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Sample records for acromioclavicular joint cysts

  1. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  2. Surgical treatment of an aseptic fistulized acromioclavicular joint cyst: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Murena, Luigi; D’angelo, Fabio; Falvo, Daniele A

    2009-01-01

    An acromioclavicular joint cyst is an uncommonly reported condition, which seems to result from a massive rotator cuff tear and degenerative osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. We present the case of an 81-year-old man affected by an acromioclavicular joint cyst, associated to a massive rotator cuff tear, proximal migration of the humeral head and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint. The mass was 7 × 2.5 cm in size and the overlying skin presented a fistula that drained clear synovial-like fluid. Plain X-ray examination of the left shoulder showed proximal migration of the humeral head migration and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint, and further MRI evaluation confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a complete rotator cuff tear and observed a large subcutaneous cyst in communication with the degenerative acromioclavicular joint. The patient underwent surgical excision of the cyst and lateral resection of the clavicle to prevent disease recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an acromioclavicular joint cyst complicated by an aseptic fistula resulting from multiple aspirations. PMID:19918423

  3. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy. PMID:21869946

  4. Management of acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Ma, Richard; Bedi, Asheesh; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are among the most common shoulder girdle injuries in athletes and most commonly result from a direct force to the acromion with the arm in an adducted position. Acromioclavicular joint injuries often present with associated injuries to the glenohumeral joint, including an increased incidence of superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) tears that may warrant further evaluation and treatment. Anteroposterior stability of the acromioclavicular joint is conferred by the capsule and acromioclavicular ligaments, of which the posterior and superior ligaments are the strongest. Superior-inferior stability is maintained by the coracoclavicular (conoid and trapezoid) ligaments. Type-I or type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries have been treated with sling immobilization, early shoulder motion, and physical therapy, with favorable outcomes. Return to activity can occur when normal shoulder motion and strength are obtained and the shoulder is asymptomatic as compared with the contralateral normal extremity. The management of type-III injuries remains controversial and is individualized. While a return to the previous level of functional activity with nonsurgical treatment has been documented in a number of case series, surgical reduction and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction has been associated with a favorable outcome and can be considered in patients who place high functional demands on their shoulders or in athletes who participate in overhead sports. Surgical management is indicated for high-grade (≥type IV) acromioclavicular joint injuries to achieve anatomic reduction of the acromioclavicular joint, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and repair of the deltotrapezial fascia. Outcomes after surgical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments have been satisfactory with regard to achieving pain relief and return to functional activities, but further improvements in the biomechanical strength of these

  5. Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Altchek, David W; Cordasco, Frank A

    2006-02-01

    Arthroscopically assisted acromioclavicular joint reconstruction avoids the large incisions necessary with open reconstructions. This acromioclavicular joint reconstruction technique via the subacromial space does not violate the rotator interval or require screw removal. The patient is placed in a modified beach-chair position. The arthroscope is placed into the subacromial space, and a bursectomy is performed through a lateral subacromial portal. The coracoacromial ligament is released from the acromion with an electrocautery and an arthroscopic elevator. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the coracoacromial ligament with a suture passer, and an arthroscopic suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the suture out through the lateral portal. The coracoid is identified and isolated using a radiofrequency ablator placed through the anterior portal while visualizing through the lateral portal. A percutaneous shuttle device is passed through the skin superomedial to the coracoid. The shuttle is visualized entering superior to the coracoid and is passed just medial to the coracoid. Once the tip of the shuttle can be visualized in the recess inferior to the coracoid, the shuttle loop is advanced. A suture grasper is used to deliver both ends of the shuttle out through the anterior portal. A semitendinosus allograft is used to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through both ends of the allograft. Three strands of nonabsorbable suture are braided together. The tendon and the braided suture are shuttled around the coracoid. At this point, both the braided suture and the allograft tendon enter the anterior portal, wrap around the coracoid base, and exit the anterior portal. A 3-cm incision is made over the distal clavicle. A hole is drilled through the clavicle with a 5-mm drill. A loop of 22-gauge wire is passed through the hole in the clavicle, and a looped suture is shuttled through the hole. A curved clamp is used to

  6. Arthroscopically Assisted Treatment of Acute Dislocations of the Acromioclavicular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sepp; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Imhoff, Andreas B.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted treatments for dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint combine the advantages of exact and visually controlled coracoid tunnel placement with the possibility of simultaneous treatment of concomitant injuries. The clinical results of previous arthroscopically assisted techniques have been favorable at midterm and long-term follow-up. The presented surgical technique combines the advantages of arthroscopically positioned coracoclavicular stabilization with an additional suture cord cerclage of the acromioclavicular joint capsule for improved horizontal stability. PMID:26870646

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Lafosse, Laurent; Baier, Gloria P; Leuzinger, Jan

    2005-08-01

    This article presents an all-arthroscopic technique for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction by ligamentoplasty after acute or chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. A coracoacromial ligament transfer is done to reconstruct the torn coracoclavicular ligaments, similar to open surgery. The coracoacromial ligament is dissected from the undersurface of the acromion and is reinserted on the inferior clavicle by transosseous suture fixation. Additional wire or screw stabilization may be used. With this method, we achieve a very satisfactory reduction of the dislocated acromioclavicular joint. PMID:16086572

  8. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  9. Bone Osteolysis Following Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction Using Synthetic Ligament (Surgilig™)

    PubMed Central

    Sarda, Praveen; Richards, Andrew M.; Corbett, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Good short term results have led to increased use of synthetic ligaments for acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) disruption. They have proved quite safe in the short term but we present two cases of osteolysis following ACJ reconstruction using a synthetic ligament, reminding surgeons of potential complications with artificial ligaments. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose such complications early before irretrievable bone loss to osteolysis.

  10. Surgical treatment of symptomatic acromioclavicular joint problems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, R David; McCarty, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Excision of the distal clavicle has become the mainstay of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular joint arthritis and osteolysis refractory to nonoperative management. Surgical options for symptomatic acromioclavicular joint abnormalities refractory to nonoperative treatment are the classic open distal clavicle excision, direct (superior) arthroscopic excision, and indirect (bursal) arthroscopic distal clavicle excision. We asked whether any of these three procedures provided a better result. We systematically reviewed the medical literature (Medline, EMBASE), assigned a level of evidence for available studies, and critically identified the flaws and biases in the studies to provide comparisons between the published reports. We limited the literature review to clinical reports in the English language published in peer-reviewed journals. The literature supports surgical excision, but the reports are all Level III or IV evidence consisting largely of retrospective case series. Arthroscopic distal clavicle resection has provided more "good or excellent" results than has the open procedure, but is comprised of low-level evidence. Distal clavicle resection has provided satisfactory results when combined with other procedures. Simple distal clavicle resection may have worse outcomes when performed after preceding trauma. The published reports of the removal of medial acromial and inferior distal clavicle osteophytes when performing subacromial decompression are conflicting and may increase post-operative acromioclavicular symptoms. PMID:17159577

  11. Suture rupture in acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated with flip buttons.

    PubMed

    Motta, Pierorazio; Maderni, Alberto; Bruno, Laura; Mariotti, Umberto

    2011-02-01

    Acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations (ACDs) may be treated arthroscopically with flip buttons. This extra-articular fixation is easy to implant and is well tolerated. Between 2007 and 2009, 20 ACD patients (2 women and 18 men; mean age, 32 years) had surgery by the arthroscopic TightRope technique (Arthrex, Naples, FL). The main complication of this technique that has been reported is the partial loss of reduction at follow-up due to clavicular osteolysis under the superior flip button. We describe 4 cases with loss of reduction due to rupture of the sutures running across the buttons: 2 women with joint hyperlaxity and acute Rockwood grade IV ACD and 2 men, heavy manual workers, with joint hyperlaxity and acute Rockwood grade IV ACD. The use of flip buttons might not be indicated in patients with joint hyperlaxity because they are able to obtain immediate stability only on the vertical plane and not on the horizontal plane. Anteroposterior movements of the acromioclavicular joint might rub the suture against the bone tunnels leading to wear and cutting. PMID:21266279

  12. [Outcome after late reconstruction of dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Steuer, H G; Friedebold, G

    1983-10-01

    In a total of 130 cases with a complete luxation of the acromioclavicular joint (Tossy III) which were treated operatively, there are included 29 cases with older injuries (6 to 28 months after accident). Late reconstruction were regarded only such cases which needed a plastic reconstruction of the lig. coracoclaviculare. An account is given of the 21 cases, followed up on an average of 5,6 years after the operation. The material for the plastic reconstruction was autologous and heterologous tendons, fascia lata, carbon-fibres-ligaments, and especially lyodura. The results are very satisfied regarding to the mobility and stability of the shoulder joints. But there was seen a high rate of arthrosis of the a.c.-joint, which causes are discussed as well as the opportunity to make an osteotomy of the clavicula to degress the pressure at this point. The arthrosis is only painful in cases with a simultaneous instability. PMID:6138966

  13. Ipsilateral Closed Clavicle and Scapular spine Fracture with Acromioclavicular Joint Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kembhavi, Raghavendra s; James, Boblee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries around shoulder and clavicle are quite common. Injuries involving lateral end of clavicle involving acromioclavicular joints are commoner injuries. In this rare injury, we report about a case involving clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption which has never been described in English literature as per our knowledge. Case Report: A patient with closed clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular joint disruption was treated with open reduction and internal fixation of clavicle and scapular spine as a staged procedures. Six months post operatively, patient had excellent functional recovery with near full range of movements. Conclusion: Though rare complex injury, clavicle fracture with scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption, when managed properly with good physiotherapy protocol post operatively will result in good clinical and functional outcome. PMID:27299047

  14. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with associated brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Charles Alexander; Blakeney, William; Zellweger, René

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old female who sustained a left acromioclavicular (AC) joint type V injury and brachial plexus injury. The patient's AC joint injury was identified 6 days after she was involved in a motorbike accident where she sustained multiple other injuries. She required operative fixation of the AC joint using a locking compression medial proximal tibial plate. At 3 months post operatively, the patient was found to have a subluxed left shoulder as a result of an axonal injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In addition, the tibial plate had cut out. The plate was subsequently removed. At 8 months the glenohumeral articulation had been restored and the patient had clinically regained significant shoulder function. After 15 months the patient was pain free and could complete all her activities of daily living without impediment. She returned to playing competitive pool after 24 months. PMID:24855076

  15. Horizontal and Vertical Stabilization of Acute Unstable Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries Arthroscopy-Assisted

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Sarasquete Reiriz, Juan; Besalduch, Marina; Petrica, Alexandru; Escolà, Ana; Rodriguez, Joaquim; Fallone, Jan Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We describe the technical aspects of an arthroscopy-assisted procedure indicated for the management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries, consisting of a synthetic augmentation of both the coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments, that anatomically reproduces the coracoclavicular biomechanics and offers fixation that keeps the torn ends of the ligaments facing one another, thus allowing healing of the native structures without the need for a second surgical procedure for metal hardware removal. PMID:26870653

  16. Effects of hook plate on shoulder function after treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hong; Dong, Qi-Rong; Zhou, Rong-Kui; Zhen, Hua-Qing; Jiao, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Internal fixation with hook plate has been used to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of its use on shoulder function, to further analyze the contributing factors, and provide a basis for selection and design of improved internal fixation treatment of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation in the future. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated with a hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from January 2010 to February 2013. There were 33 cases in total, including 25 males and 8 females, with mean age of 48.27 ± 8.7 years. There were 29 cases of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation, 4 cases of type V. The Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system was used to evaluate the shoulder function recovery status after surgery. Anteroposterior shoulder X-ray was used to assess the position of the hook plate, status of acromioclavicular joint reduction and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Results: According to the Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system, the average scores were 78 ± 6 points 8 to 12 months after the surgery and before the removal of the hook plate, the average scores were 89 ± 5 minutes two months after the removal of hook plate. Postoperative X-ray imaging showed osteolysis in 10 cases (30.3%), osteoarthritis in six cases (18.1%), osteolysis associated with osteoarthritis in four cases(12.1%), and steel hook broken in one case (3%). Conclusion: The use of hook plate on open reduction and internal fixation of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation had little adverse effect on shoulder function and is an effective method for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Osteoarthritis and osteolysis are the two common complications after hook plate use, which are associated with the impairment of shoulder function. Shoulder function will be improved after removal of the hook plate. PMID

  17. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the LockDown synthetic implant: a study with cadavers.

