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Sample records for acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans

  1. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement.

  2. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement. PMID:24698204

  3. A Souvenir From France: Acrodermatitis Chronica Atrophicans Presenting in the United States.

    PubMed

    Correa-Selm, Lilia M; Bronsnick, Tara; Rao, Babar K; Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Marcus, Alan; Cha, Jisun

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred by his rheumatologist to our dermatology clinic for evaluation of dermatitis on his right arm that appeared 3 months earlier. The skin lesion was asymptomatic and the patient denied current systemic symptoms, including fever, chills, and joint pain; however, 10 months prior to this presentation he experienced arthritis in the left knee. At that time, Borrelia serology revealed positive IgG (6.07; <0.8 negative, 0.8 to 0.99 borderline, ≥1 positive) and negative IgM titers. The patient had not received treatment for Lyme disease in the past. He was referred to rheumatology for evaluation of possible Lyme disease but did not follow up until 10 months later. The arthritis has since resolved. He travels frequently to France and recalls multiple tick bites during these trips. PMID:27502263

  4. Chemokine signatures in the skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe: predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in lymphocytoma.

    PubMed

    Müllegger, Robert R; Means, Terry K; Shin, Junghee J; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L; Glickstein, Lisa J; Luster, Andrew D; Steere, Allen C

    2007-09-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3(+) T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20(+) B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13.

  5. Chemokine Signatures in the Skin Disorders of Lyme Borreliosis in Europe: Predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in Erythema Migrans and Acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in Lymphocytoma▿

    PubMed Central

    Müllegger, Robert R.; Means, Terry K.; Shin, Junghee J.; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L.; Glickstein, Lisa J.; Luster, Andrew D.; Steere, Allen C.

    2007-01-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3+ T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20+ B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13. PMID:17606602

  6. Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Nistor, Nicolai; Ciontu, Lavinia; Frasinariu, Otilia-Elena; Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Streanga, Violeta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare genetic autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by periorificial dermatitis, alopecia, and diarrhea. It is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes a membrane protein that binds zinc. We report a 14-month-old boy, admitted for erythematous, scaly and pustular lesions, initially located in the inguinal and perianal regions and on thighs, and very few erythematous lesions on the face. Due to the numerous bacterial skin superinfections with Staphylococcus aureus, including abscesses that required surgical incision, the clinical picture was modified, leading to a delayed establishment of the diagnosis. Later, the symptoms became suggestive for this disease, the diagnostic having been confirmed by low plasma zinc values. Under zinc therapy, skin lesions improved significantly in a few days, with favorable outcome. Two months later, the skin lesions almost disappeared. Abscesses due to bacterial skin superinfections may lead to initially misdiagnosed acrodermatitis enteropathica. PMID:27196457

  7. Poikiloderma Vasculare Atrophicans: A Distinct Clinical Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Mehta, Karaninder S; Sharma, Anju Lath

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a typical case of poikiloderma vasculare atrophicans (PVA) in a 48-year-old female. Histologically, the features were suggestive of PVA with the absence of Pautrier's microabscess or atypical lymphoid cells. The biopsy specimen was positive for cluster of differentiation (CD) 8 on immunohistochemical staining. Its exact pathogenesis remains obscure, and it remains unclear whether PVA actually is mycosis fungoides (MF), a forme fruste of MF, or a distinct and benign dermatosis with CD8+ phenotype that can perhaps be labeled as PVA. However, it has a long benign clinical course without progression to tumor stage of MF in most cases, and its status within the spectrum of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma remains poorly understood. Yet it is imperative to distinguish PVA from poikilodermic MF. PMID:25814753

  8. Acrodermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Cherry JD. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic infections. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  9. Pyodermia chronica glutealis complicated by acromegalic gigantism.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, S; Kasahara, M; Suzuki, K; Kondoh, M; Tsubura, A

    1998-04-01

    We report a case of pyodermia chronica glutealis complicated by acromegalic gigantism associated with hyperprolactinemia. The serum prolactin, growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and 11-deoxycortisol levels were elevated, but the estradiol and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate levels were within normal limits. However, the testosterone level was very low. Histopathologically, we found sinus tracts and scarring in a specimen from the buttocks. We could not immunohistochemically detect clear androgen, growth hormone, or prolactin receptors at any site. The patient was a man with a height of 197 cm and weight of 140 kg, he had clinical features of active acromegaly such as excessive sweating and increased thickness of soft tissue. He was also diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Under such conditions, bacteria could easily grow and lesions might have been aggravated by the heavy pressure from his weight, a possible causes of his pyodermia chronica glutealis. PMID:9609982

  10. Differentiation of pityriasis lichenoides chronica from guttate psoriasis by dermoscopy.

    PubMed

    Errichetti, E; Lacarrubba, F; Micali, G; Piccirillo, A; Stinco, G

    2015-10-01

    Clinical differentiation between pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) and guttate psoriasis (GP) may sometimes be a difficult task, which often requires histological analysis to reach a definitive diagnosis. In this study, PLC and GP lesions were examined using dermoscopy, and the significance of specific dermoscopic findings was investigated in order to facilitate their differentiation and decrease the number of cases requiring biopsy. We found that the incidence of orange-yellowish structureless areas, focal dotted vessels and nondotted vessels was statistically significant in PLC, while the incidence of diffuse dotted vessels was statistically significant in GP.

  11. Acrodermatitis dysmetabolica in an infant with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, K; Chikowski, R; Morrell, D S

    2016-08-01

    Acrodermatitis dysmetabolica (AD) is a rare, newly termed, and poorly understood disease that appears to be clinically similar to acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE). Both diseases are characterized by the triad of periorificial and acral dermatitis, diarrhoea, and alopecia. Unlike AE, which is caused by zinc deficiency, AD is caused by numerous metabolic disorders. One such disorder is maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a genetic deficiency of branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase, the enzyme that degrades the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) isoleucine, leucine and valine. Treatment involves restricting BCAAs to prevent accumulation. We report a case of an infant being treated for MSUD, who developed the triad of AE/AD after a period of poor BCAA formula intake. The child was found to have low isoleucine and normal zinc levels. Increasing the isoleucine dose improved the eruption, thus the diagnosis of AD secondary to isoleucine deficiency was made. This case emphasizes the importance of carefully balancing BCAA levels while treating MSUD, as deficiency can precipitate AD. PMID:27334242

  12. Cow’s Milk Protein Allergy Mimicking Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, John; Kamalammal, Rugmini; Sait, Mohammed Yaseen; Lohith, Harita

    2014-01-01

    Cow’s milk protein allergy is an adverse immune reaction to one or more of the constituent proteins of milk obtained from any animal, most commonly alpha s 1-casein cow’s milk. In many cases, the allergy is genetic in origin. The infants may experience symptoms within minutes after feeding (rapid onset) or commonly after 7-10 days of consuming the cow’s milk (slower onset). Many children with cow’s milk protein allergy develop symptoms in at least two of the following organ systems: gastrointestinal, skin and respiratory tract. Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (primary or secondary zinc deficiency) can also produce lesions in the skin and also gastro intestinal symptoms which can mimic milk protein allergy and differentiating between these two may be difficult. We are reporting a case of cow’s milk protein allergy in an infant, which was initially diagnosed as Acrodermatitis Enteropathica and treated with zinc. The lesions did not subside completely even after achieving adequate zinc levels, but on stopping the cow’s milk all the symptoms and signs disappeared completely and there was no recurrence on long term follow up. PMID:24783119

  13. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective. PMID:26652284

  14. Ixodes ricinus spirochete and European erythema chronicum migrans disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, R.; Kabatzki, J.; Boisten, H. P.; Steere, A. C.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Hartung, S.; Runne, U.

    1984-01-01

    From three endemic locations of erythema chronicum migrans disease in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, we recovered 19 isolates of a spirochete from Ixodes ricinus ticks. The infection rate in adult ticks was 16 percent. The isolated spirochete is immunologically related to the Ixodes dammini spirochete, Borrelia duttoni, and Treponema pallidum. Using indirect immunofluorescence, the sera of 90 patients with erythema chronicum migrans disease showed antibody titers against the isolated spirochete, which correlated with the clinical course. Similarly, antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of 21 patients with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. These results suggest an etiologic role for the Ixodes ricinus spriochete in European erythema chronicum migrans disease. Images FIG. 3 PMID:6393609

  15. Malassezia and Candida infections in bull terriers with lethal acrodermatitis.

    PubMed

    McEwan, N A

    2001-06-01

    In 12 cases of lethal acrodermatitis (LAD), four sampling techniques (brush, swab, scrape and adhesive tape strip) were used to study the distribution of yeasts in various body sites and these results were compared with those from five cases of atopic dermatitis and those of 10 normal dogs. Malassezia was frequently isolated from lesional and non-lesional skin and haircoat, footpads, nails and mucous membranes from dogs with either LAD or atopic dermatitis, although, generally, more Malassezia organisms were isolated from LAD cases. In normal dogs, Malassezia was most frequently recovered from the ear canal and the perianal skin. Candida was isolated frequently from dogs with LAD, but only a single isolate of this yeast was found in the other two groups. Fungal hyphae and pseudohyphae, probably Candida albicans, could be detected in samples collected from the nails and footpads of dogs with LAD. Both Malassezia and Candida could be isolated using all four sampling techniques. The MacKenzie (toothbrush) technique and adhesive tape strip cultures proved simple methods for the semiquantitative evaluation of yeasts. The high recovery rate of Malassezia and Candida from dogs with LAD is probably related to immune dysfunction, particularly T-cell dysfunction, known to be present in these dogs. C albicans infection may in part be responsible for the pathogenic changes of the nails and footpads commonly seen in cases of LAD. PMID:11440398

