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Sample records for acre foot measurable

  1. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Zayegh, Aladin; Begg, Rezaul K.; Wahab, Yufridin

    2012-01-01

    Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis. PMID:23012576

  2. Estimation of stature from radiographic measurement of foot dimensions: Truncated foot length may be more reliable than full foot length.

    PubMed

    Gwani, Abdullahi Suleiman; Salihu, Abubakar Tijjani; Garba, Isa Sa'idu; Rufa'i, Adamu Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Foot length has been shown to be a reliable dimension for estimation of stature. However, phalanges of the foot are very small bones and their length may not be proportional to person's stature. Thus, we hypothesized that foot length measured excluding the phalanges, the truncated foot length, may be more reliable in stature estimation than full foot length. This study, therefore, aimed at comparing the accuracy of the regression equations derived from the truncated foot length and the full foot length. The study recruited a sample of 32 young adults (16 males and 16 females) aged from 20 to 35 years. Lateral radiographs of the right feet were obtained for each subject in a bilateral standing position while maintaining equal weight on both feet. Standing height of the participants was measured with a stadiometer. Truncated foot length and full foot length were measured on the lateral radiographs of the foot. Independent t-test was used to check for mean differences in the dimensions between genders. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the equations for stature estimation. Intra and inter-observer reliability were calculated from four precision estimates: absolute technical error of measurement (aTEM), relative technical error of measurement (rTEM), coefficient of reliability (Rr) and coefficient of variation (Cv). All the dimensions measured were significantly larger in males than females. Linear regression equations were derived for estimation of stature using both the truncated foot length and full foot length. The regression equations derived from truncated foot length have larger correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, adjusted coefficient of determination as well as smaller standard error of estimation than those derived from full foot length. All the precision estimates showed that the measurement errors are within acceptable limits. This study suggests that even if the full foot length is available, excluding the phalanges may

  3. Factors influencing accuracy and reproducibility of body resistance measurements by foot-to-foot impedancemeters.

    PubMed

    Bousbiat, Sana; Jaffrin, Michel; Assadi, Imen

    2015-01-01

    The electronics of a BodySignal V2 (Tefal, France) foot-to-foot impedancemeter (FFI) was modified to display the foot-to-foot resistance instead of body fat. This device was connected to electrodes of different sizes mounted on a podoscope permitting photographs of subjects feet soles and electrodes in order to calculate the contact area between feet and electrodes. The foot-to-foot resistance was found to decrease when the contact area of feet with current and voltage electrodes increased. It was also sensitive to feet displacement and a backward move of 5 cm increased the mean resistance by 37 Ω. The resistance reproducibility was tested by asking the subject to repeat measurements 10-times by stepping up and down from the podoscope. The mean SD of these tests was 0.88% of mean resistance, but it fell to 0.47% when feet position was guided and to 0.29% with transverse voltage electrodes. For good reproducibility, it is important that voltage electrodes be small and that the scale design facilitates a correct position of heels on these electrodes.

  4. Effectiveness of urban stormwater control measures in a 100-acre test site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kansas City, Missouri chose a test area (100 acres) and a control area (80 acres) to test the effectiveness of urban stormwater control (SCM) deployment in conjunction with the USEPA, University of Alabama, University of Missouri-Kansas City and TetraTech. Both the test and cont...

  5. Measuring foot placement and clearance during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Muhaidat, Jennifer; Kerr, Andrew; Rafferty, Danny; Skelton, Dawn A; Evans, Jonathan J

    2011-03-01

    Falls during stair descent are a serious problem and can lead to accidental death. Inappropriate foot placement on, and clearance over, steps have been identified as causes for falls on stairs. This study investigated a new method for measuring placement and clearance during stair descent in 10 healthy young subjects. The effect of foot length was accounted for during the measurement of foot placement by calculating the percentage length of the foot overhanging the step. Foot clearance was measured as the resultant of the minimum vertical and horizontal distances from the heel of the foot to the edge of the step. Clearance was divided into landing and passing clearance depending on the planned placement of the foot in relation to the step edge being cleared. Each subject performed seven trials of stairs descent. Mean (SD) and CV (SD) were 16% (6), 0.28 (0.15) for placement; 45.88 (10.05), 0.21 (0.07) for landing clearance; 107.25 (5.59), 0.25 (0.08) for passing clearance. There was no statistically significant effect of trial on placement and clearance (p>0.05). There was a significant effect of step number on landing and passing clearance (p=0.01, p<0.001 respectively). Landing and passing clearances were greater for the third step compared to the second step. Passing clearance was also significantly greater than landing clearance (p<0.001). The repeatable methods and findings from this study might be useful in providing a technical background and normal values for the design of future gait studies on stairs.

  6. Error Correction for Foot Clearance in Real-Time Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Y.; Bakar, N. A.; Mazalan, M.

    2014-04-01

    Mobility performance level, fall related injuries, unrevealed disease and aging stage can be detected through examination of gait pattern. The gait pattern is normally directly related to the lower limb performance condition in addition to other significant factors. For that reason, the foot is the most important part for gait analysis in-situ measurement system and thus directly affects the gait pattern. This paper reviews the development of ultrasonic system with error correction using inertial measurement unit for gait analysis in real life measurement of foot clearance. This paper begins with the related literature where the necessity of measurement is introduced. Follow by the methodology section, problem and solution. Next, this paper explains the experimental setup for the error correction using the proposed instrumentation, results and discussion. Finally, this paper shares the planned future works.

  7. Foot-mounted inertial measurement unit for activity classification.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Mostafa; Esfahani, Ehsan T

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a classification technique for daily base activity recognition for human monitoring during physical therapy in home. The proposed method estimates the foot motion using single inertial measurement unit, then segments the motion into steps classify them by template-matching as walking, stairs up or stairs down steps. The results show a high accuracy of activity recognition. Unlike previous works which are limited to activity recognition, the proposed approach is more qualitative by providing similarity index of any activity to its desired template which can be used to assess subjects improvement.

  8. Estimation of foot trajectory during human walking by a wearable inertial measurement unit mounted to the foot.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Naoki; Ogihara, Naomichi

    2016-03-01

    To establish a supportive technology for reducing the risk of falling in older people, it is essential to clarify gait characteristics in elderly individuals that are possibly linked to the risk of falling during actual daily activities. In this study, we developed a system to monitor human gait in an outdoor environment using an inertial measurement unit consisting of a tri-axial accelerometer and tri-axial gyroscope. Step-by-step foot trajectories were estimated from the sensor unit attached to the dorsum of the foot. Specifically, stride length and foot clearance were calculated by integrating the gravity-compensated translational acceleration over time during the swing phase. Zero vertical velocity and displacement corrections were applied to obtain the final trajectory, assuming the slope of the walking surface is negligible. Short, normal, and long stride-length walking of 10 healthy participants was simultaneously measured using the proposed system and a conventional motion capture system to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated foot trajectory. Mean accuracy and precision were approximately 20 ± 50 mm, for stride length, and 2 ± 7 mm for foot clearance, indicating that the swing phase trajectory of the sensor unit attached to the foot was reconstructed more accurately and precisely using the proposed system than with previously published methods owing to the flat floor assumption. Although some methodological limitations certainly apply, this system will serve as a useful tool to monitor human walking during daily activities.

  9. The effects of prolonged running on foot posture: a repeated measures study of half marathon runners using the foot posture index and navicular height

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different foot postures are associated with alterations in foot function, kinetics and the subsequent occurrence of injury. Little is known about changes in foot posture following prolonged weightbearing exercise. This study aimed to identify changes in foot posture after running a half marathon. Methods Foot posture was measured using the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and navicular height in thirty volunteer participants before and after running a half marathon. FPI-6 scores were converted to Rasch logit values and means compared for these and navicular height using an ANOVA. Results There was a 5 mm drop in navicular height in both feet when measured after the half marathon (P < 0.05). The FPI-6 showed a side x time interaction with an increase in score indicating a more ‘pronated’ position in the left foot of + 2 [Rasch value + 1.7] but no change in the right foot (+ 0.4 [+ 0.76]) following the half marathon. Conclusion The apparent differences between the FPI-6 and navicular height on the right foot may be because the FPI-6 takes soft tissue contour changes into consideration whilst the navicular height focuses on skeletal changes. The changes in foot posture towards a more pronated position may have implications for foot function, and therefore risk of injury; shoe fit and comfort and also the effect of therapeutic orthoses worn during prolonged running. PMID:23705863

  10. Development and application of 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhong; Wang, Boxiong; Shi, Hui; Luo, Xiuzhi

    2008-03-01

    The 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads based on laser-line-scanning principle was designed and the model of the measurement system was developed. 3-D foot-shape measurements without blind areas under different loads and the automatic extraction of foot-parameter are achieved with the system. A global calibration method for CCD cameras using a one-axis motion unit in the measurement system and the specialized calibration kits is presented. Errors caused by the nonlinearity of CCD cameras and other devices and caused by the installation of the one axis motion platform, the laser plane and the toughened glass plane can be eliminated by using the nonlinear coordinate mapping function and the Powell optimized method in calibration. Foot measurements under different loads for 170 participants were conducted and the statistic foot parameter measurement results for male and female participants under non-weight condition and changes of foot parameters under half-body-weight condition, full-body-weight condition and over-body-weight condition compared with non-weight condition are presented. 3-D foot-shape measurement under different loads makes it possible to realize custom-made shoe-making and shows great prosperity in shoe design, foot orthopaedic treatment, shoe size standardization, and establishment of a feet database for consumers and athletes.

  11. Intraobserver reliability of static measures in the normally developing infant foot and clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, Yael; Durham, Sally; Daly, Karen; Ewins, David

    2009-09-01

    Static measures data for infants are used in clinical practice and studies without published reliabilities. Intraobserver reliabilities for static measures were assessed in normally developing feet and clubfeet. Coefficient of repeatability was used for reliability. Variability in reliability was found. Ankle dorsiflexion, calf circumference and foot length were considered to be reliable in both groups. Foot width was considered unreliable and reliability for ankle plantarflexion knee flexed or extended does not seem to justify its use clinically. These results suggest that ankle dorsiflexion, calf circumference and foot length are reliable measures in infants and can be used for study conclusions and clinical decisions.

  12. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886-0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management.

  13. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886–0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management. PMID:27190648

  14. Exploitation of Stereophotogrammetric Measurement of a Foot in Analysis of Plantar Pressure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankova, B.; Koudelka, T.; Pavelka, K.; Janura, M.; Jelen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Stereophotogrammetry as a method for the surface scanning can be used to capture some properties of the human body parts. The objective of this study is to quantify the foot stress distribution in 3D during its quasi-static stand using a footprint into an imprinting material when knowing its mechanical properties. One foot of a female, having the mass of 65kg, was chosen for the FEM foot model construction. After obtaining her foot imprint to the dental imprinting material, its positive plaster cast was created, whose surface was possible to scan using stereophotogrammetry. The imprint surface digital model was prepared with the help of the Konica-Minolta Vivid 9i triangulation scanner. This procedure provides the measured object models in a high resolution. The resulting surface mesh of the foot imprint involved 9.600 nodes and 14.000 triangles, approximately, after reduction due to the FEM analysis. Simulation of foot imprint was solved as the 3D time dependent nonlinear mechanical problem in the ADINA software. The sum of vertical reactions calculated at the contact area nodes was 320.5 N, which corresponds to the mass of 32.67 kg. This value is in a good agreement with the subject half weight - the load of one foot during its quasi-static stand. The partial pressures resulting from this mathematical model match the real pressures on the interface of the foot and imprinting material quite closely. Principally, these simulations can be used to assess the contact pressures in practical cases, e.g., between a foot and its footwear.

  15. 3D Measurement of Anatomical Cross-sections of Foot while Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Mochimaru, Masaaki; Kanade, Takeo

    Recently, techniques for measuring and modeling of human body are taking attention, because human models are useful for ergonomic design in manufacturing. We aim to measure accurate shape of human foot that will be useful for the design of shoes. For such purpose, shape measurement of foot in motion is obviously important, because foot shape in the shoe is deformed while walking or running. In this paper, we propose a method to measure anatomical cross-sections of foot while walking. No one had ever measured dynamic shape of anatomical cross-sections, though they are very basic and popular in the field of biomechanics. Our proposed method is based on multi-view stereo method. The target cross-sections are painted in individual colors (red, green, yellow and blue), and the proposed method utilizes the characteristic of target shape in the camera captured images. Several nonlinear conditions are introduced in the process to find the consistent correspondence in all images. Our desired accuracy is less than 1mm error, which is similar to the existing 3D scanners for static foot measurement. In our experiments, the proposed method achieved the desired accuracy.

  16. Measures to improve dairy cow foot health: consequences for farmer income and dairy cow welfare.

    PubMed

    Bruijnis, M R N; Hogeveen, H; Stassen, E N

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farming in western countries with cubicle housing is an efficient way of dairy farming. Though, a disadvantage is the high prevalence and incidence of foot disorders (clinical and subclinical), which cause high economic losses and also seriously impair the welfare of dairy cattle. To point out the importance of reducing the amount and severity of foot disorders, advice to farmers should include information about the scale of the problem and the consequences in terms of economics and animal welfare. To provide support in making decisions on implementing intervention measures, insight into costs and benefits of different measures should be available. The objective of this study, therefore, is to provide more insight into the costs and benefits, for farmer and cow, of different intervention measures to improve dairy cow foot health. Intervention measures were modeled when they were applicable on a dairy farm with cubicle housing and when sufficient information was available in literature. Net costs were calculated as the difference between the costs of the measure and the economic benefits resulting from the measure. Welfare benefits were calculated as well. Cost-effective measures are: improving lying surface (mattress and bedding, €7 and €1/cow per year, respectively), reducing stocking density (break even) and performing additional foot trimming (€1/cow per year). Simultaneously, these measures have a relative high welfare benefit. Labor costs play an important role in the cost-effectiveness of labor-intensive measures. More insight into cost-effectiveness and welfare benefits of intervention measures can help to prioritize when choosing between intervention measures.

  17. Sex identification on the basis of hand and foot measurements in Indo-Mauritian population--a model based approach.

    PubMed

    Jowaheer, Vandna; Agnihotri, Arun Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Identification is the foremost issue in crime investigation. A few studies have been performed so far in order to identify sex on the basis of single foot or hand of the victim. Moreover, these studies provide only crude measures to indicate sex and there exists no concrete methodology to predict sex using the available information. In the present paper, we have developed statistical models to identify sex based on the dimensions of foot and hand. The models containing both length and breadth of hand or foot as independent variables are capable of predicting sex in Indo-Mauritian population with fairly high accuracy as compared to those containing hand or foot indices.

  18. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  19. Perspectives for clinical measures of dynamic foot function-reference data and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Rathleff, M S; Nielsen, R G; Simonsen, O; Olesen, C G; Kersting, U G

    2010-02-01

    Several studies have investigated if static posture assessments qualify to predict dynamic function of the foot showing diverse outcomes. However, it was suggested that dynamic measures may be better suited to predict foot-related overuse problems. The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability for dynamic measures of longitudinal arch angle (LAA) and navicular height (NH) and to examine to what extent static and dynamic measures thereof are related. Intra-rater reliability of LAA and NH measures was tested on a sample of 17 control subjects. Subsequently, 79 subjects were tested while walking on a treadmill. The ranges and minimum values for LAA and NH during ground contact were identified over 20 consecutive steps. A geometric error model was used to simulate effects of marker placement uncertainty and skin movement artifacts. Results demonstrated the highest reliability for the minimum NH (MinNH), followed by the minimum LAA (MinLAA), the dynamic range of navicular height (DeltaNH) and the range of LAA (DeltaLAA) while all measures were highly reliable. Marker location uncertainty and skin movement artifacts had the smallest effects on measures of NH. The use of an alignment device for marker placement was shown to reduce error ranges for NH measures. Therefore, DeltaNH and MinNH were recommended for functional dynamic foot characterization in the sagittal plane. There is potential for such measures to be a suitable predictor for overuse injuries while being obtainable in clinical settings. Future research needs to include such dynamic but simple foot assessments in large-scale clinical studies.

  20. ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C; Xie, S; Klein, SA; McCoy, R; Comstock, JM; Delanoë, J; Deng, M; Dunn, M; Hogan, RJ; Jensen, MP; Mace, GG; McFarlane, SA; O’Connor, EJ; Protat, A; Shupe, MD; Turner, D; Wang, Z

    2011-09-12

    This document describes a new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data set, the ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED), which is created by assembling nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals of ARM measurements from different cloud retrieval algorithms. The current version of ACRED includes an hourly average of nine ground-based retrievals with vertical resolution of 45 m for 512 layers. The techniques used for the nine cloud retrievals are briefly described in this document. This document also outlines the ACRED data availability, variables, and the nine retrieval products. Technical details about the generation of ACRED, such as the methods used for time average and vertical re-grid, are also provided.

  1. Praise Acres Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Carolyn

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the "Praise Acres Project," which was initiated from a letter written by a local resident. The resident wrote about an idea to develop a wetlands and outdoor lab facility on his property for students. Thus, a plan was conceived that would not only benefit the owner, but also enhance high school science…

  2. Reliable measurement of 3D foot bone angles based on the frame-of-reference derived from a sole of the foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Lee, Dong Yeon; Park, Jinah

    2016-03-01

    Clinical management of foot pathology requires accurate and robust measurement of the anatomical angles. In order to measure a 3D angle, recent approaches have adopted a landmark-based local coordinate system to establish bone angles used in orthopedics. These measurement methods mainly assess the relative angle between bones using a representative axis derived from the morphological feature of the bone and therefore, the results can be affected by bone deformities. In this study, we propose a method of deriving a global frame-of-reference to acquire consistent direction of the foot by extracting the undersurface of the foot from the CT image data. The two lowest positions of the foot skin are identified from the surface to define the base plane, and the direction from the hallux to the fourth toe is defined together to construct the global coordinate system. We performed the experiment on 10 volumes of foot CT images of healthy subjects to verify that the proposed method provides reliable measurements. We measured 3D angles for talus-calcaneus and talus-navicular using facing articular surfaces of paired bones. The angle was reported in 3 projection angles based on both coordinate systems defined by proposed global frame-of-reference and by CT image planes (saggital, frontal, and transverse). The result shows that the quantified angle using the proposed method considerably reduced the standard deviation (SD) against the angle using the conventional projection planes, and it was also comparable with the measured angles obtained from local coordinate systems of the bones. Since our method is independent from any individual local shape of a bone, unlike the measurement method using the local coordinate system, it is suitable for inter-subject comparison studies.

  3. Measuring quality of life in stroke subjects receiving an implanted neural prosthesis for drop foot.

    PubMed

    Kottink, Anke I; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G; Hermens, Hermie J

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to determine if the treatment of a drop foot by means of an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL). All subjects were measured at baseline and after a follow-up period of 12 and 26 weeks. Twenty-nine stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegia with drop foot who fulfilled the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the present randomized controlled trial. The intervention group received an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator for correction of their drop foot. The control group continued using their conventional walking device, consisting of an ankle-foot orthosis, orthopedic shoes, or no device. HRQoL was assessed in two different ways: (i) by taking descriptive measures, that is, the Short Form-36 (SF-36; generic measure) and the Disability Impact Profile (DIP; specific measure); and (ii) by obtaining preference-based utilities both measured with the time trade-off (direct way) and by calculating them from the EuroQol (EQ-5D) and SF-36. A significant positive effect of the implantable device was found on the physical functioning domain, the general health domain, and the physical component summary score of the SF-36. For the DIP, a significant improvement was found on the domains mobility, self-care, and psychological status in the intervention group. Regarding the preference-based utility measures, a significant effect was found for the utility index calculated from the EQ-5D. The implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator seems to be efficient to improve HRQoL, mainly the domains related to physical functioning. A relation was present between the utility indexes calculated from the EQ-5D and SF-36.

  4. Application of a system for measuring foot plantar pressure for evaluation of human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimiec, Ewa; Jasiewicz, Barbara; Zaraska, Krzysztof; Piekarski, Jacek; Guzdek, Piotr; Kołaszczyński, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents evaluation of human mobility by gait analysis, carried out in natural conditions (outside laboratory). Foot plantar pressure is measured using a shoe insole with 8 sensors placed in different anatomical zones of the foot, and placed inside a sports footwear. Polarized PVDF foil is used as a sensor material. A wireless transmission system is used to transmit voltage values to the computer. Due to linear relationship between force and transducer voltage, energy released during walking in arbitrary units can be calculated as integral of the square of transducer voltage over time. Gait measurements have been done over the next few days on healthy person during normal walking and slow walking. Performed measurements allow determination of walking speed (number of steps per second), gait rhythm and manner of walking (applying force to inside versus outside part of the sole). It is found that switching from normal to slow walk increases gait energy by 25% while the pressure distribution across the anatomical regions of the foot remains unchanged. The results will be used for developing a programme for evaluation of patients with cardiac failure and future integration of actimetry with pulse and spirometry measurements.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of acrA and acrE genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D; Cook, D N; Alberti, M; Pon, N G; Nikaido, H; Hearst, J E

    1993-01-01

    The DNA fragment containing the acrA locus of the Escherichia coli chromosome has been cloned by using a complementation test. The nucleotide sequence indicates the presence of two open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis suggests that the first ORF encodes a 397-residue lipoprotein with a 24-amino-acid signal peptide at its N terminus. One inactive allele of acrA from strain N43 was shown to contain an IS2 element inserted into this ORF. Therefore, this ORF was designated acrA. The second downstream ORF is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein of 1,049 amino acids and is named acrE. Genes acrA and acrE are probably located on the same operon, and both of their products are likely to affect drug susceptibilities observed in wild-type cells. The cellular localizations of these polypeptides have been analyzed by making acrA::TnphoA and acrE::TnphoA fusion proteins. Interestingly, AcrA and AcrE share 65 and 77% amino acid identity with two other E. coli polypeptides, EnvC and EnvD, respectively. Drug susceptibilities in one acrA mutant (N43) and one envCD mutant (PM61) have been determined and compared. Finally, the possible functions of these proteins are discussed. Images PMID:8407802

  6. [The research in a foot pressure measuring system based on LabVIEW].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qiu, Hong; Xu, Jiang; He, Jiping

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a system of foot pressure measuring system based on LabVIEW. The designs of hardware and software system are figured out. LabVIEW is used to design the application interface for displaying plantar pressure. The system can realize the plantar pressure data acquisition, data storage, waveform display, and waveform playback. It was also shown that the testing results of the system were in line with the changing trend of normal gait, which conformed to human system engineering theory. It leads to the demonstration of system reliability. The system gives vivid and visual results, and provides a new method of how to measure foot-pressure and some references for the design of Insole System.

  7. Age-related factors in the relationship between foot measurements and living stature and body weight.

    PubMed

    Atamturk, Derya; Duyar, Izzet

    2008-11-01

    The measurements of feet and footprints are especially important in forensic identification, as they have been used to predict the body height and weight of victims or suspects. It can be observed that the subjects of forensic-oriented studies are generally young adults. That is to say, researchers rarely take into consideration the body's proportional changes with age. Hence, the aim of this study is to generate equations which take age and sex into consideration, when stature and body weight are estimated from foot and footprints dimensions. With this aim in mind, we measured the stature, body weight, foot length and breadth, heel breadth, footprint length and breadth, and footprint heel breadth of 516 volunteers (253 males and 263 females) aged between 17.6 and 82.9 years using standard measurement techniques. The sample population was divided randomly into two groups. Group 1, the study group, consisted of 80% of the sample (n = 406); the remaining 20% were assigned to the cross-validation group or Group 2 (n = 110). In the first stage of the study, we produced equations for estimating stature and weight using a stepwise regression technique. Then, their reliability was tested on Group 2 members. Statistical analyses showed that the ratios of foot dimensions to stature and body weight change considerably with age and sex. Consequently, the regression equations which include these variables yielded more reliable results. Our results indicated that age and sex should be taken into consideration when predicting human body height and weight for forensic purposes.

  8. Measuring of foot plantar pressure—possible applications in quantitative analysis of human body mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimiec, E.; Jasiewicz, B.; Piekarski, J.; Zaraska, K.; Guzdek, P.; Kołaszczyński, G.

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents an evaluation of human mobility by gait analysis, carried out in natural conditions (outside of the laboratory). Foot plantar pressure is measured using a shoe insole with 8 sensors placed in different anatomical zones of the foot, and placed inside a sports shoe. Polarized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) foil is used as a sensor material. A wireless transmission system is used to transmit voltage values to the computer. Miniaturization was the priority during the design of the system. Due to the linear relationship between force and transducer voltage, energy and power released during walking in arbitrary units can be calculated as an integral of the square of the transducer voltage over time. Gait measurements were carried out over several days on healthy persons during normal walking and slow walking. The performed measurements allowed for the determination of walking speed (number of steps per second), gait rhythm and manner of walking (applying force to inside versus outside part of the sole). It was found that switching from normal to slow walk increases gait energy by 25% while the pressure distribution across the anatomical regions of the foot remains unchanged. The results will be used to develop a programme for the evaluation of patients with orthopedic diseases or even with cardiac failures, for an estimation of the results of health recovery and training efficiency in many sports activities.

  9. How Big Is an Acre?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustin, Byron D.; Brandes, Donald

    1984-01-01

    Many students do not have the slightest idea of how much land is in an acre. A diagram of the official playing field for American football is used to illustrate the approximate size of an acre of land. (RM)

  10. 75 FR 47621 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the North Fork Rancheria's Proposed 305-Acre Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...-Acre Trust Acquisition and Hotel/Casino Project, Madera County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... develop a hotel, casino, parking facilities, and supporting infrastructure. The proposed 305-acre site... Proposed Project includes the development of an approximately 472,000 square foot hotel and casino...

  11. Laser velocimeter measurements of dynamic stall. [conducted in the Ames two foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    Laser velocimeter measurements were made during the study of a two-dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing conditions of dynamic stall. The measurements, which were obtained in the Ames 2 foot wind tunnel at reduced frequencies of 0.12 and 1.2, show significant flow field hysteresis around the static stall angle. Comparisons were also made with dual-plate interferograms and good agreement was found for the attached flow cases. For separated flow, characteristic vortex shedding caused poor agreement and significantly increased the measured Reynolds shear stresses.

  12. Estimation of Human Foot Motion During Normal Walking Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensor Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    OF: A foot motion filtering algorithm is presented for estimating foot kinematics relative to an earth -fixed reference frame during normal walking...Title ABSTRACT A foot motion filtering algorithm is presented for estimating foot kinematics relative to an earth -fixed reference frame during...filtering algorithm is presented for es- timating foot kinematics relative to an earth -fixed reference frame during normal walking motion. Algorithm

  13. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  14. A Technique for Measuring Rotocraft Dynamic Stability in the 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Bohn, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line technique is described for the measurement of tilt rotor aircraft dynamic stability in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The technique is based on advanced system identification methodology and uses the instrumental variables approach. It is particulary applicable to real time estimation problems with limited amounts of noise-contaminated data. Several simulations are used to evaluate the algorithm. Estimated natural frequencies and damping ratios are compared with simulation values. The algorithm is also applied to wind tunnel data in an off-line mode. The results are used to develop preliminary guidelines for effective use of the algorithm.

  15. PREDICTING FOOT PROGRESSION ANGLE DURING GAIT USING TWO CLINICAL MEASURES IN HEALTHY ADULTS, A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Kyle; Kampwerth, Teri; McAfee, Blake; Payne, Lisa; Roeckenhaus, Tara; Ross, Sandy A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The foot progression angle (FPA) is related to the transverse plane rotation of the lower extremities and associated with many lower extremity conditions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine how two commonly used clinical measures, tibio-fibular torsion (TF) and hip rotation, can be used to predict FPA during gait in healthy adults. Study Design Cross-sectional study design Methods Passive hip internal and external rotation ranges of motion and TF torsion were measured with a 12-inch goniometer while the FPA (degree of toe-in/out) was measured with the GAITRite during midstance in sixty participants. The data was analyzed using a multiple regression model. Results Hip ER was not significant and was therefore excluded from the final model. The final model included passive hip IR and TF torsion (F = 19.64; p < .001; multiple R2 = .41; adjusted R2 = .39). Simple binary correlations showed that hip IR had a moderate negative correlation (r = -.40) with FPA (the greater the hip IR, the greater the in-toeing) while TF torsion had a positive correlation (r = .39) with FPA (the greater the external TF torsion. the greater the out-toeing). Conclusions Greater amount of passive hip IR predicts in-toeing while greater TF torsion predicts out-toeing of the foot during midstance phase of gait. Level of Evidence Level 2 PMID:27274426

  16. Automatic control of a drop-foot stimulator based on angle measurement using bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Nahrstaedt, Holger; Schauer, Thomas; Shalaby, Raafat; Hesse, Stefan; Raisch, Jörg

    2008-08-01

    The topic of this contribution is iterative learning control of a drop-foot stimulator in which a predefined angle profile during the swing phase is realized. Ineffective dorsiflexion is compensated by feedback-controlled stimulation of the muscle tibialis anterior. The ankle joint measurement is based on changes in the bioimpedance (BI) caused by leg movements. A customized four-channel BI measurement system was developed. The suggested control approach and the new measurement method for the joint angle were successfully tested in preliminary experiments with a neurologically intact subject. Reference angle measurements were taken with a marker-based optical system. An almost linear relation between joint angle and BI was found for the angle range applicable during gait. The desired angle trajectory was closely tracked by the iterative learning controller after three gait cycles. The final root mean square tracking error was below 5 degrees.

  17. Effects of artificial-recharge experiments at Ship Creek alluvial fan on water levels at Spring Acres Subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, William; Patrick, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the artificial recharge experiments on water levels at Spring Acres subdivision, Anchorage, Alaska, was evaluated using two digital models constructed to simulate groundwater movement and water-level rises induced by the artificial recharge. The models predicted that the artificial recharge would have caused water levels in the aquifer immediately underlying Spring Acres subdivision to rise 0.2 foot from May 20 to August 7, 1975. The models also predicted a total rise in groundwater levels of 1.1 feet at this location from July 16, 1973 to August 7, 1975, as a result of the artificial-recharge experiments. Water-level data collected from auger holes in March 1975 by a consulting firm for the contractor indicated a depth to water of 6-7 feet below land surface at Spring Acres subdivision at this time. Water levels measured in and near Spring Acres subdivision several years before and after the 1973-75 artificial-recharge experiments showed seasonal rises of 2 to 12.4 feet. A depth to water below land surface of 2.6 feet was measured 600 feet from the subdivision in 1971 and in the subdivision in 1977. Average measured depth to water in the area was 7.0 feet from early 1976 to September 1979. (USGS)

  18. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Athlete's Foot KidsHealth > For Kids > Athlete's Foot A A A ... a public shower. Why Is It Called Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot gets its name because athletes often ...