    PubMed

    Taranu, R; Rushton, P R P; Serrano-Pedraza, I; Holder, L; Wallace, W A; Candal-Couto, J J

    2015-12-01

    Dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint is a relatively common injury and a number of surgical interventions have been described for its treatment. Recently, a synthetic ligament device has become available and been successfully used, however, like other non-native solutions, a compromise must be reached when choosing non-anatomical locations for their placement. This cadaveric study aimed to assess the effect of different clavicular anchorage points for the Lockdown device on the reduction of acromioclavicular joint dislocations, and suggest an optimal location. We also assessed whether further stability is provided using a coracoacromial ligament transfer (a modified Neviaser technique). The acromioclavicular joint was exposed on seven fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders. The joint was reconstructed using the Lockdown implant using four different clavicular anchorage points and reduction was measured. The coracoacromial ligament was then transferred to the lateral end of the clavicle, and the joint re-assessed. If the Lockdown ligament was secured at the level of the conoid tubercle, the acromioclavicular joint could be reduced anatomically in all cases. If placed medial or 2 cm lateral, the joint was irreducible. If the Lockdown was placed 1 cm lateral to the conoid tubercle, the joint could be reduced with difficulty in four cases. Correct placement of the Lockdown device is crucial to allow anatomical joint reduction. Even when the Lockdown was placed over the conoid tubercle, anterior clavicle displacement remained but this could be controlled using a coracoacromial ligament transfer. PMID:26637681

  18. Three-Dimensional Acromioclavicular Joint Motions During Elevation of the Arm

    PubMed Central

    TEECE, RACHAEL M.; LUNDEN, JASON B.; LLOYD, ANGELA S.; KAISER, ANDREW P.; CIEMINSKI, CORT J.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Descriptive laboratory study. OBJECTIVES To determine the 3-dimensional motions occurring between the scapula relative to the clavicle at the acromioclavicular joint during humeral elevation in the scapular plane. BACKGROUND Shoulder pathology is commonly treated through exercise programs aimed at correcting scapular motion abnormalities. However, little is known regarding how acromio-clavicular joint motions contribute to normal and abnormal scapulothoracic motion. METHODS AND MEASURES Thirty subjects (16 males, 14 females) participated. Subjects with positive symptoms on clinical exam or past history of shoulder pathology, trauma, or surgery were excluded. Electromagnetic surface motion analysis was performed tracking the thorax, clavicle, scapula, and humerus. Subjects performed 3 repetitions of scapular plane abduction. Passive motion data were also collected for scapular plane abduction from cadaver specimens. Data were analyzed using within-session reliability and descriptive statistics as well as repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) to determine the effect of elevation angle from rest to 90° humeral elevation. Reliability was determined from repeated trials in the same session without removing sensors or redigitizing landmarks. RESULTS Angular values were highly repeatable within session (ICC>0.94; SEM, <2.3°). During active scapular plane abduction from rest to 90°, average acromioclavicular joint angular values demonstrated increased internal rotation (approximately 4.3°), increased upward rotation (approximately 14.6°), and increased posterior tilting (approximately 6.7°) (P<.05). Passive motions on cadavers demonstrated similar kinematic patterns. CONCLUSIONS Significant motion occurs at the acromioclavicular joint during active humeral elevation, contributing to scapular motion on the thorax. This information provides a foundation for understanding normal acromioclavicular joint motion as a basis for further investigation

  19. ANATOMICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE TO THE CORACOID PROCESS, ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT AND ACROMION

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Gaspar, Eric Figueiredo; Siqueira, Karina Levy; Filho, Nivaldo Souza Cardozo; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish the anatomical relationship of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) located in the suprascapular notch, to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral border of the acromion. Methods: We dissected 16 shoulders of 16 cadavers (9 males and 7 females). The distances from the suprascapular nerve (at its passage beneath the transverse ligament) to certain fixed points on the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint, and the anterolateral border of the acromion were measured with the aid of calipers and correlated with age and sex. Cadavers with previous surgical interventions were excluded. Results: The mean measurements from the notch of the suprascapular nerve were: 3.9 cm to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process (ranging from 3.1 cm to 5.2 cm); 4.7 cm to the acromioclavicular joint (ranging from 3.9 cm to 5.2 cm); and 6.1 cm to the anterolateral border of the acromion (ranging from 5.7 cm to 6.8 cm). Conclusion: Accurate anatomical knowledge of the nerves of the anterior region of the shoulder is essential in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries and to achieve satisfactory results in surgical treatment for shoulder diseases, whether performed as open or arthroscopic procedures. PMID:27022551

  20. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Torkaman, Ali; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Mokhatri, Tahmineh; Haghighi, Mohammad Hossein Shabanpour; Monshizadeh, Siamak; Taraz, Hamid; Hasanvand, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH), constant and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71%) were male and four (14.28%) were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments. PMID:26894217

  1. Chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated by the GraftRope device

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Jonas S; Aagaard, Knut E; Lunsjö, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations is challenging, and no single procedure can be considered to be the gold standard. In 2010, the GraftRope method (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was introduced in a case series of 10 patients, showing good clinical results and no complications. We wanted to evaluate the GraftRope method in a prospective consecutive series. Patients and methods 8 patients with chronic Rockwood type III–V acromioclavicular joint dislocations were treated surgically using the GraftRope method. The patients were clinically evaluated and a CT scan was performed to assess the integrity of the repair. Results and interpretation In 4 of the 8 patients, loss of reduction was seen within the first 6 weeks postoperatively. A coracoid fracture was the reason in 3 cases and graft failure was the reason in 1 case. In 3 of the 4 patients with intact repairs, the results were excellent with no subjective shoulder disability 12 months postoperatively. It was our intention to include 30 patients in this prospective treatment series, but due to the high rate of complications the study was discontinued prematurely. Based on our results and other recent reports, we cannot recommend the GraftRope method as a treatment option for chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations. PMID:25323800

  2. Acroplate--a modern solution for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Cîrstoiu, C; Rădulescu, R; Popescu, D; Ene, R; Circotă, G; Bădiceanu, Corina

    2009-01-01

    Two main ways to fix the reduction were imposed in surgical treatment of the acromioclavicular joint dislocations: fixation with trans acromioclavicular pin (Phemister method) and fixation with plate and screws type acroplate. The purpose of the present paper work is to compare immediate and later postoperative results between the two types of surgical interventions. During 2005-2007, 37 surgical reductions and fixation of acromioclavicular joint dislocations were performed in the Orthopedic-Traumatology Clinic of SUUB. In 17 cases a fixation with screws and plates type acroplate has been performed and in 20 cases with pins using the Phemister method. Sex ratio: 31 men and 8 women. Patients were aged between 17 and 56 years old. Follow up at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 18 post-operatory months. Osteosintesis material removing was done postoperatively, at 4 weeks in case of acroplate's and at 6 weeks in case of the pins. All patients treated of fixation with plate and screws acroplate type had a favorable evolution/development, starting with the shoulder joint mobilization at 24 hours postoperatively, with a complete recovery 4 weeks after the operation, at the same time with the ablation, and without immediate other late complications. As far as the patients treated by using the Phemister method are concerned, they were applied an immobilization, postoperatively. Desault bandage or the scarf for a period between 1 and 3 weeks, beginning with the shoulder joint mobilization later on and a full recovery after a minimum of 6 weeks. However, 3 of the cases showed a migration of one or both pins. Following the study, a more rapid recovery resulted, complete, and without complications of mobility in the shoulder joint, when using plate type acroplate vs pin. PMID:20108536

  3. Type IV acromioclavicular joint dislocation associated with a mid-shaft clavicle malunion

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Khalid D.; Stachiw, Danielle; Malone, Alex A.

    2016-01-01

    This reports presents the case of a combined clavicle fracture malunion and chronic Type IV acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. The patient was seen acutely in the emergency department following a mountain bike accident at which time the clavicle fracture was identified and managed conservatively however the AC dislocation was not diagnosed. The patient presented 25 months following the injury with persistent pain and disability and was treated with clavicle osteotomy and AC stabilization. We document the clinical details, surgical treatment and outcome. PMID:26980988

  4. Type IV acromioclavicular joint dislocation associated with a mid-shaft clavicle malunion.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Khalid D; Stachiw, Danielle; Malone, Alex A

    2016-01-01

    This reports presents the case of a combined clavicle fracture malunion and chronic Type IV acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. The patient was seen acutely in the emergency department following a mountain bike accident at which time the clavicle fracture was identified and managed conservatively however the AC dislocation was not diagnosed. The patient presented 25 months following the injury with persistent pain and disability and was treated with clavicle osteotomy and AC stabilization. We document the clinical details, surgical treatment and outcome. PMID:26980988

  5. An analysis of acromioclavicular joint morphology as a factor for shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkolizadeh, Adel; Sinha, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine whether acromioclavicular (AC) joint morphology was a factor in the development of symptomatic impingement necessitating AC joint excision. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study on all patients undergoing AC joint excision for symptomatic joint pain unresponsive to conservative treatment between 2009 and 2011. This involved 106 consecutive patients (57 women, 49 men, average age 54 years, age range 33 to 76 years). Prior to surgery, radiographic classification of the AC joint was performed producing three main groups: oblique, flat or curved. Pre- and postoperative assessment was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Results A significantly (p < 0.05) higher frequency of oblique AC joint morphology was seen in the AC joint excision study population compared to the normal population. Postoperative outcome demonstrated no significant difference (P > 0.05) between any of the three AC joint morphologies. Conclusions The present study demonstrates a significant association between the oblique AC joint morphology and those patients who develop AC joint pain requiring surgery. Outcomes of surgery were independent of joint morphology, gender or age, with all patient subgroups demonstrating significant improvement by the end of the study.

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries and results.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Gordon W; Bowen, Mark K

    2003-04-01

    Injuries and conditions that affect the AC joint are common. Low-grade separations, degenerative conditions, and osteolysis of the distal clavicle are frequently dealt with by the treating physician. Proper assessment requires a thorough history, examination, and radiologic work-up. An injection of bupivicaine into the AC joint can be a very useful test to evaluate the source of pain about the symptomatic shoulder. Most conditions affecting the AC joint can be treated conservatively, but patients who do not respond to these treatments or athletes who do not wish to modify their activities may require resection of the distal clavicle and the AC joint. Operative intervention can be performed as an open procedure with good results. Recent advances in operative arthroscopic procedures allow us to replicate and exceed the results of the open resection. Arthroscopic resection can be undertaken via a direct approach that does not violate the subacromial space or via an indirect or bursal approach. The indirect approach allows you to assess both the subacromial space and the AC joint because impingement pathology and subacromial compromise are frequently associated with AC change. The advantage of an arthroscopic resection is its ability to be performed as an outpatient procedure with less compromise of musculotendinous structures, shorter rehabilitation, and quicker return to activity. The amount of bone resection necessary is less than with the open procedure because of the ability to preserve the stabilizing properties of the superior AC ligaments. Resection of 4 mm to 8 mm of bone is all that may be required to give uniformly good results. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle is technically demanding and requires skill and familiarity with other arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Complications related to this procedure are relatively infrequent and include infection, residual pain, lack of adequate bone resection, and instability, particularly in patients with

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with double flip button.

