also be combined in a synergistic manner. Our study shows efflux pumps to be an important mechanism in host engineering for olefins, and one that can be further improved using strategies such as directed evolution, to increase tolerance and potentially production.

  6. Geochemical variability in MORB controlled by concurrent mixing and crystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    The isotopic and elemental diversity in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) traces the history of mantle differentiation, recycling and convective stirring. However, to interpret this record it is critical to account for the magma transport and storage processes modifying the primary geochemical variability of mantle derived melts. Magma mixing during low pressure differentiation is a key petrological process that controls the chemical variability of basalts throughout the global mid-ocean ridge system. Mixing occurs concurrent with crystallisation and must in general be dominant over any assimilatory processes in controlling the chemical evolution of basalts with MgO concentrations >5 wt% MgO. The effect of this mixing is to collapse the diversity of melt compositions leaving the mantle into the narrow range expressed in most mid-ocean ridge settings. In this context magma mixing can be viewed as contaminating the variance structure of primitive mantle melts, which leads to irreversible information loss on the sources and processes involved in melt generation unless primitive, unmixed, liquids and crystal phases are erupted. However, where we can track magma mixing, the homogenisation itself offers the potential to be an important petrological tool, which constrains the storage and transport processes magma experiences during its ascent through the mantle and crust. In the global dataset interrogated here systematic mixing trends are visible up to the length scales of first order ridge segmentation (∼300 km), indicating the possible links between surface tectonics and the record of mantle heterogeneity in basalts. The importance of magma mixing at mid-ocean ridges hints at the need to reevaluate the MORB-ocean island basalt chemical dichotomy, given the poorly understood mixing processes operating during intraplate magma transport from mantle to surface.

  7. Development of a solvate as an active pharmaceutical ingredient: Developability, crystallisation and isolation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Julien; Stevenson, Neil; Lee, Mei; Mallet, Franck; Ward, Richard; Aspin, Peter; Dennehy, Daniel Robert; Camus, Laure

    2012-03-01

    The preclinical development of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) begins with the selection of a solid state form. A solvate may be selected for development if it is sufficiently stable and if the solvent quantity administered to the patient is lower than the tolerated potential daily exposure (PDE). The selection and process development of a solvate is presented here. The initial crystallisation process gave poor control over the particle size distribution (PSD) and inclusion of additional crystallisation solvent in the crystal lattice. These two API attributes were controlled using micronised seeds and optimising the crystallisation conditions. After filtration, slurry washing with a second solvent was used to replace the high boiling point crystallisation solvent to improve the drying efficiency. The slurry washing was modelled and studied in the laboratory to control the level of unbound crystallisation solvent in the API. The API desolvation during slurry washing was studied by considering thermodynamics, by construction of the ternary phase diagram, and kinetics aspects. This work provides useful approaches and considerations to assess the risks specific to the controlled production of a solvate that are rarely presented in the literature.

  8. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far.

  9. Timing of Crystallisation of the Lunar Magma Ocean Constrained by the Oldest Zircon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A.; Timms, N.; Pidgeon, R.; Geisler, T.; Reddy, S.; Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The presently favoured concept for the early evolution of the Moon involves consolidation of debris from a giant impact of a Mars sized body with Earth forming a primitive Moon with a thick global layer of melt referred to as the Lunar Magma Ocean1 . It is widely accepted that many significant features observed on the Moon today are the result of crystallisation of this magma ocean. However, controversy exists over the precise timing and duration of the crystallisation process. Resolution of this problem depends on the establishment of precise and robust key crystallisation time points. We report a 4417 6 Myr old zircon in lunar breccia sample 72215,195, which provides a precisely determined younger limit for the solidification of the Lunar Magma Ocean. A model based on these data, together with the age of the Moon forming giant impact, defines an exponential time frame for crystallisation and suggests formation of anorthositic crust after about 80-85% of the magma ocean was solidified. In combination with other zircon ages the 4417 +/- 6 Myr age also suggests that the very small (less than a few per cent) residual portion of the magma ocean continued to solidify during the following 300-500 m.y.

  10. Lewis acid/base character and crystallisation properties of poly(butylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Santos, José M R C A; Guthrie, James T

    2015-01-30

    Two grades of poly(butylene terephthalate) were analysed by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and the results correlated with the respective crystallisation properties. The following parameters were determined by IGC: the dispersive component of the surface tension, the enthalpy and the entropy of adsorption of selected polar and apolar probes, and the Lewis acidity and basicity constants, Ka and Kb respectively. The interpretation of the values determined for Ka and Kb is in agreement with the FTIR spectra relating to the carboxyl end-group and the hydroxyl end-group concentrations in these polymers. The differences in the molecular weight values and in the end-group type and concentration, between the two grades of PBT, do not cause differences in the crystallisation activation energy. This observation suggests that there is a leading contribution of the Lewis basic sites to the crystallisation activation energy of the grades of PBT that were analysed. However, the lower value of Ka and the greater molar mass of one of the PBT grades lead to a corresponding lower crystallisation degree.

  11. Use of extension-deformation-based crystallisation of silk fibres to differentiate their functions in nature.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Hikima, Takaaki; Sasaki, Sono; Sekiyama, Kazuhide; Takata, Masaki

    2015-08-21

    β-Sheet crystals play an important role in determining the stiffness, strength, and optical properties of silk and in the exhibition of silk-type-specific functions. It is important to elucidate the structural changes that occur during the stretching of silk fibres to understand the functions of different types of fibres. Herein, we elucidate the initial crystallisation behaviour of silk molecules during the stretching of three types of silk fibres using synchrotron radiation X-ray analysis. When spider dragline silk was stretched, it underwent crystallisation and the alignment of the β-sheet crystals became disordered initially but was later recovered. On the other hand, silkworm cocoon silk did not exhibit further crystallisation, whereas capture spiral silk was predominantly amorphous. Structural analyses showed that the crystallisation of silks following extension deformation has a critical effect on their mechanical and optical properties. These findings should aid the production of artificial silk fibres and facilitate the development of silk-inspired functional materials.

  12. Image analysis of palm oil crystallisation as observed by hot stage microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Peter D.; Smith, Kevin W.; Bhaggan, Krishnadath; Stapley, Andrew G. F.

    2016-06-01

    An image processing algorithm previously used to analyse the crystallisation of a pure fat (tripalmitin) has been applied to the crystallisation of a multicomponent natural fat (palm oil). In contrast to tripalmitin, which produced circular crystals with a constant growth rate, palm oil produced speckled crystals caused by the inclusion of entrapped liquid, and growth rates gradually decreased with time. This can be explained by the depletion of crystallisable material in the liquid phase, whereas direct impingement of crystals (the basis of the Avrami equation) was less common. A theoretical analysis combining this depletion with assuming that the growth rate is proportional to the supersaturation of a crystallisable pseudo-component predicted a tanh function variation of radius with time. This was generally able to provide good fits to the growth curves. It was found that growth rate was a relatively mild function of temperature but also varied from crystal to crystal and even between different sides of the same crystal, which may be due to variations in composition within the liquid phase. Nucleation rates were confirmed to vary approximately exponentially with decreasing temperature, resulting in much greater numbers of crystals and a smaller final average crystal size at lower temperatures.

  13. Studies of isothermal crystallisation kinetics of sunflower hard stearin-based confectionery fats.

    PubMed

    Bootello, Miguel A; Hartel, Richard W; Levin, Madeline; Martínez-Blanes, Jose M; Real, Concepción; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2013-08-15

    The crystallisation and polymorphic properties of three sunflower hard stearins (SHSs) and cocoa butter equivalents (CBEs) formulated by blending SHSs and palm mid fraction (PMF) were studied and compared with those from cocoa butter (CB), to explore their possibilities as confectionery fats. The isothermal crystallisation kinetics of these fats were examined by pNMR and DSC at three different temperatures. All samples studied displayed a two-step crystallisation profile that could be fitted to an exponential-Gompertz equation. Stop-and-return DSC studies showed that SHSs and CBEs exhibited different crystallisation mechanisms according to their triacylglycerol composition, with a quick formation of metastable crystals, followed by a polymorphic transition to the more stable β or β' forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the polymorphic forms of tempered SHSs and CBEs in the long term. In all cases the resulting fats displayed short spacing patterns associated with β polymorphism. These formulations based on SHSs and PMF met all the requirements to be considered as CBEs; therefore they could be used as an alternative to traditional confectionery fats.

  14. Thermodynamic modelling of a membrane distillation crystallisation process for the treatment of mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Jeeten; Randall, Dyllon Garth

    2016-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) could be applicable in zero liquid discharge applications. This is due to the fact that MD is applicable at high salinity ranges which are generally outside the scope of reverse osmosis (RO) applications, although this requires proper management of precipitating salts to avoid membrane fouling. One way of managing these salts is with MD crystallisation (MDC). This paper focuses on the applicability of MDC for the treatment of mining wastewater by thermodynamically modelling the aqueous chemistry of the process at different temperatures. The paper is based on the typical brine generated from an RO process in the South African coal mining industry and investigates the effect water recovery and operating temperature have on the salts that are predicted to crystallise out, the sequence in which they will crystallise out and purities as a function of the water recovery. The study confirmed the efficacy of using thermodynamic modelling as a tool for investigating and predicting the crystallisation aspects of the MDC process. The key finding from this work was that, for an MDC process, a purer product can be obtained at higher operating temperatures and recoveries because of the inverse solubility of calcium sulphate.

  15. Magma crystallisation on a steep side-wall: Physical behaviour of the crystal mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M.; Holness, M. B.

    2009-12-01

    The Marginal Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion, East Greenland, crystallised on the steeply dipping side-walls of the magma chamber. The rocks represent a series of mafic cumulates which crystallised inwards during fractional crystallisation of a single pulse of basaltic magma. They show the same progression of mineral assemblage and the same cryptic mineral compositional variation as that of the better known Layered Series, which crystallised on the chamber floor, demonstrating the “onion-skin” style of solidification of this box-shaped magma chamber. The original study of Wager & Deer (1939) divided the Marginal Border Series into the outer Tranquil Zone and an inner Banded Zone, although this field-based division bears no relationship with the progressive fractionation of the gabbros. A key feature of the Tranquil Zone is the “Wavy Pyroxene Rock”, which comprises geometrically aligned, lensoid segregations of very coarse-grained plagioclase and poikilitic augite set within otherwise uniform, unbanded and homogeneous gabbro. These segregations consistently strike parallel to the chamber wall and dip towards the contact. The shape, size, grain-size and mineralogy of the segregations change systematically away from the intrusion wall. They become bigger, chemically more evolved and more irregular in shape with increasing distance from the intrusion’s margins, and thus with stratigraphic position. We suggest that the Wavy Pyroxene Rock represents tearing of the poorly-consolidated crystal mush, during localised sagging of the vertical mush zone. Small, regularly spaced and shaped, tears formed in the thinner, more rapidly chilled, outer parts of the MBS, while larger irregular tears occurred in the inner, highly porous and poorly consolidated regions. Once the tears had formed, interstitial liquid moved into the space, crystallising as relatively evolved coarse-grained segregations. We use mineral chemistry to estimate the porosity when tearing

  16. Strong isotope effects on melting dynamics and ice crystallisation processes in cryo vitrification solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirichek, Oleg; Soper, Alan; Dzyuba, Boris; Callear, Sam; Fuller, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of crystalline ice during cooling, and further crystallization processes during re-warming are considered to be key processes determining the success of low temperature storage of biological objects, as used in medical, agricultural and nature conservation applications. To avoid these problems a method, termed vitrification, is being developed to inhibit ice formation by use of high concentration of cryoprotectants and ultra-rapid cooling, but this is only successful across a limited number of biological objects and in small volume applications. This study explores physical processes of ice crystal formation in a model cryoprotective solution used previously in trials on vitrification of complex biological systems, to improve our understanding of the process and identify limiting biophysical factors. Here we present results of neutron scattering experiments which show that even if ice crystal formation has been suppressed during quench cooling, the water molecules, mobilised during warming, can crystallise as detectable ice. The crystallisation happens right after melting of the glass phase formed during quench cooling, whilst the sample is still transiting deep cryogenic temperatures. We also observe strong water isotope effects on ice crystallisation processes in the cryoprotectant mixture. In the neutron scattering experiment with a fully protiated water component, we observe ready crystallisation occurring just after the glass melting transition. On the contrary with a fully deuteriated water component, the process of crystallisation is either completely or substantially supressed. This behaviour might be explained by nuclear quantum effects in water. The strong isotope effect, observed here, may play an important role in development of new cryopreservation strategies.

  17. Hen Egg-White Lysozyme Crystallisation: Protein Stacking and Structure Stability Enhanced by a Tellurium(VI)-Centred Polyoxotungstate

    PubMed Central

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan G; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    As synchrotron radiation becomes more intense, detectors become faster and structure-solving software becomes more elaborate, obtaining single crystals suitable for data collection is now the bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Hence, there is a need for novel and advanced crystallisation agents with the ability to crystallise proteins that are otherwise challenging. Here, an Anderson–Evans-type polyoxometalate (POM), specifically Na6[TeW6O24]⋅22 H2O (TEW), is employed as a crystallisation additive. Its effects on protein crystallisation are demonstrated with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), which co-crystallises with TEW in the vicinity (or within) the liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS) region. The X-ray structure (PDB ID: 4PHI) determination revealed that TEW molecules are part of the crystal lattice, thus demonstrating specific binding to HEWL with electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The negatively charged TEW polyoxotungstate binds to sites with a positive electrostatic potential located between two (or more) symmetry-related protein chains. Thus, TEW facilitates the formation of protein–protein interfaces of otherwise repulsive surfaces, and thereby the realisation of a stable crystal lattice. In addition to retaining the isomorphicity of the protein structure, the anomalous scattering of the POMs was used for macromolecular phasing. The results suggest that hexatungstotellurate(VI) has great potential as a crystallisation additive to promote both protein crystallisation and structure elucidation. PMID:25521080

  18. Hen egg-white lysozyme crystallisation: protein stacking and structure stability enhanced by a Tellurium(VI)-centred polyoxotungstate.

    PubMed

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan G; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-19

    As synchrotron radiation becomes more intense, detectors become faster and structure-solving software becomes more elaborate, obtaining single crystals suitable for data collection is now the bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Hence, there is a need for novel and advanced crystallisation agents with the ability to crystallise proteins that are otherwise challenging. Here, an Anderson-Evans-type polyoxometalate (POM), specifically Na6 [TeW6 O24 ]⋅22 H2 O (TEW), is employed as a crystallisation additive. Its effects on protein crystallisation are demonstrated with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), which co-crystallises with TEW in the vicinity (or within) the liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) region. The X-ray structure (PDB ID: 4PHI) determination revealed that TEW molecules are part of the crystal lattice, thus demonstrating specific binding to HEWL with electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The negatively charged TEW polyoxotungstate binds to sites with a positive electrostatic potential located between two (or more) symmetry-related protein chains. Thus, TEW facilitates the formation of protein-protein interfaces of otherwise repulsive surfaces, and thereby the realisation of a stable crystal lattice. In addition to retaining the isomorphicity of the protein structure, the anomalous scattering of the POMs was used for macromolecular phasing. The results suggest that hexatungstotellurate(VI) has great potential as a crystallisation additive to promote both protein crystallisation and structure elucidation.

  19. Mechanism and modelling of aluminium nanoparticle oxidation coupled with crystallisation of amorphous Al2O3 shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chengdong; Yu, Dan; Li, Shuiqing; Yao, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of aluminium nanoparticles coupled with crystallisation of amorphous alumina shell is investigated through the thermogravimetric analyser and differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC) and the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermogravimetric (TG) curves show stepwise shapes with temperature increase and could be divided into four stages. The reaction at the second stage is complex, including the simultaneous crystallisation of amorphous alumina (am-Al2O3) and Al oxidation. The crystallisation of am-Al2O3 promotes the reaction through generating fast diffusion channels, like micro-cracks and grain boundaries in the oxide shell to accelerate the ionic diffusion. An enhancement factor (freact), which follows a power-law formula with the crystallisation rate, is introduced to quantify the impact of crystallisation on reaction. With heating rate increase, the second stage of TG curves shifts to the high temperature regime and the total weight gain at the second stage decreases slowly. A crystallisation-reaction model is constructed to fit and predict the weight gain after derivation of diffusivities and crystallisation kinetics. Modelling indicates that with heating rate rise, the mass increment at the second stage of TG curves decreases owing to the reduced reaction time, although the reaction is accelerated. The shift of TG curve to higher temperature is due to the polymorphic phase transition. Actually the derived kinetics of the crystallisation of amorphous alumina indicates that the polymorphic phase transformation mechanism works mainly below the heating rate of 3 K s-1. At higher heating rate, the melting of Al takes place firstly and the crystallisation of am-Al2O3 follows to enhance the ionic diffusion. Therefore, when the heating rate is fast during ignition or combustion, the Al nanoparticles undergo both the melting of Al and the polymorphic phase transition of am-Al2O3 to accelerate the reaction.

  20. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  1. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  2. The Rustenburg Layered Suite (Bushveld Complex) crystallised in less than 1.5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, Armin; Ovtcharova, Maria; Wilson, Allan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    The timing and crystallisation of the ca. 2.055 Ga old Rustenburg Layered Suite (RLS) of the Bushveld Complex is the subject of ongoing debate. The RLS represents one of the Earth's oldest large igneous provinces, and contains the world's largest reserves of PGE, chromium and vanadium. Previous high-precision U-Pb zircon dating indicated periodic crystallisation over an interval of 5.2 ± 0.79 Ma, with zircon crystallisation events at 2060.5 Ma, below the UG2 chromitite, and at 2055.3 Ma from the Merensky Reef (MR) upwards in the succession (Scoates & Friedman, 2008; Scoates et. al., 2012). Such a prolonged and periodic crystallisation history, however, contradicts field observations and petrological data, which rather require a relatively fast and continuous crystallisation process, periodically interrupted by new magma replenishment (Eales & Cawthorn, 1996; Cawthorn & Walraven, 1998). Here, we present new data from high-precision U-Pb dating, Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and mineral inclusion studies that support this latter interpretation. Our data indicate that zircon crystallised from highly fractionated, silica-saturated intercumulus melts at temperatures between 890 and 700°C most likely continuously from the base of the RLS (Marginal Zone) to the top (Upper Zone), within 0.92 ± 0.57 Ma, between 2055.81 ± 0.20 and 2054.89 ± 0.37 Ma. References Eales, H. V. & Cawthorn, R. G. (1996). The Bushveld Complex, in Layered Intrusions (ed. Cawthorn, R. G.) 181-229 (Elsevier Science, Amsterdam). Cawthorn, R. G. & Walraven, F. (1998). Emplacement and crystallization time for the Bushveld Complex. J. Petrol. 39, 1669-1687. Scoates, J. S. & Friedman, R. M. (2008). Precise age of the platiniferous Merensky Reef, Bushveld Complex, South Africa, by the U-Pb zircon chemical abrasion ID-TIMS technique. Econ. Geol. 103, 465-471. Scoates, J. S., Wall, C. J., Friedman, R. M., VanTongeren, J. A. & Mathez, E. A (2012). Age of the Bushveld Complex. Abstr. Goldschmidt Conference

  3. Approaches to determine the enthalpy of crystallisation, and amorphous content, of lactose from isothermal calorimetric data.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Sarah E; Buckton, Graham; Gaisford, Simon; Ramos, Rita

    2004-10-13

    Amorphous lactose will crystallise rapidly if its glass transition temperature is reduced below its storage temperature. This is readily achieved by storing samples at ambient temperature and a relative humidity (RH) of greater than 50%. If the sample is monitored in an isothermal microcalorimeter as it crystallises, the heat changes associated with the event can be measured; indeed this is one of the methods used to quantify the amorphous content of powders and formulations. However, variations in the calculation methods used to determine these heat changes have led to discrepancies in the values reported in the literature and frequently make comparison of data from different sources difficult. Data analysis and peak integration software allow the selection and integration of specific areas of complex traces with great reproducibility; this has led to the observation that previously ignored artefacts are in fact of sufficient magnitude to affect calculated enthalpies. In this work a number of integration methodologies have been applied to the analysis of amorphous spray-dried lactose, crystallised under 53 or 75% RH at 25 degrees C. The data allowed the selection of a standard methodology from which reproducible heat changes could be determined. The method was subsequently applied to the analysis of partially amorphous lactose samples (containing 1-100% (w/w) amorphous content) allowing the quantification limit of the technique to be established. It was found that the best approach for obtaining reproducible results was (i) to crystallise under an RH of 53%, because this slowed the crystallisation response allowing better experimental measurement and (ii) to integrate all the events occurring in the ampoule, rather than trying to select only that region corresponding to crystallisation, since it became clear that the processes occurring in the cell overlapped and could not be deconvoluted. The technique was able to detect amorphous contents as low as 1% (w

  4. Highlights from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    DISCUSSION by CHAIRMAN: P.J. ODDONE, Scientific Secretaries: W. Fisher, A. Holzner Note from Publisher: The Slides of the Lecture: "Highlights from Fermilab" can be found at http://www.ccsem.infn.it/issp2007/

  5. Langley test highlights, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Significant aircraft tests which were performed are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities. The conributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  6. Highlights, predictions, and changes.

    PubMed

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-15

    Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding "hot" retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  7. Energy Research Highlights-2

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-26

    Highlights the research NETL is doing in the following fields: Clean Coal, Gasification, Carbon Sequestration, and Hydrogen. This video was featured in the lobby of the Forrestal building in Washington, D.C.

  8. Crystallisation in apatite-mullite glass-ceramics as a function of fluorine content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Kenneth T.; Hill, Robert G.

    2005-02-01

    Apatite-mullite glass-ceramics are materials prepared by the controlled heat-induced devitrification of glasses of suitable composition and are under investigation for applications in dentistry and orthopaedics. The glasses used here are based on a system with the composition 1.5(5- x)SiO 2·(5- x)Al 2O 3·1.5P 2O 5·(5- x)CaO· xCaF 2. The amount of fluorine in the glasses was varied to investigate the crystallisation behaviour as a function of both fluorine content and temperature. The resultant crystalline phases are fluorapatite [Ca 10(PO 4) 6F 2], mullite [Al 6Si 2O 13] and in some cases, anorthite [CaAl 2Si 2O 8]. Crystal phases were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD) from both the surface and the bulk of heat-treated monolithic samples and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image the crystal phase morphologies. Crystallisation characteristics varied widely in terms of apparent nucleation mechanism, crystal phases formed and microstructure. In general, glasses with higher fluorine content devitrified more readily to fluorapatite (FAp) with a higher nucleation density and for glasses with an intermediate to low fluorine content there tended to be an interdependence between FAp and mullite crystallisation. A greater tendency towards anorthite formation, especially at surfaces, was observed for glasses with lower fluorine contents. Furthermore, on decreasing the fluorine content, glasses tended to crystallise by formation of FAp spherulites with increasing diameter and with greater crystal aspect ratio.

  9. Effect of crystallisation conditions and feedstock morphology on the aerosolization performance of micronised salbutamol sulphate.

    PubMed

    Shariare, M H; de Matas, M; York, P

    2011-08-30

    Salbutamol sulphate (SS) used in dry powder inhalers requires drug particles in the respirable size range of 1-5 μm to achieve a suitable therapeutic effect. The aim of this study was therefore to determine strategies for controlling drug substance characteristics pre and post-crystallisation to facilitate the production of micronised SS with desirable particle attributes for optimal delivery as an inhaled aerosol. SS batches were crystallised using an antisolvent method to produce a range of crystal morphologies. Air jet milling was then used to reduce the size of crystallised SS particles. Starting materials and micronised batches of SS were characterised in the solid state using a range of techniques with subsequent assessment of aerosol properties. Assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of micronised SS delivered by DPI (without any carrier) indicated that fine particle fraction and emitted dose as a percentage of the total recovered dose were dependent on the quality attributes of the micronised SS, which were directly linked to the degree of imperfections and the morphology of the crystalline feedstock used in micronisation. Aerosolization performance of micronised SS can be optimised by manipulation of feedstock characteristics through crystal engineering and through definition of optimal processing conditions for micronisation.

  10. NASA Langley Highlights, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  11. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  12. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  13. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  14. NASA highlights, 1986 - 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA research from 1986 to 1988 are discussed. Topics covered include Space Shuttle flights, understanding the Universe and its origins, understanding the Earth and its environment, air and space transportation, using space to make America more competitive, using space technology an Earth, strengthening America's education in science and technology, the space station, and human exploration of the solar system.

  15. Collegiate Athletics Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Highlights 15 trends/events in black college athletics, including championship coaches, Black Coaches Association, eligibility issues, disclosure of athlete graduation rates, athletics resource allocation, early adoption of professional athlete status, success of the Women's National Basketball Association, lack of black access to certain sports,…

  16. NASA Langley Highlights, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Langley's mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government Agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of some of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate the broad range of research and technology activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States' leadership in aeronautics and space research. A color electronic version of this report is available at URL http://larcpubs.larc.nasa.gov/randt/1998/.

  17. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Annema, Jouke T; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F

    2016-07-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  18. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Grgic, Aleksander; Antoniou, Katerina; Ställberg, Björn; Herth, Felix F.

    2016-01-01

    This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective. PMID:27730202

  19. Highlights from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Axel

    2016-12-01

    This talk presents highlights from the PHENIX experiment. These include results from the beam energy scan at √{sNN} = 7.7 to 200 GeV, yield and anisotropy of low pT direct photon emission in Au+Au, results on the e+e- pair continuum measured with the hadron blind detector (HBD), separation of charm and bottom energy loss using the PHENIX vertex tracker (VTX), and evidence for strongly coupled matter in small systems.

  20. Coarse-grained modelling of triglyceride crystallisation: a molecular insight into tripalmitin tristearin binary mixtures by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzirusso, Antonio; Brasiello, Antonio; De Nicola, Antonio; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Milano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The first simulation study of the crystallisation of a binary mixture of triglycerides using molecular dynamics simulations is reported. Coarse-grained models of tristearin (SSS) and tripalmitin (PPP) molecules have been considered. The models have been preliminarily tested in the crystallisation of pure SSS and PPP systems. Two different quenching procedures have been tested and their performances have been analysed. The structures obtained from the crystallisation procedures show a high orientation order and a high content of molecules in the tuning fork conformation, comparable with the crystalline α phase. The behaviour of melting temperatures for the α phase of the mixture SSS/PPP obtained from the simulations is in qualitative agreement with the behaviour that was experimentally determined.

  1. Crystallisation kinetics of some archetypal ionic liquids: isothermal and non-isothermal determination of the Avrami exponent.

    PubMed

    Pas, Steven J; Dargusch, Matthew S; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-07-07

    The properties of ionic liquids give rise to applications in diverse technology areas including mechanical engineering, mining, aerospace and defence. The arbitrary physical property that defines an ionic liquid is a melting point below 100 °C, and as such, an understanding of crystallisation phenomena is extremely important. This is the first report dealing with the mechanism of crystallisation in ionic liquids. Assuming crystallisation of the ionic liquids is a thermal or mass diffusion-controlled process, the values of the isothermal Avrami exponent obtained from three different ionic liquids with three different anions and cations all indicate that growth occurs with a decreasing nucleation rate (n=1.8-2.2). For one of the ionic liquids it was possible to avoid crystallisation by fast cooling and then observe a devitrification upon heating through the glass transition. The isothermal Avrami exponent of devitrification suggested growth with an increasing nucleating rate (n=4.1), compared to a decreasing nucleation rate when crystallisation occurs on cooling from the melt (n=2.0). Two non-isothermal methods were employed to determine the Avrami exponent of devitrification. Both non-isothermal Avrami exponents were in agreement with the isothermal case (n=4.0-4.15). The applicability of JMAK theory suggests that the nucleation event in the ionic liquids selected is a random stochastic process in the volume of the material. Agreement between the isothermal and non-isothermal techniques for determining the Avrami exponent of devitrification suggests that the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy are independent of thermal history. The heating rate dependence of the glass transition enabled the calculation of the fragility index, which suggests that the ionic liquid is a "strong" glass former. This suggests that the temperature dependence of the rate constant could be close to Arrhenius, as assumed by JMAK theory. More generally, therefore, it can be

  2. Structure development during isothermal crystallisation of high-density polyethylene: Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślusarczyk, Czesław

    2013-12-01

    Isothermal melt crystallisation in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied using the time-resolved SAXS method with synchrotron radiation over a wide range of crystallisation temperatures. The SAXS profile was analysed by an interface distribution function, g1(r), which is a superposition of three contributions associated with the size distributions of crystalline (LC) and amorphous (LA) layers and a distribution of long period (LP). The morphological parameters extracted from the g1(r) functions show that the lamellar thickness increases with time, obeying a logarithmic time dependence. The time evolution of LC observed for the sample crystallised at 122 °C leads to the conclusion that crystallisation proceeds according to the mechanism of thickening growth. For samples crystallised at lower temperatures (116 °C and 118 °C), the lamellar thickening mechanism has been observed. The rate of lamellar thickening in these cases is much lower than that at 122 °C. At 40 °C, thickening of the crystalline layer does not occur. The interface distribution functions were deconvoluted, and the relative standard deviation σC/LC obtained in this way is an additional parameter that is varied during crystallisation and can be used for analysis of this process. Time-dependent changes in the σC/LC at large supercooling (TC=40 °C) indicates that LC presents a broad distribution in which the relative standard deviation increases with time. At lower supercooling (TC=122 °C), LC shows a much sharper distribution. In this case, the relative standard deviation decreases with time.

  3. The influence of sodium carbonate on sodium aluminosilicate crystallisation and solubility in sodium aluminate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kali; Gerson, Andrea R.; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Smart, Roger St. C.

    1997-01-01

    Isothermal batch precipitation experiments have been carried out in synthetic Bayer liquors to investigate the effects of sodium carbonate concentration on both silica solubility and the crystallisation of sodium aluminosilicates. At both 90 and 160°C cancrinite (generically defined as a sodium aluminosilicate of space group P6 3) is the stable solid phase. Sodalite (generically defined as a sodium aluminosilicate with space group P4¯3n seed transforms to cancrinite at both these temperatures. A high concentration of sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor causes a decrease in the rate of conversion of sodalite to cancrinite. The solubility of both cancrinite and sodalite decreases as the concentration of sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor is increased. For instance at 90°C and with 40.0 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor after 13 days the sodium aluminosilicate concentration is 0.52 g dm -3 compared to 0.85 g dm -3 with 4.6 g dm -3 of sodium carbonate in solution. At 160°C the sodium aluminosilicate concentration is 0.47 g dm -3 with 40.0 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in solution after 13 days and 0.79 g dm -3 with 4.6 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in solution. Throughout all these experiments a progressive loss of carbonate from the sodium aluminosilicate crystallisation products was observed as a function of time.

  4. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E

    2015-06-11

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures.

  5. Sintering, crystallisation and biodegradation behaviour of Bioglass-derived glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, Aldo R; Chen, Qizhi; Lefebvre, Leila; Gremillard, Laurent; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2007-01-01

    Sintering and crystallisation phenomena in powders of a typical bioactive glass composition (45S5 Bioglass) have been investigated in order to gain further understanding of the processes involved in the fabrication of Bioglass, based glass-ceramic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In situ experiments in an environmental scanning electron microscope with a heating stage were carried out to follow the morphology of Bioglass particles during sintering and crystallisation. Optimal processing parameters for the manufacture of Bioglass based glass-ceramic scaffolds by the foam-replica technique were determined. To assess the in vitro performance and bioreactivity of Bioglass -derived glass-ceramic scaffolds, the biodegradation of samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated using various techniques, including SEM, TEM, XRD and EDX. The mechanism of interaction of the glass-ceramic surface with SBF was determined, which involves (i) preferential dissolution at glass/crystal interfaces, (ii) break-down of crystalline particles into very fine grains through preferential dissolution at crystal structural defects, and (iii) amorphisation of the crystalline structure by introduction of point defects produced during ion exchange. The present report thus offers for the first time a complete assessment of the processing parameters, microstructure, and in vitro performance of Bioglass derived glass-ceramic scaffolds intended for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, Voc and Jsc than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  7. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallisation in vitro by an extract of Bergenia ciliata

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sarmistha; Verma, Ramtej J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an extract obtained from the rhizomes of Bergenia ciliata (Saxifragaceae) on the inhibition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallisation in vitro. Materials and methods A hydro-alcoholic extract (30:70, v/v) of rhizomes of B. ciliata was prepared at different concentrations (1–10 mg/mL). The crystallisation of CaOx monohydrate (COM) was induced in a synthetic urine system. The nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals were measured using spectrophotometric methods. The rates of nucleation and aggregation were evaluated by comparing the slope of the turbidity of a control system with that of one exposed to the extract. The results were compared with a parallel study conducted with a marketed poly-herbal combination, Cystone, under identical concentrations. Crystals generated in the urine were also analysed by light microscopy. Statistical differences and percentage inhibitions were calculated and assessed. Results The extract of B. ciliata was significantly more effective in inhibiting the nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals in a dose-dependent manner than was Cystone. Moreover, the extract induced more CaOx dihydrate crystals, with a significant reduction in the number and size of COM crystals. Conclusion An extract of the traditional herb B. ciliata has an excellent inhibitory activity on crystalluria and therefore might be beneficial in dissolving urinary stones. However, further study in animal models of urolithiasis is needed to evaluate its potential anti-urolithiatic activity. PMID:26558080

  8. Droplet crystallisation in large scale direct molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemand, J.; Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H.; Angelil, R.

    2014-12-01

    We use large scale direct (NVE and NVT) molecular dynamics simulations to study phase transitions. Typical runs contain one billion atoms and run for up to 100 million time-steps. This corresponds to scales of micrometers and microseconds and allows us to resolve similar nucleation rates as probed in some laboratory experiments. In homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation simulations using Lennard-Jones atoms (Diemand et al. JCP 2013) and various water models (ongoing work) we observe a second phase transition form liquid-to-solid in some of the lower temperature runs (see Tanaka et al. JCP 2011 for one such case). Here we will describe the crystallisation of these supercooled liquid-like nano-clusters in detail. We will present crystal structure, nucleation and growth rates for a range of temperatures, droplet sizes and interaction potentials and compare with model predictions. Since our liquid nano-droplets are condensing naturally out of the vapour phase, as in clouds and some experiments and industrial processes, we can address some specific questions relevant in these contexts: How does the droplet size, structure and especially its surface affect the freezing process? To what extend does the latent heat from the ongoing condensation onto the droplets surface delay and alter crystallisation? Can frozen nano-clusters grow by direct de-sublimation from the vapour, or is there always a liquid-like surface? And can they form directly without going through a liquid-like proto-cluster stage?

  9. Do "inhibitors of crystallisation" play any role in the prevention of kidney stones? A critique.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William G

    2017-02-01

    A critical examination of data in the literature and in as yet unpublished laboratory records on the possible role of so-called inhibitors of crystallisation in preventing the formation of calcium-containing kidney stones leads to the following conclusions. So-called inhibitors of spontaneous "self-nucleation" are unlikely to play any role in the initiation of the crystallisation of CaOx or CaP in urine because excessive urinary supersaturation of urine with respect to these salts dominates the onset of "self-nucleation" within the normal time frame of the transit of tubular fluid through the nephron (3-4 min). Inhibitors of the crystal growth of CaOx crystals may or may not play a significant role in the prevention of CaOx stone-formation since once again excessive supersaturation of urine can overwhelm any potential effect of the inhibitors on the growth process. However, they may play a role as inhibitors of crystal growth at lower levels of metastable supersaturation when the balance between supersaturation and inhibitors is more equal. Inhibitors of CaOx crystal aggregation may play a significant role in the prevention of stones, since they do not appear to be strongly affected by excessive supersaturation, either in vitro or in vivo. Inhibitors of CaOx crystal binding to renal tubular epithelium may exist but further studies are necessary to elucidate their importance in reducing the risk of initiating stones in the renal tubules. Inhibitors of CaOx crystal binding to Randall's Plaques and Randall's Plugs may exist but further studies are necessary to elucidate their importance in reducing the risk of initiating stones on renal papillae. There may be an alternative explanation other than a deficiency in the excretion of inhibitors for the observations that there is a difference between CaOx crystal size and degree of aggregation in the fresh, warm urines of normal subjects compared those in urine from patients with recurrent CaOx stones. This difference may

  10. Voyager: Neptune Encounter Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Voyager encounter data are presented in computer animation (CA) and real (R) animation. The highlights include a view of 2 full rotations of Neptune. It shows spacecraft trajectory 'diving' over Neptune and intercepting Triton's orbit, depicting radiation and occulation zones. Also shown are a renegade orbit of Triton and Voyager's encounter with Neptune's Magnetopause. A model of the spacecraft's complex maneuvers during close encounters of Neptune and Triton is presented. A view from Earth of Neptune's occulation experiment is is shown as well as a recreation of Voyager's final pass. There is detail of Voyager's Image Compensation technique which produces Voyager images. Eighteen images were produced on June 22 - 23, 1989, from 57 million miles away. A 68 day sequence which provides a stroboscopic view - colorization approximates what is seen by the human eye. Real time images recorded live from Voyager on 8/24/89 are presented. Photoclinometry produced the topography of Triton. Three images are used to create a sequence of Neptune's rings. The globe of Neptune and 2 views of the south pole are shown as well as Neptune rotating. The rotation of a scooter is frozen in images showing differential motion. There is a view of rotation of the Great Dark Spot about its own axis. Photoclinometry provides a 3-dimensional perspective using a color mosaic of Triton images. The globe is used to indicate the orientation of Neptune's crescent. The east and west plumes on Triton are shown.