  16. Malassezia and Candida infections in bull terriers with lethal acrodermatitis.

    PubMed

    McEwan, N A

    2001-06-01

    In 12 cases of lethal acrodermatitis (LAD), four sampling techniques (brush, swab, scrape and adhesive tape strip) were used to study the distribution of yeasts in various body sites and these results were compared with those from five cases of atopic dermatitis and those of 10 normal dogs. Malassezia was frequently isolated from lesional and non-lesional skin and haircoat, footpads, nails and mucous membranes from dogs with either LAD or atopic dermatitis, although, generally, more Malassezia organisms were isolated from LAD cases. In normal dogs, Malassezia was most frequently recovered from the ear canal and the perianal skin. Candida was isolated frequently from dogs with LAD, but only a single isolate of this yeast was found in the other two groups. Fungal hyphae and pseudohyphae, probably Candida albicans, could be detected in samples collected from the nails and footpads of dogs with LAD. Both Malassezia and Candida could be isolated using all four sampling techniques. The MacKenzie (toothbrush) technique and adhesive tape strip cultures proved simple methods for the semiquantitative evaluation of yeasts. The high recovery rate of Malassezia and Candida from dogs with LAD is probably related to immune dysfunction, particularly T-cell dysfunction, known to be present in these dogs. C albicans infection may in part be responsible for the pathogenic changes of the nails and footpads commonly seen in cases of LAD.

  17. Zinc-deficiency acrodermatitis in a patient with chronic alcoholism and gastric bypass: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Dariush; Ahmed, Zubair; Karikkineth, Ajoy; Williams, Richard; Zigel, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Acquired adult-onset zinc deficiency is occasionally reported in patients with malnutrition states, such as alcoholism, or malabsorptive states, such as post-bariatric surgery. The defining symptoms of hypozincemia include a classic triad of necrolytic dermatitis, diffuse alopecia, and diarrhea. We report a case of zinc deficiency in a 39-year-old man with history of gastric bypass surgery and alcoholism. For this patient, severe hypozincemia confirmed acrodermatitis, and zinc supplementation was met with gradual improvement. PMID:25147643

  18. Miescher's granulomatosis (granulomatosis disciformis chronica et progressiva) in a non-diabetic patient – case report

    PubMed Central

    Bergler-Czop, Beata; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Rogala-Poborska, Iwona

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum is a rare disease of unclear etiology, that occurs in about 1% of diabetic patients. Case report We present case of granulomatosis disciformis chronica et progressiva Miescher with good response to systemic corticosteroids therapy. Patient 45 years old woman, with primary yellow-brown areas skin lesions, with foci well separated from surroundings on both lower legs, that occurred 5 years ago. In laboratory tests there was no abnormalities. Because of advance suggestion (after last admit in dermatological ward) of observation according to xantogranuloma necrobioticum tests for paraproteinemia were made. Immunoelectrophoresis, IgG, IgM, IgA levels, kappa light chain, lambda heavy chain; were correct, Bence-Johns protein-negative. During hospitalization in Clinic methylprednisolone in dose of 32 mg od, vascular drugs and local steroidotherapy was applied with good therapeutic response. Conclusion We described case of typical clinical and histological characters of necrobiosis lipoidica. without diabetes-granulomatosis disciformis chronica et progressiva Miescher that despite of suspicion of proper diagnosis for a long time was not treat effective. PMID:19715570

  19. Successful treatment of Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau associated with psoriatic arthritis with adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Lefkir, Salima; Slimani, Samy; Brahimi, Nadjia; Ladjouze-Rezig, Aicha

    2015-01-01

    Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau (ACH) is a rare form of pustular psoriasis, mainly affecting distal phalanges of hands and feet. Many therapeutic options exist; however, it tends to be resistant to treatment. We report a 26-year-old man presented with a very severe psoriatic arthritis associated with ACH. Although this patient was resistant to a first line treatment (glucocorticoids and methotrexate), a rapid and dramatic improvement was observed after adalimumab was introduced. The effectiveness and tolerance of the treatment were maintained during the 12-month period of follow-up. This is the first report of the efficacy of adalimumab on ACH in a patient presented with psoriatic arthropathy.

  20. Acrodermatitis enteropathica: a novel SLC39A4 gene mutation found in a patient with an early-onset.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Felicidade; Matos, José; Moreno, Ana; Schmitt, Sébastien; Bézieau, Stéphane; Tellechea, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 3-month-old full-term, breast-fed infant with clinical and laboratorial findings consistent with acrodermatitis enteropathica. In addition, the mother had low zinc levels in her breast milk. Mutation analysis revealed a novel insertion in the SLC39A4 gene.

  1. A Novel Member of a Zinc Transporter Family Is Defective in Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Bing; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Zemansky, Jason; Gitschier, Jane

    2002-01-01

    The rare inherited condition acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) results from a defect in the absorption of dietary zinc. Recently, we used homozygosity mapping in consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds to localize the AE gene to an ∼3.5-cM region on 8q24. In this article, we identify a gene, SLC39A4, located in the candidate region and, in patients with AE, document mutations that likely lead to the disease. The gene encodes a histidine-rich protein, which we refer to as “hZIP4,” which is a member of a large family of transmembrane proteins, some of which are known to serve as zinc-uptake proteins. We show that Slc39A4 is abundantly expressed in mouse enterocytes and that the protein resides in the apical membrane of these cells. These findings suggest that the hZIP4 transporter is responsible for intestinal absorption of zinc. PMID:12032886

  2. A novel member of a zinc transporter family is defective in acrodermatitis enteropathica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Bing; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Zemansky, Jason; Gitschier, Jane

    2002-07-01

    The rare inherited condition acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) results from a defect in the absorption of dietary zinc. Recently, we used homozygosity mapping in consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds to localize the AE gene to an approximately 3.5-cM region on 8q24. In this article, we identify a gene, SLC39A4, located in the candidate region and, in patients with AE, document mutations that likely lead to the disease. The gene encodes a histidine-rich protein, which we refer to as "hZIP4," which is a member of a large family of transmembrane proteins, some of which are known to serve as zinc-uptake proteins. We show that Slc39A4 is abundantly expressed in mouse enterocytes and that the protein resides in the apical membrane of these cells. These findings suggest that the hZIP4 transporter is responsible for intestinal absorption of zinc.

  3. The successful use of etanercept in combination therapy for treatment of acrodermatitis continua of hallopeau.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, Kimberly; Joyce, Kathleen M; Hodson, Darryl

    2005-01-01

    Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau (ACH) is a rare form of pustular psoriasis which poses a challenge to treat and causes considerable pain and suffering for those afflicted. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of ACH and other forms of psoriasis. Inhibition of TNF-alpha has been shown to provide benefit in such inflammatory conditions as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and, most recently, plaque psoriasis. In this report, we present the case of a 65-year-old man with a 9-year history of recalcitrant ACH who demonstrated significant and sustained clinical improvement when etanercept, a competitive inhibitor of TNF-alpha, was added to his treatment regimen of acitretin and topical corticosteroids over a 12-week period.

  4. Avidity determination of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rauer, S; Beitlich, P; Neubert, U; Rasiah, C; Kaiser, R

    2001-01-01

    The avidity indices of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies were estimated using ELISA in sera from patients with different stages of Lyme disease. In addition, sera from healthy students with proof of borrelial-specific IgG antibodies from standard serology were tested. Low avidity indices were detected predominantly in sera from patients with early-stage Lyme disease [erythema migrans (EM); n = 25]. High avidity indices were found in healthy students (n = 72) and in most of the patients with neuroborreliosis (NB; n = 44) and chronic late-stage Lyme disease [acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA); n = 36]. In conclusion, early-stage Lyme disease (EM) could be differentiated from advanced and chronic stages (NB, ACA) and from "seropositive" healthy persons using avidity determination in the majority of patients in this study.

  5. The expanding spectrum of cutaneous borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Eisendle, K; Zelger, B

    2009-04-01

    The known spectrum of skin manifestations in cutaneous Lyme disease is continuously expanding and can not be regarded as completed. Besides the classical manifestations of cutaneous borreliosis like erythema (chronicum) migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans evidence is growing that at least in part also other skin manifestations, especially morphea, lichen sclerosus and cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma are causally related to infections with Borrelia. Also granuloma annulare and interstitial granulomatous dermatitis might be partly caused by Borrelia burgdorferi or similar strains. There are also single reports of other skin manifestations to be associated with borrelial infections like cutaneous sarcoidosis, necrobiosis lipoidica and necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. In addition, as the modern chameleon of dermatology, cutaneous borreliosis, especially borrelial lymphocytoma, mimics other skin conditions, as has been shown for erythema annulare centrifugum or lymphocytic infiltration (Jessner Kanof) of the skin. PMID:19357623

  6. Heterogeneity of Borrelia burgdorferi in the skin.

    PubMed

    Aberer, E; Kersten, A; Klade, H; Poitschek, C; Jurecka, W

    1996-12-01

    The reliability of various in vitro techniques to identify Borrelia burgdorferi infection is still unsatisfactory. Using a high-power resolution videomicroscope and staining with the borrelia genus-specific monoclonal flagellar antibody H9724, we identified borrelial structures in skin biopsies of erythema chronicum migrans (from which borrelia later was cultured), of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, and of morphea. In addition to typical borreliae, we noted stained structures of varying shapes identical to borreliae found in a "borrelia-injected skin" model; identical to agar-embedded borreliae; and identical to cultured borreliae following exposure to hyperimmune sera and/or antibiotics. We conclude that the H9724-reactive structures represent various forms of B. burgdorferi rather than staining artifacts. These "atypical" forms of B. burgdorferi may represent in vivo morphologic variants of this bacterium.