    PubMed

    Murena, L; Vulcano, Ettore; Ratti, C; Cecconello, L; Rolla, P R; Surace, M F

    2009-12-01

    The ideal treatment for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation is still controversial, both in terms of indications and surgical technique. The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 16 patients affected by acute AC joint dislocation (type III-V) and arthroscopically treated with a coracoclavicular double flip button are presented. Despite the excellent clinical results both in terms of Constant score (mean 97 points) and patient satisfaction, at a mean follow-up of 31 months the radiographs showed partial loss of reduction due to distal migration of the flip button within the upper third of the clavicle in one-fourth of the cases. The technique presented here proved to be safe and minimally invasive while delivering good aesthetic results and allowing for the treatment of associated lesions. Furthermore, the technique could benefit from more advanced retention devices, which ought to reduce or avoid migration of the flip buttons. PMID:19554311

  8. [Arthroscopically assisted techniques for treatment of acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint injuries].

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Imhoff, A B; Martetschläger, F

    2015-05-01

    Acute and chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is frequently encountered in the routine clinical practice. This injury can lead to significant impairment of shoulder girdle function. Therapy based on the severity of injury is recommended to re-establish correct shoulder function. The static radiographic Rockwood classification is used to define the degree of dislocation but the clinical aspects and functional x-ray imaging of horizontal AC joint instability should also be considered for selection of the appropriate procedure. Rockwood grades I and II injuries are treated non-operatively with early functional exercise. The approach for Rockwood grade III injuries should be individual and patient-specific, with non-surgical procedures for low functional requirement patients with a high risk for surgical interventions. For patients with high demands on shoulder function surgery is recommended. A detailed diagnostic assessment frequently reveals Rockwood grade III injuries to be type IV injuries. Rockwood types IV and V AC joint dislocations require surgery for sustained stability. Treatment of acute injuries is recommended within 1-3 weeks after trauma but there is no clear evidence of a cut-off for the presence of chronic injuries. Various surgical techniques have been described in the literature. This article presents an arthroscopically assisted technique that addresses both vertical and horizontal instability of the AC joint. PMID:25964020

  9. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  10. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42–70 years). The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4–8 years 10 months). The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly (P < 0.001). There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor. PMID:27512219

  11. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-shal, Ehab A.; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. Objective: To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Methods: Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 – 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. Results: In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Conclusion: Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure. PMID:27347245

  12. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  13. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  14. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with coracoacromial ligament transfer using the docking technique

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Peter J; Braun, Sepp; Gobezie, Reuben; Pacheco, Iván H

    2009-01-01

    Background Symptomatic Acromioclavicular (AC) dislocations have historically been surgically treated with Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction with transfer of the Coracoacromial (CA) ligament. Tensioning the CA ligament is the key to success. Methods Seventeen patients with chronic, symptomatic Type III AC joint or acute Type IV and V injuries were treated surgically. The distal clavicle was resected and stabilized with CC ligament reconstruction using the CA ligament. The CA ligament was passed into the medullary canal and tensioned, using a modified 'docking' technique. Average follow-up was 29 months (range 12–57). Results Postoperative ASES and pain significantly improved in all patients (p = 0.001). Radiographically, 16 (94%) maintained reduction, and only 1 (6%) had a recurrent dislocation when he returned to karate 3 months postoperatively. His ultimate clinical outcome was excellent. Conclusion The docking procedure allows for tensioning of the transferred CA ligament and healing of the ligament in an intramedullary bone tunnel. Excellent clinical results were achieved, decreasing the risk of recurrent distal clavicle instability. PMID:19144190

  15. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gang; Peng, Chao-An; Sun, Hua-Bin; Xiao, Jing; Zhu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up. Results Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4) than Group A (80.4±11.5) in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001). Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002), activities (P=0.02), range of motion (P<0.001), and strength (P=0.004). In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7%) and mild pain by 8 (34.8%) patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3%) patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7%) patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7%) encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion. Conclusion Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. PMID:26811685

  16. Comparison of Results between Hook Plate Fixation and Ligament Reconstruction for Acute Unstable Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Lee, Byoung-Joo; Nam, Sang Jin; Chung, Seok Won; Jeong, Won-Ju; Min, Woo-Kie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study, we aimed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes between hook plate fixation and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction for the treatment of acute unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent surgery for an unstable acute dislocation of the AC joint were included. We divided them into two groups according to the treatment modality: internal fixation with a hook plate (group I, 24 cases) or CC ligament reconstruction (group II, 18 cases). We evaluated the clinical outcomes using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Constant-Murley score, and assessed the radiographic outcomes based on the reduction and loss of CC distance on preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up plain radiographs. Results The mean VAS scores at the final follow-up were 1.6 ± 1.5 and 1.3 ± 1.3 in groups I and II, respectively, which were not significantly different. The mean Constant-Murley scores were 90.2 ± 9.9 and 89.2 ± 3.5 in groups I and II, respectively, which were also not significantly different. The AC joints were well reduced in both groups, whereas CC distance improved from a mean of 215.7% ± 50.9% preoperatively to 106.1% ± 10.2% at the final follow-up in group I, and from 239.9% ± 59.2% preoperatively to 133.6% ± 36.7% at the final follow-up in group II. The improvement in group I was significantly superior to that in group II (p < 0.001). Furthermore, subluxation was not observed in any case in group I, but was noted in six cases (33%) in group II. Erosions of the acromion undersurface were observed in 9 cases in group I. Conclusions In cases of acute unstable AC joint dislocation, hook plate fixation and CC ligament reconstruction yield comparable satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, radiographic outcomes based on the maintenance of reduction indicate that hook plate fixation is a better treatment option. PMID:25729525

  17. Arthroscopic-Assisted Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction Using the TightRope Device With Allograft Augmentation: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Trenhaile, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations remains challenging, especially in the revision setting. Most commonly, Rockwood type I and II injuries are managed nonoperatively whereas type IV, V, and VI injuries are managed with surgery. Type III separations are more controversial, with evidence supporting both nonoperative and operative treatment options. Multiple different arthroscopic techniques have been described; however, there is no current gold standard. AC joint reconstruction with the TightRope device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) with the patient in the lateral decubitus position is a method of restoring joint stability that allows for a minimally invasive, low-profile fixation construct using a single drill hole through the clavicle. Allograft augmentation of this fixation construct helps to eliminate the stress risers potentially created by this device while increasing overall repair construct stability. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic AC joint reconstruction using a TightRope device with allograft augmentation. PMID:26759765

  18. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 1: Sternoclavicular, Acromioclavicular, and Scapulothoracic Joints

    PubMed Central

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joint motion between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Differences in scapulothoracic kinematics are associated with shoulder pain. Several studies have measured these differences using surface sensors, but the results of this technique may be affected by skin-motion artifact. Furthermore, previous studies have not included the simultaneous measurement of sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint motion. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus of 12 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic individuals for direct, bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Angular positions for the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joints were measured during shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups were found for sternoclavicular and scapulothoracic joint positions. Symptomatic individuals consistently demonstrated less sternoclavicular posterior rotation, regardless of angle, phase, or plane of shoulder motion. Symptomatic individuals also demonstrated less scapulothoracic upward rotation at 30° and 60° of humerothoracic elevation during shoulder abduction and scapular plane abduction. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that differences in shoulder complex kinematics exist between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. However, the magnitude of these differences was small, and the resulting clinical implications are not yet fully understood. The biomechanical coupling of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints requires further research to better understand scapulothoracic movement deviations and to improve manual therapy and exercise-based physical therapy interventions. PMID:25103135

  19. Results of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment of Rockwood Types III and V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Niemitukia, Lea; Mäkelä, E. Antero; Väätäinen, Urho

    2014-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment of acute, complete dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is still unresolved. Purpose: To determine the difference between operative and nonoperative treatment in acute Rockwood types III and V ACJ dislocation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: In the operative treatment group, the ACJ was reduced and fixed with 2 transarticular Kirschner wires and ACJ ligament suturing. The Kirschner wires were extracted after 6 weeks. Nonoperatively treated patients received a reduction splint for 4 weeks. At the 18- to 20-year follow-up, the Constant, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), Larsen, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores were obtained, and clinical and radiographic examinations of both shoulders were performed. Results: Twenty-five of 35 potential patients were examined at the 18- to 20-year follow-up. There were 11 patients with Rockwood type III and 14 with type V dislocations. Delayed surgical treatment for ACJ was used in 2 patients during follow-up: 1 in the operatively treated group and 1 in the nonoperatively treated group. Clinically, ACJs were statistically significantly less prominent or unstable in the operative group than in the nonoperative group (normal/prominent/unstable: 9/4/3 and 0/6/3, respectively; P = .02) and in the operative type III (P = .03) but not type V dislocation groups. In operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the mean Constant scores were 83 and 85, UCLA scores 25 and 27, Larsen scores 11 and 11, and SST scores 11 and 12 at follow-up, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in type III and type V dislocations. In the radiographic analysis, the ACJ was wider in the nonoperative than the operative group (8.3 vs 3.4 mm; P = .004), and in the type V dislocations (nonoperative vs operative: 8.5 vs 2.4 mm; P = .007). There was no statistically significant difference between study groups in

  20. Arthroscopically Assisted Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations: Anatomic AC Ligament Reconstruction With Protective Internal Bracing—The “AC-RecoBridge” Technique

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Maier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An arthroscopically assisted technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is presented. This pathology-based procedure aims to achieve anatomic healing of both the acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC) and the coracoclavicular ligaments. First, the acromioclavicular joint is reduced anatomically under macroscopic and radiologic control and temporarily transfixed with a K-wire. A single-channel technique using 2 suture tapes provides secure coracoclavicular stabilization. The key step of the procedure consists of the anatomic repair of the ACLC (“AC-Reco”). Basically, we have observed 4 patterns of injury: clavicular-sided, acromial-sided, oblique, and midportion tears. Direct and/or transosseous ACLC repair is performed accordingly. Then, an X-configured acromioclavicular suture tape cerclage (“AC-Bridge”) is applied under arthroscopic assistance to limit horizontal clavicular translation to a physiological extent. The AC-Bridge follows the principle of internal bracing and protects healing of the ACLC repair. The AC-Bridge is tightened on top of the repair, creating an additional suture-bridge effect and promoting anatomic ACLC healing. We refer to this combined technique of anatomic ACLC repair and protective internal bracing as the “AC-RecoBridge.” A detailed stepwise description of the surgical technique, including indications, technical pearls and pitfalls, and potential complications, is given. PMID:26052493

  1. Coracoid Process Avulsion Fracture at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Attachment Site in an Osteoporotic Patient with Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Takahisa; Fukuda, Kimitaka; Kajino, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP), and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and complained of pain in her shoulder. Radiographs revealed an ACJ dislocation with a distal clavicle fracture. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) reconstruction showed a small bone fragment at the medial apex of the CP. She was treated conservatively and achieved a satisfactory outcome. CP avulsion fractures at the CCL attachment can occur in osteoporotic patients with ACJ dislocations. Three-dimensional computed tomography is useful for identifying this fracture type. CP avulsion fractures should be suspected in patients with ACJ dislocations and risk factors for osteoporosis or osteopenia. PMID:27493819

  2. Coracoid Process Avulsion Fracture at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Attachment Site in an Osteoporotic Patient with Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Onada, Yoshihiro; Umemoto, Takahisa; Fukuda, Kimitaka; Kajino, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP), and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and complained of pain in her shoulder. Radiographs revealed an ACJ dislocation with a distal clavicle fracture. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) reconstruction showed a small bone fragment at the medial apex of the CP. She was treated conservatively and achieved a satisfactory outcome. CP avulsion fractures at the CCL attachment can occur in osteoporotic patients with ACJ dislocations. Three-dimensional computed tomography is useful for identifying this fracture type. CP avulsion fractures should be suspected in patients with ACJ dislocations and risk factors for osteoporosis or osteopenia. PMID:27493819

  3. Acromioclavicular joint separations grades I-III: a review of the literature and development of best practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Reid, Duncan; Polson, Kate; Johnson, Louise