  11. 1999 NCCS Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Jerome (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) is a high-performance scientific computing facility operated, maintained and managed by the Earth and Space Data Computing Division (ESDCD) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Earth Sciences Directorate. The mission of the NCCS is to advance leading-edge science by providing the best people, computers, and data storage systems to NASA's Earth and space sciences programs and those of other U.S. Government agencies, universities, and private institutions. Among the many computationally demanding Earth science research efforts supported by the NCCS in Fiscal Year 1999 (FY99) are the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission, Earth gravitational model development efforts, the National Weather Service's North American Observing System program, Data Assimilation Office studies, a NASA-sponsored project at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, a NASA-sponsored microgravity project conducted by researchers at the City University of New York and the University of Pennsylvania, the completion of a satellite-derived global climate data set, simulations of a new geodynamo model, and studies of Earth's torque. This document presents highlights of these research efforts and an overview of the NCCS, its facilities, and its people.

  12. FY 1986 budget highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    The FY 1986 budget request for DOE supports the energy, general science and defense missions of the Department in a comprehensive manner, while being responsive to the President's directive to all Federal agencies to freeze or reduce Government spending wherever possible to reduce the Federal deficit. The discussion displays the budget in a format designed to emphasize the varied activities of DOE. ''Research and Development'' describes the nature of the scientific and technical effort which underlies the Department's programs in a number of areas, such as energy, general science, and weapons research, which previously appeared in three distinct sections of our budget presentation. ''Defense Production and Support'' highlights a significant element of our defense activities which have production, whether of weapons or materials, as a common thread. ''Waste Activities'' combines programs from the civilian and defense areas to bring attention to a major effort of DOE ''Business Enterprises'' focuses attention on the fact that a number of the Department's activities are operated like businesses, marketing products and generating revenues. ''Grants and Other Energy Functions'' is how we group non-research and development grant programs and such essential activities as energy information and regulation. Finally, ''Department Management'' includes the various ''overhead'' organizations which keep the Department functioning at headquarters and in the field.

  13. Highlights of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  14. Computer simulations suggest direct and stable tip to tip interaction between the outer membrane channel TolC and the isolated docking domain of the multidrug RND efflux transporter AcrB.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas H; Raunest, Martin; Fischer, Nadine; Reith, Dirk; Kandt, Christian

    2016-07-01

    One way by which bacteria achieve antibiotics resistance is preventing drug access to its target molecule for example through an overproduction of multi-drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) protein super family of which AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli is a prominent example. Although representing one of the best studied efflux systems, the question of how AcrB and TolC interact is still unclear as the available experimental data suggest that either both proteins interact in a tip to tip manner or do not interact at all but are instead connected by a hexamer of AcrA molecules. Addressing the question of TolC-AcrB interaction, we performed a series of 100 ns - 1 µs-molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-embedded TolC in presence of the isolated AcrB docking domain (AcrB(DD)). In 5/6 simulations we observe direct TolC-AcrB(DD) interaction that is only stable on the simulated time scale when both proteins engage in a tip to tip manner. At the same time we find TolC opening and closing freely on extracellular side while remaining closed at the inner periplasmic bottleneck region, suggesting that either the simulated time is too short or additional components are required to unlock TolC.

  15. ESO Highlights in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  16. Estimation of Pressure and Temperature of Intrusive Rocks Crystallisation: A Case Study of Naqadeh, Pasveh and Delkeh Plutons, W Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhari, Seyed Ali; Bea, Fernando; Amini, Sadraddin; Ghalamghash, Jalil

    The Naqadeh, Pasveh and Delkeh plutons of North Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, W Iran, are medium to high potassium calc-alkaline intrusive rocks composed of mafic and felsic rocks. Six samples were selected as representative of different units of these plutons for estimation of pressure and temperature of magmatic crystallisation. Al-in-hornblende barometry and crosstie contents of amphiboles suggest <4.5 kbar (1.6-4.5 kbar) pressure for emplacement depth of intrusives. Different thermometer methods indicate various stages of magmatic evolution from near liquidus to sub-solidus temperatures. The highest temperature resulted from orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene solvus thermometry which is more than 1100°C, reflecting initial crystallisation of pyroxene from dioritic magma. Hornblende-clinopyroxene thermometry show another hyper-solidus crystallisation phase during magmatic cooling. The temperature come from hornblende-plagioclase thermometer (695-760°C) probably refer to late stage crystallisation of the magma near solidus condition. Calculated temperature of feldspar thermometry show scatter results (281-1086°C) implies sub-solidus re-equilibration of the feldspar during magmatic and post-magmatic evolution.

  17. Fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs)—New molecules for the prevention of cholesterol crystallisation in bile

    PubMed Central

    Gilat, T; Somjen, G; Mazur, Y; Leikin-Frenkel, A; Rosenberg, R; Halpern, Z; Konikoff, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cholesterol gall stones are a frequent disease for which at present surgery is the usual therapy. Despite the importance of bile acids it has become evident that phospholipids are the main cholesterol solubilisers in bile. Even phospholipid components, such as fatty acids, have anticrystallising activity.
AIM—To synthesise fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs) and study their effects on cholesterol crystallisation in bile in vitro and in vivo.
METHODS—FABACs were prepared by conjugation of cholic acid at position 3 with saturated fatty acids of variable chain length using an amide bond. Cholesterol crystallisation and its kinetics (crystal observation time, crystal mass) were studied in model bile, pooled enriched human bile, and fresh human bile using FABACs with saturated fatty acids of varying chain length (C-6 to C-22). Absorption of FABACs into blood and bile was tested in hamsters. Prevention of biliary cholesterol crystallisation in vivo was tested in hamsters and inbred mice.
RESULTS—FABACs strongly inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in model as well as native bile. The FABACs with longer acyl chains (C-16 to C-22) were more effective. At a concentration of 5 mM, FABACs almost completely inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in fresh human bile for 21 days. FABACs were absorbed and found in both portal and heart blood of hamsters. Levels in bile were 2-3 times higher than in blood, indicating active secretion. Appreciable levels were found in the systemic circulation 24-48 hours after a single administration. Ingested FABACs completely prevented the formation of cholesterol crystals in the gall bladders of hamsters and mice fed a lithogenic diet.
CONCLUSIONS—FABACs are potent inhibitors of cholesterol crystallisation in bile. They are absorbed and secreted into bile and prevent the earliest step of cholesterol gall stone formation in animals. These compounds may be of potential use in cholesterol gall stone disease in

  18. Influence of mixing and ultrasound frequency on antisolvent crystallisation of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Kentish, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to promote nucleation of crystals and produce a narrower size distribution in a controlled and reproducible manner for the crystallisation process. Although there are various theories that suggest cavitation bubbles are responsible for sonocrystallisation, most studies use power ultrasonic horns that generate both intense shear and cavitation and this can mask the role that cavitation bubbles play. High frequency ultrasound from a plate transducer can be used to examine the effect of cavitation bubbles without the intense shear effect. This study reports the crystal size and morphology with various mixing speeds and ultrasound frequencies. The results show high frequency ultrasound produced sodium chloride crystals of similar size distribution as an ultrasonic horn. In addition, ultrasound generated sodium chloride crystals having a more symmetrical cubic structure compared to crystals produced by a high shear mixer.

  19. Struvite crystallisation and recovery using a stainless steel structure as a seed material.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, K S; Valsami-Jones, E; Hobbs, P; Jefferson, B; Parsons, S A

    2007-06-01

    A metallic system acting as a seed substrate has been designed and developed in order to assess its efficiency in recovering phosphorus as struvite. The device, consisting of two concentric stainless steel meshes, was immerged in the upper section of a pilot crystallisation reactor fed with synthetic liquors (MgCl(2) x 6H(2)O, NH(4)H(2)PO(4),) for 2h. Apart from soluble PO(4)-P removals which remained in the range 79-80% with or without application of the metallic system, it was found that under the specific operating conditions tested the meshes were capable of accumulating struvite at a rate of 7.6 gm(-2)h(-1), hence reducing significantly the amount of fine particles remaining in solution from 302.2 to 12 mg L(-1) when compared to trials without mesh.

  20. Tracking intercumulus crystallisation at the Skaergaard intrusion using immobile trace elements: Evidence for liquid immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Madeleine

    2010-05-01

    A key target in the study of a layered intrusion is to constrain the liquid line of descent of the magma. However, the liquid line of descent of the intercumulus liquid is rarely considered, and is often assumed to be equivalent to that of the bulk magma. If the bulk liquid and interstitial liquids follow the same liquid line of descent, then intercumulus zoning profiles should be similar to the cryptic compositional variations seen with stratigraphic height. Because of extensive sub-solidus and diffusional changes that occur in slowly cooled rocks, clues to the composition of the intercumulus liquid can only be obtained using very slowly diffusing trace elements and components; the anorthite content of plagioclase and its Ti concentration are ideal in this respect. For the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, anorthite content (XAn) decreases monotonically as temperature decreases and the liquid becomes more evolved. The Ti content decreases in both cumulus and intercumulus plagioclase, as a result of falling liquid Ti after Fe-Ti oxides start to crystallise. However, Ti-XAn zoning in intercumulus plagioclase does not match the cryptic variations observed with increasing stratigraphic height, which demonstrates that the cumulus and intercumulus liquid lines of descent are not equivalent. In the intercumulus plagioclase, different trends develop adjacent to fine-grained, mafic and felsic interstitial pockets, which represent the crystallised products of trapped, late-stage immiscible liquids. The zoning trends vary systematically as a function of stratigraphic height and spatial location within the intrusion. The distribution and composition of the reversed plagioclase are used to infer the spatial distribution and differential movement of interstitial immiscible liquids throughout the Layered Series, and processes affecting the intercumulus liquid.

  1. Groundmass crystallisation and cooling rates of lava-like ignimbrites: the Grey's Landing ignimbrite, southern Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. S.; Cordonnier, B.; Rowe, M. C.; Szymanowski, D.; Bachmann, O.; Andrews, G. D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Constraining magmatic and eruptive processes is key to understanding how volcanoes operate. However, reconstructing eruptive and pre-eruptive processes requires the ability to see through any post-eruptive modification of the deposit. The well-preserved Grey's Landing ignimbrite from the central Snake River Plain provides an opportunity to systematically investigate the post-eruptive processes occurring through a single deposit sheet. Despite overall compositional homogeneity in both bulk and glass compositions, the Grey's Landing ignimbrite does preserve differences in the abundance of Li in plagioclase crystals which are strongly associated with the host lithology. Li abundances in plagioclase from the quickly cooled upper and basal vitrophyres are typically low (average 5 ppm, n = 262) while plagioclase from the microcrystalline interior of the deposit has higher Li contents (average 33 ppm, n = 773). Given that no other trace elemental parameter in plagioclase varies, we interpret the variability in Li to reflect a post-depositional process. Groundmass crystallisation of a rhyolite like Grey's Landing requires ˜50 % crystallisation of sanidine and variable amounts of a silica-rich phase (quartz, tridymite, cristobalite) and plagioclase to satisfy mass balance. We suggest the low affinity of Li for sanidine causes migration of groundmass Li into plagioclase during crystallisation. Even within the microcrystalline interior of the deposit, the morphology of the groundmass varies. The more marginal, finer-grained regions are dominated by cristobalite as the SiO2-rich phase while tridymite and quartz are additionally found in the more slowly cooled, coarser-grained portions of thick sections of the ignimbrite. Numerical models of cooling and crystallisation tested against field observations indicate that the groundmass crystallisation occurred relatively rapidly following emplacement (a maximum of a few years where the ignimbrite is thickest). These numerical

  2. Expression of the marA, soxS, acrB and ramA genes related to the AcrAB/TolC efflux pump in Salmonella enterica strains with and without quinolone resistance-determining regions gyrA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Rafaela Gomes; Galiana, Antonio; Cremades, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Magnani, Marciane; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Oliveira, Tereza C R M; Royo, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted in recent years to elucidate the structure, function and significance of AcrB, MarA, SoxS and RamA in Salmonella enterica. In this study, the relative quantification of acrB, soxS, marA and ramA genes expression was evaluated in 14 strains of S. enterica, with or without accompanying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA gene, that were exposed to ciprofloxacin during the exponential growth phase. The presence of ciprofloxacin during the log phase of bacterial growth activated the genes marA, soxS, ramA and acrB in all S. enterica strains analyzed in this study. The highest expression levels for acrB were observed in strains with gyrA mutation, and marA showed the highest expression in the strains without mutation. Considering only the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values<0.125 μg/mL (sensitive to ciprofloxacin), the most expressed gene in the strains both with and without mutations was acrB. In the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values ≥ 0.125 μg/mL (low susceptibility), with and without mutations in gyrA, the most expressed gene was marA. In this study, we observed that strains resistant to nalidixic acid may express genes associated with the efflux pump and the expression of the AcrAB-TolC pump genes seems to occur independently of mutations in gyrA.

  3. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are "The Teaching of Euclid" by Bertrand Russell, an article on integrals by G. H. Hardy, "An Address on Relativity" by A. S. Eddington, "The Food of the Gods" by Prof. E. H. Neville, and "Simplicity and Truthfulness in Arithmetic" by W. Hope-Jones. (CT)

  4. Time resolved WAXS/SAXS observations of crystallisation in oriented melts of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Mahendrasingam, A.; Blundell, D. J.; Urban, Volker S; Narayanan, T.; Fuller, W.

    2004-04-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been drawn in the melt state at 140, 145 and 150 C at extension rates {approx}1 s{sup -1} while simultaneously recording two dimensional SAXS and WAXS with a time resolution of 0.1 s. The first observable crystallisation is mainly in the orthorhombic form at a level of about {approx}1 wt%. At higher draw ratios additional crystallisation is in the hexagonal form up to {approx}10 wt%. The crystallization is accompanied by strong SAXS equatorial scatter with maxima at {approx}25 nm period; in some cases meridional maxima are also visible at {approx}120 nm. Substantial crystallisation occurs on subsequent cooling to 130 C, accompanied by strong meridional maxima of narrow lateral width. The observed crystal forms are consistent with a temperature-strain phase diagram, favoring hexagonal at higher strains. There are indications that the thermodynamic orthorhombic to hexagonal transition T{sub tr} is above 150 C so that all the observable hexagonal structures are metastable. The initial orthorhombic crystals are associated with the high molecular weight tail and provide the strain hardening to enable the formation of subsequent hexagonal crystals. The equatorial SAXS lobes are interpreted in terms of lateral density fluctuations that are associated with an arrangement of columns of oriented chains comprising both orthorhombic and hexagonal structures. The columns are embryonic shish structures that on cooling nucleate kebab overgrowths.

  5. Massively parallel molecular-dynamics simulation of ice crystallisation and melting: the roles of system size, ensemble, and electrostatics.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J

    2014-12-21

    Ice crystallisation and melting was studied via massively parallel molecular dynamics under periodic boundary conditions, using approximately spherical ice nano-particles (both "isolated" and as a series of heterogeneous "seeds") of varying size, surrounded by liquid water and at a variety of temperatures. These studies were performed for a series of systems ranging in size from ∼1 × 10(6) to 8.6 × 10(6) molecules, in order to establish system-size effects upon the nano-clusters" crystallisation and dissociation kinetics. Both "traditional" four-site and "single-site" and water models were used, with and without formal point charges, dipoles, and electrostatics, respectively. Simulations were carried out in the microcanonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles, to assess the influence of "artificial" thermo- and baro-statting, and important disparities were observed, which declined upon using larger systems. It was found that there was a dependence upon system size for both ice growth and dissociation, in that larger systems favoured slower growth and more rapid melting, given the lower extent of "communication" of ice nano-crystallites with their periodic replicae in neighbouring boxes. Although the single-site model exhibited less variation with system size vis-à-vis the multiple-site representation with explicit electrostatics, its crystallisation-dissociation kinetics was artificially fast.

  6. Massively parallel molecular-dynamics simulation of ice crystallisation and melting: The roles of system size, ensemble, and electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice crystallisation and melting was studied via massively parallel molecular dynamics under periodic boundary conditions, using approximately spherical ice nano-particles (both "isolated" and as a series of heterogeneous "seeds") of varying size, surrounded by liquid water and at a variety of temperatures. These studies were performed for a series of systems ranging in size from ˜1 × 106 to 8.6 × 106 molecules, in order to establish system-size effects upon the nano-clusters" crystallisation and dissociation kinetics. Both "traditional" four-site and "single-site" and water models were used, with and without formal point charges, dipoles, and electrostatics, respectively. Simulations were carried out in the microcanonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles, to assess the influence of "artificial" thermo- and baro-statting, and important disparities were observed, which declined upon using larger systems. It was found that there was a dependence upon system size for both ice growth and dissociation, in that larger systems favoured slower growth and more rapid melting, given the lower extent of "communication" of ice nano-crystallites with their periodic replicae in neighbouring boxes. Although the single-site model exhibited less variation with system size vis-à-vis the multiple-site representation with explicit electrostatics, its crystallisation-dissociation kinetics was artificially fast.

  7. Estimation of the growth kinetics for the cooling crystallisation of paracetamol and ethanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Niall A.; Ó'Ciardhá, Clifford T.; Frawley, Patrick J.

    2011-08-01

    This work details the estimation of the growth kinetics of paracetamol in ethanol solutions for cooling crystallisation processes, by means of isothermal seeded batch experiments. The growth kinetics of paracetamol crystals were evaluated in isolation, with the growth rate assumed to be size independent. Prior knowledge of the Metastable Zone Width (MSZW) was required, so that supersaturation ratios of 1.7-1.1 could be induced in solution without the occurrence of nucleation. The technique involved the utilisation of two in-situ Process Analytical Techniques (PATs), with a Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM ®) utilised to ensure that negligible nucleation occurred and an Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) probe employed for online monitoring of solute concentration. Initial Particle Size Distributions (PSDs) were used in conjunction with desupersaturation profiles to determine the growth rate as a function of temperature and supersaturation. Furthermore, the effects of seed loading and size on the crystal growth rate were investigated. A numerical model, incorporating the population balance equation and the method of moments, was utilised to describe the crystal growth process. Experimental parameters were compared to the model simulation, with the accuracy of the model validated by means of the final product PSDs and solute concentration.

  8. Influence of Ag2O on crystallisation and structural modifications of phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravindan, Samickannian; Rajendran, Venkatachalam; Rajendran, Nallaiyan

    2012-07-01

    A series of phosphate glasses of composition 45P2O5-(40 - x)CaO-15Na2O-xAg2O (x = 0, 3, 6, 8, 10 and 12 mol%) with different Ag2O contents were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The incorporated Ag2O highly influenced the increase of its transition tendency towards crystallisation and, on contrary, reduced the degree of glassification of phosphate glasses. The lowering of glass transition temperature and increase in thermal expansion were observed in glasses against Ag2O inclusions. The crystalline phase transitions of amorphous material during thermal treatment were confirmed by employing X-ray diffraction studies. As revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the incorporated silver oxide into phosphate glass exists in two different oxidation states, Ag2O and AgO. The pyrophosphate and metaphosphate units were predominantly occupied in glass and glass ceramics. The elastic moduli and Vicker's hardness values exhibited the decrease in phosphate glass structural compactness due to Ag2O-incorporation and these values were found to improve because of crystalline transitions.

  9. Supersaturation patterns in counter-diffusion crystallisation methods followed by Mach Zehnder interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, J. M.; Novella, M. L.; Otálora, F.

    1999-01-01

    We present experimental observation of the spatio-temporal pattern of supersaturation in counter-diffusion methods. These complex patterns were recorded by dynamical interferometric analysis using a Mach-Zehnder configuration. Tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme crystals were grown inside APCF (advanced protein crystallisation facility) reactors. Salt and protein diffusion profiles were obtained independently by performing duplicated experiments with and without protein in the protein chamber; salt gradients were observed directly while protein concentration profiles are computed from the differences in refractive index between the two experiments. As expected from computer simulations, the time evolution of supersaturation shows a maximum about 45 h after activation (although this value can change as a function of the starting conditions and the geometry of the reactor). Nucleation takes place before this maximum supersaturation is reached. This explains the trend of the growth rate versus time curves for experiments performed within APCF reactors (both on ground and in space) and in capillaries by the gel acupuncture technique. By using very low concentration agarose gel in the protein chamber, sedimentation and buoyancy effects are eliminated so that the effects of gravity on fluid dynamics and hence on the spatio-temporal evolution of supersaturation can be assessed. These results confirm experimentally the predicted behaviour of counter-diffusion systems and support their use in growing large high-quality protein single crystals.

  10. In Situ Thermal Characterization of Cooling/Crystallising Lavas During Rheology Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Transport properties of silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. Migration and transport of silicate melts in the earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperature regimes where they are subject to non-isothermal and non-equilibrium crystallization. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce. In such dynamic situations heat capacities, latent heats of phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and thermal inertia of the apparatus are all potential factors in determining the thermal regime. Yet thermal characterisation of non- equilibrium conditions are absent, hampered by the inconvenience of recording in situ sample temperature during dynamic rheological measurements. Here we present a new experimental setup for in situ sample temperature monitoring in high temperature rheometry. We overcome the limitation of hardwired thermocouples during sample deformation by employing wireless data transmitters directly mounted onto the rotating spindle, immersed in the sample. This adaptation enables in situ, real-time, observations of the thermal regime of crystallising, deforming lava samples under the transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions expected in lava flows in nature. We present the apparatus calibration procedure, assess the experimental uncertainty in viscosity measurements and discuss experimental data investigating the dynamic, rheologic and thermal evolution of lavas in both temperature step and continuous cooling experiments.

  11. An investigation into the effects of thermal history on the crystallisation behaviour of amorphous paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Avalle, Paolo; Saklatvala, Robert; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2008-05-01

    The effects of thermal history and sample preparation on the polymorphic transformation profile from amorphous paracetamol have been investigated. The crystallisation behaviour of slow and quench cooled amorphous paracetamol was studied using DSC. Quench cooled paracetamol showed a glass transition (Tg) at 25.2 degrees C, a single exothermic transition at 64.9 degrees C and an endotherm at 167.7 degrees C. The initial degree of crystallinity was calculated as a function of time and recrystallisation circa 20 degrees C below Tg was demonstrated. Slow cooled material in pinholed or hermetic pans (sealed under nitrogen) showed a Tg at 25.1 degrees C, two exothermic transitions at circa 80-85 degrees C and 120-130 degrees C followed by melting at 156.9 degrees C; a single exotherm at 83 degrees C was observed for material sealed in hermetic pans under ambient conditions. Hot stage microscopy yielded complementary information on crystal growth and transformation profile. A transformation scheme is proposed which indicates that amorphous paracetamol may transform into Form III, II or I depending on the thermal history and the gaseous environment in which recrystallisation takes place. The study has demonstrated that the thermal history and encapsulation method may profoundly influence the polymorphic forms generated from amorphous paracetamol.

  12. The potential energy landscape for crystallisation of a Lennard-Jones fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Vanessa K.; Wales, David J.

    2016-07-01

    Crystallisation pathways are explored by direct analysis of the potential energy landscape for a system of Lennard-Jones particles with periodic boundary conditions. A database of minima and transition states linking liquid and crystalline states is constructed using discrete path sampling and the entire potential energy landscape from liquid to crystal is visualised. We demonstrate that there is a strong negative correlation between the number of atoms in the largest crystalline cluster and the potential energy. In common with previous results we find a strong bias towards the growth of FCC rather than HCP clusters, despite a very small potential energy difference. We characterise three types of perfect crystals with very similar energies: pure FCC, pure HCP, and combinations of FCC and HCP layers. There are also many slightly defective crystalline structures. The effect of the simulation box is analysed for a supercell containing 864 atoms. There are low barriers between some of the different crystalline structures via pathways involving sliding layers, and many different defective structures with FCC layers stacked at an angle to the periodic box. Finally, we compare a binary Lennard-Jones system and visualise the potential energy landscape from supercooled liquid to crystal.

  13. Insights into the crystallisation process from anhydrous, hydrated and solvated crystal forms of diatrizoic acid.

    PubMed

    Fucke, Katharina; McIntyre, Garry J; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Wilkinson, Clive; Edwards, Alison J; Howard, Judith A K; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-01-12

    Diatrizoic acid (DTA), a clinically used X-ray contrast agent, crystallises in two hydrated, three anhydrous and nine solvated solid forms, all of which have been characterised by X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal neutron structures of DTA dihydrate and monosodium DTA tetrahydrate have been determined. All of the solid-state structures have been analysed using partial atomic charges and hardness algorithm (PACHA) calculations. Even though in general all DTA crystal forms reveal similar intermolecular interactions, the overall crystal packing differs considerably from form to form. The water of the dihydrate is encapsulated between a pair of host molecules, which calculations reveal to be an extraordinarily stable motif. DTA presents functionalities that enable hydrogen and halogen bonding, and whilst an extended hydrogen-bonding network is realised in all crystal forms, halogen bonding is not present in the hydrated crystal forms. This is due to the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network based on individual enclosed water squares, which is not amenable to the concomitant formation of halogen bonds. The main interaction in the solvates involves the carboxylic acid, which corroborates the hypothesis that this strong interaction is the last one to be broken during the crystal desolvation and nucleation process.

  14. Atmospheric Research 2011 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of Atmospheric Research. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  15. Children's Environmental Health 2008 Highlights

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, eighth in an annual series from the Office of Children's Health Protection and Environmental Education, highlights the Agency's recent work on protecting the health of children by addressing the environments where they live, learn and play.

  16. 1978 Aeronautics and Space Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    These highlights include the space shuttle, new astronauts, Pioneers to Venus, Voyagers to Jupiter and Saturn, High Energy Astronomy Observatories Space Telescope, Landsat/Seasat, space applications, wind energy research, and aeronautics.

  17. GHGRP Yearly Overview Data Highlights

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  18. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  19. Research and technology highlights, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities supported by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. This report also describes some of the Center's most important research and testing facilities.

  20. Cloning, expression and crystallisation of SGT1 co-chaperone protein from Glaciozyma antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Beddoe, Travis; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Studies on psycrophiles are now in the limelight of today's post genomic era as they fascinate the research and development industries. The discovery from Glaciozyma antarctica, an extreme cold adapted yeast from Antarctica shows promising future to provide cost effective natural sustainable energy and create wider understanding of the property that permits this organisms to adapt to extreme temperature downshift. In plants and yeast, studies show the interaction between SGT1 and HSP90 are essential for disease resistance and heat stress by activating a number of resistance proteins. Here we report for the first time cloning, expression and crystallization of the recombinant SGT1 protein of G. antarctica (rGa_SGT1), a highly conserved eukaryotic protein that interacts with the molecular chaperones HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) apparently associated in a role of co-chaperone that may play important role in cold adaptation. The sequence analysis of rGa_SGT1 revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of SGT1 protein. In this study, we present the outlines and results of protein structural study of G. antarctica SGT1 protein. We validate this approach by starting with cloning the target insert into Ligation Independent Cloning system proceeded with expression using E. coli system, and crystallisation of the target rGA_SGT1 protein. The work is still on going with the target subunit of the complex proteins yielded crystals. These results, still ongoing, open a platform for better understanding of the uniqueness of this crucial molecular machine function in cold adaptation.

  1. Splice Variants of Perlucin from Haliotis laevigata Modulate the Crystallisation of CaCO3

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Sebastian; Grunwald, Ingo; Kelm, Sørge

    2014-01-01

    Perlucin is one of the proteins of the organic matrix of nacre (mother of pearl) playing an important role in biomineralisation. This nacreous layer can be predominately found in the mollusc lineages and is most intensively studied as a compound of the shell of the marine Australian abalone Haliotis laevigata. A more detailed analysis of Perlucin will elucidate some of the still unknown processes in the complex interplay of the organic/inorganic compounds involved in the formation of nacre as a very interesting composite material not only from a life science-based point of view. Within this study we discovered three unknown Perlucin splice variants of the Australian abalone H. laevigata. The amplified cDNAs vary from 562 to 815 base pairs and the resulting translation products differ predominantly in the absence or presence of a varying number of a 10 mer peptide C-terminal repeat. The splice variants could further be confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) analysis as endogenous Perlucin, purified from decalcified abalone shell. Interestingly, we observed that the different variants expressed as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins in E. coli showed strong differences in their influence on precipitating CaCO3 and that these differences might be due to a splice variant-specific formation of large protein aggregates influenced by the number of the 10 mer peptide repeats. Our results are evidence for a more complex situation with respect to Perlucin functional regulation by demonstrating that Perlucin splice variants modulate the crystallisation of calcium carbonate. The identification of differentially behaving Perlucin variants may open a completely new perspective for the field of nacre biomineralisation. PMID:24824517

  2. Investigation of the hydrothermal crystallisation of the perovskite solid solution NaCe{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} and its defect chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Woodward, David I.; Peel, Martin D.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-11-15

    Perovskites of nominal composition NaCe{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} (0≤x≤1) crystallise directly under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. Raman spectroscopy shows distortion from the ideal cubic structure and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction reveals that the materials represent a continuous series in rhombohedral space group R3-bar c. Ce L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy shows that while the majority of cerium is present as Ce{sup 3+} there is evidence for Ce{sup 4+}. The paramagnetic Ce{sup 3+} affects the chemical shift and line width of {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectra, which also show with no evidence for A-site ordering. {sup 2}H MAS NMR of samples prepared in D{sub 2}O shows the inclusion of deuterium, which IR spectroscopy shows is most likely to be as D{sub 2}O. The deuterium content is highest for the cerium-rich materials, consistent with oxidation of some cerium to Ce{sup 4+} to provide charge balance of A-site water. - Graphical abstract: A multi-element A-site perovskite crystallises directly from aqueous, basic solutions at 240 °C; while the paramagnetic effect of Ce{sup 3+} on the {sup 23}Na NMR shows a homogeneous solid-solution, the incorporation of A-site water is also found from {sup 2}H NMR and IR, with oxidation of some cerium to charge balance proved by XANES spectroscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Direct hydrothermal synthesis allows crystallisation of a perovskite solid-solution. • XANES spectroscopy shows some oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+}. • The paramagnetism of Ce{sup 3+} shifts and broadens the {sup 23}Na solid-state NMR. • The perovskite materials incorporate water as an A-site defect.

  3. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The role of the NASA Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests that were performed during calendar year 1989 in the NASA Langley Research Center test facilities are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the NASA Langley Research Center are illustrated along with the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1989 are described in Research and Technology 1989 - Langley Research Center.

  4. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1985 in Langley test facilities, are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research, are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1985 are described in Research and Technology-1985 Annual Report of the Langley Research Center.

  5. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The role of NASA-Langley is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and spaceflight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests are highlighted which were performed during 1990 in the NASA-Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated. Other highlights of Langley research and technology for 1990 are described in Research and Technology 1990 Langley Research Center.

  6. Research and technology highlights, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year are presented. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of research and technology (R&T) activities supported by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. Some of the Center's most important research and testing facilities are also described.

  7. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  8. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS. PMID:27429744

  9. Research and Technology Highlights 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission is accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, other NASA Centers, the educational community, and the local community. This report contains highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of research and technology (R&T) activities carried out by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. An electronic version of the report is available at URL http://techreports.larc.nasa.gov/RandT95. This color version allows viewing, retrieving, and printing of the highlights, searching and browsing through the sections, and access to an on-line directory of Langley researchers.

  10. Estimation of the nucleation kinetics for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol/water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó'Ciardhá, Clifford T.; Frawley, Patrick J.; Mitchell, Niall A.

    2011-08-01

    In this work the primary nucleation kinetics have been estimated for the anti-solvent crystallisation of paracetamol in methanol-water solutions from metastable zone widths (MSZW) and induction times at 25 °C. Laser back-scattering via a focused beam reflectance Measurement (FBRM ®) is utilised to detect the onset of nucleation. The theoretical approach of Kubota was employed to estimate the nucleation kinetics, which accounts for the sensitivity of the nucleation detection technique. This approach is expanded in this work to analyse the induction time for an anti-solvent crystallisation process. Solvent composition is known to have a significant impact on the measured induction times and MSZW. The induction time in this paper was measured from 40% to 70% mass water and the MSZW is measured from 40% to 60% mass water. The primary focus of the paper was to gauge the extent of how solvent composition affects nucleation kinetics so that this effect may be incorporated into a population balance model. Furthermore, the effects of solvent composition on the estimated nucleation rates are investigated. The primary nucleation rates were found to decrease with dynamic solvent composition, with the extent of their reduction linked to the gradient of the solubility curve. Finally, both MSZW and induction time methods have been found to produce similar estimates for the nucleation parameters.

  11. The influence of polyethyleneglycols on predicting crystallisation conditions of lipase from wheat germ by dynamic light scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo-Flores, Ma. Eugenia; Soriano-García, Manuel; Moreno, Abel

    1998-03-01

    The availability of lasers and the development of dynamic light scattering methods have led to a rebirth of the interest in light scattering applications in polymer sciences, biophysical chemistry and recently in biological macromolecules. In the case of these biomolecules, all the investigations have been focused on the crystallisation step, which is considered a handicap in protein crystallography, not only for the difficulties found in the search for crystallisation conditions, but also because little is known about crystal growth behaviour of protein molecules in solution [1] [L. Jancarik, S.H. Kim, J. Appl. Crystallogr., 24 (1991) 409] [2] [A. McPherson, Preparation and Analysis of Protein Crystals, Krieger, Malabar, FL, 1989, Chapter 4]. In this paper, the influence of polyethylene glycols ranging from polyethyleneglycol 400 to polyethyleneglycol 6000 molecular weight and of two alcohols (methanol and ethanol) on the aggregation steps of lipase from wheat germ at pH 6 and 9 has been studied in solution by the use of dynamic light scattering methods. It has been possible to evaluate whether the initial formation of clusters and the trend for aggregation is due to nucleation (crystal formation) or to random mechanisms (amorphous precipitate obtaining). Finally, it is shown how the experimental predictions are useful to design new experimental protocols in order to generate the first available nucleation of the protein studied, which will be grown by either macro or microseeding techniques.

  12. Extreme chemical conditions of crystallisation of Umbrian Melilitolites and wealth of rare, late stage/hydrothermal minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Schiazza, M.

    2014-12-01

    Melilitolites of the Umbria Latium Ultra-alkaline District display a complete crystallisation sequence of peculiar, late-stage mineral phases and hydrothermal/cement minerals, analogous to fractionated mineral associations from the Kola Peninsula. This paper summarises 20 years of research which has resulted in the identification of a large number of mineral species, some very rare or completely new and some not yet classified. The progressive increasing alkalinity of the residual liquid allowed the formation of Zr-Ti phases and further delhayelitemacdonaldite mineral crystallisation in the groundmass. The presence of leucite and kalsilite in the igneous assemblage is unusual and gives a kamafugitic nature to the rocks. Passage to non-igneous temperatures (T<600 °C) is marked by the metastable reaction and formation of a rare and complex zeolite association (T<300 °C). Circulation of low-temperature (T<100 °C) K-Ca-Ba-CO2-SO2-fluids led to the precipitation of sulphates and hydrated and/or hydroxylated silicate-sulphate-carbonates. As a whole, this mineral assemblage can be considered typical of ultra-alkaline carbonatitic rocks.

  13. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs. Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation. PMID:27672048

  14. Growth morphology of single-crystal grains obtained by directional crystallisation of an Al-Cu-Fe alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowiec, Marian; Bogdanowicz, Wlodzimierz; Krawczyk, Jacek; Formanek, Bolesław; Sozanska, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Quasicrystalline as well as crystalline faceted single grains of four phases were obtained during directional crystallisation of an Al-Cu-Fe alloy by the Bridgman technique. The monoclinic λ phase, Al13(Cu, Fe)4, dominating at high temperatures formed single-crystal lamellae 0.5 mm to 1 mm thick. A second type of attractive morphological form exhibiting flux dissolution terraces was observed on spherical single crystals of β phase Al(Fe, Cu). Rectangular, hexagonal and octagonal shaped dissolution terraces were revealed at the positions of two-, three- and four-fold symmetry axes, respectively. A single quasicrystalline ψ phase, Al6Cu2Fe, exhibited icosahedral symmetry with growth forms of a dodecahedron with pentagonal facets. The flux dissolution of the β phase apparently plays an essential role in a peritectic reaction leading to quasicrystalline ψ phase formation. Polygonal single grains of ω phase Al7Cu2Fe exhibiting tetragonal symmetry formed the fourth type of thermodynamically stable growth forms. Single grains of the ω phase crystallised in the form of pellets with an octagonal cross-section. The growth morphology of the stable phases was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the growth forms described was confirmed by X-ray microanalysis using a scanning electron microscope, whereas the phase composition was determined using electron selected area diffraction and X-ray powder diffraction.

  15. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation.

  16. Influence of variety, date of harvest and storage time on factors connected with the crystallisation on canned scorzonera (Scorzonera hispanica).