  7. Is serological follow-up useful for patients with cutaneous Lyme borreliosis?

    PubMed

    Mullegger, R R; Glatz, M

    2009-01-01

    Serologic follow-up examinations are frequently performed in patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (the 3 dermatoborrelioses) to evaluate treatment efficacy. There is, however, substantial proof in the literature that antibody titer development after therapy is unpredictable and variable, and moreover it is largely uncorrelated with the clinical course and mode of antibiotic treatment. For example, persistent positive IgG and/ or IgM antibody titers do not indicate treatment failure. Thus, repeated serologic testing is of very limited value for assessing therapy efficacy, and therefore not recommended in the follow-up of dermatoborrelioses patients. Since cultivation of the etiologic agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and polymerase chain reaction are also inadequate for this purpose, the assessment of patients with cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in the follow-up rests primarily on the clinical picture.

  8. A Zinc Sulphate-Resistant Acrodermatitis Enteropathica Patient with a Novel Mutation in SLC39A4 Gene.

    PubMed

    Kilic, M; Taskesen, M; Coskun, T; Gürakan, F; Tokatli, A; Sivri, H S; Dursun, A; Schmitt, S; Küry, S

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of zinc deficiency due to an abnormal intestinal zinc transporter. It is characterized by the triad of acral dermatitis, alopecia, and diarrhoea. Once AE is correctly diagnosed, patients are treated with orally administered zinc sulphate. In some patients, relapses occur during adolescence, despite the regular treatment. Here, we discuss the clinical and molecular features of a 13-year-old adolescent girl with acrodermatitis enteropathica who was resistant to high-dose zinc sulphate therapy. We successfully treated the patient with zinc gluconate and vitamin C, and we detected a novel homozygous c.541_551dup (p.Leu186fsX38) mutation in the exon 3 of her SLC39A4 gene.

  9. Chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis in a patient with systemic sclerosis associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (Reynolds syndrome): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Walter Alberto Sifuentes; González-García, Carmen; de las Heras Alonso, Elena; de la Puente Bujidos, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis is a rare non-neoplastic inflammatory and degenerative process of the external ear, characterized by necrobiotic changes in the dermis that extend down to the perichondrium. This condition has been occasionally reported in patients with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis but not in those with concomitant primary biliary cirrhosis; this association is known as Reynolds syndrome. We report a 70-year-old woman diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis at age 47 and with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis at age 54 who developed a painful ulcerated nodule on the helical rim of the left ear shortly after the last diagnosis. The lesion was excised because of the suspicion of malignancy, but the histopathology was consistent with chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis. Although this condition is infrequent, it is necessary to know, because it may occur in patients with systemic sclerosis and be mistaken for neoplasms, such as basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, and these patients have an increased risk for the development of skin malignancies.

  10. Clioquinol Synergistically Augments Rescue by Zinc Supplementation in a Mouse Model of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; De Lisle, Robert C.; Finkelstein, David; Adlard, Paul A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency due to poor nutrition or genetic mutations in zinc transporters is a global health problem and approaches to providing effective dietary zinc supplementation while avoiding potential toxic side effects are needed. Methods/Principal Findings Conditional knockout of the intestinal zinc transporter Zip4 (Slc39a4) in mice creates a model of the lethal human genetic disease acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE). This knockout leads to acute zinc deficiency resulting in rapid weight loss, disrupted intestine integrity and eventually lethality, and therefore provides a model system in which to examine novel approaches to zinc supplementation. We examined the efficacy of dietary clioquinol (CQ), a well characterized zinc chelator/ionophore, in rescuing the Zip4intest KO phenotype. By 8 days after initiation of the knockout neither dietary CQ nor zinc supplementation in the drinking water was found to be effective at improving this phenotype. In contrast, dietary CQ in conjunction with zinc supplementation was highly effective. Dietary CQ with zinc supplementation rapidly restored intestine stem cell division and differentiation of secretory and the absorptive cells. These changes were accompanied by rapid growth and dramatically increased longevity in the majority of mice, as well as the apparent restoration of the homeostasis of several essential metals in the liver. Conclusions These studies suggest that oral CQ (or other 8-hydroxyquinolines) coupled with zinc supplementation could provide a facile approach toward treating zinc deficiency in humans by stimulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24015258

  11. [Enteropathic acrodermatitis in a patient with high-out-put ileostomy].

    PubMed

    Junquera Bañares, Sonia; Oria Mundín, Eugenio; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Zinc deficiency is relatively common in certain pathologies, although its clinical manifestation is uncommon. We present the case of a patient who was admitted presenting hyponatremic dehydration and pre-renal failure secondary to high-output ileostomy and oral intolerance. Although the ileostomy output was normalized within 3 days of admission and initial zinc plasma levels were normal, after being fed with TPN supplemented with 13 mg/day of zinc, he suffered a severe zinc deficit with enteropathic acrodermatitis that was completely resolved after one week with 26.5 mg/day. However, plasma levels did not return to normal until one month on therapy with high doses of zinc. Zinc plasma levels are not a good indicator of zinc stores in the body and many times their changes are a late indicator of zinc deficit. There is not a correlation between the clinical improvement and normalization of zinc levels, being common the clinical resolution within few days of the supplementation without observing an increase of zinc plasma levels.

  12. The Use of Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy in the Assessment of Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma vs. Pityriasis lichenoides Chronica

    SciTech Connect

    El Bedewi, A.; El Anany, G; El Mofty, M; Kretlow, A; Park, S; Miller, L

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous lymphomas remains a challenge for both the clinician and dermatopathologist. To differentiate between frank malignant and premalignant lymphocytes within the skin. This study was performed on 20 patients with a mean age of 50 years. They were divided into two groups: mycosis fungoides (MF) (stage IA, IB and IIA) and pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC). Immunophenotyping using antibodies CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20 and CD30 was performed. Synchrotron Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIRM) was performed on cell nuclei to assess chemical differences between MF and PLC cases as a potential complementary screening tool. Dermal spectra of both MF and PLC were compared using principal components analysis (PCA) of the S-FTIRM data. All PLC spectra was clustered together. However, the MF spectra formed two clusters, one that grouped with the PLC and the other grouped separately. Moreover, protein and nucleic acids showed highly significant differences between MF (IIA and IB), MF (IA) and PLC. The malignant transformation within lymphocytes was identifiable through the spectroscopic analysis of protein, RNA and DNA with S-FTIRM, making it a promising tool for classifying the progression of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  13. Establishment of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified recombinant 83-kilodalton antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia afzelii for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rauer, S; Kayser, M; Neubert, U; Rasiah, C; Vogt, A

    1995-10-01

    The 83-kDa antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (p83-ELISA). Antibodies to the 83-kDa antigen of both the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM isotypes could be detected in all stages of Lyme disease. Sensitivity varied, depending on the clinical stage of illness. In early stages, as defined for 118 patients with erythema migrans, it was found to be 20% (24 of 118 patients: 7 with IgM, 16 with IgG, and 1 with IgM and IgG). Of the patients with late-stage Lyme arthritis and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, 94% (16 of 17:2 with IgM and IgG and 14 with IgG) and 86% (36 of 42:2 with IgG and IgM and 34 with IgG) revealed positive results in the p83-ELISA, respectively. p83 displays sequence heterogeneity according to the genomospecies, but when the reactions of serum specimens from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans patients and arthritis patients with p83 derived from representative strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia afzelii in ELISAs were compared, no differences in specificity and sensitivity were seen. When 82 serum specimens from healthy controls were tested, none had IgG and only 3 (4%) had IgM antibodies, indicating a high specificity. Positive reactions with antibodies against Treponema pallidum (1 of 37 patients; IgG) and Epstein-Barr virus (1 of 44 patients; IgM) and with autoantibodies of various specificities (1 of 53 patients; IgG) were seen with < 3% of the serum samples te11111111111111111111 high speficicity for B. burgdorferi.2+ 13% for IgM antibodies, the IgM p83-ELISA provided little diagnostic information for Lyme disease, whereas the IgG p83-ELISA appears to be a suita ;e test for serodiagnosis of advanced-stage Lyme disease.