    2012-08-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) separation injuries are common injuries among sporting populations. ACJ separations are graded according to severity from grade I being a mild sprain to grade VI, which is severe dislocation with displacement. There is consensus in the literature that grade I-III ACJ separations are managed conservatively and grades IV-VI are managed surgically. Despite conservative care being recommended for lesser grades of injury, there is very little evidence in the literature as to what constitutes conservative care. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was, first, to review the relevant anatomy and kinematics of the ACJ and, second, to review the literature relating to current evidence of conservative management of ACJ injury. Using this data, a best practice guideline for conservative rehabilitation in grade I-III ACJ separations was developed. For the conservative management, a literature search was undertaken using the following databases in the Auckland University of Technology's electronic library resources; MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus™ and the Cochrane Library. The following keywords or phrases were used: 'acromioclavicular joint separations', 'injury', 'dislocations', 'rehabilitation', 'conservative care', 'physiotherapy' and 'exercise'. A total of 24 articles was identified. There were no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated conservative treatment for grade I-III ACJ sprains. Therefore, a narrative review was formulated covering the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACJ, injury mechanisms and relevant literature reviewed covering rehabilitation principles. Conservative management of grade I-III ACJ separations is still the main recommendation following this review. A best practice guideline for managing grade I-III ACJ separations is presented to help guide clinicians until well constructed RCTs are carried out to improve the conservative management of ACJ injuries. PMID:22784232

  4. Biomechanical Comparison of an Intramedullary and Extramedullary Free-Tissue Graft Reconstruction of the Acromioclavicular Joint Complex

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rishi; Javidan, Pooya; Lee, Thay Q.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several different surgical techniques have been described to address the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments in acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries. However, very few techniques focus on reconstructing the AC ligaments, despite its importance in providing stability. The purpose of our study was to compare the biomechanical properties of two free-tissue graft techniques that reconstruct both the AC and CC ligaments in cadaveric shoulders, one with an extramedullary AC reconstruction and the other with an intramedullary AC reconstruction. We hypothesized intramedullary AC reconstruction will provide greater anteroposterior translational stability and improved load to failure characteristics than an extramedullary technique. Methods Six matched cadaveric shoulders underwent translational testing at 10 N and 15 N in the anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, under AC joint compression loads of 10 N, 20 N, and 30 N. After the AC and CC ligaments were transected, one of the specimens was randomly assigned the intramedullary free-tissue graft reconstruction while its matched pair received the extramedullary graft reconstruction. Both reconstructed specimens then underwent repeat translational testing, followed by load to failure testing, via superior clavicle distraction, at a rate of 50 mm/min. Results Intramedullary reconstruction provided significantly greater translational stability in the anteroposterior direction than the extramedullary technique for four of six loading conditions (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in translational stability in the superoinferior direction for any loading condition. The intramedullary reconstructed specimens demonstrated improved load to failure characteristics with the intramedullary reconstruction having a lower deformation at yield and a higher ultimate load than the extramedullary reconstruction (p < 0.05). Conclusions Intramedullary reconstruction of the AC joint provides greater stability in the

  5. Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement with Minimal ACJ Excision Arthroplasty for Management of Massive ACJ Cyst - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shaarani, Shahril R; Mullett, Hannan

    2014-01-01

    Massive acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an extremely rare cause of shoulder impairment and with limited consensus in its management. We present the first published case report of a patient with a massive ACJ cyst treated with a reverse total shoulder replacement with minimal ACJ excision arthroplasty. PMID:25279019

  6. Epiduroscopic Removal of a Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Bae, Jun Yeol; In, Chi Bum; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2015-01-01

    Facet joint synovial cysts are usually associated with osteoarthritis of the adjacent facet joint and/or spondylolisthesis. In between the conservative and operative ends of the treatment spectrum lie minimally invasive techniques such as cyst rupture using epiduroscopy. In this report, we describe an 82-year-old male patient presenting with low back pain radiating to his lower left extremity and associated paresthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed a synovial cyst at left L4/5 facet joint. Using epiduroscopy, the cyst was mechanically ruptured by popping it with the tip of the scope. The patient remained symptom-free at his successive visits until 12 months after the procedure, and was opened for desired follow up. PMID:26495082

  7. Comparison of single and two-tunnel techniques during open treatment of acromioclavicular joint disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction with semitendinosus tendon (ST) grafts has become more popular and has achieved relatively good results; however optimal reconstruction technique, single-tunnel or two-tunnel, still remains controversial. This paper is to compare the clinical and radiographic data of allogenous ST grafting with single- or two-tunnel reconstruction techniques of the AC joint. Methods The outcomes of 21 consecutive patients who underwent anatomical reduction and ST grafting for AC joint separation were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: single-tunnel group (11) and two-tunnel group (10). All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically using a modified UCLA rating scale. Results The majority of separations (18 of 21) were Rockwood type V, with one each in type III, IV and VI categories. The overall mean follow-up time was 16 months, and at the time of the latest follow-up, the overall mean UCLA rating score was 14.1 (range 8–20). The percentage of good-to-excellent outcomes was significantly higher for patients with the two-tunnel technique than for those with the one-tunnel technique (70% vs. 18%, respectively, p = 0.03). Within the single-tunnel group, there was no statistically significant difference in percentage of good-to-excellent outcomes between patients with vs. without tightrope augmentation (17% vs 20%, p > 0.99). Similarly, within the two-tunnel group, there was no significant difference in the percentage of good-to-excellent outcomes between the graft only and augment groups (67% vs. 75%, p > 0.99). Conclusion Anatomical reduction of the AC joint and reconstruction CC ligaments are crucial for optimal joint stability and function. Two-tunnel CC reconstruction with an allogenous ST graft provides superior significantly better radiographic and clinical results compared to the single-tunnel reconstruction technique. PMID:25127715

  8. Shoulder pain in primary care: diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests for non-traumatic acromioclavicular joint pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite numerous methodological flaws in previous study designs and the lack of validation in primary care populations, clinical tests for identifying acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) pain are widely utilised without concern for such issues. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of traditional ACJ tests and to compare their accuracy with other clinical examination features for identifying a predominant ACJ pain source in a primary care cohort. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain were recruited prospectively from primary health care clinics. Following a standardised clinical examination and diagnostic injection into the subacromial bursa, all participants received a fluoroscopically guided diagnostic block of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride (XylocaineTM) into the ACJ. Diagnostic accuracy statistics including sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) were calculated for traditional ACJ tests (Active Compression/O’Brien’s test, cross-body adduction, localised ACJ tenderness and Hawkins-Kennedy test), and for individual and combinations of clinical examination variables that were associated with a positive anaesthetic response (PAR) (P≤0.05) defined as 80% or more reduction in post-injection pain intensity during provocative clinical tests. Results Twenty two of 153 participants (14%) reported an 80% PAR. None of the traditional ACJ tests were associated with an 80% PAR (P<0.05) and combinations of traditional tests were not able to discriminate between a PAR and a negative anaesthetic response (AUC 0.507; 95% CI: 0.366, 0.647; P>0.05). Five clinical examination variables (repetitive mechanism of pain onset, no referred pain below the elbow, thickened or swollen ACJ, no symptom provocation during passive glenohumeral abduction and external rotation) were associated with an 80% PAR (P<0.05) and demonstrated an ability to accurately discriminate between an PAR and NAR

  9. Extra-Articular Ganglion Cysts around the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Eun; Panchal, Karnav; Kim, Young-Yul; Ji, Jong-Hun; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Park, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to report clinical results of open excision of extra-articular ganglion cysts around the knee joint combined with arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies if present. Materials and Methods Of the total 107 cases of cystic lesions around the knee, 23 cases of extra-articular ganglion cysts were reviewed between January 2006 and July 2011. There were 13 males and 10 females with a mean age of 48 years (range, 30 to 73 years). The mean follow-up duration was 40 months (range, 30 to 60 months). Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was done in all cases. Open surgical excision of the cyst was performed after arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies in all but 1 case. At the last follow-up, Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were evaluated and MRI was conducted to detect recurrence. Results The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores showed significant improvement (p=0.005 and 0.013, respectively).The location of the cysts was anterior in 9, lateral in 7, medial in 6, and posterosuperior in 1. Intra-articular pathologies were found in 16/23 cases (69.6%). In 10/23 cases (43%), the cyst was connected to the knee joint. Three months postoperative MRI did not show any recurrence of ganglion cysts except for 1 case. Conclusions In the treatment of extra-articular ganglion cysts, MRI can be useful for detecting intra-articular lesions and connecting orifices, and arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies with open excision of the cyst should be considered as a viable treatment option. PMID:26672721

  10. Evidence to support that adventitial cysts, analogous to intraneural ganglion cysts, are also joint-connected.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Robert J; Desy, Nicholas M; Agarwal, Gautum; Pawlina, Wojciech; Kalra, Manju; Amrami, Kimberly K

    2013-03-01

    Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is a rare condition in which cyst is found within a vessel, typically producing symptoms of vascular compromise. Most commonly located in the popliteal artery near the knee, it has been reported in arteries and veins throughout the body. Its pathogenesis has been poorly understood and various surgical approaches have been recommended. We extrapolated some recent information about a similar condition, intraneural ganglion cyst affecting the deep fibular (peroneal) nerve, to the prototype, CAD of the popliteal artery. In intraneural ganglion cysts affecting the deep fibular nerve we have shown that an articular (neural) branch is the conduit between the superior tibiofibular joint and the main parent nerve for which epineurial dissection of joint fluid can occur. We hypothesized that the same principles would apply to CAD and that an articular (vascular) branch would be the conduit from the knee joint leading to dissection to the main parent vessel. We reviewed five patients with CAD of the popliteal artery in whom MRIs were available: two treated by the primary author well familiar with the proposed articular theory, and three treated by others at our institution, less familiar with it. We then reviewed the literature critically to assess for additional evidence to support our articular (synovial) theory and an anatomic explanation. In the two cases treated by the primary author a joint connection was identified on high resolution MRI prospectively and intraoperatively through the middle genicular artery (MGA); postoperatively in these cases there was no recurrence. In the other three cases, a joint connection was not identified on imaging or at operation. Reinterpretation of these cases revealed a joint connection through the MGA in the one patient who had preoperative imaging and subclinical persistence/recurrence in the two patients who underwent postoperative MRIs done for other reasons. Our review of the literature and imaging

  11. Intratendinous supraspinatus cyst as a cause of shoulder impingement

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Akshay; Karuppaiah, Karthik; Elias, David; Tavakkolizadeh, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old gentleman with shoulder impingement. An articular-sided intratendinous supraspinatus cyst was identified as the cause of his symptoms. Arthroscopic cyst debridement resulted in a good outcome at 1-year follow-up. Cysts around the shoulder are a well described pathological entity. They consist of different categories, including intraosseus cysts of the humeral head and glenoid, paralabral cysts and cysts associated with the acromioclavicular joint. Although paralabral cysts that lie intramuscularly or between the muscle bellies have frequently been reported, this is the first report of an intratendinous supraspinatus cyst with an intact rotator cuff. We describe the case, its management and the postsurgical outcome. PMID:27582975

  12. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  13. Treatment of Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation in a Paraplegic Patient with the Weaver-Dunn Procedure and a Hook-Plate

    PubMed Central

    Godry, Holger; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A.; Seybold, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In case of patients with spinal cord injury and concomitant acromioclavicular (AC) joint-dislocation the treatment is challenging, as in this special patient group the function of the shoulder joint is critical because patients depend on the upper limb for mobilization and wheelchair-locomotion. Therefore the goal of this study was to examine, if the treatment of chronic AC-joint dislocation using the Weaver-Dunn procedure augmented with a hook-plate in patients with a spinal cord injury makes early postoperative wheelchair mobilization and the wheelchair transfer with full weight-bearing possible. In this case the Weaver-Dunn procedure with an additive hook-plate was performed in a 34-year-old male patient with a complete paraplegia and a posttraumatic chronic AC-joint dislocation. The patient was allowed to perform his wheelchair transfers with full weight bearing on the first post-operative day. The removal of the hook-plate was performed four months after implantation. At the time of follow-up the patient could use his operated shoulder with full range of motion without restrictions in his activities of daily living or his wheel-chair transfers. PMID:27433301