    PubMed

    Vulsteke, G; Calus, A

    1990-04-01

    In the period 1983-1986, research was carried out into the inulin content of scorzonera during ripening and storage. Since the inulin content is determining for the occurrence of crystallisation with canned scorzonera, the effects of the varieties, the time of harvest and storage of the scorzonera were investigated. The changing of the inulin content on the conversion into reducing sugars was checked; the effect of the dry matter and nitrate content were also defined. The aim was to define whether the determination of the inulin content was a useful parameter for the ripening of the scorzonera. On the whole, the different varieties showed remarkable differences where fructosanes + inulin, as well as pure inulin, were concerned. A significant decrease of the inulin content was obtained from the middle of November, by so far that it was below the limit above which crystallisation takes place. A two-month storage period of scorzonera harvested in early October also led to a very low inulin content, so that no problems could occur while canning. Storage conditions of the scorzonera seemed of importance too. The nitrate content of the different scorzonera varieties was low, although some variations were noted. The crops harvested in early December showed considerably lower contents when compared to those harvested in early October or mid-November. The inulin content as well as the content of reducing sugars are a useful parameter to determine the maturity of the scorzonera.

  17. Recent Highlights of ATVB Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic studies over the past decades using in vitro systems, animal models, and human tissues have highlighted the complexity of pathophysiological processes of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia, as one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, is still the focus of many mechanistic studies and the major therapeutic target of atherosclerosis. Although there is a dire need to validate many experimental findings in humans, there is a large number of approaches that have been showing promise for contributing to future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25717174

  18. Electrochemical effects of magmatic crystallisation: cyclic units of the Bushveld Igneous Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Reid, David L.; Dulski, Peter; Keiding, Jakob K.; Trumbull, Robert B.

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Critical Zone (UCZ) of the Bushveld Igneous Complex displays spectacular layering in the form of cyclic units comprising a basal chromitite layer overlain by a sequence of silicate cumulates in the order, from the bottom to the top, pyroxentite-norite-anorthosite. Electron microprobe and laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of chromite and silicate cumulate minerals in the cyclic units between the UG2 chromitite and the Merensky reef revealed variations in major and trace element compositions that are difficult to reconcile with existing models of cumulate mineral-melt evolution. The anomalies in mineral chemistry are best developed at sharp contacts of chromitites with adjacent anorthosite and pyroxenitic cumulates. At the contacts, major element characteristics of chromite composition change abruptly from high and stable Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) and Fe2+/Fe3+ typical for cumulus chromitites to variable and generally low values in chromite crystals disseminated in silicate cumulates. Chromites from different types of cumulates also differ in Sc, V, Ni and Zn contents. The abrupt changes in chromite composition mark the contacts regardless of the thickness of the chromitite layer and estimated mass proportions of chromite to intercumulus liquid. Chemical variations, which defy a simple explanation, are also observed in plagioclase. In addition to previously revealed inconsistency between chemical trends of cumulus plagioclase and orthopyroxene in the UCZ cyclic units our study demonstrates that intercumulus, poikilitic plagioclase cementing chromitite layers has anomalously low Li, K, Rb concentrations and K/La values. Summarising previous studies and the new trace element data we propose a model of post-cumulus re-crystallisation leading to consolidation of a modally layered crystal-liquid mush into a sequence of nearly monomineral layers of chromitites, pyroxenites and anorthosites, which defines the cyclic units. The crucial element of the model is the establishment of

  19. Copper stable isotopes as tracers of metal-sulphide segregation and fractional crystallisation processes on iron meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Helen M.; Archer, Corey

    2011-06-01

    lowest Δ 65Cu M-FeS values, whereas the converse is observed in the irons with large values D Cu that deviate most from Cu concentration equilibrium. The magnitudes of Cu and Fe isotope fractionation between metal and FeS in the most equilibrated samples are similar: 0.25 and 0.32‰/amu, respectively. As proposed in an earlier study ( Williams et al., 2006) the range in Δ 57Fe M-FeS values can be explained by incomplete Fe isotope equilibrium between metal and sulphide during cooling, where the most rapidly-cooled samples are furthest from isotopic equilibrium and display the smallest Δ 57Fe M-FeS and largest D Cu values. The range in Δ 65Cu M-FeS, however, reflects the combined effects of partial isotopic equilibrium overprinting an initial kinetic signature produced by the diffusion of Cu from metal into exsolving sulphides and the faster diffusion of the lighter isotope. In this scenario, newly-exsolved sulphides initially have low Cu contents (i.e. high D Cu) and extremely light δ 65Cu FeS values; with progressive equilibrium and fractional crystallisation the Cu contents of the sulphides increase as their isotopic composition becomes less extreme and closer to the metal value. The correlation between Δ 65Cu M-FeS and Δ 57Fe M-FeS is therefore a product of the superimposed effects of kinetic fractionation of Cu and incomplete equilibrium between metal and sulphide for both isotope systems during cooling. The correlations between Δ 65Cu M-FeS and Δ 57Fe M-FeS are defined by both magmatic and non-magmatic irons record fractional crystallisation and cooling of metallic melts on their respective parent bodies as sulphur and chalcophile elements become excluded from crystallised solid iron and concentrated in the residual melt. Fractional crystallisation processes at shallow levels have been implicated in the two main classes of models for the origin of the non-magmatic iron meteorites; at (i) shallow levels in impact melt models and (ii) at much deeper levels

  20. Langley aerospace test highlights - 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. This report highlights some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1986 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world. The report illustrates both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  1. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  2. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  3. Langley aerospace test highlights, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1988 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  4. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  5. Highlighting inconsistencies regarding metal biosorption.

    PubMed

    Robalds, Artis; Naja, Ghinwa Melodie; Klavins, Maris

    2016-03-05

    Thousands of articles have been devoted to examine different types of biosorbents and their use in cleaning polluted waters. An important objective of some studies has been the identification of the biosorption mechanisms. This type of investigation is not always performed, as it can only be done if scientists are aware of all mechanisms that, at least theoretically, control the removal of the target substances. Mistakes are often made, even in highly cited review articles, where biosorption mechanisms are named and/or grouped. The aim of this article is to highlight errors and inaccuracies as well as to discuss different classification systems of the biosorption mechanisms. This article serves as a guide, as well as a platform for discussion among researchers involved in the investigation of biosorbents, in an effort to avoid reproducing errors in subsequent articles.

  6. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  7. An in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigation of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation from supersaturated sodium aluminate liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Loan, Melissa J.; Madsen, Ian C.; Knott, Robert B.; Brodie, Greta M.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-02-01

    Lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation from supersaturated sodium aluminate liquor at 70 °C was investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The presence of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides in the Bayer process has implications for the nucleation and growth of scale on process equipment, and a greater understanding of the effect they have on Al(OH) 3 crystallisation may allow for development of methods for Al(OH) 3 scale prevention. The early stages of both crystallisation reactions were characterised by nucleation of gibbsite on the seed material. This was followed by a rapid increase in gibbsite concentration, which coincided with the appearance of the bayerite and nordstrandite polymorphs of Al(OH) 3. The lepidocrocite-seeded reaction then proceeded via a mechanism similar to that which has been observed previously for goethite, hematite and magnetite-seeded Al(OH) 3 crystallisation. Different behaviour was observed in the ferrihydrite-seeded experiment, with nucleation as well as growth occurring during the period of rapid increase in gibbsite concentration, followed by a period of diffusion controlled growth.

  8. Highlights of Coastal Waves 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David P.; Dorman, Clive E.; Edwards, Kathleen A.; Brooks, Ian M.; Melville, W. Kendall; Burk, Stephen D.; Thompson, William T.; Holt, Teddy; Ström, Linda M.; Tjernström, Michael; Grisogono, Branko; Bane, John M.; Nuss, Wendell A.; Morley, Bruce M.; Schanot, Allen J.

    1998-07-01

    Some of the highlights of an experiment designed to study coastal atmospheric phenomena along the California coast (Coastal Waves 1996 experiment) are described. This study was designed to address several problems, including the cross-shore variability and turbulent structure of the marine boundary layer, the influence of the coast on the development of the marine layer and clouds, the ageostrophy of the flow, the dynamics of trapped events, the parameterization of surface fluxes, and the supercriticality of the marine layer.Based in Monterey, California, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 Hercules and the University of North Carolina Piper Seneca obtained a comprehensive set of measurements on the structure of the marine layer. The study focused on the effects of prominent topographic features on the wind. Downstream of capes and points, narrow bands of high winds are frequently encountered. The NCAR-designed Scanning Aerosol Backscatter Lidar (SABL) provided a unique opportunity to connect changes in the depth of the boundary layer with specific features in the dynamics of the flow field.An integral part of the experiment was the use of numerical models as forecast and diagnostic tools. The Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model System (COAMPS) provided high-resolution forecasts of the wind field in the vicinity of capes and points, which aided the deployment of the aircraft. Subsequently, this model and the MIUU (University of Uppsala) numerical model were used to support the analysis of the field data.These are some of the most comprehensive measurements of the topographically forced marine layer that have been collected. SABL proved to be an exceptionally useful tool to resolve the small-scale structure of the boundary layer and, combined with in situ turbulence measurements, provides new insight into the structure of the marine atmosphere. Measurements were made sufficiently far offshore to distinguish between the

  9. VGP highlights of Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    Two special events of interest to Union and VGP section members will take place on Tuesday afternoon, May 25, during AGU's Spring Meeting in Baltimore.R. A. Daly Lecture: Every section of AGU has an established “Bowie Lecture” named after a distinguished scientist associated with the work of the section. These lectures are delivered by special invitation during the annual AGU Spring or Fall meetings and are highlighted in the program. The VGP lecture is named for Reginald A. Daly, but it has never been given. Its inauguration at this year's Spring Meeting celebrates the distinguished career of this famous Harvard professor and author of the seminal Igneous Rocks and the Depths of the Earth (1914, 1933). Most fittingly, the inaugural lecture will be given by David Walker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory after a day-long Union session on discontinuities in the mantle. Dave's lecture, “Errors in Earth Evolution,” will start at 4:45 P.M. We can expect to hear an original and provocative talk that features exciting, new data.

  10. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Montecchia, F.; Incicchitti, A.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-11-01

    The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM) particle component(s) in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes) as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles) have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  11. The influence of crystallised Fe3O4 on the magnetic properties of coprecipitation-derived ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, O; Spriano, S; Verné, E; Cöisson, M; Tiberto, P; Allia, P

    2005-07-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics are potential candidates for magnetic induction hyperthermia, which is one form of inducing deep-regional hyperthermia, by using a magnetic field. The aim of this work was to analyse the influence of the amount of crystallised magnetite on the magnetic properties of glass-ceramic samples. Thus, two different ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics with the composition of the system Na(2)O-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-FeO-Fe(2)O(3) were prepared by melting at 1500 degrees C for 30 min of the coprecipitation-derived starting products. The X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of nanometric magnetite crystals in a glassy matrix after cooling from melting temperature. The estimated amount of crystallised magnetite varies between 20 and 45 wt.%, as a function of the chemical composition. The morphology of the crystals was studied by scanning electron micrography and transmission electron micrography. Glass transition temperature and thermal stability were investigated by differential thermal analysis. Magnetic hysteresis cycles were analysed using a vibrating sample magnetometer with a maximum applied field of 17 kOe, at room temperature, in quasi-static conditions. Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a magnetic induction furnace. The power losses estimated from calorimetric measurements under a magnetic field of 40 kA/m and 440 kHz are 65 W/g for the glass-ceramic with lower iron oxides content and 25 W/g for the glass-ceramic with higher iron oxide content.

  12. ESO PR Highlights in 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    new interesting scientific results on the basis of data from ESO telescopes, including several results from the unmatched interferometer mode of the VLT, the VLTI, some of which were highlighted in ESO Press Releases. Certainly worth noting is the possible first ever bona-fide image of an exoplanet and the discovery of the lightest known exoplanet . At the beginning of the year, Paranal welcomed the first Auxiliary Telescope, while on the instrument side as well, 2004 was a good year: we saw the arrival of SINFONI on the VLT, of AMBER on the VLTI, and the installation at the NACO Adaptive Optics instrument of the " Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI)" to detect exoplanets. And the first prototype of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory was able to provide unprecedented results on the existence of Type-2 quasars by discovering an entire population of obscured, powerful supermassive black holes. Many of these developments are described in ESO's Press Releases, most with Press Photos, cf. the 2004 PR Index. Some of last year's ESO PR highlights may be accessed directly via the clickable image above.

  13. Highlighting Your Science to NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, C.

    2003-12-01

    An effort is underway to provide greater visibility within NASA headquarters, and to those who provide funding to NASA, of the outstanding work that is being performed by scientists involved in the Solar System Exploration Research and Analysis Programs, most of whom are DPS members. In support of this effort, a new feature has been developed for the NASA Headquarters Solar System Exploration Division web site whereby researchers can provide a synopsis of their current research results. The site (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/spotlight/ - Username: your email address Password: sse) is an online submission area where NASA-funded scientists can upload the results of their research. There they provide their contact information, briefly describe their research, and upload any associated images or graphics. The information is available to a limited number of reviewers and writers at JPL. Each month, one researcher's work will be chosen as a science spotlight. After a writer interviews the scientist, a brief Power Point presentation that encapsulates their work will be given to Dr. Colleen Hartman at NASA headquarters. She will then present the exciting findings to Associate Administrator for Space Science, Dr. Ed Weiler. The information from some of these highlights can serve as a basis to bring Principal Investigators to NASA Headquarters for exposure to media through Space Science Updates on NASA television. In addition, the science results may also be incorporated into briefing material for the Office of Management and Budget and congressional staffers. Some spotlights will also be converted into feature stories for the Solar System Exploration website so the public, too, can learn about exciting new research. The site, http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/, is one of NASA's most visited. Over the past decade, there has been a trend of flat budgets for Research and Analysis activities. By giving more visibility to results of Solar System research, our goal is to encourage

  14. ESO PR Highlights in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    2005 was the year of Physics. It was thus also in part the year of astronomy and this is clearly illustrated by the numerous breakthroughs that were achieved, in particular using ESO's telescopes. One of the highlights was without any doubt the confirmation of the first image of an exoplanet , around the star 2M1207 (see ESO PR 12/05). ESO's telescopes also found a Neptune-mass exoplanet around a small star ( PR 30/05) - a discovery that proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems, and imaged a tiny companion in the close vicinity of the star GQ Lupi, a very young object still surrounded by a disc, with an age between 100,000 and 2 million years ( PR 09/05). Moreover, using a new high-contrast adaptive optics camera on the VLT, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI, astronomers were able for the first time to image a companion 120 times fainter than its star , very near the star AB Doradus A. This companion appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be ( PR 02/05). ESO's telescopes proved very useful in helping to solve a 30-year old puzzle . Astronomers have for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars ( PR 26/05). Additional evidence came from witnessing another event with the VLT ( PR 32/05). Also in this field, astronomers found the farthest known gamma-ray burst with ESO's VLT, observing an object with a redshift 6.3, i.e. that is seen when the Universe was less than 900 million years old ( PR 22/05). On July 4, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft plunged onto Comet 9P/Tempel 1 with the aim to create a crater and expose pristine material from beneath the surface. For two days before and six days after, all major ESO telescopes have been observing the comet, in a coordinated fashion and in

  15. Highlights of Astronomy, Volume 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2007-08-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  16. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Earth Sciences Division in atmospheric science research. Figure 1.1 shows the 20-year record of peer-reviewed publications and proposals among the various Laboratories. This data shows that the scientific work being conducted in the Laboratories is competitive with the work being done elsewhere in universities and other government agencies. The office of Deputy Director for Atmospheric Research will strive to maintain this record by rigorously monitoring and promoting quality while emphasizing coordination and integration among atmospheric disciplines. Also, an appropriate balance will be maintained between the scientists' responsibility for large collaborative projects and missions and their need to carry out active science research as a principal investigator. This balance allows members of the Laboratories to improve their scientific credentials, and develop leadership potentials. Interdisciplinary research is carried out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other government agencies. Members of the Laboratories interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratories raise the public's awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Atmosphere Laboratories make substantial efforts to attract and recruit new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA's mission, provides highlights of our research scope and activities, and summarizes our scientists' major

  17. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  18. ESO PR Highlights in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Another great year went by for ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere. From 1 January 2007, with the official joining of the Czech Republic, ESO has 13 member states, and since September, ESO has a new Director General, Tim de Zeeuw (ESO 03/07 and 38/07). Many scientific discoveries were made possible with ESO's telescopes. Arguably, the most important is the discovery of the first Earth-like planet in the habitable zone of a low-mass red dwarf (ESO 22/07). If there is water on this planet, then it should be liquid! ESO PR Highlights 2007 This is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2007. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2007 page. In our own Solar System also, astronomers made stunning breakthroughs with ESO's telescopes, observing the effect of the light from the Sun on an asteroid's rotation (ESO 11/07), describing in unprecedented detail the double asteroid Antiope (ESO 18/07), peering at the rings of Uranus (ESO 37/07), discovering a warm south pole on Neptune (ESO 41/07), showing a widespread and persistent morning drizzle of methane over the western foothills of Titan's major continent (ESO 47/07), and studying in the greatest details the wonderful Comet McNaught (ESO 05/07 and 07/07). In the study of objects slightly more massive than planets, the VLT found that brown dwarfs form in a similar manner to normal stars (ESO 24/07). The VLT made it also possible to measure the age of a fossil star that was clearly born at the dawn of time (ESO 23/07). Other discoveries included reconstructing the site of a flare on a solar-like star (ESO 53/07), catching a star smoking (ESO 34/07), revealing a reservoir of dust around an elderly star (ESO 43/07), uncovering a flat, nearly edge-on disc of silicates in the heart of the magnificent Ant Nebula (ESO 42/07), finding material around a star before it exploded (ESO 31/07), fingerprinting the Milky Way (ESO 15/07), revealing a rich

  19. A 125Te and 23Na NMR investigation of the structure and crystallisation of sodium tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Holland, D; Bailey, J; Ward, G; Turner, B; Tierney, P; Dupree, R

    2005-01-01

    125Te static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23Na and 125Te magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR have been used, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction, to examine the structure and crystallisation behaviour of glasses of composition xNa2O.(1-x)TeO2 (0.075 x 0.4). The MAS NMR 23Na spectra from the glasses are broad and featureless but shift by approximately +5 ppm with increased x, i.e. as the system becomes more ionic. The static 125Te NMR spectra show an increase in axial symmetry with increasing x, indicating a shift from predominantly [TeO4] to [TeO3] structural units. The 23Na and 125Te spectra from the crystallised samples have been fitted to obtain information on the sites in the metastable crystal phases, which are the first to form on heating and which are therefore more closely related to the glass structure than thermodynamically stable crystal phases. New sodium tellurite phases are reported, including a sodium stabilised, face centred cubic phase related to delta-TeO2; a metastable form of Na2Te4O9 containing 3 sodium and 4 tellurium sites; and a metastable form of Na2Te2O5 containing 2 sodium sites. There is evidence of oxidation of TeIV to TeVI occurring in glasses with high values of x and, at x=0.40 and 0.50 (outside the glass forming range), some sodium metatellurate (Na2TeO4) is formed at the same time as sodium metatellurite (Na2TeO3). The 125Te shift is very sensitive to environment within the sodium tellurite system, covering more than 320 ppm, with anisotropies varying from 640 to 1540 ppm. The lack of features in the 125Te spectra of the glass phases, combined with the large shift range and high but variable anisotropy, means than it is not possible to obtain a unique fit to any presumed species present. Furthermore, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters for three of the four Te sites in the Na2Te4O9 phase are found to lie outside the range used for previous simulations of glass spectra.

  20. Facilitating pictorial comprehension with color highlighting.

    PubMed

    McDougald, Brannan R; Wogalter, Michael S

    2014-09-01

    Pictorials can aid in communicating warning information, but viewers may not always correctly comprehend them. Two experiments focused on whether the use of relevant highlighting could benefit pictorial comprehension. A set of warning-related pictorials were manipulated according to three-color highlighting conditions: highlighting areas more relevant to correct comprehension, highlighting areas less relevant to comprehension, and no highlighting. Participants were asked to describe the purpose and meaning of each pictorial presented to them. The findings from both experiments indicate that comprehension of warning pictorials is higher for the relevant highlighting condition than the other two conditions. The highlighting of less relevant areas reduced comprehension compared to no highlighting. Use of appropriately placed highlighting could benefit the design of a complex symbol by pointing out pertinent areas to aid in determining its intended conceptual meaning.

  1. Influence of ZnO/MgO substitution on sintering, crystallisation, and bio-activity of alkali-free glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Saurabh; Goel, Ashutosh; Correia, Ana Filipa; Pascual, Maria J; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Hae-Won; Ferreira, José M F

    2015-08-01

    The present study reports on the influence of partial replacement of MgO by ZnO on the structure, crystallisation behaviour and bioactivity of alkali-free bioactive glass-ceramics (GCs). A series of glass compositions (mol%): 36.07 CaO-(19.24-x) MgO-x ZnO-5.61 P2O5-38.49 SiO2-0.59 CaF2 (x=2-10) have been synthesised by melt-quench technique. The structural changes were investigated by solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. The sintering and crystallisation behaviours of glass powders were studied by hot-stage microscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. All the glass compositions exhibited good densification ability resulting in well sintered and mechanically strong GCs. The crystallisation and mechanical behaviour were studied under non-isothermal heating conditions at 850 °C for 1h. Diopside was the primary crystalline phase in all the GCs followed by fluorapatite and rankinite as secondary phases. Another phase named petedunnite was identified in GCs with ZnO content >4 mol. The proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) on GCs was revealed to be Zn-dose dependent with the highest performance being observed for 4 mol% ZnO.

  2. Overexpression of the Multidrug Efflux Operon acrEF by Insertional Activation with IS1 or IS10 Elements in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB Mutants Selected with Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Olliver, Anne; Vallé, Michel; Chaslus-Dancla, Elisabeth; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2005-01-01

    High-level fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT204 has been previously shown to be essentially due to both multiple target gene mutations and active efflux by the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. In this study we show that in intermediatly resistant acrB-inactivated serovar Typhimurium DT204 mutants, high-level resistance to FQs can be restored on in vitro selection with FQs. In each FQ- resistant mutant selected from serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB mutant strains, an insertion sequence (IS1 or IS10) was found integrated upstream of the acrEF operon, coding for AcrEF, an efflux pump highly homologous to AcrAB. In one of the strains, transposition of IS1 caused partial deletion of acrS, the putative local repressor gene of the acrEF operon. Sequence analysis showed that both IS1 and IS10 elements contain putative promoter sequences that might alter the expression of adjacent acrEF genes. Indeed, reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed an 8- to 10-fold increase in expression of acrF in these insertional mutants, relative to their respective parental strain, which correlated well with the resistance levels observed to FQs and other unrelated drugs. It is noteworthy that AcrEF did not contribute to the intrinsic drug resistance of serovar Typhimurium, since acrF deletion in wild-type strains did not result in any increase in drug susceptibility. Moreover, deletion of acrS did not cause any acrF overexpression or any decrease in drug susceptibility, suggesting that acrEF overexpression is mediated solely by the IS1 and IS10 promoter sequences and not by inactivity of AcrS. Southern blot experiments showed that the number of chromosomal IS1 and IS10 elements in the serovar Typhimurium DT204 genome was about 5 and 15 respectively. None were detected in epidemic serovar Typhimurium DT104 strains or in the serovar Typhimurium reference strain LT2. Carrying IS1 and/or IS10 elements in their chromosome may thus be a selective

  3. A low viscosity, low boiling point, clean solvent system for the rapid crystallisation of highly specular perovskite films

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Nakita K.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Wenger, Bernard; Klug, Matthew T.; Hörantner, Maximilian T.; Johnston, Michael B.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Moore, David T.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite-based photovoltaics have, in recent years, become poised to revolutionise the solar industry. While there have been many approaches taken to the deposition of this material, one-step spin-coating remains the simplest and most widely used method in research laboratories. Although spin-coating is not recognised as the ideal manufacturing methodology, it represents a starting point from which more scalable deposition methods, such as slot-dye coating or ink-jet printing can be developed. Here, we introduce a new, low-boiling point, low viscosity solvent system that enables rapid, room temperature crystallisation of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite films, without the use of strongly coordinating aprotic solvents. Through the use of this solvent, we produce dense, pinhole free films with uniform coverage, high specularity, and enhanced optoelectronic properties. We fabricate devices and achieve stabilised power conversion efficiencies of over 18% for films which have been annealed at 100 degrees C, and over 17% for films which have been dried under vacuum and have undergone no thermal processing. This deposition technique allows uniform coating on substrate areas of up to 125 cm2, showing tremendous promise for the fabrication of large area, high efficiency, solution processed devices, and represents a critical step towards industrial upscaling and large area printing of perovskite solar cells.

  4. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  5. Laboratory studies on recovery of N and P from human urine through struvite crystallisation and zeolite adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bán, Zs; Dave, G

    2004-01-01

    Struvite [Mg (K, NH4)(PO4) x 6H2O] crystallisation and adsorption to zeolite have been proposed as a method for nutrient recovery from human urine collected with urine separating toilets. The aim of the present study was to optimise the use of MgO (to precipitate struvite) and zeolite (to adsorb ammonia) in this process. The experiments were performed with fresh urine, to which various amounts of MgO and zeolite were added. After repeated stirring and settling for 3 days the supernatant was analysed for pH, total-N, total-P and acute toxicity for Daphnia magna (24- and 48-h EC50). The results show that addition of MgO reduced P and addition of zeolite reduced N in the supernatant, as expected. The required concentration of MgO added was less than expected from the stoichiometric Mg-P-ratio for struvite. In combination with zeolite the requirement for MgO was reduced even further. Zeolite was effective in reducing total-N, but because of its interaction with MgO the effect of zeolite on N as well as P reduction was rather complicated. The optimal combination of MgO and zeolite for combined N and P recovery was found to be around 0.5 MgO per litre urine and 15 g zeolite per litre urine. These additions reduced supernatant P from about 1300 mg l(-1) to 10 mg l(-1) and N from 8000 mg l(-1) to 1000 mg l(-1). The 24-h EC50 for D. magna was not significantly affected by these additions. The expected recovery potentials for P and N by addition of MgO and zeolite are, thus, about 99% for P and 90% for N. However, these figures need to be verified, and pilot plant experiments at a science centre with urine separation wastewater treatment (www.universeum.se) are in progress.

  6. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2009 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  7. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2007 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  8. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2010 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  9. Laboratory for Atmospheres: 2006 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, are highlighted in this report.

  10. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2005 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Technical highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  11. Compare and contrast the effects of surfactants (PluronicF-127 and CremophorEL) and sugars (β-cyclodextrin and inulin) on properties of spray dried and crystallised lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita Rochdy; Elkordy, Amal Ali; Chaw, Cheng Shu; Moore, Adrian

    2013-07-16

    The stabilisation of proteins using different excipients in dried forms for possible therapeutic use is extensively studied. However, the effects of excipients on proteins in crystallised forms are sparsely documented. Therefore, the influences of PluronicF-127 and CremophorEL (as surfactants) and β-cyclodextrin and inulin (as sugars) on stability and biological activity of lysozyme, a model protein, in spray dried and crystallised forms were investigated. Spray dried and crystallised lysozyme were prepared in absence and presence of the mentioned excipients in a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The protein formulations were characterised in both solution state (using biological assay, particle size analysis and protein concentration determination) and solid state (employing yield determination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for secondary structure analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for thermal study). Also, protein samples were assayed for their biological activities after exposing to storage stability study for 20 weeks in solid states at 24 °C/76% relative humidity (RH) and in aqueous states at 24 °C. The results showed that lysozyme crystals with CremophorEL, PluronicF-127, β-cyclodextrin and inulin maintained protein thermal stability (as indicated by DSC) to greater extent compared with spray dried protein formulations. Also, PluronicF-127 was competent to recover 100% lysozyme from crystallisation protein solutions (as confirmed by yield determination); this surfactant was able to prevent aggregate formation within spray dried lysozyme (as demonstrated by particle size analysis). The presence of PluronicF-127, β-cyclodextrin and inulin preserved the protein biological activity in freshly prepared spray dried and crystallised samples. PluronicF-127 was competent to protect lysozyme in both spray dried and crystallised forms after storage. PluronicF-127 has proved to be a

  12. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C.; Busey, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure. PMID:26744839

  13. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    PubMed

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  14. A Dual-Porosity, In Situ Crystallisation Model For Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Chambers Based Upon Direct Observation From Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Lissenberg, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a revised magma chamber model for fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges based upon a synthesis of new data from a complete section of lower crust from the East Pacific Rise, reconstructed from samples collected from the Hess Deep rift valley during cruise JC21. Our investigation includes detailed sampling across critical transitions in the upper part of the plutonic section, including the inferred axial melt lens (AML) within the dyke-gabbro transition. We find that an overall petrological progression, from troctolite and primitive gabbro at the base up into evolved (oxide) gabbro and gabbronorite at the top of the lower crustal section, is mirrored by a progressive upward chemical fractionation as recorded in bulk rock and mineral compositions. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured using EBSD show that the downward increase in deformation of mush required in crystal subsidence models is not observed. Together these observations are consistent only with a model in which crystallisation of upward migrating evolving melts occurs in situ in the lower crust. Over-enrichment in incompatible trace element concentrations and ratios above that possible by fractional crystallisation is ubiquitous. This implies redistribution of incompatible trace elements in the lower crust by low porosity, near-pervasive reactive porous flow of interstitial melt moving continuously upward through the mush pile. Mass balance calculations reveal a significant proportion of this trace element enriched melt is trapped at mid-crustal levels. Mineral compositions in the upper third to half of the plutonic section are too evolved to represent the crystal residues of MORB. Erupted MORB therefore must be fed from melts sourced in the deeper part of the crystal mush pile, and which must ascend rapidly without significant modification in the upper plutonics or AML. From physical models of mush processes we posit that primitive melts are transported through transient, high porosity

  15. Highlights from NNSA's Decade of Success

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    On April 28, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration celebrated its 10-year anniversary with a series of events aimed at highlighting a decade of success across the nuclear security enterprise. This slideshow features images from the past 10 years.

  16. Highlights of the 2009 Hurricane Season

    NASA Video Gallery

    Picture yourself sitting in space watching the highlights of the 2009's Atlantic Ocean hurricane season in fast-forward. This latest animation from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm...

  17. Highlights from NNSA's Decade of Success

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-28

    On April 28, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration celebrated its 10-year anniversary with a series of events aimed at highlighting a decade of success across the nuclear security enterprise. This slideshow features images from the past 10 years.

  18. Highlight detection and removal from spectral image.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Pesal; Pant, Paras; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2011-11-01

    We present a constrained spectral unmixing method to remove highlight from a single spectral image. In the constrained spectral unmixing method, the constraints have been imposed so that all the fractions of diffuse and highlight reflection sum up to 1 and are positive. As a result, the spectra of the diffuse image are always positive. The spectral power distribution (SPD) of the light source has been used as the pure highlight spectrum. The pure diffuse spectrum of the measured spectrum has been chosen from the set of diffuse spectra. The pure diffuse spectrum has a minimum angle among the angles calculated between spectra from a set of diffuse spectra and the measured spectrum projected onto the subspace orthogonal to the SPD of the light source. The set of diffuse spectra has been collected by an automated target generation program from the diffuse part in the image. Constrained energy minimization in a finite impulse response linear filter has been used to detect the highlight and diffuse parts in the image. Results by constrained spectral unmixing have been compared with results by the orthogonal subspace projection (OSP) method [Proceedings of International Conference on Pattern Recognition (2006), pp. 812-815] and probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) [Proceedings of the 4th WSEAS International Conference on Signal Processing, Robotics and Automation (2005), paper 15]. Constrained spectral unmixing outperforms OSP and PPCA in the visual assessment of the diffuse results. The highlight removal method by constrained spectral unmixing is suitable for spectral images.

  19. 2015 SNMMI Highlights Lecture: Oncology, Part I

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    From the Newsline Editor: The Highlights Lecture, presented at the closing session of each SNMMI Annual Meeting, was originated and delivered for more than 30 years by Henry N. Wagner, Jr., MD. Beginning in 2010, the duties of summarizing selected significant presentations at the meeting were divided annually among 4 distinguished nuclear and molecular medicine subject matter experts. The 2015 Highlights Lectures were delivered on June 10 at the SNMMI Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Umar Mahmood, MD, PhD, a professor of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), spoke on oncology highlights from the meeting’s sessions. Because of its length, the oncology presentation will be divided between 2 Newsline issues. Note that in the following summary, numerals in brackets represent abstract numbers as published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine [2015;56:suppl 3). PMID:26526798

  20. Display format, highlight validity, and highlight method: Their effects on search performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim D.; Obrien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. Responses to valid applications of highlight were significantly faster than responses to non or invalidly highlighted applications. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. A separate within-subject analysis of variance of display format, highlight validity, and several highlight methods did not reveal a main effect of highlight method. In addition, observed display search times were compared to search time predicted by Tullis' Display Analysis Program. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  1. Highlights from AQMEII Phase 2 & Next Steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the second phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) that was completed in May 2014. Activities in this phase were focused on the application and evaluation of coupled meteorology-chemistry models ...

  2. Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2012", the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics. However, it…

  3. Teaching Literature to Highlight Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cnaan, Ram A.

    1989-01-01

    A second-year elective course for graduate social work students in which twentieth-century novels are used to highlight social issues is described. The relationships between art and social realities and literature's usefulness for social policy analysis are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  4. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  5. Highlights of Good Manufacturing Practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Morita, K

    1990-01-01

    Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in the pharmaceutical industry originated in the United States. Japan, having absorbed many things from the U.S., is actively seeking to establish Good Manufacturing Practice to match the pharmaceutical manufacturing climate in Japan. Several of the themes which highlight Japanese GMP efforts are presented below.

  6. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  7. LibTech Highlights from ALA Midwinter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hane, Paula J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite lower attendance than in the past and blustery, cold weather, the American Library Association's Midwinter Meeting in Denver in January offered lots of news from industry vendors and lots of opportunities to discuss important issues and trends. In this report, the author highlights some of the most important product announcements with a…

  8. Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2011", the OECD's flagship compendium of education…

  9. The Nation's Report Card: Reading Highlights, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This report highlights the results of the 2002 NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) fourth-, eighth-, and twelfth-grade reading assessment for the nation. Results in 2002 are compared to previous NAEP reading assessments. It describes assessment content; presents major findings as average scale scores and percentages of students…

  10. The Highlights of a Decade of Miniball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, N.

    2013-03-01

    Miniball has been used since September 2001 in a variety of experiments with radioactive beams ranging from 17F to 224Ra at the REX-ISOLDE facility (CERN). A few of the highlights of this decade of activity are presented here as well as an outlook for the future.