  19. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Athlete's Foot KidsHealth > For Teens > Athlete's Foot A A A ... your skin, hair, and nails. What Is Athlete's Foot? The medical name for athlete's foot is tinea ...

  20. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Angevine, Peter D; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Choudhri, Asim F; Fries, Ian Blair; Holly, Langston T; Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaqulle; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; O'Toole, John E; Sharma, Aseem; Shetty, Vilaas S; West, O Clark; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with myelopathic symptoms may have a number of causative intradural and extradural etiologies, including disc degenerative diseases, spinal masses, infectious or inflammatory processes, vascular compromise, and vertebral fracture. Patients may present acutely or insidiously and may progress toward long-term paralysis if not treated promptly and effectively. Noncontrast CT is the most appropriate first examination in acute trauma cases to diagnose vertebral fracture as the cause of acute myelopathy. In most nontraumatic cases, MRI is the modality of choice to evaluate the location, severity, and causative etiology of spinal cord myelopathy, and predicts which patients may benefit from surgery. Myelopathy from spinal stenosis and spinal osteoarthritis is best confirmed without MRI intravenous contrast. Many other myelopathic conditions are more easily visualized after contrast administration. Imaging performed should be limited to the appropriate spinal levels, based on history, physical examination, and clinical judgment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals, and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  1. ACR appropriateness criteria jaundice.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Tasneem; Couto, Corey A; Rosen, Max P; Baker, Mark E; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Katz, Douglas S; Kaur, Harmeet; Miller, Frank H; Qayyum, Aliya; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yarmish, Gail M; Yee, Judy

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental consideration in the workup of a jaundiced patient is the pretest probability of mechanical obstruction. Ultrasound is the first-line modality to exclude biliary tract obstruction. When mechanical obstruction is present, additional imaging with CT or MRI can clarify etiology, define level of obstruction, stage disease, and guide intervention. When mechanical obstruction is absent, additional imaging can evaluate liver parenchyma for fat and iron deposition and help direct biopsy in cases where underlying parenchymal disease or mass is found. Imaging techniques are reviewed for the following clinical scenarios: (1) the patient with painful jaundice, (2) the patient with painless jaundice, and (3) the patient with a nonmechanical cause for jaundice. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  2. New devices for measuring forces on the kayak foot bar and on the seat during flat-water kayak paddling: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Johnny E; Rosdahl, Hans G

    2014-03-01

    The purpose was to develop and validate portable force-measurement devices for recording push and pull forces applied by each foot to the foot bar of a kayak and the horizontal force at the seat. A foot plate on a single-point force transducer mounted on the kayak foot bar underneath each foot allowed the push and pull forces to be recorded. Two metal frames interconnected with 4 linear ball bearings, and a force transducer allowed recording of horizontal seat force. The foot-bar-force device was calibrated by loading each foot plate with weights in the push-pull direction perpendicular to the foot plate surface, while the seat-force device was calibrated to horizontal forces with and without weights on the seat. A strong linearity (r2 = .99-1.0) was found between transducer output signal and load force in the push and pull directions for both foot-bar transducers perpendicular to the foot plate and the seat-force-measuring device. Reliability of both devices was tested by means of a test-retest design. The coefficient of variation (CV) for foot-bar push and pull forces ranged from 0.1% to 1.1%, and the CV for the seat forces varied from 0.6% to 2.2%. The current study opens up a field for new investigations of the forces generated in the kayak and ways to optimize kayak-paddling performance.

  3. 78 FR 2694 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Cancellation of the January 18, 2013, ACRS Subcommittee Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee meeting on...

  4. Evidence of Validity for the Japanese Version of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hidetomo; Sasaki, Shogo; Nagano, Yasuharu; Shinozuka, Nobuyuki; Sunagawa, Norihiko; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) is a valid, reliable, and self-reported outcome instrument for the foot and ankle region. Objective: To provide evidence for translation, cross-cultural adaptation, validity, and reliability of the Japanese version of the FAAM (FAAM-J). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Collegiate athletic training/sports medicine clinical setting. Patients or Other Participants: Eighty-three collegiate athletes. Main Outcome Measure(s): All participants completed the Activities of Daily Living and Sports subscales of the FAAM-J and the Physical Functioning and Mental Health subscales of the Japanese version of the Short Form-36v2 (SF-36). Also, 19 participants (23%) whose conditions were expected to be stable completed another FAAM-J 2 to 6 days later for test-retest reliability. We analyzed the scores of those subscales for convergent and divergent validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. Results: The Activities of Daily Living and Sports subscales of the FAAM-J had correlation coefficients of 0.86 and 0.75, respectively, with the Physical Functioning section of the SF-36 for convergent validity. For divergent validity, the correlation coefficients with Mental Health of the SF-36 were 0.29 and 0.27 for each subscale, respectively. Cronbach α for internal consistency was 0.99 for the Activities of Daily Living and 0.98 for the Sports subscale. A 95% confidence interval with a single measure was ±8.1 and ±14.0 points for each subscale. The test-retest reliability measures revealed intraclass correlation coefficient values of 0.87 for the Activities of Daily Living and 0.91 for the Sports subscales with minimal detectable changes of ±6.8 and ±13.7 for the respective subscales. Conclusions: The FAAM was successfully translated for a Japanese version, and the FAAM-J was adapted cross-culturally. Thus, the FAAM-J can be used as a self-reported outcome measure for Japanese-speaking individuals; however

  5. The use of 3D surface scanning for the measurement and assessment of the human foot

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of surface scanning systems with the ability to quickly and easily obtain 3D digital representations of the foot are now commercially available. This review aims to present a summary of the reported use of these technologies in footwear development, the design of customised orthotics, and investigations for other ergonomic purposes related to the foot. Methods The PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were searched. Reference lists and experts in the field were also consulted to identify additional articles. Studies in English which had 3D surface scanning of the foot as an integral element of their protocol were included in the review. Results Thirty-eight articles meeting the search criteria were included. Advantages and disadvantages of using 3D surface scanning systems are highlighted. A meta-analysis of studies using scanners to investigate the changes in foot dimensions during varying levels of weight bearing was carried out. Conclusions Modern 3D surface scanning systems can obtain accurate and repeatable digital representations of the foot shape and have been successfully used in medical, ergonomic and footwear development applications. The increasing affordability of these systems presents opportunities for researchers investigating the foot and for manufacturers of foot related apparel and devices, particularly those interested in producing items that are customised to the individual. Suggestions are made for future areas of research and for the standardization of the protocols used to produce foot scans. PMID:20815914

  6. Prediction of human gait parameters from temporal measures of foot-ground contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Investigation of the influence of human physical activity on bone functional adaptation requires long-term histories of gait-related ground reaction force (GRF). Towards a simpler portable GRF measurement, we hypothesized that: 1) the reciprocal of foot-ground contact time (1/tc); or 2) the reciprocal of stride-period-normalized contact time (T/tc) predict peak vertical and horizontal GRF, loading rates, and horizontal speed during gait. GRF data were collected from 24 subjects while they walked and ran at a variety of speeds. Linear regression and ANCOVA determined the dependence of gait parameters on 1/tc and T/tc, and prediction SE. All parameters were significantly correlated to 1/tc and T/tc. The closest pooled relationship existed between peak running vertical GRF and T/tc (r2 = 0.896; SE = 3.6%) and improved with subject-specific regression (r2 = 0.970; SE = 2.2%). We conclude that temporal measures can predict force parameters of gait and may represent an alternative to direct GRF measurements for determining daily histories of habitual lower limb loading quantities necessary to quantify a bone remodeling stimulus.

  7. Measurements and modeling of deposited particle transport by foot traffic indoors.

    PubMed

    Sippola, Mark R; Sextro, Richard G; Thatcher, Tracy L

    2014-04-01

    Deposited particles are transported into and within buildings by adhering to and releasing from people's shoes. To better understand transport of deposited particulate contaminants and exposures to these materials, experimental data on tracking by foot traffic are needed. Laboratory experiments measured uptake and downlay mass transfer efficiencies of particles between shoes and floors in a step-simulation chamber. Equilibrium uptake transfer fractions, the net mass fraction transferred from floors to shoes after several steps, were also measured. Single-step uptake and downlay transfer efficiencies ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and equilibrium uptake transfer fractions were 0.10-0.40. Particle size, particle loading, shoe type, floor type, step pressure, and step sequence were all investigated. Experiments demonstrated that single-step downlay transfer efficiencies decrease with each successive step onto clean floors. A simple empirical model is proposed to estimate these transfers as a function of step number. Simulations using the transfer efficiency values measured here illustrate the spread of deposited particles by people walking in a hypothetical hallway. These simulations show that in locations where a few people walk over the same area each minute, tracking can spread deposited material over length scales comparable to building dimensions in just a few hours.

  8. Athlete's foot

    MedlinePlus

    Tinea pedis; Fungal infection - feet; Tinea of the foot; Infection - fungal - feet; Ringworm - foot ... Athlete's foot is the most common type of tinea infection. The fungus or yeast thrives in warm, ...

  9. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  10. Charcot Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  11. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  12. Effects of five hindfoot arthrodeses on foot and ankle motion: Measurements in cadaver specimens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Yanxi; Qiang, Minfei; Hao, Yini

    2016-01-01

    Single, double, and triple hindfoot arthrodeses are used to correct hindfoot deformities and relieve chronic pain. However, joint fusion may lead to dysfunction in adjacent articular surfaces. We compared range of motion in adjacent joints before and after arthrodesis to determine the effects of each procedure on joint motion. The theory of moment of couple, bending moment and balanced loading was applied to each of 16 fresh cadaver feet to induce dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, internal rotation, external rotation, inversion, and eversion. Range of motion was measured with a 3-axis coordinate measuring machine in a control foot and in feet after subtalar, talonavicular, calcaneocuboid, double, or triple arthrodesis. All arthrodeses restricted mainly internal-external rotation and inversion-eversion. The restriction in a double arthrodesis was more than that in a single arthrodesis, but that in a calcaneocuboid arthrodesis was relatively low. After triple arthrodeses, the restriction on dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements was substantial, and internal-external rotation and inversion-eversion were almost lost. Considering that different arthrodesis procedures cause complex, three-dimensional hindfoot motion reductions, we recommend talonavicular or calcaneocuboid arthrodesis for patients with well-preserved functions of plantarflexion/dorsiflexion before operation, subtalar or calcaneocuboid arthrodesis for patients with well-preserved abduction/adduction, and talonavicular arthrodesis for patients with well-preserved eversion/inversion. PMID:27752084

  13. Utilization Management and ACR Select.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The ACR, published as ACR Select, provides an industry standard for imaging and through its experience with Appropriateness Criteria, is positioned to respond quickly to changing market demands. It has added hundreds of clinically relevant indications to ensure that even common scenarios have coverage. ACR Select is inclusive of numerous other credible content sources and actively receives vetted criteria from other medical specialty societies. ACR Select is well established in the market and available for integration into multiple physician access points. It also has support for the provisions and requirements of PL113-93. Healthcare providers have adopted ACR Select within their physician access points to deliver higher quality imaging services and understand the impact that imaging has on the overall care cycle. This better positions these providers to participate in risk-based contracts based on the value that appropriate imaging delivers. With the passage of PAMA, Congress has set a powerful precedent that has created the opportunity for every healthcare payer to transform the way imaging utilization is managed. Physicians will be required to consult Appropriateness Criteria delivered through CDS when placing orders for HTDI exams for Medicaid patients, and this can easily extend across the entire payer mix. PAMA has passed into public law (PLI113-93) and represents an opportunity for healthcare providers to develop risk based payment models across all imaging services, regardless of the payer of the claim or care setting.

  14. Noise measurements from a large-scale lift fan transport in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Noise data measurements from a large scale lift fan transport model aircraft were made in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The model had two lift fans in deep inlets in the forward fuselage and two lift-cruise fans in pods on the aft fuselage. The noise data measurements are presented as listings and plots of sounds pressure level versus 1/3-octave center frequency.

  15. Validity of the timed 25-foot walk as an ambulatory performance outcome measure for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Benedict, Ralph; Phillips, Glenn; LaRocca, Nicholas; Hudson, Lynn D; Rudick, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Assessments Consortium (MSOAC) includes representatives from advocacy organizations, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), European Medicines Agency (EMA), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), academic institutions, and industry partners along with persons living with multiple sclerosis (MS). One of the MSOAC goals is acceptance and qualification by regulators of performance outcomes that are highly reliable and valid, practical, cost-effective, and meaningful in MS. This article addresses the history, application, and psychometric properties of one such MSOAC metric of ambulation or walking namely, the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW). The T25FW has strong reliability over both brief and long periods of time in MS across a large range of disability levels. The outcome of walking speed from the T25FW has obvious real-world relevance and has correlated strongly with other measures of walking and lower extremity function. The T25FW is responsive for capturing intervention effects in pharmacological and rehabilitation trials and has an established value for capturing clinically meaningful change in ambulation. Directions for future research involve validating clinically meaningful improvements on the T25FW as well as determining whether 20% change is clinically meaningful across the disability spectrum. Researchers might further consider synchronizing accelerometers and motion sensors with the T25FW for capturing walking speed in everyday life and the patient's real environment.

  16. Farmers' Intentions to Implement Foot and Mouth Disease Control Measures in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jemberu, Wudu T; Mourits, M C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore farmers' intentions to implement foot and mouth disease (FMD) control in Ethiopia, and to identify perceptions about the disease and its control measures that influence these intentions using the Health Belief Model (HBM) framework. Data were collected using questionnaires from 293 farmers in three different production systems. The influence of perceptions on the intentions to implement control measures were analyzed using binary logistic regression. The effect of socio-demographic and husbandry variables on perceptions that were found to significantly influence the intentions were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. Almost all farmers (99%) intended to implement FMD vaccination free of charge. The majority of farmers in the pastoral (94%) and market oriented (92%) systems also had the intention to implement vaccination with charge but only 42% of the crop-livestock mixed farmers had the intention to do so. Only 2% of pastoral and 18% of crop-livestock mixed farmers had the intention to implement herd isolation and animal movement restriction continuously. These proportions increased to 11% for pastoral and 50% for crop-livestock mixed farmers when the measure is applied only during an outbreak. The majority of farmers in the market oriented system (>80%) had the intention to implement herd isolation and animal movement restriction measure, both continuously and during an outbreak. Among the HBM perception constructs, perceived barrier was found to be the only significant predictor of the intention to implement vaccination. Perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit and perceived barrier were the significant predictors of the intention for herd isolation and animal movement restriction measure. In turn, the predicting perceived barrier on vaccination control varied significantly with the production system and the age of farmers. The significant HBM perception predictors on herd isolation and animal movement

  17. 77 FR 47680 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittees on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittees on Reliability and PRA and Fukushima; Revision to Notice of Meetings The (ACRS) Subcommittee on Fukushima...

  18. 77 FR 24745 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Thermal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena will hold...

  19. 76 FR 18585 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water...

  20. 78 FR 66968 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor...

  1. 76 FR 11524 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactors (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water...

  2. 78 FR 79019 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor...

  3. 77 FR 74698 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor...

  4. 78 FR 56756 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor...

  5. 76 FR 24540 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor...

  6. 75 FR 55365 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Joint Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Joint Subcommittee The ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulics Phenomena; Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); and Materials,...

  7. 76 FR 55717 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and PRA will hold a...

  8. 78 FR 34677 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Acrs Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the Acrs Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... pellet-cladding interaction during anticipated operational occurrences for Pressurized Water...

  9. 77 FR 76089 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  10. 78 FR 3474 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  11. 78 FR 29159 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels.... Cayetano Santos, Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING...

  12. 78 FR 79020 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  13. 75 FR 16874 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  14. 76 FR 61119 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  15. 75 FR 58447 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials...

  16. 78 FR 66967 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommitte on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommitte on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  17. 76 FR 27101 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  18. 76 FR 55717 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  19. 76 FR 55716 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  20. 77 FR 56240 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  1. 78 FR 17944 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  2. 76 FR 36160 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  3. 77 FR 68161 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  4. 76 FR 34779 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  5. 77 FR 38099 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  6. 75 FR 4881 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  7. Optical measurements of microvascular circulatory function in the foot for detection of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, G.; Chekh, V.; Burge, M.; Barriga, E. S.; Luan, S.; Heintz, P.; Edwards, A.; McGrew, E.; Soliz, P.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to quantify functional signals in the microvascular circulation of the plantar. Our device is based on thermal and spectral technologies that can be easily adopted in clinical and tele-screening settings. Eightytwo thousand amputations are performed annually on diabetics in the US. The cost of foot disorder diagnosis and management are estimated at $10.9 billion dollars annually. Our experiments on normal controls and diabetics assess the temperature recovery time characteristics due to cold provocation to the bottom of the foot (plantar). A difference in the nature of the recovery time between normal controls and diabetics was observed.

  8. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Ledoux, William R.; Shofer, Jane B.; Cowley, Matthew S.; Ahroni, Jessie H.; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Methods Diabetic subjects (n = 591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure–time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. Results During follow-up (2.4 years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194 kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Conclusions Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. PMID:24012295

  9. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of tinea, athlete's foot. The Basics on Tinea Infections Tinea (pronounced: TIH-nee-uh) is the medical name ... or scalp, including athlete's foot, jock itch , and ringworm (despite its name, ringworm is not a worm). ...

  10. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) is a fungal infection that usually begins ... closely related to other fungal infections such as ringworm and jock itch. It can be treated with ...

  11. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  12. Ambulatory measurement of three-dimensional foot displacement during treadmill walking using wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon

    2015-03-01

    Techniques that could be used to monitor human motion precisely are helpful in various applications such as rehabilitation, gait analysis, and athletic performance analysis. This paper focuses on the 3-D foot trajectory measurements based on a wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network. The system consists of an ultrasonic transmitter (mobile) and several receivers (anchors) with fixed known positions. In order not to restrict the movement of subjects, a radio frequency (RF) module is used for wireless data transmission. The RF module also provides the synchronization clock between mobile and anchors. The proposed system measures the time-of-arrival (TOA) of the ultrasonic signal from mobile to anchors. Together with the knowledge of the anchor's position, the absolute distance that the signal travels can be computed. Then, the range information defines a circle centered at this anchor with radius equal to the measured distance, and the mobile resides within the intersections of several such circles. Based on the TOA-based tracking technique, the 3-D foot trajectories are validated against a camera-based motion capture system for ten healthy subjects walking on a treadmill at slow, normal, and fast speeds. The experimental results have shown that the ultrasonic system has sufficient accuracy of net root-mean-square error ( 4.2 cm) for 3-D displacement, especially for foot clearance with accuracy and standard deviation ( 0.62 ±7.48 mm) compared to the camera-based motion capture system. The small form factor and lightweight feature of the proposed system make it easy to use. Such a system is also much lower in cost compared to the camera-based tracking system.

  13. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  14. Field measurements of the linear and nonlinear shear moduli of cemented alluvium using dynamically loaded surface footings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangsoo

    In this dissertation, a research effort aimed at development and implementation of a direct field test method to evaluate the linear and nonlinear shear modulus of soil is presented. The field method utilizes a surface footing that is dynamically loaded horizontally. The test procedure involves applying static and dynamic loads to the surface footing and measuring the soil response beneath the loaded area using embedded geophones. A wide range in dynamic loads under a constant static load permits measurements of linear and nonlinear shear wave propagation from which shear moduli and associated shearing strains are evaluated. Shear wave velocities in the linear and nonlinear strain ranges are calculated from time delays in waveforms monitored by geophone pairs. Shear moduli are then obtained using the shear wave velocities and the mass density of a soil. Shear strains are determined using particle displacements calculated from particle velocities measured at the geophones by assuming a linear variation between geophone pairs. The field test method was validated by conducting an initial field experiment at sandy site in Austin, Texas. Then, field experiments were performed on cemented alluvium, a complex, hard-to-sample material. Three separate locations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada were tested. The tests successfully measured: (1) the effect of confining pressure on shear and compression moduli in the linear strain range and (2) the effect of strain on shear moduli at various states of stress in the field. The field measurements were first compared with empirical relationships for uncemented gravel. This comparison showed that the alluvium was clearly cemented. The field measurements were then compared to other independent measurements including laboratory resonant column tests and field seismic tests using the spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves method. The results from the field tests were generally in good agreement with the other independent test results, indicating

  15. Comparison of acoustic data from a 102 mm conic nozzle as measured in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Mckie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), England, and the NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to compare acoustic measurements made in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The acoustic measurements were made in both facilities using the same 102 mm conical nozzle supplied by the RAE. The nozzle was tested by each organization using its respective jet test rig. The mounting hardware and nozzle exit conditions were matched as closely as possible. The data from each wind tunnel were independently analyzed by the respective organization. The results from these tests show good agreement. In both facilities, interference with acoustic measurement is evident at angles in the forward quadrant.

  16. Measuring New Born Foot Length to Identify Small Babies in Need of Extra Care: a Cross-Sectional Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Satarupa; Roy, Prithwish; Mitra, Souvik; Samanta, Moumita; Chatterjee, Sukanta

    2013-01-01

    Objective The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) continues to remain quite high, one important cause being preterm deliveries. The main obstacle in the pathway towards decreasing NMR is identification of babies in need of extra care. To analyze the utility of newborn foot length as a proxy measure for birth weight and gestational age. Methods A cross-sectional study done in a hospital of eastern India with 351 babies during 4 months. Right foot length of each recorded using a plastic, stiff ruler. Findings 48.1% babies were preterm, 51.8% low birth weight (LBW) and 33.3% very low birth weight (VLBW). Foot length less than 7.75 cm has 92.3% sensitivity and 86.3% specificity for identification of preterm neonates. For identification of LBW babies (<2500 gm) a foot length less than 7.85cm has 100% sensitivity and 95.3% specificity. Foot length less than 6.85 cm has 100% sensitivity and 94.9% specifity for identification of VLBW babies (<1500 gm). Conclusion Foot length may be used in the identification of LBW and preterm babies who are in need of extra care. PMID:24800008

  17. Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain begin after intense physical activity?YesNoDid your foot pain or swelling begin with an injury or accident?YesNoIs there swelling or redness on top of your foot?YesNoAre you unable to stand or walk on ...

  18. Comparison of Urine Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio (ACR) Between ACR Strip Test and Quantitative Test in Prediabetes and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seon; Kim, Suyoung; Cho, Han-Ik

    2017-01-01

    Background Albuminuria is generally known as a sensitive marker of renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. It can be used to help predict the occurrence of nephropathy and cardiovascular disorders in diabetes. Individuals with prediabetes have a tendency to develop macrovascular and microvascular pathology, resulting in an increased risk of retinopathy, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic renal diseases. We evaluated the clinical value of a strip test for measuring the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) in prediabetes and diabetes. Methods Spot urine samples were obtained from 226 prediabetic and 275 diabetic subjects during regular health checkups. Urinary ACR was measured by using strip and laboratory quantitative tests. Results The positive rates of albuminuria measured by using the ACR strip test were 15.5% (microalbuminuria, 14.6%; macroalbuminuria, 0.9%) and 30.5% (microalbuminuria, 25.1%; macroalbuminuria, 5.5%) in prediabetes and diabetes, respectively. In the prediabetic population, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of the ACR strip method were 92.0%, 94.0%, 65.7%, 99.0%, and 93.8%, respectively; the corresponding values in the diabetic population were 80.0%, 91.6%, 81.0%, 91.1%, and 88.0%, respectively. The median [interquartile range] ACR values in the strip tests for measurement ranges of <30, 30-300, and >300 mg/g were 9.4 [6.3-15.4], 46.9 [26.5-87.7], and 368.8 [296.2-575.2] mg/g, respectively, using the laboratory method. Conclusions The ACR strip test showed high sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value, suggesting that the test can be used to screen for albuminuria in cases of prediabetes and diabetes. PMID:27834062

  19. Optimising measurement of health-related characteristics of the built environment: Comparing data collected by foot-based street audits, virtual street audits and routine secondary data sources.

    PubMed

    Pliakas, Triantafyllos; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Silverwood, Richard J; Nanchahal, Kiran; Grundy, Chris; Armstrong, Ben; Casas, Juan Pablo; Morris, Richard W; Wilkinson, Paul; Lock, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The role of the neighbourhood environment in influencing health behaviours continues to be an important topic in public health research and policy. Foot-based street audits, virtual street audits and secondary data sources are widespread data collection methods used to objectively measure the built environment in environment-health association studies. We compared these three methods using data collected in a nationally representative epidemiological study in 17 British towns to inform future development of research tools. There was good agreement between foot-based and virtual audit tools. Foot based audits were superior for fine detail features. Secondary data sources measured very different aspects of the local environment that could be used to derive a range of environmental measures if validated properly. Future built environment research should design studies a priori using multiple approaches and varied data sources in order to best capture features that operate on different health behaviours at varying spatial scales.

  20. 77 FR 45700 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will... addressing the Fukushima Near Term Task Force (NTTF) Recommendation 1: Enhanced Regulatory Framework....

  1. 77 FR 64147 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on October 31, 2012, Room...

  2. 77 FR 68161 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on December 5, 2012, Room T-2B3... requested in the March 2012 10 CFR 50.54(f) letters to address Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Report, Task...

  3. 77 FR 74697 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on January 18, 2013, Room...

  4. 77 FR 68161 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on December 4, 2012, Room...

  5. 78 FR 27442 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 23, Room T-2B1,...

  6. 77 FR 59676 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on October 3, 2012, Room...

  7. 77 FR 28637 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 22- 23, 2012, Room...

  8. 78 FR 17945 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on April 10, 2013, Room T-2B1... requested in the March 2012 10 CFR 50.54(f) letters to address Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Report Task...

  9. 77 FR 45699 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 148 (Wednesday, August 1, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 45699] [FR Doc No: 2012-18757] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

  10. 76 FR 27103 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 26, 2011, Room T-2B1... Subcommittee will review recent events at the Fukushima site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear...

  11. 78 FR 65008 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima...

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    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on November 5, 2013, Room...

  12. 78 FR 50457 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 4, 2013, Room...

  13. 78 FR 51752 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 18, 2013, Room...

  14. 77 FR 52371 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on September 5, 2012, Room...

  15. 77 FR 31676 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

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    2012-05-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on June 20, 2012, Room...

  16. 76 FR 44377 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on August 16, 2011, Room T-2B1... events at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactor site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by...

  17. 76 FR 34778 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on June 23, 2011, Room T-2B1... Subcommittee will review recent events at the Fukushima site in Japan. The Subcommittee will hear...

  18. 77 FR 28903 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Fukushima will hold a meeting on May 22, 2012, Room...

  19. 75 FR 30077 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ESBWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ESBWR The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on June...

  20. 75 FR 32229 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting on June 23-24, 2010, Room...

  1. 75 FR 57536 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting on October 20, 2010, Room...

  2. 75 FR 66803 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting...

  3. 76 FR 68793 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... No: 2011-28737] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on November 30,...

  4. 76 FR 34778 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... room. Dated: June 7, 2011 Cayetano Santos, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee...

  5. 78 FR 31987 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels..., Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  6. 78 FR 37595 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR.... Kathy Weaver, Acting Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards....

  7. 76 FR 27102 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on May 26, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike,...

  8. 76 FR 5218 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor... inconvenience. Dated: January 24, 2011. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee...

  9. 76 FR 34276 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR..., Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  10. 77 FR 59678 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  11. 76 FR 55718 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting... (RES) initiative on quantitatively ensuring ``extremely low (XLPR) probability of rupture'' for...

  12. 76 FR 62866 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) will hold a meeting on October 21, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville...

  13. 76 FR 72451 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...-72452] [FR Doc No: 2011-30238] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting on December 15,...

  14. 76 FR 16016 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy And Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor...: March 15, 2011. Cayetano Santos, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch A, Advisory Committee on...

  15. 75 FR 58449 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting... inconvenience. Dated: September 17, 2010. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee...

  16. 78 FR 20959 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting.... Antonio Dias, Technical Advisor, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  17. 75 FR 27841 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Doc No: 2010-11820] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on May 18, 2010, Room T-2B1, 11545...

  18. 78 FR 70597 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Doc No: 2013-28328] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on December 3, 2013, Room...

  19. 77 FR 31044 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-12611] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on June 5, 2012, Room...

  20. 75 FR 82093 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Doc No: 2010-32822] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on January 11, 2011, Room...

  1. 75 FR 82092 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Doc No: 2010-32810] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on January 12, 2011, Room...

  2. 75 FR 27840 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Doc No: 2010-11823] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on May 18, 2010, Room T-2B1, 11545...

  3. 76 FR 44964 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-18954] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on August 17, 2011, Room...

  4. Measurement of the passive stiffness of ankle joint in 3 DOF using stewart platform type ankle foot device.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenta; Yonezawa, Teru; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint in three degrees of freedom (DOF) under two motion speeds (1 Hz and 5 degree/s) using a developed Stewart platform-type device. The developed device can reproduce input motions of the foot in 6 DOF by controlling six pneumatic linear motion actuators. We used the device to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint undergoing three kinds of motion, namely dorsi-plantar flexion, inversion-eversion, and adduction-abduction. The measured values of the passive stiffness of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion that we obtained agreed well with that obtained in a previous study, indicating that the developed device is useful for measuring the passive stiffness of ankle joint. In addition, the developed device can be used to measure the stiffness in inversion-eversion and adduction-abduction motions as well, parameters that have never been measured. The results we obtained demonstrated certain interesting features as we varied both the direction and pace of motion (e.g., there were significant differences in the stiffness not only between adduction and abduction during the faster pace, but also between these and the other motions).

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Carucci, Laura R; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Gage, Kenneth L; Noto, Richard B; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Lalani, Tasneem

    2015-10-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by episodic flares and times of remission. Underlying structural damage occurs progressively, with recurrent bouts of inflammation. The diagnosis and management of this disease process is dependent on several clinical, laboratory, imaging, endoscopic, and histologic factors. In recent years, with the maturation of CT enterography, and MR enterography, imaging has played an increasingly important role in relation to Crohn Disease. In addition to these specialized examination modalities, ultrasound and routine CT have potential uses. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and nuclear medicine may be less beneficial depending on the clinical scenario. The imaging modality best suited to evaluating this disease may change, depending on the target population, severity of presentation, and specific clinical situation. This document presents seven clinical scenarios (variants) in both the adult and pediatric populations and rates the appropriateness of the available imaging options. They are summarized in a consolidated table, and the underlying rationale and supporting literature are presented in the accompanying narrative. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  6. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... be advised by a podiatrist, depending on your test results or a specific medical condition. Postoperative Care The type of foot surgery performed determines the length and kind of aftercare required ...