  14. Nilontinib induced keratosis pilaris atrophicans.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Shilpi; Sood, Apra; Billings, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a disorder of follicular keratinization that is characterized by keratin plugs in the hair follicles with surrounding erythema. A 46-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was started on nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Two months later the patient noticed red bumps on the skin and patchy hair loss on the arms, chest, shoulders, back, and legs. Cutaneous reactions to nilotinib are the most frequent non-hematologic adverse effects reported. However, it is important to distinguish KP-like eruptions from more severe drug hypersensitivity eruptions, which can necessitate discontinuing the medication. Also, it is important to classify the cutaneous eruptions in patients on TKI according to the morphology instead of labeling them all as "chemotherapy eruption" to be able to better manage these adverse effects. PMID:27617940

  15. Lyme Borreliosis and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  16. Lyme borreliosis and skin.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-05-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  17. Chronic polyneuropathy and Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Mygland, A; Skarpaas, T; Ljøstad, U

    2006-11-01

    Infection of the peripheral nervous system with Borrelia burgdorferi can present as a cranial neuropathy or radiculopathy with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and intrathecal antibody production against B. burgdorferi, or as an asymmetric peripheral neuropathy with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA) and normal CSF findings. According to North American studies, it can also present as a symmetric chronic polyneuropathy without ACA or other Lyme manifestations. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies in patients presenting with isolated chronic polyneuropathy (PN) in a European region with high incidence of Lyme disease. Sera from 209 PN patients and 247 healthy blood donors from Vest-Agder County, Norway, were examined. Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies were detected in 43 (21%) PN patients and in 45 (18%) healthy blood donors (P = 0.553). The prevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies was similar (P = 0.311) in cryptogenic PN (24/102, 24%) and PNs of identified etiologies (19/107, 18%). PN patients with B. burgdorferi antibodies had normal spinal fluid white cell count and they did not differ clinically or electrophysiologically from PN patients without antibodies. None of 20 antibody-positive PN patients responded to antimicrobial treatment. The study shows that, in Europe, chronic distal PN without ACA or other Lyme manifestations is very rarely caused by a B. burgdorferi infection.

  18. Damage of Collagen and Elastic Fibres by Borrelia Burgdorferi – Known and New Clinical and Histopathological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kurt E

    2012-01-01

    Lyme Borreliosis, or Lyme’s disease, manifests itself in numerous skin conditions. Therapeutic intervention should be initiated as soon as a clinical diagnosis of erythema migrans is made. The histopathology of some of the skin conditions associated with Lyme Borreliosis is characterised by structural changes to collagen, and sometimes also elastic fibres. These conditions include morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. More recently, further skin conditions have been identified by the new microscopic investigation technique of focus floating microscopy: granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, erythema annulare centrifugum, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, cutaneous sarcoidosis and lymphocytic infiltration; these conditions also sometimes cause changes in the connective tissue. In the case of ligaments and tendons, collagen and elastic fibres predominate structurally. They are also the structures that are targeted by Borrelia. The resultant functional disorders have previously only rarely been associated with Borreliosis in clinical practice. Ligamentopathies and tendinopathies, spontaneous ruptures of tendons after slight strain, dislocation of vertebrae and an accumulation of prolapsed intervertebral discs as well as ossification of tendon insertions can be viewed in this light. PMID:23986790

  19. Homogeneous Inflammatory Gene Profiles Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts in Response to the Three Main Species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb, Mariam; Carpentier, Wassila; Cagnard, Nicolas; Nadaud, Sophie; Grillon, Antoine; Barthel, Cathy; De Martino, Sylvie Josiane; Jaulhac, Benoît; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In Lyme borreliosis, the skin is the key site for bacterial inoculation by the infected tick and for cutaneous manifestations. We previously showed that different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolated from tick and from different clinical stages of the Lyme borreliosis (erythema migrans, and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans) elicited a very similar transcriptional response in normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, using whole transcriptome microarray chips, we aimed to compare the transcriptional response of normal human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 3 Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato strains belonging to 3 main pathogenic species (B. afzelii, B. garinii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto) in order to determine whether “species-related” inflammatory pathways could be identified. The three Borrelia strains tested exhibited similar transcriptional profiles, and no species-specific fingerprint of transcriptional changes in fibroblasts was observed. Conversely, a common core of chemokines/cytokines (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL10, IL-6, IL-8) and interferon-related genes was stimulated by all the 3 strains. Dermal fibroblasts appear to play a key role in the cutaneous infection with Borrelia, inducing a homogeneous inflammatory response, whichever Borrelia species was involved. PMID:27706261

  20. [The variable spectrum of cutaneous Lyme borreliosis. Diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, H

    2012-05-01

    Lyme borreliosis can affect almost all human organs. Erythema migrans is the first and most frequent manifestation in 80-90% of patients in the early stage of localized skin infection. Besides the typical clinical appearance, many atypical variants can be observed. The solitary borrelial lymphocytoma is much less common and occurs mostly in children. Due to improvement in the early recognition of Lyme borreliosis, the diagnosis is made in the disseminated and late stage in only 10-20% of patients. Multiple erythemata migrantia indicating the hematogenous dissemination of B. burgdorferi remain frequently unrecognized. Late stages of infection feature chronic plasma-cell rich cutaneous inflammation and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans in its edematous to atrophic forms. Cultivation or DNA detection of B. burgdorferi in skin biopsies are options to prove unusual skin manifestations. Serological detection of Borrelia-specific IgG- and IgM antibodies should be performed according to the two step protocol with ELISA and immunoassay according to the criteria of the MIQ 12. Serological tests have limited utility for follow-up. Antibiotic therapy is very effective if performed according to evidence-based protocols, such as the AWMF guidelines. PMID:22573314

  1. Chronic Lyme; diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, U; Mygland, Å

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we aim to discuss the definition, clinical and laboratory features, diagnostics, and management of chronic Lyme. Chronic Lyme is a rare condition caused by long-lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). The most common manifestations are progressive encephalitis, myelitis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans with or without neuropathy, and arthritis. Chronic Lyme is not considered to present with isolated subjective symptoms. Direct detection of Bb has low yield in most manifestations of chronic Lyme, while almost 100% of the cases are seropositive, that is, have detectable Bb IgG antibodies in serum. Detection of Bb antibodies only with Western blot technique and not with ELISA and detection of Bb IgM antibodies without simultaneous detection of Bb IgG antibodies should be considered as seronegativity in patients with long-lasting symptoms. Patients with chronic Lyme in the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) have, with few exceptions, pleocytosis and production of Bb antibodies in their cerebrospinal fluid. Strict guidelines should be applied in diagnostics of chronic Lyme, and several differential diagnoses, including neurological disease, rheumatologic disease, post-Lyme disease syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and psychiatric disease, should be considered in the diagnostic workup. Antibiotic treatment with administration route and dosages according to current guidelines are recommended. Combination antimicrobial therapy or antibiotic courses longer than 4 weeks are not recommended. Patients who attribute their symptoms to chronic Lyme on doubtful basis should be offered a thorough and systematic diagnostic approach, and an open and respectful dialogue. PMID:23190290

  2. A Mouse Model of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: Loss of Intestine Zinc Transporter ZIP4 (Slc39a4) Disrupts the Stem Cell Niche and Intestine Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; Venken, Koen J. T.; De Lisle, Robert C.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the human Zip4 gene cause acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare, pseudo-dominant, lethal genetic disorder. We created a tamoxifen-inducible, enterocyte-specific knockout of this gene in mice which mimics this human disorder. We found that the enterocyte Zip4 gene in mice is essential throughout life, and loss-of-function of this gene rapidly leads to wasting and death unless mice are nursed or provided excess dietary zinc. An initial effect of the knockout was the reprogramming of Paneth cells, which contribute to the intestinal stem cell niche in the crypts. Labile zinc in Paneth cells was lost, followed by diminished Sox9 (sex determining region Y-box 9) and lysozyme expression, and accumulation of mucin, which is normally found in goblet cells. This was accompanied by dysplasia of the intestinal crypts and significantly diminished small intestine cell division, and attenuated mTOR1 activity in villus enterocytes, indicative of increased catabolic metabolism, and diminished protein synthesis. This was followed by disorganization of the absorptive epithelium. Elemental analyses of small intestine, liver, and pancreas from Zip4-intestine knockout mice revealed that total zinc was dramatically and rapidly decreased in these organs whereas iron, manganese, and copper slowly accumulated to high levels in the liver as the disease progressed. These studies strongly suggest that wasting and lethality in acrodermatitis enteropathica patients reflects the loss-of-function of the intestine zinc transporter ZIP4, which leads to abnormal Paneth cell gene expression, disruption of the intestinal stem cell niche, and diminished function of the intestinal mucosa. These changes, in turn, cause a switch from anabolic to catabolic metabolism and altered homeostasis of several essential metals, which, if untreated by excess dietary zinc, leads to dramatic weight loss and death. PMID:22737083

  3. [Peripheral circulatory disorders and acrocyanosis in arsenic exposed Moselle wine-growers].

    PubMed

    Grobe, V J

    1976-06-01

    Peripheric circulatory disturbances and acrocyanosis in Moselle vinedressers injured by arsenic. During the years 1972--1975 a total number of 100 vine-dressers came for medical treatment because of late injures caused by arsenic intoxication. That is an average of 400 examinations per year 1600 control examinations within four years. These patients belonged to the age-classes 1890--1923, and the average time of exposure to arsenic was 20 years. After years of being exposed to arsenic, and even years after the exposure to it has stopped, there are those so-called late injures caused by arsenic. There are typical arsenic melanisms on the forehad-temple-rim where the hair begins to grow, on the nape of the neck, on the shoulders, chest, arms, and on the back of the hands which pass into precanceroses and carcinomas. The average time until the first late injuries caused by arsenic occur is 26 years. However, there have been latence periods of up to 50 years. This depends mainly on the amount of arsenic absorbed during the time. There are skin alterations which resemble very much an acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans Herxheimer. Histological examinations rather showed the symptoms of an endangiitis obliterans with atrophy of the cutis. These symptoms were found in 60--70% of the 50--60 years old patients, in 80--90% of the 60--70 years old patients, and in 90--95% of the 70--80 years old patients. Simultaneously there are distinct peripheric circulatory disturbances, cyanosis of the lips, dyspnoea, and an emphysema together with typical cardiac insufficiency. Foot and finger pulse are distinctly slower, and the temperature of the skin is remarkably lower. While people grow older the cyanosis gets worse. With a control group of patients who hadn't been exposed to arsenic these symptoms had only been found on 1--2%.