  11. The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics Highlights, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This issue of The Nation's Report Card highlights mathematics in 2003. It includes sections on Average Scale Scores, Students Reaching NAEP Achievement Levels, Percentile Results, 2003 Assessment Design, State Results, Subgroup Results, Sample Mathematics Questions, Technical Notes, Additional Data Tables, and NAEP on the Web. (AMT)

  12. Highlights: 1985 Recent College Graduates Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Joanell T.

    Highlights of a survey of 1983 and 1984 college graduates at the bachelor's or master's degree level are presented. Information is provided on types of jobs and starting salaries of degree recipients, with comparisons by sex, along with data on newly qualified and beginning teachers. The survey, which was conducted by the Center for Education…

  13. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  14. Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Saha, Lopamudra; Satyanarayan, Manavalan; Pati, Jayanta

    2015-04-01

    Fractional Crystallisation of Archaean Trondhjemite Magma at 12-7 Kbar: Constraints on Rheology of Archaean Continental Crust Sarkar, S.1, Saha, L.1, Satyanarayan, M2. and Pati, J.K.3 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, Haridwar, India, 2. HR-ICPMS Lab, Geochemistry Group, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad-50007, India. 3. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Nehru Science Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, India. Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTGs) group of rocks, that mostly constitute the Archaean continental crusts, evolved through a time period of ~3.8 Ga-2.7 Ga with major episodes of juvenile magma generations at ~3.6 Ga and ~2.7 Ga. Geochemical signatures, especially HREE depletions of most TTGs conform to formation of this type of magma by partial melting of amphibolites or eclogites at 15-20 kbar pressure. While TTGs (mostly sodic in compositions) dominates the Eoarchaean (~3.8-3.6 Ga) to Mesoarchaean (~3.2-3.0 Ga) domains, granitic rocks (with significantly high potassium contents) became more dominant in the Neoarchaean period. The most commonly accepted model proposed for the formation of the potassic granite in the Neoarchaean time is by partial melting of TTGs along subduction zones. However Archaean granite intrusive into the gabbro-ultramafic complex from Scourie, NW Scotland has been interpreted to have formed by fractional crystallization of hornblende and plagioclase from co-existing trondhjemitic gneiss. In this study we have studied fractional crystallization paths from a Mesoarchaean trondhjemite from the central Bundelkhand craton, India using MELTS algorithm. Fractional crystallization modeling has been performed at pressure ranges of 20 kbar to 7 kbar. Calculations have shown crystallization of garnet-clinopyroxene bearing assemblages with progressive cooling of the magma at 20 kbar. At pressure ranges 19-16 kbar, solid phases

  15. Primary welding and crystallisation textures preserved in the intra-caldera ignimbrites of the Permian Ora Formation, northern Italy: implications for deposit thermal state and cooling history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcock, M. A. W.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-06-01

    Exceptional exposure through a Permian intra-caldera ignimbrite fill within the 42 × 40 km Ora caldera (>1,290 km3 erupted volume) provides an opportunity to study welding textures in a thick intra-caldera ignimbrite succession. The ignimbrite succession records primary dense welding, a simple cooling unit structure, common crystallisation zones, and remarkably preserves fresh to slightly hydrated glass in local vitrophyre zones. Evidence for primary syn- and post-emplacement welding consists of (a) viscously deformed and sintered juvenile glass and relict shard textures; (b) complete deposit welding; (c) subtle internal welding intensity variations; (d) vitrophyre preserved locally at the base of the ignimbrite succession; (e) persistent fiamme juvenile clast shapes throughout the succession at the macroscopic and microscopic scales, defining a moderate to well-developed eutaxitic texture; (f) common undulating juvenile clast (pumice) margins and feathery terminations; (g) a general loss of deposit porosity; and (h) perlitic fracturing. A low collapsing or fountaining explosive eruption column model is proposed to have facilitated the ubiquitous welding of the deposit, which in turn helped preserve original textures. The ignimbrite succession preserves no evidence of a time break through the sequence and columnar joints cross-gradational ignimbrite lithofacies boundaries, so the ignimbrite is interpreted to represent a simple cooling unit. Aspect ratio and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analyses through stratigraphic sections within the thick intra-caldera succession and at the caldera margin reveal variable welding compaction and strain profiles. Significantly, these data show that welding degree/intensity may vary in an apparently simple cooling unit because of variations in eruption process recorded in differing lithofacies. These data imply complex eruption, emplacement, and cooling processes. Three main crystallisation textural zones are

  16. Generation of Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    2 (s)ds/ si. (2) 0=i i=1 §3. Concept of Surface Generation Based on Evolute A surface is generated by moving a generatrix along two directrices . When...Fig. 1(a) shows an object surface Surfaces with Smooth Highlight Lines 147 Sgeneratrices v generated surface S u directrices evoluteseolesufc (a...the directrices , and suffix u denotes partial differentiation. Fig. 1(b) shows an evolute surface and a generated surface satisfying the constraints

  17. STS-46 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Scenes of the mission highlights for the STS-46 Atlantis mission are shown. Footage shows the pre-launch activities (crew breakfast and suit-up) and launch of Atlantis. The European Retrievable Carrier's (EURECA) and the Tethered Satellite System's (TSS) pre-deploy and deployment are shown. Shots of the crew's activities and the Earth are shown, including footage taken over the Red Sea and central South America. Atlantis' landing is also shown.

  18. Extending Word Highlighting in Multiparticipant Chat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    un- supervised learners (Bingham, Kabán, and Girolami 2003; Kolenda, Hansen, and Larsen 2001). The difference be- tween these approaches and what we... Learner (UpdateGraph) Unlabeled Data U (from chat logs) GWRH US Ws W (Highlighted) Message m ′ Related Words R, W Message m Graph G Figure 3: GWRH’s...see that in these top ten words, com- mon English words are removed despite their frequent ap- pearance. This is desirable since it allows GWRH to

  19. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 3 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 6 and 7. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). Flight day 6 features a very complicated EVA (extravehicular activity) to service the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Linnehan replace the HST's power control unit, disconnecting and reconnecting 36 tiny connectors. The procedure includes the HST's first ever power down. The cleanup of spilled water from the coollant system in Grunsfeld's suit is shown. The pistol grip tool, and two other space tools are also shown. On flight day 7, Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA. They replace the HST's FOC (Faint Object Camera) with the ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys). The video ends with crew members playing in the shuttle's cabin with a model of the HST.

  20. Benzylidenemalononitrile derivatives as substrates and inhibitors of a new NAD(P)H dehydrogenase of erythrocytes. Purification and crystallisation of two forms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ueberschär, K H; Kille, S; Laule, G; Maurer, P; Wallenfels, K

    1979-10-01

    Using the powerful lachrymator (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile as electron acceptor, two types of NAD(P)H dehydrogenases have been isolated from human blood. Crystallisation of the homogenous enzymes was performed in 50% polyethylene glycol solution. The enzymes (average molecular weight 18 000) are composed of only one polypeptide chain and have a very similar amino acid composition. B-side stereospecificity was determined with respect to the cofactor by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the reductase. Besides (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile, 2,6-dichloroindophenol, methylene blue, 4-benzoquinone, FMN and FAD are also reduced using NADH or NADPH as hydrogen donor with the rates decreasing in the given order. Reduction of methemoglobin is observed only upon addition of methylene blue, FMN or FAD as carriers. (2-Chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile reduction is inhibited by most of the compounds known to be decouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Crystallisation of magmatic topaz and implications for Nb-Ta-W mineralisation in F-rich silicic melts - The Ary-Bulak ongonite massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agangi, Andrea; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Hofmann, Axel; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Vladykin, Nikolay V.

    2014-08-01

    Textural, mineralogical and geochemical data on F-rich rhyolite (ongonite) from the Ary-Bulak massif of eastern Transbaikalia help constrain the formation of magmatic topaz. In these rocks, topaz occurs as phenocrysts, thus providing compelling evidence for crystallisation at the orthomagmatic stage. Cathodoluminescence images of topaz and quartz reveal growth textures with multiple truncation events in single grains, indicative of a dynamic system that shifted from saturated to undersaturated conditions with respect to topaz and quartz. Electron microprobe and Raman analyses of topaz indicate near-pure F composition [Al2SiO4F2], with very limited OH replacement. Laser ablation ICP-MS traverses revealed the presence of a large number of trace elements present at sub-ppm to hundreds of ppm levels. The chemical zoning of topaz records trace element fluctuations in the coexisting melt. Concentrations of some trace elements (Li, Ga, Nb, Ta and W) are correlated with cathodoluminescence intensity, thus suggesting that some of these elements act as CL activators in topaz. The study of melt inclusions indicates that melts with different F contents were trapped at different stages during formation of quartz and topaz phenocrysts, respectively. Electron microprobe analyses of glass in subhedral quartz-hosted melt inclusions indicate F ≤ 1.2 wt.%, whereas irregular-shaped melt inclusions hosted in both topaz and quartz have F ≤ 9 wt.%. Cryolithionite [Na3Li3Al2F12] coexists with glass in irregular inclusions, implying high Li contents in the melt. The very high F contents would have increased the solubility of Nb, Ta and W in the melt, thus allowing progressive concentration of these elements during magma evolution. Crystallisation of Nb-Ta-W-oxides (W-ixiolite and tantalite-columbite) may have been triggered by separation of cryolithionite, which would have caused F and Li depletion and consequent drop in the solubility of these elements.

  2. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 4 and 5. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The primary activities during these days were EVAs (extravehicular activities) to replace two solar arrays on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Footage from flight day 4 records an EVA by Grunsfeld and Linnehan, including their exit from Columbia's payload bay airlock, their stowing of the old HST starboard rigid array on the rigid array carrier in Columbia's payload bay, their attachment of the new array on HST, the installation of a new starboard diode box, and the unfolding of the new array. The pistol grip space tool used to fasten the old array in its new location is shown in use. The video also includes several shots of the HST with Earth in the background. On flight day 5 Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA to change the port side array and diode box on HST. This EVA is very similar to the one on flight day 4, and is covered similarly in the video. A hand operated ratchet is shown in use. In addition to a repeat of the previous tasks, the astronauts change HST's reaction wheel assembly, and because they are ahead of schedule, install installation and lubricate an instrument door on the telescope. The Earth views include a view of Egypt and Israel, with the Nile River, Red Sea, and Mediterranean Sea.

  3. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  4. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  5. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 4. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002139469), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). The primary activity of flight day 1 is the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The crew is seen before the launch at a meal and suit-up, and some pre-flight procedures are shown. Perrin holds a sign with a personalized message. The astronauts communicate with Mission Control extensively after launch, and an inside view of the shuttle cabin is shown. The replays of the launch include close-ups of the nozzles at liftoff, and the fall of the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank. Flight day 2 shows footage of mainland Asia at night, and daytime views of the eastern United States and Lake Michigan. Flight day three shows the Endeavour orbiter approaching and docking with the ISS. After the night docking, the crews exchange greetings, and a view of the Nile river and Egypt at night is shown. On flight day 4, the MPLM (Multi-Purpose Logistics Module) Leonardo was temporarily transferred from Endeavour's payload bay to the ISS.

  6. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  7. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-18

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  8. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam S.

    2014-09-01

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  9. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation. PMID:27843642

  10. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  11. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  12. ISPAE Research Highlights 1995-1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, Ken

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents ISPAE (Institute for Space Physics, Astrophysics and Education) research highlights from 1995-1997. The topics include: 1) High-Energy Astrophysics (Finding the smoking gun in gamma-ray bursts, Playing peekaboo with gamma ray bursts, and Spectral pulses muddle burst source study, Einstein was right: Black holes do spin, Astronomers find "one-man X-ray band", and Cosmic rays from the supernova next door?); 2) Solar Physics (Bright burst confirms solar storm model, Model predicts speed of solar wind in space, and Angry sunspots snap under the strain); 3) Gravitational Physics; 4) Tether Dynamics; and 5) Space Physics (Plasma winds blow form polar regions, De-SCIFERing thermal electrons, and UVI lets scientists see daytime aurora).

  13. New budget highlights coordinated science ventures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo; Ireton, M. Frank Watt

    1992-02-01

    Five presidential initiatives highlighted in the new federal budget proposal reflect the growing role of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology in setting the nation's science funding agenda. “This marks the greatest involvement of FCCSET to date in shaping federal R&D spending,” said D. Allan Bromley, the president's science advisor, when the fiscal year 1993 budget was released.FCCSET committees drawn from various federal agencies developed interagency budget programs in five areas this year: High Performance Computing and Communications, Advanced Materials and Processing, Biotechnology Research, Global Change Research, and Mathematics and Science Education. All the programs have long-range goals, and some are interrelated. Three of these initiatives are discussed here.

  14. STS-114 Flight Day 5 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Highlights of Day 5 of the STS-114 Return to Flight mission (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) include video coverage of an extravehiclular activity (EVA) by Noguchi and Robinson. The other crew members of Discovery are seen on the flight deck and mid-deck helping the astronauts to suit-up. The objectives of the EVA are to test repair techniques on sample tiles in the shuttle's payload bay, to repair electrical equipment for a gyroscope on the International Space Station (ISS), and to install a replacement GPS antenna on the ISS. Noguchi and Robinson use a caulk gun and a putty knife to repair the sample tiles. The video contains several Earth views, including one of Baja California.

  15. STS-67 mission highlights resource tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Chuck

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle Mission, STS-67, is highlighted in this video. Flight crew (Stephen S. Oswald (Commander), William G. Gregory (Pilot), Tamara E. Jernigan, Wendy B. Lawrence, John M. Grunfeld (Mission Specialists), Samuel T. Durrance, and Ronald A. Parise (Payload Specialists)) prelaunch and launch activities, EVA activities with payload deployment and retrieval (ASTRO-2 and WUPPE (Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo Polarimeter Experiment)), spaceborne experiments (astronomical observation and data collection, protein crystal growth, and human physiological processes), and pre-reentry activities are shown. There are astronomical telescopic observation from the two telescopes in the payload, the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, of Io and of globular clusters, and their emission spectra is collected via a spectrometer. Earth view film and photography is shown, which includes lightning on terrestrial surfaces, cyclone activity, and cloud cover.

  16. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  17. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  18. 1990 annual statistics and highlights report.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on some of the highlights and distribution statistics for most of the basic NSSDC operational services for fiscal year 1990. Contents: General services: 1. NSSDC On-line Data and Information Services (NODIS). 2. The Master Directory and Catalog Interoperability (MD/CI). 3. Distribution of NSSDC data via non-interactive modes. 4. NSSDC Data Archive and Distribution Service (NDADS). 5. Visual reproduction facility. Earth science data systems: 1. NASA's Climate Data System (NCDS). 2. Pilot Land Data System (PLDS). 3. Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS). Space science data systems: 1. Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) program. 2. Satellite Situation Center (SSC) and SPACEWARN. 3. The Astronomical Data Center (ADC). 4. ROSAT Mission Information and Planning System (MIPS). Standards and technologies: 1. NASA/OSSA Office of Standards and Technology (NOST). 2. The Standards and Technology Information System (STIS).

  19. STS-66 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This video contains the mission highlights of the STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis Mission in November 1994. Astronauts included: Don McMonagle (Mission Commander), Kurt Brown, Ellen Ochoa (Payload Commander), Joe Tanner, Scott Parazynski, and Jean-Francois Clervoy (collaborating French astronaut). Footage includes: pre-launch suitup, entering Space Shuttle, countdown and launching of Shuttle, EVA activities (ATLAS-3, CRISTA/SPAS, SSBUV/A, ESCAPE-2), on-board experiments dealing with microgravity and its effects, protein crystal growth experiments, daily living and sleeping compartment footage, earthviews of various meteorological processes (dust storms, cloud cover, ocean storms), pre-landing and land footage (both from inside the Shuttle and from outside with long range cameras), and tracking and landing shots from inside Mission Control Center. Included is air-to-ground communication between Mission Control and the Shuttle. This Shuttle was the last launch of 1994.

  20. STS-66 mission highlights resource tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    This video contains the mission highlights of the STS-66 Space Shuttle Atlantis Mission in November 1994. Astronauts included: Don McMonagle (Mission Commander), Kurt Brown, Ellen Ochoa (Payload Commander), Joe Tanner, Scott Parazynski, and Jean-Francois Clervoy (collaborating French astronaut). Footage includes: pre-launch suitup, entering Space Shuttle, countdown and launching of Shuttle, EVA activities (ATLAS-3, CRISTA/SPAS, SSBUV/A, ESCAPE-2), on-board experiments dealing with microgravity and its effects, protein crystal growth experiments, daily living and sleeping compartment footage, earthviews of various meteorological processes (dust storms, cloud cover, ocean storms), pre-landing and land footage (both from inside the Shuttle and from outside with long range cameras), and tracking and landing shots from inside Mission Control Center. Included is air-to-ground communication between Mission Control and the Shuttle. This Shuttle was the last launch of 1994.

  1. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  2. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  3. Highlights of Commission 37 Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; de Grijs, Richard; Elmegreen, Bruce; Stetson, Peter; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Goodwin, Simon; Geisler, Douglas; Minniti, Dante

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance (e.g., in mapping out the Milky Way) had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar nucleosynthesis continue to benefit and improve tremendously from the study of these systems. Additionally, fundamental quantities such as the initial mass function can be successfully derived from modelling either the Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams or the integrated velocity structures of, respectively, resolved and unresolved clusters and cluster populations. Star cluster studies thus span the fields of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, while heavily affecting our detailed understanding of the process of star formation in dense environments. This report highlights science results of the last decade in the major fields covered by IAU Commission 37: Star clusters and associations. Instead of focusing on the business meeting - the out-going president presentation can be found here: http://www.sc.eso.org/gcarraro/splinter2015.pdf - this legacy report contains highlights of the most important scientific achievements in

  4. STS-71 mission highlights resource tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-09-01

    This video highlights the international cooperative Shuttle/Mir mission of the STS-71 flight. The STS-71 flightcrew consists of Cmdr. Robert Hoot' Gibson, Pilot Charles Precourt, and Mission Specialists Ellen Baker, Bonnie Dunbar, and Gregory Harbaugh. The Mir 18 flightcrew consisted of Cmdr. Vladamir Dezhurov, Flight Engineer Gennady Strekalov, and Cosmonaut-Research Dr. Norman Thagard. The Mir 18 crew consisted of Cmdr. Anatoly Solovyev and Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin. The prelaunch, launch, shuttle in-orbit, and in-orbit rendezvous and docking of the Mir Space Station to the Atlantis Space Shuttle are shown. The Mir 19 crew accompanied the STS-71 crew and will replace the Mir 18 crew upon undocking from the Mir Space Station. Shown is on-board footage from the Mir Space Station of the Mir 18 crew engaged in hardware testing and maintenance, medical and physiological tests, and a tour of the Mir. A spacewalk by the two Mir 18 cosmonauts is shown as they performed maintenance of the Mir Space Station. After the docking between Atlantis and Mir is completed, several mid-deck physiological experiments are performed along with a tour of Atlantis. Dr Thagard remained behind with the Shuttle after undocking to return to Earth with reports from his Mir experiments and observations. In-cabin experiments included the IMAX Camera Systems tests and the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment-2 (SAREX-2). There is footage of the shuttle landing.

  5. Highlights in breast cancer from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast A critical review of the highlights in breast cancer research from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing studies reported at the meeting, in the advanced breast cancer setting several important confirmatory studies on the use of CDK inhibitors, and studies on using data on oestrogen receptor mutations to guide choices of endocrine therapy are discussed. The PHEREXA trial, in which a combination trastuzumab and pertuzumab was studied in the advanced setting is also considered. In the early breast cancer setting, the KRISTINE and ADAPT studies evaluated the potential of dual blockade in HER2-positive tumours. In HER2-negative early breast cancer several trials are also discussed with respect to types of adjuvant chemotherapy. The results of the MA.17R trial, which considered extending the duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy, are also discussed. The potential role of immunotherapy in breast cancer therapy is briefly mentioned. PMID:27900208

  6. STS-114 Flight Day 9 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The highlight of Day 9 is the third extravehicular activity (EVA) of the STS-114 mission (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda). Astronauts Noguchi and Robinson are seen preparing for the EVA in the closed payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery; on the EVA they install on the International Space Station (ISS) a Materials on the International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) unit, an External Stowage Platform (ESP-2), and a wireless antenna. The astronauts are seen working on the ISS under different lighting conditions, and use a pistol-grip tool to remove ESP-2 from the shuttle payload bay. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System then carries Robinson to the underside of the Discovery orbiter, where he communicates with Mission Control during the delicate and unprecedented removal of gap fillers from between the shuttle's tiles. Before and the after the EVA the video includes views of a damaged thermal blanket beneath the shuttle cockpit window. Other views of the shuttle include pans along the underside and topside by the Orbiter Boom Sensor System. The video also includes a view from orbit of Kazakhstan.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Research Highlights 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The research and development highlights are summarized. The world's brightest source of X-rays could revolutionize materials research. Test of a prototype insertion device, a key in achieving brilliant X-ray beams, have given the first glimpse of the machine's power. Superconductivity research focuses on the new materials' structure, economics and applications. Other physical science programs advance knowledge of material structures and properties, nuclear physics, molecular structure, and the chemistry and structure of coal. New programming approaches make advanced computers more useful. Innovative approaches to fighting cancer are being developed. More experiments confirm the passive safety of Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor concept. Device simplifies nuclear-waste processing. Advanced fuel cell could provide better mileage, more power than internal combustion engine. New instruments find leaks in underground pipe, measure sodium impurities in molten liquids, detect flaws in ceramics. New antibody findings may explain ability to fight many diseases. Cadmium in cigarettes linked to bone loss in women. Programs fight deforestation in Nepal. New technology could reduce acid rain, mitigate greenhouse effect, enhance oil recovery. Innovative approaches transfer Argonne-developed technology to private industry. Each year Argonne educational programs reach some 1200 students.

  8. STS-107 Crew Choice Television Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 flight day highlights begin with a shot inside the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia where Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William McCool, and Mission Specialists David Brown and Kalpana Chawla are seated. The actual liftoff of the Space Shuttle Columbia is shown with Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Laurel Clark, and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon seated on the middeck of the spacecraft. Mission Specialist David Brown exits his seat to take pictures of the external tank while Michael Anderson also prepares to take photographs. A beautiful shot of the orbiter flying over Egypt is presented. A view of the Spacehab Research Double Module is shown where crystals are growing in microgravity. Laurel Clark is also shown working on the Bioreactor experiment. Michael Anderson is shown performing various breathing experiments in space. This video shows the last flight of STS-107 during ascent as the crew is seated in the flight deck and middeck of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  9. Huygens Mission Overview and Results Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.

    2005-08-01

    After a 7-year interplanetary trajectory on board the Cassini Orbiter, the Huygens Probe was successfully released on 25 December 2004 for its encounter with Titan 3 weeks later on 14 January 2005. It entered the atmosphere of Titan at 9:06 UTC (Titan time) at the velocity of 6 km/s. At the end of the entry, which lasted about 4 minutes during which the Probe was slowed down to 400 m/s, the three parachutes were deployed in a 15-min sequence. The first parachute was deployed at an altitude of about 156 km. The descent under parachute lasted 2h28min. Huygens landed safely on Titan's surface and continued to function for several hours after landing. Data were transmitted over two channels to the overflying Cassini Orbiter, for on-board recording and later playback, during the whole parachute descent and for an additional 72 min after landing. The Huygens Probe descent was monitored on one of the two channels with a network of radio telescopes on Earth, all part of the Huygens Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) experiment. Several telescopes of the network were equipped with sensitive receivers that allowed real time Doppler tracking measurements from Earth. An overview of the mission is provided. The overall probe performance is discussed and a selected set of the science results is highlighted. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, The European Space Agency (ESA) and the Italian Space Agency

  10. Active Reading Procedures for Moderating the Effects of Poor Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki S.; Herring, Daniel; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Kreiner, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated two active reading techniques intended to eliminate the negative effect on reading comprehension of preexisting, inappropriate highlighting. College students read passages in three highlighting conditions: no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, and inappropriate highlighting. In Experiment 1, 30 students read the passages while…

  11. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2008 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report. The Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 613) is part of the Earth Sciences Division (Code 610), formerly the Earth Sun Exploration Division, under the Sciences and Exploration Directorate (Code 600) based at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. In line with NASA s Exploration Initiative, the Laboratory executes a comprehensive research and technology development program dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets. The research program is aimed at understanding the influence of solar variability on the Earth s climate; predicting the weather and climate of Earth; understanding the structure, dynamics, and radiative properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; understanding atmospheric chemistry, especially the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and advancing our understanding of physical properties of Earth s atmosphere. The research program identifies problems and requirements for atmospheric observations via satellite missions. Laboratory scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Laboratory members conduct field measurements for satellite data calibration and validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud-resolving models, and development of next-generation Earth system models. Interdisciplinary research is carried

  12. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-06-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  13. Cluster recent highlights in magnetospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    After more than 15 years in space, the Cluster mission is continuing to deliver groundbreaking results, thanks to its ability to move the four spacecraft with respect to each other, according to the science topic to be studied. The main goal of the Cluster mission, made of four identical spacecraft carrying each 11 complementary instruments, is to study in three dimensions the key plasma processes at work in the main regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied more than 55 times from a few km up to 36000 km to address the various scientific objectives. The smallest distance achieved between two Cluster spacecraft was 3.1 km in December 2015, about 50 times smaller than planned at the beginning of the mission. The rate of change of separation distances has accelerated in the last few years with the Guest Investigator programme that allowed scientists in the community to propose special science programmes requiring a new spacecraft constellation. We will present recent science highlights obtained such as solar wind reconnection and bifurcated current sheet development, multi-altitude measurements of field aligned currents, reconnection efficiency in accelerating particles and effect of cold ions, motion of X-lines, speed and direction of tail reconnection events, flux transfer events evolution, new method to find magnetic nulls outside the Cluster tetrahedron, interplanetary shock waves very quick damping and origin of theta auroras. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  14. The 1990 annual statistics and highlights report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has archived over 6 terabytes of space and Earth science data accumulated over nearly 25 years. It now expects these holdings to nearly double every two years. The science user community needs rapid access to this archival data and information about data. The NSSDC has been set on course to provide just that. Five years ago the NSSDC came on line, becoming easily reachable for thousands of scientists around the world through electronic networks it managed and other international electronic networks to which it connected. Since that time, the data center has developed and implemented over 15 interactive systems, operational nearly 24 hours per day, and is reachable through DECnet, TCP/IP, X25, and BITnet communication protocols. The NSSDC is a clearinghouse for the science user to find data needed through the Master Directory system whether it is at the NSSDC or deposited in over 50 other archives and data management facilities around the world. Over 13,000 users accessed the NSSDC electronic systems, during the past year. Thousands of requests for data have been satisfied, resulting in the NSSDC's sending out a volume of data last year that nearly exceeded a quarter of its holdings. This document reports on some of the highlights and distribution statistics for most of the basic NSSDC operational services for fiscal year 1990. It is intended to be the first of a series of annual reports on how well NSSDC is doing in supporting the space and Earth science user communities.

  15. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  16. Crystallisation ages in coeval silicic magma bodies: 238U-230Th disequilibrium evidence from the Rotoiti and earthquake flat eruption deposits, Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charlier, B.L.A.; Peate, D.W.; Wilson, C.J.N.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Storey, M.; Brown, S.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The timescales over which moderate to large bodies of silicic magma are generated and stored are addressed here by studies of two geographically adjacent, successive eruption deposits in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The earlier, caldera-forming Rotoiti eruption (>100 km3 magma) at Okataina volcano was followed, within months at most, by the Earthquake Flat eruption (??? 10 km3 magma) from nearby Kapenga volcano; both generated nonwelded ignimbrite and coeval widespread fall deposits. The Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat deposits are both crystal-rich high-silica rhyolites, with sparse glass-bearing granitoid fragments also occurring in Rotoiti lag breccias generated during caldera collapse. Here we report 238U-230Th disequilibrium data on whole rocks and mineral separates from representative Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat pumices and the co-eruptive Rotoiti granitoid fragments using TIMS and in situ zircon analyses by SIMS. Multiple-grain zircon-controlled crystallisation ages measured by TIMS from the Rotoiti pumice range from 69??3 ka ( 350 ka, with a pronounced peak at 70-90 ka. The weighted mean of isochrons is 83??14 ka, in accord with the TIMS data. One glass-bearing Rotoiti granitoid clast yielded an age of 57??8 ka by TIMS (controlled by Th-rich phases that, however, are not apparently present in the juvenile pumices). Another glass-bearing Rotoiti granitoid yielded SIMS zircon model ages peaking at 60-90 ka, having a similar age distribution to the pumice. Age data from pumices are consistent with a published 64??4 ka eruptive age (now modified to 62??2 ka), but chemical and/or mineralogical data imply that the granitoid lithics are not largely crystalline Rotoiti rhyolite, but instead represent contemporaneous partly molten intrusions reflecting different sources in their chemistries and mineralogies. Similarly, although the Earthquake Flat eruption immediately followed (and probably was triggered by) the Rotoiti event, age data from juvenile material

  17. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although the extraction of mineral wealth has been the major influence in the history of Johannesburg and the surrounding Witwatersrand regions (with about 45% of all gold ever mined coming from there), the discovery of now-famous hominid fossils at the Sterkfontein Caves, and the convening of the world's largest-ever conference on environment and development, are setting a new stage for the future. The United Nations began the second Development and Environment Conference in Johannesburg on August 26, 2002. This meeting addresses the implementation of international goals to fight poverty and protect the global environment that were established at the first such conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Johannesburg summit involves about forty thousand participants, and perhaps 100 world leaders. One of several official opening ceremonies for the conference was held at the Sterkfontein Caves to recognize the outstanding universal value of the paleo-anthropological fossils found there.

    These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) highlight a number of the land use, vegetation, and geological features found within Gauteng Province (including the urban center of Johannesburg and the capital city Pretoria) and parts of the North West and Free State Provinces. The image on the right displays vegetation in red hues and is a false-color view utilizing data from MISR's near-infrared, red and blue bands. Both the natural-color view (left) and the false-color version were acquired by MISR's nadir camera on June 16, 2002. The urban areas appear as gray-colored pixels in the natural-color view, and exhibit colors corresponding with the relative abundance of vegetation found in the urban parts of this arid region.

    The mountains trending east-west near the center of the images extend from Pretoria in the east to Rustenberg in the west. These ranges, the Magaliesberg and Witwatersberg, separate the low-lying, hotter bushveld to the north from

  18. Physicochemical properties and crystallisation behaviour of bakery shortening produced from stearin fraction of palm-based diacyglycerol blended with various vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Latip, Razam Ab; Lee, Yee-Ying; Tang, Teck-Kim; Phuah, Eng-Tong; Tan, Chin-Ping; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-12-15

    The stearin fraction of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAGS) was produced from dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG). Bakery shortening blends were produced by mixing PDAGS with either palm mid fraction, PMF (PDAGS/PMF), palm olein, POL(PDAGS/POL) or sunflower oil, SFO (PDAGS/SFO) at PDAGS molar fraction of XPDAGS=0.4%, 0.5%, 0.6%, 0.7%, 0.8%, 0.9%. The physicochemical results obtained indicated that C16:0 and C18:1 were the dominant fatty acids for PDAGS/PMF and PDAGS/POL, while C18:1 and C18:2 were dominant in the PDAGS/SFO mixtures. SMP and SFC of the PDAGS were reduced with the addition of PMF, POL and SFO. Binary mixtures of PDAGS/PMF had better structural compatibility and full miscibility with each other. PDAGS/PMF and PDAGS/SFO crystallised in β'+β polymorphs in the presence of 0.4-0.5% PDAGS while PDAGS/POL resulted in β polymorphs crystal. The results gave indication that PDAGS: PMF at 50%:50% and 60%:40% (w/w) were the most suitable fat blend to be used as bakery shortening.

  19. Application of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), HPLC and pNMR for interpretation primary crystallisation caused by combined low and high melting TAGs.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Sami; Ariffin, Abdul Azis; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Miskandar, Mat Sahri; Boo, Huey Chern; Abdulkarim, Sabo Mohammed

    2012-05-01

    The main goal of the present work was to assess the mechanism of crystallisation, more precisely the dominant component responsible for primary crystal formations and fat agglomerations. Therefore, DSC results exhibited significant effect on temperature transition; peak sharpness and enthalpy at palm stearin (PS) levels more than 40wt.%. HPLC data demonstrated slight reduction in the content of POO/OPO at PS levels less than 40wt.%, while the excessive addition of PS more than 40wt.% increased significantly PPO/POP content. The pNMR results showed significant drop in SFC for blends containing PS less than 40wt.%, resulting in low SFC less than 15% at body temperature (37°C). Moreover, the values of viscosity (η) and shear stress (τ) at PS levels over 40wt.% expressed excellent internal friction of the admixtures. All the data reported indicate that PPO/POP was the major component of primary nucleus developed. In part, the levels of PS should be less than 40wt.%, if these blends are designed to be used for margarine production.

  20. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    . References: [1] http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ and https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ [2] Foing B. Moon exploration highlights and Moon Village introduction. [3] Young Lunar Explorers Report ESTEC Moon village sessions with community and young professionals.

  1. Facilitatory mechanisms of specular highlights in the perception of depth.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ko; Meiji, Ryoko; Abe, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether specular highlights facilitate the perception of shape from shading in a search paradigm and how highlights interact with shading to facilitate this perception. Our results indicated that stimuli containing highlights led to shorter searching time with the dependence on the light source direction (top lights make searching faster), suggesting that highlights indeed facilitate shape-from-shading processing. To examine how highlight processing interacts with shading processing, we tested unnatural stimuli for which the lighting directions for shading and highlights were inconsistent. The results indicated that unnatural highlights (bright spots) placed in a direction inconsistent with the shading either decrease or do not alter searching time. This suggests that highlights may facilitate, and not suppress, shading processing. With more physically plausible highlights generated from image-based lighting, we also observed facilitation with consistent highlights, but no change with inconsistent highlights. Finally, we examined whether highlights indeed work to facilitate depth perception in a discrimination task. The results showed that correct discrimination of depth increases when highlights are added to shading even when their lighting directions are inconsistent. These results indicate that specular highlights facilitate shading processing, and do not suppress it even when the highlights are placed in a direction inconsistent with shading. The results also elucidate the lighting constraints of the visual system.

  2. EPA Highlights Green Sports Initiatives at Killington Resort

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA toured the Killington Resort to highlight green operations that got Killington named Vermont’s Overall Greenest Resort in 2014 by Ski Vermont, and EPA highlights Killington’s green operations.

  3. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  4. Difference between highlight and object colors enhances glossiness.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Mitsuhiko

    2012-06-01

    The effect of highlight and object colors on perception of glossiness was examined. Ten participants rated glossiness of object images. The color coordinates of objects and highlights were varied while luminance of each pixel was unchanged. Four colors were used for objects and highlights. Objects were perceived as glossier when the highlight color was different from the object color than when they were the same. Objects with some unnatural combinations of highlight and object colors were perceived to be as glossy as those with natural color combinations. The results suggested that differences between highlight and object colors enhance perceived glossiness and that perceived glossiness does not depend on naturalness of color combination for highlights and objects.

  5. Highlight detection for video content analysis through double filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chen, Hexin; Chen, Mianshu

    2005-07-01

    Highlight detection is a form of video summarization techniques aiming at including the most expressive or attracting parts in the video. Most video highlights selection research work has been performed on sports video, detecting certain objects or events such as goals in soccer video, touch down in football and others. In this paper, we present a highlight detection method for film video. Highlight section in a film video is not like that in sports video that usually has certain objects or events. The methods to determine a highlight part in a film video can exhibit as three aspects: (a) locating obvious audio event, (b) detecting expressive visual content around the obvious audio location, (c) selecting the preferred portion of the extracted audio-visual highlight segments. We define a double filters model to detect the potential highlights in video. First obvious audio location is determined through filtering the obvious audio features, and then we perform the potential visual salience detection around the potential audio highlight location. Finally the production from the audio-visual double filters is compared with a preference threshold to determine the final highlights. The user study results indicate that the double filters detection approach is an effective method for highlight detection for video content analysis.

  6. Geochemical and Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence for a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation process for volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, Hidalgo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    2001-03-01

    This study reports new geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for Miocene to Quaternary basaltic to andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, located in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). The initial Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, except for one rhyolite, range as follows: 87Sr/ 86Sr 0.70357-0.70498 and 143Nd/ 144Nd 0.51265-0.51282. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios are generally similar to those for volcanic rocks from other areas of the central and eastern parts of the MVB. The isotopic ratios of one older pre-caldera rhyolite (HP30) from the Huichapan area, particularly its high 87Sr/ 86Sr, are significantly different from rhyolitic rocks from this and other areas of the MVB, but are isotopically similar to some felsic rocks from the neighbouring geological province of Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), implying an origin as a partial melt of the underlying crust. The evolved andesitic to rhyolitic magmas could have originated from a basaltic magma through a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) process. Different compositions, representing lower crust (LC) and upper crust (UC) as well as a hypothetical crust similar to the source of high 87Sr/ 86Sr rhyolite HP30, were tested as plausible assimilants for the AFC process. The results show that the UC represented by granitic rocks from a nearby Los Humeros area or by Cretaceous limestone (L) rocks outcropping in the northern part of the study area, and the LC represented by granulitic xenoliths from a nearby San Luis Potosı´ (SLP) area are not possible assimilants for Huichapan magmas, whereas a hypothetical crust (HA) similar in isotopic compositions to rhyolite HP30 could be considered a possible assimilant for the AFC process. Chemical composition of assimilant HA, although not well constrained at present, was inferred under the assumption that HP30 type partial melts could be generated from its partial melting. These data were then used to evaluate

  7. Guidelines for Effective Usage of Text Highlighting Techniques.

    PubMed

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Oelke, Daniela; Kwon, Bum Chul; Schreck, Tobias; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Semi-automatic text analysis involves manual inspection of text. Often, different text annotations (like part-of-speech or named entities) are indicated by using distinctive text highlighting techniques. In typesetting there exist well-known formatting conventions, such as bold typeface, italics, or background coloring, that are useful for highlighting certain parts of a given text. Also, many advanced techniques for visualization and highlighting of text exist; yet, standard typesetting is common, and the effects of standard typesetting on the perception of text are not fully understood. As such, we surveyed and tested the effectiveness of common text highlighting techniques, both individually and in combination, to discover how to maximize pop-out effects while minimizing visual interference between techniques. To validate our findings, we conducted a series of crowdsourced experiments to determine: i) a ranking of nine commonly-used text highlighting techniques; ii) the degree of visual interference between pairs of text highlighting techniques; iii) the effectiveness of techniques for visual conjunctive search. Our results show that increasing font size works best as a single highlighting technique, and that there are significant visual interferences between some pairs of highlighting techniques. We discuss the pros and cons of different combinations as a design guideline to choose text highlighting techniques for text viewers.

  8. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  9. Highlights of the Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Highlights of the Exposure Factors Handbook (EPA/600/R-10/030).This Highlights document presents an overview of the information provided in the Exposure Factors Handbook (U.S. EPA, 2011). Excerpts of each chapter of the ...

  10. Small Drinking Water Systems Communication and Outreach Highlights

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of our small drinking water systems efforts, this poster highlights several communications and outreach highlights that EPA's Office of Research and Development and Office of Water have been undertaking in collaboration with states and the Association of State Drinking Wa...