  14. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  15. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  16. Clinical and radiological results after coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using three different techniques. A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    VASCELLARI, ALBERTO; SCHIAVETTI, STEFANO; BATTISTELLA, GIUSEPPE; REBUZZI, ENRICO; COLETTI, NICOLÒ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this retrospective study was to present the outcomes of three different techniques for the treatment of type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations: arthroscopic TightRope (TR), arthroscopic GraftRope (GR), and open reconstruction of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament using the Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System (LARS). Methods eighteen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluations after a mean follow-up time of 43 months. The following clinical outcome measures were considered: the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure (DASH), the Nottingham Clavicle Score (NCS), and the Constant score (CS). On X-rays, the CC distance was measured. Results the median DASH score at follow-up was 12.5 in the TR group, 5 in the GR group, and 4.2 in the LARS group. The median NCS value was 88 in the TR group, 88 in the GR group, and 91 in the LARS group. The median CS was 100 in the TR group, 95 in the GR group, and 94.5 in the LARS group. The mean CC distance was 10.3 mm in the TR group, 13.8 in the GR group, and 16.6 in the LARS group. Conclusions all three techniques proved to be reliable in providing good clinical outcomes, although none of the studied techniques demonstrated reliability in maintaining anatomical reduction after surgery. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:26605251

  17. Comparison of surgical outcomes between fixation with hook plate and loop suspensory fixation for acute unstable acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arirachakaran, Alisara; Boonard, Manusak; Piyapittayanun, Peerapong; Phiphobmongkol, Vajarin; Chaijenkij, Kornkit; Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of acute (≤4 weeks) high-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation (types III-VI) is still controversial. Currently, the two modern techniques that are widely used include hook plate fixation and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament fixation using a suspensory loop device (tightrope, synthetic ligament or absorbable polydioxansulfate sling). These techniques are both reported to have superior clinical outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess and compare clinical outcomes of hook plate fixation versus fixation of the CC ligament using a loop suspensory fixation (LSF) device for the treatment of AC joint injury. These clinical outcomes consist of the Constant-Murley score (CMS), pain visual analog score (VAS) and postoperative complications. Relevant comparative studies were identified from MEDLINE and Scopus from inception to October 5, 2015. Five of 571 studies were eligible; 5, 3, 3, and 5 studies were included in the pooling of CMS, pain VAS, surgical time and postoperative complications, respectively. The unstandardized mean difference (UMD) of the CMS for LSF was 4.43 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.73, 8.14], which was statistically significantly higher than the CMS in hook plate fixation. For VAS, the UMD was 0.02 points (95 % CI -3.54, 3.73) higher than LSF but without statistical significance. The surgical time of LSF was 16.21 min (95 % CI 6.27, 26.15) statistically significantly higher than hook plate fixation. LSF had a lower chance of postoperative complications by 0.62 units (95 % CI 0.30, 1.32) when compared to hook plate fixation, but this also was not statistically significant. In acute high-grade AC joint injuries, loop suspensory fixation had higher postoperative functional CMS and mean surgical time when compared to hook plate fixation. However, for postoperative VAS and complication rates, there were no statistically significant differences between groups. PMID:27334621

  18. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  19. Synovial Cysts of the Temporomandibular Joint: An Immunohistochemical Characterization and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, B.; Tomás-Amerigo, J. A.; Baquero, C.; Vera-Sempere, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are very rare, and to date, only 12 cases of a synovial cyst in the TMJ region have been reported in the literature. In this paper, we present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of one such lesion affecting a 48-year-old woman, presented with a mass in the left preauricular region. We describe the usefulness of immunohistochemical analysis for recognizing the synovial lining, which allowed for clear differentiation between ganglion and synovial cysts. Immunohistochemical analyses can be used to diagnose synovial cysts with certainty; however, using at least two markers is advisable to distinguish the two existing synovial cell subtypes. Our findings indicate that synovial cysts of TMJ possess an internal lining dominated by type B (fibroblast-like) synoviocytes. PMID:23573446

  20. An atypically located large subchondral cyst in an osteoarthritic hip joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritic subchondral cysts within or around the hip joint can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from primary osseous and soft tissue tumors due to their radiological appearance and uncommon location. Case presentation We report the case of a 74-year-old Turkish man with a subchondral cyst arising from the hip joint, eroding the acetabulum and located on the medial side of the iliac bone, which imitated a soft tissue tumor. This cystic lesion was resected and the results of histopathological analysis of tissue samples were found to be consistent with an osteoarthritic cyst. Conclusions The present case illustrates how an osteoarthritic subchondral cyst can grow into the soft tissue planes in the presence of destruction of the articular cartilage and subchondral bone continuity, and present as an apparent soft tissue tumor. PMID:23829963

  1. BAKER'S CYST

    PubMed Central

    Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Baker's cysts are located in the posteromedial region of the knee between the medial belly of the gastrocnemius muscle and semimembranosus tendon. In adults, these cysts are related to intra-articular lesions, which may consist of meniscal lesions or arthrosis. In children, these cysts are usually found on physical examination or imaging studies, and they generally do not have any clinical relevance. Ultrasound examination is appropriate for identifying and measuring the popliteal cyst. The main treatment approach should focus on the joint lesions, and in most cases there is no need to address the cyst directly. Although almost all knee cysts are benign (Baker's cysts and parameniscal cysts), presence of some signs makes it necessary to suspect malignancy: symptoms disproportionate to the size of the cyst, absence of joint damage (e.g. meniscal tears) that might explain the existence of the cyst, unusual cyst topography, bone erosion, cyst size greater than 5 cm and tissue invasion (joint capsule). PMID:27027065

  2. Arthroscopic fixation of type III acromioclavicular dislocations.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jan F A; Van der Linden, Dietert

    2007-10-01

    Type III Acromio-Clavicular Joint dislocations can be treated successfully by surgical stabilisation in situ, with or without reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. The authors describe a simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically. The technique can be used for in situ fixation, or as part of an arthroscopically assisted Weaver and Dunn procedure. Using a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained. No hardware removal is necessary. Concomitant glenohumeral pathology can be treated simultaneously. PMID:18019910

  3. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  4. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steen, M Willemijn; Hofstede, Diederik J

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11-64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  5. A paralabral cyst of the hip joint causing sciatica: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok; Panchal, Ramesh

    2014-07-01

    The prolapse of the intervertebral disc is most common cause of sciatica; rare causes of sciatica are pelvic fractures, pelvic tumors, piriformis syndrome, a rupture of medial head of gastronemius and sacroiliac joint dysfunction. We report the case of a 30-year-old male with a paralabral cyst of the hip joint with an acetabular labral tear causing sciatica. Our patient had an acetabular labral tear caused by a repetitive micro-trauma and external rotation injury. The diagnosis of the paralabral cyst with acetabular labral tear was based on clinical examination and histopathological examinations, and Magnetic resonance imaging findings. The patient underwent successful surgical excision of paralabral cyst and surgical repair of an acetabular labral tear. The present case reinforces the need for clinicians to be vigilant about rare causes of sciatica. PMID:25977624

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Ganglion Cyst: A Unique Case of Complete Resolution Following Subtotal Excision.

    PubMed

    Levarek, Rachel E; Nolan, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Ganglion cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a rare entity. Most often, ganglions present in anatomic regions, such as the hand, wrist, knee, foot, or ankle. Ganglion cysts are pseudocysts characterized by a fibrous connective tissue lining that lacks synovial cells and contains a thick gelatinous material. The etiology remains unclear, but might involve myxoid degeneration or softening of the collagen and connective tissue after long-term irritation and trauma. Ganglion cysts of the TMJ most commonly present as a swelling in the preauricular region, produce limited or no pain, and often have no effect on mouth opening. Because of the infrequent involvement of ganglion cysts with the TMJ and the nonspecific clinical presentation, the diagnosis is challenging. Diagnostic imaging tools, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have aided in diagnosis; however, only histopathologic examination will lead to a definitive diagnosis. The precise management of ganglion cysts of the TMJ remains uncertain owing to the uncommon appearance of these lesions. Treatment has focused on surgical excision without regard for lesion size or symptoms. This seems to be due to the decreased rate of recurrence after complete excision and microscopic examination providing the best method for a definitive diagnosis. This report describes a unique case of an 88-year-old woman with a large multilocular ganglion cyst of the right TMJ that completely resolved approximately 1.5 years after subtotal cystectomy. PMID:27019412

  7. A rare case of cervical facet joint and synovial cyst at C5/C6.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are uncommon, and particularly rare at cervical levels. We report a 40-year-old woman who presented with pain distribution in the typical C6 dermatome. MRI revealed a right-sided large extradural cystic lesion adjacent to the C5/C6 facet joint that was hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI and hypointense on T1-weighted MRI. The patient underwent posterior cervical surgery at the C5/C6 level which involved posterior decompressive unilateral laminotomy and excision of the C5/C6 facet joint cyst. Following complete facetectomy of the right C5/C6 facet joint and exposure of the C6 nerve throughout its foraminal course, instrumented fusion was performed. Following the procedure, the patient had an uneventful recovery with relief of her radicular symptoms at follow-up clinical review. PMID:26916905

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Subchondral Bony Cyst in Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Allogeneic Bone Graft: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gi-Soo; Kang, Chan; Lee, Jung-Bum; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Subchondral bony cyst, large solitary or multiple cysts in acetabular dome usually exacerbate progression to degenerative osteoarthritis in the hip joint. But it can be treated through arthroscopic intervention. We report two cases that treated by arthroscopic curettage and bone graft for subchondral bony cysts in early osteoarthritis of the hip joint, and it may delay progression to moderate osteoarthritis.

  9. Intradural extraneural bilobate ganglion cyst of the atlanto-occipital joint compressing the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Mario; Gerganov, Venelin M; Samii, Amir; Samii, Madjid

    2012-03-01

    Ganglion cysts (ganglia) are benign lesions of the soft tissue arising in the periarticular space. We present a 54-year-old woman with a 5-month history of headache and weakness of the tongue with deviation to the left side who had a rare extraneural intradural bilobate ganglion cyst of the atlanto-occipital joint compressing the hypoglossal nerve. An MRI showed a bilobate cystic lesion in the premedullary cistern on the left side at the level of the hypoglossal canal. This lesion was removed using a lateral suboccipital approach in the semi-sitting position with removal of the C1 hemiarch. The lesion proved to be a ganglion cyst on histopathology. Intracranial juxtafacet (ganglion and synovial) cysts compressing the hypoglossal nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis with other lesions of this region. Although there was no recurrence at 30-month follow-up, there was no significant improvement of the tongue weakness. We describe our surgical strategy and discuss the pathogenesis of the cyst. PMID:22277565

  10. Acromioclavicular separation. Reconstruction using synthetic loop augmentation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D S; Lemos, M J

    1995-01-01

    A total of 110 patients with a diagnosis of acromioclavicular joint separation were seen at our clinic between 1986 and 1991. Of these, 14 patients (12.7%) with grade III, IV, or V injuries required surgical reconstruction and were examined 2 years after surgery. All 14 patients underwent acromioclavicular reconstruction using a synthetic loop passed through drill holes in the base of the coracoid and the anterior third of the clavicle. When the loop is tightened, the clavicle is reduced anatomically without the anterior subluxation caused by simple clavicular cerclage. At an average followup of 44.2 months, patients were evaluated using the University of California, Los Angeles, rating scale. Twelve of the 14 had good or excellent results and returned to normal sport and work activities at 6 months. Of the two initial poor results, one required revision 1 month post-operatively because the patient was noncompliant, and the other required manipulation under anesthesia 3 months after surgery. The results in these two patients at 2 years were good and excellent, respectively. We concluded that, when medically indicated, fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid using this technique yields satisfactory results in an athletic population. PMID:7726339

  11. Distal Clavicle Osteolysis after Modified Weaver-Dunn's Procedure for Chronic Acromioclavicular Dislocation: A Case Report and Review of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Fernando; Mingo, Felipe; Piñol, Ignasi; Solano, Albert; Puig-Verdié, Lluís; Torrens, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction. This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis. PMID:25544923

  12. Diagnostic challenges in acromioclavicular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with Klinefelter's syndrome presented with a painful shoulder and staphylococcal sepsis. He received intravenous antibiotics while investigations were performed to locate the source of infection. MRI demonstrated infection in the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). The patient clinically improved and a further 5 weeks of oral antibiotics were given. He remained asymptomatic at 2-year follow-up. Although ACJ septic arthritis is rare, independent of immune-competent status, a high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. The condition presents additional diagnostic challenges due to unfamiliarity, the challenges of interpreting imaging, desire for radiological guided arthrocentesis and low volume aspirates. Overcoming these pitfalls is essential to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27257000

  13. Bilateral Acromioclavicular Septic Arthritis as an Initial Presentation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Sadraei, Neda; Gupta, Rohan; Machicado, Jorge D.; Govindu, Rukma

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is infrequently associated with septic arthritis. Moreover, septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae IE in a patient who presented with bilateral AC joint septic arthritis and we review the literature on the topic. PMID:24987538

  14. Clinical results of coracoacromial ligament transfer in acromioclavicular dislocations: A review of published literature.