  4. Antibody profile to Borrelia burgdorferi in veterinarians from Nuevo León, Mexico, a non-endemic area of this zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra M.; Salinas, José A.; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Maldonado, Guadalupe; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease caused by infections with Borrelia. Persons infected with Borrelia can be asymptomatic or can develop disseminated disease. Diagnosis and recognition of groups at risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is of great interest to contemporary rheumatology. There are a few reports about Borrelia infection in Mexico, including lymphocytoma cases positive to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto by PCR and a patient with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Veterinarians have an occupational risk due to high rates of tick contact. The aim of this work was to investigate antibodies to Borrelia in students at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics, at Nuevo León, Mexico, and determine the antibody profile to B. burgdorferi antigens. Material and methods Sera were screened using a C6 ELISA, IgG and IgM ELISA using recombinant proteins from B. burgdorferi, B. garinii and B. afzelii. Sera with positive or grey-zone values were tested by IgG Western blot to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Results All volunteers reported tick exposures and 72.5% remembered tick bites. Only nine persons described mild Lyme disease related symptoms, including headaches, paresthesias, myalgias and arthralgias. None of the volunteers reported erythema migrans. Nine samples were confirmed by IgG Western blot. The profile showed 89% reactivity to OspA, 67% to p83, and 45% to BmpA. Conclusions Positive sera samples shared antibody reactivity to the markers of late immune response p83 and BmpA, even if individuals did not present symptoms of Lyme arthritis or post-Lyme disease. The best criterion to diagnose Lyme disease in our country remains to be established, because it is probable that different strains coexist in Mexico. This is the first report of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in Latin American veterinarians. Veterinarians and high-risk people should be alert to take precautionary measures to prevent tick-borne diseases. PMID:27504018

  5. [Skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in patients at the 1st Dermato-venereologic Clinic of Comenius University Medical School in Bratislava 1996-1998].

    PubMed

    Svecová, D; Buchvald, J; Oprsalová, K; Dolezalová, A

    2000-08-01

    60-70% of Lyme borreliosis is formed by early manifestations, in particular erythema migrans (EM). All vegetative forms of the tick Ixodes ricinus (e.g. full grown tick, nymphae and larvae) transmit the causal organism, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. garinii, B. afzelii). The objective of the work was to evaluate clinical and epidemiological parameters and to contribute by testing and investigating in greater detail criteria to the early and exact diagnosis of the disease. In a group of 50 patients the time of development of EM was evaluated, the mode of transmission, the incubation period, localization, symptoms of dissemination of B. burgdorferi, the period of treatment and the antibiotic used. The dynamics of the antibody titre against B. burgdorferi (IFA test) were assessed in 21 patients with EM for a period of 1 to 22 months and in 5 patients with acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans (ACA) for 3 to 55 months. In 50% EM developed during the summer months. 66% reported as the vector a tick, 14% insects and 20% did not know. An incubation of 1 and 2 weeks was reported in 34%, the lower extremities were affected in 52%. Manifestations of dissemination were found in 6 patients, in 2 patients EM relapsed. Antibodies (Ab) against B. burgdorferi were present in 38 patients. In 21 patients the dynamics of the antibody titre were followed up for 1 to 22 months and no substantial changes were found. Serum positivity in patients with ACA persisted without change of the titre for several years. In the treatment of EM most frequently doxycycline was administered for two weeks. EM as the early stage of LB is a seasonal disease with a natural focus. If treatment is started in the early stage of infection, antibodies against B. burgdorferi need not develop. There is no correlation between clinical complaints and serological results and the type of treatment. The prognosis of the disease is favourable in the majority of

  6. Hartnup disease masked by kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Orbak, Zerrin; Ertekin, Vildan; Selimoglu, Ayse; Yilmaz, Nebahat; Tan, Huseyin; Konak, Murat

    2010-08-01

    This report describes an 11-month old girl with Hartnup disease presenting with kwashiorkor and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like skin lesions but free of other clinical findings. This case with kwashiorkor had acrodermatitis enteropathica-like desquamative skin eruption. Since zinc level was in the normal range, investigation for a metabolic disorder was considered, and Hartnup disease was diagnosed.

  7. [Clinical trial of a topical preparation containing urea, sunflower oil, evening primrose oil, wheat germ oil and sodium pyruvate, in several hyperkeratotic skin conditions].

    PubMed

    Ferrando, J

    1986-01-01

    A topical clinical trial with preparations containing urea and sodium pyruvate has been made. It was used for diverse hyperkeratotic skin conditions (psoriasis, xerosis, pityriasis rubra pilaris, stuccokeratosis, seborrheic dermatitis, stasis dermatitis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica). A month later a clinical improvement was evident in all cases except in pityriasis lichenoides.

  8. Epidermolysis bullosa: dental and anesthetic management of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wright, J T

    1984-02-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare genetic disorders which are of dental interest because of their specific oral manifestations and management difficulties. Two cases of recessive EB which may be classified clinically as the atrophicans-gravis Herlitz type are described. Dental therapy consisted of extractions and stainless steel crown restorations, with inhalation general anesthesia. The need for and advantages of early preventive and restorative dental care are illustrated by the cases presented.

  9. Vulvitis plasmacellularis: two new cases.

    PubMed Central

    Neri, I; Patrizi, A; Marzaduri, S; Marini, R; Negosanti, M

    1995-01-01

    Vulvitis chronica plasmacellularis or Zoon's vulvitis is a rare benign circumscribed inflammation of the vulvar mucosa. It is found in women ranging in age from 26 to 70 years. Shiny, macular erythematous lesions, which are irregular in shape and sharply marginated are usually observed. The histologic findings show chronic subepithelial dense inflammation composed largely of plasma cells. We here report two cases of vulvitis plasmacellularis with typical clinical manifestations, courses and histopathologic findings. Images PMID:7490049

  10. Misdiagnosed food allergy resulting in severe malnutrition in an infant.

    PubMed

    Alvares, Michael; Kao, Leon; Mittal, Vineeta; Wuu, Alice; Clark, April; Bird, J Andrew

    2013-07-01

    As food allergies become increasingly prevalent and testing methods to identify "food allergy" increase in number, the importance of careful diagnosis has become even more critical. Misdiagnosis of food allergy and inappropriate use of unproven testing modalities may lead to a harmful food-elimination diet. This case is an example of an infant who was placed on an overly restrictive elimination diet at the recommendation of her health care providers, resulting in kwashiorkor and acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica.

  11. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica.

  12. Acquired protein energy malnutrition in glutaric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqiao; Savory, Stephanie; Agim, Nnenna G

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acquired protein energy malnutrition with associated zinc deficiency in an 18-month-old boy with type 1 glutaric acidemia. Physical examination findings included generalized nonpitting edema, widespread desquamative plaques, and sparse hair with a reddish tinge. Laboratory abnormalities included low levels of zinc, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and iron. A review of skin manifestations of nutritional deficiencies, specifically kwashiorkor, is presented, as well as the relatively new entity called acrodermatitis dysmetabolica. PMID:23330977

  13. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    PubMed

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome.

  14. [The clinical and serological manifestations of Lyme disease in Russia].

    PubMed

    Anan'eva, L P; Skripnikova, I A; Barskova, V G; Steere, A C

    1995-01-01

    Out of 86 Lyme's disease patients with a history of migrating erythema nervous system, cardiovascular and articular involvement was observed in 27, 6 and 43% of cases. Acrodermatitis was diagnosed in 2% of patients. Affection of locomotor system manifested with acute arthritis episodes or pains in major joints. 11 patients of 12 examined at arthritis onset showed elevated titer of anti-Borrelia IgG antibodies. Serologically, of 80 patients with arthritis or arthralgia without prior migrating erythema 6 demonstrated antibodies to 5 and more Borrelia polypeptides.

  15. [Pustular psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Weisenseel, P; Wilsmann-Theis, D; Kahl, C; Reich, K; Mössner, R

    2016-06-01

    A number of pustular skin diseases share clinical, pathogenetic, and epidemiological aspects with plaque-type psoriasis, and their classification as a separate clinical entity or as a subtype of psoriasis remains controversial, which is also reflected in the multitude of their names. They include generalized pustular psoriasis with its subtypes, acrodermatitis continua suppurativa (Hallopeau), acute pustulosis palmopantaris, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, and pustular variants of a mostly TNF-blocker triggered paradoxical psoriasiform dermatitis. In this article, the epidemiology, clinical picture, pathogenesis, genetics, and therapy of these pustular skin diseases are described. PMID:27240667

  16. Study on dermatoses and their prevalence in groups of confirmed alcoholic individuals in comparison to a non-alcoholic group of individuals*

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Maria Cecilia Teixeira de Carvalho; Vilela, Maria Aparecida Constantino; de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto B. Mendes

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The direct relationship between alcoholism and dermatoses has been evaluated in recent researches. However, there are few objective surveys that demonstrate and prove a direct relationship between alcohol and a specific dermatosis. OBJECTIVES to verify the prevalence of dermatoses in alcoholics, analize the dermatological changes found in these patients and their evolution during alcoholic abstinence. Also, to compare the results obtained with a non-alcoholic control group and with the data found in medical literature. METHODS: the dermatologic conditions of 278 alcoholic patients (250 men, 28 women) were studied over a period of 4 years, and compared to those of a control group of 271 non-alcoholic individuals (249 men, 22 women), members of the Military Police Force. The individuals in both groups were between 20 and 60 years old. RESULTS Pellagra, nummular eczema, purpura pigmentosa chronica (also known as pigmented purpuric dermatosis) and psoriasis were more frequent in the group of alcoholics and, apparently, occurred in parallel with alcoholism that seems to play a role in the evolution of these dermatoses. The dermatopathies were more frequent before the age of forty, regardless of factors such as profession, race or gender. CONCLUSION the association of dermatoses and alcoholism was extremely significant according to the statistical data. Alcoholism can be considered a risk factor for pellagra, psoriasis, nummular eczema and purpura pigmentosa chronica dermatoses, which can, as well, be considered alcoholism indicators. PMID:23793198