  11. Highlighting impact: Do editors' selections identify influential papers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    A recent trend in scientific publishing is that journal editors highlight each week a select set among the papers published (usually) in their respective journals. The highlighted papers are deemed of higher quality, importance, or interest than the 'average' paper and feature prominently in the publishers' websites. We perform a citation analysis of the highlighted papers for a number of journals from various publishers in physics. By comparing the performance of highlighted papers relative to (a) typical papers and (b) highly cited papers in their source journals and in other journals in the field, we explore whether, and to what extent, the selection process at the time of publication identifies papers that will turn out to be influential. We discuss the broader implications for research assessment.

  12. Astronomic-Geodetic Highlights from the Soviet Union,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report is a translation of an article in the German language periodical Austrian Journal of Geodesy , written by K. Ledersteger, published in Vienna in 1959. It concerns Astronomic-Geodetic highlights in the Soviet Union.

  13. Physical and Life Sciences 2008 Science & Technology Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D L; Hazi, A U

    2009-05-06

    This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate that made news in 2008. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2008.

  14. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  15. 1971 Aeronautics and Space Highlights. [NASA programs and research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    These highlights include Mariner orbit of Mars, Interplanetary Monitoring Platform, Orbiting Solar Observatory, small scientific satellite, sounding rockets, Stratoscope 11, earth resources, aeronautics, jet noise abatement, airport runway safety, Apollo 14 and 15, and Skylab.

  16. Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along the North Carrollton facade - Reformed Episcopal Church of the Rock of Ages, 1210 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  18. 3. A general elevation view looking west highlights the Elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. A general elevation view looking west highlights the Elevator and Silo Complex C, commonly known as the 'Landmark' (1940). - Quaker Oats Cereal Factory, Southeast corner of Broadway & Mill Streets, Akron, Summit County, OH

  19. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  20. Aeronautics and Space Report: Highlights 1970. [NASA programs and research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    These highlights include the 1970 solar eclipse, Tiros, Nimbus, Intelsat, wake turbulence, the Peru earthquake, Oregon fishing grounds, Apollo 13, SI-C static firing, McDonnell/Douglas 90-day confinement test, and the moon from Galileo to 1971.

  1. Highlight summarization in golf videos using audio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Gook; Kim, Jin Young

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic summarization of highlights in golf videos based on audio information alone without video information. The proposed highlight summarization system is carried out based on semantic audio segmentation and detection on action units from audio signals. Studio speech, field speech, music, and applause are segmented by means of sound classification. Swing is detected by the methods of impulse onset detection. Sounds like swing and applause form a complete action unit, while studio speech and music parts are used to anchor the program structure. With the advantage of highly precise detection of applause, highlights are extracted effectively. Our experimental results obtain high classification precision on 18 golf games. It proves that the proposed system is very effective and computationally efficient to apply the technology to embedded consumer electronic devices.

  2. 7-(Pyrazol-4-yl)-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based derivatives for kinase inhibition: Co-crystallisation studies with Aurora-A reveal distinct differences in the orientation of the pyrazole N1-substituent.

    PubMed

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Pérez-Fuertes, Yolanda; McIntyre, Patrick J; Atrash, Butrus; Kosmopoulou, Magda; O'Fee, Lisa; Burke, Rosemary; Sun, Chongbo; Faisal, Amir; Bush, Katherine; Avery, Sian; Henley, Alan; Raynaud, Florence I; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Bayliss, Richard; Blagg, Julian

    2015-10-01

    Introduction of a 1-benzyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl moiety at C7 of the imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine scaffold provided 7a which inhibited a range of kinases including Aurora-A. Modification of the benzyl group in 7a, and subsequent co-crystallisation of the resulting analogues with Aurora-A indicated distinct differences in binding mode dependent upon the pyrazole N-substituent. Compounds 7a and 14d interact with the P-loop whereas 14a and 14b engage with Thr217 in the post-hinge region. These crystallographic insights provide options for the design of compounds interacting with the DFG motif or with Thr217.

  3. STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 1 of 3' (document ID 20010020281), the activities of flight days four through six are seen. Footage includes the spacewalks performed by Noriega and Tanner, the deployment of the Solar Array Blanket Box (SABB), various shots of Endeavour's payload bay and the International Space Station (ISS), and the deployment of the solar radiators on the ISS. Flight days seven through eleven and Endeavour's landing are shown in 'STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 3 of 3' (document ID 20010020283).

  4. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  5. Dryden Flight Research Highlights; August 2006 - July 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, David A.

    2007-01-01

    A DVD highlights the research activities of the Dryden Flight Research Center. The video includes coverage of space-based communication, intelligent flight controls, autonomous refueling demonstration, QuietSpike, sonic boom tests, G-III radar pod, X-48B blended wing body, Altair fire mission, Ikhana UAV, STS-117 Atlantis, and SOFIA Telescope research efforts.

  6. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2009-12. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Education and Technology provides strategic leadership for the development of the next generation economy in Alberta through the provision of accessible, affordable and quality learning opportunities for all Albertans and support for a dynamic and integrated innovation system. This paper provides the highlights of the business plan of the…

  7. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  8. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  9. Highlights from the ISCB Student Council Symposia in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Siranosian, Ben; Schwahn, Kevin; Conard, Ashley Mae; Aben, Nanne; Hassan, Mehedi; Fatima, Nazeefa; Hermans, Susanne M.A.; Woghiren, Melissa; Meysman, Pieter; Rahman, Farzana; Jigisha, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    This editorial provides a brief overview of the 12th International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council Symposium and the 4th European Student Council Symposium held in Florida, USA and The Hague, Netherlands, respectively. Further, the role of the ISCB Student Council in promoting education and networking in the field of computational biology is also highlighted. PMID:28003876

  10. Tobacco Use. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2012-33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte; Terzian, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has steadily declined among adolescents during the last fifteen years, although use of some tobacco products, like cigars, has seen recent increases. However, large numbers of teens continue to use tobacco products. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents key research findings; describes prevalence and trends; illustrates…

  11. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  12. Great American Smokeout Highlights the Importance of Smoking Cessation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Occupational Health Services (OHS) recently took part in the 41st Great American Smokeout, an event that highlights the dangers of smoking and encourages smokers to make a plan to quit. Tobacco smoking is the single most preventable cause of chronic disease and death.

  13. The Morehouse College Glee Club: History and Recent Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, David

    1987-01-01

    The history of the Morehouse College Glee Club, founded around 1911 at the Black college, is highlighted by appearances before such notables as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Haile Selassie, Jimmy Carter, and Benjamin E. Mays and performances with people such as Robert Shaw, Leontyne Price, Diahann Carroll, Maynard Jackson, Billy…

  14. Highlights of the Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Highlights document presents an overview of the information provided in the Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) Exposure Factors Handbook (U.S. EPA, 2011). Excerpts of each chapter of the Handbook and summaries of key recommendations for each of the exposure factor...

  15. Child Deaths Highlight Choking Dangers Posed by Grapes

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162679.html Child Deaths Highlight Choking Dangers Posed by Grapes Deaths of 5-year-old and toddler cited in ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young children can choke to death on whole grapes, warn the authors of a ...

  16. Check This Out: Highlights of Model Library Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Tony; Perkinson, Kathryn

    This pamphlet highlights 13 public, academic, school, and special programs that are representative of 62 libraries and media centers recognized by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) for their innovative programs. Programs are grouped in the following categories: (1) community service programs…

  17. Research and technology highlights of the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Highlights of research accomplishments of the Lewis Research Center for fiscal year 1984 are presented. The report is divided into four major sections covering aeronautics, space communications, space technology, and materials and structures. Six articles on energy are included in the space technology section.

  18. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  19. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2010-13. Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology envisions Alberta's prosperity through innovation and lifelong learning. Advanced Education and Technology's mission is to lead the development of a knowledge-driven future through a dynamic and integrated advanced learning and innovation system. This paper presents the highlights of the business…

  20. Highlighting in Early Childhood: Learning Biases through Attentional Shifting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burling, Joseph M.; Yoshida, Hanako

    2017-01-01

    The literature on human and animal learning suggests that individuals attend to and act on cues differently based on the order in which they were learned. Recent studies have proposed that one specific type of learning outcome, the highlighting effect, can serve as a framework for understanding a number of early cognitive milestones. However,…

  1. The Goal Trumps the Means: Highlighting Goals is More Beneficial than Highlighting Means in Means-End Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Means-end actions are an early-emerging form of problem solving. These actions require initiating initial behaviors with a goal in mind. In this study, we explored the origins of 8-month-old infants' means-end action production using a cloth-pulling training paradigm. We examined whether highlighting the goal (toy) or the means (cloth) was more…

  2. Using publication metrics to highlight academic productivity and research impact.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Cone, David C; Sarli, Cathy C

    2014-10-01

    This article provides a broad overview of widely available measures of academic productivity and impact using publication data and highlights uses of these metrics for various purposes. Metrics based on publication data include measures such as number of publications, number of citations, the journal impact factor score, and the h-index, as well as emerging metrics based on document-level metrics. Publication metrics can be used for a variety of purposes for tenure and promotion, grant applications and renewal reports, benchmarking, recruiting efforts, and administrative purposes for departmental or university performance reports. The authors also highlight practical applications of measuring and reporting academic productivity and impact to emphasize and promote individual investigators, grant applications, or department output.

  3. STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Various clips give an overview of the STS-97 Endeavour mission. Footage includes Endeavour on the launch pad, the crew of STS-97 (Commander Brent W. Jett, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Joseph R. Tanner, Carlos I. Noriega, and Marc Garneau) suiting up, replays of the nighttime launch, Launch Control Center at Kenendy Space Center during countdown, and the activities of flight days one through three. The activities of flight days four through six can be seen on 'STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 2 of 3' (document ID 20010020282). The activities of flight days seven through eleven and Endeavour's landing can be found on 'STS-97 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 3 of 3' (document ID 20010020283).

  4. Using Publication Metrics to Highlight Academic Productivity and Research Impact

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Cone, David C.; Sarli, Cathy C.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of widely available measures of academic productivity and impact using publication data and highlights uses of these metrics for various purposes. Metrics based on publication data include measures such as number of publications, number of citations, the journal impact factor score, and the h-index, as well as emerging metrics based on document-level metrics. Publication metrics can be used for a variety of purposes for tenure and promotion, grant applications and renewal reports, benchmarking, recruiting efforts, and administrative purposes for departmental or university performance reports. The authors also highlight practical applications of measuring and reporting academic productivity and impact to emphasize and promote individual investigators, grant applications, or department output. PMID:25308141

  5. Highlights of Transient Plume Impingement Model Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes highlights of an ongoing validation effort conducted to assess the viability of applying a set of analytic point source transient free molecule equations to model behavior ranging from molecular effusion to rocket plumes. The validation effort includes encouraging comparisons to both steady and transient studies involving experimental data and direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Finally, this model is applied to describe features of two exotic transient scenarios involving NASA Goddard Space Flight Center satellite programs.

  6. Spring Research Festival Highlighted on WHAG-TV | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    WHAG-TV (Hagerstown, Md.) visited Fort Detrick to highlight the 2015 Spring Research Festival (SRF), sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR). Visit the WHAG-TV website to see the video broadcast, which aired May 6. The video was produced by WHAG Reporter Mallory Sofastaii. The video featured Linganore High School senior Rebecca Matthews, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, NCI Center for Cancer Research; Lanessa Hill, public affairs specialist,

  7. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  8. UEG Week 2014 highlights: putting endoscopy into perspective.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Siersema, Peter D

    2015-02-01

    The 22nd United European Gastroenterology (EUG) Week took place in Vienna in October 2014. The meeting offered a great opportunity to all those interested in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to exchange clinical experiences, research trends, and scientific progress from all over the world. This report will highlight some of the most interesting topics of GI endoscopy that were presented over the 3 days, and will briefly comment on them in light of the latest bibliographic data.

  9. STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 4 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape'. This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage from flight days 10 through 12 of STS-110. The spacecrew includes Michael J. Bloomfield, Commander; Stephen N. Frick, Pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist; Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist; Ellen Ochoa, Mission Specialist; Lee M.E. Morin, Mission Specialist; Rex J. Walheim, Mission Specialist. Flight day 10 includes an exchange of farewells with the Expedition 4 crew (Yury I. Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel W. Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl E. Walz, Flight Engineer) of the International Space Station (ISS), and undocking. The video includes many views of the ISS as Atlantis departs, including cloud cover and the Earth's limb as backgrounds. There is also a view of Atlantis with its payload bay open. On flight day 11, in preparation for landing, the crew conducts a checkout of flight controls and a test firing. A spaceborne wheat plant experiment onboard the ISS is briefly shown. Flight day 12 includes closing the payload bay, suit-up, and landing. Kennedy Space Center is seen from the air, and the video shows landing replays, as well as a heads-up display view of the landing. Earth views include clear views of Western Sahara, Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria, with the Atlantic Ocean, a cloud obstructed view of Newfoundland and the Atlantic, Pacific Ocean sun glint, and an excellent view of the Chicago area and Lake Michigan at night. The activities from other flights days can be seen on "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002137575), "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137573), and "STS 110 Mission Highlights Resource Tape" Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002137574).

  10. Ranking Highlights in Personal Videos by Analyzing Edited Videos.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Farhadi, Ali; Chen, Tseng-Hung; Seitz, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automatic system for ranking domain-specific highlights in unconstrained personal videos by analyzing online edited videos. A novel latent linear ranking model is proposed to handle noisy training data harvested online. Specifically, given a targeted domain such as "surfing," our system mines the YouTube database to find pairs of raw and their corresponding edited videos. Leveraging the assumption that an edited video is more likely to contain highlights than the trimmed parts of the raw video, we obtain pair-wise ranking constraints to train our model. The learning task is challenging due to the amount of noise and variation in the mined data. Hence, a latent loss function is incorporated to mitigate the issues caused by the noise. We efficiently learn the latent model on a large number of videos (about 870 min in total) using a novel EM-like procedure. Our latent ranking model outperforms its classification counterpart and is fairly competitive compared with a fully supervised ranking system that requires labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. We further show that a state-of-the-art audio feature mel-frequency cepstral coefficients is inferior to a state-of-the-art visual feature. By combining both audio-visual features, we obtain the best performance in dog activity, surfing, skating, and viral video domains. Finally, we show that impressive highlights can be detected without additional human supervision for seven domains (i.e., skating, surfing, skiing, gymnastics, parkour, dog activity, and viral video) in unconstrained personal videos.

  11. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  12. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume II. Budget highlights, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    DOE budget requests for FY 1982 is summarized and then detailed. Budget highlights of the energy programs include: conservation; research, development, and applications (fossil energy, solar, electric energy and energy storage systems, magnetic fusion, nuclear fission, environment); regulation and energy information; direct energy production, and strategic petroleum reserves. Additional programs and their budget requests are given for: general science, defense activities, and departmental administration. The FY 1981 supplemental and recission request is indicated. Special budget analyses are given for Federal fossil, Federal solar, nuclear waste, conservation, and alternative fuels activities programs. The organizational table is presented. Extensive statistics are presented in the appendix. (MCW)

  13. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  14. GREAT Highlights from the SOFIA Early Science Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, Hans; Gusten, R.; GREAT Team

    2012-01-01

    Since its first light on April 01, the German REceiver for Astronomy at TeraHertz Frequencies (GREAT) has flown more than a dozen SOFIA science flights both for US and German proposals. The spectrometer was operated routinely in its low frequency configurations, for sky frequencies between 1.25 and 1.5 THz (L1 channel) and 1.81-1.91 THz (L2 channel). During a GREAT engineering flight, the 2.5 THz OH ground-state transition was successfully observed. We will summarize the science opportunities with GREAT and present highlights from these Early Science flights.

  15. Highlights from PHENIX-I: initial state and early times

    SciTech Connect

    Leitch, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    We will review the latest physics developments from PHENIX concentrating on cold nuclear matter effects, the initial state for heavy-ion collisions, and probes of the earliest stages of the hot-dense medium created in those collisions. Recent physics results from p + p and d + Au collisions; and from direct photons, quarkonia and low-mass vector mesons in A+A collisions will be highlighted. Insights from these measurements into the characteristics of the initial state and about the earliest times in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed.

  16. STS-99 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 1 of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the STS-99 Endeavour mission is given through footage of each flight day. Scenes from flight days one through ten show activities such as astronaut prelaunch procedures (breakfast, suit-up, and boarding Endeavour), launch, and on-orbit activities such as the deployment of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) instrument. Crewmembers are seeing during such everyday activities as brushing their teeth, exercising (bicycle), and emerging from their sleeping bunks. One of the crewmembers shows the contents of the onboard medical kit. See 'STS-99 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 2 of 2' for the activities of flight days 11-12 and the landing of Endeavour.

  17. Highlights from the 7th European meeting on molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loonen, Anne Jm; Schuurman, Rob; van den Brule, Adriaan Jc

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology, clinical genetics and forensics. Novel real-time amplification approaches, novel diagnostic applications and new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, PCR electrospray-ionization TOF mass spectrometry and techniques based on the detection of proteins or other molecules, were discussed. Furthermore, diagnostic companies presented their future visions for molecular diagnostics in human healthcare.

  18. Fifteen Years of Chandra Operation: Scientific Highlights and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Tucker, Wallace; Wilkes, Belinda; Baggett, Randy; Brissenden, Roger; Edmonds, Peter; Mattison, Edward

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, designed for three years of operation with a goal of five years is now entering its 15-th year of operation. Thanks to its superb angular resolution, the Observatory continues to yield new and exciting results, many of which were totally unanticipated prior to launch. We discuss the current technical status, review recent scientific highlights, indicate a few future directions, and present what we feel is the most important lesson learned from our experience of building and operating this great observatory.

  19. Research highlights in engineering sciences, fiscal year 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-04-01

    The Engineering Sciences Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is responsible for developing and maintaining the engineering science resources needed to perform Laboratory programs and to establish expertise in new scientific, engineering, and technical areas of interest to the Laboratory. Highlights from several research efforts carried out in FY 1981 by the Engineering Sciences Divisions at Los Alamos are described. The diversity of these efforts illustrates the variety of research being conducted within the Directorate in support of programs and under the auspices of the Laboratory Director's supporting research and development program. Research on the following subjects is summarized: nuclear reactors; magnetic fusion; explosives; computing systems; electronics; and systems analysis.

  20. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Provart, Nicholas J; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D; Frommer, Wolf B; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U; Waese, Jamie; Wagner, Doris; McCourt, Peter

    2016-02-01

    922 I. 922 II. 922 III. 925 IV. 925 V. 926 VI. 927 VII. 928 VIII. 929 IX. 930 X. 931 XI. 932 XII. 933 XIII. Natural variation and genome-wide association studies 934 XIV. 934 XV. 935 XVI. 936 XVII. 937 937 References 937 SUMMARY: The year 2014 marked the 25(th) International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. We present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.

  1. STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2 of 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video is a continuation of 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 1 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049331). Flight day four footage continues with a video tour of the International Space Station (ISS). During flight day five, an exterior view of the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is seen, followed by the crew unloading the supplies and equipment from the MPLM. Commander Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialist Linda Godwin are seen making preparations for the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) scheduled for the following day. Footage of an exterior view of the ISS is also shown. Flight day six footage includes Godwin and Mission Specialist Daniel Tani suiting up for their EVA and the installation of thermal blankets around the solar array wings of the ISS. Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson is seen working in the ISS laboratory during flight day seven. Views are shown of Saudi Arabia and the Red Sea, the western coast of Australia, Cuba and Florida, and Switzerland and Northern Italy. During flight day eight, the crew is seen stowing objects in the MPLM for return to earth. The video concludes with footage of the treadmill used by the astronauts for physical exercise. Flight days nine through twelve are included in 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 3 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049329).

  2. Highlights from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/highlights-from-san-antonio-breast-cancer-symposium-2015 A critical review on the practice changing studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held December 2015, is presented in this podcast. A number of areas, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment, treatment of metastatic disease and the emergence of new biomarkers are addressed. Trials discussed include the WSG-ADAPT HER2+/HR+ phase II trial, which assessed 12-weeks of neoadjuvant TDM1 with or without endocrine therapy versus trastuzumab+endocrine therapy in HER2-positive hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, the CREATE-X study, which assessed adjuvant capecitabine in patients with HER2-negative pathologic residual invasive disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and the TH3RESA study, which investigated trastuzumab emtansine use in patients with previously treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Further, studies on new promising biomarkers such as the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells in follow up of early breast cancer patients after adjuvant chemotherapy are highlighted. Overall, the present podcast represents a comprehensive overview on some of the most important studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. PMID:27843589

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  4. STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 3 of 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A continuation of 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 1 of 3' (internal ID 2002049331) and 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape, Part 2 of 3' (internal ID 2002049330), this video shows footage from flight days 9-12. The control of the International Space Station (ISS) is handed from the Expedition 3 crew (Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov) to the Expedition 4 crew (Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Daniel Bursch) in an on-orbit ceremony. Both Expedition crews and the STS-108 crew (Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani) are seen reloading the Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). External shots show the MPLM demating from the ISS and returning to the payload bay of Endeavour. The three crews bid farewell to each other before closing the hatches between ISS and Endeavour. The orbiter undocks from ISS and performs its flyarounds. ISS is seen against a backdrop of stars as Endeavour flies away. On the return flight to Earth, the Starshine 2 satellite is deployed. The video ends with the orbiter's landing as seen from several viewpoints.

  5. Specular highlights of plastic surfaces and the Fresnel coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelopoulou, Elli; Poger, Sofya

    2004-10-01

    One of the biggest clues in specularity detection algorithms is the color of the specular highlights. There is a prevalent assumption that the color of specularities for materials like plastics and ceramics can be approximated by the color of the incident light. We show that such an assumption is not generally appropriate because of the effects of the Fresnel reflectance coefficient and its dependence on wavelength. Our theoretical analysis establishes that the sensitivity of the Fresnel term to the wavelength variations of the refractive index can be at least as large as 15%. Our experiments demonstrate that, even with traditional RGB color cameras, the recorded color of specular highlights is distinct from the color of the incident light. Furthermore, by computing the spectral gradients (i.e. the partial derivatives of the image with respect to wavelength) at specular regions we can isolate the Fresnel term up to an additive illumination constant. Our theory is supported by experiments performed on multispectral images of different colored plastic tiles. The refractive indices of the opaque plastics were measured using a specialized spectroscopic ellipsometer. The computed spectral gradients of the tile specularities exhibited a less than 2.5% deviation from the predicted theoretical values.

  6. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  7. STS-41D Post Flight Press Conference with Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The crew, Commander Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr., Pilot Michael L. Coats, Mission Specialists Judith A. Resnik, Steven A. Hawley, and Richard M. Mullane, and Payload Specialist Charles D. Walker are seen participating a panel discussion. Live footage of the Press Conference begins with a brief introduction of all the crew, followed by highlights of the flight, a selection of slides and still pictures, and ends with a question and answer segment. The highlights consist of the astronauts walk out to the Astro-Van, panoramic views of the Discovery on the launch pad, main engine start, ignition of the solid rocket boosters, liftoff, and separation of the boosters. Images of the opening of the sun shield and the deployment of the three communication satellites (Satellite Business System (SBS-D), SYNCOM IV-2, and TELSTAR) are also seen. The crew is seen working on experiments, dumping the wastewater, eating supper, and sleeping. Concluding the live footage are slides, and stills of various areas around the world, including the Libyan Desert, Angola, Namibia, and Australia. The Press Conference ends with questions from Houston, NASA Headquarter, Kennedy Space Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  8. Highlights of Aeroacoustics Research in the U.S. 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-01-01

    Highlights of aeroacoustics research in the United States of America during 1998 are reported in a summary compiled from information provided by members of the Aeroacoustics Technical Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other leading research groups in industry, national laboratories, and academia. The past few years have seen significant progress in aeroacoustics. Research has steadily progressed toward enhanced safety, noise benefits, and lower costs. Since industrial progress is generally not published in the archival literature, it is particularly important to highlight these accomplishments. This year we chose to report on five topics of great interest to the aerospace industry including a synopsis of fundamental research at universities and national laboratories. The topics chosen are: (1) Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST), (2) High Speed Research (HSR), (3) Rotorcraft, (4) Weapons bay aeroacoustics control and (5) Academic research including Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA). Although the information presented in this review is not all encompassing we hope that the topics covered will provide some insights into aeroacoustics activity in the U.S.

  9. SOFIA: first science highlights and future science potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2013-06-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Agency (DLR) to develop and operate a 2.5 m airborne telescope in a highly modified Boeing 747SP aircraft that can fly as high as 45 000 feet (13.7 km). This is above 99.8 % of the precipitable water vapor which blocks much of the mid- and far-infrared radiation from reaching ground-based telescopes. In this review, we briefly discuss the characteristics of the Observatory and present a number of early science highlights obtained with the FORCAST camera in 5-40 micron spectral region and with the GREAT heterodyne spectrometer in the 130-240 micron spectral region. The FORCAST images in Orion show the discovery of a new high-mass protostar (IRc4), while GREAT observations at 1 km s-1 velocity resolution detected velocity-resolved, redshifted ammonia spectra at 1.81 THz in absorption against several strong far-infrared dust continuum sources, clear evidence of substantial protostellar infall onto massive (non-ionizing) protostars. These powerful new data allow us to determine how massive stars form in our Galaxy. Another highlight is the stunning image taken by FORCAST that reveals the transient circumnuclear 1.5 pc radius (dust) ring around our Galactic center, heated by hundreds of massive stars in the young nuclear star cluster. The GREAT heterodyne spectrometer also observed the circumnuclear ring in highly excited CO rotational lines, indicative of emission from warm dense molecular gas with broad velocity structure, perhaps due to local shock heating. GREAT also made superb mapping observations of the [C II] fine structure cooling line at 158 microns, for example in M17-SW molecular cloud-star cluster interface, observations which disprove the simple canonical photodissociation models. The much better baseline stability of the GREAT receivers (compared to Herschel HIFI) allows efficient on-the-fly mapping of extended [C II] emission in our

  10. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    PubMed Central

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  11. Cancer genome: highlights of a Nature Medicine perspective

    PubMed Central

    Voest, Emile

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast The author reviews the recently published article, ‘Facilitating a culture of responsible and effective sharing of cancer genome data’ (Nat Med 2016;22:464–71), considering why data sharing is important, and explaining the obstacles and problems involved. The need to identify common bioinformatics pipelines, and resolving outstanding legal, ethical and technical issues are highlighted. Particular attention is given to emerging issues around informed consent and the handling of electronic patient records. There is now an urgent need to address all these issues on multiple levels in order to fulfil the promise of personalised medicine. The author further considers the work of the Global Alliance for genomics and health across cancer and rare diseases, and in the emerging field of infectious diseases genomics. Finally, the potential impact of cancer genomic data on clinical practice is considered and the enormous potential for it to inform good decision-making is underscored. PMID:27843618

  12. Big data for ecologists: Highlighting the ORNL DAAC

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Alison G; Cook, Robert B; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Eby, Pete I; Thornton, Michele M; Thornton, Peter E; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Virdi, Makhan L; Wei, Yaxing

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly confronted by questions that can be addressed only by integrating data from numerous sources, often across large geographic areas and broad time periods. The supply of ecological big data is increasing at a rapid pace as researchers are publishing their data sets and large, public science and data infrastructures (such as NEON, DataONE, LTER, & NCEAS) are producing and curating extensive volumes of complex data and metadata. While supply of, and demand for, ecological data is on the rise, many ecologists now face a new challenge in locating and synthesizing the data relevant for their particular question. Here we highlight selected popular big data products applicable to ecological research available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. STS-88 Mission Highlights Resources Tape. Tape A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-88 flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev present a video overview of their space flight. This is the first of three videos which show the highlights of the Endeavour mission. Important visual images include pre-launch activities such as the eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters. Once on-orbit crew members are seen delivering and connecting the UNITY Connecting Module to the ZARYA Control Module.

  14. Mycophagous rove beetles highlight diverse mushrooms in the Cretaceous.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenyang; Leschen, Richard A B; Hibbett, David S; Xia, Fangyuan; Huang, Diying

    2017-03-16

    Agaricomycetes, or mushrooms, are familiar, conspicuous and morphologically diverse Fungi. Most Agaricomycete fruiting bodies are ephemeral, and their fossil record is limited. Here we report diverse gilled mushrooms (Agaricales) and mycophagous rove beetles (Staphylinidae) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, the latter belonging to Oxyporinae, modern members of which exhibit an obligate association with soft-textured mushrooms. The discovery of four mushroom forms, most with a complete intact cap containing distinct gills and a stalk, suggests evolutionary stasis of body form for ∼99 Myr and highlights the palaeodiversity of Agaricomycetes. The mouthparts of early oxyporines, including enlarged mandibles and greatly enlarged apical labial palpomeres with dense specialized sensory organs, match those of modern taxa and suggest that they had a mushroom feeding biology. Diverse and morphologically specialized oxyporines from the Early Cretaceous suggests the existence of diverse Agaricomycetes and a specialized trophic interaction and ecological community structure by this early date.

  15. Neuroimaging in Tourette Syndrome: Research Highlights From 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Deanna J.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Black, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (ts) is a developmental neuropsychiatric disorder of the central nervous system defined by the presence of chronic tics. While investigations of the underlying brain mechanisms have provided valuable information, a complete understanding of the pathophysiology of ts remains elusive. Neuroimaging methods provide remarkable tools for examining the human brain, and have been used to study brain structure and function in ts. In this article, we review ts neuroimaging studies published in 2014–2015. We highlight a number of noteworthy studies due to their innovative methods and interesting findings. Yet, we note that many of the recent studies share common concerns, specifically susceptibility to motion artifacts and modest sample sizes. Thus, we encourage future work to carefully address potential methodological confounds and to study larger samples to increase the potential for replicable results. PMID:26543796

  16. Implantable Intrathecal Pumps for Chronic Pain: Highlights and Updates

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Karen H.; Brand, Frances M.; Mchaourab, Ali S.; Veneziano, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Management of chronic pain by intrathecal delivery is gaining increasing use. The aim of this article is to review the literature pertinent to implantable devices used for treatment of chronic pain, and to highlight what is known. Articles were obtained from Medline database and reviewed. Practical patient selection criteria, trial management, and surgical technique are described. Expert consensus guidelines for intrathecal medication use are also reviewed. Finally, an exhaustive description of known complications and future implications is discussed. We concluded that intrathecal pump seems to be overused, while there is still weak evidence to support its outcome. It is also recommended that future research focus on the outcome, measured by functional parameters rather than commonly used pain scores. PMID:17309136

  17. Highlights of contractor initiatives in quality enhancement and productivity improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The NASA/Contractor Team efforts are presented as part of NASA's continuing effort to facilitate the sharing of quality and productivity improvement ideas among its contractors. This complilation is not meant to be a comprehensive review of contractor initiative nor does it necessarily express NASA's views. The submissions represent samples from a general survey, and were not edited by NASA. The efforts are examples of quality and productivity programs in private industry, and as such, highlight company efforts in individual areas. Topics range from modernization of equipment, hardware, and technology to management of human resources. Of particular interest are contractor initiatives which deal with measurement and evaluation data pertaining to quality and productivity performance.

  18. Antibacterial agents: patent highlights January to June 2004.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Oludotun A

    2004-08-01

    This review presents highlights of 32 patents, published between January and June 2004, detailing different classes of antibacterial agents. Disclosures on novel oxazolidinone derivatives with antibacterial activity continue to dominate patent publications in recent years. Novel oxazolidinone derivatives active against linezolid-resistant cocci are reviewed. Patents on beta-lactam antibiotics focused mainly on developing new processes and formulations to improve cost, purity and pharmacokinetic parameters of existing clinical agents. Disclosures on novel potential dual-acting macrolide-quinolone hybrids designed to overcome erythromycin resistance, and new macrolide derivatives with antimycobacterial activity are described. Also presented are novel antibacterial agents, including peptide deformylase and cell-wall inhibitors, and those with undefined mechanisms of action as potential lead compounds, as well as quinolone and quinoline derivatives.

  19. Cambodian Bon Om Touk stampede highlights preventable tragedy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Edbert B; Burkle, Frederick M

    2012-10-01

    The tragic nature of the human stampede that took place in Phnom Penh, Cambodia on November 22, 2010 claimed the lives of 347 people during the three-day-long Water Festival, known as Bon Om Touk. Described as the greatest tragedy that Cambodia has experienced since the collapse of the Khmer Rouge, the Bon Om Touk stampede ranks among the deadliest human stampede disasters during the past 30 years, a Class IV event exceeding 100 fatalities according to a recently proposed scale. 1 From the perspective of global health, the event shares many characteristics with preceding major crowd disasters and failures in event planning. It is essential for the international community to officially monitor human stampedes as it does other major disasters. Additional research on human stampedes is needed to improve our collective understanding of the causes of crowd disasters and how best to prevent them. Hsu EB , Burkle FM Jr . Cambodian Bon Om Touk stampede highlights preventable tragedy.

  20. Women in evolution - highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Otto, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The face of science has changed. Women now feature alongside men at the forefront of many fields, and this is particularly true in evolutionary biology. This special issue celebrates the outstanding achievements and contributions of women in evolutionary biology, by highlighting a sample of their research and accomplishments. In addition to original research contributions, this collection of articles contains personal reflections to provide perspective and advice on succeeding as a woman in science. By showcasing the diversity and research excellence of women and drawing on their experiences, we wish to enhance the visibility of female scientists and provide inspiration as well as role models. These are exciting times for evolutionary biology, and the field is richer and stronger for the diversity of voices contributing to the field.

  1. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  2. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  3. Mycophagous rove beetles highlight diverse mushrooms in the Cretaceous

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenyang; Leschen, Richard A. B.; Hibbett, David S; Xia, Fangyuan; Huang, Diying

    2017-01-01

    Agaricomycetes, or mushrooms, are familiar, conspicuous and morphologically diverse Fungi. Most Agaricomycete fruiting bodies are ephemeral, and their fossil record is limited. Here we report diverse gilled mushrooms (Agaricales) and mycophagous rove beetles (Staphylinidae) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, the latter belonging to Oxyporinae, modern members of which exhibit an obligate association with soft-textured mushrooms. The discovery of four mushroom forms, most with a complete intact cap containing distinct gills and a stalk, suggests evolutionary stasis of body form for ∼99 Myr and highlights the palaeodiversity of Agaricomycetes. The mouthparts of early oxyporines, including enlarged mandibles and greatly enlarged apical labial palpomeres with dense specialized sensory organs, match those of modern taxa and suggest that they had a mushroom feeding biology. Diverse and morphologically specialized oxyporines from the Early Cretaceous suggests the existence of diverse Agaricomycetes and a specialized trophic interaction and ecological community structure by this early date. PMID:28300055

  4. Highlights from the 2013 national cancer research institute conference.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Cancer research is a multifaceted endeavour that incorporates not only a myriad of techniques and specialties but also encompasses a huge range of disease types. The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK partnership comprising 21 charity and government funders of cancer research along with the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry. Each year, the NCRI hosts the largest cancer meeting in the UK; bringing together members of the UK cancer research community, research leaders from around the world, health professionals, service users, research funders, and industry to discuss the latest findings in cancer research from a wide range of disciplines. The 2013 NCRI Conference attracted over 1700 delegates and 150 speakers from 15 different countries. The conference programme covered a large range of topic areas including prevention, screening, model systems, the provision of information, survivorship, and end-of-life care. This conference report gives an overview of the plenary sessions at the conference as well as highlights from the parallel sessions.

  5. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  6. STS 63 Flight Day 4 Highlights/MIR-Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS 63 Flight, day 4, the MIR-Shuttle rendezvous is highlighted in this video. The six-member team in the Shuttle are introduced and discuss their functions and tests for this day of the flight. There is actual footage of earth from space, of the MIR Space Station, a tour of the Shuttle cockpit, some footage from the MIR of the Space Shuttle, and footage from inside the MIR with the cosmonauts. Mission control communications with the Shuttle, communication between the Shuttle and MIR, and an historic communication between the Shuttle's astronauts and President Bill Clinton are included. President Clinton interviews each of the six-member team and discusses the upcoming space walk by Dr. Bernard Harris, the first black astronaut to walk in space. This video was recorded on February 6, 1995.

  7. STS 63 flight day 4 highlights/MIR-Shuttle rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    STS 63 Flight, day 4, the MIR-Shuttle rendezvous is highlighted in this video. The six-member team in the Shuttle are introduced and discuss their functions and tests for this day of the flight. There is actual footage of earth from space, of the MIR Space Station, a tour of the Shuttle cockpit, some footage from the MIR of the Space Shuttle, and footage from inside the MIR with the cosmonauts. Mission control communications with the Shuttle, communication between the Shuttle and MIR, and an historic communication between the Shuttle's astronauts and President Bill Clinton are included. President Clinton interviews each of the six-member team and discusses the upcoming space walk by Dr. Bernard Harris, the first black astronaut to walk in space. This video was recorded on February 6, 1995.

  8. SOFIA - A Brief Overview of ISM Science Highlights to Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2016-05-01

    SOFIA is now close to finishing its Cycle 3 observing season. Despite a turbulent year (2014) including a NASA funding crisis and a heavy maintenance visit (down-time) at Lufthansa-Technik, SOFIA has successfully carried out many important observing programs, using the 4 instruments GREAT, FORCAST, FIFI-LS, and EXES. A second southern hemisphere multi-week deployment to New Zealand was completed in June/July 2015 with FORCAST and GREAT and has provided exciting new data. Here we present a brief overview of science highlights from Cycle 0, 1, 2, and 3 observations related to the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and star formation. Some of these results have been covered by more detailed individual accounts, but a summary and synopsis of SOFIA's major achievements to date seems worthwhile, also to indicate SOFIA's future potential for investigating key interstellar processes (collapse, disk formation, outflows, turbulence, heating and cooling, and magnetic field effects).