    PubMed

    Sood, Aman; Wallwork, Nicholas; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2008-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are common injuries, which typically occur with trauma in young men. Treatment recommendations for these injuries are highly variable and controversial. There are greater than 100 surgical techniques described for operative treatment of this injury. One of the most widely recommended methods of surgical reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocations is to utilize the coracoacromial ligament for stabilization of the distal clavicle. Several modifications of this procedure have been described which have involved adjunct coracoclavicular fixation or fixation across acromioclavicular joint. Although the literature is replete with descriptive papers, there is paucity of studies evaluating the surgical outcome of this procedure. We systematically reviewed the English language published literature in peer reviewed journals (Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS) and assigned a level of evidence for available studies. We critically reviewed each paper for the flaws and biases and then evaluated the comparable clinical outcomes for various procedures and their modifications. The published literature consists entirely of case series (Level IV evidence) with variability in surgical technique and outcome measures. On review there is low level evidence to support the use of coracoacromial ligament for acromioclavicular dislocation but it has been associated with high rate of deformity recurrence. Adjunct fixation does not improve clinical results when compared to isolated coracoacromial ligament transfer. This is in part because of the high incidence of fixation related complications. Similar results are reported with coracoacromial ligament reconstruction for acute and chronic cases. The development of secondary acromioclavicular joint symptoms with distal clavicle retention is poorly reported with the incidence rate varying from 12% to 32%. Despite this, the retention or excision of distal clavicle did not affect overall clinical results except

  15. Salvage procedure for chronic acromioclavicular dislocation subsequent to overzealous distal clavicle resection.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, John E; Popkin, Charles A; Botto-van Bemden, Angie

    2008-12-01

    This article presents our surgical technique for reestablishing acromioclavicular stability after overzealous distal clavicular resection. Two cases are presented in which the clavicle of the affected acromioclavicular joint was unstable, causing pain with range of motion (ROM). To address the pathology, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament and reattachment of the trapezius and deltoid to the clavicle were required. We reconstructed the coracoclavicular ligaments using an Achilles tendon calcaneal allograft. The bony end of the Achilles tendon allograft was used as an extension to lengthen the clavicle and the tendinous portion to reconstruct the coracoacromial ligament, thus stabilizing the clavicle. Once allograft reconstruction and stability had been achieved, a 1.5-cm gap remained between the acromion and the new allograft end of the clavicle. There was no evidence of acromioclavicular impingement. Supplemental fixation was not required. The trapezius, pectoralis, and deltoids were all reefed over the clavicle using Vicryl sutures (Ethicon, Inc, West Somerville, New Jersey) to reinforce the reduction and restore the natural contour of the shoulder girdle. Fifteen months postoperatively, both patients had maintained a reduced acromioclavicular joint. They had no pain with ROM, and full muscular strength was evident in all planes. Radiographs of their shoulders revealed a completely incorporated graft and a reduced clavicle. We recommend this novel technique for reestablishing acromiclavicular stability, as it provides good functional and subjective results. PMID:19226059

  16. EXTRA-ARTICULAR FRACTURE OF THE MEDIAL END OF THE CLAVICLE ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE IV ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION: CAAE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Mário Chaves; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, Jose Carlos Souza; Leonel, Igor Lima; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the clavicle and acromioclavicular dislocations are very common injuries when they occur separately. The combination of an acromioclavicular dislocation and a fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle is not rare. However, there are very few reported cases of acromioclavicular dislocations associated with fractures of the middle third of the clavicle; those associated with fractures of the medial third are even rarer. We report the case of an adult male who suffered an acromioclavicular dislocation (type IV) associated with a displaced extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle (Almann group 3) in a cycling accident. The patient was treated during the acute phase with open reduction and internal fixation of the two lesions. At the clinical evaluation 12 months after the surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, with full active and passive mobility, and normal strength and endurance of the shoulder girdle. Radiographs and a three-dimensional CT scan showed persistent posterosuperior subluxation of the acromioclavicular joint and anatomical consolidation of the clavicular fracture. PMID:27027060

  17. Editorial Commentary: Are Larger Screws the Answer When Anatomic Reconstruction of an Acromioclavicular Separation Fails?

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Although fixation methods have improved, failure after fixation of an acromioclavicular joint separation is not uncommon. This biomechanical study shows that in the setting of graft slippage through previously well-placed clavicular tunnels, a revision anatomic reconstruction is feasible with larger tenodesis screws. Although the risk of clavicular fracture increases with larger tunnels, anatomic revision with larger screws is an option in select cases. PMID:27495861

  18. Baker’s cyst

    MedlinePlus

    Popliteal cyst; Bulge-knee ... Baker's cyst is caused by swelling in the knee. The swelling is due to an increase in the fluid that lubricates the knee joint (synovial fluid). When pressure builds up, fluid ...

  19. Femoral nerve compression secondary to a ganglion cyst arising from a hip joint: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Femoral nerve compression due to a cystic lesion around the hip joint is rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Among these, true ganglion cysts are even more rare. Case presentation We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with femoral nerve compression caused by a true ganglion cyst of the hip joint. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to predict a non-palpable cystic lesion around the hip joint as it may mimic different disorders and should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of unusual groin pain, radicular pain and peripheral vascular disorders. PMID:19178731

  20. Operation of lumbar zygoapophyseal joint cysts using a full-endoscopic interlaminar and transforaminal approach: prospective 2-year results of 74 patients.

    PubMed

    Komp, Martin; Hahn, Patrick; Ozdemir, Semih; Merk, Harry; Kasch, Richard; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    In appropriate situations, extensive decompression with laminectomy often continues to be described as the method of choice for operations involving lumbar zygoapophyseal joint (z-joint) cysts. Tissue-sparing procedures are nevertheless becoming more common. Endoscopic techniques have become the standard procedures in many areas because of the advantages they offer in terms of surgical technique and in rehabilitation. One key aspect in spinal surgery was the development of instruments for sufficient bone resection carried out under continuous visual control. This enabled endoscopes to be used when operating on z-joint cysts. The objective of this prospective study was to examine the technical possibilities for the full-endoscopic interlaminar and transforaminal technique in lumbar z-joint cysts. A total of 74 patients were followed up for 2 years. The results show that 85% of the patients no longer have any leg pain or that the pain had been almost completely eliminated, and 11 % experience occasional pain. The complication rate was low. The full-endoscopic techniques brought advantages in the following areas: operation, complications, traumatization, and rehabilitation. The recorded results show that full-endoscopic resection of a z-joint cyst using an interlaminar and transforaminal approach provides an adequate and safe supplement, and is an alternative to conventional procedures when the indication criteria are fulfilled. It also offers the advantages of a minimally invasive intervention. PMID:24667524

  1. Semimembranosus ganglion cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kannadath, Bijun Sai; Soundamourthy, Sandosh; Subramanian, Aruna; Sinhasan, Sankappa P.; Bhat, Ramachandra V.

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are tumor-like lesions in the soft tissues, generated by mucoid degeneration of the joint capsule, tendon or tendon sheaths on the dorsum of hand, wrist and foot. However, an intratendinous origin for a ganglion cyst is extremely rare. During dissection of the popliteal fossa, a cyst of 2.5 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm was observed in the tendon of right semimembranosus, 3.5 cm above the insertion of the muscle. Contrast X-ray revealed the cyst as not communicating with the knee joint or any adjacent bursae. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ganglion cyst. PMID:25276481

  2. Ovarian cysts

    MedlinePlus

    Physiologic ovarian cysts; Functional ovarian cysts; Corpus luteum cysts; Follicular cysts ... cyst often contains a small amount of blood. Ovarian cysts are more common in the childbearing years between ...

  3. Subchondral cysts (geodes) in arthritic disorders: pathologic and radiographic appearance of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Resnick, D; Niwayama, G; Coutts, R D

    1977-05-01

    A comprehensive study of femoral heads of patients and cadavers with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease allows insight into the radiographic and pathologic appearance of subchondral radiolucencies in these disorders. The term geode, rather than cyst or pseudocyst, may be a more appropriate decription of these lesions. In osteoarthritis, goedes occur on the pressure segment of the femoral head in association with loss of articular space; in rheumatoid arthritis, they are initially noted at the chondro-osseous junction and subsequently involve the entire femoral head. In osteonecrosis, geodes appear in the necrotic segment of the femoral head. In calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, geodes resemble those in osteoarthritis but are larger, more numerous, and more widespread. PMID:404905

  4. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Esposito, John G; Ono, Yohei; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC) separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH)” OR “acromioclavicular* (text)” OR “coracoclavicular* (text)” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH)” OR “Arthroscop* (text)” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence IV Results A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26.8% of patients. Conclusion Arthroscopic AC reconstruction techniques carry a distinct complication profile. The TightRope/Endobutton techniques, when performed acutely, provide good radiographic outcomes at the expense of hardware irritation. In contrast, graft reconstructions in patients with chronic AC separations demonstrated a high risk for loss of reduction. Fractures of the coracoid/clavicle remain a significant complication occurring predominately with

  5. Surgical technique affects outcomes in acromioclavicular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Cole, Chad; Wohlrab, Kurt; Eichinger, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Optimal treatment for acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation is unknown. Numerous surgical procedures for AC injuries have been described with little comparison. This study sought to compare the clinical and radiographic results of various surgical techniques in order to identify the optimal surgical technique. Ninety patients met inclusion criteria of AC reconstruction at this institution. A retrospective review of outcomes was performed using the electronic records system. Radiographs were measured for pre- and postoperative grade and percent elevation versus the contralateral side. Overall revision rate was 9%. Suture button fixation had a revision rate of 0% compared to 14% (p = .01). Reconstruction procedures performed with distal clavicle excision showed a higher revision rate, 17% compared to 0% (p = .003). There were no statistically significant clinical differences. AC reconstructions performed with suture button construct were superior to other surgical techniques. Procedures performed with distal clavicle excision were inferior to those without. PMID:23449059

  6. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ075 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Ovarian Cysts • What is an ovarian cyst? • What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts? • How are ovarian cysts diagnosed? • How are ovarian ...