  17. Poikilodermatous mycosis fungoides: clinical and histopathological analysis of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Oleg; Gradova, Svetlana; Tarasevich, Svetlana; Pankratov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Poikilodermatous mycosis fungoides is a rare distinct clinical variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), formerly referred to as poikiloderma vasculare atrophicans or parapsoriasis variegata. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a malignant neoplasm of T-lymphocyte origin, most commonly memory CD4+ T-cells.We report here a patient with generalized poikilodermatous skin lesions whose diagnosis of mycosis fungoides was made only a few years after the onset of his disease due to its bizarre clinical behavior and a natural reluctance to diagnose this disease in children and adolescents.The variability of atypical clinical presentations of MF and its similarity to benign inflammatory and noninflammatory skin disorders may become a source of considerable confusion and controversy, challenging a dermatologist to make a precise diagnosis. Therefore, scrupulous clinicopathological correlation is an absolute necessity.

  18. [Laparoscopy in the gynecologic clinic].

    PubMed

    Palatyński, A

    1992-11-01

    Three thousand and twelve (3012) diagnostic laparoscopies in children, girls and women were carried out during the period 1970--1992. The age of the patients was between 6--49 years. The present studies show that laparoscopy fills up the space between the clinical investigation and laparotomy probatoria. It helps to solve in a clear way, a lot of diagnostic problems in gynecology in adult women, in gynecology of developmental age and gynecological endocrinology. There were the following indications to laparoscopy: 1. Adnexitis chronica 2. Infertility-primary and secondary. 3. Unclear tumor and pelvic infections in adolescence. 4. Primary and secondary failure of ovaries. 5. Suspicion of polycystic ovaries. 6. Second look laparoscopy. 7. Suspicion of endometriosis. 8. Suspicion of ectopic pregnancy. 9. Developmental faults of sexual organs. 10. Pubertas praecox. PMID:1305570

  19. [Histological evaluation of the condition of the trepanation cavity coating after radical surgery on the middle ear].

    PubMed

    Anikin, I A; Bykova, V P; Patiakina, O K; Portenko, E G

    1998-01-01

    Tissue samples obtained intraoperatively from different parts of the middle ear in the course of the radical operation (35 cases) or reconstructive operations in patients with the history of surgical intervention on the ear (67 cases) were examined histologically. Fibrous-atrophic changes in the trepanation cavity coating correlated with the duration of the disease and the time since the radical operation. Pathomorphological and topographic profile of the changes in the operated ear coating copies relevant picture of otitis media purulenta chronica. The tympanomastoid cavity coating was characterized by increasing fibrous-atrophic changes reflecting regeneratory-plastic insufficiency of the epithelium and persistent tympanofibrosis in conditions of open trepanation cavity with disturbed anatomic relations in the middle ear.

  20. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  1. A case of Gianotti Crosti syndrome with HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dikici, B; Uzun, H; Konca, C; Kocamaz, H; Yel, S

    2008-01-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (papular acrodermatitis of childhood), which was first described in 1955, is a nonspecific rash that usually consists of the abrupt onset of pink flesh coloring, smooth or lichenoid, flat-topped papules. It was first related to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, cases not associated with HBV infection were reported as well. Although a type of delayed hypersensitivity reaction is speculated as a cause, exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. The prognosis is favorable and successful management relies upon general supportive and symptomatic care. We report a seven-year-old boy diagnosed with Gianotti-Crosti syndrome with monomorphous papules on his cheeks, buttocks and extremities associated with hepatitis B virus infection.

  2. Case report: Diaper dermatitis presenting as pustules.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Ann T; Emerson, Ashley N; Wyatt, Julie P; Brodell, Robert T

    2014-09-01

    Diaper dermatitis is the most common dermatologic disorder of infancy. Its cause can often be determined clinically based on the clinical presentation. Primary diaper dermatitis is associated with irritants and spares the deep skin folds. Secondary diaper dermatitis is most often caused by Candida yeast overgrowth and typically presents as a well-defined area of beefy red erythema covering the diaper area and including the deep folds of skin with hallmark satellite pustules. Other causes include seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, acrodermatitis enteropathica, allergic contact dermatitis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and, in the setting of a primarily pustular eruption, bacterial folliculitis. A simple potassium hydroxide preparation (KOH) can confirm the diagnosis of candida diaper dermatitis and guide proper treatment.

  3. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  4. Innovative uses for zinc in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoon Soo; Hill, Nikki D; Bibi, Yuval; Dreiher, Jacob; Cohen, Arnon D

    2010-07-01

    Severe zinc deficiency states, such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, are associated with a variety of skin manifestations, such as perioral, acral, and perineal dermatitis. These syndromes can be reversed with systemic zinc repletion. In addition to skin pathologies that are clearly zinc-dependent, many dermatologic conditions (eg, dandruff, acne, and diaper rash) have been associated and treated with zinc. Success rates for treatment with zinc vary greatly depending on the disease, mode of administration, and precise zinc preparation used. With the exception of systemic zinc deficiency states, there is little evidence that convincingly demonstrates the efficacy of zinc as a reliable first-line treatment for most dermatologic conditions. However, zinc may be considered as an adjunctive treatment modality. Further research is needed to establish the indications for zinc treatment in dermatology, optimal mode of zinc delivery, and best type of zinc compound to be used. PMID:20510767

  5. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  6. Extreme Population Differences in the Human Zinc Transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4) Are Explained by Positive Selection in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pybus, Marc; Andrews, Glen K.; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Comas, David; Sekler, Israel; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Stoneking, Mark; Valverde, Miguel A.; Vicente, Rubén; Bosch, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Extreme differences in allele frequency between West Africans and Eurasians were observed for a leucine-to-valine substitution (Leu372Val) in the human intestinal zinc uptake transporter, ZIP4, yet no further evidence was found for a selective sweep around the ZIP4 gene (SLC39A4). By interrogating allele frequencies in more than 100 diverse human populations and resequencing Neanderthal DNA, we confirmed the ancestral state of this locus and found a strong geographical gradient for the derived allele (Val372), with near fixation in West Africa. In extensive coalescent simulations, we show that the extreme differences in allele frequency, yet absence of a classical sweep signature, can be explained by the effect of a local recombination hotspot, together with directional selection favoring the Val372 allele in Sub-Saharan Africans. The possible functional effect of the Leu372Val substitution, together with two pathological mutations at the same codon (Leu372Pro and Leu372Arg) that cause acrodermatitis enteropathica (a disease phenotype characterized by extreme zinc deficiency), was investigated by transient overexpression of human ZIP4 protein in HeLa cells. Both acrodermatitis mutations cause absence of the ZIP4 transporter cell surface expression and nearly absent zinc uptake, while the Val372 variant displayed significantly reduced surface protein expression, reduced basal levels of intracellular zinc, and reduced zinc uptake in comparison with the Leu372 variant. We speculate that reduced zinc uptake by the ZIP4-derived Val372 isoform may act by starving certain pathogens of zinc, and hence may have been advantageous in Sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, these functional results may indicate differences in zinc homeostasis among modern human populations with possible relevance for disease risk. PMID:24586184

  7. IL36RN Mutations Affect Protein Expression and Function: A Basis for Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Pustular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Marie; Bal, Elodie; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Madrange, Marine; Khelil, Amel; Sahel, Houria; Zenati, Akila; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Boubridaa, Khaled; Chiali, Amel; Smahi, Naima; Otsmane, Farida; Bouajar, Bakar; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Turki, Hamida; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Viguier, Manuelle; Hamel, Yamina; Bachelez, Hervé; Smahi, Asma

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous or compound heterozygous IL36RN gene mutations underlie the pathogenesis of psoriasis-related pustular eruptions including generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption. We identified two unreported IL36RN homozygous mutations (c.41C>A/p.Ser14X and c.420_426del/p.Gly141MetfsX29) in patients with familial generalized pustular psoriasis. We analyzed the impact of a spectrum of IL36RN mutations on IL-36 receptor antagonist protein by using site-directed mutagenesis and expression in HEK293T cells. This enabled us to differentiate null mutations with complete absence of IL-36 receptor antagonist (the two previously unreported mutations, c.80T>C/p.Leu27Pro, c.28C>T/p.Arg10X, c.280G>T/p.Glu94X, c.368C>G/p.Thr123Arg, c.368C>T/p.Thr123Met, and c.227C>T/p.Pro76Leu) from mutations with decreased (c.95A>G/p.His32Arg, c.142C>T/p.Arg48Trp, and c.308C>T/p.Ser113Leu) or unchanged (c.304C>T/p.Arg102Trp and c.104A>G/p.Lys35Arg) protein expression. Functional assays measuring the impact of mutations on the capacity to repress IL-36-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway showed complete functional impairment for null mutations, whereas partial or no impairment was observed for other mutations considered as hypomorphic. Finally, null mutations were associated with severe clinical phenotypes (generalized pustular psoriasis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption), whereas hypomorphic mutations were identified in both localized (palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau) and generalized variants. These results provide a preliminary basis for genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with deficiency of the IL-36Ra (DITRA), and suggest the involvement of other factors in the modulation of clinical expression. PMID:27220475

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the urine of treated patients with chronic Lyme disease symptoms. A PCR study of 97 cases.