  9. Management of children after renal transplantation: highlights for general pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Giglia, Lucy; Chan, Howard; Chan, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    The number of children undergoing successful renal transplantations has been increasing steadily and as a result; general pediatricians are now more likely to encounter children with a kidney allograft in their practice. Although the medical care immediately after transplantation is mostly provided by transplant teams, more and more outpatient care will eventually be performed at the patient’s local community. Medical care from general pediatricians is particularly important, especially for children who are residing far from transplant centers. As these children require prolong immunosuppressive therapies and are susceptible to various specific clinical problems, it is imperative for their primary care providers and pediatricians to be knowledgeable about their specific needs and be competent in providing care. This article highlights the roles and common practice related issues that pertain to general pediatricians in the care of pediatric renal allograft recipients. PMID:26835261

  10. Ancient hyaenas highlight the old problem of estimating evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Beth; Ho, Simon Y W

    2014-02-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA data can provide a timeline for evolutionary change even in the absence of fossils. The power to infer the evolutionary rate is, however, highly dependent on the number and age of samples, the information content of the sequence data and the demographic history of the sampled population. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Sheng et al. (2014) analysed mitochondrial DNA sequences isolated from a combination of ancient and present-day hyaenas, including three Pleistocene samples from China. Using an evolutionary rate inferred from the ages of the ancient sequences, they recalibrated the timing of hyaena diversification and suggest a much more recent evolutionary history than was believed previously. Their results highlight the importance of accurately estimating the evolutionary rate when inferring timescales of geographical and evolutionary diversification.

  11. The use of inverse phase gas chromatography to study the change of surface energy of amorphous lactose as a function of relative humidity and the processes of collapse and crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Newell, H E; Buckton, G; Butler, D A; Thielmann, F; Williams, D R

    2001-04-17

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the surface energy of amorphous lactose. Two samples of amorphous lactose were investigated; a spray dried 100% amorphous material and a ball milled sample of crystalline lactose. The milled sample had less than 1% amorphous content by mass, but on investigation at 0% RH, yielded surface energies comparable to those obtained from the 100% amorphous material, indicating that the surface was amorphous. The effect of increasing humidity was to reduce the dispersive surface energy of the two samples from 36.0 +/- 0.14 and 41.6 +/- 1.4 mJ m(-2) at 0% RH for the spray dried and milled samples respectively, to a value comparable to that obtained for the crystalline alpha-lactose monohydrate of 31.3 +/- 0.41 mJ m(-2). The change in surface energy due to water sorption was only reversible up to 20% RH; after exposure to higher RH values subsequent drying did not result in a return to the original surface energy of the amorphous form. This shows that the surface is reorganising as the glass transition temperature (Tg) is reduced, even though the sample has not collapsed or crystallised. It was possible to follow the collapse behaviour in the column with ease, using a number of different methods.

  12. Highlighting landslides and other geomorphological features using sediment connectivity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Giulia; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Landslide identification is usually made through interpreting geomorphological features in the field or with remote sensing imagery. In recent years, airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) has enhanced the potentiality of geomorphological investigations by providing a detailed and diffuse representation of the land surface. The development of algorithms for geomorphological analysis based on LiDAR derived high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) is increasing. Among them, the sediment connectivity index (IC) has been used to quantify sediment dynamics in alpine catchments. In this work, maps of the sediment connectivity index are used for detecting geomorphological features and processes not exclusively related to water-laden processes or debris flows. The test area is located in the upper Passer Valley in South Tyrol (Italy). Here a 4 km2 Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DGSD) with several secondary phenomena has been studied for years. The connectivity index was applied to a well-known study area in order to evaluate its effectiveness as an interpretative layer to assist geomorphological analysis. Results were cross checked with evidence previously identified by means of in situ investigations, photointerpretation and monitoring data. IC was applied to a 2.5 m LiDAR derived DTM using two different scenarios in order to test their effectiveness: i) IC derived on the hydrologically correct DTM; ii) IC derived on the original DTM. In the resulting maps a cluster of low-connectivity areas appears as the deformation of the DGSD induce a convexity in the central part of the phenomenon. The double crests, product of the sagging of the landslide, are extremely evident since in those areas the flow directions diverge from the general drainage pattern, which is directed towards the valley river. In the crown area a rock-slab that shows clear evidence of incumbent detachment is clearly highlighted since the maps emphasize the presence of traction trenches and

  13. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    PubMed

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    contributions focused on cardiac inflammation, cardiac sarcoidosis, and specific imaging of large vessel vasculitis. The physics and instrumentation track included many highlights such as novel, high resolution scanners. The most noteworthy news and developments of this meeting were summarized in the highlights lecture. Only 55 scientific contributions were mentioned, and hence they represent only a brief summary, which is outlined in this article. For a more detailed view, all presentations can be accessed by the online version of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Volume 42, Supplement 1).

  14. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  15. Satellite tracking of manta rays highlights challenges to their conservation.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rachel T; Witt, Matthew J; Castellanos, Dan W; Remolina, Francisco; Maxwell, Sara; Godley, Brendan J; Hawkes, Lucy A

    2012-01-01

    We describe the real-time movements of the last of the marine mega-vertebrate taxa to be satellite tracked - the giant manta ray (or devil fish, Manta birostris), the world's largest ray at over 6 m disc width. Almost nothing is known about manta ray movements and their environmental preferences, making them one of the least understood of the marine mega-vertebrates. Red listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as 'Vulnerable' to extinction, manta rays are known to be subject to direct and incidental capture and some populations are declining. Satellite-tracked manta rays associated with seasonal upwelling events and thermal fronts off the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and made short-range shuttling movements, foraging along and between them. The majority of locations were received from waters shallower than 50 m deep, representing thermally dynamic and productive waters. Manta rays remained in the Mexican Exclusive Economic Zone for the duration of tracking but only 12% of tracking locations were received from within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Our results on the spatio-temporal distribution of these enigmatic rays highlight opportunities and challenges to management efforts.

  16. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  17. Latest Highlights from our Direct Measurement Video Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, M.; Bohacek, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in technology have made videos much easier to produce, edit, store, transfer, and view. This has spawned an explosion in a production of a wide variety of different types of pedagogical videos. But with the exception of student-made videos (which are often of poor quality) almost all of the educational videos being produced are passive. No matter how compelling the content, students are expected to simply sit and watch them. Because we feel that being engaged and active are necessary components of student learning, we have been working to create a free online library of Direct Measurement Videos (DMV's). These videos are short high-quality videos of real events, shot in a way that allows students to make measurements directly from the video. Instead of handing students a word problem about a car skidding on ice, we actually show them the car skidding on ice. We then ask them to measure the important quantities, make calculations based on those measurements and solve for unknowns. DMV's are more interesting than their word problem equivalents and frequently inspire further questions about the physics of the situation or about the uncertainty of the measurement in ways that word problems almost never do. We feel that it is simply impossible to a video of a roller coaster or a rocket and then argue that word problems are better. In this talk I will highlight some new additions to our DMV collection. This work is supported by NSF TUES award #1245268

  18. STS-44 mission highlights resource tape. Part 1 of 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-11-01

    The STS-44 mission is highlighted in this first part of a two part video set. The flight crew consisted of: Cmdr. Fred Gregory; Pilot Tom Hendricks; Payload Specialist Tom Hennen; and Mission Specialists Story Musgrave, Jim Voss, and Mario Runco. The primary space shuttle mission objective was the deployment of the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite. Secondary payload and spaceborne experiments consisted of a microbial air sampler, the Terra Scout PADVOS system, an M88-1 camera demonstration, a lower body negative pressure test, the Visual Function Tester, and a bioreactor demonstration. A tour of the flight deck, mid-deck, bathroom, and flight compartments with explanations of the equipment found in each area was conducted, a trash compactor was demonstrated, and footage of the crew together for their Thanksgiving dinner was shown. Earth views include several oceans, cloud cover, typhoon Yuri, northeast Australia, and the Barrier Reef Islands. The actor John Patrick Stewart (Commander Pickard of the show 'Star Trek: The Next Generation') performed the wake-up call for the astronauts. This flight was shortened due to an inertial measurement unit failure on the sixth day of the mission.

  19. Research highlights: natural passive samplers--plants as biomonitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vivian S

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade, interest in boosting the collection of data on environmental pollutants while reducing costs has spurred intensive research into passive samplers, instruments that monitor the environment through the free flow of chemical species. These devices, although relatively inexpensive compared to active sampling technologies, are often tailored for collection of specific contaminants or monitoring of a single phase, typically water or air. Plants as versatile, natural passive samplers have gained increased attention in recent years due to their ability to absorb a diverse range of chemicals from the air, water, and soil. Trees, lichens, and other flora have evolved exquisite biological features to facilitate uptake of nutrients and water from the ground and conduct gas exchange on an extraordinary scale, making them excellent monitors of their surroundings. Sampling established plant specimens in a region also provides both historical and spatial data on environmental contaminants at relatively low cost in a non-invasive manner. This Highlight presents several recent publications that demonstrate how plant biomonitoring can be used to map the distribution of a variety of pollutants and identify their sources.

  20. Highlights in peptide nanoparticle carriers intended to oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Benergossi, Jéssica; Calixto, Giovana; Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Aida, Kelly Limi; de Cássia Negrini, Thais; Duque, Cristiane; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon; Chorilli, Marlus

    2015-01-01

    New biocompatible nanomaterials are leading to a range of emerging health treatments. Thus, peptide drugs present in oral diseases, such as caries, periodontal diseases and oral cancer, are highlighting into clinical practice because the peptides can have an influence the growth of tumor cells or microorganisms and its can exhibit direct cytotoxic activity towards cancer cells or microbial cells. Therefore, it is interesting to speculate what are the natural or synthetic peptides that can be used to develop novel strategies to fight cancer diseases or microbial cells, and so, to represent a novel family of anticancer or antimicrobial agents. The use of buccal drug delivery systems, especially nanoparticles, to carrier peptides shows to be very interesting, because these systems can protect the peptide against enzymatic degradation, in addition to target inaccessible sites. However, this peptide delivery system seems to be unexplored by researchers. On the hand, the application of drug delivery systems for oral diseases could be a proposed treatment for these diseases, including the treatment or co-treatment with other therapies, such as photodynamic therapy, of antimicrobial, periodontal diseases and cancer, or even in the early diagnosis of cancer. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based peptides delivery systems intended to oral diseases.

  1. STS-112 Mission Highlights Resource, Part 3 of 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-112 Mission begins with a view of the center radiator on the S(1) Truss. A good view of the International Space Station's (ISS) Destiny Laboratory, Soyuz Crew Return Vehicle and Quest Airlock are shown from a video camera located at the end of the S(1) Truss Segment. The ISS Canadarm 2 is shown getting in position for spacewalk three. Highlights of flight day eight begin with Pilot Pam Melroy and Mission Specialist Fyodur Yurchikhin shown inside of the Quest Airlock closing the hatch as spacewalkers David Wolf and Piers Sellers move in the outer compartment of the Airlock to begin Extravehicular Activity 3 (EVA 3). During EVA 3, Dave Wolf and Piers Sellers are installing spool positioning devices on ammonia lines located on the ISS. Robot Arm Operators Peggy Whitson and Sandy Magnus are shown reviewing procedures for operating the robot arm. A view of Piers Seller climbing back into the Quest Airlock is presented. During flight day nine, robot arm operators Pam Melroy, Jeff Ashby and Peggy Whitson are in the process of removing spacesuits worn by David Wolf and Piers Sellers. A final farewell of the nine crewmembers shown inside of the Destiny Laboratory is presented during flight day ten. The undocking of Space Shuttle Atlantis from the International Space Station is shown on flight day eleven. This presentation ends on flight day 12 with a view of head up displays and the actual landing of the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

  2. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A). Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES) was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for "dark photons" are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  3. The COSPAR Capacity Building Initiative - past, present, future, and highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Carlos; Mendez, Mariano; D'Amicis, Raffaella; Santolik, Ondrej; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Smith, Randall

    At the time of the COSPAR General Assembly in Moscow, the 21st workshop of the Programme for Capacity Building will have taken place. We have started in 2001 with the aim of: i) increasing the knowledge and use of public archives of space data in developing countries, ii) providing highly-practical instruction in the use of these archives and the associated publicly-available software, and iii) fostering personal links between participants and the experienced scientists who lecture during the workshops and supervise the projects carried on by the students. Workshops in many space disciplines have been successfully held so far (X-ray, Gamma-ray and Space Optical and UV Astronomy, Magnetospheric Physics, Space Oceanography, Remote Sensing and Planetary Science) in thirteen countries (Argentina, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Morocco, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Thailand and Uruguay). An associated Fellowship Programme is helping former participants of these workshops to build on skills gained at them. We will summarize the past and discuss the present and future of the Programme, including highlights like the most recent one: the identification of a transient magnetar (the 9th object of this class so far discovered) in the vicinity of a supernova by one of our students, during the CB workshop on high-energy Astrophysics in Xuyi, China, in September 2013.

  4. Satellite Tracking of Manta Rays Highlights Challenges to Their Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rachel T.; Witt, Matthew J.; Castellanos, Dan W.; Remolina, Francisco; Maxwell, Sara; Godley, Brendan J.; Hawkes, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the real-time movements of the last of the marine mega-vertebrate taxa to be satellite tracked – the giant manta ray (or devil fish, Manta birostris), the world's largest ray at over 6 m disc width. Almost nothing is known about manta ray movements and their environmental preferences, making them one of the least understood of the marine mega-vertebrates. Red listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as ‘Vulnerable’ to extinction, manta rays are known to be subject to direct and incidental capture and some populations are declining. Satellite-tracked manta rays associated with seasonal upwelling events and thermal fronts off the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and made short-range shuttling movements, foraging along and between them. The majority of locations were received from waters shallower than 50 m deep, representing thermally dynamic and productive waters. Manta rays remained in the Mexican Exclusive Economic Zone for the duration of tracking but only 12% of tracking locations were received from within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Our results on the spatio-temporal distribution of these enigmatic rays highlight opportunities and challenges to management efforts. PMID:22590622

  5. Highlights on Hevea brasiliensis (pro)hevein proteins.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Peruch, Frédéric; Lecomte, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    Hevein, from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree), was identified in 1960. It is the most abundant soluble protein (22%) found in latex. Hevein is formed from a larger protein called prohevein. The 187 amino-acid prohevein is cleaved into two fragments: the N-terminal 43 amino-acid hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties, and a C-terminal domain (C-ter), which possesses amyloid properties. Hevein-like proteins are also widely represented in the plant kingdom and belong to a larger family related to stress and pathogenic responses. During the last 55 years, these proteins have attracted the interest of numerous specialists from the fields of plant physiology, genetics, molecular and structural biology, and physico-chemistry to allergology. This review highlights various aspects of hevein, prohevein, and C-ter from the point of view of these various fields, and examines their potential roles in latex as well as their beneficial and negative biological effects (e.g. wound sealing and resistance to pathogens which is mediated by agglutination, antimicrobial activity, and/or allergenicity). It covers results and observations from 1960 up to the most recent research.

  6. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory: Progress Report and Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 13 years, the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ability to provide high resolution X-ray images and spectra have established it as one of the most versatile and powerful tools for astrophysical research in the 21st century. Chandra explores the hot, high-energy regions of the universe, observing X-ray sources with fluxes spanning more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the X-ray brightest, Sco X-1, to the faintest sources in the Chandra Deep Field South survey. Thanks to its continuing operational life, the Chandra mission now also provides a long observing baseline which, in and of itself, is opening new research opportunities. Observations in the past few years alone have deepened our understanding of the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies, the details of black hole accretion, the nature of dark energy and dark matter, the details of supernovae and their progenitors, the interiors of neutron stars, the evolution of massive stars, and the high-energy environment of protoplanetary nebulae and the interaction of an exo-planet with its star. Here we update the technical status, highlight some of the scientific results, and very briefly discuss future prospects. We fully expect that the Observatory will continue to provide outstanding scientific results for many years to come.

  7. Celebrating the millennium - historical highlights of photosynthesis research, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Thomas Beatty, J; Gest, Howard

    2003-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to Part 2 of our celebrations of the historical highlights of photosynthesis research. Part 1 was published in October 2002 as Volume 73 of Photosynthesis Research. After a brief introduction, we recognize two giants in the field: Cornelis B. van Niel (for anoxygenic photosynthesis), and Robert Hill (for oxygenic photosynthesis). This is followed by recognition of a 1960 book by Hans Gaffron, and a multi-authored book edited by W. Ruhland and André Pirson, and inclusion in the appendix of a list of selected books. Our celebration is enhanced by the inclusion of beautiful paintings of cells by Antoinette Ryter. After introducing all the historical papers contained in this volume, we honor Louis N. M. Duysens, one of the greatest biophysicists of our time, and finally we dedicate this volume to a great scientist, humanist and peacemaker: Eugene I. Rabinowitch. [12pt] 'Annihilating all that is made To a green thought in a green shade' - Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), The Garden (1681).

  8. Highlights of the advances in basic immunology in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the major fundamental advances in immunological research reported in 2011. The highlights focus on the improved understanding of key questions in basic immunology, including the initiation and activation of innate responses as well as mechanisms for the development and function of various T-cell subsets. The research includes the identification of novel cytosolic RNA and DNA sensors as well as the identification of the novel regulators of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. Moreover, remarkable advances have been made in the developmental and functional properties of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Helper T cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells play indispensable roles in orchestrating adaptive immunity. There have been exciting discoveries regarding the regulatory mechanisms of the development of distinct T-cell subsets, particularly Th17 cells and Treg cells. The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in T cell immunity are discussed, as is the recent identification of a novel T-cell subset referred to as follicular regulatory T (TFR) cells. PMID:22522654

  9. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  10. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-01-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  11. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair.

  12. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  13. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  14. Highlighting Entanglement of Cultures via Ranking of Multilingual Wikipedia Articles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013 PMID:24098338

  15. Highlights of the advances in basic immunology in 2011.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we summarize the major fundamental advances in immunological research reported in 2011. The highlights focus on the improved understanding of key questions in basic immunology, including the initiation and activation of innate responses as well as mechanisms for the development and function of various T-cell subsets. The research includes the identification of novel cytosolic RNA and DNA sensors as well as the identification of the novel regulators of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. Moreover, remarkable advances have been made in the developmental and functional properties of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Helper T cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells play indispensable roles in orchestrating adaptive immunity. There have been exciting discoveries regarding the regulatory mechanisms of the development of distinct T-cell subsets, particularly Th17 cells and Treg cells. The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in T cell immunity are discussed, as is the recent identification of a novel T-cell subset referred to as follicular regulatory T (TFR) cells.

  16. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    PubMed

    Tananbaum, H; Weisskopf, M C; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 < E < 10 keV, locating x-ray sources to high precision, detecting extremely faint sources, and obtaining high-resolution spectra of selected cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  17. Can chimpanzee biology highlight human origin and evolution?

    PubMed

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-07-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily "Homininae". This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human-chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine's subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  18. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions, much is unknown about the risks and exposure pathways associated with bathing in or drinking untreated or partially treated sewage. Beyond acute illness, we are learning more about the chronic sequelae that arise from repeated exposure to pathogens found in sewage. Additionally, we do not know enough about how to measure water quality, especially in developing countries. A consequence of these knowledge gaps is that data from developed countries are used to guide public health approaches in low· and middle-income settings. More data that are locally specific are needed to inform guidelines for improving sanitation and water quality in Rio and other cities in developing countries. Recent media reports of high levels of sewage contamination have caused wide-ranging concerns about the safety of sailing, rowing, and other open water events at the upcoming Olympics. This commentary discusses the global public health problem of exposures to untreated sewage and describes the need for context specific solutions to monitoring and communication and risk assessment.

  19. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  20. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N.; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Su Hao, LO; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Bruneval, Patrick; Norris, Russell A.; Milan, David J.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Levine, Robert A.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown aetiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death1. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance2–5. We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 1,442 cases and 2,439 controls. We identified and replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls six loci and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 encoding a transcription factor6, for which morpholino knockdown in zebrafish results in atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained for tensin1 (TNS1), a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also show the expression of tensin1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1−/− mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair7. PMID:26301497

  1. Recent Science Highlights of the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr

    2016-10-01

    The morning of 30 August 2012 saw an Atlas 5 rocket launch NASA's second Living With a Star spacecraft mission, the twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes, into an elliptic orbit cutting through Earth's radiation belts. Renamed the Van Allen Probes soon after launch, the Probes are designed to determine how the highly variable populations of high-energy charged particles within the radiation belts, dangerous to astronauts and satellites, are created, respond to solar variations, and evolve in space environments. The Van Allen Probes mission extends beyond the practical considerations of the hazard's of Earth's space environment. Twentieth century observations of space and astrophysical systems throughout the solar system and out into the observable universe have shown that the processes that generate intense particle radiation within magnetized environments such as Earth's are universal. During its mission the Van Allen Probes verified and quantified previously suggested energization processes, discovered new energization mechanisms, revealed the critical importance of dynamic plasma injections into the innermost magnetosphere, and used uniquely capable instruments to reveal inner radiation belt features that were all but invisible to previous sensors. This paper gives a brief overview of the mission, presents some recent science highlights, and discusses plans for the extended mission.

  2. Highlights from the La Silla QUEST Variability Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Paolo S.; La Silla QUEST Survey Team

    2017-01-01

    The recently completely QUEST supernova survey ran for 6 years on the ESO 1m Schmidt telescope in La Silla Chile using a large CCD array to replace the photographic plate of the Schmidt. The survey covered ~1000 degres twice per night, for a total survey coverage area of ~20,000 square degrees from declination ~ -40 to +20. The survey magnitude limit is V~21. The average number of visits on a given patch of sky was ~150, although over a thousand squares more than 1000 visits. Although the survey cadence was driven by supernova science, it turns out to be provide good logarithmic coverage on a broad range of timescales, from ~hours to ~year, Much more time domain science can thus be done than a simple supernova search. Here we present highlights from La Silla QUEST non-supernova science, especially for AGN and RR Lyrae stars. Lessons learned from the La Silla QUEST survey should prove useful in preparing for LSST.

  3. ESA `Huygens and Mars Express' science highlights - call to press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    Almost one year has passed since ESA’s Huygens probe landed on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. Today, a set of new wide-ranging results from the probe’s two-and-a-half hour descent and landing, part of the extraordinary NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and its moons, is ready for release. At the same time, ESA’s Mars Express mission is continuing its investigations of Mars, painting a new picture of the 'red planet'. This includes the first ever probing below the surface of Mars, new geological clues with implications for the climate, newly-discovered surface and atmospheric features and, above all, traces of the presence of water on this world. These and other exciting findings from just one year of observations and data analysis - in the context of ESA’s overall scientific achievements - will be the focus of a press conference to be held at ESA Headquarters in Paris at 16:00 on 30 November 2005. Media interested in attending are invited to complete the following registration form. Press conference programme Space Science Highlights 2005 From Huygens to Mars Express 30 November 2005, 16:00 hrs Room 137, European Space Agency Headquarters 8-10 Rue Mario-Nikis, F-75738 Paris Cedex, France 15:30 - Registration 16:00 - A Year of European Space Science Successes Prof. David Southwood, ESA Director of Science Programme 16:10 - Highlights of the Huygens Mission Results Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA Huygens Project Scientist 16:15 - Robin Duttaroy, Co-Investigator, Doppler Wind Experiment, University of Bonn, Germany 16:20 - Marcello Fulchignoni , Principal Investigator, Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument, Université de Paris 7, France 16:25 - John Zarnecki, Principal Investigator, Surface Science Package, Open University, UK 16:30 - François Raulin, Co-Investigator, Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer, Université de Paris 12 - Créteil, France 16:35 - Guy Israel, Principal Investigator, Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyser, Service d

  4. Highlights from Ground-Based O/IR Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. Thomas; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Akeson, R. L.; Bakker, E. J.; Hutter, D. J.; McAlister, H. A.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Townes, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based optical/infrared long-baseline interferometry has continued to extend its capabilities in the U.S., where several existing facilites demonstrate its capabilites in a broad range of scientific applications. This poster presents brief overviews of the CHARA Array and the Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI) on Mt. Wilson, CA; the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) on Mt. Palomar, CA; the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) located on Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, AZ; and the Keck Interferometer (KI) on Mauna Kea, HI; as well as the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI) now under construction at the highest elevation of the Magdalena Mountains of New Mexico. The poster also includes pointers to a small fraction of the scientific results from U.S. interferometers. Recent scientific highlights range from stellar atmospheres (precise diameters, including G/K dwarfs; limb darkening; Cepheid pulsations) to circumstellar material (water detected in a protoplanetary disk; debris disks; Be star disks; warped circumbinary disks; dust shells) to orbits and stellar masses in double, triple, and quadruple systems, to images of stellar surfaces (rapid rotators such Altair), to name a few. While the great majority of results to date have focused on stellar astrophysics, the MROI strives to have sensitivity sufficient to access a number of AGN. Research with these independently operated facilities is sponsored by the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for PTI; the Oceanographer of the Navy and the Office of Naval Research for NPOI; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for KI; the National Science Foundation and Georgia State University for the CHARA Array; and the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for ISI. Funding for MROI is administered through the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Science Highlights from Ground-Based O/IR Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlister, Harold A.; Akeson, R.; Armstrong, T.; Bakker, E.; Boden, A.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Hutter, D.

    2007-05-01

    Ground-based optical/infrared long-baseline interferometry has come of age in the U.S. where several existing or planned facilities have produced remarkable scientific results demonstrating the power of the technique within a broad range of scientific applications. This paper presents brief overviews of the following facilities: the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) on Mt. Palomar, CA; the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) located on Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, AZ; the Keck Interferometer (KI) on Mauna Kea, HI; and the CHARA Array on Mt. Wilson, CA. Also described is the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI) to be built at the highest elevation of the Magdalena Mountains of New Mexico. Example scientific highlights to date include: The first measurement of stellar rotational oblateness (Altair), the detection of Cepheid pulsations, and ultra-precise astrometry of binaries with PTI; the first six-telescope images (the triple system eta Virginis) and constraints on disk parameters of Be stars with NPOI; resolving the nucleus of NGC 4151 and probing the inner disk regions of YSOs with KI; and, the first direct detection of gravity darkening in single stars (Regulus), calibration of the Baade-Wesselink method for Cepheids, and the first direct measurement of the diameter of an exoplanet (the transit system HD 189733) using the CHARA Array. While the great majority of results to date have focused on stellar astrophysics, the MROI strives to have sensitivity sufficient to access a number of AGN. Research with these independently operated facilities is sponsored by the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for PTI; the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Naval Research Laboratory for NPOI; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for KI; and, the National Science Foundation and Georgia State University for the CHARA Array. Funding for MROI is administered through the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Cassini Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s exploration of the Saturn system has generated a treasure trove of scientific data on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other diverse icy satellites, the rings, and magnetosphere. After eight years of close study of this exceptionally complex and dynamic environment, Cassini is still unveiling new scientific discoveries that continue to amaze us. Standout recent highlights include aftereffects from Saturn’s huge storm, a possible subsurface ocean on Titan, close flybys of icy satellites, migrating ring “propellers”, and unexpected variations in Saturn kilometric radiation periodicities. Current observations show seasonal changes including the formation of a polar vortex at Titan’s south pole. To date, Cassini has observed Saturn from just after northern winter solstice through northern spring equinox and now is observing the Saturn system in the previously unobserved period leading up to northern summer solstice. In the remaining five years of the on-going Solstice Mission, Cassini will continue to study seasonally and temporally dependent processes. Given the long Saturnian year ( 30 years) the longevity of Cassini is essential for elucidating seasonal change in the Saturn system. The grand finale of the mission occurs in 2017, when a series of inclined orbits brings Cassini between the innermost D ring and the upper regions of Saturn’s atmosphere. This geometry will offer unique opportunities for new discoveries and ground-breaking science, including Saturn interior structure science from otherwise unobtainable gravity and magnetic field measurements and unprecedented determination of the ring mass, currently uncertain by an order of magnitude. This Proximal orbit phase is similar to Juno’s mission at Jupiter. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn is the first step toward the next great leap in solar system origins research. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  7. STS-107 Mission Highlights Resource, Part 3 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This video, Part 3 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-107 crew during flight days 9 through 12 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The crew consists of Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William McCool, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, and Laurel Clark, and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon. On flight day 9 David Brown and other crew members are at work on experiments in the Spacehab research module, and imagery is shown from the Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment (MEIDEX) on a pass over North Africa and the Horn of Africa. Ilan Ramon narrates part of the footage from flight day 10, and intravehicular activities of the astronauts onboard Columbia are shown, as well as views of the Gulf of Aden, and Lake Chad, which is seen with the back of the orbiter in the foreground. Rick Husband narrates the footage from day 11, which includes cleaning duties and maintenance, as well as an excellent view of the Sinai Peninsula, Israel, and Jordan, as well as the Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aqaba. The highlight of flight day 12 is a conversation between Columbia's crew and the crew of the International Space Station (ISS). A special section of Earth views at the end of the video shows: 1) Atlantic Ocean, Strait of Gibraltar, Mediterranean Sea, Iberian Peninsula, Morocco, and Algeria; 2) Baja Peninsula; 3) Cyprus and Mediterranean Sea; 4) Florida; 5) Earth limb and Pacific Ocean; 6) North Carolina Outer Banks, Cape Hatteras, and Atlantic Ocean; 7) Houston with zoom out to Texas and Louisiana; 8) Mt. Vesuvius (Italy); 9) Earth limb and Atlantic Ocean; 10) Earth limb and terminator, and Pacific Ocean; 11) Saudia Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and Arabian Sea.

  8. Process highlights to enhance DSA contact patterning performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharbi, A.; Tiron, R.; Argoud, M.; Chamiot-Maitral, G.; Fouquet, A.; Lapeyre, C.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Sarrazin, A.; Servin, I.; Delachat, F.; Bos, S.; Bérard-Bergery, S.; Hazart, J.; Chevalier, X.; Nicolet, C.; Navarro, C.; Cayrefourcq, I.; Bouanani, S.; Monget, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we focus on the directed-self-assembly (DSA) application for contact hole (CH) patterning using polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymers (BCPs). By employing the DSA planarization process, we highlight the DSA advantages for CH shrink, repair and multiplication which are extremely needed to push forward the limits of currently used lithography. Meanwhile, we overcome the issue of pattern densityrelated- defects that are encountered with the commonly-used graphoepitaxy process flow. Our study also aims to evaluate DSA performances as function of material properties and process conditions by monitoring main key manufacturing process parameters: CD uniformity (CDU), placement error (PE) and defectivity (Hole Open Yield = HOY). Concerning process, it is shown that the control of surface affinity and the optimization of self-assembly annealing conditions enable to significantly enhance CDU and PE. Regarding materials properties, we show that the best BCP composition for CH patterning should be set at 70/30 of PS/PMMA total weight ratio. Moreover, it is found that increasing the PS homopolymer content from 0.2% to 1% has no impact on DSA performances. Using a C35 BCP (cylinder-forming BCP of natural period L0 = 35nm), high DSA performances are achieved: CDU-3σ = 1.2nm, PE-3σ = 1.2nm and HOY = 100%. The stability of DSA process is also demonstrated through the process follow-up on both patterned and unpatterned surfaces over several weeks. Finally, simulation results, using a phase field model based on Ohta-Kawasaki energy functional are presented and discussed with regards to experiments.

  9. Algerian abortion controversy highlights rape of war victims.

    PubMed

    Chelala, C

    1998-05-09

    This brief article highlights the change in Islamic practices to allow abortion for women raped during war situations in Algeria. The Islamic Supreme Council on April 12, 1998, issued an edict (fatwa) that allowed abortions for women attacked by Islamic extremists. This changes the prior prohibition of abortion, except in cases where the mother's life is in danger. The day after the edict, the newspapers Le Matin and La Tribune denied the existence of the edict, because the President's council did not request the change in Islamic law. The newspaper Al Khabar published the April 12, 1998, news of the edict and drew attention to the fate of over 1000 women and young girls raped during attacks. An estimated 70,000 people have been reported killed since 1992. The war was precipitated when the army nullified national elections that would have given the Islamic party political power. The Algerian Family Solidarity Ministry reports that as many as 1600 women, mostly aged 13-20 years, have been abducted and raped since 1994, by bands from the Armed Islamic Group. Figures are considered underestimates. Many women were able to escape from captors, but many of these women were pregnant. The stigma is so strong that many of these women will not be accepted home by their own families. In addition to those women who survived being raped, an estimated 2000 raped women were killed by their captors. The abductions have declined, but are still ongoing, especially around Algiers and near the Moroccan and Tunisian borders. The terrorists consider the act a "temporary marriage." Amnesty International and others have criticized the recent UN Human Rights Commission for not taking action in Algeria.

  10. BRITICE-CHRONO: The project and highlights so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabel, D.; Clark, C.; Chiverrell, R. C.; O'Cofaigh, C.; Scourse, J. D.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2015-12-01

    BRITICE-CHRONO is a five-year Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded consortium of more than 40 researchers comprising glaciologists, marine and terrestrial Quaternary scientists and ice sheet-modellers, with the specific aim to systematically collect and date material to constrain the timing and rates of change of the marine-influenced sectors of the collapsing British Irish Ice Sheet (http://britice-chrono.org/). At the halfway point of the project we have completed two 40-day research cruises circumnavigating the British Isles and Ireland, and over 300 person-days of terrestrial fieldwork, yieldeding around 15 tonnes of samples for dating by optically stimulated luminescence-, surface exposure-, and radiocarbon methods. By March 2016 we expect to have generated about 850 new dates from landforms associated with the deglaciation of the last British and Irish ice-sheet. The success of the project will in part depend on the team being able to provide ice-sheet modellers with robust chronological markers against which the ice-sheet models can be tested. The decision-making process in deciding robustness of ages derived from multiple samples and different Quaternary geochronological methods will be discussed. Some geochronological highlights thus far are that deglaciation of the northwest sector of the ice-sheet was in progress at 28ka, well before the global LGM, and the northern tip of mainland Scotland was ice free by 25ka. At the same time the Irish Sea ice stream in the south appears to have been advancing towards its maximum extend. Although deglaciation in the south commences much later, both the main southern and northern ice streams appear to have persisted for at least 10ka with final retreat onto the mainland occurring at approximately the same time (16ka).

  11. Structure-Activity Relationship of Nerve-Highlighting Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Summer L.; Xie, Yang; Goodwill, Haley L.; Nasr, Khaled A.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Madigan, Victoria J.; Siclovan, Tiberiu M.; Zavodszky, Maria; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Frangioni, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Nerve damage is a major morbidity associated with numerous surgical interventions. Yet, nerve visualization continues to challenge even the most experienced surgeons. A nerve-specific fluorescent contrast agent, especially one with near-infrared (NIR) absorption and emission, would be of immediate benefit to patients and surgeons. Currently, there are only three classes of small molecule organic fluorophores that penetrate the blood nerve barrier and bind to nerve tissue when administered systemically. Of these three classes, the distyrylbenzenes (DSBs) are particularly attractive for further study. Although not presently in the NIR range, DSB fluorophores highlight all nerve tissue in mice, rats, and pigs after intravenous administration. The purpose of the current study was to define the pharmacophore responsible for nerve-specific uptake and retention, which would enable future molecules to be optimized for NIR optical properties. Structural analogs of the DSB class of small molecules were synthesized using combinatorial solid phase synthesis and commercially available building blocks, which yielded more than 200 unique DSB fluorophores. The nerve-specific properties of all DSB analogs were quantified using an ex vivo nerve-specific fluorescence assay on pig and human sciatic nerve. Results were used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and to define the nerve-specific pharmacophore. All DSB analogs with positive ex vivo fluorescence were tested for in vivo nerve specificity in mice to assess the effect of biodistribution and clearance on nerve fluorescence signal. Two new DSB fluorophores with the highest nerve to muscle ratio were tested in pigs to confirm scalability. PMID:24039960

  12. Highlights from the first year of Odin observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Å.; Frisk, U.; Olberg, M.; Bergman, P.; Bernath, P.; Biver, N.; Black, J. H.; Booth, R. S.; Buat, V.; Crovisier, J.; Curry, C. L.; Dahlgren, M.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Falgarone, E.; Feldman, P. A.; Fich, M.; Florén, H. G.; Fredrixon, M.; Gerin, M.; Gregersen, E. M.; Hagström, M.; Harju, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Horellou, C.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Kyrölä, E.; Kwok, S.; Larsson, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Liljeström, T.; Lindqvist, M.; Liseau, R.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Mattila, K.; Mégie, G.; Mitchell, G. F.; Murtagh, D.; Nyman, L.-Å.; Nordh, H. L.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Olofsson, G.; Olofsson, H.; Pagani, L.; Persson, G.; Plume, R.; Rickman, H.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rydbeck, G.; Sandqvist, Aa.; von Schéele, F.; Serra, G.; Torchinsky, S.; Tothill, N. F.; Volk, K.; Wiklind, T.; Wilson, C. D.; Winnberg, A.; Witt, G.