  7. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... The fungus most commonly attacks the feet because shoes create a warm, dark, and humid environment which ... sweat mechanism, reaction to dyes or adhesives in shoes, eczema, and psoriasis, may mimic athlete's foot. Causes ...

  8. Background noise levels measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    The acoustic capability of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel has been significantly improved by reducing the background noise levels measured by in-flow microphones. This was accomplished by incorporating streamlined microphone holders having a profile developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center. These new holders were fabricated for fixed mounting on the tunnel wall and for an axially traversing microphone probe which was mounted to the tunnel floor. Measured in-flow noise levels in the tunnel test section were reduced by about 10 dB with the new microphone holders compared with those measured with the older, less refined microphone holders. Wake interference patterns between fixed wall microphones were measured and resulted in preferred placement patterns for these microphones to minimize these effects. Acoustic data from a model turbofan operating in the tunnel test section showed that results for the fixed and translating microphones were equivalent for common azimuthal angles, suggesting that the translating microphone probe, with its significantly greater angular resolution, is preferred for sideline noise measurements. Fixed microphones can provide a local check on the traversing microphone data quality, and record acoustic performance at other azimuthal angles.

  9. Postural Control Characteristics during Single Leg Standing of Individuals with a History of Ankle Sprain: Measurements Obtained Using a Gravicorder and Head and Foot Accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yota; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to validate the postural control characteristics of individuals with a history of ankle sprain during single leg standing by using a gravicorder and head and foot accelerometry. [Subjects] Twenty subjects with and 23 subjects without a history of ankle sprain (sprain and control groups, respectively) participated. [Methods] The anteroposterior, mediolateral, and total path lengths, as well as root mean square (RMS) of each length, were calculated using the gravicorder. The anteroposterior, mediolateral, and resultant acceleration of the head and foot were measured using accelerometers and were evaluated as the ratio of the acceleration of the head to the foot. [Results] There was no significant difference between the two groups in path length or RMS acceleration of the head and foot. However, the ratios of the mediolateral and resultant components were significantly higher in the sprain group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that individuals with a history of ankle sprain have a higher head-to-foot acceleration ratio and different postural control characteristics than those of control subjects.

  10. Analysis of the human female foot in two different measurement systems: from geometric morphometrics to functional morphology.

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L; Domjanić, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    The relationship of geometric morphometrics (GMM) to functional analysis of the same morphological resources is currently a topic of active interest among functional morphologists. Although GMM is typically advertised as free of prior assumptions about shape features or morphological theories, it is common for GMM findings to be concordant with findings from studies based on a-priori lists of shape features whenever prior insights or theories have been properly accounted for in the study design. The present paper demonstrates this happy possibility by revisiting a previously published GMM analysis of footprint outlines for which there is also functionally relevant information in the form of a-pri-ori foot measurements. We show how to convert the conventional measurements into the language of shape, thereby affording two parallel statistical analyses. One is the classic multivariate analysis of "shape features", the other the equally classic GMM of semilandmark coordinates. In this example, the two data sets, analyzed by protocols that are remarkably different in both their geometry and their algebra, nevertheless result in one common biometrical summary: wearing high heels is bad for women inasmuch as it leads to the need for orthotic devices to treat the consequently flattened arch. This concordance bears implications for other branches of applied anthropology. To carry out a good biomedical analysis of applied anthropometric data it may not matter whether one uses GMM or instead an adequate assortment of conventional measurements. What matters is whether the conventional measurements have been selected in order to match the natural spectrum of functional variation.

  11. Model-based correction of the influence of body position on continuous segmental and hand-to-foot bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Eitner, Frank; Walter, Marian; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2010-06-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is suitable for continuous monitoring of body water content. The combination of body posture and time is a well-known source of error, which limits the accuracy and therapeutic validity of BIS measurements. This study evaluates a model-based correction as a possible solution. For this purpose, an 11-cylinder model representing body impedance distribution is used. Each cylinder contains a nonlinear two-pool model to describe fluid redistribution due to changing body position and its influence on segmental and hand-to-foot (HF) bioimpedance measurements. A model-based correction of segmental (thigh) and HF measurements (Xitron Hydra 4200) in nine healthy human subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, 40 min supine) has been evaluated. The model-based compensation algorithm represents a compromise between accuracy and simplicity, and reduces the influence of changes in body position on the measured extracellular resistance and extracellular fluid by up to 75 and 70%, respectively.

  12. A compilation of the pressures measured on a wing and aileron with various amounts of sweep in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, Richard T

    1948-01-01

    A compilation is made in tabular form of all the pressures measured on a thin high-aspect-ratio wing and aileron with no sweep and with 30 degree and 45 degree of sweepback and sweepforward at high subsonic Mach numbers in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel.

  13. ACR testing of a dedicated head SPECT unit.

    PubMed

    Sensakovic, William F; Hough, Matthew C; Kimbley, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-08

    Physics testing necessary for program accreditation is rigorously defined by the ACR. This testing is easily applied to most conventional SPECT systems based on gamma camera technology. The inSPira HD is a dedicated head SPECT system based on a rotating dual clamshell design that acquires data in a dual-spiral geometry. The unique geometry and configuration force alterations of the standard ACR physics testing protocol. Various tests, such as intrinsic planar uniformity and/or resolution, do not apply. The Data Spectrum Deluxe Phantom used for conventional SPECT testing cannot fit in the inSPira HD scanner bore, making (currently) unapproved use of the Small Deluxe SPECT Phantom necessary. Matrix size, collimator type, scanning time, reconstruction method, and attenuation correction were all varied from the typically prescribed ACR instructions. Visible spheres, sphere contrast, visible rod groups, uniformity, and root mean square (RMS) noise were measured. The acquired SPECT images surpassed the minimum ACR requirements for both spatial resolution (9.5 mm spheres resolved) and contrast (6.4 mm rod groups resolved). Sphere contrast was generally high. Integral uniformity was 4% and RMS noise was 1.7%. Noise appeared more correlated than in images from a conventional SPECT scanner. Attenuation-corrected images produced from direct CT scanning of the phantom and a manufacturer supplied model of the phantom demonstrated negligible differences.

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  15. 7 CFR 760.632 - Payment acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP. (h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered...

  16. 7 CFR 760.632 - Payment acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP. (h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered...

  17. 7 CFR 760.632 - Payment acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP. (h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered...

  18. 7 CFR 760.632 - Payment acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP. (h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered...

  19. 7 CFR 760.632 - Payment acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... acreage of a crop produced on land that is not eligible for crop insurance or NAP. (h) For any crop acreage for which crop insurance or NAP coverage is canceled, those acres will no longer be considered...

  20. The Automated Conflict Resolution System (ACRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Ted; Musliner, Andrew; Wampler, David

    1993-01-01

    The Automated Conflict Resolution System (ACRS) is a mission-current scheduling aid that predicts periods of mutual interference when two or more orbiting spacecraft are scheduled to communicate with the same Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) at the same time. The mutual interference predicted has the potential to degrade or prevent communications. Thus the ACRS system is a useful tool for aiding in the scheduling of Space Network (SN) communications.

  1. Cavus Foot (High-Arched Foot)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  2. 78 FR 79019 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ..., Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels... materials and metallurgy. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and hold discussions with the...

  3. Foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Lockard, M A

    1988-12-01

    This review article describes shoe inserts and provides information to assist physical therapists to identify patients who may benefit from foot orthoses. The article discusses goals for and types of shoe inserts, in addition to the materials and methods that can be used in fabricating appliances. Clinical considerations for the use of shoe inserts and application to specific patient populations are presented.

  4. Diabetic Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel a cut, a blister or a sore. Foot injuries such as these can cause ulcers and infections. Serious cases may even lead to amputation. Damage to the blood vessels can also mean that your feet do not get enough blood and oxygen. It ...

  5. Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the best ways to exercise and keep fit. Structure of the Foot Each of your feet contains 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 120 muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. These all work together to support the weight of your body, act as shock ...

  6. Importation of beef from countries infected with foot and mouth disease: a review of risk mitigation measures.

    PubMed

    Sutmoller, P

    2001-12-01

    Risk mitigation measures to reduce the risks associated with importing beef from countries affected by foot and mouth disease (FMD) consist of controls at the farm of origin, inspection of slaughterhouses and maturation and deboning of carcasses. This assessment evaluates the effect of these measures on the mitigation of the risks presented by meat from cattle with FMD, for each of the different stages of the disease. The four disease stages considered are the incubation period, the period of clinical signs, convalescence and the carrier stage. Efficient animal health systems, disease surveillance, and ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of all cattle effectively reduce the risk of FMD transmission from cattle slaughtered during the period of clinical signs or convalescence. These measures fail if the cattle are slaughtered during the incubation period, because of the absence of clinical signs. Cattle in this stage of the infection are likely to be viraemic, with FMD virus present in the skeletal muscles. Maturation of the carcasses of viraemic cattle reduces the risk of virus presence in the beef. In addition, deboning and removal of the principal lymph nodes and large blood vessels eliminate a source of FMD contamination of the beef. However, the slaughter of viraemic cattle creates an additional hazard of gross environmental viral contamination of the slaughterhouse facilities. Therefore, the maturation process may create a false sense of security, and the emphasis should instead be placed on disease surveillance within the infected zone and on the farms of origin, to prevent the slaughter of herds that are incubating FMD. Cattle slaughtered during the carrier stage do not pose a risk for the international beef trade.

  7. Measurements in 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel of hazard posed by lift-generated wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Sacco, J. N.; Askins, P. A.; Bisbee, L. S.; Smith, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    The large, low speed wind tunnel at NASA-Ames has been used to study the characteristics of lift-generated vortices involved in the definition of aircraft-separation criteria, in order to enhance airport capacity without compromising safety. Attention is given to the potential hazard caused by the vortex wake of several configurations of a subsonic transport. Measured downwash distributions in the wake of three different wake-generator configurations are obtained by means of a vortex-lattice method, in order to predict the lift and rolling moment on several models of wake-following aircraft.

  8. Calf muscle activity alteration with foot orthoses insertion during walking measured by fine-wire electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Imai, Atsushi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Naoto; Kaneoka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to assess the muscle activity change of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and peroneus longus during gait with orthoses. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Activity of each muscle was measured by using fine-wire and surface electromyography. Gait task was performed by the participants barefoot, with footwear and with orthoses. The electromyography data from a stance phase of each gait trial were used for analysis. The stance phase was divided into contact, midstance, and propulsion phases. The data from ten participants were extracted for final analysis, as electromyography measurements were unsuccessful for the other six. [Results] The results demonstrated that orthoses significantly reduced the tibialis posterior muscle activity in the propulsion phase compared to that in the barefoot condition. Although there was a significant difference in the midstance phase, post hoc analysis did not indicate significant differences among the phases. No significant electromyography amplitude change was detected in flexor digitorum longus and peroneus longus. [Conclusion] Orthothes reduced the tibialis posterior activity level during gait. This result may be beneficial for patients with injuries related to excessive activity of tibialis posterior. PMID:28174473

  9. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  10. 77 FR 45699 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Economic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 148 (Wednesday, August 1, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 45699-45700] [FR Doc No: 2012-18759] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (ESBWR); Notice of...

  11. A flexible micromachined optical sensor for simultaneous measurement of pressure and shear force distribution on foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Panergo, Reynold R.; Galvanin, Christopher M.; Ledoux, William; Sangeorzan, Bruce; Reinhall, Per G.

    2003-07-01

    Lower limb complications associated with diabetes include the development of plantar ulcers that can lead to infection and subsequent amputation. While it is known from force plate analyses that there are medial/lateral and anterior/posterior shear components of the ground reaction force, there is little known about the actual distribution of this force during daily activities, nor about the role that shear plays in causing plantar ulceration. Furthermore, one critical reason why these data have not been obtained previously is the lack of a validated, widely used, commercially available shear sensor, in part because of the various technical issues associated with shear measurement. Here we have developed novel means of tranducing plantar shear and pressure stress via a new microfabricated optical system. The pressure/shear sensor consists of an array of optical waveguides lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of pressure and shear stress is constructed based on observed macro bending through the intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular optical waveguides. The uniqueness of the sensor is in its batch fabrication process, which involves injection molding and embossing techniques with Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the optical medium. Here we present the preliminary results of the prototype. The sensor has been shown to have low noise and responds linearly to applied loads. The smallest detectable force on each sensor element based on the current setup is ~0.1 N. The smallest area we have resolved in our mesh sensor is currently 950x950μm2

  12. Foot Pain and Pronated Foot Type are Associated with Self-Reported Mobility Limitations in Older Adults: the Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Katz, Patricia; Hannan, Marian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The foot plays an important role in supporting the body when undertaking weight bearing activities. Aging is associated with an increased prevalence of foot pain and a lowering of the arch of the foot, both of which may impair mobility. Objective To examine the associations of foot pain, foot posture and dynamic foot function with self-reported mobility limitations in community-dwelling older adults. Methods Foot examinations were conducted on 1,860 members of the Framingham Study in 2002–2005. Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static pressure measurements, and foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using dynamic pressure measurements. Participants were asked whether they had foot pain and any difficulty performing a list of nine weight bearing tasks. Multivariate logistic regression and linear regression models were used to examine the associations of foot pain, posture, function and ability to perform these activities. Results After adjusting for age, sex, height and weight, foot pain was significantly associated with difficulty performing all nine weight bearing activities. Compared to those with normal foot posture and function, participants with planus foot posture were more likely to report difficulty remaining balanced (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 1.85; p=0.018) and individuals with pronated foot function were more likely to report difficulty walking across a small room (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 4.22; p=0.045). Foot pain and planus foot posture were associated with an overall mobility limitation score combining performances on each measure. Conclusion Foot pain, planus foot posture and pronated foot function are associated with self-reported difficulty undertaking common weight bearing tasks. Interventions to reduce foot pain and improve foot posture and function may therefore have a role in improving mobility in older adults. PMID:26645379

  13. The Expanding Significance of One Acre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Daniel R., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A management class assignment requires students to study the history and complexity of one acre of land. The intent is to develop connections between the natural environment and human acts of management, focusing on the concept of privilege. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  14. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    PubMed

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI <25). Obese participants were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals.

  15. 75 FR 57536 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Thermal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Hydraulic Phenomena The ACRS Subcommittee on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena will hold a meeting on October 18... 5 p.m. The Subcommittee will review the thermal-hydraulic research activities in the Office...

  16. 76 FR 11525 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland. The entire...

  17. 76 FR 22934 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... and Probabilistic Risk Assessment; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) will hold a meeting on May 11, 2011, Room T-2B3, 11545 Rockville...

  18. 76 FR 18586 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) will hold a meeting on April 20, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville...

  19. 76 FR 71609 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... and Probabilistic Risk Assessment; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) will hold a meeting on December 14, 2011, Room T-2B3, 11545 Rockville...

  20. 76 FR 32240 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... Instrumentation and Control Systems; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems (DI&C) will hold a meeting on June 7, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike,...

  1. Accuracy and precision of hind limb foot contact timings of horses determined using a pelvis-mounted inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Starke, Sandra D; Witte, Thomas H; May, Stephen A; Pfau, Thilo

    2012-05-11

    Gait analysis using small sensor units is becoming increasingly popular in the clinical context. In order to segment continuous movement from a defined point of the stride cycle, knowledge about footfall timings is essential. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of foot contact timings of a defined limb determined using an inertial sensor mounted on the pelvis of ten horses during walk and trot at different speeds and in different directions. Foot contact was estimated from vertical velocity events occurring before maximum sensor roll towards the contralateral limb. Foot contact timings matched data from a synchronised hoof mounted accelerometer well when velocity minimum was used for walk (mean (SD) difference of 15 (18)ms across horses) and velocity zero-crossing for trot (mean (SD) difference from -4 (14) to 12 (7)ms depending on the condition). The stride segmentation method also remained robust when applied to movement data of hind limb lame horses. In future, this method may find application in segmenting overground sensor data of various species.

  2. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  3. A preliminary study of the measurement of overload applied to the foot support of a wheelchair and a seated postural support device

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Satoshi; Handa, Takashi; Kozai, Yoshihiko; Maeda, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The mechanical strength of wheelchair and seating products is specified by standards to ensure user safety. However, some individual users are affected by severe spasticity resulting from cerebral palsy that occasionally breaks such devices. Until recently, reports of quantitative measurement of these mechanical overloads have been scarce, and the exact loads applied have been unknown. This study aimed to conduct a sampling survey prior to conducting a future full-scale study. [Subjects and Methods] Using two force plates, we measured the load on the foot support applied by three participants with cerebral palsy. The applied load was measured at a 100 Hz sampling rate, and maximum load and vertical/horizontal component forces were analyzed. [Results] The maximum load applied by participants was approximately 1.34 times their body weight. The vertical force applied on the foot support accounted for 70–80% of the total load. The horizontal force also reached about 35% at its maximum. [Conclusion] Because the horizontal load also reached 1/3 of the total load, it will be advantageous to use a three-axis force plate to measure forces in a future study with more participants. PMID:28210028

  4. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data.

    PubMed

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2015-12-23

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject's foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15 % under the various walking conditions.

  5. Operating Characteristics of the Multiple Critical Venturi System and Secondary Calibration Nozzles Used for Weight-Flow Measurements in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Leavitt, L. D.; Bangert, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the weight flow measurement characteristics of a multiple critical Venturi system and the nozzle discharge coefficient characteristics of a series of convergent calibration nozzles. The effects on model discharge coefficient of nozzle throat area, model choke plate open area, nozzle pressure ratio, jet total temperature, and number and combination of operating Venturis were investigated. Tests were conducted at static conditions (tunnel wind off) at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.3 to 7.0.

  6. 7 CFR 1412.44 - Notification of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notification of base acres. 1412.44 Section 1412.44... through 2012 § 1412.44 Notification of base acres. The operator and owners of record of a farm will be notified in writing of the number of base acres eligible for enrollment in a contract, unless such...

  7. 7 CFR 1412.44 - Notification of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notification of base acres. 1412.44 Section 1412.44... through 2012 § 1412.44 Notification of base acres. The operator and owners of record of a farm will be notified in writing of the number of base acres eligible for enrollment in a contract, unless such...

  8. 7 CFR 1412.21 - Election of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Election of base acres. 1412.21 Section 1412.21... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.21 Election of base acres. (a) Subject to adjustments in...

  9. 7 CFR 1412.44 - Notification of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notification of base acres. 1412.44 Section 1412.44... Through 2012 § 1412.44 Notification of base acres. The operator and owners of record of a farm will be notified in writing of the number of base acres eligible for enrollment in a contract, unless such...

  10. 7 CFR 1412.21 - Election of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election of base acres. 1412.21 Section 1412.21... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.21 Election of base acres. (a) Subject to adjustments in...

  11. 7 CFR 1412.21 - Election of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Election of base acres. 1412.21 Section 1412.21... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.21 Election of base acres. (a) Subject to adjustments in...

  12. 7 CFR 1412.44 - Notification of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notification of base acres. 1412.44 Section 1412.44... through 2012 § 1412.44 Notification of base acres. The operator and owners of record of a farm will be notified in writing of the number of base acres eligible for enrollment in a contract, unless such...

  13. 7 CFR 1412.44 - Notification of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Notification of base acres. 1412.44 Section 1412.44... Through 2012 § 1412.44 Notification of base acres. The operator and owners of record of a farm will be notified in writing of the number of base acres eligible for enrollment in a contract, unless such...

  14. 7 CFR 1412.21 - Election of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Election of base acres. 1412.21 Section 1412.21... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.21 Election of base acres. (a) Subject to adjustments in...

  15. 7 CFR 1412.21 - Election of base acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Election of base acres. 1412.21 Section 1412.21... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.21 Election of base acres. (a) Subject to adjustments in...

  16. The influence of NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Bugajski, Marcin; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Czernicki, Jan

    In stroke patients, the NDT - (Bobath - Neurodevelopmental Treatment) and PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation) methods are used to achieve the main objective of rehabilitation, which aims at the restoration of maximum patient independence in the shortest possible period of time (especially the balance of the body). The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of the NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke. The study included 72 patients aged from 20 to 69 years after ischemic stroke with Hemiparesis. The patients were divided into 4 groups by a simple randomization. The criteria for this division were: the body side (right or left) affected by paresis and the applied rehabilitation methods. All the patients were applied the recommended kinesitherapeutic method (randomized), 35 therapy sessions, every day for a period of six weeks. Before initiation of therapy and after 6 weeks was measured the total area of the support and path length (COP (Center Of Pressure) measure foot pressure) using stabilometer platform - alpha. The results were statistically analyzed. After treatment studied traits decreased in all groups. The greatest improvement was obtained in groups with NDT-Bobath therapy. NDT-Bobath method for improving the balance of the body is a more effective method of treatment in comparison with of the PNF method. In stroke patients, the effectiveness of NDT-Bobath method does not depend on hand paresis.

  17. 75 FR 51501 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures The ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures will hold a meeting on September 8, 2010, at... conduct of the meeting, persons planning to attend should check with these references if such...

  18. 75 FR 67783 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures The ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures will hold a meeting on December 1, 2010, in Room... conduct of the meeting, persons planning to attend should check with these references if such...

  19. 77 FR 4838 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (U.S. EPR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (U.S. EPR) will hold a meeting on...

  20. 77 FR 74696 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on AP-1000...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on AP-1000; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on AP-1000 will hold a meeting on January 18, 2013, Room...

  1. 76 FR 44964 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... No: 2011-18952] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (U.S. EPR) will hold a meeting on August 18, 2011, Room...

  2. 77 FR 61791 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on October 18- 19, 2012, Room T... review Chapter 4, ``Reactor,'' of the Safety Evaluation Reports associated with the US-APWR...

  3. 77 FR 73497 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on January 15, 2013, Room T-2B3... Reports are associated with the design certification of the US-APWR. The Subcommittee will...

  4. 77 FR 56240 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on September 20, 2012, Room...

  5. 78 FR 47802 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on September 17-18, 2013, Room T... Chapter 6, ``Engineered Safety Features,'' of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) associated with the...

  6. 78 FR 59076 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on October 1, 2013, Room T-2B1... the US-APWR design. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and hold discussions...

  7. 78 FR 20959 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on April 25- 26, 2013, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville..., ``Instrumentation and Control,'' of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) associated with the US-APWR...

  8. 78 FR 68867 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on November 20-21, 2013, Room T... the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) associated with the US-APWR design certification and the...

  9. 78 FR 17945 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on April 9... based licensing framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The Subcommittee will...

  10. 75 FR 58448 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on October 21, 2010, at 11545... Subcommittee will review current Design Acceptance Criteria associated with Digital Instrumentation and...

  11. 76 FR 5220 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on February 9, 2011, at...

  12. 76 FR 64123 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on November...

  13. 77 FR 74698 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on January 17... Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) fuel and source term research and development of risk-informed...

  14. 76 FR 16016 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs The ACRS Subcommittee on Future Plant Designs will hold a meeting on April 5, 2011, at...

  15. 78 FR 50457 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C will hold a briefing on September 19, 2013, Room T... identification of digital system failure modes and use of hazard analysis methods for digital safety systems....

  16. 75 FR 30077 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee On Digital I&C Systems The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Control (DI&C) Systems will hold a meeting on... Digital Instrumentation and Control (DI&C) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). Topics will include...

  17. 77 FR 67688 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C will hold a meeting on November 16, 2012, Room...

  18. 76 FR 7882 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C Systems The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation & Control (DI&C) Systems will hold a meeting...

  19. 75 FR 51499 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital I&C Systems The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Systems will hold a meeting on...--8:30 a.m. until 12 p.m. The Subcommittee will review Digital I&C Interim Staff Guidance on...

  20. Flow direction measurement criteria and techniques planned for the 40- by 80-/80- x 120-foot wind tunnel integrated systems tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, P. T.; Hoffmann, J.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was performed in order to develop the criteria for the selection of flow direction indicators for use in the Integrated Systems Tests (ISTs) of the 40 by 80/80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel System. The problems, requirements, and limitations of flow direction measurement in the wind tunnel were investigated. The locations and types of flow direction measurements planned in the facility were discussed. A review of current methods of flow direction measurement was made and the most suitable technique for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane that employs a Hall Effect Transducer was then developed and evaluated for application during the ISTs.

  1. A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

    1997-01-01

    Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

  2. Constructability -- from Qinshan to the ACR

    SciTech Connect

    Elgohary, Medhat; Fairclough, Neville; Ricciuti, Rick

    2003-09-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has recognized the importance of constructability for many years, and it is applying its principals to CANDU projects with increasing success. The CANDU 6 Nuclear Power Plant has been constructed eleven times in the last 25 years. However, the last two units completed on the Qinshan project in China have employed some very innovative construction methods that have not been used on the previous units. In order to make nuclear power generation more competitive, shorter construction schedules and reduced project cost and risks are essential objectives. The application of constructability principles is a major contributor to achieving these objectives. The success of Qinshan has increased the confidence in the new construction methods, which are being implemented on the ACR (Advanced CANDU Reactor) successfully. An ACR construction strategy that utilizes advanced construction techniques has been developed by AECL. The strategy includes paralleling of activities by using extensive modularization and the vertical installation of equipment and modules into the reactor building using a VHL (Very Heavy Lift) crane. This strategy allows short schedules to be met with a minimum risk to the project.

  3. 76 FR 34276 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... with Inventory and Certification of digital systems, operating experience for digital systems, and... Instrumentation and Control Systems; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems (DI&C) will hold a meeting on June 22, 2011, Room T-2B3, 11545 Rockville Pike,...

  4. 76 FR 55717 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... and Probabilistic Risk Assessment The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) will hold a meeting on September 20, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville... Modifying the Risk-Informed Regulatory Guidance for New Reactors. The Subcommittee will hear...

  5. 77 FR 60480 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Instrumentation and Control Systems; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems (DI&C) will hold a meeting on October 30, 2012, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike... and discuss the Design Specific Review Standard (DSRS) for Instrumentation and Control of the...

  6. 76 FR 52715 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Instrumentation and Control Systems; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems (DI&C) will hold a meeting on September 7, 2011, Room T-2B1, 11545 Rockville Pike... Diversity on Defense-In-Depth in Digital Computer-Based I&C Systems,'' and other related activities...

  7. 75 FR 61781 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... and PRA The ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) will hold a... statement on Safety Culture. The Subcommittee will hear presentations by and hold discussions with...: September 30, 2010. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  8. The Relationship with Balance, Foot Posture, and Foot Size in School of Physical Education and Sports Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of foot posture and foot size with balance. A hundred and thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited from undergraduate students (Male = 74, Female = 37, age range 18-22). The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6), anthropometric measurements, dynamic balance and static balance measurements were done…

  9. MO-AB-207-04: ACR Update in Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, E.

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  10. MO-AB-207-01: ACR Update in CT

    SciTech Connect

    McNitt-Gray, M.

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  11. MO-AB-207-02: ACR Update in MR

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  12. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... work and the pounding their feet endure from... Foot Injuries in Olympic Athletes and Beyond Foot and ankle ... making them... Athletes Living with Diabetes Face More Foot Injuries Than Athletes Without Foot and ankle injuries are ...

  13. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  14. Prevention of foot blisters.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Foot blisters are the most common medical problem faced by Soldiers during foot march operations and, if untreated, they can lead to infection. Foot blisters are caused by boots rubbing on the foot (frictional forces), which separates skin layers and allows fluid to seep in. Blisters can be prevented by wearing properly sized boots, conditioning feet through regular road marching, wearing socks that reduce reduce friction and moisture, and possibly applying antiperspirants to the feet.

  15. Wind tunnel measurements on a full-scale F/A-18 with a tangentially blowing slot. [conducted in the Ames 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    A full-scale F/A-18 was tested in the 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center to measure the effectiveness of a tangentially blowing slot in generating significant yawing moments while minimizing coupling in the pitch and roll axes. Various slot configurations were tested to determine the optimum configuration. The test was conducted for angles of attack from 25 to 50 deg, angles of sideslip from -15 to +15 deg, and freestream velocities from 67 ft/sec to 168 ft/sec. By altering the forebody vortex flow, yaw control was maintained for angles of attack up to 50 deg. Of particular interest was the result that blowing very close to the radome apex was not as effective as blowing slightly farther aft on the radome, that a 16-inch slot was more efficient, and that yawing moments were generated without inducing significant rolling or pitching moments.

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Yee, Judy; Kim, David H; Rosen, Max P; Lalani, Tasneem; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Katz, Douglas S; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Most colorectal cancers can be prevented by detecting and removing the precursor adenomatous polyp. Individual risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer will influence the particular choice of screening tool. CT colonography (CTC) is the primary imaging test for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk individuals, whereas the double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) is now considered to be a test that may be appropriate, particularly in settings where CTC is unavailable. Single-contrast barium enema has a lower performance profile and is indicated for screening only when CTC and DCBE are not available. CTC is also the preferred test for colon evaluation following an incomplete colonoscopy. Imaging tests including CTC and DCBE are not indicated for colorectal cancer screening in high-risk patients with polyposis syndromes or inflammatory bowel disease. This paper presents the updated colorectal cancer imaging test ratings and is the result of evidence-based consensus by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  17. Cavus Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Smaller Toes How To... Foot Health Foot Injury Footwear News Videos Find a Surgeon Información en ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The ... reduce other injuries such as repeated ankle sprains and broken bones. ...

  18. Foot sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... or weeks after your injury: Rest. Stop any physical activity that causes pain, and keep your foot still when possible. Ice your foot for 20 minutes 2 to 3 times a day. DO NOT apply ice directly to your skin. Keep your foot raised to help keep swelling ...