    PubMed

    Bayer, M E; Zhang, L; Bayer, M H

    1996-01-01

    The presence of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA was established by PCR from urine samples of 97 patients clinically diagnosed as presenting with symptoms of chronic Lyme disease. All patients had shown erythema chronica migrans following a deer tick bite. Most of the patients had been antibiotic-treated for extended periods of time. We used three sets of primer pairs with DNA sequences for the gene coding of outer surface protein A (OspA) and of a genomic sequence of B. burgdorferi to study samples of physician-referred patients from the mideastern USA. Controls from 62 healthy volunteers of the same geographic areas were routinely carried through the procedures in parallel with patients' samples. Of the 97 patients, 72 (74.2%) were found with positive PCR and the rest with negative PCR. The 62 healthy volunteers were PCR negative. It is proposed that a sizeable group of patients diagnosed on clinical grounds as having chronic Lyme disease may still excrete Borrelia DNA, and may do so in spite of intensive antibiotic treatment.

  9. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition. PMID:27662089

  10. [Skin manifestations of Lyme borreliosis--occurrence, diagnosis, therapy].

    PubMed

    Svecova, D; Buchvald, J

    2000-01-01

    Eight genotypes of Borrelia burgdorferi are known currently. In Slovakia (Carpathian Euroregion) the most frequent genotypes are B. garini, B. afzelii, as well as B. valaisiana and B. lusitaniae. Infestation of the vector Ixodes ricinus is 3-30%. The most frequent early skin manifestation is erythema migrans (60-70%). Borrelia burgdorferi is suggested to be the causative agent in sclerodermia circumscripta, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, maybe also in urticaria chronica, granuloma anulare, erythema anulare, erythema nodosum. It can be the causative agent also in neurological diagnoses as e.g. chronic oligosymptomatic encephalopathy, "sclerosis multiplex-like" syndrome and fatigue syndrome, arthralgia, myalgia, seronegative indifferentiated oligoarthritis and fibromyalgies. The serological diagnosis has to be coincide with clinical findings. Used serological examinations are ELISA, Immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence examination. PCR is an important contribution in examination of synovial fluid (85% detection) and cerebrospinal liquor (24-100%). The importance of PCR is stressed in cases with mixed infections by several borrrelia genotypes. The first line treatment includes doxyciclin, amoxicilin, and erythromycin. The second line includes macrolides, cephalosporines. New perspectives are ascribed to active immunisation with recombined antigen OsA (LYMErix, ImuLyme).

  11. The Functions of Metallothionein and ZIP and ZnT Transporters: An Overview and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomoki; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-01-01

    Around 3000 proteins are thought to bind zinc in vivo, which corresponds to ~10% of the human proteome. Zinc plays a pivotal role as a structural, catalytic, and signaling component that functions in numerous physiological processes. It is more widely used as a structural element in proteins than any other transition metal ion, is a catalytic component of many enzymes, and acts as a cellular signaling mediator. Thus, it is expected that zinc metabolism and homeostasis have sophisticated regulation, and elucidating the underlying molecular basis of this is essential to understanding zinc functions in cellular physiology and pathogenesis. In recent decades, an increasing amount of evidence has uncovered critical roles of a number of proteins in zinc metabolism and homeostasis through influxing, chelating, sequestrating, coordinating, releasing, and effluxing zinc. Metallothioneins (MT) and Zrt- and Irt-like proteins (ZIP) and Zn transporters (ZnT) are the proteins primarily involved in these processes, and their malfunction has been implicated in a number of inherited diseases such as acrodermatitis enteropathica. The present review updates our current understanding of the biological functions of MTs and ZIP and ZnT transporters from several new perspectives. PMID:26959009

  12. [Epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis in French-speaking Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Nahimana, I; Gern, L; Péter, O; Praz, G; Moosmann, Y; Francioli, P

    2000-10-14

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of cases and the clinical aspects of Lyme borreliosis in French-speaking Switzerland. From July 1996 to December 1997, all laboratories performing serological tests for Lyme borreliosis sent a questionnaire to the treating physicians whenever the tests were positive. In addition, the physicians who diagnosed a case on clinical grounds only were also asked to report these cases. During this period, 1460 positive serological tests were recorded among approximately 10,360 performed (14%). A total of 775 questionnaires were returned (53%). In 3/4 of the cases, the test was ordered because of an acute clinical manifestation or a tick bite. The rest related to chronic symptoms or follow-up. In 504 cases (65%), diagnosis was considered certain or probable. These were erythema migrans in 46%, clinical manifestations of stage II in 33% (26 facial palsy, 20 acute arthritis, 5 benign cutaneous lymphocytoma) and chronic symptoms in 21% (23 acrodermatitis, 26 neuropathies, and 8 arthritis). The adjusted incidence, estimated on the basis of the treating physician's place of residence, ranged from 9/100,000 in Valais to 95/100,000 in Neuchâtel. This study indicates that Lyme borreliosis is a diagnosis frequently looked for and established in French-speaking Switzerland. Although erythema migrans is the main clinical manifestation, symptoms of stage II and III indicate that Lyme borreliosis is also responsible for relatively major systemic morbidity.

  13. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome: clinical, serologic, and therapeutic data from nine children.

    PubMed

    Boeck, K; Mempel, M; Schmidt, T; Abeck, D

    1998-12-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS), a self-limiting papulovesicular acrodermatitis often associated with underlying viral infection, is mainly described in children. Nine children with GCS were evaluated with dermatologic examination and serologic tests for viral infections. Therapy was modified according to the subjective symptoms of patients, which included characteristic acrolocated papulovesicles, generalized skin eruption, and mild to severe pruritus. Results of serologic investigations revealed Epstein-Barr virus, Coxsackie A virus, parvovirus B19, and parainfluenza virus 1/2. In three children no underlying viral infection was found. Therapeutic interventions included topical clioquinol lotion 1 percent, topical application of corticosteroids, systemic antihistaminic therapy, and systemic methylprednisolone. Skin lesions resolved after 2 to 4 weeks in treated as well as in nontreated children. Although GCS in children often lacks close association with a causative viral infection, such severe infections as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus must be considered. Whole-body involvement seems to correlate with severe pruritus and additional general symptoms requiring more intensive therapy.

  14. Of mice and men, metals and mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Danks, D M

    1986-01-01

    Several mutations affecting the transport of copper and zinc in humans and in mice have been discovered over the last 15 years, joining the long known disturbance of copper transport in Wilson's disease. Menkes' disease (classical and mild variant forms) and X linked Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type IX, X linked cutis laxa) have features in common with one another and with the brindled (Mobr) and blotchy (Moblo) mouse mutants, respectively. There may be one allelic series of mutants in each species or two loci may be involved in each. The toxic milk mutant (tx) in the mouse may be homologous to Wilson's disease in man. The defect of intestinal absorption of zinc in acrodermatitis enteropathica has no homologue yet in the mouse. However, the lethal milk (lm) mutant in the mouse may be homologous to a condition of zinc deficiency described in a few breastfed, low birth weight infants. Many more genetic defects of transport of copper and of zinc may await discovery. Conversely, these mutants are valuable in elucidating the normal processes of copper and zinc transport. PMID:3519972

  15. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans.

  16. Diet in dermatology: revisited.

    PubMed

    Kaimal, Sowmya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Diet has an important role to play in many skin disorders, and dermatologists are frequently faced with the difficulty of separating myth from fact when it comes to dietary advice for their patients. Patients in India are often anxious about what foods to consume, and what to avoid, in the hope that, no matter how impractical or difficult this may be, following this dictum will cure their disease. There are certain disorders where one or more components in food are central to the pathogenesis, e.g. dermatitis herpetiformis, wherein dietary restrictions constitute the cornerstone of treatment. A brief list, although not comprehensive, of other disorders where diet may have a role to play includes atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, psoriasis vulgaris, pemphigus, urticaria, pruritus, allergic contact dermatitis, fish odor syndrome, toxic oil syndrome, fixed drug eruption, genetic and metabolic disorders (phenylketonuria, tyrosinemia, homocystinuria, galactosemia, Refsum's disease, G6PD deficiency, xanthomas, gout and porphyria), nutritional deficiency disorders (kwashiorkar, marasmus, phrynoderma, pellagra, scurvy, acrodermatitis enteropathica, carotenemia and lycopenemia) and miscellaneous disorders such as vitiligo, aphthous ulcers, cutaneous vasculitis and telogen effluvium. From a practical point of view, it will be useful for the dermatologist to keep some dietary information handy to deal with the occasional patient who does not seem to respond in spite of the best, scientific and evidence-based therapy.