    2003-05-01

    Key Odin operational and instrumental features and highlights from our sub-millimetre and millimetre wave observations of H2O, H218O, NH3, 15NH3 and O2 are presented, with some insights into accompanying Odin Letters in this A&A issue. We focus on new results where Odin's high angular resolution, high frequency resolution, large spectrometer bandwidths, high sensitivity or/and frequency tuning capability are crucial: H2O mapping of the Orion KL, W3, DR21, S140 regions, and four comets; H2O observations of Galactic Centre sources, of shock enhanced H2O towards the SNR IC443, and of the candidate infall source IRAS 16293-2422; H218O detections in Orion KL and in comet Ikeya-Zhang; sub-mm detections of NH3 in Orion KL (outflow, ambient cloud and bar) and ρ Oph, and very recently, of 15NH3 in~Orion KL. Simultaneous sensitive searches for the 119 GHz line of O2 have resulted in very low abundance limits, which are difficult to accomodate in chemical models. We also demonstrate, by means of a quantitative comparison of Orion KL H2O results, that the Odin and SWAS observational data sets are very consistently calibrated. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes), and the Centre National d'études Spatiales (CNES, France). The Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) has been the prime industrial contractor, and is also responsible for the satellite operation from its Odin Mission Control Centre at SSC in Solna and its Odin Control Centre at ESRANGE near Kiruna in northern Sweden. See also the SNSB Odin web page: http://www.snsb.se/eng_odin_intro.shtml

  13. Recent Science Highlights from the Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert; Marchant, J.; Moss, C.; Steele, I.

    2008-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope is a fully-robotic 2-metre astronomical telescope owned and operated on La Palma by the Astrophysics Research Institute of Liverpool John Moores University (UK) with the financial support of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). A range of instruments are permanently mounted at the Cassegrain focus providing optical imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry and near-IR imaging with instrument changes in less than one minute. Though a very broad range of observational projects run on the telescope, the instrumentation and infrastructure have been designed specifically to exploit the robotic observatory's fully automated capabilities by focusing on the demands of time-domain astrophysics. Targets may be monitored on any time scale from hours to months and rapid response observations made in response to events such as GRBs, novae and supernovae or newly discovered solar system objects. In this poster we present a few recent highlights from the range of greater than 40 observational programs running now or over the past year, many of which are specifically enabled by the robotic nature of the telescope. In the case of results that have not been already published in refereed journals, the authors have kindly given permission for the inclusion of their data in this paper. * An exceptionally early measurement of GRB optical polarization, only 203 seconds after the burst itself (Mundell et al., 2007, Science, 315, 1822) * The first detection of the YORP effect in an asteroid's spin period (Lowry et al., 2007, Science, 316, 272) * Milli-magnitude photometry of several extra-solar planetary transits (Pollaco et al, in prep.). For more details of the telescope and the time allocation procedures please see http://telescope.livjm.ac.uk/

  14. Working with Workflows: Highlights from 5 years Building Scientific Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Altintas, Ilkay; Chin, George; Crawl, Daniel; Iyer, H.; Khan, Ayla; Klasky, S.; Koehler, Sven; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Mouallem, Pierre; Nagappan, Mie; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Silva, C.; Tchoua, Roselynne; Vouk, M.

    2011-07-30

    In 2006, the SciDAC Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center proposed to continue its work deploying leading edge data management and analysis capabilities to scientific applications. One of three thrust areas within the proposed center was focused on Scientific Process Automation (SPA) using workflow technology. As a founding member of the Kepler consortium [LAB+09], the SDM Center team was well positioned to begin deploying workflows immediately. We were also keenly aware of some of the deficiencies in Kepler when applied to high performance computing workflows, which allowed us to focus our research and development efforts on critical new capabilities which were ultimately integrated into the Kepler open source distribution, benefiting the entire community. Significant work was required to ensure Kepler was capable of supporting large-scale production runs for SciDAC applications. Our work on generic actors and templates have improved the portability of workflows across machines and provided a higher level of abstraction for workflow developers. Fault tolerance and provenance tracking were obvious areas for improvement within Kepler given the longevity and complexity of our target workflows. To monitor workflow execution, we developed and deployed a web-based dashboard. We then generalized this interface and released it so it could be deployed at other locations. Outreach has always been a primary focus of our work and we had many successful deployments across a number of scientific domains while continually publishing and presenting our work. This short paper describes our most significant accomplishments over the past 5 years. Additional information about the SDM Center can be found in the companion paper: The Scientific Data Management Center: Available Technologies and Highlights.

  15. Highlights from Hitomi observations of non-Perseus targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Bamba, Aya; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Hughes, John Patrick; Madejski, Greg; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hitomi Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Before the tragic loss of the spacecraft due to attitude control problems, Hitomi observed three supernova remnants (SNR), N132D, G21.5-0.9, and the Crab Nebula, with the main purpose of initial in-orbit calibration. Here we present some scientific highlights of these observations.N132D is a middle-aged, core-collapse SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). It was observed after the Perseus cluster. Even though the exposure was very short, the SXS clearly resolves the fine structure of He-like S K-shell emission. We detect a significant redshift that is consistent with the line-of-sight velocity of the LMC. Fe K emission is redshifted even more significantly, with a corresponding velocity of ~2000 km/s. This suggests a non-uniform velocity distribution of the Fe ejecta, probably due to an asymmetric supernova explosion.G21.5-0.9 is a young plerionic composite-type SNR. Powered by the 62 ms rotation-powered pulsar J1833-1034, the SNR is dominated by non-thermal emission from the pulsar wind nebula, with extended limb-brightening and knots of X-ray emission. The Hitomi SXS, SXI, and HXI observations provide a high-statistics wide-band spectrum from a single satellite. We are currently searching for 1) emission or absorption line features, 2) a spectral break in the continuum, and 3) the pulse period. The status of the analysis and results will be presented.The Crab was observed after all the instruments aboard Hitomi were turned on. We successfully obtain the pulse profile with all of the instruments. The X-ray polarization is being studied with the HXI and SGD. We also search for emission/absorption lines with the SXS, but no features have so far been significantly detected. We discuss the results in light of constraining the nature of the Crab's progenitor explosion.

  16. Highlights and Conclusions of the Unidata OGC Interoperability Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenico, B.; Davis, E.; Rew, R.; Caron, J.; Nativi, S.; Yang, W.; Falke, S.; Woolf, A.; Tandy, J.

    2007-12-01

    At the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) Technical Committee meetings, Unidata hosted a special Interoperability Day workshop to address the use of web services via standard interfaces for accessing a broad range of environmental data. These interfaces include: WCS (Web Coverage Service), WFS (Web Feature Service, SOS (Sensor Observation Service, CS-W/ebRIM (Catalog Service for the Web / electronic business Registry Information Model) for providing access to data currently served via THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services), OPeNDAP (Open source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol), netCDF-CF (network Common Data Form - Climate and Forecast conventions) and IDD/LDM (Internet Data Distribution / Local Data Manager) technologies. The primary data served includes weather, climate and ocean data from the community sometimes referred to as Fluid Earth Sciences (FES). An international set of representatives from industry, government, and academia, spanning many geosciences disciplines participated actively in the workshop and are committed to continued collaboration. The overall objective for the day was to come up with practical and concrete ideas for how to deliver various classes of FES data via web services through the standard interfaces. The primary focus was on gridded datasets (e.g., forecast model output) and station/observation/point datasets (e.g. the observational data collected at weather stations, ocean buoys, river gaging stations. As time allowed, other categories (profile/trajectory, swath, radial, unstructured grids) were addressed. The main objective was to come up with a realistic plan for dealing with gridded and station/observation/point datasets. Then the remaining categories can be addressed incrementally. This presentation summarizes the highlights of the Interoperability Day and the resulting plans for future implementation and testing.

  17. STS-107 Mission Highlights Resource, Part 4 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-107 crew during flight days 13 through 15 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The crew consists of Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William McCool, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, and Laurel Clark, and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon. The highlight of flight day 13 is Kalpana Chawla conversing with Mission Control Center in Houston during troubleshooting of the Combustion Module in a recovery procedure to get the MIST fire suppression experiment back online. Chawla is shown replacing an atomizer head. At Mission Control Center a vase of flowers commemorating the astronauts who died on board Space Shuttle Challenger's final flight is shown and explained. The footage of flight day 14 consists of a tour of Columbia's flight deck, middeck, and Spacehab research module. Rick Husband narrates the tour, which features Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Clark, and himself. The astronauts demonstrate hygene, a dining tray, the orbiter's toilet, and a space iron, which is a rack for strapping down shirts. The Earth limb is shown with the Spacehab module in the foreground. Clark exercises on a bicycle for a respiration experiment, and demonstrates how a compact disk player gyrates in microgravity. On flight day 15, the combustion module is running again, and footage is shown of the Water Mist Fire-Suppression Experiment (Mist) in operation. Laurel Clark narrates a segment of the video in which Ilan Ramon exercises on a bicycle, Rick Husband, Kalpana Chawla, and Ramon demonstrate spinning and push-ups in the Spacehab module, and Clark demonstrates eating from a couple of food packets. The video ends with a shot of the Earth limb reflected on the radiator on the inside of Columbia's open payload bay door with the Earth in the background.

  18. Cassini-Huygens Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Altobelli, Nicolas; Edgington, Scott

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has greatly enhanced our understanding of the Saturn system. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, its retinue of icy moons including Titan, the dynamic rings, and the system's complex magnetosphere. Launched in 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft spent seven years traveling to Saturn, arriving in July 2004, roughly two years after the northern winter solstice. Cassini has orbited Saturn for 9.5 years, delivering the Huygens probe to its Titan landing in 2005, crossing northern equinox in August 2009, and completing its Prime and Equinox Missions. It is now three years into its 7-year Solstice mission, returning science in a previously unobserved seasonal phase between equinox and solstice. As it watches the approach of northern summer, long-dark regions throughout the system become sunlit, allowing Cassini's science instruments to probe as-yet unsolved mysteries. Key Cassini-Huygens discoveries include icy jets of material streaming from tiny Enceladus' south pole, lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and methane rain on giant Titan, three-dimensional structures in Saturn's rings, and curtain-like aurorae flickering over Saturn's poles. The Huygens probe sent back amazing images of Titan's surface, and made detailed measurements of the atmospheric composition, structure and winds. Key Cassini-Huygens science highlights will be presented. The Solstice Mission continues to provide new science. First, the Cassini spacecraft observes seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere. Second, it addresses new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, for example providing qualitatively new measurements of Enceladus and Titan that could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Third, it will conduct a close-in mission at Saturn yielding fundamental knowledge about the interior of Saturn. This grand finale of the

  19. A highlight of data products from IRIS Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutko, A. R.; Bahavar, M.; Trabant, C. M.; Van Fossen, M.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2009 the IRIS Data Management Center has served the seismology community in a variety of ways by offering higher order data products generated internally or by the research community in addition to raw times series data traditionally managed at the DMC. These products are intended to facilitate research as baseline standards, tools for data visualization or characterization, and teaching & outreach material. We currently serve 25 data products of which 7 are event-based that provide quick looks at many aspects of interest to researchers, often within a few hours of real-time. Among our new offerings is an expansion of the visualization capabilities of the Earth Model Collaboration, a repository of author contributed tomography and other Earth models. Currently EMC tools allow users to make 2D plots slicing through models. New 3D visualization tools being developed will bridge the gap between 2D slices and advanced and sometimes complicated 3D visualization packages with common 3D capabilities that can be set up and learned within minutes. The newly released Global Stacks is a project that stacks up to a million seismograms to illuminate the global seismic wavefield. Seismograms are processed and stacked for three component data across many frequency bands. The resulting stacks lead to high-fidelity wavefield images that clearly highlight characteristics such as dispersion in surface waves and many phases not commonly observed such as P'P'P'P'. Another recent addition is the Automated Surface Wave Phase Velocity Measuring System, which is an automated do-it-yourself surface wave tomography package requiring minimal user input and produces research quality tomography results. To further enhance our effort to support the research community, we invite proposals for collaborative data product development. This is an excellent opportunity for researchers to put forward unique and useful data product ideas and collaborate with the DMC in the development of the

  20. Hurricane Debby and the Appalachians Highlight New MISR Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MISR team has developed new methods for retrieving information about clouds, airborne particles, and surface properties that capitalize on the instrument's unique, multi-angle imaging approach. This illustration, based upon results contained in sample products that have just been publicly released at the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC), highlights some of these new capabilities. The ASDC, located at NASA's Langley Research Center, is the primary processing and archive center for MISR data (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/).

    On August 21, 2000, during Terra orbit 3600, MISR imaged Hurricane Debby in the Atlantic Ocean. The first panel on the left is the MISR downward-looking (nadir) view of the storm's eastern edge. The next two panels show the results of a new approach that uses MISR's stereoscopic observations to retrieve cloud heights and winds. In the middle panel of this set, gradations from low to high cloud are depicted in shades ranging from blue to red. Since it takes seven minutes for all nine MISR cameras to view any location on Earth, and the clouds moved during this time, the data also contain information about wind speed and direction. Derived wind vectors, shown in the third panel, reveal Hurricane Debby's cyclonic motion. The highest wind speed measured is nearly 100 kilometers/hour. MISR obtains this type of information on a global basis, which will help scientists study the relationship between climate change and the three-dimensional characteristics of clouds.

    MISR imaged the eastern United States on March 6, 2000, during Terra orbit 1155. The first panel in the righthand set is the downward-looking (nadir) view, covering the region from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The middle panel is the image taken by the forward-viewing 70.5-degree camera. At this increased slant angle, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere is three times longer, and a thin haze over the Appalachians is

  1. Highlighting and Its Relation to Distributed Study and Students' Metacognitive Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Carole L.; Storm, Benjamin C.; Kornell, Nate; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Use of highlighting is a prevalent study strategy among students, but evidence regarding its benefit for learning is mixed. We examined highlighting in relation to distributed study and students' attitudes about highlighting as a study strategy. Participants read a text passage twice while highlighting or not, with their readings either…

  2. Kinetics of bulk crystallisation of supercooled melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Pil'nik, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The exact solution that fully describes the kinetics of the growth of a spherical crystal in supercooled melt is found. The kinetic model of nucleation-mediated crystallization is presented. It correctly takes into account the change in supercooling of the initial phase in the process of formation and evolution of a new phase.

  3. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning; Highlights in Research and Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This NREL Highlight discusses a recent state-of-the-art review of membrane processes for air conditioning that identifies future research opportunities. This highlight is being developed for the June 2015 S&T Alliance Board meeting.

  4. 1972 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This document includes Mariners to Mars, Pioneer to Jupiter, Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, Small Astronomy Satellite, sounding rockets, earth resources, Nimbus weather watcher, communication satellites, aeronautics, wind tunnel research, STOL, noise abatement, lifting bodies, US/Soviet cooperation, preparation for Skylab, and the Apollo 16 and 17 missions.

  5. Brookhaven highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  6. JPL highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Deep-space exploration; information systems and space technology development; technology applications; energy and energy conversion technology; and earth observational systems and orbital applications are discussed.

  7. LLTI Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankratz, David

    1997-01-01

    Presents discussions that have taken place in an electronic forum by language lab professionals to discuss issues relevant to their everyday work. The discussions covered focus on the practicality of digital audio lab, good programs for instructional technology, "Systeme-D /Atajo" writing assistant programs for French and Spanish, and LCD…

  8. Landes Highlights

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing helps to fine-tune potassium channel MiR-93 promotes tumor angiogenesis and metastasis via LATS2 suppression Imprinted small RNAs and their contribution to human disease Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription via P-TEFb interaction

  9. Highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Current research programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are presented. The topics include: the genetic basis for breast cancer, the Advanced Light Source, selenium characterization in soils via x-ray absorption spectroscopy, automated colony sorting in efforts of map the human genome, cancer drugs, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), atomic force microscopes (AFM), mapping the radon risk in homes, ketene research, tracking B mesons and the search for the top quark, computerized scientific visualization, technology transfer efforts, and astronomy in the classroom.

  10. MAGIC highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE) side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the "bridge" of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  11. AGARD Highlights.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    m) IT ala (1) a freccia ES sensacion (r) artificial ES indicador (m) tipo A NE pillvleugel FR I sensation MI artificielle FR indicateur (m) type A...visualizzatore (m) tipo A TU W tipi kanat fT sensirie Nf errificiale NE A-scharmt iro) NE kunstmastig I stuurkracht) gevroel In) PO dcran Wm tipo A 10596

  12. Highlights of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Highlights of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook. As a "highlights" document, this is a companion report to the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report) EPA released in 2008. This highlights doc...

  13. Display format and highlight validity effects on search performance using complex visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim; O'Brien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  14. Modeling sports highlights using a time-series clustering framework and model interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Otsuka, Isao; Xiong, Ziyou; Divakaran, Ajay

    2005-01-01

    In our past work on sports highlights extraction, we have shown the utility of detecting audience reaction using an audio classification framework. The audio classes in the framework were chosen based on intuition. In this paper, we present a systematic way of identifying the key audio classes for sports highlights extraction using a time series clustering framework. We treat the low-level audio features as a time series and model the highlight segments as "unusual" events in a background of an "usual" process. The set of audio classes to characterize the sports domain is then identified by analyzing the consistent patterns in each of the clusters output from the time series clustering framework. The distribution of features from the training data so obtained for each of the key audio classes, is parameterized by a Minimum Description Length Gaussian Mixture Model (MDL-GMM). We also interpret the meaning of each of the mixture components of the MDL-GMM for the key audio class (the "highlight" class) that is correlated with highlight moments. Our results show that the "highlight" class is a mixture of audience cheering and commentator's excited speech. Furthermore, we show that the precision-recall performance for highlights extraction based on this "highlight" class is better than that of our previous approach which uses only audience cheering as the key highlight class.

  15. Modeling sports highlights using a time-series clustering framework and model interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Otsuka, Isao; Xiong, Ziyou; Divakaran, Ajay

    2004-12-01

    In our past work on sports highlights extraction, we have shown the utility of detecting audience reaction using an audio classification framework. The audio classes in the framework were chosen based on intuition. In this paper, we present a systematic way of identifying the key audio classes for sports highlights extraction using a time series clustering framework. We treat the low-level audio features as a time series and model the highlight segments as "unusual" events in a background of an "usual" process. The set of audio classes to characterize the sports domain is then identified by analyzing the consistent patterns in each of the clusters output from the time series clustering framework. The distribution of features from the training data so obtained for each of the key audio classes, is parameterized by a Minimum Description Length Gaussian Mixture Model (MDL-GMM). We also interpret the meaning of each of the mixture components of the MDL-GMM for the key audio class (the "highlight" class) that is correlated with highlight moments. Our results show that the "highlight" class is a mixture of audience cheering and commentator's excited speech. Furthermore, we show that the precision-recall performance for highlights extraction based on this "highlight" class is better than that of our previous approach which uses only audience cheering as the key highlight class.

  16. The Effects of Highlighting, Validity, and Feature Type on Air-to-Ground Target Acquisition Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cultura I taget Target type Validity X target X leadin interaction on initial response time (highlighted trials) WRONG HIGHLIGHTING ÖU - M ea...natural - leadin cultural ndurd cultura taget I taget Target type Figure 3.10: Validity X lead-in X Target interaction Confirmation time A

  17. Moving beyond Text Highlights: Inferring Users' Interests to Improve the Relevance of Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Mehmood, Yasir; Nagappan, Yoganathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have indicated that users' text highlighting behaviour can be further manipulated to improve the relevance of retrieved results. This article reports on a study that examined users' text highlight frequency, length and users' copy-paste actions. Method: A binary voting mechanism was employed to determine the weights for the…

  18. EPA Regional Administrator Highlights the Benefits of Reducing Food Waste in South Bend

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (SOUTH BEND, IND. - November 5, 2015) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Susan Hedman joined South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg today at Ivy Tech Community College's culinary school to highlight the benefits of diverting food waste fr

  19. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  20. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts.

  1. Technical Highlight: NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, B.

    2012-01-09

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market.

  2. Technical Highlight: Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls.

  3. The R. M. Aller Astronomical Observatory Research on Double and Multiple Stars: Highlights and Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docobo, J.-A.

    2012-12-01

    In this talk, I will speak about some relevant results that we have obtained in the Ramon Maria Aller Astronomical Observatory (OARMA) concerning binaries. More concretely, I will discuss our current research project and highlights of our work.

  4. 76 FR 68183 - Highlights of the Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Update Release of Final Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Update Release of Final Report AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA's Office of Research and Development. The parent Exposure Factors... in assessing exposure to environmental chemicals. The Highlights of the Exposure Factors...

  5. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2012 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodén, H.; Efraimsson, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2012, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. During 2012, a number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarized in this paper, as well as highlights from other programmes funded by national programmes or by industry. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection.

  6. Biophotonics and immune responses-Highlights from a new SPIE photonics west conference (BIOS 2006).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei R; Huang, Zheng

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes some highlights from the "Biophotonics and Immune Responses", a new 2006 SPIE Photonics West Biomedical Optics (BIOS 2006) Conference. Some exciting recent progresses in host immune responses elicited by photodynamic therapy and other novel phototherapies are discussed.

  7. Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory-Science Highlights for the First 8 Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the science highlights for the first 8 months of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Results from pulsars, flaring AGN, gamma ray bursts, diffuse radiation, LMC and electron spectrum are also presented.

  8. PNNL Highlights for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (July 2013-July 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin; Warren, Pamela M.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2014-08-13

    This report includes research highlights of work funded in part or whole by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as well as selected leadership accomplishments.

  9. Chlorophyll b degradation by chlorophyll b reductase under high-light conditions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Rei; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2015-12-01

    The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein complex of photosystem II (LHCII) is the main antenna complex of photosystem II (PSII). Plants change their LHCII content depending on the light environment. Under high-light conditions, the content of LHCII should decrease because over-excitation damages the photosystem. Chlorophyll b is indispensable for accumulating LHCII, and chlorophyll b degradation induces LHCII degradation. Chlorophyll b degradation is initiated by chlorophyll b reductase (CBR). In land plants, NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1) and NYC1-Like (NOL) are isozymes of CBR. We analyzed these mutants to determine their functions under high-light conditions. During high-light treatment, the chlorophyll a/b ratio was stable in the wild-type (WT) and nol plants, and the LHCII content decreased in WT plants. The chlorophyll a/b ratio decreased in the nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants, and a substantial degree of LHCII was retained in nyc1/nol plants after the high-light treatment. These results demonstrate that NYC1 degrades the chlorophyll b on LHCII under high-light conditions, thus decreasing the LHCII content. After the high-light treatment, the maximum quantum efficiency of the PSII photochemistry was lower in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants than in WT and nol plants. A larger light-harvesting system would damage PSII in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the leaves indicated that photosystem I was also damaged by the excess LHCII in nyc1/nol plants. These observations suggest that chlorophyll b degradation by NYC1 is the initial reaction for the optimization of the light-harvesting capacity under high-light conditions.

  10. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2013 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. J.; Kennedy, J.; Meskell, C.; Carley, M.; Jordan, P.; Rice, H.

    2015-03-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2013, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. During 2013, a number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarised in this paper, as well as highlights from other programmes funded by national programmes or by industry. Furthermore, a concise summary of the CEAS-ASC workshop "Atmospheric and Ground Effects on Aircraft Noise" held in Seville, Spain in September 2013 is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection. This issue of the "highlights" paper is dedicated to the memory of Prof. John A. Fitzpatrick, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, and a valued member of the Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee. John passed away in September 2012 and is fondly missed across the globe by the friends he made in the Aeroacoustics Community. This paper is edited by PhD graduates and colleagues of John's who conduct research in aeroacoustics, inspired by his thirst for knowledge.

  11. Nineteenth International Cosmic Ray Conference. Conference Papers: Invited Rapporteur, Highlight, Miscellaneous, Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Invited talks, rapporteur talks, and highlight talks are included. Topics of the invited and highlight talks include astrophysical jets, gamma-ray line astronomy, cosmic rays and gamma rays in astrophysics, the early universe, elementary particle physics, solar flares and acceleration of energetic particles, cosmogenic nuclei, extragalactic astronomy, composition of solar flare particles, very high energy gamma ray sources, gamma-ray bursts, shock acceleration in the solar wind, cosmic rays in deep underground detectors, spectrum of cosmic rays at 10 to the 19th power eV, and nucleus-nucleus interactions.

  12. Labor Markets for New Science and Engineering Graduates in Private Industry. Science Resources Studies Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Data are presented on labor market conditions for science and engineering graduates based on responses of 255 firms to mail and telephone surveys conducted in late fall of 1981. Highlights presented in table, chart, and text indicate: (1) definite and likely shortages were concentrated in the computer and engineering fields; (2) chemical,…

  13. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health Concern Over Untreated Sewage Disposal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions,...

  14. The National Science Board: A History in Highlights, 1950-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    This document highlights key moments in the history of science chosen for their national impact and for the insight they provide on the values and principles that guide the inner workings of the National Science Board (NSB) in its governance of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and its role in national policy. This brochure takes a walk…

  15. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2011 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, A.; Astley, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2011, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. During 2011, a number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarized in this paper, as well as highlights from other programmes funded by national programmes or by industry. Furthermore, a concise summary of the CEAS-ASC workshop "Acoustic Liners and Associated Propagation Techniques" held in Lausanne in October 2011 is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection.

  16. Fun & Fitness. Youth Physical Fitness Survey and Program Highlights. A Navy Youth Program. Resource Guide 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet offers information on a variety of programs being offered for Navy youth by the Navy Recreation Services. The guide illustrates the types of programs being conducted, and highlights some exceptional programs. A chart presents a listing of youth team sports, indoor and outdoor sports, special events, fitness camps, parent clubs, and…

  17. A Catholic Campus in Reflective Action: A Co-Curricular Event Highlighting Identity and Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vinne, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A campus-wide program to highlight Catholic identity and mission, Community Day has been celebrated at Notre Dame of Maryland University every year since 1993. Featuring a keynote speaker, followed by an array of thematic workshops led by faculty, staff, and students, the event invites participants to reflect on Catholic Social Teaching, embedded…

  18. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  19. Water Reuse Highlights: A Summary Volume of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Water Works Association, Denver, CO. Research Foundation.

    This document reports the efforts of the AWWA Research Foundation to gather, prepare, and distribute current technical information in the wastewater reclamation and reuse field. The information reported has been abstracted from other Foundation publications and only attempts here to highlight the field. Categories discussed include research,…

  20. Frontiers: Research Highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1996-01-01

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  1. Making the Connection: Some People, Programs and Ideas Highlighted by Adult Learners Week 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, John; Della, Jennie

    This document profiles selected people, programs, and ideas highlighted by Australia's Adult Learners Week 2001 and begins with these papers: "Adult Learners Week: A National Celebration" (Ned Dennis); "A Message from the Adult Learners Week Patron" (Peter Hollingworth); "A Message of Support from the Prime Minister of…

  2. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2014 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detandt, Yves

    2015-11-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is the 2014 issue of this collection of Aeroacoustic Highlights, compiled from informations submitted to the CEAS-ASC. The contributions are classified in different topics; the first categories being related to specific aeroacoustic challenges (airframe noise, fan and jet noise, helicopter noise, aircraft interior noise) and two last sections are respectively devoted to recent improvements and emerging techniques and to general advances in aeroacoustics. For each section, the present paper focus on accomplished projects, providing the state of the art in each research category in 2014. A number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarised in this paper, as well as highlights funded by national programmes or by industry.

  3. Agricultural Research Service research highlights in remote sensing for calendar year 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, J. C. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Selected examples of research accomplishments related to remote sensing are compiled. A brief statement is given to highlight the significant results of each research project. A list of 1981 publication and location contacts is given also. The projects cover emission and reflectance analysis, identification of crop and soil parameters, and the utilization of remote sensing data.

  4. The Probability Evaluation Game: An Instrument to Highlight the Skill of Reflexive Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Probability Evaluation Game (PEG): an innovative teaching instrument that emphasises the sophistication of listening and highlights listening as a key skill for accounting practitioners. Whilst in a roundtable format, playing PEG involves participants individually evaluating a series of probability terms…

  5. Academic Science/Engineering Employment Increased 3% between 1980 and 1981. Science Resources Studies Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Data presented in this report are derived from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) 1981 Survey of Scientific and Engineering Personnel Employed at Universities and Colleges. Highlights of the survey indicate that: 1) science and engineering (S/E) employment in the higher education sector increased 3-percent between January 1980 and January…

  6. Auditory Highlighting as a Strategy for Improving Listening Comprehension. Auditory Learning Monograph Series 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, James W.

    Fifty-eight students (in grades 5 and 6) of average or near-average intelligence (who were reading 2 or more years below their normal expected level and who learned best through the auditory modality) took part in a study to evaluate the following areas: the effectiveness of two auditory highlighting procedures for increasing listening…

  7. Variety and Service Highlight the 2010 Effective and Innovative Practices Award Winners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2010

    2010-01-01

    APPA's Effective & Innovative Practices Award continues to highlight the best of the most creative and practical programs and processes that enhance and transform service delivery, lower costs, increase productivity, improve customer service, generate revenue, or otherwise benefit an educational institution. This article features five 2010…

  8. Growth in Neuroscience May Be Leveling Off. Science Resources Studies Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Major findings of a survey of 188 universities and colleges that constitute the universe of higher education institutions with doctoral-level programs in neuroscience are highlighted and discussed in this brief report. Areas considered included graduate students, doctoral recipients, postdoctoral trainees, principal areas of concentration,…

  9. State Digital Learning Exemplars: Highlights from States Leading Change through Policies and Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acree, Lauren; Fox, Christine

    2015-01-01

    States are striving to support the expansion of technology tools and resources in K-12 education through state policies, programs, and funding in order to provide digital learning opportunities for all students. This paper highlights examples of states with policies in support of five key areas: (1) innovative funding streams and policy; (2)…

  10. Teaching World Geography to Late-Arrival Immigrant Students: Highlighting Practice and Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Cinthia; Franquiz, Maria E.; Reidel, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    In this case study, the work of an exemplary high school social studies teacher is highlighted. In her class, late-arrival immigrant students participated in oral, writing, and demonstration activities as they learned the physical, cultural, and historical traditions of geography education. As newcomers to the English language, the students'…

  11. Highlights of papers presented at the workshop on cold fusion phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report contains highlights of formal oral papers presented at the Workshop on Cold Fusion Phenomena, hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and held May 23--25, 1989, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. General topics covered are: physics of fusion reactions; neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy; colorimetry; and applicable condensed-matter physics, electrochemistry, and analytical chemistry.

  12. Highlights of the 2 nd Bioinformatics Student Symposium by ISCB RSG-UK

    PubMed Central

    White, Benjamen; Fatima, Vayani; Fatima, Nazeefa; Das, Sayoni; Rahman, Farzana; Hassan, Mehedi

    2016-01-01

    Following the success of the 1 st Student Symposium by ISCB RSG-UK, a 2 nd Student Symposium took place on 7 th October 2015 at The Genome Analysis Centre, Norwich, UK. This short report summarizes the main highlights from the 2 nd Bioinformatics Student Symposium. PMID:27239284

  13. Insight into Skin Tumorigenesis Highlighting the Function of Epigenetic Regulators in SCC Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the polycomb and trithorax group proteins . Annu Rev Genet 2004;38:413-443...lys 27. Genes Dev 2003;17:1823-1828. 9 Francis NJ, Kingston RE, Woodcock CL: Chromatin compaction by a polycomb group protein complex. Science...Highlighting the Function of Epigenetic Regulators in SCC Formation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jisheng Zhang CONTRACTING

  14. Low cost labeling with highlighter ink efficiently visualizes developing blood vessels in avian and mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yuta; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2013-12-01

    To understand how blood vessels form to establish the intricate network during vertebrate development, it is helpful if one can visualize the vasculature in embryos. We here describe a novel labeling method using highlighter ink, easily obtained in stationery stores with a low cost, to visualize embryo-wide vasculatures in avian and mice. We tested 50 different highlighters for fluorescent microscopy with filter sets equipped in a standard fluorescent microscope. The yellow and violet inks yielded fluorescent signals specifically detected by the filters used for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) detections, respectively. When the ink solution was infused into chicken/quail and mouse embryos, vasculatures including large vessels and capillaries were labeled both in living and fixed embryos. Ink-infused embryos were further subjected to histological sections, and double stained with antibodies including QH-1 (quail), α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and PECAM-1 (mouse), revealing that the endothelial cells were specifically labeled by the infused highlighter ink. Highlighter-labeled signals were detected with a resolution comparable to or higher than signals of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin and Rhodamine-dextran, conventionally used for angiography. Furthermore, macroconfocal microscopic analyses with ink-infused embryos visualized fine vascular structures of both embryo proper and extra-embryonic plexus in a Z-stack image of 2400 μm thick with a markedly high resolution. Together, the low cost highlighter ink serves as an alternative reagent useful for visualization of blood vessels in developing avian and mouse embryos and possibly in other animals.

  15. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2015 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiříček, Ondřej

    2016-10-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on the European scale, and European aeronautics activities internationally. Each year, the committee highlights several of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is the 2015 issue of this collection of Aeroacoustic Highlights, compiled from contributions submitted to the CEAS-ASC. The contributions are classified in different topics; the first categories being related to specific aeroacoustic challenges (airframe noise, fan and jet noise, helicopter noise, aircraft interior noise), while the two last sections are devoted respectively to recent improvements and emerging techniques and to general advances in aeroacoustics. Furthermore, a concise summary of the CEAS-ASC workshop "Broadband noise of rotors and airframes" held in La Rochelle, France, in September 2015 is included in this report.

  16. The impact of specular highlights on 3D-2D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlein, Vincent; Riess, Christian; Angelopoulou, Elli; Evangelopoulos, Georgios; Kakadiaris, Ioannis

    2013-05-01

    One of the most popular form of biometrics is face recognition. Face recognition techniques typically assume that a face exhibits Lambertian reectance. However, a face often exhibits prominent specularities, especially in outdoor environments. These specular highlights can compromise an identity authentication. In this work, we analyze the impact of such highlights on a 3D-2D face recognition system. First, we investigate three different specularity removal methods as preprocessing steps for face recognition. Then, we explicitly model facial specularities within the face detection system with the Cook-Torrance reflectance model. In our experiments, specularity removal increases the recognition rate on an outdoor face database by about 5% at a false alarm rate of 10-3. The integration of the Cook-Torrance model further improves these results, increasing the verification rate by 19% at a FAR of 10-3.

  17. Research highlights of the global modeling and simulation branch for 1986-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Wayman (Editor); Susskind, Joel (Editor); Pfaendtner, James (Editor); Randall, David (Editor); Atlas, Robert (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted in the Global Modeling and Simulation Branch and highlights the most significant accomplishments in 1986 to 1987. The Branch has been the focal point for global weather and climate prediction research in the Laboratory for Atmospheres through the retrieval and use of satellite data, the development of global models and data assimilation techniques, the simulation of future observing systems, and the performance of atmospheric diagnostic studies.

  18. [Highlights of the 2010 ERUS meeting, September 29 to October 1, 2010, Bordeaux, France].

    PubMed

    Descazeaud, Aurélien

    2011-01-01

    This work summarizes the highlights of what was presented at the seventh edition of the European Robotic Urology Symposium meeting which took place in Bordeaux, France, from September 29 to October 1, 2010. Future developments of robotic surgery and training in robotic were discussed. Robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was largely discussed. The use of robotic in renal and bladder surgery was also developed. The congress contained update lectures, debates, live cases transmission of robotic surgery, and poster and video communications.