  19. Is the foot elevation the optimal position for wound healing of a diabetic foot?

    PubMed

    Park, D J; Han, S K; Kim, W K

    2010-03-01

    In managing diabetic foot ulcers, foot elevation has generally been recommended to reduce oedema and prevent other sequential problems. However, foot elevation may decrease tissue oxygenation of the foot more than the dependent position since the dependent position is known to increase blood flow within the arterial system. In addition, diabetic foot ulcers, which have peripheral vascular insufficiency, generally have less oedema than other wounds. Therefore, we argue that foot elevation may not be helpful for healing of vascularly compromised diabetic foot ulcers since adequate tissue oxygenation is an essential factor in diabetic wound healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of foot height on tissue oxygenation and to determine the optimal foot position to accelerate wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers. This study included 122 cases (73 males and 47 females; two males had bilateral disease) of diabetic foot ulcer patients aged 40-93 years. Trans-cutaneous partial oxygen tension (TcpO(2)) values of diabetic feet were measured before and after foot elevation (n=21). Elevation was achieved by placing a foot over four cushions. We also measured foot TcpO(2) values before and after lowering the feet (n=122). Feet were lowered to the patient's tibial height, approximately 30-35 cm, beside a bed handrail. Due to the large number of lowering measurements, we divided them into five sub-groups according to initial TcpO(2.) Tissue oxygenation values were compared. Foot-elevation-lowered TcpO(2) values before and after elevation were 32.5+/-22.2 and 23.8+/-23.1 mmHg (p<0.01), respectively. Foot-lowering-augmented TcpO(2) values before and after lowering were 44.6+/-23.8 and 58.0+/-25.9 mmHg (p<0.01), respectively. The lower the initial TcpO(2) level, the more the TcpO(2) level increased. The foot lowering, rather than elevation, significantly augments TcpO(2) and may stimulate healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

  20. [Foot reflex zone massage].

    PubMed

    Kesselring, A

    1994-01-01

    Foot reflexology is defined as massage of zones on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. A medline-search yielded no literature in the field of foot reflexology. Indications for and results of foot reflexology have been extrapolated from case-descriptions and two pilot studies with small samples. One study (Lafuente et al.) found foot reflexology to be as helpful to patients with headaches as medication (flunarizine), yet foot reflexology was fraught with less side-effects than medication. In a second study (Eichelberger et al.) foot reflexology was used postoperatively on gynecological patients. The intervention group showed a lesser need for medication to enhance bladder tonus than did the control group. The literature describes foot reflexology as enhancing urination, bowel movements and relaxation.

  1. Foot roll-over evaluation based on 3D dynamic foot scan.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Van Hamme, Angèle; Sanchez, Stéphane; Chèze, Laurence; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Feipel, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Foot roll-over is commonly analyzed to evaluate gait pathologies. The current study utilized a dynamic foot scanner (DFS) to analyze foot roll-over. The right feet of ten healthy subjects were assessed during gait trials with a DFS system integrated into a walkway. A foot sole picture was computed by vertically projecting points from the 3D foot shape which were lower than a threshold height of 15 mm. A 'height' value of these projected points was determined; corresponding to the initial vertical coordinates prior to projection. Similar to pedobarographic analysis, the foot sole picture was segmented into anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) to process mean height (average of height data by ROI) and projected surface (area of the projected foot sole by ROI). Results showed that these variables evolved differently to plantar pressure data previously reported in the literature, mainly due to the specificity of each physical quantity (millimeters vs Pascals). Compared to plantar pressure data arising from surface contact by the foot, the current method takes into account the whole plantar aspect of the foot, including the parts that do not make contact with the support surface. The current approach using height data could contribute to a better understanding of specific aspects of foot motion during walking, such as plantar arch height and the windlass mechanism. Results of this study show the underlying method is reliable. Further investigation is required to validate the DFS measurements within a clinical context, prior to implementation into clinical practice.

  2. [Neurogenic foot deformities].

    PubMed

    Senst, S

    2010-01-01

    There is a multitude of neurological diseases which may lead to neuro-orthopaedic problems and subsequently to neurogenic foot deformities. For this reason the diagnostician will be consistently surprised that there is a great multitude of different foot abnormalities and that not only the typical spastic talipes equines dominates. Of particular significance here is that these deformities almost always develop progressively, whereas most diseases persist per se, cerebral palsy being a typical case in point. However, in MMC (myelomeningocele) patients, there is also the danger of a worsening of the basic problem in the case of tethered cord syndrome. Unlike congenital talipes equinovarus, neuro-orthopaedic talipes equinovarus often shows over- or undercorrection postoperatively due to a shift in muscle imbalance. It is important, therefore, that the basis of conservative therapy include regular physiotherapy and orthoses during the day and, if necessary, at night. Botulinum toxin has been established as an additional measure for spasticity; however, this cannot always prevent surgical intervention, but is able to delay this to a better point in the development of the child/patient. The present article describes the diversity of neurological deformities and presents conservative as well as surgical therapeutic approaches.

  3. Effects of water temperature on cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation during foot immersion (foot bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, M.; Ono, K.; Onodera, S.

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to make clear the effects of water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath) on heart rate, blood pressure, rectal temperature and autonomic nervous system modulation. The subjects performed foot immersion at 25, 35, 41 and 45 degrees Celsius at random, during different days, but always at the same time. Cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation was estimated with the power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability by using the Fast Fourier Transformation. The two frequency components of HRV was measured by integrate low frequency (LF; 0.04- 0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF; 0.15- 0.40 Hz). HF was used as an indicator of cardiac vagal modulation and was showed logarithmically (LogHF). LogHF during foot immersion at 35 and 41 degrees Celsius was significantly increased. These data indicate that cardiac vagal activity was affected by water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath).

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Right Upper Quadrant Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yarmish, Gail M.; Smith, Martin P.; Rosen, Max P.; Baker, Mark E.; Blake, Michael A.; Cash, Brooks D.; Hindman, Nicole M.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Kaur, Harmeet; Nelson, Rendon C.; Piorkowski, Robert J.; Qayyum, Aliya; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Acute right upper quadrant pain is a common presenting symptom in patients with acute cholecystitis. When acute cholecystitis is suspected in patients with right upper quadrant pain, in most clinical scenarios, the initial imaging modality of choice is ultrasound. Although cholescintigraphy has been shown to have slightly higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis, ultrasound is preferred as the initial study for a variety of reasons, including greater availability, shorter examination time, lack of ionizing radiation, morphologic evaluation, confirmation of the presence or absence of gallstones, evaluation of bile ducts, and identification or exclusion of alternative diagnoses. CT or MRI may be helpful in equivocal cases and may identify complications of acute cholecystitis. When ultrasound findings are inconclusive, MRI is the preferred imaging test in pregnant patients who present with right upper quadrant pain. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:24485592

  5. ACR appropriateness criteria right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Yarmish, Gail M; Smith, Martin P; Rosen, Max P; Baker, Mark E; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Hindman, Nicole M; Kamel, Ihab R; Kaur, Harmeet; Nelson, Rendon C; Piorkowski, Robert J; Qayyum, Aliya; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Acute right upper quadrant pain is a common presenting symptom in patients with acute cholecystitis. When acute cholecystitis is suspected in patients with right upper quadrant pain, in most clinical scenarios, the initial imaging modality of choice is ultrasound. Although cholescintigraphy has been shown to have slightly higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis, ultrasound is preferred as the initial study for a variety of reasons, including greater availability, shorter examination time, lack of ionizing radiation, morphologic evaluation, confirmation of the presence or absence of gallstones, evaluation of bile ducts, and identification or exclusion of alternative diagnoses. CT or MRI may be helpful in equivocal cases and may identify complications of acute cholecystitis. When ultrasound findings are inconclusive, MRI is the preferred imaging test in pregnant patients who present with right upper quadrant pain. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  6. SKITTER foot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Gene; Jones, David L.; Morris, James; Parham, Martin; Stephens, Jim; Yancey, Gregg

    1987-01-01

    A mechanical design team was formed to design a foot for the lunar utility vehicle SKITTER. The primary design was constrained to be a ski pole design compatible with the existing femur-tibia design legs. The lunar environment had several important effects on the foot design. Three materials were investigated for the SKITTER foot: aluminum alloys, cold worked stainless steel alloys, and titanium alloys. Thin film coatings were investigated as a method of wear reduction for the foot. The performance of the foot is dependent on the action of the legs. The range of motion for the legs was determined to be vertical to 15 degrees above horizontal. An impact analysis was performed for the foot movement, but the results were determined to be inconclusive due to unknown soil parameters. The initial foot design configuration consisted of an annulus attached to the pointed pole. The annulus was designed to prevent excess sinkage. Later designs call for a conical shaped foot with a disk at the point of the tibia attachment. The conical design was analyzed for strength and deflection by two different approaches. A deformable body analysis was performed for the foot under crane load in crane position, and also under actuator load in the vertical position. In both cases, the deflection of the foot was insignificant and the stresses well below the strength of the titanium alloy.

  7. 7 CFR 1412.23 - Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. 1412.23... Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.23 Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. (a... of production flexibility contract acres or base acres protected by a Conservation Reserve...

  8. 7 CFR 1412.23 - Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. 1412.23... Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.23 Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. (a... of production flexibility contract acres or base acres protected by a Conservation Reserve...

  9. 7 CFR 1412.23 - Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. 1412.23... Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.23 Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. (a... of production flexibility contract acres or base acres protected by a Conservation Reserve...

  10. 7 CFR 1412.23 - Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. 1412.23... Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.23 Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. (a... of production flexibility contract acres or base acres protected by a Conservation Reserve...

  11. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist.

  12. The effect of forward speed on J85 engine noise from suppressor nozzles as measured in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect of forward speed on the exhaust noise from a conical ejector nozzle and three suppressor nozzles mounted behind a J85 engine was performed in a 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The nozzles were tested at three engine power settings and at wind tunnel forward speeds up to 91 m/sec (300 ft/sec). In addition, outdoor static tests were conducted to determine (1) the differences between near field and far field measurements, (2) the effect of an airframe on the far field directivity of each nozzle, and (3) the relative suppression of each nozzle with respect to the baseline conical ejector nozzle. It was found that corrections to near field data are necessary to extrapolate to far field data and that the presence of the airframe changed the far field directivity as measured statically. The results show that the effect of forward speed was to reduce the noise from each nozzle more in the area of peak noise, but the change in forward quadrant noise was small or negligible. A comparison of wind tunnel data with available flight test data shows good agreement.

  13. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  14. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor...

  15. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  16. Foot Push-Up Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  17. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data

    PubMed Central

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject’s foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15% under the various walking conditions. PMID:26703622

  18. 130. Julian Price Memorial Park. Fortyseven acre Julian Price Lake ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. Julian Price Memorial Park. Forty-seven acre Julian Price Lake created by an impoundment. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. Chronic laminitis: foot management.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Scott

    2010-08-01

    Laminitis is a disease of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx, which can advance to the chronic stage with varying degrees of structural failure. Because the disease may ultimately lead to mechanical failure of the digit, a foot management plan is required to effectively and mechanically treat these cases. Many laminitis cases can be successfully rehabilitated back to athletic soundness, light use, breeding, or pasture soundness, whereas others suffer from permanent instability and never enjoy an acceptable level of comfort. To understand how to minimize damage in the acute laminitic foot or rehabilitate the chronic laminitic foot, the veterinarian should have an understanding of the normal supporting structures of the digit, the biomechanical forces acting on the foot, and the structural failure that results when these otherwise normal forces act on a diseased, damaged foot.

  20. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  1. Potential impact of species and livestock density on the epidemic size and effectiveness of control measures for foot-and-mouth disease in Japan

    PubMed Central

    HAYAMA, Yoko; YAMAMOTO, Takehisa; KOBAYASHI, Sota; MUROGA, Norihiko; TSUTSUI, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of a livestock area, including farm density and animal species, influence the spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). In this study, the impact of livestock area on FMD epidemics was examined using an FMD transmission model. For this simulation, three major livestock areas were selected: the 2010 FMD epidemic area in Japan as the baseline area (BS), a cattle and pig mixed production area (CP) and a cattle production area (C). Simulation results demonstrated that under the 24-hr culling policy, only 12% of epidemics among 1,000 simulations were abated within 100 days in the CP area, whereas 90% of the epidemics ceased in the BS area. In the C area, all epidemics were successfully contained within 100 days. Evaluation of additional control measures in the CP area showed that the 0.5-km pre-emptive culling, even when only targeting pig farms, raised the potential for successful containment to 94%. A 10-km vaccination on day 7 or 14 after initial detection was also effective in halting the epidemics (80%), but accompanied a large number of culled or vaccinated farms. The combined strategy of 10-km vaccination and 0.5-km pre-emptive culling targeting pig farms succeeded in containing all epidemics within 100 days. The present study suggests the importance of preparedness for the 24-hr culling policy and additional control measures when an FMD outbreak occurs in a densely populated area. Considering the characteristics of the livestock area is important in planning FMD control strategies. PMID:26256043

  2. Potential impact of species and livestock density on the epidemic size and effectiveness of control measures for foot-and-mouth disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Kobayashi, Sota; Muroga, Norihiko; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of a livestock area, including farm density and animal species, influence the spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). In this study, the impact of livestock area on FMD epidemics was examined using an FMD transmission model. For this simulation, three major livestock areas were selected: the 2010 FMD epidemic area in Japan as the baseline area (BS), a cattle and pig mixed production area (CP) and a cattle production area (C). Simulation results demonstrated that under the 24-hr culling policy, only 12% of epidemics among 1,000 simulations were abated within 100 days in the CP area, whereas 90% of the epidemics ceased in the BS area. In the C area, all epidemics were successfully contained within 100 days. Evaluation of additional control measures in the CP area showed that the 0.5-km pre-emptive culling, even when only targeting pig farms, raised the potential for successful containment to 94%. A 10-km vaccination on day 7 or 14 after initial detection was also effective in halting the epidemics (80%), but accompanied a large number of culled or vaccinated farms. The combined strategy of 10-km vaccination and 0.5-km pre-emptive culling targeting pig farms succeeded in containing all epidemics within 100 days. The present study suggests the importance of preparedness for the 24-hr culling policy and additional control measures when an FMD outbreak occurs in a densely populated area. Considering the characteristics of the livestock area is important in planning FMD control strategies.

  3. Estimation of stride length in level walking using an inertial measurement unit attached to the foot: a validation of the zero velocity assumption during stance.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, A; Della Croce, U; Cereatti, A

    2011-07-07

    In a variety of applications, inertial sensors are used to estimate spatial parameters by double integrating over time their coordinate acceleration components. In human movement applications, the drift inherent to the accelerometer signals is often reduced by exploiting the cyclical nature of gait and under the hypothesis that the velocity of the sensor is zero at some point in stance. In this study, the validity of the latter hypothesis was investigated by determining the minimum velocity of progression of selected points of the foot and shank during the stance phase of the gait cycle while walking at three different speeds on level ground. The errors affecting the accuracy of the stride length estimation resulting from assuming a zero velocity at the beginning of the integration interval were evaluated on twenty healthy subjects. Results showed that the minimum velocity of the selected points on the foot and shank increased as gait speed increased. Whereas the average minimum velocity of the foot locations was lower than 0.011 m/s, the velocity of the shank locations were up to 0.049 m/s corresponding to a percent error of the stride length equal to 3.3%. The preferable foot locations for an inertial sensor resulted to be the calcaneus and the lateral aspect of the rearfoot. In estimating the stride length, the hypothesis that the velocity of the sensor can be set to zero sometimes during stance is acceptable only if the sensor is attached to the foot.

  4. 75 FR 66401 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Pressurized-Water Reactor (US-APWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on US-APWR will hold a meeting on... Evaluation report (SER) associated with the US-APWR design certification. The Subcommittee will...

  5. The status of the light-footed clapper rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilbur, S.R.

    1974-01-01

    Only 12 California marsh areas are presently believed to be inhabited by the Light-footed Clapper Rail, and eight of these appear to support only 5-15 birds apiece. Tentative estimates for the other four are: Anaheim Bay 200, Upper Newport 30-35, Los Penasquitos 30, and Tijuana Estuary 150. These estimates, admittedly very rough, indicate a total Light-footed Rail population on only about 500 birds. Recognizing that rails are secretive and hard to inventory, the actual count could be somewhat higher, but I feel it is most unlikely that the number could be more than 750 birds altogether. Reductions in Light-footed Clapper Rail populations can be attributed almost entirely to loss of habitat. An estimated 26,000 acres of saltmarsh once existed between Santa Barbara and the Mexican border. At present there are approximately 8500 acres, much of which has been degraded by pollution, water diversion, and restriction of tidal flow. Of those areas currently occupied by Clapper Rails, few can be considered to have a very secure future. Of the four major areas only Anaheim Bay appears to be relatively safe from future habitat destruction. Tijuana Estuary, Los Penasquitos Lagoon, and Upper Newport Bay are all threatened by commercial developments that could reduce or destroy local rail populations. I have not visited Baja California, but I believe there is still a substantial population of Clapper Rails in the marshes around San Quintin Bay. Taxonomists do not agree on the subspecific identity of these birds, but some feel they are representatives of the Light-footed race. If so, it is fortunate to have a relatively secure (for now) reservoir of these birds, but whether the Light-footed Clapper Rail survives within the United States may well be decided within the next few years.

  6. Foot placement during error and pedal applications in naturalistic driving.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqing; Boyle, Linda Ng; McGehee, Daniel; Roe, Cheryl A; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Foley, James

    2017-02-01

    Data from a naturalistic driving study was used to examine foot placement during routine foot pedal movements and possible pedal misapplications. The study included four weeks of observations from 30 drivers, where pedal responses were recorded and categorized. The foot movements associated with pedal misapplications and errors were the focus of the analyses. A random forest algorithm was used to predict the pedal application types based the video observations, foot placements, drivers' characteristics, drivers' cognitive function levels and anthropometric measurements. A repeated multinomial logit model was then used to estimate the likelihood of the foot placement given various driver characteristics and driving scenarios. The findings showed that prior foot location, the drivers' seat position, and the drive sequence were all associated with incorrect foot placement during an event. The study showed that there is a potential to develop a driver assistance system that can reduce the likelihood of a pedal error.

  7. Hydrologic effects of annually diverting 131,000 acre-feet of water from Dillon Reservoir, central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.; Bauer, D.P.; Veenhuis, J.E.; Brennan, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Because of the increased demands for water in eastern Colorado, principally in the urbanizing Denver metropolitan area, increased diversions of water from Dillon Reservoir are planned. Estimates of end-of-month storage in Dillon Reservoir, assuming the reservoir was in place and 131,000 acre-feet of water were diverted from the reservoir each year, were reconstructed by mass balance for the 1931-77 water years. Based on the analysis, the annual maximum end-of-month drawdown below the elevation at full storage would have averaged 54 feet. The maximum end-of-month drawdown below the elevation at full storage would have been 171 feet. The mean-annual discharge-weighted dissolved-solids concentrations in the Colorado River near Glenwood Springs and Cameo, Colo., and Cisco, Utah, for the 1942-77 water years, were computed assuming an annual diversion of 131,000 acre-feet of water from Dillon Reservoir. The average increases in the dissolved-solids concentrations with the 131 ,000-acre-foot diversion were 15 to 16 milligrams per liter at the three sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  9. Foot posture is associated with kinematics of the foot during gait: A comparison of normal, planus and cavus feet.

    PubMed

    Buldt, Andrew K; Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Menz, Hylton B; Nester, Christopher J; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-06-01

    Variations in foot posture are associated with the development of some lower limb injuries. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. The objective of this study was to compare foot kinematics between normal, pes cavus and pes planus foot posture groups using a multi-segment foot model. Ninety-seven healthy adults, aged 18-47 were classified as either normal (n=37), pes cavus (n=30) or pes planus (n=30) based on normative data for the Foot Posture Index, Arch Index and normalised navicular height. A five segment foot model was used to measure tri-planar motion of the rearfoot, midfoot, medial forefoot, lateral forefoot and hallux during barefoot walking at a self-selected speed. Angle at heel contact, peak angle, time to peak angle and range of motion was measured for each segment. One way ANOVAs with post-hoc analyses of mean differences were used to compare foot posture groups. The pes cavus group demonstrated a distinctive pattern of motion compared to the normal and pes planus foot posture groups. Effect sizes of significant mean differences were large and comparable to similar studies. Three key differences in overall foot function were observed between the groups: (i) altered frontal and transverse plane angles of the rearfoot in the pes cavus foot; (ii) Less midfoot motion in the pes cavus foot during initial contact and midstance; and (iii) reduced midfoot frontal plane ROM in the pes planus foot during pre-swing. These findings indicate that foot posture does influence motion of the foot.

  10. 7 CFR 1412.23 - Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. 1412.23... Base Acres for a Farm for Covered Commodities § 1412.23 Base acres and Conservation Reserve Program. (a... year, adjust the base acres for covered commodities and peanuts with respect to the farm by the...

  11. Foot amputation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foot. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... of amputations. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  12. Foot pain causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 58. LeCursi N. Sports shoes and orthoses. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... Ligamentous Injuries of the Foot and Ankle. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  13. The Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the principles of good foot care. If time for teaching is limited, this task must be delegated to a podiatrist or a diabetes nurse educator in a diabetes day centre. It is the physician's responsibility to confirm foot care by personal inspection of the feet of all diabetic patients at every visit. PMID:21234002

  14. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographic (English) Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies) Diabetic Kidney Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems Diabetic ... time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy , that can cause tingling and pain, and can ...

  15. [COMPLEX OF THE TREATMENT MEASURES IN A SYSTEM OF THE MEDICAL CARE DELIVERY TO WOUNDED PERSONS WITH THE GUN-SHOT AND MINE-EXPLOSIVE INJURIES OF THE FOOT].

    PubMed

    Korohl, S O

    2015-11-01

    Complex of the treatment measures, conducted in 302 wounded persons, suffering the gun-shot and mine-explosive injuries of the foot in 2014 - 2015 yrs, was analyzed. Primary surgical processing of the wound was conducted in all injured persons, secondary surgical processing--in 64.6%, the foot bones osteosynthesis--in 13.9%, primary immobilization, using improvised tire--in 77.8%, secondary immobilization, using the plaster splint--in 48.1%, llizarov's spokes--in 35.2%, Ilizarov's apparatus--in 18.5%, the rods apparatuses of external fixation--in 16.7%. For improvement of functioning of a modern system for the treatment-evacuation provision it is necessary, to reduce the quantity of levels of the medical help provision maximally.

  16. Outcomes of a Nurse-Managed Diabetes Foot Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Managed Diabetes Foot Clinic 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-04-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N04-017...measured outcomes of a nurse-managed diabetes foot clinic on foot wound rates, health care costs, and changes in health status in adults with... diabetes . Design: This study reflects results of a two-group randomized, controlled trial. Sample: Participants were 126 adults with diabetes for more

  17. Foot deformation during walking: differences between static and dynamic 3D foot morphology in developing feet.

    PubMed

    Barisch-Fritz, Bettina; Schmeltzpfenning, Timo; Plank, Clemens; Grau, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The complex functions of feet require a specific composition, which is progressively achieved by developmental processes. This development should take place without being affected by footwear. The aim of this study is to evaluate differences between static and dynamic foot morphology in developing feet. Feet of 2554 participants (6-16 years) were recorded using a new scanner system (DynaScan4D). Each foot was recorded in static half and full weight-bearing and during walking. Several foot measures corresponding to those used in last construction were calculated. The differences were identified by one-way ANOVA and paired Student's t-test. Static and dynamic values of each foot measure must be considered to improve the fit of footwear. In particular, footwear must account for the increase of forefoot width and the decrease of midfoot girth. Furthermore, the toe box should have a more rounded shape. The findings are important for the construction of footwear for developing feet.

  18. The Challenges from Extreme Climate Events for Sustainable Development in Amazonia: the Acre State Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. D. N. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the past ten years Acre State, located in Brazil´s southwestern Amazonia, has confronted sequential and severe extreme events in the form of droughts and floods. In particular, the droughts and forest fires of 2005 and 2010, the 2012 flood within Acre, the 2014 flood of the Madeira River which isolated Acre for two months from southern Brazil, and the most severe flooding throughout the state in 2015 shook the resilience of Acrean society. The accumulated costs of these events since 2005 have exceeded 300 million dollars. For the last 17 years, successive state administrations have been implementing a socio-environmental model of development that strives to link sustainable economic production with environmental conservation, particularly for small communities. In this context, extreme climate events have interfered significantly with this model, increasing the risks of failure. The impacts caused by these events on development in the state have been exacerbated by: a) limitations in monitoring; b) extreme events outside of Acre territory (Madeira River Flood) affecting transportation systems; c) absence of reliable information for decision-making; and d) bureaucratic and judicial impediments. Our experience in these events have led to the following needs for scientific input to reduce the risk of disasters: 1) better monitoring and forecasting of deforestation, fires, and hydro-meteorological variables; 2) ways to increase risk perception in communities; 3) approaches to involve more effectively local and regional populations in the response to disasters; 4) more accurate measurements of the economic and social damages caused by these disasters. We must improve adaptation to and mitigation of current and future extreme climate events and implement a robust civil defense, adequate to these new challenges.

  19. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  20. 24 CFR 1710.9 - Twenty acre lots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Twenty acre lots. 1710.9 Section 1710.9 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  1. "Forty Acres and a Mule" as a Pedagogical Motif

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    This essay revisits an iconic yet now languishing phrase in United States political culture--"Forty Acres and a Mule"--to clarify the meaning of freedom and to assess the contemporary meaning of its betrayal by the U.S. government immediately after the Civil War. Among the few citizens for whom the phrase still retains a semblance of…

  2. ACR Electrical Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Mark

    This document contains a teacher's guide and student guide for a high school-level competency-based course in air conditioning and refrigeration (ACR) equipment electrical systems. Presented in the teacher's guide are the following: explanation of the instructional units' use; competency profile for recording students' performance of the tasks in…

  3. Role of industries in the care of diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, A; Lakshmi, S; Arun, Nanditha; Samith Shetty, A; Snehalatha, C

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease is a dreaded complication causing severe economic and social burden, mental and physical agony, and severe morbidity and mortality. This complication is largely preventable if the risk factors such as peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are detected early and appropriate measures are taken to control glycemia, foot pressure, and chances of foot injury. In the case of ulceration, proper microbial control, pressure offloading by debridement, and use of appropriate footwear are mandatory to save the foot. This article focuses on the need for preventive care for diabetic complications demonstrating potentially helpful roles for industry in India.

  4. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  5. AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC multidrug efflux systems are involved in enterobactin export in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli produces the iron-chelating compound enterobactin to enable growth under iron-limiting conditions. After biosynthesis, enterobactin is released from the cell. However, the enterobactin export system is not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that the outer membrane channel TolC is involved in enterobactin export. There are several multidrug efflux transporters belonging to resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family that require interaction with TolC to function. Therefore, several RND transporters may be responsible for enterobactin export. In this study, we investigated whether RND transporters are involved in enterobactin export using deletion mutants of multidrug transporters in E. coli. Single deletions of acrB, acrD, mdtABC, acrEF, or mdtEF did not affect the ability of E. coli to excrete enterobactin, whereas deletion of tolC did affect enterobactin export. We found that multiple deletion of acrB, acrD, and mdtABC resulted in a significant decrease in enterobactin export and that plasmids carrying the acrAB, acrD, or mdtABC genes restored the decrease in enterobactin export exhibited by the ΔacrB acrD mdtABC mutant. These results indicate that AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC are required for the secretion of enterobactin.

  6. [The hyperostotic foot].

    PubMed

    Claustre, J; Simon, L

    1982-01-01

    Clinical and radiological examination of the foot in 25 cases of ankylosing verteral hyperostosis revealed signs of the disease in 16 cases: eleven patients had painful symptoms (predominantly pain in the heel, 9 cases) and and five had radiological changes in the feet which led to the discovery of the characteristic vertebral involvement. As for other extra-vertebral sites of vertebral hyperostosis, the foot warrants careful examination. The radiological lesions consist of osteophytic proliferations of the calcaneum (sometimes pathognomonic), scattered ossifications in the ligaments of the inferior and posterior aspects of this bone, the neck of the talus, the dorsum of the mid-foot, the internal aspect of the tarsal scaphoid or the external face of the styloid apophysis of the 5th metatarsal, and a bony proliferation enlarging the base of the distal phalanx of the big toe.

  7. [The diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Stirnemann, P; Z'Brun, A; Brunner, D

    1998-10-01

    Problems of the diabetic foot are frequent. The magnitude of the clinical picture and morbidity mirrors the severity and complexity of the underlying pathobiology. The three pathogenetic mechanism involved are ischemia, neuropathy and infection. Seldom do these mechanisms work in isolation, rather most foot problems result from a complex interplay among all three. The clinical picture of the diabetic foot reaches from the neuropathic deformity with diminished or absent sensation of pain to limited gangrene or superficial ulcer. The polymicrobial infection leads to extensive tissue destruction (plantarphlegmone) with osteomyelitis. The patients often notes no pain and may become aware of the infection only through the presence of drainage or a foul odor. These infections are usually more extensive than would be predicted by clinical signs and symptoms. These lesions must be debrided and drained promptly and completely. This often requires amputations of one or more toes, combined with an incision along the entire course of the infected track on the plantar or dorsal aspect of the foot. Cultures should be taken from the depth of the wound. Initial treatment should be with broad-spectrum antibiotics, with subsequent adjustment based on culture results. The diabetic foot is a clinical problem that can be solved with a high degree of success when the approached by an interdisciplinary team (specialists in infectious and vascular disease, podiatry and diabetology). Arterial reconstruction should be designed to restore maximum perfusion to the foot. The most effective result can be obtained with infra-inguinal vein bypass with distal anastomosis to the most proximal artery with direct continuity to the ischemic territory. The single most important factor in the achievement of the reduction of amputation is the autologous vein bypass. The overall outcome in the diabetic patient in terms of graft patency and limb salvage is equal to that in the nondiabetic.

  8. Bikeability and methodological issues using the active commuting route environment scale (ACRES) in a metropolitan setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Route environments can positively influence people's active commuting and thereby contribute to public health. The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES) was developed to study active commuters' perceptions of their route environments. However, bicycle commuters represent a small portion of the population in many cities and thus are difficult to study using population-based material. Therefore, the aim of this study is to expand the state of knowledge concerning the criterion-related validity of the ACRES and the representativity using an advertisement-recruited sample. Furthermore, by comparing commuting route environment profiles of inner urban and suburban areas, we provide a novel basis for understanding the relationship between environment and bikeability. Methods Bicycle commuters from Greater Stockholm, Sweden, advertisement- (n = 1379) and street-recruited (n = 93), responded to the ACRES. Traffic planning and environmental experts from the Municipality of Stockholm (n = 24) responded to a modified version of the ACRES. The criterion-related validity assessments were based on whether or not differences between the inner urban and the suburban route environments, as indicated by the experts and by four existing objective measurements, were reflected by differences in perceptions of these environments. Comparisons of ratings between advertisement- and street-recruited participants were used for the assessments of representativity. Finally, ratings of inner urban and suburban route environments were used to evaluate commuting route environment profiles. Results Differences in ratings of the inner urban and suburban route environments by the advertisement-recruited participants were in accord with the existing objective measurements and corresponded reasonably well with those of the experts. Overall, there was a reasonably good correspondence between the advertisement- and street-recruited participants' ratings. Distinct differences in

  9. ACR white paper: New practice models--hospital employment of radiologists: a report from the ACR Future Trends Committee.