  17. Breast cancer--the diagnostic and therapeutic problem.

    PubMed

    Madej, B; Maciejewski, R; Radzikowska, E; Janicki, K; Burdan, F

    2001-01-01

    The progress made in recent years in the diagnostics of breast cancer, the universal character of mammographic and ultrasonographic screening examinations and the growth of social awareness with respect to this disease have caused a great deal of diagnostic problems. Cases of big, ulcerating cancer tumours, which infiltrate skin have now become history, and are reported sporadically. However, physicians are now facing the problem, which is the diagnosis of 1-5 mm changes detected in examinations. The necessity to diagnose small tumours in combination with 80-90% mammographic sensitivity reported compelled clinical physicists to verify these changes with histopathological examination. In the cases when the clinical examination, the result of a mammographic examination and that of fine needle aspiration biopsy do not provide a coherent picture, a surgeon has to qualify a patient for tumorectomy with an intra-operative study. In the years 1997-2000, 173 breast tumorectomies were made. Patients with benign neoplasm (e.g. adenofibroma, papilloma mammae) or patients with arousing suspicion of oncological anxiety breast tumour were qualified for surgical procedures. Operations were performed in one-day surgery conditions and intra-operative examination was performed in every case. In cases of non-palpable tumours, which were visible in ultrasonography or mammography the changes were marked by an "anchor" in order to be removed and examined histopathologically. The operated patients were 17-89 years old. In the obtained 173 tissue fragments dysplasia benign was recognized in 47.98% of cases, in 42.2% adenofibroma, in 2.31% papilloma mammae, in 1.73% mastitis chronica, in 4.62% ca ductale invasivum and in 1.16% ca ductale in situ has been observed. PMID:11977314

  18. A role for dZIP89B in Drosophila dietary zinc uptake reveals additional complexity in the zinc absorption process.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc is the principal source of zinc in eukaryotes, with its uptake and distribution controlled by a complex network of numerous membrane-spanning transport proteins. Dietary absorption is achieved by members of the SLC39A (ZIP) gene family, which encode proteins that are generally responsible for the movement of zinc into the cytosol. ZIP4 is thought to be the primary mammalian zinc uptake gene in the small intestine, with mutations in this gene causing the zinc deficiency disease Acrodermatitis enteropathica. In Drosophila, dual knockdown of the major dietary zinc uptake genes dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) and dZIP42C.2 (dZIP2) results in a severe sensitivity to zinc-deficient media. However, the symptoms associated with ZIP4 loss can be reversed by zinc supplementation and dZIP42C.1 and 2 knockdown has minimal effect under normal dietary conditions, suggesting that additional pathways for zinc absorption exist in both mammals and flies. This study provides evidence that dZIP89B is an ideal candidate for this role in Drosophila, encoding a low-affinity zinc uptake transporter active in the posterior midgut. Flies lacking dZIP89B, while viable and apparently healthy, show indications of low midgut zinc levels, including reduced metallothionein B expression and compensatory up-regulation of dZIP42C.1 and 2. Furthermore dZIP89B mutants display a dramatic resistance to toxic dietary zinc levels which is abrogated by midgut-specific restoration of dZIP89B activity. We postulate that dZIP89B works in concert with the closely related dZIP42C.1 and 2 to ensure optimal zinc absorption under a range of dietary conditions.

  19. Clinical, endocrinological and biochemical effects of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-08-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal disease, certain diuretics, the use of chelating agents such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. The requirement of zinc is increased in pregnancy and during the growing age period. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency included bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhoea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males and it is fatal if untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss and hyperammonaemia. Zinc is a growth factor. As a result of its deficiency, growth is affected adversely in many animal species and in man. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level and the hypothalamic--pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in a cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus its function. In mice, the incidence of degenerate oocytes, and hypohaploidy and hyperhaploidy in metaphase II oocytes were increased due to zinc deficiency. Zinc at physiological concentrations reduced prolactin secretion from the pituitary in vitro and it has been

  20. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  1. Olmsted syndrome: clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-03-17

    Olmsted syndrome (OS) is a rare genodermatosis classically characterized by the combination of bilateral mutilating transgredient palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) and periorificial keratotic plaques, but which shows considerable clinical heterogeneity. The disease starts usually at birth or in early childhood. About 73 cases have been reported worldwide. OS is observed in both sexes, although male cases are more frequent. The most suggestive symptoms associate PPK with pseudoainhum and periorificial keratotic plaques. Frequently associated features include hair and nail abnormalities, leukokeratosis, corneal default and recurrent infections. Pain and itching are variable but can be severe. Most of reported OS cases are sporadic, although familial cases with different mode of inheritance were also described. Mutations in TRPV3 (Transient receptor potential vanilloid-3) gene have recently been identified as a cause of autosomal dominant (gain-of-function mutations) or recessive OS. Mutations in MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2) gene were identified in a recessive X-linked form. The diagnosis relies mainly on clinical features associating severe PPK and periorificial keratotic plaques, but can be challenging in patients with incomplete phenotype or atypical features. OS has to be differentiated from other severe forms of PPK including Vohwinkel, Clouston, Papillon-Lefèvre or Haim-Munk syndromes, Mal de Meleda, pachyonychia congenita, Tyrosinemia type II and acrodermatitis enteropathica. When differential diagnoses are difficult to exclude, genetic studies are essential to search for a TRPV3 or MBTPS2 mutation. However, additional genes remain to be identified. No specific and satisfactory therapy is currently available for OS. Current treatments of hyperkeratosis (mainly emollients, keratolytics, retinoids or corticosteroids), either topical or systemic, are symptomatic and offer only temporary partial relief. Specific management of pain and

  2. Dermatologic signs in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2005-01-01

    Eating disorders are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescent females and young women. They are associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay and developmental delay. Dermatologic symptoms are almost always detectable in patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and awareness of these may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN or BN. Cutaneous manifestations are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs (such as laxatives and diuretics), and of psychiatric morbidity. These manifestations include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrheic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, generalized pruritus, acquired striae distensae, slower wound healing, prurigo pigmentosa, edema, linear erythema craquele, acral coldness, pellagra, scurvy, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms arising from laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions to drugs. Symptoms arising from psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the 'hidden' signs of these disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder, and to avoid over-treatment of conditions which are overemphasized by patients' distorted perception of skin appearance. Even though skin signs of eating disorders improve with weight gain, the dermatologist will be asked to treat the dermatological conditions mentioned above. Xerosis improves with moisturizing ointments and humidification of the environment. Acne may be treated with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibacterials or azaleic acid; these agents may be

  3. [Clinical studies of pediatric malabsorption syndromes].

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Multiple cases with various types of pediatric malabsorption syndromes were evaluated. The clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, pathophysiology, and histopathological descriptions of each patient were analyzed in an effort to clear the pathogenesis of the malabsorption syndromes and the treatments were undertaken. The cases studied, included one patient with cystic fibrosis, two with lactose intolerance with lactosuria (Durand type), one with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, two with familial hypobetalipoproteinemia, one with Hartnup disease, one with congenital chroride diarrhea, one with acrodermatitis enteropathica, one with intestinal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia (NLH), five with intractable diarrhea of early infancy and four with glycogenosis type Ia. Each case description and outcome is described below: 1. A 15-year-old Japanese boy with cystic fibrosis presented with severe symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bronchiectasis, pneumothorax and hemoptysis. His prognosis was poor. Analysis of the CFTR genes of this patient revealed a homozygous large deletion from intron 16 to 17b. 2. In the sibling case of Durand type lactose intolerance, the subjects'disaccaridase activity of the small bowel, including lactase, were within normal limits. The results of per oral and per intraduodenal lactose tolerance tests confirmed lactosuria in both. These observations suggested, not only an abnormal gastric condition, but also duodenal and intestinal mucosal abnormal permeability of lactose. 3. In the case of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, the subject had a lymphedematous right arm and hand, a grossly coarsened mucosal pattern of the upper gastrointestinal tract (identified via radiologic examination) and the presence of lymphangiectasia (confirmed via duodenal mucosal biopsy). The major laboratory findings were hypoalbuminemia, decreased immunoglobulin levels and lymphopenia resulting from loss of lymph fluid and protein into the gastro

  4. Urea cycle disorders in Thai infants: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Wasant, Pornswan; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Liammongkolkul, Somporn; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2002-08-01

    Urea Cycle Disorders (UCD) is an inborn error of urea synthesis in which ammonium and other nitrogenous precursors of urea accumulate leading to episodic coma and a high mortality rate. Therapy with peritoneal dialysis, essential amino acids or their nitrogen-free analogues has increased survival. The authors report 5 cases of urea cycle disorders, all of whom developed and were rescued from hyperammonemic coma. However, the eventual outcome was quite variable. Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (ALD) Case 1. A 2 month old male infant, a product of a consanguineous marriage (Suphanburi province); developed poor feeding on day 7, lethargy, convulsion, hepatomegaly and respiratory alkalosis leading to respiratory failure and coma. Hyperammonemia, elevation of glutamic acid and argininosuccinic acid and its anhydrides confirmed the diagnosis of ALD. He is now 9 years old and severely retarded. Case 2. A male infant with history of lethargy, poor feeding on day 3, treated as sepsis and required respiratory support for 6 days; subsequently readmitted at age 2 weeks with vomitting, lethargy, seizure activity and hyperammonemia, and was treated by a local pediatrician in Songkhla province. There was a history of parental consanguinity and he was referred to Siriraj Hospital on day 64 with severe essential amino acid deficiency and acrodermatitis enteropathica with markedly elevated plasma citrulline level. In spite of aggressive treatment; the patient developed sepsis and he expired on day 78. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTC) Case 3. An eleven-month-old male infant, the product of a non-consanguineous marriage, developed neonatal onset of hyperammonemia on day 5 after poor feeding, lethargy, hypothermia, seizure, apnea and coma. He was rescued from neonatal hyperammonemic coma on day 9 after aggressive treatment, but expired at eleven months of age after overwhelming sepsis. Case 4. A male infant, sibling of case 3 was referred to Siriraj Hospital on day 8 with