  19. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

  20. Identifying, highlighting and reducing polypharmacy in a UK hospice inpatient unit using improvement Science methods

    PubMed Central

    Phippen, Alison; Pickard, Jennie; Steinke, Douglas; Cope, Matt; Roberts, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual is a growing global issue driven by an ageing population and increasing prevalence of multi-morbidity[1]. Polypharmacy can be problematic: interactions between medications, reduced adherence to medication, burden of medication to patients, administration time, increased risk of errors and increased cost. Quality improvement methods were applied to identify and highlight polypharmacy patients with the aim of reducing their average number of regular tablets/capsules per day by 25%. The project was delivered within a UK based 27 bedded hospice inpatient unit. A series of PDSA cycles studied interventions focusing on the identification of patients with polypharmacy, the highlighting of these patients to prescribers for review and the views of patients about their medication. For the purposes of the study, polypharmacy was defined as greater than ten regular medicines and/or greater than twenty regular tablets/capsules each day. The interventions tested included patients on regular paracetamol and strong opioids being offered a trial without regular paracetamol, a constipation guide promoting the use of combination laxatives, education of prescribers around dose strengths, checklist of recommendations was placed in case notes and a sticker was used on the medicine chart to highlight patients in need of polypharmacy review. The introduction of a trial without paracetamol and a laxative guide led to reductions in polypharmacy. The sticker and checklist were successful interventions for highlighting patients with polypharmacy. Quality improvement methods were used to plan, try, test and implement simple interventions for patients on the hospice inpatient unit. This has led to a 25% reduction in the average regular tablet/capsules burden , a 16% reduction in the average number of regular medications and a 30% reduction in the average volume of liquid medication per patient without an increase in the

  1. Identifying, highlighting and reducing polypharmacy in a UK hospice inpatient unit using improvement Science methods.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Alison; Pickard, Jennie; Steinke, Douglas; Cope, Matt; Roberts, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual is a growing global issue driven by an ageing population and increasing prevalence of multi-morbidity[1]. Polypharmacy can be problematic: interactions between medications, reduced adherence to medication, burden of medication to patients, administration time, increased risk of errors and increased cost. Quality improvement methods were applied to identify and highlight polypharmacy patients with the aim of reducing their average number of regular tablets/capsules per day by 25%. The project was delivered within a UK based 27 bedded hospice inpatient unit. A series of PDSA cycles studied interventions focusing on the identification of patients with polypharmacy, the highlighting of these patients to prescribers for review and the views of patients about their medication. For the purposes of the study, polypharmacy was defined as greater than ten regular medicines and/or greater than twenty regular tablets/capsules each day. The interventions tested included patients on regular paracetamol and strong opioids being offered a trial without regular paracetamol, a constipation guide promoting the use of combination laxatives, education of prescribers around dose strengths, checklist of recommendations was placed in case notes and a sticker was used on the medicine chart to highlight patients in need of polypharmacy review. The introduction of a trial without paracetamol and a laxative guide led to reductions in polypharmacy. The sticker and checklist were successful interventions for highlighting patients with polypharmacy. Quality improvement methods were used to plan, try, test and implement simple interventions for patients on the hospice inpatient unit. This has led to a 25% reduction in the average regular tablet/capsules burden , a 16% reduction in the average number of regular medications and a 30% reduction in the average volume of liquid medication per patient without an increase in the

  2. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: highlights from the first three years of the mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Shrader, C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray observatory is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. It has been in operation for over three years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments continue to function nearly flawlessly, and many significant discoveries have been made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and highlight some of the results from the first three years of the mission.

  3. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  4. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  5. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  6. Research highlights about contributions on cancer published in Electronic Physician Journal between 2009 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Khelassi, Abdeljalil

    2016-12-01

    This article aims to highlight the important research work on cancer published in Electronic Physician Journal. The journal has published 18 articles concerning cancer research, i.e., two review articles, two case reports, and 14 original articles from 2009 through 2015. The types of cancer are breast cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, leukemia, cervical cancer, rectal cancer, and papillary thyroid Cancer. In addition, the articles have addressed several aspects of cancer, including prevention, diagnosis, follow-up, and therapy.

  7. Research highlights about contributions on cancer published in Electronic Physician Journal between 2009 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Khelassi, Abdeljalil

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the important research work on cancer published in Electronic Physician Journal. The journal has published 18 articles concerning cancer research, i.e., two review articles, two case reports, and 14 original articles from 2009 through 2015. The types of cancer are breast cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, leukemia, cervical cancer, rectal cancer, and papillary thyroid Cancer. In addition, the articles have addressed several aspects of cancer, including prevention, diagnosis, follow-up, and therapy. PMID:28163841

  8. Website malfunction: a case report highlighting the danger of using electrical insulating tape for buddy strapping.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Brian Meldan; Baker, Joseph F; Fitzgerald, Eilis; McCarthy, Conor

    2010-05-06

    A case of injury to the third web space of the right hand of a rugby player, as a result of buddy strapping with electrical insulating tape of the little and ring finger, is presented. A deep laceration of the web space and distal palmar fascia resulted, necessitating wound exploration and repair. This case highlights the danger of using electrical insulating tape as a means to buddy strap fingers.

  9. STS-105 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Flight Days 1-3. Part 1 of 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the STS-105 mission is given through footage of each flight day. Scenes from flight days one through three show activities such as astronaut prelaunch procedures (breakfast, suit-up, and boarding Discovery), the launch from multiple vantage points, and various on-orbit activities. Expedition 3 (E3) Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineer Mikhail Turin perform the H-Reflex Experiment, an experiment to test the effects of microgravity on the human spinal cord. As Discovery approaches the International Space Station (ISS), the Expedition 2 (E2) crew, Commander Yuriy Usachev and Flight Engineers James Voss and Susan Helms, are seen working in the Destiny Laboratory Module aboard ISS. Discovery docks to the space station and the three crews (STS-105, E2, and E3) greet each other after the hatches between the orbiter and ISS are opened. As Discovery passes over the United States, Utah, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Minnesota are seen through patchy clouds. Footage from flight days 4-13 can be found on 'STS-105 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Flight Days 4-6' (internal ID 2002046549), 'STS-105 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Flight Days 7-9' (internal ID 2002046552), and 'STS-105 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Flight Days 10-13' (internal ID 2002046551).

  10. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2 of 4; Flight Days 4 & 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 2 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 4 and 5. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The primary activities during these days were EVAs (extravehicular activities) to replace two solar arrays on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Footage from flight day 4 records an EVA by Grunsfeld and Linnehan, including their exit from Columbia's payload bay airlock, their stowing of the old HST starboard rigid array on the rigid array carrier in Columbia's payload bay, their attachment of the new array on HST, the installation of a new starboard diode box, and the unfolding of the new array. The pistol grip space tool used to fasten the old array in its new location is shown in use. The video also includes several shots of the HST with Earth in the background. On flight day 5 Newman and Massimino conduct an EVA to change the port side array and diode box on HST. This EVA is very similar to the one on flight day 4, and is covered similarly in the video. A hand operated ratchet is shown in use. In addition to a repeat of the previous tasks, the astronauts change HST's reaction wheel assembly, and because they are ahead of schedule, install installation and lubricate an instrument door on the telescope. The Earth views include a view of Egypt and Israel, with the Nile River, Red Sea, and Mediterranean Sea.

  11. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  12. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: "Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers".

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marion; Van Laere, Koen

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions ( http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php ). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014.

  13. Laminin targeting of a peripheral nerve-highlighting peptide enables degenerated nerve visualization

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael A.; Gross, Larry A.; Friedman, Beth; Adams, Stephen R.; Crisp, Jessica L.; Hussain, Timon; Frei, Andreas P.; Novy, Karel; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Target-blind activity-based screening of molecular libraries is often used to develop first-generation compounds, but subsequent target identification is rate-limiting to developing improved agents with higher specific affinity and lower off-target binding. A fluorescently labeled nerve-binding peptide, NP41, selected by phage display, highlights peripheral nerves in vivo. Nerve highlighting has the potential to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating intraoperative nerve identification, reducing accidental nerve transection, and facilitating repair of damaged nerves. To enable screening of molecular target-specific molecules for higher nerve contrast and to identify potential toxicities, NP41’s binding target was sought. Laminin-421 and -211 were identified by proximity-based labeling using singlet oxygen and by an adapted version of TRICEPS-based ligand-receptor capture to identify glycoprotein receptors via ligand cross-linking. In proximity labeling, photooxidation of a ligand-conjugated singlet oxygen generator is coupled to chemical labeling of locally oxidized residues. Photooxidation of methylene blue–NP41-bound nerves, followed by biotin hydrazide labeling and purification, resulted in light-induced enrichment of laminin subunits α4 and α2, nidogen 1, and decorin (FDR-adjusted P value < 10−7) and minor enrichment of laminin-γ1 and collagens I and VI. Glycoprotein receptor capture also identified laminin-α4 and -γ1. Laminins colocalized with NP41 within nerve sheath, particularly perineurium, where laminin-421 is predominant. Binding assays with phage expressing NP41 confirmed binding to purified laminin-421, laminin-211, and laminin-α4. Affinity for these extracellular matrix proteins explains the striking ability of NP41 to highlight degenerated nerve “ghosts” months posttransection that are invisible to the unaided eye but retain hollow laminin-rich tubular structures. PMID:27791138

  14. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 4 of 4; Flight Days 8 - 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows footage of crew activities from flight days 8 through 12 of STS-109. The crew included: Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, Richard Linnehan, James Newman, Michael Massimino, Mission Speicalists. The activities from other flights days can be seen on 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 1 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139476). The primary activity on flight day 8 was an EVA (extravehicular activity) by Grunsfeld and Linnehan to install a cryocooler and radiator for the NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer) on the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Before returning to Columbia's airlock, the astronauts, with a cloudy background, hold onto the orbiter and offer their thoughts on the significance of their mission, the HST, and spaceflight. Footage from flight day 9 includes the grappling, unbearthing, and deployment of the HST from Columbia, and the crew coordinating and videotaping Columbia's departure. Flight day 10 was a relatively inactive day, and flight day 11 includes a checkout of Columbia's aerodynamic surfaces. Columbia landed on flight day 12, which is covered by footage of the crew members speaking during reentry, and their night landing, primarily shown through the orbiter's head-up display. The video includes numerous views of the HST, as well as views of the the Galapagos Islands, Madagascar, and Southern Africa with parts of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and part of the coast of Chile. The pistol grip space tool is shown in use, and the crew answers two messages from the public, including a message to Massimino from the Fire Department of New York.

  15. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1 of 4; Flight Days 1 - 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 4. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002139469), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). The primary activity of flight day 1 is the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The crew is seen before the launch at a meal and suit-up, and some pre-flight procedures are shown. Perrin holds a sign with a personalized message. The astronauts communicate with Mission Control extensively after launch, and an inside view of the shuttle cabin is shown. The replays of the launch include close-ups of the nozzles at liftoff, and the fall of the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank. Flight day 2 shows footage of mainland Asia at night, and daytime views of the eastern United States and Lake Michigan. Flight day three shows the Endeavour orbiter approaching and docking with the ISS. After the night docking, the crews exchange greetings, and a view of the Nile river and Egypt at night is shown. On flight day 4, the MPLM (Multi-Purpose Logistics Module) Leonardo was temporarily transferred from Endeavour's payload bay to the ISS.

  16. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010 (January 1, 2010 through March 31, 2010)

    SciTech Connect

    West, Staci A.; Showalter, Mary Ann; Manke, Kristin L.; Carper, Ross R.; Wiley, Julie G.; Beckman, Mary T.

    2010-04-20

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. EMSL is operated by PNNL for the DOE-Office of Biological and Environmental Research. At one location, EMSL offers a comprehensive array of leading-edge resources and expertise. Access to the instrumentation and expertise is obtained on a peer-reviewed proposal basis. Staff members work with researchers to expedite access to these capabilities. The "EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report" documents current research and activities of EMSL staff and users.

  17. Highlights of the annual meeting of the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Konta, Laura; Hayes, Nicholas; Qureshi, Shakeel A

    2013-09-01

    The 47th annual meeting of the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology was held on 22-25th May 2013 in London, UK. This is one of the largest scientific meetings in Europe within the field of congenital cardiac disease and was held in association with the Japanese Society of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, and Asia Pacific Pediatric Cardiology Society. There were 900 submitted abstracts and over 1000 delegates from 57 countries attended. We have summarized some of the highlights of the meeting below.

  18. Highlights from the 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference, April 2-6, 2016.

    PubMed

    Solis, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS) Conference, held in Florence, Italy, attracted approximately 1,800 attendees from over 54 countries to the stately Firenze Fiera Conference Center from April 2-6, 2016. Providing plenary sessions, special sessions, symposia, workshops, oral presentations and poster presentations, this 5th Biennial SIRS Conference focused on "Deconstructing Schizophrenia towards Targeted Treatment." In conjunction with the Schizophrenia Research Forum, a Web project of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and with our thanks to the SIRS organizers and staff, we bring you the following selected highlights.

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory - 1995 Highlights. Fiscal Year 1995, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this Highlights Report is to present a brief overview of the Laboratory`s significant research accomplishments during the fiscal year 1995. The activities covered in this report include advances on the large projects, such as the discovery of the Enhanced Reversed Shear mode on the TFTR and the engineering design developments in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, as well as the significant progress made in plasma theory, small-scale experiments, technology transfer, graduate education, and the Laboratory`s outreach program in science education.

  20. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of a rigid wing with an NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  1. Unlocking the wasting enigma: Highlights from the 8th Cachexia Conference

    PubMed Central

    von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article highlights pre‐clinical and clinical studies into the field of wasting disorders that were presented at the 8th Cachexia Conference held in Paris, France December 2015. This year some interesting results of clinical trials and different new therapeutic targets were shown. This article presents the biological and clinical significance of different markers and new drugs for the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting. Effective treatments of cachexia and wasting disorders are urgently needed in order to improve the patients' quality of life and their survival. PMID:27128291

  2. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of rigid wing with a NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  3. Highlights of the society for immunotherapy of cancer (SITC) 27th annual meeting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 27th annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) was held on October 26–28, 2012 in North Bethesda, Maryland and the highlights of the meeting are summarized. The topics covered at this meeting included advances in cancer treatment using adoptive cell therapy (ACT), oncolytic viruses, dendritic cells (DCs), immune check point modulators and combination therapies. Advances in immune editing of cancer, immune modulation by cancer and the tumor microenvironment were also discussed as were advances in single cell analysis and the manufacture and potency testing of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL).

  4. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  5. Highlights from the CERN/ESO/NordForsk ''Gender in Physics Day''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, F.; Guinot, G.; Strandberg, L.

    2017-03-01

    In their role as observers on the EU Gender Equality Network in the European Research Area (GENERA) project, funded under the Horizon 2020 framework, CERN, ESO and NordForsk joined forces and organised a Gender in Physics Day at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation. The one-day conference aimed to examine innovative activities promoting gender equality, and to discuss gender-oriented policies and best practice in the European Research Area (with special emphasis on intergovernmental organisations), as well as the importance of building solid networks. The event was very well attended and was declared a success. The main highlights of the meeting are reported.

  6. RENASICA II: A Mexican acute myocardial infarction registry that highlights the importance of regional registries

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, worldwide, with disproportionate representation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Registro Nacional de los Síndromes Coronarios Agudos II (RENASICA II) investigators reported smoking, hypertension and diabetes were the main risk factors among Mexican patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fibrinolytic therapy was administered to 37%. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) was performed in only 15% of patients. 30-day mortality was 10%. This study highlights the importance of conducting regional registries for quality improvement. PMID:25780784

  7. RENASICA II: A Mexican acute myocardial infarction registry that highlights the importance of regional registries.

    PubMed

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, worldwide, with disproportionate representation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Registro Nacional de los Síndromes Coronarios Agudos II (RENASICA II) investigators reported smoking, hypertension and diabetes were the main risk factors among Mexican patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Fibrinolytic therapy was administered to 37%. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) was performed in only 15% of patients. 30-day mortality was 10%. This study highlights the importance of conducting regional registries for quality improvement.

  8. Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography: highlights on the European marketing approval.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Blanco, Anabel; Prieto-Yerro, Concha; Martinez-Lazaro, Raul; Zamora, Javier; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Haberkamp, Marion; Pohly, Johannes; Enzmann, Harald; Zinserling, Jörg; Strassmann, Valerie; Broich, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been recently approved in Europe to estimate β-amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brain when the subject is still alive. Such density is one of the key issues for the definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at autopsy. This capability of florbetapir (18F) is regarded as a significant improvement in the diagnostic procedures for adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for AD and other causes of cognitive impairment. The current paper highlights the specific characteristics of the European marketing authorization of florbetapir (18F).

  9. Moving forward a focus on NASN priorities: 2013 annual highlights report.

    PubMed

    Duff, Carolyn L; Mazyck, Donna

    2013-07-01

    For the 3rd consecutive year the July issue of NASN School Nurse has published this NASN Annual Highlights Report. This 2013 report emphasizes current NASN priorities, discussing the updated strategic plan and providing insight into the accomplishments and strengths of our organization. Carolyn Duff the newly installed NASN president, and Donna Mazyck, NASN executive director collaborated to provide information of significance to NASN membership and stakeholders through the use of an interview format. As always, we encourage members to connect with NASN through a variety of formats outlined in the member center on our website (www.nasn.org).

  10. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 184: Single-Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy, London, UK, September 2015.

    PubMed

    Gellings, E; Faez, S; Piatkowski, L

    2016-02-07

    The 2015 Faraday Discussion on single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy brought together leading scientists involved in various topics of single-molecule research. It attracted almost a hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - from experimentalists to theoreticians, from biologists to materials scientists, from masters students to Nobel Prize Laureates. The meeting was merely a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to detect individual molecules has had on science over the past quarter of a century. In the following we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  11. Selected highlights on women and HIV from the 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

    PubMed

    Bartnof, H S

    1998-04-01

    Many sessions at the 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections dealt specifically with HIV infection and treatment in women. Highlights are presented from several sessions, including indinavir blood levels at various points in the menstrual cycle, abnormal kidney function associated with women taking indinavir, abnormal pap smears in women with high viral load, the relationship between viral load and the increased risk of death in women, and the impact of ddI crossing the placenta in pregnant women. Information is given on each presentation, including clinical trial results, side effects, and impacts on disease progression.

  12. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nutan; Tyagi, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  13. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nutan; Tyagi, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as “molecular chaperones” within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these “guides” can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus. PMID:26604499

  14. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Lumley, David; Sherlock, Don; Daley, Tom; Lawton, Don; Masters, Ron; Verliac, Michel; White, Don

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  15. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  16. Functional Genomic Annotation of Genetic Risk Loci Highlights Inflammation and Epithelial Biology Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with the risk of CKD. Almost all risk variants are localized to the noncoding region of the genome; therefore, the role of these variants in CKD development is largely unknown. We hypothesized that polymorphisms alter transcription factor binding, thereby influencing the expression of nearby genes. Here, we examined the regulation of transcripts in the vicinity of CKD-associated polymorphisms in control and diseased human kidney samples and used systems biology approaches to identify potentially causal genes for prioritization. We interrogated the expression and regulation of 226 transcripts in the vicinity of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms using RNA sequencing and gene expression arrays from 95 microdissected control and diseased tubule samples and 51 glomerular samples. Gene expression analysis from 41 tubule samples served for external validation. 92 transcripts in the tubule compartment and 34 transcripts in glomeruli showed statistically significant correlation with eGFR. Many novel genes, including ACSM2A/2B, FAM47E, and PLXDC1, were identified. We observed that the expression of multiple genes in the vicinity of any single CKD risk allele correlated with renal function, potentially indicating that genetic variants influence multiple transcripts. Network analysis of GFR-correlating transcripts highlighted two major clusters; a positive correlation with epithelial and vascular functions and an inverse correlation with inflammatory gene cluster. In summary, our functional genomics analysis highlighted novel genes and critical pathways associated with kidney function for future analysis. PMID:25231882

  17. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2010 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs Nagy, Attila

    2011-10-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2010, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. At the end of 2010, project X-NOISE EV of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission has been launched as a continuation of the X-Noise series, with objectives of reducing aircraft noise and reaching the goal set by the ACARE 2020 Vision. Some contributions submitted to the editor summarizes selected findings from European projects launched before or concluded in 2010, while other articles cover issues supported by national associations or by industries. Furthermore, a concise summary of the workshop on "Aeroacoustics of High-Speed Aircraft Propellers and Open Rotors" held in Warsaw in October is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection.

  18. Selective photobleaching of chlorophylls and carotenoids in photosystem I particles under high-light treatment.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Abarova, Silvia; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Picorel, Rafael; Velitchkova, Maya

    2007-01-01

    Photosystem I particles (PSI-200) isolated from spinach leaves were studied by means of absorbance, 77K fluorescence and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. The aim was to obtain better insight into the changes of the pigment spectral properties in those particles during prolonged exposure to high-light intensities and to reveal the involvement of these pigments in the photoprotection of the PSI. During prolonged exposure to high-light intensities of spinach PSI particles, a loss of a significant amount of photosynthetic pigments was observed. It was shown that various pigments exhibited different susceptibility to photodamage. In addition to bleaching of chlorophyll a (Chl a), bleaching of carotenoids was also clearly observed. RR technique allowed us to recognize the type and conformation of photobleached carotenoid molecules. Raman data revealed a nearly full photobleaching of the long-wavelength lutein molecules. The observed similar bleaching rate of the lutein molecules and the most-red shifted long-wavelength Chl a, located in the antenna membrane protein Lhca4, suggested that these molecules are located closely. Our results showed that the photobleached antenna pigments and especially luteins and the most long-wavelength absorbing chlorophylls are involved in photoprotection of PSI core complex.

  19. Highlighting nuclear membrane staining in thyroid neoplasms with emerin: review and diagnostic utility.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Mary D; Hinrichs, Benjamin; Cohen, Cynthia; Siddiqui, Momin T

    2013-06-01

    Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) with emerin, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, highlights nuclear membrane details in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We evaluated emerin for highlighting nuclear shape, grooves, inclusions, circumferential nuclear membrane irregularities ("garlands"), deep "stellate" membrane invaginations, and crescents in 34 fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cell blocks, PTC (n = 24) and follicular neoplasms (FN) (n = 10). Tissue microarrays were also examined for 182 cases, PTC (n = 95) and non-PTC (n = 87). Emerin IHC of PTC revealed a predominantly oval nuclear shape in the majority of cases, with FN demonstrating round nuclei and FV of PTC showing a roughly equal distribution of round and oval shapes. In addition to oval nuclear shape, the presence of emerin-positive nuclear grooves, circumferential emerin nuclear "garlands," nuclear crescent shapes, and chromatin clearing on cell block H&E staining were significant predictors of PTC by regression analysis. Emerin IHC of thyroid FNA and surgical specimens serves as a useful adjunct to conventional H&E staining in the diagnosis of PTC and its distinction from FN by delineating diagnostic nuclear membrane irregularities ("garlands" and crescents), nuclear grooves, and a characteristic oval nuclear shape. In diagnostically challenging cases with limited cellularity, emerin staining can help to provide a more definitive diagnosis of PTC.

  20. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Provart, Nicholas J.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M.; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U.; Waese, Jamie; McCourt, Peter

    2015-10-14

    The year 2014 marked the 25th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. In this paper, we present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.

  1. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions

    DOE PAGES

    Provart, Nicholas J.; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M.; ...

    2015-10-14

    The year 2014 marked the 25th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. In this paper, we present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting somemore » outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.« less

  2. Design of a detection system of highlight LED arrays' effect on the human organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Shi, Guiju; Xue, Tongze; Liu, Yanming

    2009-05-01

    LED (Light Emitting Diode) has many advantages in the intensity, wavelength, practicality and price, so it is feasible to apply in biomedicine engineering. A system for the research on the effect of highlight LED arrays to human organization is designed. The temperature of skin surface can rise if skin and organization are in irradiation by highlight LED arrays. The metabolism and blood circulation of corresponding position will be quicker than those not in the shine, so the surface temperature will vary in different position of skin. The structure of LED source arrays system is presented and a measure system for studying LED's influence on human organization is designed. The temperature values of shining point are detected by infrared temperature detector. Temperature change is different according to LED parameters, such as the number, irradiation time and luminous intensity of LED. Experimental device is designed as an LED arrays pen. The LED arrays device is used to shine the points of human body, then it may effect on personal organization as well as the acupuncture. The system is applied in curing a certain skin disease, such as age pigment, skin cancer and fleck.

  3. Highlights of recent studies and future plans for the French human biomonitoring (HBM) programme.

    PubMed

    Fréry, Nadine; Vandentorren, Stéphanie; Etchevers, Anne; Fillol, Clémence

    2012-02-01

    This manuscript presents highlights of recent studies and perspectives from the French human biomonitoring (HBM) programme. Until recently, HBM studies focused on specific populations or pollutants to gain a better understanding of exposure to environmental chemicals, to help regulators reduce environmental exposure and to monitor existing policies on specific concerns. Highlights of recent multicentre biomonitoring studies with specific population or pollutant focus are given. These French HBM studies have been implemented to know: (1) the influence of living near an incinerator on serum dioxin and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels, (2) the influence of consuming river fish contaminated by PCBs on serum PCBs of fishermen, and (3) the evolution of blood lead levels in children from 1 to 6 years old since 1995. Special emphasis is placed on the use of an integrated (HBM coupled with nutrition and health studies), multipollutant approach. This approach has been initiated in France with a recent national population-based biomonitoring survey, the Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé (ENNS; French Nutrition and Health Survey). This survey will provide the first reference distribution for 42 biomarkers in the French population. The current national HBM strategy will build upon the ENNS and include a national survey of people aged between 6 and 74 years complemented for the neonatal period and childhood by the Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l'Enfance (ELFE; French longitudinal study of children). France also contributes to the harmonization of HBM activities in Europe through participation in European HBM projects.

  4. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2011-07-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  5. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights March 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2011-04-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for February 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/71, was distributed to program participants on March 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

  6. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights February 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2011-03-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for January 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/30, was distributed to program participants on February 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

  7. A case of chemical scalp burns after hair highlights: experimental evidence of oxidative injuries.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Roberta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Pendolino, Flavio; Facchin, Giangiacomo; Snenghi, Rossella

    2016-12-01

    Hair highlights are quite common procedures carried out in hair salons by using a mixture of a lightening powder containing persulfates with a suspension containing hydrogen peroxide: a representative case of chemical scalp burns is described as a consequence of this treatment. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the strict relationship between the scalp damage and the commercial products used in a case of hair highlighting. The results of some chemical analyses have been reported, showing, in particular, that the chemical reactivity of the mixture changes in the time, thus strongly suggesting that the procedure for the application of the mixture is critical for the occurrence of possible accidents. The presence in the powder of chemical compounds bearing aliphatic chains as surfactants explains the appearance of dramatic symptoms after days due to a slow dissolution of the oxidant compounds in the stratum corneum of skin with no effect in reducing injury of palliative treatments. Safety suggestions and recommendations for producers and workers are also included.

  8. An evolutionary screen highlights canonical and noncanonical candidate antiviral genes within the primate TRIM gene family.

    PubMed

    Malfavon-Borja, Ray; Sawyer, Sara L; Wu, Lily I; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent viral pressure has acted on host-encoded antiviral genes during primate and mammalian evolution. This selective pressure has resulted in dramatic episodes of adaptation in host antiviral genes, often detected via positive selection. These evolutionary signatures of adaptation have the potential to highlight previously unrecognized antiviral genes (also called restriction factors). Although the TRIM multigene family is recognized for encoding several bona fide restriction factors (e.g., TRIM5alpha), most members of this expansive gene family remain uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the TRIM multigene family for signatures of positive selection to identify novel candidate antiviral genes. Our analysis reveals previously undocumented signatures of positive selection in 17 TRIM genes, 10 of which represent novel candidate restriction factors. These include the unusual TRIM52 gene, which has evolved under strong positive selection despite its encoded protein lacking a putative viral recognition (B30.2) domain. We show that TRIM52 arose via gene duplication from the TRIM41 gene. Both TRIM52 and TRIM41 have dramatically expanded RING domains compared with the rest of the TRIM multigene family, yet this domain has evolved under positive selection only in primate TRIM52, suggesting that it represents a novel host-virus interaction interface. Our evolutionary-based screen not only documents positive selection in known TRIM restriction factors but also highlights candidate novel restriction factors, providing insight into the interfaces of host-pathogen interactions mediated by the TRIM multigene family.

  9. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2009 highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano

    2010-10-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. In this context, "aeroacoustics" encompasses all aerospace acoustics and related areas. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is a report on highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2009, compiled from information provided to the ASC of the CEAS. In April 2009, the Level-2 project OPENAIR of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission has been launched with the goal of delivering a step change in noise reduction, beyond the successful achievements of the predecessor SILENCE(R). Some contributions submitted to the editor summarizes findings from programmes launched before 2009, while other contributions report on activities supported by national associations and industries. Furthermore, a concise summary of the workshop on "Resolving Uncertainties in Airframe Noise Testing and CAA Code Validation" held in Bucharest is included in this report. Enquiries concerning all contributions should be addressed to the authors who are given at the end of each subsection.

  10. Highlight-shading relationship as a cue for the perception of translucent and transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Isamu

    2010-09-13

    Natural surfaces, such as those of food and drink, have translucent properties. Translucent materials involve complex optics, such as sub-surface scattering and refraction, but humans can easily distinguish them from opaque materials. Here, we investigated image features that are diagnostic of the perceived translucency and transparency, focusing on the fact that variations in the opacity of a surface affect largely the non-specular component (shading pattern) of an image and little the specular component (highlights). In a simple rating experiment with computer-generated objects, we show that the non-specular image component tends to be blurred, faint, and even partially contrast-reversed for objects that appear more translucent or transparent. A subsequent experiment further demonstrated that manipulation of the contrast and blur of the non-specular image component dramatically alters the apparent translucency of an opaque object. The results support the notion that the spatial and contrast relationship between specular highlights and non-specular shading patterns is a robust cue for the perceived translucency and transparency of three-dimensional objects.

  11. Multi-modal highlight generation for sports videos using an information-theoretic excitability measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Taufiq; Bořil, Hynek; Sangwan, Abhijeet; L Hansen, John H.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to detect and organize `hot spots' representing areas of excitement within video streams is a challenging research problem when techniques rely exclusively on video content. A generic method for sports video highlight selection is presented in this study which leverages both video/image structure as well as audio/speech properties. Processing begins where the video is partitioned into small segments and several multi-modal features are extracted from each segment. Excitability is computed based on the likelihood of the segmental features residing in certain regions of their joint probability density function space which are considered both exciting and rare. The proposed measure is used to rank order the partitioned segments to compress the overall video sequence and produce a contiguous set of highlights. Experiments are performed on baseball videos based on signal processing advancements for excitement assessment in the commentators' speech, audio energy, slow motion replay, scene cut density, and motion activity as features. Detailed analysis on correlation between user excitability and various speech production parameters is conducted and an effective scheme is designed to estimate the excitement level of commentator's speech from the sports videos. Subjective evaluation of excitability and ranking of video segments demonstrate a higher correlation with the proposed measure compared to well-established techniques indicating the effectiveness of the overall approach.

  12. Research highlights: laboratory studies of the formation and transformation of atmospheric organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; Lin, Vivian S

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles are emitted from a variety of anthropogenic and natural precursors and have direct impacts on climate, by scattering solar irradiation and nucleating clouds, and on health, by causing oxidative stress in the lungs when inhaled. They may also form from gaseous precursors, creating complex mixtures of organic and inorganic material. The chemical composition and the physical properties of aerosols will evolve during their one-week lifetime which will consequently change their impact on climate and health. The heterogeneity of aerosols is difficult to model and thus atmospheric aerosol research strives to characterize the mechanisms involved in nucleating and transforming particles in the atmosphere. Recent advances in four laboratory studies of aerosol formation and aging are highlighted here.

  13. A bizarre theropod from the Early Cretaceous of Japan highlighting mosaic evolution among coelurosaurians

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Yoichi; Xu, Xing; Shibata, Masateru; Kawabe, Soichiro; Miyata, Kazunori; Imai, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of coelurosaurian evolution, particularly of bird origins, has been greatly improved, mainly due to numerous recently discovered fossils worldwide. Nearly all these discoveries are referable to the previously known coelurosaurian subgroups. Here, we report a new theropod, Fukuivenator paradoxus, gen. et sp. nov., based on a nearly complete specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Formation of the Tetori Group, Fukui, Japan. While Fukuivenator possesses a large number of morphological features unknown in any other theropod, it has a combination of primitive and derived features seen in different theropod subgroups, notably dromaeosaurid dinosaurs. Computed-tomography data indicate that Fukuivenator possesses inner ears whose morphology is intermediate between those of birds and non-avian dinosaurs. Our phylogenetic analysis recovers Fukuivenator as a basally branching maniraptoran theropod, yet is unable to refer it to any known coelurosaurian subgroups. The discovery of Fukuivenator considerably increases the morphological disparity of coelurosaurian dinosaurs and highlights the high levels of homoplasy in coelurosaurian evolution. PMID:26908367

  14. Satellite Monitoring Over the Canadian Oil Sands: Highlights from Aura OMI and TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark W.; McLinden, Chris; Fioletov, Vitali; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Krotkov, Nick A.; Boersma, Folkert; Li, Can; Luo, Ming; Bhartia, P. K.; Joiner, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides a unique perspective for air quality monitoring in and around the Canadian Oil Sands as a result of its spatial and temporal coverage. Presented are Aura satellite observations of key pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), and formic acid (HCOOH) over the Canadian Oil Sands. Some of the highlights include: (i) the evolution of NO2 and SO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), including comparisons with other nearby sources, (ii) two years of ammonia, carbon monoxide, methanol, and formic acid observations from 240 km North-South Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) transects through the oils sands, and (iii) preliminary insights into emissions derived from these observations.

  15. Etiology of Obesity Over the Life Span: Ecological and Genetic Highlights from Asian Countries.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pei Nee; Teh, Christinal Pey Wen; Poh, Bee Koon; Noor, Mohd Ismail

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic, and the prevalence rate has doubled since the 1980s. Asian countries are also experiencing the global epidemic of obesity with its related health consequences. The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing at an alarming rate across all age groups in Asia. These increases are mainly attributed to rapid economic growth, which leads to socio-economic, nutrition and lifestyle transitions, resulting in a positive energy balance. In addition, fat mass and obesity-associated gene variants, copy number variants in chromosomes and epigenetic modifications have shown positive associations with the risk of obesity among Asians. In this review highlights of prevalence and related ecological and genetic factors that could influence the rapid rise in obesity among Asian populations are discussed.

  16. Vertebrate neurogenic placode development: historical highlights that have shaped our current understanding.

    PubMed

    Stark, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    With the flood of published research encountered today, it is important to occasionally reflect upon how we arrived at our current understanding in a particular scientific discipline, thereby positioning new discoveries into proper context with long-established models. This historical review highlights some of the important scientific contributions in the field of neurogenic placode development. By viewing cumulatively the rich historical data, we can more fully appreciate and apply what has been accomplished. Early descriptive work in fish and experimental approaches in amphibians and chick yielded important conceptual models of placode induction and cellular differentiation. Current efforts to discover genes and their molecular functions continue to expand our understanding of the placodes. Carefully considering the body of work may improve current models and help focus modern experimental design.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey coastal and marine geology research; recent highlights and achievements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Barnes, Peter W.; Prager, Ellen J.

    2000-01-01

    The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program has large-scale national and regional research projects that focus on environmental quality, geologic hazards, natural resources, and information transfer. This Circular highlights recent scientific findings of the program, which play a vital role in the USGS endeavor to understand human interactions with the natural environment and to determine how the fundamental geologic processes controlling the Earth work. The scientific knowledge acquired through USGS research and monitoring is critically needed by planners, government agencies, and the public. Effective communication of the results of this research will enable the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program to play an integral part in assisting the Nation in responding the pressing Earth science challenges of the 21st century.

  18. Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, H; Effenberg, F; Schmitz, O; Biedermann, C; Feng, Y; Jakubowski, M; König, R; Krychowiak, M; Lore, J; Niemann, H; Pedersen, T S; Stephey, L; Wurden, G A

    2016-11-01

    Interpretation of spectroscopic measurements in the edge region of high-temperature plasmas can be a challenge since line of sight integration effects make direct interpretation in terms of quantitative, local emission strengths often impossible. The EMC3-EIRENE code-a 3D fluid edge plasma and kinetic neutral gas transport code-is a suitable tool for full 3D reconstruction of such signals. A versatile synthetic diagnostic module has been developed recently which allows the realistic 3D setup of various plasma edge diagnostics to be captured. We highlight these capabilities with two examples for Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X): a visible camera for the analysis of recycling, and a coherent-imaging system for velocity measurements.

  19. Mirolydidae, a new family of Jurassic pamphilioid sawfly (Hymenoptera) highlighting mosaic evolution of lower Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Rasnitsyn, Alexandr P.; Yang, Zhongqi; Shih, Chungkun; Wang, Hongbin; Ren, Dong

    2017-01-01

    We describe Pamphilioidea: Mirolydidae Wang, Rasnitsyn et Ren, fam. n., containing Mirolyda hirta Wang, Rasnitsyn et Ren, gen. et sp. n., from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. The new taxon is characterized by unique forewing venation with the presence of forewing SC, 1-RS almost as long as 1-M, M + Cu straight, 2r-rs strongly reclival, and antenna with homonomous flagellum, revealing new and important details in antennal evolutionary transformations. Thus, M. hirta with a combination of primitive and more derived characters highlights its transitional state in the Pamphilioidea and complex mosaic evolution within Pamphilioidea in the late Middle Jurassic. The body of this species is densely covered with thin and long setae, suggesting its possible habit of visiting gymnosperm reproductive organs for pollen feeding and/or pollination during the late Middle Jurassic, much earlier than the appearance of angiosperm flowers. PMID:28266631

  20. Neurological Diseases, Disorders and Injuries in Canada: Highlights of a National Study.

    PubMed

    Bray, Garth M; Huggett, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions, a partnership between Neurological Health Charities Canada and the Government of Canada, was the largest study of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries ever conducted in Canada. Undertaken between 2009 and 2013, the expansive program of research addressed the epidemiology, impacts, health services, and risk factors of 18 neurological conditions and estimated the health outcomes and costs of these conditions in Canada through 2031. This review summarizes highlights from the component projects of the study as presented in the synthesis report, Mapping Connections: An Understanding of Neurological Conditions in Canada. The key findings included new prevalence and incidence estimates, documentation of the diverse and often debilitating effects of neurological conditions, and identification of the utilization, economic costs, and current limitations of related health services. The study findings will support health charities, governments, and other stakeholders to reduce the impact of neurological conditions in Canada.