    PubMed

    Medverd, Jonathan R; Muroff, Lawrence R; Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N; Lexa, Frank J; Levin, David C

    2012-11-01

    In response to the current era of rapid evolution of health care delivery and financing, radiologists are increasingly considering, as well as confronting, new practice models. Hospital employment is one such opportunity. Within this report to the ACR membership, the potential advantages and risks for radiologists considering hospital employment are examined.

  10. 78 FR 70597 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ..., Rockville, Maryland. The meeting will be open to public attendance with the exception of a portion that may... that are open to the public. Detailed procedures for the conduct of and participation in ACRS meetings...-25-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  11. 76 FR 68793 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... [Federal Register Volume 76, Number 215 (Monday, November 7, 2011)] [Notices] [Page 68793] [FR Doc... participation in ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 17, 2011 (76 FR 64127-64128... Assistant, Reactor Safety Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. [FR Doc. 2011-28738 Filed...

  12. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... not warming up and stretching, also can cause foot and ankle injuries. Work in certain occupations. Certain work environments, such ... too little light may lead to falls and foot and ankle injuries. Have certain conditions. Having fragile bones (osteoporosis) or ...

  13. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What Is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... also be a contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  14. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection ...

  15. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand, foot, and mouth disease is common in infants ...

  16. Volcano surveillance by ACR silver fox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, M.C.L.; Mulligair, A.; Douglas, J.; Robinson, J.; Pallister, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    made possible by utilizing GPS and computer-controlled flight direction and stabilization to acquire and track target areas within the Mount St. Helens crater. It was also determined that additional light-weight sensor development will be needed to enable autonomous measurements of volcanic gasses and imaging in poor-weather conditions. Copyright ?? 2005 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adult cavovarus foot.

    PubMed

    Younger, Alastair S E; Hansen, Sigvard T

    2005-09-01

    Cavovarus foot deformity, which often results from an imbalance of muscle forces, is commonly caused by hereditary motor sensory neuropathies. Other causes are cerebral palsy, cerebral injury (stroke), anterior horn cell disease (spinal root injury), talar neck injury, and residual clubfoot. In cavovarus foot deformity, the relatively strong peroneus longus and tibialis posterior muscles cause a hindfoot varus and forefoot valgus (pronated) position. Hindfoot varus causes overload of the lateral border of the foot, resulting in ankle instability, peroneal tendinitis, and stress fracture. Degenerative arthritic changes can develop in overloaded joints. Gait examination allows appropriate planning of tendon transfers to correct stance and swing-phase deficits. Inspection of the forefoot and hindfoot positions determines the need for soft-tissue release and osteotomy. The Coleman block test is invaluable for assessing the cause of hindfoot varus. Prolonged use of orthoses or supportive footwear can result in muscle imbalance, causing increasing deformity and irreversible damage to tendons and joints. Rebalancing tendons is an early priority to prevent unsalvageable deterioration of the foot. Muscle imbalance can be corrected by tendon transfer, corrective osteotomy, and fusion. Fixed bony deformity can be addressed by fusion and osteotomy.

  18. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-06-10

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations.

  19. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  2. The ACR20 and defining a threshold for response in rheumatic diseases: too much of a good thing.

    PubMed

    Felson, David T; LaValley, Michael P

    2014-01-03

    In the past 20 years great progress has been made in the development of multidimensional outcome measures (such as the Disease Activity Score and ACR20) to evaluate treatments in rheumatoid arthritis, a process disseminated throughout rheumatic diseases. These outcome measures have standardized the assessment of outcomes in trials, making it possible to evaluate and compare the efficacy of treatments. The methodologic advances have included the selection of pre-existing outcome measures that detected change in a sensitive fashion (in rheumatoid arthritis, this was the Core Set Measures). These measures were then combined into a single multidimensional outcome measure and such outcome measures have been widely adopted in trials and endorsed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and regulatory agencies. The secular improvement in treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis has been facilitated in part by these major methodologic advancements. The one element of this effort that has not optimized measurement of outcomes nor made it easier to detect the effect of treatments is the dichotomization of continuous measures of response, creating responders and non-responder definitions (for example, ACR20 responders; EULAR good responders). Dichotomizing response sacrifices statistical power and eliminates variability in response. Future methodologic work will need to focus on improving multidimensional outcome measurement without arbitrarily characterizing some patients as responders while labeling others as non-responders.

  3. 78 FR 2694 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and... Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  4. A novel packing arrangement of AcrB in the lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Ly, K; Bartho, J D; Eicher, T; Pos, K M; Mitra, A K

    2014-12-20

    The central component AcrB of the Escherichia coli drug efflux complex AcrA-AcrB-TolC has been extensively investigated by X-ray crystallography of detergent-protein 3-D crystals. In these crystals, AcrB packs as trimers - the functional unit. We visualized the AcrB-AcrB interaction in its native environment by examining E. coli lipid reconstituted 2-D crystals, which were overwhelmingly formed by asymmetric trimers stabilized by strongly-interacting monomers from adjacent trimers. Most interestingly, we observed lattices formed by an arrangement of AcrB monomers distinct from that in traditional trimers. This hitherto unobserved packing, might play a role in the biogenesis of trimeric AcrB.

  5. The Acre vertebrate fauna: Age, diversity, and geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzuol, Mario Alberto

    2006-07-01

    The vertebrate faunal assemblage associated with the Neogene deposits in the Acre region (southwestern Amazonia) is secured as Late Miocene on the basis of a correlation with the 'Mesopotamian' faunal assemblage from the Paraná region of Argentina and Uruguay. Both assemblages occur in the time span of the Huayquerian South American Land Mammal Age (SALMA). The Acre, 'Mesopotamian' (Argentina and Uruguay), and Urumaco (Venezuela) assemblages are considered faunistically correlated and contemporaneous on the basis of their shared amniote taxa. The Laventan assemblage from Colombia has important faunistic affinities with the previous three but is older. A paleogeographic scenario is proposed to explain the long-distance correlation among those assemblages. On the basis of data from geology, field observations, fauna, and palynology, the validity of the Ucayali unconformity as a time marker along all of western Amazonia is rejected.

  6. ACR appropriateness criteria radiologic management of infected fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Jonathan M; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Cash, Brooks D; Gaba, Ron C; Gervais, Debra A; Gipson, Matthew G; Kolbeck, Kenneth J; Kouri, Brian E; Marshalleck, Francis E; Nair, Ajit V; Ray, Charles E; Hohenwalter, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The best management of infected fluid collections depends on a careful assessment of clinical and anatomic factors as well as an up-to-date review of the published literature, to be able to select from a host of multidisciplinary treatment options. This article reviews conservative, radiologic, endoscopic, and surgical options and their best application to infected fluid collections as determined by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Interventional Radiology. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals, and the application, by the panel, of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  7. The foot of Homo naledi

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt-Smith, W. E. H.; Throckmorton, Z.; Congdon, K. A.; Zipfel, B.; Deane, A. S.; Drapeau, M. S. M.; Churchill, S. E.; Berger, L. R.; DeSilva, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  8. The foot of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Throckmorton, Z; Congdon, K A; Zipfel, B; Deane, A S; Drapeau, M S M; Churchill, S E; Berger, L R; DeSilva, J M

    2015-10-06

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo.

  9. A comparative study of foot dimension between adult male and female and evaluation of foot hazards due to using of footwear.

    PubMed

    Manna, I; Pradhan, D; Ghosh, S; Kar, S K; Dhara, P

    2001-07-01

    Using footwear often becomes troublesome and creates many problems. Most of these problems are associated with the wearing of ill-fitting footwear, as it leads to biomechanical imbalance and ultimately give rise to different foot problems. In the present investigation different foot problems, viz., discomfort, pain and other hazards related to the use of footwear have been evaluated and attempts have been made to study different foot dimensions of men and women that are related to the design of footwear. For the present study different foot dimensions of both right and left feet of the subjects were measured on 300 Bengalee (Indian) subjects having the age range of 20-35 years. The subjects reported that they had got discomfort, pain, blister and corn due to using different footwear. It was noted that the occurrence of these problems in right foot was greater than that in left foot. There was no significant correlation between foot troubles and type of footwear. Results also showed that there was no significant difference in most of the foot dimensions between left foot and right foot. However, significant difference (P < 0.001) in all foot dimensions was observed between male and female subjects. Correlation coefficient among different foot dimensions has also been evaluated and it was noted that foot length was highly correlated with stature and foot volume, particularly in left foot. Footwear should be made according to the foot dimensions of the user population. The database collected from the Bengalee (Indian) population may be a helpful guide for manufacturing different footwear.

  10. 7 CFR 1412.79 - Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with... Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) Program § 1412.79 Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with... conformity with the provisions of this part, the provisions of this part will prevail....

  11. 75 FR 4882 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on EPR; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on EPR; Notice of Meeting The ACRS U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) Subcommittee will hold a meeting on February 18-19... inconvenience. Dated: January 25, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee...

  12. 10 CFR 52.87 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.87 Section 52.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the ACRS. The...

  13. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting...

  14. 10 CFR 52.87 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.87 Section 52.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the ACRS. The...

  15. 76 FR 57082 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels Revision to September 21, 2011, ACRS Meeting; Federal Register Notice The Federal Register Notice for the ACRS Subcommittee Meeting on Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels is...

  16. 76 FR 76442 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels Revision to December 15, 2011, ACRS Meeting Federal Register Notice The Federal Register Notice for the ACRS Subcommittee Meeting on Materials, Metallurgy & Reactor Fuels scheduled to be held...

  17. 7 CFR 1412.79 - Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with... Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) Program § 1412.79 Executed ACRE contract not in conformity with... conformity with the provisions of this part, the provisions of this part will prevail....

  18. 76 FR 9835 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Digital Instrumentation & Control (DI&C); Revision to February 23, 2011, ACRS Meeting Federal Register Notice The Federal Register Notice for the ACRS Subcommittee Meeting on Digital Instrumentation & Control (DI&C) scheduled...

  19. Rear-foot, mid-foot and fore-foot motion during the stance phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Leardini, A; Benedetti, M G; Berti, L; Bettinelli, D; Nativo, R; Giannini, S

    2007-03-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol designed to track a large number of foot segments during the stance phase of gait with the smallest possible number of markers, with particular clinical focus on coronal plane alignment of the rear-foot, transverse and sagittal plane alignment of the metatarsal bones, and changes at the medial longitudinal arch. The shank, calcaneus, mid-foot and metatarsus were assumed to be 3D rigid bodies. The longitudinal axis of the first, second and fifth metatarsal bones and the proximal phalanx of the hallux were also tracked independently. Skin markers were mounted on bony prominences or joint lines, avoiding the course of main tendons. Trajectories of the 14 markers were collected by an eight-camera motion capture system at 100 Hz on a population of 10 young volunteers. Three-dimensional joint rotations and planar angles were calculated according to anatomically based reference frames. The marker set was well visible throughout the stance phase of gait, even in a camera configuration typical of gait analysis of the full body. The time-histories of the joint rotations and planar angles were well repeatable among subjects and consistent with clinical and biomechanical knowledge. Several dynamic measurements were originally taken, such as elevation/drop of the medial longitudinal arch and of three metatarsal bones, rear-foot to fore-foot rotation and transverse plane deformation of the metatarsus. The information obtained from this protocol, consistent with previous clinical knowledge, enhanced our understanding of the dynamics of the human foot during stance.

  20. The athlete's foot.

    PubMed

    Resnik, S S; Lewis, L A; Cohen, B H

    1977-09-01

    In general, painful feet can affect the performance of an athlete in any sport. To prevent skin diseases of the feet, the "Athlete's Foot" should be kept clean and dry with toenails trimmed. Properly fitting athletic shoes should be worn to avoid the formation of blisters. Wearing of sandals in locker and shower rooms, which prevents intimate contact with infecting organisms, can alleviate many of the problems that affect the feet.

  1. The German and Belgian accreditation models for diabetic foot services.

    PubMed

    Morbach, Stephan; Kersken, Joachim; Lobmann, Ralf; Nobels, Frank; Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot recommends that auditing should be part of the organization of diabetic foot care, the efforts required for data collection and analysis being balanced by the expected benefits. In Germany legislature demands measures of quality management for in- and out-patient facilities, and, in 2003, the Germany Working Group on the Diabetic Foot defined and developed a certification procedure for diabetic foot centres to be recognized as 'specialized'. This includes a description of management facilities, treatment procedures and outcomes, as well as the organization of mutual auditing visits between the centres. Outcome data is collected at baseline and 6 months on 30 consecutive patients. By 2014 almost 24,000 cases had been collected and analysed. Since 2005 Belgian multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinics could apply for recognition by health authorities. For continued recognition diabetic foot clinics need to treat at least 52 patients with a new foot problem (Wagner 2 or more or active Charcot foot) per annum. Baseline and 6-month outcome data of these patients are included in an audit-feedback initiative. Although originally fully independent of each other, the common goal of these two initiatives is quality improvement of national diabetic foot care, and hence exchanges between systems has commenced. In future, the German and Belgian accreditation models might serve as templates for comparable initiatives in other countries. Just recently the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot initiated a working group for further discussion of accreditation and auditing models (International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot AB(B)A Working Group).

  2. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  3. Measurement of muscle actions and foot reaction forces from crew members during entire working days on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedeker, Jess G.; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    We present pilot work in preparation for ISS Experiment 318, which will investigate changes in lower limb daily mechanical loading and muscular activity profiles that have been implicated in bone mineral loss and muscle atrophy during spaceflight. Prototype equipment for the musculo-skeletal rack of the Human Research Facility (HRF) was used in conjunction with the Ambulatory Data Acquisition System to record and store data. Right foot ground reaction force profiles, right leg EMG activity profiles from the tibialis anterior and vastus medialis, and joint angular excursion profiles from the right knee and ankle were collected during five minutes each of forward and backward running in 1g as well as over a twelve hour period of activities during daily living. Ground reaction force profiles were analyzed to provide an estimate of 1g daily mechanical load stimulus, while EMG and joint angle profiles characterized the role of individual muscles in generating and absorbing energy. .

  4. [Foot specific orthotic devices].

    PubMed

    Goldcher, Alain

    2010-03-20

    For each foot pathology, whatever its nature and aetiology, there is an orthesis, the best mechanical treatment. For toe pathologies due to or worsened by the footwear, we must recommend wearing other shoes and sometimes an orthoplasty which is not covered by health insurance. Sole orthesis are quite effective for most pathologies causing pain when walking, and involving the foot sole or starting in the foot. Realised by an approved splint technician, they are covered by health insurance for a lump sum, but patients are telling us their cost is becoming more and more difficult to bear Mass-produced shoes, therapeutic or not, deserve a special place in the therapeutic arsenal of podiatry. Temporary used shoes improve post-operation situation and some specifically located discharges. More and more shoes are available for longer use, most of them not approved but better looking, and at least as effective as and not costlier than the few models covered by health insurance.They can provide footwear that are not standard and can't be helped by bespoke shoes reserved for precise medical indications.

  5. Diabetic neuropathy and foot complications.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2014-01-01

    Foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) are well recognized and documented late sequelae of diabetic peripheral, somatic, and sympathetic autonomic neuropathy. The neuropathic foot, however, does not ulcerate spontaneously: it is a combination of loss of sensation due to neuropathy together with other factors such as foot deformity and external trauma that results in ulceration and indeed CN. The commonest trauma leading to foot ulcers in the neuropathic foot in Western countries is from inappropriate footwear. Much of the management of the insensate foot in diabetes has been learned from leprosy which similarly gives rise to insensitive foot ulceration. No expensive equipment is required to identify the high risk foot and recently developed tests such as the Ipswich Touch Test and the Vibratip have been shown to be useful in identifying the high risk foot. A comprehensive screening program, together with education of high risk patients, should help to reduce the all too high incidence of ulceration in diabetes. More recently another very high risk group has been identified, namely patients on dialysis, who are at extremely high risk of developing foot ulceration; this should be preventable. The most important feature in management of neuropathic foot ulceration is offloading as patients can easily walk on active foot ulcers due to the loss of pain sensation. Infection should be treated aggressively and if there is any evidence of peripheral vascular disease, arteriography and appropriate surgical management is also indicated. CN often presents with a unilateral hot, swollen foot and any patient presenting with these features known to have neuropathy should be treated as a Charcot until this is proven otherwise. Most important in the management of acute CN is offloading, often in a total contact cast.

  6. Understanding the nature and mechanism of foot pain

    PubMed Central

    Hawke, Fiona; Burns, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of the population are affected by foot pain at any given time. It is often disabling and can impair mood, behaviour, self-care ability and overall quality of life. Currently, the nature and mechanism underlying many types of foot pain is not clearly understood. Here we comprehensively review the literature on foot pain, with specific reference to its definition, prevalence, aetiology and predictors, classification, measurement and impact. We also discuss the complexities of foot pain as a sensory, emotional and psychosocial experience in the context of clinical practice, therapeutic trials and the placebo effect. A deeper understanding of foot pain is needed to identify causal pathways, classify diagnoses, quantify severity, evaluate long term implications and better target clinical intervention. PMID:19144200

  7. Diabetic foot syndrome--dermatological point of view.

    PubMed

    Troskot, Nina; Duvancić, Tomislav; Kolić, Maja

    2013-03-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus often suffer from diabetic foot syndrome, a condition leading to foot ulceration or even amputation of lower extremity. Peripheral neuropathy combined with repetitive trauma to the foot and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in the development of foot ulcers. Other major contributive factors include the effects of callus, increased plantar pressures, and local infections. Patient education concerning their disease has a central role in the prevention of foot ulcers. Ordinary preventive measures taken by the patient include regular self-inspections, appropriate daily hygiene of the feet, appropriate footwear to reduce plantar pressures, and medical pedicure performed by a pedicurist experienced in diabetic foot patients. The importance of callus in diabetic patients has been shown in several studies by high predictability of subsequent ulcer development in patients with plantar calluses. For removing callus, urea based preparations are considered to be the treatment of choice. In case of local bacterial and fungal diabetic foot infections, systemic antibiotic and systemic antimycotic therapy is indicated, respectively. Wound dressings of various types are the mainstay in the treatment of chronic foot ulcers with avoidance of occlusive dressings in infected ulcers. Since the vast majority of ulcers and amputations can be prevented in diabetic patients, proper diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are essential.

  8. Inpatient Management of Diabetic Foot Disorders: A Clinical Guide

    PubMed Central

    Wukich, Dane K.; Armstrong, David G.; Attinger, Christopher E.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Burns, Patrick R.; Frykberg, Robert G.; Hellman, Richard; Kim, Paul J.; Lipsky, Benjamin A.; Pile, James C.; Pinzur, Michael S.; Siminerio, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of an inpatient diabetic foot service should be the goal of all institutions that care for patients with diabetes. The objectives of this team are to prevent problems in patients while hospitalized, provide curative measures for patients admitted with diabetic foot disorders, and optimize the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. Essential skills that are required for an inpatient team include the ability to stage a foot wound, assess for peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy, wound infection, and the need for debridement; appropriately culture a wound and select antibiotic therapy; provide, directly or indirectly, for optimal metabolic control; and implement effective discharge planning to prevent a recurrence. Diabetic foot ulcers may be present in patients who are admitted for nonfoot problems, and these ulcers should be evaluated by the diabetic foot team during the hospitalization. Pathways should be in place for urgent or emergent treatment of diabetic foot infections and neuropathic fractures/dislocations. Surgeons involved with these patients should have knowledge and interest in limb preservation techniques. Prevention of iatrogenic foot complications, such as pressure sores of the heel, should be a priority in patients with diabetes who are admitted for any reason: all hospitalized diabetic patients require a clinical foot exam on admission to identify risk factors such as loss of sensation or ischemia. Appropriate posthospitalization monitoring to reduce the risk of reulceration and infection should be available, which should include optimal glycemic control and correction of any fluid and electrolyte disturbances. PMID:23970716

  9. Bioinjection Performance Review for the Building 100 Area and 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site

    SciTech Connect

    Survochak, Scott; Daniel, Joe

    2016-05-01

    This document provides a summary of a review of the performance of bioinjection activities at the Building 100 Area and the 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site since 2010, determines how best to optimize future injection events, and identifies the approach for the bioinjection event in 2016 at (1) the 4.5 Acre Site and (2) the Essentra property at the Building 100 Area. Because this document describes the next bioinjection event at the 4.5 Acre Site, it also serves as an addendum to the Interim Remedial Action Plan for Emulsified Edible Oil Injection at the 4.5 Acre Site (DOE 2013). In addition, this document revises the injection layout and injection intervals for the Essentra property that were originally described in the Interim Corrective Measure Work Plan for Source and Plume Treatment at the Building 100 Area (DOE 2014), and is a de facto update of that document. Bioinjection consists of injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (DHM; formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface to enhance biodegradation of trichloroethene (TCE), dichloroethene (DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). VC is the only contaminant that exceeds its maximum contaminant level (10 micrograms per liter onsite and 1 microgram per liter onsite) on the 4.5 Acre Site and the Essentra property. Bioinjection was conducted at the 4.5 Acre Site in 2010 and 2013. Approximately 49,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 95 injection points in February 2010, and approximately 22,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 46 injection points in July 2013. The injection locations are shown on Figure 1. The goal of bioinjection at the 4.5 Acre Site is to decrease contaminant concentrations to maximum contaminant levels along the west and southwest property boundaries (to meet risk–based corrective action requirements) and to minimize the extent of the contaminant plume in the interior of the site. Bioinjection was

  10. Influence of foot-stretcher height on rowing technique and performance.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica M; Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-11-01

    Strength, technique, and coordination are crucial to rowing performance, but external interventions such as foot-stretcher set-up can fine-tune technique and optimise power output. For the same resultant force, raising the height of foot-stretchers on a rowing ergometer theoretically alters the orientation of the resultant force vector in favour of the horizontal component. This study modified foot-stretcher heights and examined their instantaneous effect on foot forces and rowing technique. Ten male participants rowed at four foot-stretcher heights on an ergometer that measured handle force, stroke length, and vertical and horizontal foot forces. Rowers were instrumented with motion sensors to measure ankle, knee, hip, and lumbar-pelvic kinematics. Key resultant effects of increased foot-stretcher heights included progressive reductions in horizontal foot force, stroke length, and pelvis range of motion. Raising foot-stretcher height did not increase the horizontal component of foot force as previously speculated. The reduced ability to anteriorly rotate the pelvis at the front of the stroke may be a key obstacle in gaining benefits from raised foot-stretcher heights. This study shows that small changes in athlete set-up can influence ergometer rowing technique, and rowers must individually fine-tune their foot-stretcher height to optimise power transfer through the rowing stroke on an ergometer.

  11. Measurements of Local Heat Transfer and Pressure on Six 2-Inch-Diameter Blunt Bodies at a Mach Number of 4.95 and at Reynolds Numbers Per Foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Morton; Mayo, Edward E.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the local heat transfer and pressure distribution have been made on six 2-inch-diameter, blunt, axially symmetric bodies in the Langley gas dynamics laboratory at a Mach number of 4.95 and at Reynolds numbers per foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6). During the investigation laminar flow was observed over a hemispherical-nosed body having a surface finish from 10 to 20 microinches at the highest test Reynolds number per foot (for this configuration) of 77.4 x 10(exp 6). Though it was repeatedly possible to measure completely laminar flow at this Reynolds number for the hemisphere, it was not possible to observe completely laminar flow on the flat-nosed body for similar conditions. The significance of this phenomenon is obscured by the observation that the effects of particle impacts on the surface in causing roughness were more pronounced on the flat-nosed body. For engineering purposes, a method developed by M. Richard Dennison while employed by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation appears to be a reasonable procedure for estimating turbulent heat transfer provided transition occurs at a forward location on the body. For rearward-transition locations, the method is much poorer for the hemispherical nose than for the flat nose. The pressures measured on the hemisphere agreed very well with those of the modified Newtonian theory, whereas the pressures on all other bodies, except on the flat-nosed body, were bracketed by modified Newtonian theory both with and without centrifugal forces. For the hemisphere, the stagnation-point velocity gradient agreed very well with Newtonian theory. The stagnation-point velocity gradient for the flat- nosed model was 0.31 of the value for the hemispherical-nosed model. If a Newtonian type of flow is assumed, the ratio 0.31 will be independent of Much number and real-gas effects.

  12. Overexpression and purification of the three components of the Enterobacter aerogenes AcrA-AcrB-TolC multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Pradel, Elizabeth

    2003-03-25

    The tripartite AcrA-AcrB-TolC system is the major efflux pump of the nosocomial pathogen Enterobacter aerogenes. AcrA is a trimeric periplasmic lipoprotein anchored in the inner membrane, AcrB is an inner membrane transporter and TolC is a trimeric outer membrane channel. In order to reconstitute the AcrA-AcrB-TolC system of E. aerogenes in artificial membranes, we overexpressed and purified the three proteins. The E. aerogenes acrA, acrB and tolC open reading frames were individually inserted in the expression vector pET24a(+), in frame with a sequence coding a C-terminal hexahistidine tag to allow purification by INAC (Immobilized Nickel Affinity Chromatography). The mature AcrA-6His was overproduced in a soluble form in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). AcrA-6His was purified under native conditions in two steps using INAC and gel permeation chromatography. We obtained about 25 mg of 97% pure AcrA-6His per liter of culture. AcrB-6His was solubilized from the membrane fraction of E. coli C43(DE3) in 300 mM NaCl, 5% Triton X-100 and purified in one step by INAC. The AcrB-6His enriched fraction was eluted with 100 mM imidazole. The final yield was 1-2 mg of 95% pure AcrB-6His per liter of culture. The membrane fraction of E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS containing TolC-6His was first treated with 2% Triton X-100, 30 mM MgCl(2) to solubilize the inner membrane proteins. After ultracentrifugation, the pellet was treated with 5% Triton X-100, 5 mM EDTA to solubilize the outer membrane proteins. Approximately 5 mg of 95% pure TolC-6His trimers per liter of culture was purified by INAC.

  13. [The diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Hartemann-Heurtier, Agnès; Ha Van, Georges

    2003-05-15

    Diabetic patients are concerned with foot complications when a peripheral neuropathy is present. Screening of predisposed patients may be annually assessed using monofilament testing. Peripheral arterial disease, when associated, increases amputation risk. Ideal treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with a first-line medical treatment including an optimal off-loading of the diabetic ulcer, ulcer dertersion, glycemic control, and if necessary antibiotic therapy. In case of associated osteomyelitis, a limited surgical resection of the infected bone may be performed. In case of associated arterial disease, a revascularization procedure precede bone resection.

  14. The influence of body mass on foot dimensions during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Ko; Chiu, Hsin-Tzu; Chao, An-Shine; Wang, Ming-Hsu; Chen, Yi-Lang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a time-series approach was used to measure women's feet to accurately analyze changes in foot size and body mass during pregnancy. One-hundred women who were pregnant for the first time were asked to respond to questions on subjective complaints of foot discomfort listed in a questionnaire. Among these 100 women, a sample of 30 was obtained and used to measure the women's feet from the twentieth week of the gestation period until labor. The data (from 5 of the 30 women) were used to establish a prediction model for the influence of body mass on changes in foot size during pregnancy. The results indicate that the women subjectively complained that their shoes were too tight, resulting in foot discomfort. From the twentieth to the thirty-eighth week of pregnancy, the average increase in foot length, width, and back foot surface was 0.86 cm (3.6%), 0.25 cm (2.6%), and 18.36 cm(2) (11.9%), respectively. The height of the arch decreased by an average of 0.52 cm (-24.2%). Body mass accounted for more than 90% of the variation (R(2)) in foot dimensions during pregnancy and, thus indicated satisfactory predictive ability. The prediction model developed in this study can serve as a reference for clinical applications and shoe design to prevent women from experiencing extreme discomfort in their feet during pregnancy.

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Clinically Suspected Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Michael; Ahmed, Osmanuddin; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Ginsburg, Michael; Gornik, Heather L; Johnson, Pamela T; Oliva, Isabel B; Ptak, Thomas; Steigner, Michael L; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are often included in the differential diagnosis of common clinical presentations, including hypoxemia, hemoptysis, brain abscesses, and paradoxical stroke, as well as affecting 30% to 50% of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Various imaging studies are used in the diagnostic and screening settings, which have been reviewed by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Vascular Imaging Panel. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation screening in patients with HHT is commonly performed with transthoracic echocardiographic bubble study, followed by CT for positive cases. Although transthoracic echocardiographic bubble studies and radionuclide perfusion detect right-to-left shunts, they do not provide all of the information needed for treatment planning and may remain positive after embolization. Pulmonary angiography is appropriate for preintervention planning but not as an initial test. MR angiography has a potential role in younger patients with HHT who may require lifelong surveillance, despite lower spatial resolution compared with CT. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  16. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-02-26

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call "transporter exchange." This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria.

  17. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    A researcher is launching a model into the tunnel airstream of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long- handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models used are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  18. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    Interior view of model in 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long-handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models mused are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  19. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  20. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  1. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  2. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... foot and ankle surgeons. All Fellows of the College are board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights ...

  3. Human Behavior Recognition Using Foot Pressure Sensing Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Chika; Ozaki, Kenji; Ezoe, Ryosuke; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Yamato, Hiroyuki

    To recognize human behavior in unlimited environments, sensing shoes for measuring foot pressure distribution were developed. Seven pressure sensors were installed on an insole, and a measurement module was embedded in the shoe. An analysis for discriminating the user's movements from the foot pressure distribution was examined, considering the movements, walking, running, standing, sitting, going upstairs and downstairs, and cycling. These seven actions were discriminated using feature quantities such as the average, standard deviation, maximum, and difference deviation extracted from the data of three sensors by discriminant analysis. The evaluation results showed highly accurate behavior recognition based on foot pressure at some points. In addition, by canonical discriminant analysis, six discriminant functions which classify the seven actions with an accuracy of 100% were derived by using feature quantities extracted from five sensors. The results confirmed that discriminant analysis can be used for automatically recognizing human behaviors based on foot pressure data.