  7. Baker’s Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Frush, Todd J.; Noyes, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Popliteal synovial cysts, also known as Baker’s cysts, are commonly found in association with intra-articular knee disorders, such as osteoarthritis and meniscus tears. Histologically, the cyst walls resemble synovial tissue with fibrosis evident, and there may be chronic nonspecific inflammation present. Osteocartilaginous loose bodies may also be found within the cyst, even if they are not seen in the knee joint. Baker’s cysts can be a source of posterior knee pain that persists despite surgical treatment of the intra-articular lesion, and they are routinely discovered on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the symptomatic knee. Symptoms related to a popliteal cyst origin are infrequent and may be related to size. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was conducted with keywords related to the history, diagnosis, and treatment of Baker’s cysts—namely, Baker’s cyst, popliteal cyst, diagnosis, treatment, formation of popliteal cyst, surgical indications, and complications. Bibliographies from these references were also reviewed to identify related and pertinent literature. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Baker’s cysts are commonly found associated with intra-articular knee disorders. Proper diagnosis, examination, and treatment are paramount in alleviating the pain and discomfort associated with Baker’s cysts. Conclusion: A capsular opening to the semimembranosus–medial head gastrocnemius bursa is a commonly found normal anatomic variant. It is thought that this can lead to the formation of a popliteal cyst in the presence of chronic knee effusions as a result of intra-articular pathology. Management of symptomatic popliteal cysts is conservative. The intra-articular pathology should be first addressed by arthroscopy. If surgical excision later becomes necessary, a limited posteromedial approach is often employed. Other treatments, such as arthroscopic debridement and closure of the valvular mechanism

  8. Help Desk Answers: Surgery vs conservative management for AC joint repair: How do the 2 compare?

    PubMed

    Matchin, Bruce; Yee, Bruce; Mott, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    When not considering the grade of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation, both conservative and surgical management lead to positive outcomes, although surgically managed patients require more time out of work. PMID:27262254

  9. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... new cysts. A health problem that may involve ovarian cysts is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with ... male hormones, irregular or no periods and small ovarian cysts. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office ...

  10. Ovarian cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome . Symptoms Ovarian cysts often cause no symptoms. An ... You may need other treatments if you have polycystic ovary syndrome or another disorder that can cause cysts. Outlook ( ...

  11. Arachnoid Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Arachnoid Cysts Information Page Synonym(s): Intracranial Cysts Table of Contents ( ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What are Arachnoid Cysts? Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid-filled sacs that ...

  12. Multidirectional Instability Accompanying an Inferior Labral Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Sung-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Paralabral cyst of the shoulder joint can be observed in 2% to 4% of the general population, particularly in men during the third and fourth decade. On average, these cysts measure 10 mm to 20 mm in diameter and are located preferentially on the postero-superior aspect of the glenoid. The MRI has increased the frequency of the diagnosis of paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint. Paralabral cysts of the shoulder joint usually develop in the proximity of the labrum. The relationship between shoulder instability and labral tears is well known, however, the association of shoulder instability with a paralabral cyst is rare. Shoulder instability may cause labral injury or labral injury may cause shoulder instability, and then injured tear develops paralabral cyst. In our patient, the inferior paralabral cyst may be associated with inferior labral tears and instability MRI. PMID:20514270

  13. Ganglion cysts in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Cho, K O; Park, N Y; Kang, M I; Umemura, K; Itakura, C

    2000-07-01

    Ganglion cysts were diagnosed in a 4-month-old male Afghan Hound. Grossly, the subcutaneous ovoid cysts around the caudal right elbow joint and left ischiatic tuberosity had abundant mucinous fluid and internal folding. The lesions recurred twice around the elbow joint after surgical removal. Neither cyst communicated with the joint cavity. Histologically, the cyst wall consisted of inner myxomatous and outer immature connective tissue. Some parts of the cyst wall had various stages of myxoid metaplasia of collagen tissue leading to new cyst formation. Ultrastructural study revealed that cells in the myxoid metaplastic lesion had well-developed cytoplasmic secretory elements, including abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and many smooth-walled vesicles. These ganglion cysts apparently resulted from the metaplasia of fibroblasts to secreting cells. PMID:10896396

  14. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys. They are usually characterized as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water- ... of the time, they are simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water- ...

  15. Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the cysts ... failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) usually happens in people who are on ...

  16. Myxoid Cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... question & answer discussion forum widgets for professionals dermatology education rash and rashes clinical tools ... These cysts form in the middle aged and the elderly. Overview A myxoid cyst, also known as a digital mucous cyst or pseudocyst, is a growth usually ...

  17. Vaginal cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... or is protruding from the vagina. It is important to contact your provider for an exam for any cyst or mass you notice. Alternative Names Inclusion cyst; Gartner duct cyst Images Female reproductive anatomy Uterus Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) References Baggish ...

  18. Epidermoid Cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... epidermis) grows into the middle layer of the skin (dermis). This may occur due to injury or blocked hair follicles. The lesion may be ... the cyst. However, this is a temporary measure. After this treatment, a cyst will refill with the cheesy contents because the lining of the cyst has not been removed. ... Jean L., ed. Dermatology , pp. ...

  19. Juxtafacet Spinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This was a retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine through posterior laminectomy in combination with transpedicular screw fixation. Overview of Literature Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine contribute significantly to narrowing of the spinal canal and lateral thecal sac and nerve root compression. Cysts form as a result of arthrotic disruption of the facet joint, leading to degenerative spondylolisthesis in up to 40% of patients. Methods Retrospective data from 6 patients, treated during the period of March 2007 to February 2011, were analyzed. All preoperative and postoperative manifestations, extension/flexion radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography records were reviewed. All underwent surgery for synovial cysts with excision and decompression combined with posterior fixation. The result of surgery was evaluated with Macnab's classification. An excellent or good outcome was considered as satisfactory. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale was used for evaluation of back pain. Results All patients included in this study had excellent outcomes as regarding to improvement of all preoperative manifestations and returning to normal daily activities. Only 2 cases developed postoperative transient cerebro-spinal fluid leak and were treated conservatively and improved during the follow up period. Conclusions Although this study included a small number of cases and we could not have statistically significant results, the good outcome of decompression of synovial cysts combined with posterior fixation and fusion encouraged us to recommend this approach for patients with juxtafacet synovial cysts. PMID:26949457

  20. Results of Arthroscopy-Assisted TightRope Repair of Acromioclavicular Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Flinkkilä, Tapio E.; Ihanainen, Essi

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study assessed results of arthroscopy-assisted TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) repair of acute Rockwood grade III and V acromioclavicular (AC) dislocations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 57 patients with AC dislocations treated with TightRope fixation: 15 Rockwood grade III and 42 grade V. Functional results were assessed using the Constant score, and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and RAND 36-ltem Health Survey scores after a mean 2.6 years of follow-up (range 1.0 years to 4.5 years). Radiographic results were assessed using the AC joint coracoclavicular (CC) distance. Results Postoperative radiographs showed anatomical AC joint reduction in all patients. In nine patients, fixation failed before 6 weeks postoperatively, mainly as a result of suture breakage. For the remaining 47 patients, CC distance was well maintained at 6 weeks. At follow-up, mean (SD) CC distance was significantly increased compared to the contralateral side or postoperative radiographs [17 (4) mm versus 10 (3) mm]. Mean DASH score was 9, Constant score was 88 and the RAND 36 score showed a quality of life similar to the Finnish reference population. Conclusions Despite initial good reduction of grade III and V AC dislocations using TightRope fixation, subluxation often recurs after 6 weeks. Patients suffer minor subjective complaints that do not worsen the quality of life.

  1. A ganglion cyst derived from a synovial cyst: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Gurcan, Sevilay; Berber, Osman; Ozsunar, Yelda; Eliyatkın, Nuket

    2015-01-01

    The synovial and ganglion cysts originating from the facet joint have been named under the name of the Juxtafacet cyst by the several researchers. They put forward that the synovial cyst originated from the synovial joint. But, they failed to clarify the pathophysiology of the formation of the ganglion cyst. In this case report, we reported a 67-year-old male patient was referred to the emergency from another center with the complaint of a left leg pain and weakness in the left foot and patient was treated with microchirurgical technique. His patological examination was evaluated a ganglion cyst. We have discussed and explained the pathophysiology of the formation of a ganglion cyst derivered from a synovial cyst. And separately, we have presented the spinal cysts by grouping them under a new classification called a cystic formation of the soft tissue attachments of the mobile spine as well as dividing them into sub-groups. PMID:26652879

  2. A Case of Digital Myxoid Cyst Coexisting with Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Soo; Jwa, Seung Wook; Suh, Sung Won; Kim, Sung Jun; Oh, Chang-Keun; Kwon, Kyung Sool

    2008-01-01

    A 62-year-old male developed a solitary asymptomatic nodule on the lateral aspect of the distal interphalangeal joint of the right great toe. Histopathologic findings demonstrated a myxoid cyst with a concomitant epidermal inclusion cyst. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concurrent occurrence of digital myxoid cyst and epidermal inclusion cyst. Although the exact mechanism for developing a digital myxoid cyst and an epidermal inclusion cyst simultaneously at the same site is not explained, trauma might be a possible cause.

  3. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Malhotra, Akshay; Cribb, Gillian; Cool, Paul; Hay, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Impingement syndrome is usually caused by irritation of the rotator cuff within the sub acromial space and this includes the coraco-acromial arch (Acromion and Coraco-acromial ligament), the acromio-clavicular joint and occasionally the coracoid. Iatrogenic causes such as sutures, pins, plates or wires left from previous surgery can cause similar symptoms. We present a series of four cases mimicking "classical" impingement symptoms/signs in which the causal pathology was identified outside the sub-acromial space. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed lesions that were present in the supra-spinatus fossa but were causing pressure effects on the sub-acromial space, namely - a ganglion cyst in one case, lipomata in two other cases, and a glomus tumour. A ganglion cyst and glomus tumour mimicking impingement syndrome is a rare reported case to our knowledge. These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical. PMID:27594993

  4. Urethroid cyst.

    PubMed

    Paslin, D

    1983-01-01

    Cysts found on the ventral surface of the penis have been pathogenetically ascribed to defective embryologic closure of the median raphe, to anomalous developmental rests of the periurethral glands of Littre, and to the ectopic development of apocrine cystadenoma in the penile skin. This case reports a previously unrecognized but compelling pathogenesis for at least some ventral penile cysts, namely the anomalous congenital outgrowth of the entodermal urethral lining, giving rise to what is here designated as a urethroid cyst. PMID:6849573

  5. Type III acromioclavicular separation: results of a recent survey on its management.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Carl W; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2007-02-01

    The issue of managing type III acromioclavicular (AC) separations remains controversial, and decisions about using operative versus conservative management have undergone many distinct changes over the years. To review current management preferences within the orthopedic community, we sent a mail-in survey to all members of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and approved Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) orthopedic program residency directors. Of the 664 respondents (577 AOSSM members, 87 directors), 81% (71/87 AOSSM members) to 86% (502/577 directors) continue to treat uncomplicated type III AC separations conservatively. Providing a sling for comfort remains the preferred type of conservative management (AOSSM members, 91% [456/502]; directors, 89% [63/71]). For surgical management, respondents recommended resection of the distal clavicle slightly more often than not (AOSSM members, 57% [42/74]; directors, 59% [319/538]) and rigid stabilization of the AC joint during early postoperative rehabilitation (AOSSM members, 80% [444/555]; directors, 82% [61/74]). Finally, most recommended reconstructing either the coracoclavicular ligaments (69% [330/476] and 61% [33/54], respectively) or both the coracoclavicular ligaments and the AC ligaments (27% 130/476] and 33% [18/54]) when addressing this problem. Since the early 1990s, there has been little change in initial conservative management of type III AC separations. Furthermore, the surgical approach to reconstruction, when necessary, has also undergone relatively few changes, with the exception of an increased preference for primary distal clavicle excision. PMID:17405638

  6. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCA and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral (ScB) and trabecular (TB) bone structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCA was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCA was lower than Non-Op and other OCA. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCA did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCA contained “basal” cysts, localized to deeper regions, some “subchondral” cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  7. Arthroscopic stabilisation of an acute acromioclavicular dislocation grade III in a patient with ectopic insertion of the pectoralis minor: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Minuesa-Asensio, Alvaro; Barrio-Asensio, Carmen; González-Gómez, Ignacio; Murillo-González, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    The different approaches used in arthroscopic stabilisation of the acromioclavicular joint are well known. However, and despite a great incidence of ectopic pectoralis minor insertion, an alternative choice for the use of arthroscopic portal has not being sufficiently described. Here, we describe a case of acute acromioclavicular dislocation grade III. The arthroscopic stabilisation was achieved using the TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, USA) implant. Through this technique, the approach to the articular portion of the coracoid process can be made intra-articularly or from the subacromial space. We accessed intra-articularly, by opening the rotator interval to reach the coracoid process from the joint cavity. After opening the rotator interval, an ectopic insertion of the pectoralis minor was observed. The choice of approach of the coracoid process from the subacromial space would have complicated the intervention, making it necessary to sever the ectopic tendon to complete the technique, lengthening the surgical time and increasing the chance of complications. For this reason, the use of a standard posterior portal providing intra-articular arthroscopic access through the rotator interval is recommended since the aforementioned anatomical variation is not infrequent. Level of evidence Therapeutic studies-investigating the results of treatment, Level V. PMID:25448140

  8. A rare case of floating clavicle and a novel technique for stabilizing the sternoclavicular joint

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Mark; Wallace, Angus

    2014-01-01

    We present the first ever case report of a floating clavicle with a unique combination of a posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation and an associated grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. We treated this injury surgically by stabilizing both ends of clavicle using a polyester surgical mesh device (LockDown™; Mandaco 569 Limited, Redditch, UK; previously called the Nottingham Surgilig).