  4. Effects of thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-04-20

    BACKGROUND Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. RESULTS After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

  5. Functional Foot Symmetry and Its Relation to Lower Extremity Physical Performance in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Riskowski, J.L.; Hagedorn, TJ; Dufour, AB; Hannan, MT

    2012-01-01

    Background While many studies use gait symmetry as a marker of healthy gait, the evidence that gait symmetry exists is limited. Because gait symmetry is thought to arise through laterality (i.e., limb preference) and affects gait retraining efforts, it is important to understand if symmetry exists during gait in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate foot and gait symmetry in the population-based Framingham Foot Study as well as to determine the effects of vertical force symmetry on physical performance measures. Methods Members of the Framingham Foot Study were included in this analysis (N=1333). Foot function and force data were collected using the Tekscan Matscan during self-selected gait, with symmetry evaluated using the symmetry index. The short physical performance battery (SPPB) measures of balance, chair stands and gait speed assessed lower extremity physical function. Participants were evaluated using quartiles of gait speed and foot symmetry to determine the effects of symmetry on lower extremity physical function. Results Individuals with faster gait speed displayed greater foot function asymmetry; individuals with −3.0% to −9.5% asymmetry in foot function performed better on the short physical performance battery (SPPB). Further, with aging, the degree of asymmetry was reduced. Conclusions While this research suggests that a moderate degree of foot asymmetry is associated with better lower extremity function, the causes of vertical force asymmetry are unknown. Future studies should evaluate the causes of foot asymmetry and should track the changes in symmetry that occur with aging. PMID:22560642

  6. A review of the foot function index and the foot function index – revised

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Foot Function Index (FFI) is a self-report, foot-specific instrument measuring pain and disability and has been widely used to measure foot health for over twenty years. A revised FFI (FFI-R) was developed in response to criticism of the FFI. The purpose of this review was to assess the uses of FFI and FFI-R as were reported in medical and surgical literature and address the suggestions found in the literature to improve the metrics of FFI-R. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed/Medline and Embase databases from October 1991 through December 2010 comprised the main sources of literature. To enrich the bibliography, the search was extended to BioMedLib and Scopus search engines and manual search methods. Search terms included FFI, FFI scores, FFI-R. Requirements included abstracts/full length articles, English-language publications, and articles containing the term "foot complaints/problems." Articles selected were scrutinized; EBM abstracted data from literature and collected into tables designed for this review. EBM analyzed tables, KJC, JM, RMS reviewed and confirmed table contents. KJC and JM reanalyzed the original database of FFI-R to improve metrics. Results Seventy-eight articles qualified for this review, abstracts were compiled into 12 tables. FFI and FFI-R were used in studies of foot and ankle disorders in 4700 people worldwide. FFI Full scale or the Subscales and FFI-R were used as outcome measures in various studies; new instruments were developed based on FFI subscales. FFI Full scale was adapted/translated into other cultures. FFI and FFI-R psychometric properties are reported in this review. Reanalysis of FFI-R subscales' confirmed unidimensionality, and the FFI-R questionnaires' response categories were edited into four responses for ease of use. Conclusion This review was limited to articles published in English in the past twenty years. FFI is used extensively worldwide; this instrument pioneered a quantifiable measure

  7. MO-AB-207-00: ACR Update in MR, CT, Nuclear Medicine, and Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  8. TU-A-18C-01: ACR Accreditation Updates in CT, Ultrasound, Mammography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Berns, E; Hangiandreou, N; McNitt-Gray, M

    2014-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, the ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound, and computed tomography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program. To understand the new requirements of the ACR ultrasound accreditation program, and roles the physicist can play in annual equipment surveys and setting up and supervising the routine QC program. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process.

  9. MO-AB-207-03: ACR Update in Nuclear Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, B.

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  10. The reliability and validity of a three-camera foot image system for obtaining foot anthropometrics.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Damien; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Hunt, Adrienne; Smith, Richard

    2010-08-01

    The purpose was to develop a foot image capture and measurement system with web cameras (the 3-FIS) to provide reliable and valid foot anthropometric measures with efficiency comparable to that of the conventional method of using a handheld anthropometer. Eleven foot measures were obtained from 10 subjects using both methods. Reliability of each method was determined over 3 consecutive days using the intraclass correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE). Reliability was excellent for both the 3-FIS and the handheld anthropometer for the same 10 variables, and good for the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint height. The RMSE values over 3 days ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 mm for the handheld anthropometer, and from 0.8 to 3.6 mm for the 3-FIS. The RMSE values between the 3-FIS and the handheld anthropometer were between 2.3 and 7.4 mm. The 3-FIS required less time to collect and obtain the final variables than the handheld anthropometer. The 3-FIS provided accurate and reproducible results for each of the foot variables and in less time than the conventional approach of a handheld anthropometer.

  11. The adaptive drop foot stimulator - Multivariable learning control of foot pitch and roll motion in paretic gait.

    PubMed

    Seel, Thomas; Werner, Cordula; Schauer, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Many stroke patients suffer from the drop foot syndrome, which is characterized by a limited ability to lift (the lateral and/or medial edge of) the foot and leads to a pathological gait. In this contribution, we consider the treatment of this syndrome via functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the peroneal nerve during the swing phase of the paretic foot. A novel three-electrodes setup allows us to manipulate the recruitment of m. tibialis anterior and m. fibularis longus via two independent FES channels without violating the zero-net-current requirement of FES. We characterize the domain of admissible stimulation intensities that results from the nonlinearities in patients' stimulation intensity tolerance. To compensate most of the cross-couplings between the FES intensities and the foot motion, we apply a nonlinear controller output mapping. Gait phase transitions as well as foot pitch and roll angles are assessed in realtime by means of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). A decentralized Iterative Learning Control (ILC) scheme is used to adjust the stimulation to the current needs of the individual patient. We evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in experimental trials with drop foot patients walking on a treadmill and on level ground. Starting from conventional stimulation parameters, the controller automatically determines individual stimulation parameters and thus achieves physiological foot pitch and roll angle trajectories within at most two strides.

  12. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  13. Foot anatomy specialization for postural sensation and control.

    PubMed

    Wright, W G; Ivanenko, Y P; Gurfinkel, V S

    2012-03-01

    Anthropological and biomechanical research suggests that the human foot evolved a unique design for propulsion and support. In theory, the arch and toes must play an important role, however, many postural studies tend to focus on the simple hinge action of the ankle joint. To investigate further the role of foot anatomy and sensorimotor control of posture, we quantified the deformation of the foot arch and studied the effects of local perturbations applied to the toes (TOE) or 1st/2nd metatarsals (MT) while standing. In sitting position, loading and lifting a 10-kg weight on the knee respectively lowered and raised the foot arch between 1 and 1.5 mm. Less than 50% of this change could be accounted for by plantar surface skin compression. During quiet standing, the foot arch probe and shin sway revealed a significant correlation, which shows that as the tibia tilts forward, the foot arch flattens and vice versa. During TOE and MT perturbations (a 2- to 6-mm upward shift of an appropriate part of the foot at 2.5 mm/s), electromyogram (EMG) measures of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius revealed notable changes, and the root-mean-square (RMS) variability of shin sway increased significantly, these increments being greater in the MT condition. The slow return of RMS to baseline level (>30 s) suggested that a very small perturbation changes the surface reference frame, which then takes time to reestablish. These findings show that rather than serving as a rigid base of support, the foot is compliant, in an active state, and sensitive to minute deformations. In conclusion, the architecture and physiology of the foot appear to contribute to the task of bipedal postural control with great sensitivity.

  14. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory

    PubMed Central

    Chantelau, Ernst A

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless foot ulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complication of painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletes the foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the afferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptors and excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, some of them are cold or warm receptors whose functions in diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported. Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testing that thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increase during the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Pain perception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely been studied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantar digital skinfolds showed that the perception threshold was always above the upper limit of measurement of 512 mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However, deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy. PMID:25897350

  15. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst A

    2015-04-15

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless foot ulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complication of painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletes the foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the afferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptors and excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, some of them are cold or warm receptors whose functions in diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported. Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testing that thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increase during the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Pain perception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely been studied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantar digital skinfolds showed that the perception threshold was always above the upper limit of measurement of 512 mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However, deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy.

  16. Sex determination from hand and foot dimensions in a North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Sharma, Abhilasha

    2011-03-01

    Hands and feet are often recovered from the site of natural as well as man-made disasters because of bomb blasts, train accidents, plane crashes, or mass homicides. This study is intended to establish standards for determination of sex from the dimensions of hands and feet in a North Indian population. The data for this study comprise 123 men and 123 women aged between 17 and 20 years from the "Rajput" population of Himachal Pradesh in North India. Four anthropometric measurements viz. hand length, hand breadth, foot length, and foot breadth have been taken on both sides of each subject following international anthropometric standards. The hand index (hand breadth/hand length × 100) and the foot index (foot breadth/foot length × 100) were calculated. Sectioning points and regression models are derived for the hand and foot dimensions and the derived indices. The hand and foot dimensions show a higher accuracy in sex determination by sectioning point analysis when compared to hand and foot index. Of the hand and the foot dimensions, hand breadth and foot breadth showed better accuracy in sex determination. Hand index and foot index remain poor sex discriminators in the study.

  17. Analysis of joint force and torque for the human and non-human ape foot during bipedal walking with implications for the evolution of the foot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Abboud, Rami J; Günther, Michael M; Crompton, Robin H

    2014-01-01

    The feet of apes have a different morphology from those of humans. Until now, it has merely been assumed that the morphology seen in humans must be adaptive for habitual bipedal walking, as the habitual use of bipedal walking is generally regarded as one of the most clear-cut differences between humans and apes. This study asks simply whether human skeletal proportions do actually enhance foot performance during human-like bipedalism, by examining the influence of foot proportions on force, torque and work in the foot joints during simulated bipedal walking. Skeletons of the common chimpanzee, orangutan, gorilla and human were represented by multi-rigid-body models, where the components of the foot make external contact via finite element surfaces. The models were driven by identical joint motion functions collected from experiments on human walking. Simulated contact forces between the ground and the foot were found to be reasonably comparable with measurements made during human walking using pressure- and force-platforms. Joint force, torque and work in the foot were then predicted. Within the limitations of our model, the results show that during simulated human-like bipedal walking, (1) the human and non-human ape (NHA) feet carry similar joint forces, although the distributions of the forces differ; (2) the NHA foot incurs larger joint torques than does the human foot, although the human foot has higher values in the first tarso-metatarsal and metatarso-phalangeal joints, whereas the NHA foot incurs higher values in the lateral digits; and (3) total work in the metatarso-phalangeal joints is lower in the human foot than in the NHA foot. The results indicate that human foot proportions are indeed well suited to performance in normal human walking. PMID:24925580

  18. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  19. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  20. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482.

  1. Foot morphology in Spanish school children according to sex and age.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Abellán, Laura; Aguado, Xavier; Jiménez-Ormeño, Ester; Mecerreyes, Laura; Alegre, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the differences in foot dimensions in a sample of Spanish school-aged children. A total of 497 boys and 534 girls from Spain participated in the study. Measurements of both feet were obtained using a 3D foot digitiser, and shoe sizes were recorded and then estimated based on foot length measurements. The variations in foot measurements underwent a gradual increase with age in both boys and girls. Gender differences appeared at the age of 8-9 years, when the girls in the sample were found to wear smaller shoes than those they should have worn. Most foot dimensions begin to differ between boys and girls at the age of 8 years. The girls in the sample studied used footwear that was too small for their foot length, probably because they looked for a better width fit.

  2. The Diabetic foot: A global threat and a huge challenge for Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papanas, N; Maltezos, E

    2009-01-01

    The diabetic foot continues to be a major cause of morbidity, posing a global threat. Substantial progress has been now accomplished in the treatment of foot lesions, but further improvement is required. Treatment options may be classified into established measures (revascularisation, casting and debridement) and new modalities. All therapeutic measures should be provided by specialised dedicated multidisciplinary foot clinics. In particular, the diabetic foot is a huge challenge for Greece. There is a dramatic need to increase the number of engaged foot care teams and their resources throughout the country. It is also desirable to continue education of both physicians and general diabetic population on the magnitude of the problem and on the suitable preventative measures. At the same time, more data on the prevalence and clinical manifestations of the diabetic foot in Greece should be carefully collected. Finally, additional research should investigate feasible ways of implementing current knowledge in everyday clinical practice. PMID:20011082

  3. Movement within foot and ankle joint in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a 3-dimensional ultrasound analysis of medial gastrocnemius length with correction for effects of foot deformation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    of externally applied moments, it is concluded that foot plate angle measurements underestimate angular changes at the talocrural joint when moving in dorsal flexion direction and overestimate them when moving in plantar flexion direction, with concomitant effects on triceps surae lengths. Conclusions In SCP children diagnosed with decreased dorsal ROM of the ankle joint, the commonly used measure (i.e. range of foot plate angle), is not a good estimate of rotation at the talocrural joint. since a sizable part of the movement of the foot (or foot plate) derives from internal deformation of the foot. PMID:24364826

  4. Clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in people with chronic gout.

    PubMed

    Rome, Keith; Erikson, Kathryn; Otene, Cynthia; Sahid, Hazra; Sangster, Karyn; Gow, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gout is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and it has an affliction to the foot. Foot involvement in gout has been linked to foot pain, impairment and disability. There has been limited research on the effect of ulceration on foot pain, impairment, disability and health-related quality of life in patients already living with gout. The aim of the study was to describe the wound characteristics and the effect on foot pain, disability and health-related quality of life in patients with foot ulceration associated with gout. Participants were recruited from rheumatology clinics in Auckland, New Zealand. All the current foot ulceration sites and wound characteristics were recorded using the TIME wound assessment tool. The outcome measures included general pain, patient global assessment scale, foot pain, disability and impairment. Participants completed the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule to assess the effect of ulcers on health-related quality of life. Sensory loss, vibrational thresholds and ankle brachial pressure index were collated to assess for lower limb arterial disease. Six participants were predominantly older men with a long duration of gout, high rates of obesity and co-morbidities such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The mean (SD) duration of the foot ulcers was 4 (2) months. The majority of foot ulcers observed were 0·5 cm(2) or smaller superficial thickness with surrounding callus. Partial thickness and full-thickness ulcers were also observed. Two patients presented with ulcers on multiple sites. There was only one case of infection. Gouty tophi were evident in most of the wounds. The dorsal aspect of the third toe was found to ulcerate in most cases. Moderate scores of foot pain, disability, impairment and health-related quality of life were observed. Most participants wore shoes deemed as poor. Foot ulceration in gout is chronic and multiple ulcers can occur with the potential of leading to delayed

  5. Role of Aspergillus niger acrA in Arsenic Resistance and Its Use as the Basis for an Arsenic Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Se-In; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Lee, Mark J.; Gibbs, Bernard F.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater sources is a major issue worldwide, since exposure to high levels of arsenic has been linked to a variety of health problems. Effective methods of detection are thus greatly needed as preventive measures. In an effort to develop a fungal biosensor for arsenic, we first identified seven putative arsenic metabolism and transport genes in Aspergillus niger, a widely used industrial organism that is generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Among the genes tested for RNA expression in response to arsenate, acrA, encoding a putative plasma membrane arsenite efflux pump, displayed an over 200-fold increase in gene expression in response to arsenate. We characterized the function of this A. niger protein in arsenic efflux by gene knockout and confirmed that AcrA was located at the cell membrane using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion construct. Based on our observations, we developed a putative biosensor strain containing a construct of the native promoter of acrA fused with egfp. We analyzed the fluorescence of this biosensor strain in the presence of arsenic using confocal microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The biosensor strain reliably detected both arsenite and arsenate in the range of 1.8 to 180 μg/liter, which encompasses the threshold concentrations for drinking water set by the World Health Organization (10 and 50 μg/liter). PMID:22467499

  6. Role of Aspergillus niger acrA in arsenic resistance and its use as the basis for an arsenic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-In; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Lee, Mark J; Gibbs, Bernard F; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-06-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater sources is a major issue worldwide, since exposure to high levels of arsenic has been linked to a variety of health problems. Effective methods of detection are thus greatly needed as preventive measures. In an effort to develop a fungal biosensor for arsenic, we first identified seven putative arsenic metabolism and transport genes in Aspergillus niger, a widely used industrial organism that is generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Among the genes tested for RNA expression in response to arsenate, acrA, encoding a putative plasma membrane arsenite efflux pump, displayed an over 200-fold increase in gene expression in response to arsenate. We characterized the function of this A. niger protein in arsenic efflux by gene knockout and confirmed that AcrA was located at the cell membrane using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion construct. Based on our observations, we developed a putative biosensor strain containing a construct of the native promoter of acrA fused with egfp. We analyzed the fluorescence of this biosensor strain in the presence of arsenic using confocal microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The biosensor strain reliably detected both arsenite and arsenate in the range of 1.8 to 180 μg/liter, which encompasses the threshold concentrations for drinking water set by the World Health Organization (10 and 50 μg/liter).

  7. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  8. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.312 Footings. (a) Materials approved... (incorporated by reference, see § 3285.4). (3) ABS footing pads. (i) ABS footing pads are permitted, provided... use in the soil classification at the site. (ii) ABS footing pads must be listed or labeled for...

  9. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Foundations § 3285.312 Footings. (a) Materials approved... (incorporated by reference, see § 3285.4). (3) ABS footing pads. (i) ABS footing pads are permitted, provided... use in the soil classification at the site. (ii) ABS footing pads must be listed or labeled for...

  10. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  11. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  12. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  13. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm.

  14. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  15. [Three-dimensional analysis of the foot following implantation of a HINTEGRA ankle prosthesis: evaluation with the Heidelberg foot model].

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Wolf, S; Döderlein, L

    2006-05-01

    Detailed foot kinematics after total ankle replacement has not yet been investigated. In this study 11 patients with unilateral Hintegra ankle prosthesis were analysed with the Heidelberg Foot Model. This model measures the kinematics of the fore-, mid- and hindfoot in three clinical planes. Moreover, the kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle was captured. A diminished ROM was found in all foot segments investigated. The timing of the kinematics between sound and involved side appeared similar. A limitation in the hindfoot mobility, as experienced after ankle arthrodesis, was not observed. However, a careful hindfoot alignment is essential for optimal foot function, and previous malalignments should be corrected. Concerning the kinetics, the replaced ankle showed a decreased power generation compensated by an increase in power in the ipsilateral knee. For a more detailed evaluation, further studies are required which include pre- and postoperative data and also take into account different types of prostheses.

  16. Mouth in Foot Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Daniel C; Agee, Willie A; Pires, Valerie L; Yim, Duke G; Ngauy, Viseth

    2015-01-01

    Toothpicks are commonly used household items that rarely cause serious injury or infection. Toothpick-related injuries often occur due to ingestion with subsequent trauma/infection at distal sites within the gastrointestinal tract; however, cardiovascular, pleural, and soft tissue infections have been reported. Eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus found in oral flora associated with bite wound infections. A few case reports describe E. corrodens osteomyelitis from toothpick puncture wounds. We report a case of foot cellulitis and abscess in an elderly diabetic after toothpick puncture injury that was unresponsive to empiric antibiotics. Wound cultures grew E. corrodens and rare Peptostreptococcus species. E. corrodens is resistant to first-generation cephalosporins, macrolides, aminoglycosides, clindamycin, and metronidazole. This case highlights the insidious nature of E. corrodens infections and the need to tailor empiric antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections based on the mechanism of injury. In addition, this case stresses the importance of protective footwear in diabetics and serves as a cautionary tale regarding the use of seemingly innocuous toothpicks. PMID:26793413

  17. Homosexual foot fetishism.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M S; Williams, C J; Calhan, C

    1994-12-01

    262 respondents from an organization for homosexual foot fetishists provide information from a broader sample than clinical cases and allow examination of the effects of sexual preference on fetishism. Data show a wide range of feet/footwear objects to be arousing. Such interests were often associated with particular types of men, yet interests were subject to change over time. Fetishistic arousal rested on both sensual and symbolic aspects of the fetish. Symbolically, it was the theme of "masculinity" that made male feet/footwear arousing, showing parallels to "femininity" evoked by female feet/footwear for male heterosexual fetishists. For many of the respondents, fetishism did not seem to be a substitute for living persons. Respondents had intimate relationships and were able to incorporate their fetish interests into stable relationships and less intimate ones. Considerable involvement in sadomasochistic practices was also found as was involvement in the gay world. Finally, nothing about a fetishistic interest seemed to preclude the development of subcultural forms around the practice.

  18. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  19. The Relationships between Foot Arch Volumes and Dynamic Plantar Pressure during Midstance of Walking in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsun-Wen; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Chien-Ju; Su, Fong-Chin; Tsai, Ming-June

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the foot arch volume measured from static positions and the plantar pressure distribution during walking. Methods A total of 27 children, two to six years of age, were included in this study. Measurements of static foot posture were obtained, including navicular height and foot arch volume in sitting and standing positions. Plantar pressure, force and contact areas under ten different regions of the foot were obtained during walking. Results The foot arch index was correlated (r = 0.32) with the pressure difference under the midfoot during the foot flat phase. The navicular heights and foot arch volumes in sitting and standing positions were correlated with the mean forces and pressures under the first (r = −0.296∼−0.355) and second metatarsals (r = −0.335∼−0.504) and midfoot (r = −0.331∼−0.496) during the stance phase of walking. The contact areas under the foot were correlated with the foot arch parameters, except for the area under the midfoot. Conclusions The foot arch index measured in a static position could be a functional index to predict the dynamic foot functions when walking. The foot arch is a factor which will influence the pressure distribution under the foot. Children with a lower foot arch demonstrated higher mean pressure and force under the medial forefoot and midfoot, and lower contact areas under the foot, except for the midfoot region. Therefore, children with flatfoot may shift their body weight to a more medial foot position when walking, and could be at a higher risk of soft tissue injury in this area. PMID:24736650

  20. 10 CFR 52.53 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.53 Section 52.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  1. 10 CFR 52.165 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.165 Section 52.165 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  2. 10 CFR 52.165 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.165 Section 52.165 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  3. 75 FR 10840 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 18... 3, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  4. 75 FR 7632 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 2, 2010, at 11545...: February 12, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  5. 10 CFR 52.23 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.23 Section 52.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application for an early...

  6. 10 CFR 52.23 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.23 Section 52.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application for an early...

  7. 10 CFR 52.141 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.141 Section 52.141 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  8. 10 CFR 52.141 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.141 Section 52.141 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  9. 75 FR 13611 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability and PRA; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Reliability... would result in major inconvenience. Dated: March 15, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  10. 10 CFR 52.53 - Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). 52.53 Section 52.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS... Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). The Commission shall refer a copy of the application to the...

  11. 75 FR 38564 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Plant Operations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Plant Operations and Fire Protection The ACRS Subcommittee on Plant Operations and Fire Protection will hold a...

  12. 76 FR 80410 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Doc No: 2011-32907] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on January 18, 2012, Room...

  13. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Control panel below the test section of the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (8-Foot HST). Authorized July 17, 1933, construction of the 8-Foot HST was paid for with funds from the Federal Public Works Administration. Manly Hood and Russell Robinson designed the unusual facility which could produce a 500 mph wind stream across an 8-Foot test section. The concrete shell was not part of the original design. Like most projects funded through New Deal programs, the PWA restricted the amount of money which could be spent on materials. The majority of funds were supposed to be expended on labor. Though originally, Hood and Robinson had planned a welded steel pressure vessel around the test section, PWA officials proposed the idea of concrete. This picture shows the test section inside the igloo-like structure with walls of 1-foot thick reinforced concrete. The thick walls were needed 'because of the Bernoulli effect, [which meant that] the text chamber had to withstand powerful, inwardly directed pressure. Operating personnel located inside the igloo were subjected to pressures equivalent to 10,000-foot altitude and had to wear oxygen masks and enter through airlocks. A heat exchanger removed the large quantities of heat generated by the big fan.'

  14. Proliferation Resistance Evaluation of ACR-1000 Fuel with Minor Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2008-09-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics

  15. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-03-06

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana.

  16. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    PubMed

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  17. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Gaudiani, Michael A.; Slullitel, Pablo A.; Satalich, James; Rebolledo, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity-related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain and who underwent FPAW testing along with standard physical examination testing. Demographic data, including age, sex and hip laterality, were collected from each patient. FPAW testing was performed with directed internal and external foot progression angles from their baseline measurements, with a positive test reproducing pain and/or discomfort. Comparisons were then made with flexion adduction internal rotation (FADIR) and flexion abduction external rotation (FABER) tests as the designated diagnostic standard examinations for FAI and hip instability, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, along with the McNemar chi-square test for group comparison, were used to generate summary statistics. In addition, areas under the combined receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of test performance were calculated for both FPAW and the designated standard examination tests (FADIR, FABER). Radiographic imaging was used subsequently to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The average age of the study cohort was 35.4 ± 11.8 years, with 114 patients being

  18. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  19. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  20. ACR appropriateness criteria acute hip pain-suspected fracture.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert J; Weissman, Barbara N; Kransdorf, Mark J; Adler, Ronald; Appel, Marc; Bancroft, Laura W; Bernard, Stephanie A; Bruno, Michael A; Fries, Ian Blair; Morrison, William B; Mosher, Timothy J; Roberts, Catherine C; Scharf, Stephen C; Tuite, Michael J; Zoga, Adam C

    2014-02-01

    Substantial cost, morbidity, and mortality are associated with acute proximal femoral fracture and may be reduced through an optimized diagnostic imaging workup. Radiography represents the primary diagnostic test of choice for the evaluation of acute hip pain. In middle aged and elderly patients with negative radiographs, the evidence indicates MRI to be the next diagnostic imaging study to exclude a proximal femoral fracture. CT, because of its relative decreased sensitivity, is only indicated in patients with MRI contraindications. Bone densitometry (DXA) should be obtained in patients with fragility fractures. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  1. [The prevalence of tuberculosis in the state of Acre].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Analdemyra da Costa; Sanchez, Myllianne da Silva; Moreira, Suzianny da Silva; Lopes, Creso Machado

    2004-01-01

    It is a descriptive study with the aim of studying the prevalence of tuberculosis in the State of Acre from 1995 to 2001. The data were collected from the forms of the Program for Tuberculosis Control of the Health and Sanitation Office. The data show that the incidence has been maintaining an average of 343.7 new cases a year. The pulmonary type was the most prevalent one, accounting for 90.0%. Among the age groups, the 20-49 age range, with 1347 (56.0%) and the 60 and over-60 age range, with 412 (17.0%), stand out. From 1998 to 2001 the male sex was the most attacked one by the disease, when the year 2000 accounted for 58.2% of the cases. The average of the cure rate was 71.0% and abandonment of treatment was 14.8% in 2001 and 32.3% in 1995. The smallest percentage of death occurred in 1995 (1.0%) and the largest one in 1997 (7.0%). Five cases were notified for the occurrence of coinfection between TB/AIDS and HIV/TB. The program's population coverage was within 90% every year. From the 22 cities, 6 (27.3%) still do not have any action for controlling the disease.

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Assessment of Fetal Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Lynn; Khati, Nadia J; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Dudiak, Kika M; Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Henrichsen, Tara L; Meyer, Benjamin J; Nyberg, David A; Poder, Liina; Shipp, Thomas D; Zelop, Carolyn M; Glanc, Phyllis

    2016-12-01

    Although there is limited evidence that antepartum testing decreases the risk for fetal death in low-risk pregnancies, women with high-risk factors for stillbirth should undergo antenatal fetal surveillance. The strongest evidence supporting antepartum testing pertains to pregnancies complicated by intrauterine fetal growth restriction secondary to uteroplacental insufficiency. The main ultrasound-based modalities to determine fetal health are the biophysical profile, modified biophysical profile, and duplex Doppler velocimetry. In patients at risk for cardiovascular compromise, fetal echocardiography may also be indicated to ensure fetal well-being. Although no single antenatal test has been shown to be superior, all have high negative predictive values. Weekly or twice-weekly fetal testing has become the standard practice in high-risk pregnancies. The timing for the initiation of assessments of fetal well-being should be tailored on the basis of the risk for stillbirth and the likelihood of survival with intervention. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

  3. Comparing resolved-sideband cooling and measurement-based feedback cooling on an equal footing: Analytical results in the regime of ground-state cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Nurdin, Hendra I.; Strauch, Frederick W.; James, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We show that in the regime of ground-state cooling, simple expressions can be derived for the performance of resolved-sideband cooling—an example of coherent feedback control—and optimal linear measurement-based feedback cooling for a harmonic oscillator. These results are valid to leading order in the small parameters that define this regime. They provide insight into the origins of the limitations of coherent and measurement-based feedback for linear systems, and the relationship between them. These limitations are not fundamental bounds imposed by quantum mechanics, but are due to the fact that both cooling methods are restricted to use only a linear interaction with the resonator. We compare the performance of the two methods on an equal footing—that is, for the same interaction strength—and confirm that coherent feedback is able to make much better use of the linear interaction than measurement-based feedback. We find that this performance gap is caused not by the back-action noise of the measurement but by the projection noise. We also obtain simple expressions for the maximal cooling that can be obtained by both methods in this regime, optimized over the interaction strength.

  4. Diabetic foot disease is associated with reduced erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Avivit; Livshits, Leonid; Srulevich, Ariel; Raz, Itamar; Yedgar, Shaul; Barshtein, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and encompasses microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. Abnormal blood rheology may also play a part in its development. Using a cell flow analyser (CFA), we examined the association between erythrocyte deformability and diabetic foot disease. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients with no known microvascular complications (n = 11) and patients suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer (n = 11) were isolated and their average elongation ratio (ER) as well as the ER distribution curve were measured. Average ER was decreased in the diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with diabetes and no complications (1·64 ± 0·07 versus 1·71 ± 0·1; P = 0·036). A significant rise in the percentage of minimally deformable red blood cells RBCs in diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with no complications was observed (37·89% ± 8·12% versus 30·61% ± 10·17%; P = 0·039) accompanied by a significant decrease in the percentage of highly deformable RBCs (12·47% ± 4·43% versus 17·49% ± 8·17% P = 0·046). Reduced erythrocyte deformability may slow capillary flow in the microvasculature and prolong wound healing in diabetic foot patients. Conversely, it may be the low-grade inflammatory state imposed by diabetic foot disease that reduces erythrocyte deformability. Further study of the rheological changes associated with diabetic foot disease may enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis and aid in the study of novel therapeutic approaches.

  5. Cutaneous microvascular flow in the foot during simulated variable gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. S.; Breit, G. A.; Styf, J. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to understand how weight bearing with varying gravitational fields affects blood perfusion in the sole of the foot. Human subjects underwent whole body tilting at four angles: upright [1 gravitational vector from head to foot (Gz)], 22 degrees (0.38 Gz), 10 degrees (0.17 Gz), and supine (0 Gz), simulating the gravitational fields of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity, respectively. Cutaneous capillary blood flow was monitored on the plantar surface of the heel by laser Doppler flowmetry while weight-bearing load was measured. At each tilt angle, subjects increased weight bearing on one foot in graded load increments of 1 kg beginning with zero. The weight bearing at which null flow first occurred was determined as the closing load. Subsequently, the weight bearing was reduced in reverse steps until blood flow returned (opening load). Mean closing loads for simulated Earth gravity, Mars gravity, Moon gravity, and microgravity were 9.1, 4.6, 4.4, and 3.6 kg, respectively. Mean opening loads were 7.9, 4.1, 3.5, and 3.1 kg, respectively. Mean arterial pressures in the foot (MAP(foot)) calculated for each simulated gravitational field were 192, 127, 106, and 87 mmHg, respectively. Closing load and opening load were significantly correlated with MAP(foot) (r =0.70, 0.72, respectively) and were significantly different (P < 0.001) from each other. The data suggest that decreased local arterial pressure in the foot lowers tolerance to external compression. Consequently, the human foot sole may be more prone to cutaneous ischemia during load bearing in microgravity than on Earth.

  6. Near-wall aerodynamics of idealized model foot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yoshi; Hall, Joseph; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sheth, Ritesh; Glauser, Mark; Khalifa, Ezzat

    2006-11-01

    The air quality is affected by amounts and types of contaminant particles suspended in the air. The particulate matter reaches the respiratory system in an indoor environment by fist becoming detached, resupended and then entrained in the human micro-environment. The resuspension phenomena from the floor occur through either a ballistic mechanism, where kinetic energy is transferred to dust particles through direct contact, or an aerodynamic mechanism, where dust particles are resuspended by the flow generated by the body. In this study we focus on the aerodynamic resuspension of particles caused by walking. The foot motion is idealized and is either towards or away from a floor. A circular disk and an elongated plate having the equivalent area to that of a human foot are used. The foot motion is driven vertically by a linear servo motor that controls the velocity, acceleration, stroke and deceleration. The model velocity is based on the real foot motion. In addition to flow visualization, flowfield measurements were conducted with PIV. In the downstroke, results show a vortex impacting the wall creating the strong wall jet. In upstroke, the vortex generated behind the idealized foot exhibits the large magnitude of velocity. Experiment is continuing with a model more closely to simulating shoe geometry as well as incorporating the real foot kinetics. The results will be compared with the numerical simulation and analytical results.

  7. Fear of falling and foot pain, impairment and disability in rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Morpeth, Tricia; Brenton-Rule, Angela; Carroll, Matthew; Frecklington, Mike; Rome, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Fear of falling, foot pain, impairment and disability are commonly reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the relationship between fear of falling and foot pain, impairment and disability has not been investigated in established RA. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between fear of falling and foot pain, walking velocity and foot impairment and disability in women with established RA. A secondary aim was to evaluate differences between fear of falling, foot pain, walking velocity and foot impairment and disability in women with established RA and age- and sex-matched control participants. Twenty-one women with established RA and twenty-one age- and sex-matched controls were assessed for fear of falling, foot pain, foot impairment and disability and walking velocity. Pearson's r-correlations were used to examine relationships between fear of falling and the foot measures. Independent samples t tests evaluated the differences in fear of falling and foot measures between the two groups. In people with RA, significant correlations were found between fear of falling and foot impairment (r = 0.53, p = 0.015), foot disability (r = 0.77, p <0.001) and walking velocity (r = 0.56, p < 0.001). No correlation was found between fear of falling and foot pain (r = 0.36; p = 0.11). Significant differences between cases and control participants were found between fear of falling (p = 0.001), foot impairment (p = 0.004) and foot disability (p < 0.001). Foot impairment and disability relates to fear of falling in women with established RA. A better understanding of fear of falling in people with established RA may contribute to more efficient falls assessments in order to identify at risk individuals.

  8. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiner, S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, Jody L.; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-ft in 1996 and 6,300 acre-ft in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by ET, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

  9. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner,S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, J.LaRue; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

    2002-01-29

    component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-feet in 1996 and 6,300 acre-feet in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by E T, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

  10. Deployment of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades in Simulated Forward Flight: Preliminary PSP Results from Test 581 in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Anthony Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, James; Forlines, Alan; Goss, Larry; Gregory, James W.; Juliano, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on the tips of rotorcraft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The system was designed to use a pulsed laser as an excitation source and PSP data was collected using the lifetime-based approach. With the higher intensity of the laser, this allowed PSP images to be acquired during a single laser pulse, resulting in the collection of crisp images that can be used to determine blade pressure at a specific instant in time. This is extremely important in rotorcraft applications as the blades experience dramatically different flow fields depending on their position in the rotor disk. Testing of the system was performed using the U.S. Army General Rotor Model System equipped with four identical blades. Two of the blades were instrumented with pressure transducers to allow for comparison of the results obtained from the PSP. This report will also detail possible improvements to the system.

  11. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  12. Full-Scale Propeller Disk Wake Survey and Boundary Layer Velocity Profile Measurements on the 154-Foot Ship R/V Athena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    TABLES ............. ........................... ix NOTATION ........ ..... ............................... x ABSTRACT...Pressure r/R or x Radius or RIO. Distance (r) from the propeller axis expressed as a ratio of the propeller radius (R) R R Reynolds number n n RI, R2 RI, R2...longitudinal velocity measured by means of boundary layer pitot tubes V V Actual model or ship velocity Vb( x ,e) --- Resultant inflow velocity to

  13. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions.

    PubMed

    Yoga, R; Khairul, A; Sunita, K; Suresh, C

    2006-02-01

    Infection plays a pivotal role in enhancing a diabetic foot at risk toward amputation. Effective antibiotic therapy against the offending pathogens is an important component of treatment of diabetic foot infections. Recognition of the pathogen is always difficult as the representative deep tissue sample for culture is surrounded by ulcer surface harbouring colonies of organisms frequently labelled as skin commensals. The emergent of resistant strains represents a compounding problem standing against efforts to prevent amputation. This study was undertaken to identify the pathogens associated with diabetic foot infection in terms of their frequency and sensitivity against certain commonly used antibiotics. Forty-four consecutive patients with open diabetic foot infections had wound swab taken for culture and sensitivity testing. Cultures positive were observed in 89% of the cases with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa encountered in 20%, 14% and 14% of cases respectively. Mixed growths were isolated in 6% of cultures. All Staphylcoccus aureus isolates were resistant to Penicillin but 80% were sensitive to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were sensitive to Methicillin and Gentamycin in 80% and 60% of cases respectively, and resistant to Ampicillin and Ceftazidime in 83% and 50% respectively. All Pseudomonas aeroginosa isolates were sensitive to Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin but 50% were resistant to Gentamycin. There was no single antibiotic possessing good coverage for all common organisms isolated from diabetic foot lesions. Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant cause of diabetic foot infections followed by Klebsiela pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most infections are monomicrobial. The emergence of multiresistant organisms is a worrying feature in diabetic foot infections.

  14. A pneumatic power harvesting ankle-foot orthosis to prevent foot-drop

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Robin; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T; Loth, Eric; Kogler, Géza; Manwaring, Scott D; Tyson, Serena N; Shorter, K Alex; Gilmer, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    Background A self-contained, self-controlled, pneumatic power harvesting ankle-foot orthosis (PhAFO) to manage foot-drop was developed and tested. Foot-drop is due to a disruption of the motor control pathway and may occur in numerous pathologies such as stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. The objectives for the prototype PhAFO are to provide toe clearance during swing, permit free ankle motion during stance, and harvest the needed power with an underfoot bellow pump pressurized during the stance phase of walking. Methods The PhAFO was constructed from a two-part (tibia and foot) carbon composite structure with an articulating ankle joint. Ankle motion control was accomplished through a cam-follower locking mechanism actuated via a pneumatic circuit connected to the bellow pump and embedded in the foam sole. Biomechanical performance of the prototype orthosis was assessed during multiple trials of treadmill walking of an able-bodied control subject (n = 1). Motion capture and pressure measurements were used to investigate the effect of the PhAFO on lower limb joint behavior and the capacity of the bellow pump to repeatedly generate the required pneumatic pressure for toe clearance. Results Toe clearance during swing was successfully achieved during all trials; average clearance 44 ± 5 mm. Free ankle motion was observed during stance and plantarflexion was blocked during swing. In addition, the bellow component repeatedly generated an average of 169 kPa per step of pressure during ten minutes of walking. Conclusion This study demonstrated that fluid power could be harvested with a pneumatic circuit built into an AFO, and used to operate an actuated cam-lock mechanism that controls ankle-foot motion at specific periods of the gait cycle. PMID:19527526

  15. A comparison of foot kinematics in people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Barton, Christian J; Cotchett, Matthew P; McSweeney, Simone R; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-10-01

    Foot posture is thought to influence predisposition to overuse injuries of the lower limb. Although the mechanisms underlying this proposed relationship are unclear, it is thought that altered foot kinematics may play a role. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate differences in foot motion between people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Foot posture in 19 participants was documented as normal-arched (n=10) or flat-arched (n=9) using a foot screening protocol incorporating measurements from weightbearing antero-posterior and lateral foot radiographs. Differences between the groups in triplanar motion of the tibia, rearfoot and forefoot during walking were evaluated using a three-dimensional motion analysis system incorporating a multi-segment foot model (OFM). Participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated greater peak forefoot plantar-flexion (-13.7° ± 5.6° vs -6.5° ± 3.7°; p=0.004), forefoot abduction (-12.9° ± 6.9° vs -1.8° ± 6.3°; p=0.002), and rearfoot internal rotation (10.6° ± 7.5° vs -0.2°± 9.9°; p=0.018) compared to those with normal-arched feet. Additionally, participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated decreased peak forefoot adduction (-7.0° ± 9.2° vs 5.6° ± 7.3°; p=0.004) and a trend towards increased rearfoot eversion (-5.8° ± 4.4° vs -2.5° ± 2.6°; p=0.06). These findings support the notion that flat-arched feet have altered motion associated with greater pronation during gait; factors that may increase the risk of overuse injury.

  16. Pseudoatomic Structure of the Tripartite Multidrug Efflux Pump AcrAB-TolC Reveals the Intermeshing Cogwheel-like Interaction between AcrA and TolC.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeongseop; Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Shigematsu, Hideki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Hyun, Jaekyung; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-02-02

    The resistance-nodulation-division type tripartite pump AcrAB-TolC and its homologs are responsible for multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by expelling a wide variety of toxic substrates. The three essential components, AcrA, AcrB, and TolC, must function in concert with each respective binding partner within the complex. In this study, we report an 8.2-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) 3D reconstruction of the complex that consists of an AcrAB fusion protein and a chimeric TolC protein. The pseudoatomic structure derived from the cryo-EM reconstruction clearly demonstrates a model only compatible with the adaptor bridging mechanism, wherein the funnel-like AcrA hexamer forms an intermeshing cogwheel-like interaction with the α-barrel tip region of TolC. These observations provide a structural milestone for understanding multidrug resistance in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and may also lead to the design of new antibacterial drugs.

  17. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  18. An Evaluation of Surgical Functional Reconstruction of the Foot Using Kinetic and Kinematic Systems: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Palomar, Elena Irene; Javierre, Etelvina; Rey-Vasalo, José; Alfaro-Santafé, Víctor; Gómez-Benito, María José

    Most pedobarographic studies of microsurgical foot reconstruction have been retrospective. In the present study, we report the results from a prospective pedobarographic study of a patient after microsurgical reconstruction of her foot with a latissimus dorsi flap and a cutaneous paddle, with a 42-month follow-up period. We describe the foot reconstruction plan and the pedobarographic measurements and analyzed its functional outcome. The goal of the present study was to demonstrate that pedobarography could have a role in the treatment of foot reconstruction from a quantitative perspective. The pedobarographic measurements were recorded after the initial coverage surgery and 2 subsequent foot remodeling procedures. A total of 4 pedobarographic measurements and 2 gait analyses were recorded and compared for both the noninvolved foot and the injured foot. Furthermore, the progress of the reconstructed foot was critically evaluated using this method. Both static and dynamic patterns were compared at subsequent follow-up visits after the foot reconstruction. The values and progression of the foot shape, peak foot pressure (kPa), average foot pressure (kPa), total contact surface (cm(2)), loading time (%), and step time (ms) were recorded. Initially, the pressure distribution of the reconstructed foot showed higher peak values at nonanatomic locations, revealing a greater ulceration risk. Over time, we found an improvement in the shape and values of these factors in the involved foot. To homogenize the pressure distribution and correct the imbalance between the 2 feet, patient-specific insoles were designed and fabricated. In our patient, pedobarography provided an objective, repeatable, and recordable method for the evaluation of the reconstructed foot. Pedobarography can therefore provide valuable insights into the prevention of pressure ulcers and optimization of rehabilitation.

  19. Postnatal Foot Length to Determine Gestational Age: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wyk, Lizelle Van; Smith, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Gestational age is a critical factor in the management, decision-making, prognostication and follow-up of newborn infants. It is also essential for research and epidemiology. In the absence of an early assessment of fetal gestation by abdominal ultrasound, many neonatal units in developing countries determine gestational age by neonatal scores and last menstrual period-both of which are highly inaccurate. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether postnatal foot length measurement could accurately determine gestational age in a specified South African hospitalized neonatal population. Foot length was measured with a plastic Verniere's caliper. Foot length was shown to correlate well with gestational age (r = 0.919,p < 0.001). Intra-observer and inter-observer variability of foot length measurements was low. Foot length can therefore be used with high accuracy to determine the gestational age in a population where there is poor access to or utilization of antenatal sonar.

  20. Pitot pressure measurements in flow fields behind circular-arc nozzles with exhaust jets at subsonic free-stream Mach numbers. [langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, M. L.; Putnam, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The flow field behind a circular arc nozzle with exhaust jet was studied at subsonic free stream Mach numbers. A conical probe was used to measure the pitot pressure in the jet and free stream regions. Pressure data were recorded for two nozzle configurations at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0, 2.9, and 5.0. At each set of test conditions, the probe was traversed from the jet center line into the free stream region at seven data acquisition stations. The survey began at the nozzle exit and extended downstream at intervals. The pitot pressure data may be applied to the evaluation of computational flow field models, as illustrated by a comparison of the flow field data with results of inviscid jet plume theory.

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nandini D; Broderick, Daniel F; Burns, Judah; Deshmukh, Tejaswini K; Fries, Ian Blair; Harvey, H Benjamin; Holly, Langston; Hunt, Christopher H; Jagadeesan, Bharathi D; Kennedy, Tabassum A; O'Toole, John E; Perlmutter, Joel S; Policeni, Bruno; Rosenow, Joshua M; Schroeder, Jason W; Whitehead, Matthew T; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Corey, Amanda S

    2016-09-01

    Most patients presenting with uncomplicated acute low back pain (LBP) and/or radiculopathy do not require imaging. Imaging is considered in those patients who have had up to 6 weeks of medical management and physical therapy that resulted in little or no improvement in their back pain. It is also considered for those patients presenting with red flags raising suspicion for serious underlying conditions, such as cauda equina syndrome, malignancy, fracture, and infection. Many imaging modalities are available to clinicians and radiologists for evaluating LBP. Application of these modalities depends largely on the working diagnosis, the urgency of the clinical problem, and comorbidities of the patient. When there is concern for fracture of the lumbar spine, multidetector CT is recommended. Those deemed to be interventional candidates, with LBP lasting for > 6 weeks having completed conservative management with persistent radiculopathic symptoms, may seek MRI. Patients with severe or progressive neurologic deficit on presentation and red flags should be evaluated with MRI. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria pretreatment staging of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Jones, Bronwyn; Katz, Douglas S; Lalani, Tasneem; Miller, Frank H; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Tulchinsky, Mark; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy

    2012-11-01

    Because virtually all patients with colonic cancer will undergo some form of surgical therapy, the role of preoperative imaging is directed at determining the presence or absence of synchronous carcinomas or adenomas and local or distant metastases. In contrast, preoperative staging for rectal carcinoma has significant therapeutic implications and will direct the use of radiation therapy, surgical excision, or chemotherapy. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is recommended for the initial evaluation for the preoperative assessment of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Although the overall accuracy of CT varies directly with the stage of colorectal carcinoma, CT can accurately assess the presence of metastatic disease. MRI using endorectal coils can accurately assess the depth of bowel wall penetration of rectal carcinomas. Phased-array coils provide additional information about lymph node involvement. Adding diffusion-weighted imaging to conventional MRI yields better diagnostic accuracy than conventional MRI alone. Transrectal ultrasound can distinguish layers within the rectal wall and provides accurate assessment of the depth of tumor penetration and perirectal spread, and PET and PET/CT have been shown to alter therapy in almost one-third of patients with advanced primary rectal cancer. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  3. Overexpression of the Multidrug Efflux Operon acrEF by Insertional Activation with IS1 or IS10 Elements in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB Mutants Selected with Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Olliver, Anne; Vallé, Michel; Chaslus-Dancla, Elisabeth; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2005-01-01

    High-level fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT204 has been previously shown to be essentially due to both multiple target gene mutations and active efflux by the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. In this study we show that in intermediatly resistant acrB-inactivated serovar Typhimurium DT204 mutants, high-level resistance to FQs can be restored on in vitro selection with FQs. In each FQ- resistant mutant selected from serovar Typhimurium DT204 acrB mutant strains, an insertion sequence (IS1 or IS10) was found integrated upstream of the acrEF operon, coding for AcrEF, an efflux pump highly homologous to AcrAB. In one of the strains, transposition of IS1 caused partial deletion of acrS, the putative local repressor gene of the acrEF operon. Sequence analysis showed that both IS1 and IS10 elements contain putative promoter sequences that might alter the expression of adjacent acrEF genes. Indeed, reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed an 8- to 10-fold increase in expression of acrF in these insertional mutants, relative to their respective parental strain, which correlated well with the resistance levels observed to FQs and other unrelated drugs. It is noteworthy that AcrEF did not contribute to the intrinsic drug resistance of serovar Typhimurium, since acrF deletion in wild-type strains did not result in any increase in drug susceptibility. Moreover, deletion of acrS did not cause any acrF overexpression or any decrease in drug susceptibility, suggesting that acrEF overexpression is mediated solely by the IS1 and IS10 promoter sequences and not by inactivity of AcrS. Southern blot experiments showed that the number of chromosomal IS1 and IS10 elements in the serovar Typhimurium DT204 genome was about 5 and 15 respectively. None were detected in epidemic serovar Typhimurium DT104 strains or in the serovar Typhimurium reference strain LT2. Carrying IS1 and/or IS10 elements in their chromosome may thus be a selective

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Salem Acres Site, Salem, MA, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This decision document represents the selected remedial action for the Salem Acres Site in Salem, Massachusetts. The remedial action for the Salem Acres Site, as described in this ROD, addresses the principal threats to the human health and the environment posed by exposure of humans to contaminated soils from the Salem Acres Site. This remedy addresses all principal threats to human health and the environment posed by the sources of contamination at the Site resulting from dermal absorption and incidental ingestion of contaminants in surficial soils.

  5. [Operative treatment of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B

    1999-07-08

    The majority of diabetic foot ulcers are the results of repetitive pressure that exceeds the threshold of soft-tissue tolerance, leading to mechanical destruction of the tissue. Progression of plantar ulcers can rapidly lead to osteomyelitis that may result in loss of the foot through amputation. In order to prevent such a disaster, surgical treatment should be taken into consideration when conservative treatment remains without success. The goal of surgical treatment of an infected ulcer is debridement of the soft-tissue and removal of the underlying pressure by careful bone resection or correction of a deformity by arthrodesis. Various authors have recently reported successful surgical reconstruction of neuroarthropathic foot deformity and instability. Apparently arthrodesis is a viable alternative to amputation for patients with unstable deformity or recurrent ulceration. Proper preoperative evaluation is mandatory. The indications are not well defined yet.

  6. Foot Comfort for the Fashionable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Modellista Footwear's new shoe line uses Tempur(TM) material, which conforms to each wearer's unique foot shape to absorb shock and cushion the foot. The foam's properties allow the shoe to change with the wearer's foot as it shrinks and swells throughout the day. Scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center originally developed temper foam in the early 1970s to relieve the intense pressure of G-forces experienced by astronauts during rocket launches. Tempur-Pedic, Inc., further developed the foam and granted Modellista a license to use it in footwear. The Modellista collection is the first shoe design and construction to be certified by the Space Awareness Alliance. The shoes, with designs ranging from traditional clog shapes to sling backs and open-toe sandals, are currently available nationwide at select specialty shoe stores and through catalogs. Tempur(TM) is a registered trademark of Tempur-Pedic, Inc.

  7. An Investigation of Structure, Flexibility and Function Variables that Discriminate Asymptomatic Foot Types.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sarah P; Song, Jinsup; Kraszewski, Andrew P; Hafer, Jocelyn F; Rao, Smita; Backus, Sherry; Mootanah, Rajshree; Hillstrom, Howard J

    2016-12-19

    It has been suggested that foot type consider not only foot structure (high, normal, low arch), but also function (over-pronation, normal, over-supination) and flexibility (reduced, normal, excessive). Therefore, this study used canonical regression analyses to assess which variables of foot structure, function, and flexibility can accurately discriminate between clinical foot type classifications. The feet of 61 asymptomatic, healthy adults (18-77 years) were classified as cavus (N=24), rectus (N=54), or planus (N=44) using standard clinical measures. Custom jigs assessed foot structure and flexibility. Foot function was assessed using an emed-x plantar pressure measuring device. Canonical regression analyses were applied separately to extract essential structure, flexibility, and function variables. A third canonical regression analysis was performed on the extracted variables to identify a combined model. The initial combined model included 30 extracted variables; however five terminal variables (malleolar valgus index, arch height index while sitting, first metatarsophalangeal joint laxity while standing, pressure-time integral and maximum contact area of medial arch) were able to correctly predict 80.7% of foot types. These remaining variables focused on specific foot characteristics (hindfoot alignment, arch height, midfoot mechanics, Windlass mechanism) that could be essential to discriminating foot type.

  8. 77 FR 74697 - Meeting of the ACRS, Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS, Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on U.S. Evolutionary Power Reactor (U.S..., 2012. Antonio Dias, Technical Advisor, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  9. ACR 2016 Open-Microphone Session: ACR Membership 3.0-Moving From Member Volume to Value.

    PubMed

    Stern, Eric; Metter, Darlene; Everett, Catherine; Flug, Jonathan; Friedberg, Eric; Kotsenas, Amy; Nathan, Jennifer; Herrington, William

    2017-04-02

    This report of the 2016 ACR Council Open Microphone session reviews the discussion around interests and concerns of council members and state chapter leaders as to the perceived and real value of their ACR membership, and how the ACR might further enhance membership value and meaningful engagement with members.

  10. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  11. Ray amputation for the treatment of foot macrodactyly in children.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Park, J W; Hong, S W; Jeong, J Y; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2015-10-01

    Macrodactyly of the foot is a rare but disabling condition. We present the results of surgery on 18 feet of 16 patients, who underwent ray amputation and were followed-up for more than two years at a mean of 80 months (25 to 198). We radiologically measured the intermetatarsal width and forefoot area pre-operatively and at six weeks and two years after surgery. We also evaluated the clinical results using the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children (OxAFQ-C) and the Questionnaire for Foot Macrodactyly. The intermetatarsal width and forefoot area ratios were significantly decreased after surgery. The mean OxAFQ-C score was 42 (16 to 57) pre-operatively, improving to 47 (5 to 60) at two years post-operatively (p = 0.021). The mean questionnaire for Foot Macrodactyly score two years after surgery was 8 (6 to 10). Ray amputation gave a measurable reduction in foot size with excellent functional results. For patients with metatarsal involvement, a motionless toe, or involvement of multiple digits, ray amputation is a clinically effective option which is acceptable to patients.

  12. Seasonal Variations in CO2 Fluxes in Fluvial Systems in Southstern of Amazonia (acre, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, E.; Krusche, A. V.; Salimon, C. I.; Victoria, R. L.; Sawakuchi, H.

    2012-12-01

    Our main objective was to measure the CO2 fluxes in 5 (five) rivers and 2 (two) streams in the Purus Basin. These rivers and streams have different size, water chemical characteristics and type soil, despite all are classified as white-water rivers. We toke measures of pH, electrical conductivity, pCO2, DOC and DIC concentrations and CO2 fluxes in two seasonal periods: Wet Season (dez2010-abr2011 and dez2011-abr2012) and Dry Season (jul2011-set2011). Water samples were taken to DOC (filtered with quartz filters and preserved with hydrochloric acid), DIC (filtered with cellulose acetate filters and preserved with thymol) and δ13C of DIC. These water samples were sent to CENA/USP to be analyzed. EC and pH measurements were made with portable meters. Partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) was measure with an equilibrator and CO2 fluxes with a floating chamber. Precipitation, water stage and discharge data was obtained by UFAC climatological station and ANA (National Water Agency). Statistical analysis were made using R Program. DOC and DIC concentrations presented significant differences between the periods. In the wet season were observed the highest values to DOC concentrations in all rivers and streams. In the rivers, these concentrations varied between 7.09±3.10 (Acre River) and 9.32±2.31 mg.L-1 (Rôla River). In the dry season, the values observed were 3.15±1.11 (Acre River) and 7.96±0.11 (Caeté River). In the streams, these concentrations also higher in the wet season, with 1.68±0.32 mg.L-1 in the Floresta stream and 3.22±1.08 mg.L-1 in the Escondido stream. To DIC concentrations, this pattern was inverted, with higher concentrations observed in the dry season. Iaco River presented the higher concentration (50.8±4.7 mg.L-1) and Acre River the lower concentration (11.30±2.77 mg.L-1). Despite the DIC concentrations were higher in the dry season, the pCO2 and CO2 fluxes values were higher in the wet season. In the rivers, the pCO2 values varied between 4,189±1

  13. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Injections and other Procedures Treatments of the ... completed a four-year program in Osteopathic Medicine. Diabetic foot - Diabetes affects the feet in a profound way ...

  14. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  16. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week @ ACFAS Poll Results Arthroscopy e-Book The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery Read some of the latest research from the official peer-reviewed scientific journal of ACFAS, The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery ( ...

  17. 43 CFR 2524.7 - Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Desert-Land Entries Within a Reclamation Project § 2524.7 Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres....

  18. 43 CFR 2524.7 - Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Desert-Land Entries Within a Reclamation Project § 2524.7 Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres....

  19. 43 CFR 2524.7 - Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Desert-Land Entries Within a Reclamation Project § 2524.7 Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres....

  20. 43 CFR 2524.7 - Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) DESERT-LAND ENTRIES Desert-Land Entries Within a Reclamation Project § 2524.7 Disposal of lands in excess of 160 acres....

  1. Dunbar Asphalt to Clean up 29-Acre Portion of Sharon Steel Superfund Site, Hermitage, Pa.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (Sept. 14, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a proposed settlement the government has reached with Dunbar Asphalt Products, Inc., to clean up a 29-acre portion of the Sharon Steel Corporation Superfund Site

  2. Mechanical and energetic consequences of rolling foot shape in human walking

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Peter G.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY During human walking, the center of pressure under the foot progresses forward smoothly during each step, creating a wheel-like motion between the leg and the ground. This rolling motion might appear to aid walking economy, but the mechanisms that may lead to such a benefit are unclear, as the leg is not literally a wheel. We propose that there is indeed a benefit, but less from rolling than from smoother transitions between pendulum-like stance legs. The velocity of the body center of mass (COM) must be redirected in that transition, and a longer foot reduces the work required for the redirection. Here we develop a dynamic walking model that predicts different effects from altering foot length as opposed to foot radius, and test it by attaching rigid, arc-like foot bottoms to humans walking with fixed ankles. The model suggests that smooth rolling is relatively insensitive to arc radius, whereas work for the step-to-step transition decreases approximately quadratically with foot length. We measured the separate effects of arc-foot length and radius on COM velocity fluctuations, work performed by the legs and metabolic cost. Experimental data (N=8) show that foot length indeed has much greater effect on both the mechanical work of the step-to-step transition (23% variation, P=0.04) and the overall energetic cost of walking (6%, P=0.03) than foot radius (no significant effect, P>0.05). We found the minimum metabolic energy cost for an arc foot length of approximately 29% of leg length, roughly comparable to human foot length. Our results suggest that the foot's apparently wheel-like action derives less benefit from rolling per se than from reduced work to redirect the body COM. PMID:23580717

  3. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Racz, Roger S; Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Puncture wounds are common injuries of the foot. Although most puncture wounds are benign, devastating complications are possible without adequate treatment. These injuries can occur in all age groups and in various circumstances. Early diagnosis and appropriate medical and surgical management is paramount in achieving successful outcomes.

  4. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  5. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156...

  6. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a)...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a)...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156...

  11. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reinforcing steel in cast-in-place concrete footings. (2) Pressure-treated wood. (i) Pressure-treated wood footings must consist of a minimum of two layers of nominal 2-inch thick pressure-treated wood, a single... values listed have been reduced by the dead load of the concrete footing. 4. Concrete block piers...

  12. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting an X-ray Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? Print A A A Jenna had been ... pins and needles." But why would your foot fall asleep? Many people say this is because you' ...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  15. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  16. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  18. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  1. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? A A A Jenna had been ... while you might have lost feeling in your foot, it might have felt heavy, or you might ...

  2. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  4. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  7. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  8. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  9. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Head-Only Asymmetric Gradient System Evaluation: ACR Image Quality and Acoustic Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Weavers, P; Shu, Y; Tao, S; Bernstein, M; Lee, S; Piel, J; Foo, T; Mathieu, J-B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A high-performance head-only magnetic resonance imaging gradient system with an acquisition volume of 26 cm employing an asymmetric design for the transverse coils has been developed. It is able to reach a magnitude of 85 mT/m at a slew rate of 700 T/m/s, but operated at 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s for this test. A challenge resulting from this asymmetric design is that the gradient nonlinearly exhibits both odd- and even-ordered terms, and as the full imaging field of view is often used, the nonlinearity is pronounced. The purpose of this work is to show the system can produce clinically useful images after an on-site gradient nonlinearity calibration and correction, and show that acoustic noise levels fall within non-significant risk (NSR) limits for standard clinical pulse sequences. Methods: The head-only gradient system was inserted into a standard 3T wide-bore scanner without acoustic damping. The ACR phantom was scanned in an 8-channel receive-only head coil and the standard American College of Radiology (ACR) MRI quality control (QC) test was performed. Acoustic noise levels were measured for several standard pulse sequences. Results: Images acquired with the head-only gradient system passed all ACR MR image quality tests; Both even and odd-order gradient distortion correction terms were required for the asymmetric gradients to pass. Acoustic noise measurements were within FDA NSR guidelines of 99 dBA (with assumed 20 dBA hearing protection) A-weighted and 140 dB for peak for all but one sequence. Note the gradient system was installed without any shroud or acoustic batting. We expect final system integration to greatly reduce noise experienced by the patient. Conclusion: A high-performance head-only asymmetric gradient system operating at 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s conforms to FDA acoustic noise limits in all but one case, and passes all the ACR MR image quality control tests. This work was supported in part by the NIH grant 5R01EB010065.

  10. Influence of foot posture on the functioning of the windlass mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rachel; Cornwall, Mark

    2017-01-17

    The absence of a functioning windlass mechanism may delay re-supination of the foot during locomotion and put excess stress on the mid-tarsal joint and soft tissues of the foot. The purpose of this study was to describe the foot posture of individuals that have an impaired or absent windlass mechanism. Forty-seven individuals (34 females and 13 males) with a mean age of 26 years were recruited to participate in this study. The Foot Posture Index was used to visually assess the posture of both feet. In addition, a digital gauge was used to measure dorsal arch height and midfoot width in bilateral resting standing. Dorsal arch height and mid-foot width were also measured in non-weight bearing. Finally, for those individuals without a functioning windlass mechanism, the amount of medial wedging needed to restore its function was measured. Subjects with an "absent" or "impaired" windlass mechanism had a mean Foot Posture Index of +6.8 (sd=2.5) compared to +2.5 (sd=3.1) for those with a functioning windlass mechanism. A series of independent t-tests showed that individuals without a functioning windlass mechanism had a more pronated foot posture, a lower dorsal arch height and a wider mid-foot width compared to those that had a functioning windlass mechanism. Finally, an average medial wedge of 5.1mm (sd=2.1) was able to produce a functioning windlass mechanism in those individuals that previously lacked one.

  11. A fluorescent microplate assay quantifies bacterial efflux and demonstrates two distinct compound binding sites in AcrB.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-04-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux.

  12. A Fluorescent Microplate Assay Quantifies Bacterial Efflux and Demonstrates Two Distinct Compound Binding Sites in AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Annette; Rijnbrand, R.; Erwin, Alice L.

    2015-01-01

    A direct assay of efflux by Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC and related multidrug pumps would have great value in discovery of new Gram-negative antibiotics. The current understanding of how efflux is affected by the chemical structure and physical properties of molecules is extremely limited, derived from antibacterial data for compounds that inhibit growth of wild-type E. coli. We adapted a previously described fluorescent efflux assay to a 96-well microplate format that measured the ability of test compounds to compete for efflux with Nile Red (an environment-sensitive fluor), independent of antibacterial activity. We show that Nile Red and the lipid-sensitive probe DiBAC4-(3) [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)-trimethine oxonol] can quantify efflux competition in E. coli. We extend the previous findings that the tetracyclines compete with Nile Red and show that DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides. The extent of the competition shows a modest correlation with the effect of the acrB deletion on MICs within the compound sets for both dyes. Crystallographic studies identified at least two substrate binding sites in AcrB, the proximal and distal pockets. High-molecular-mass substrates bound the proximal pocket, while low-mass substrates occupied the distal pocket. As DiBAC4-(3) competes with macrolides but not with Nile Red, we propose that DiBAC4-(3) binds the proximal pocket and Nile Red likely binds the distal site. In conclusion, competition with fluorescent probes can be used to study the efflux process for diverse chemical structures and may provide information as to the site of binding and, in some cases, enable rank-ordering a series of related compounds by efflux. PMID:25645845

  13. Human foot placement and balance in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Millard, Matthew; Wight, Derek; McPhee, John; Kubica, Eric; Wang, David

    2009-12-01

    Foot placement has long been recognized as the primary mechanism that humans use to restore balance. Many biomechanists have examined where humans place their feet during gait, perturbations, and athletic events. Roboticists have also used foot placement as a means of control but with limited success. Recently, Wight et al. (2008, "Introduction of the Foot Placement Estimator: A Dynamic Measure of Balance for Bipedal Robotics," ASME J. Comput. Nonlinear Dyn., 3, p. 011009) introduced a planar foot placement estimator (FPE) algorithm that will restore balance to a simplified biped that is falling. This study tested the FPE as a candidate function for sagittal plane human-foot-placement (HFP) by recording the kinematics of 14 healthy subjects while they performed ten walking trials at three speeds. The FPE was highly correlated with HFP (rho>or=0.997) and its accuracy varied linearly from 2.6 cm to -8.3 cm as walking speed increased. A sensitivity analysis revealed that assumption violations of the FPE cannot account for the velocity-dependent changes in FPE-HFP error suggesting that this behavior is volitional.

  14. Shod wear and foot alignment in clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Louey, Melissa Gar Yee; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-09-01

    Sagittal plane alignment of the foot presents challenges when the subject wears shoes during gait analysis. Typically, visual alignment is performed by positioning two markers, the heel and toe markers, aligned with the foot within the shoe. Alternatively, software alignment is possible when the sole of the shoe lies parallel to the ground, and the change in the shoe's sole thickness is measured and entered as a parameter. The aim of this technical note was to evaluate the accuracy of visual and software foot alignment during shod gait analysis. We calculated the static standing ankle angles of 8 participants (mean age: 8.7 years, SD: 2.9 years) wearing bilateral solid ankle foot orthoses (BSAFOs) with and without shoes using the visual and software alignment methods. All participants were able to stand with flat feet in both static trials and the ankle angles obtained in BSAFOs without shoes was considered the reference. We showed that the current implementation of software alignment introduces a bias towards more ankle dorsiflexion, mean=3°, SD=3.4°, p=0.006, and proposed an adjusted software alignment method. We found no statistical differences using visual alignment and adjusted software alignment between the shoe and shoeless conditions, p=0.19 for both. Visual alignment or adjusted software alignment are advised to represent foot alignment accurately.

  15. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  16. Strength of Footing with Punching Shear Preventers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Sup; Moon, Jiho; Park, Keum-Sung; Bae, Kyu-Woong

    2014-01-01

    The punching shear failure often governs the strength of the footing-to-column connection. The punching shear failure is an undesirable failure mode, since it results in a brittle failure of the footing. In this study, a new method to increase the strength and ductility of the footing was proposed by inserting the punching shear preventers (PSPs) into the footing. The validation and effectiveness of PSP were verified through a series of experimental studies. The nonlinear finite element analysis was then performed to demonstrate the failure mechanism of the footing with PSPs in depth and to investigate the key parameters that affect the behavior of the footing with PSPs. Finally, the design recommendations for the footing with PSPs were suggested. PMID:25401141

  17. Complex trauma of the foot.

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Dahlen, C; Randt, T; Gavlik, J M

    1997-12-01

    Following complex foot injuries (incidence up to 52 %) in the multiply-injured patient the ultimate goal remains the same as for all significant foot injuries: the restoration of a painless, stable and plantigrade foot to avoid corrective procedures with moderate results. In the case of a complex trauma of the foot (5 point-score) - e. g. a crush injury - primary amputation in the multiply-injured patient (PTS 3-4) is indicated. Limb salvage (PTS 1-2) depends on the intraoperative aspect during the second look (within 24-48 hours after injury): the debridement has to be radical, the selection of amputation level should be at the most distal point compatible with tissue viability and wound healing. A free tissue transfer should be done early if necessary. Single lesions presenting with a compartment syndrome need an immediate dorsal fasciotomy, in the case of a multiply-injured patient as soon as possible. Open fractures are reduced following radical debridement and temporarily stabilized with K-wires and/or tibiotarsal transfixation with an external fixateur until the definitive ORIF. Dislocation-fractures of the talus type 3 and 4 according to Hawkins' classification need open reduction and internal fixation by screws (titan). Open fractures of the calcaneus are stabilized temporarily by a medial external fixateur after debridement until the definitive treatment. If there is a compartment syndrome an immediate dermatofasciotomy is essential. Like closed, calcanear fractures in multiply-injured patients dislocation-fractures of the Chopart's joint need immediate open reduction only if it is an open fracture or associated with a compartment syndrome. The incidence of a compartment syndrome in the case of dislocation fractures of the Lisfranc's joint is high and therefore a dorsal dermatofasciotomy without delay is critical. Open reduction and internal fixation are achieved either by 1.8 mm K-wires or 3.5 mm cortical screws. To avoid further soft tissue damage a

  18. [Complex trauma of the foot].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Dahlen, C; Randt, T; Gavlik, J M

    1997-12-01

    Following complex foot injuries (incidence up to 52%) in the multiply-injured patient the ultimate goal remains the same as for all significant foot injuries: the restoration of a painless, stable and plantigrade foot to avoid corrective procedures with moderate results. In the case of a complex trauma of the foot (5 point-score)--e.g. a crush injury--primary amputation in the multiply-injured patient (PTS 3-4) is indicated. Limb salvage (PTS 1-2) depends on the intraoperative aspect during the second look (within 24-48 hours after injury): the debridement has to be radical, the selection of amputation level should be at the most distal point compatible with tissue viability and wound healing. A free tissue transfer should be done early if necessary. Single lesions presenting with a compartment syndrome need an immediate dorsal fasciotomy, in the case of a multiply-injured patient as soon as possible. Open fractures are reduced following radical debridement and temporarily stabilized with K-wires and/or tibiotarsal transfixation with an external fixateur until the definitive ORIF. Dislocation-fractures of the talus type 3 and 4 according to Hawkins' classification need open reduction and internal fixation by screws (titan). Open fractures of the calcaneus are stabilized temporarily by a medial external fixateur after debridement until the definitive treatment. If there is a compartment syndrome an immediate dermatofasciotomy is essential. Like closed, calcanear fractures in multiply-injured patients dislocation-fractures of the Chopart's joint need immediate open reduction only if it is an open fracture or associated with a compartment syndrome. The incidence of a compartment syndrome in the case of dislocation fractures of the Lisfranc's joint is high and therefore a dorsal dermatofasciotomy without delay is critical. Open reduction and internal fixation are achieved either by 1.8 mm K-wires or 3.5 mm cortical screws. To avoid further soft tissue damage a delayed

  19. The foot core system: a new paradigm for understanding intrinsic foot muscle function.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Hertel, Jay; Bramble, Dennis; Davis, Irene

    2015-03-01

    The foot is a complex structure with many articulations and multiple degrees of freedom that play an important role in static posture and dynamic activities. The evolutionary development of the arch of the foot was coincident with the greater demands placed on the foot as humans began to run. The movement and stability of the arch is controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. However, the intrinsic muscles are largely ignored by clinicians and researchers. As such, these muscles are seldom addressed in rehabilitation programmes. Interventions for foot-related problems are more often directed at externally supporting the foot rather than training these muscles to function as they are designed. In this paper, we propose a novel paradigm for understanding the function of the foot. We begin with an overview of the evolution of the human foot with a focus on the development of the arch. This is followed by a description of the foot intrinsic muscles and their relationship to the extrinsic muscles. We draw the parallels between the small muscles of the trunk region that make up the lumbopelvic core and the intrinsic foot muscles, introducing the concept of the foot core. We then integrate the concept of the foot core into the assessment and treatment of the foot. Finally, we call for an increased awareness of the importance of the foot core stability to normal foot and lower extremity function.

  20. Neuropathic ulcers of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lang-Stevenson, A I; Sharrard, W J; Betts, R P; Duckworth, T

    1985-05-01

    We report a prospective study of the causes and treatment of 26 long-standing neuropathic ulcers of the foot in 21 patients. The most important causal factor, well illustrated by pressure studies, was the presence of a dynamic or static deformity leading to local areas of peak pressure on insensitive skin. All but one of the 26 ulcers had healed after an average of 10 weeks of treatment in a light, skin-tight plaster cast, with the prohibition of weight-bearing. Recurrent ulceration was prevented in all but one foot by early operation to correct the causative deformity; this was performed after the ulcer had healed and before allowing weight-bearing on the limb. Pressure studies after operation confirmed that pressure points had been relieved.

  1. Autonomic neuropathy and diabetic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M E; Nicolaides, K H; Watkins, P J

    1986-01-01

    Autonomic function was studied in three groups of insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Heart rate changes during deep breathing and on standing were significantly less in 28 patients with a recent history of foot ulceration compared with 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy but without ulceration (p less than 0.001) and 54 patients without neuropathy (p less than 0.001). Sympathetic function was assessed in 36 of these patients from peripheral arterial diastolic flow patterns obtained by Doppler ultrasound measurements and expressed as the pulsatility index (PI). Patients with a history of ulceration (n = 10) showed considerably increased diastolic flow (PI = 4.28 +/- 0.53, mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with 12 neuropathic patients with no history of ulceration (PI = 7.80 +/- 0.68, p less than 0.002) and 14 patients without neuropathy (PI = 9.55 +/- 0.89, p less than 0.002). Severely abnormal autonomic function occurs in association with neuropathic foot ulceration, but patients without ulcers have lesser degrees of autonomic neuropathy, thus a causal relationship has not been established.

  2. Effects of Thai Foot Massage on Balance Performance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Material/Methods Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. Results After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (P<0.05); however, when comparing between 2 groups, the Thai foot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (p<0.05). The Thai foot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25892354

  3. Weigh-in-motion scale with foot alignment features

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh

    2013-03-05

    A pad is disclosed for use in a weighing system for weighing a load. The pad includes a weighing platform, load cells, and foot members. Improvements to the pad reduce or substantially eliminate rotation of one or more of the corner foot members. A flexible foot strap disposed between the corner foot members reduces rotation of the respective foot members about vertical axes through the corner foot members and couples the corner foot members such that rotation of one corner foot member results in substantially the same amount of rotation of the other corner foot member. In a strapless variant one or more fasteners prevents substantially all rotation of a foot member. In a diagonal variant, a foot strap extends between a corner foot member and the weighing platform to reduce rotation of the foot member about a vertical axis through the corner foot member.

  4. The effect of nonleading foot placement on power and velocity in the fencing lunge.

    PubMed

    Gresham-Fiegel, Carolyn N; House, Paul D; Zupan, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The fencing lunge is a sport-specific movement, which helps the fencer score quickly and accurately. The fencing lunge is executed from a stable guard position, with the toes of the leading foot pointing directly toward the opponent. As a result of coach or fencer preference, however, the angle of the nonleading foot may vary greatly among fencers, from acute (nonleading foot facing forward) to obtuse (nonleading foot facing slightly backward). Studies in other sports suggest that foot placement may affect the efficient use of leg muscles and influence the power produced. Twenty-five experienced fencers from the U.S. Air Force Academy fencing team executed lunges from 3 specific angles of nonleading foot placement and from the natural stance. Foot placements were measured as the angle of the nonleading foot from the line of the leading foot and were delimited to an acute angle (45°), a perpendicular angle (90°), and an obtuse angle (135°). The angle of natural stance was also determined for each participant. Velocity and power were measured with a TENDO Weightlifting Analyzer, and the data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Two statistical groups were considered, one containing all participants (N = 25) and a second group of participants with a natural forward-deviated stance (n = 15). Significant differences appeared between the nonleading foot placements in peak power (p < 0.001), average power (p < 0.001), peak velocity (p < 0.001), and average velocity (p < 0.001) in both groups. Pairwise t-test results indicated that, for both statistical groups, a perpendicular placement of the feet produced the greatest power and velocity during lunging.

  5. [Diabetic foot infections: microbiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Isabella; Pascale, Renato; Esposito, Silvano; Zeppa, Pio

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of wound infection is based on clinical signs and local and/or systemic inflammation. Therefore, the examination has a major role in the diagnosis of infected lesions of the foot. Once the clinical diagnosis of infection is made, the next step is to determine the etiology with the aim to undertake a rational and appropriate treatment. The most reliable method for assessing microbiological etiology is the specimen of material from infected lesion to perform a bacterioscopic examination and culture. The microorganisms involved in the etiology of diabetic foot depends on the type of injury and on specific patient features (antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalization). The most frequently detected pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. Mild infections are mostly caused by Gram positive cocci, with a prevalence of S. aureus. Moderate infections are mostly supported by pyogenic Gram positive cocci, but also Gram-negative bacteria can be involved. In severe infections the etiology is polymicrobial. As regards the involvement of fungi in diabetic foot infections data are few and mostly conflicting.

  6. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection for Spastic Equinovarus Foot in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Effects on Gait and Foot Pressure Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Young; Jung, Soojin; Rha, Dong-wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of intramuscular Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on gait and dynamic foot pressure distribution in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with dynamic equinovarus foot. Materials and Methods Twenty-five legs of 25 children with CP were investigated in this study. BoNT-A was injected into the gastrocnemius (GCM) and tibialis posterior (TP) muscles under the guidance of ultrasonography. The effects of the toxin were clinically assessed using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and modified Tardieu scale (MTS), and a computerized gait analysis and dynamic foot pressure measurements using the F-scan system were also performed before injection and at 1 and 4 months after injection. Results Spasticity of the ankle plantar-flexor in both the MAS and MTS was significantly reduced at both 1 and 4 months after injection. On dynamic foot pressure measurements, the center of pressure index and coronal index, which represent the asymmetrical weight-bearing of the medial and lateral columns of the foot, significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection. The dynamic foot pressure index, total contact area, contact length and hind foot contact width all increased at 1 month after injection, suggesting better heel contact. Ankle kinematic data were significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection, and ankle power generation was significantly increased at 4 months after injection compared to baseline data. Conclusion Using a computerized gait analysis and foot scan, this study revealed significant benefits of BoNT-A injection into the GCM and TP muscles for dynamic equinovarus foot in children with spastic CP. PMID:26847306

  7. Effectiveness of elastic band-type ankle–foot orthoses on postural control in poststroke elderly patients as determined using combined measurement of the stability index and body weight-bearing ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Sim, Woo Sang; Won, Byeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor recovery of postural stability poststroke is the primary cause of impairment in activities and social participation in elderly stroke survivors. The purpose of our study was to experimentally evaluate the effectiveness of our new elastic ankle–foot orthosis (AFO), compared to a traditional AFO fabricated with hard plastic, in improving postural stability in elderly chronic stroke survivors. Patients and methods Postural stability was evaluated in ten chronic stroke patients, 55.7±8.43 years old. Postural stability was evaluated using the standardized methods of the Biodex Balance System combined with a foot pressure system, under three experimental conditions, no AFO, rigid plastic AFO, and elastic AFO (E-AFO). The following dependent variables of postural stability were analyzed: plantar pressure under the paretic and nonparetic foot, area of the center of balance (COB) and % time spent in each location, distance traveled by the COB away from the body center, distance traveled by the center of pressure, and calculated index of overall stability, as well as indices anterior–posterior and medial–lateral stability. Results Both AFO designs improved all indices of postural stability. Compared to the rigid plastic AFO, the E-AFO produced additional positive effects in controlling anterior–posterior body sway, equalizing weight bearing through the paretic and nonparetic limbs, and restraining the displacement of the center of pressure and of the COB. Conclusion Based on our outcomes, we recommend the prescription of E-AFOs as part of a physiotherapy rehabilitation program to promote recovery of postural stability poststroke. When possible, therapeutic outcomes should be documented using the Biodex Balance System and foot pressure system, as used in our study, to provide evidence needed to support the development of a larger controlled trial to generate high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of E-AFOs. PMID:26622174

  8. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Ali; Naseri, Mahdi; Salaree, Mohammad Mahdi; Nehrir, Batool

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67) years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups) during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses. PMID:28032074

  9. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Ali; Naseri, Mahdi; Salaree, Mohammad Mahdi; Nehrir, Batool

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67) years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups) during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses.

  10. Sexual dimorphism in foot length ratios among North Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Passi, Neelam; DiMaggio, John A

    2015-11-01

    Determination of sex along with other parameters of identification like stature, age and ancestry is one of the foremost criteria in establishing the biological profile of an individual. The present study was conducted to analyze the sex differences in the foot length ratios in a North Indian adolescent population. The study was conducted on 149 females and 154 males aged from 13 to 18 years. Foot length measurements were taken from pternion to the most anterior part of each toe and designated as T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5 respectively for first to fifth toes on both the feet in each participant using standard methods and techniques. A total of ten ratios (T1:T2, T1:T3, T1:T4, T1:T5, T2:T3, T2:T4, T2:T5, T3:T4, T3:T5, and T4:T5) were thus, obtained and the same were analyzed for sex differences using Student's t-test. Stature was measured in each participant and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to find the correlation between various foot length ratios, age and stature. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was employed to test the sexing accuracy of the variables. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Foot length dimensions from each toe (T1 to T5) and stature were found to be significantly higher in males than females. The foot length ratios did not show any statistically significant correlation with stature. Statistically significant sex differences were exhibited by ratios between T1 and T2 (p = 0.002), T1 and T3 (p = 0.001), T1 and T4 (p < 0.001), T1 and T5 (p = 0.001), and T2 and T4 (p = 0.014). Maximum sex differences were evident for foot length ratio between T1 and T4 (63.4%), and minimum for the ratio between T2 and T4 (56.5%). Though foot length measurements are significantly larger in males, its utility in sex differentiation may be limited owing to its direct correlation with stature of an individual. It has been observed that the foot length ratios are independent of stature and thus

  11. Experiments on Dust Levitation due to Foot Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-01

    Near wall aerodynamics and dust levitation process from the floor due to human foot stomping and walking were investigated. Actual human foot kinematics was first recorded, and input to the laboratory experiment. At present, the foot movement was limited in the vertical direction without any ankle articulation. To focus on the aerodynamic effect on dust suspension and avoid the floor vibration, the model was stopped immediately before contacting the floor. Sole geometries ranged from a disk, an elongated flat plate to an indoor slipper. The suspended particle pattern showed the zone from which particles were suspended effectively. With the elongated plate and the shoe shape, strong directionality in particle suspension was shown associated with a concentrated area of vertical structure. Lateral streaks on the particle pattern were considered to be caused by vortex instabilities. The upward foot motion was also found to be effective in dust levitation from the floor. The time-dependent velocity field was measured with a PIV, and the particle concentration measurement with image analysis was conducted. Basic fluid dynamics as well as its practical implications will be addressed.

  12. Receptor-like kinase ACR4 restricts formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Ive; Vassileva, Valya; De Rybel, Bert; Levesque, Mitchell P; Grunewald, Wim; Van Damme, Daniël; Van Noorden, Giel; Naudts, Mirande; Van Isterdael, Gert; De Clercq, Rebecca; Wang, Jean Y; Meuli, Nicholas; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jirí; Hilson, Pierre; Jürgens, Gerd; Ingram, Gwyneth C; Inzé, Dirk; Benfey, Philip N; Beeckman, Tom

    2008-10-24

    During the development of multicellular organisms, organogenesis and pattern formation depend on formative divisions to specify and maintain pools of stem cells. In higher plants, these activities are essential to shape the final root architecture because the functioning of root apical meristems and the de novo formation of lateral roots entirely rely on it. We used transcript profiling on sorted pericycle cells undergoing lateral root initiation to identify the receptor-like kinase ACR4 of Arabidopsis as a key factor both in promoting formative cell divisions in the pericycle and in constraining the number of these divisions once organogenesis has been started. In the root tip meristem, ACR4 shows a similar action by controlling cell proliferation activity in the columella cell lineage. Thus, ACR4 function reveals a common mechanism of formative cell division control in the main root tip meristem and during lateral root initiation.

  13. Narrative review: Diabetic foot and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J.

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the major complications experienced by diabetic patients. An early identification and appropriate treatment of diabetic foot problems can prevent devastating consequences such as limb amputation. Several studies have demonstrated that temperature variations in the plantar region can be related to diabetic foot problems. Infrared thermography has been successfully used to detect complication related to diabetic foot, mainly because it is presented as a rapid, non-contact and non-invasive technique to visualize the temperature distribution of the feet. In this review, an overview of studies that relate foot temperature with diabetic foot problems through infrared thermography is presented. Through this research, it can be appreciated the potential of infrared thermography and the benefits that this technique present in this application. This paper also presents the different methods for thermogram analysis and the advantages and disadvantages of each one, being the asymmetric analysis the method most used so far.

  14. When and how to audit a diabetic foot service.

    PubMed

    Leese, Graham P; Stang, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement depends on data collection and audit of clinical services to inform clinical improvements. Various steps in the care of the diabetic foot can be used to audit a service but need defined audit standards. A diabetes foot service should have risk stratification system in place that should compare to the population-based figures of 76% having low-risk feet, 17% moderate risk and 7% being at high risk of ulceration. Resources can then be directed towards those with high-risk feet. Prevalence of foot ulceration needs to be audited. Community-based studies give an audit standard of around 2%, with 2 to 9% having had an ulcer at some stage in the past. Amputation rates should be easier to measure, and the best results are reported to be around 1.5-3 per 1000 people with diabetes. This is a useful benchmark figure, and the rate has been shown to decrease by approximately a third over the last 15 years in some centres. Ulceration rates and ulcer healing rates are the ultimate outcome audit measure as they are always undesirable, whilst occasionally for defined individuals, an amputation can be a good outcome. In addition to clinical outcomes, processes of care can be audited such as provision of clinical services, time from new ulcer to be seen by health care professional, inpatient foot care or use of antibiotics. Measurement of clinical services can be a challenge in the diabetic foot, but it is essential if clinical services and patient outcomes are to be improved.

  15. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  16. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2012-02-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical outcome. However, several aspects related to offloading are underexposed. First, in the management of foot complications, offloading is mostly studied as a single entity, whereas it should be analysed in a broader perspective of contributing factors to better predict clinical outcome. This includes assessment of patient behavioural factors such as type and intensity of daily physical activity and adherence to prescribed treatment. Second, a large gap exists between evidence-based recommendations and clinical practice in the use of offloading for ulcer treatment, and this gap needs to be bridged. Possible ways to achieve this are discussed in this article. Third, our knowledge about the efficacy and role of offloading in treating complicated and non-plantar neuropathic foot ulcers needs to be expanded because these ulcers currently dominate presentation in multidisciplinary foot practice. Finally, foot ulcer prevention is underexposed when compared with ulcer treatment. Prevention requires a larger focus, in particular regarding the efficacy of therapeutic footwear and its relative role in comparison with other preventative strategies. These priorities need the attention of clinicians, scientists and professional societies to improve our understanding of offloading and to improve clinical outcome in the management of the diabetic foot.

  17. Complications of Pediatric Foot and Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime R

    2017-01-01

    Ankle fractures account for 5% and foot fractures account for approximately 8% of fractures in children. Some complications are evident early in the treatment or natural history of foot and ankle fractures. Other complications do not become apparent until weeks, months, or years after the original fracture. The incidence of long-term sequelae like posttraumatic arthritis from childhood foot and ankle fractures is poorly studied because decades or lifelong follow-up has frequently not been accomplished. This article discusses a variety of complications associated with foot and ankle fractures in children or the treatment of these injuries.

  18. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (P<0.05), decreased contact surface on the hindfoot (P<0.03). While results indicated the important role of foot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions.

  19. Perceived standing position after reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Asai, Hitoshi; Miyaguchi, Akiyoshi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kunita, Kenji; Inoue, Katsumi

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the influence of the reduction of foot-pressure sensation by cooling the sole of the foot, at 1 degree C for 30 or 40 minutes, on the perception of standing position varied in the anteroposterior direction. The subjects were 16 healthy undergraduates. Firstly, for 4 of the subjects, cooling the sole of the foot decreased sensory information from the mechanoreceptors in the sole, by testing for an increase in the threshold for two-point discrepancy discrimination on the sole of the foot and for the disappearance of postural change with vibration to the sole. Next, the perception of standing position was measured by reproduction of a given standing reference position involving forward or backward leaning under both normal and cooled conditions of the feet. Standing position was varied in relation to the location of the center of foot pressure, defined as distance from the heel in percentage of the length of the foot. The reference positions, representing various locations of the center of foot pressure, were set at 10% increments from 20% to 80% of the length of the foot. With eyes closed, the subject first experienced the reference position and then attempted to reproduce it. The mean location of the center of foot pressure in the quiet standing posture was 45.7%. At the 40%, 50%, and 60% reference positions, those closest to quiet standing, absolute errors of reproduction were significantly larger than at other reference positions in both the normal and the cooled conditions. They were significantly larger in the cooled than in the normal condition. The 50% and 60% reference positions were reproduced significantly further forward in the cooled than in the normal condition. These results may be explained as due to an absence of marked changes in sensory information from both muscular activity and foot pressure when moving to reference positions close to the quiet standing posture.

  20. Estimation of stature using hand and foot dimensions in Slovak adults.

    PubMed

    Uhrová, Petra; Beňuš, Radoslav; Masnicová, Soňa; Obertová, Zuzana; Kramárová, Daniela; Kyselicová, Klaudia; Dörnhöferová, Michaela; Bodoriková, Silvia; Neščáková, Eva

    2015-03-01

    Hand and foot dimensions used for stature estimation help to formulate a biological profile in the process of personal identification. Morphological variability of hands and feet shows the importance of generating population-specific equations to estimate stature. The stature, hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth of 250 young Slovak males and females, aged 18-24 years, were measured according to standard anthropometric procedures. The data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test for sex and bilateral differences. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for assessing relationship between stature and hand/foot parameters, and subsequently linear regression analysis was used to estimate stature. The results revealed significant sex differences in hand and foot dimensions as well as in stature (p<0.05). There was a positive and statistically significant correlation between stature and all measurements in both sexes (p<0.01). The highest correlation coefficient was found for foot length in males (r=0.71) as well as in females (r=0.63). Regression equations were computed separately for each sex. The accuracy of stature prediction ranged from ±4.6 to ±6.1cm. The results of this study indicate that hand and foot dimension can be used to estimate stature for Slovak for the purpose of forensic field. The regression equations can be of use for stature estimation particularly in cases of dismembered bodies.