  9. Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the ... place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney ...

  10. Tarlov Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... the herpes simplex virus, which thrives in an alkaline environment, can cause Tarlov cysts to become symptomatic. Making the body less alkaline, through diet or supplements, may lessen symptoms. Microsurgical ...

  11. Ovarian Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Endometriosis fact sheet Ovarian cancer fact sheet Polycystic ovary syndrome fact sheet The javascript used in this widget ... ovaries make many small cysts. This is called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS can cause problems with the ovaries ...

  12. Acromioclavicular dislocation: postoperative evaluation of the coracoclavicular ligaments using magnetic resonance☆

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Amin, Bruno de Oliveira; Tenor Junior, Antonio Carlos; da Costa, Miguel Pereira; Filardi Filho, Cantídio Salvador; Batista, Cleber Gonçalves; Brasil Filho, Rômulo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To radiologically evaluate the healing of the coracoclavicular ligaments after surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation. Methods Ten patients who had undergone surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation via a posterosuperior route at least one year earlier were invited to return for radiological assessment using magnetic resonance. This evaluation was done by means of analogy with the scale described in the literature for studying the healing of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and for measuring the healed coracoclavicular ligaments. Results A scar structure of fibrous appearance had formed in 100% of the cases. In 50% of the cases, the images of this structure had a good appearance, while the other 50% were deficient. Conclusion Late postoperative evaluation using magnetic resonance, on patients who had been treated for acute acromioclavicular dislocation using a posterosuperior route in the shoulder, showed that the coracoclavicular ligaments had healed in 100% of the cases, but that this healing was deficient in 50%. PMID:26229916

  13. Choledochal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Singham, Janakie; Yoshida, Eric M.; Scudamore, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Much about the etiology, pathophysiology, natural course and optimal treatment of cystic disease of the biliary tree remains under debate. Gastroenterologists, surgeons and radiologists alike still strive to optimize their roles in the management of choledochal cysts. To that end, much has been written about this disease entity, and the purpose of this 3-part review is to organize the available literature and present the various theories currently argued by the experts. In part 1, we discuss the background of the disease, describing the etiology, classification, pathogenesis and malignant potential of choledochal cysts. PMID:19865581

  14. Biliary cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, P D

    1975-01-01

    This review brings the total number of biliary cysts reported in the world literature to 955. Eighty-one per cent of patients are females and 61% were discovered before age ten. The classical triad of right upper quadrant pain, right upper quandrant mass, and juandice is present in 38% of cases. The duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis ranged from less than one week to more than 40 years. The etiology is multifaceted and evidence of the existence of both acquired and congenital cysts is presented. The most useful diagnostic tool is fiberoptic endoscopy with retrograde contrast injection of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct. The incidence of biliary carcinoma in patients with biliary cysts is found to be 2.5%; 24 cases have been reported. Considerable controversy has existed concerning the best operative procedure for biliary cysts; no treatment or medical treatment yielding a 97% mortality rate. In an analysis of 235 patients presented since 1968 with an average followup of 5.2 years, the best procedure appears to be excision with either choledochocholedocostomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The operative mortality for all procedures is now 3 to 4%. PMID:1103760

  15. The successful arthroscopic treatment of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Spinner, Robert J; Smith, Jay; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Iannotti, Joseph P; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can distinguish between intraneural ganglion cysts and paralabral (extraneural) cysts at the glenohumeral joint. Suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts share the same pathomechanism as their paralabral counterparts, emanating from a tear in the glenoid labrum. The authors present 2 cases to demonstrate that the identification and arthroscopic repair of labral tears form the cornerstone of treatment for intraneural ganglion cysts of the suprascapular nerve. METHODS Two patients with suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified: 1 was recognized and treated prospectively, and the other, previously reported as a paralabral cyst, was identified retrospectively through the reinter-pretation of high-resolution MR images. RESULTS Both patients achieved full functional recovery and had complete radiological involution of the intraneural ganglion cysts at the 3-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Previous reports of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts described treatment by an open approach to decompress the cysts and resect the articular nerve branch to the glenohumeral joint. The 2 cases in this report demonstrate that intraneural ganglion cysts, similar to paralabral cysts, can be treated with arthroscopic repair of the glenoid labrum without resection of the articular branch. This approach minimizes surgical morbidity and directly addresses the primary etiology of intraneural and extraneural ganglion cysts. PMID:26323813

  16. Acromioclavicular Dislocation Associated with Coracoid Process Fracture: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Ozkan; Canbora, Kerem; Guler, Ferhat; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; May, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture is a rare injury. Herein we reported two further cases with such combination of injuries and reviewed all previously published cases in current literature. In this review, we discussed the demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment options extensively. PMID:26491588

  17. Arthroscopic management of popliteal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Amite; Chahar, Deepak; Pathrot, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of popliteal cyst is controversial. Owing to high failure rates in open procedures, recent trend is towards arthroscopic decompression and simultaneous management of intraarticular pathology. We retrospectively analysed clinical results of symptomatic popliteal cysts after arthroscopic management at 24 month followup. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of hospital database for patients presenting with pathology suggestive of a popliteal cyst from June 2007 to December 2012 was done. Twelve cases of popliteal cyst not responding to NSAIDS and with Rauschning and Lindgren Grade 2 or 3 who consented for surgical intervention were included in the study. All patients underwent arthroscopic decompression using a posteromedial portal along with management of intraarticular pathologies as encountered. Furthermore, the unidirectional valvular effect was corrected to a bidirectional one by widening the cyst joint interface. The results were assessed as per the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria. Results: All patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months (range 24-36 months). It revealed that among the study group, six patients achieved Grade 0 status while five had a minimal limitation of range of motion accompanied by occasional pain (Grade 1). One patient had a failure of treatment with no change in the clinical grading. Conclusion: Arthroscopic approach gives easy access to decompression with the simultaneous management of articular pathologies. PMID:27053804

  18. Biomechanical loading of the shoulder complex and lumbosacral joints during dynamic cart pushing task.

    PubMed

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Sun, Yun; Jaridi, Majid; Hsiao, Hongwei

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of dynamic cart pushing exertions on the biomechanical loading of shoulder and low back. Ten participants performed cart pushing tasks on flat (0°), 5°, and 10° ramped walkways at 20 kg, 30 kg, and 40 kg weight conditions. An optoelectronic motion capturing system configured with two force plates was used for the kinematic and ground reaction force data collection. The experimental data was modeled using AnyBody modeling system to compute three-dimensional peak reaction forces at the shoulder complex (sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and glenohumeral) and low back (lumbosacral) joints. The main effect of walkway gradient and cart weight, and gradient by weight interaction on the biomechanical loading of shoulder complex and low back joints was statistically significant (all p < 0.001). At the lumbosacral joint, negligible loading in the mediolateral direction was observed compared to the anterioposterior and compression directions. Among the shoulder complex joints, the peak reaction forces at the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints were comparable and much higher than the sternoclavicular joint. Increased shear loading of the lumbosacral joint, distraction loading of glenohumeral joint and inferosuperior loading of the acromioclavicular joint may contribute to the risk of work-related low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorder with prolonged and repetitive use of carts. PMID:23566675

  19. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Strasia, Rhys P; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve involvement with accepted concepts of intraneural ganglion cyst formation and propagation. PMID:25658786

  20. POSTEROSUPERIOR SURGICAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATIONS: RESULTS FROM 84 SURGICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Stipp, Willian Nandi; Petros, Rodrigo Souto Borges

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of 84 cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, using a posterosuperior access route. Methods: Eighty-four cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III in the Allman-Tossy classification) operated between November 2002 and May 2010 were evaluated. The patients’ mean age was 34 years. The diagnoses were made using clinical and radiographic evaluations. The patients were operated by the same surgical team, within three weeks of the date of the trauma, using a posterosuperior approach to the shoulder to access the top of the base of the coracoid process for placement of two anchors, which were used in reducing the dislocation. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. The postoperative clinical-radiographic evaluation was done using the modified Karlsson criteria and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Results: 92.8% of the 84 patients treated presented good or excellent results, and 7.2% presented fair or poor results, using the UCLA assessment score. According to the modified Karlsson criteria, 76.2% were assessed as grade A, 17.9% as grade B and 5.9% as grade C. Conclusion: The posterosuperior access route to the shoulder is a new option for accessing the coracoid process and treating acromioclavicular dislocation, with clinical and radiographic results equivalent to those in the literature. PMID:27047866

  1. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision. PMID:26726987

  2. Dual ACL Ganglion Cysts: Significance of Detailed Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Amit; Nag, H. L.; Meena, Sanjay; Lohiya, Ramprakash; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare and most frequently are an incidental finding on MRI and arthroscopy. Most of the previous studies have reported a single ganglion cyst in the knee. There have been previous reports of more than one cyst in the same knee but not in the same structure within the knee. We are reporting a case of dual ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) ganglion cysts one of which was missed on radiological examination but later detected during arthroscopy. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported in the indexed English literature till date. PMID:25400962

  3. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. PMID:26725189

  4. Ganglion cysts of the wrist: pathophysiology, clinical picture, and management.

    PubMed

    Gude, Warren; Morelli, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews what is known about ganglion cyst formation, natural history (50% of cysts will spontaneously resolve), diagnosis, and management of this common malady. Although the exact mechanism of cyst formation is unknown, most current theories hold that extra-articular mucin "droplets" coalesce to form the main body of the tumor. Only subsequently are the "cyst wall" and pedicle (connecting the cyst to a nearby synovial joint) formed. Treatment options include watchful waiting, nonoperative aspiration/injection, and surgical removal. Although treatment is often unnecessary, many patients seeking consultation desire some form of definitive treatment. Cyst aspiration/injection is fraught with a high incidence of recurrence. Surgery generally results in lower rates of recurrence, but a higher incidence of complications. All current treatment options are suboptimal. PMID:19468907

  5. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Simple Kidney Cysts Page Content On this page: What are simple ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs ...

  6. Beware the Tarlov cyst.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Jane E; Torode, Hugh; Sears, William; Cousins, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Tarlov cysts are sacral perineural cysts. This case report describes the clinical course after biopsy of a very large Tarlov cyst via laparoscopy, which was thought preoperatively to be an adnexal mass. It serves as a warning against attempting biopsy or resection of these lesions. PMID:19110185

  7. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  8. Radial tunnel syndrome caused by ganglion cyst: treatment by arthroscopic cyst decompression.

    PubMed

    Mileti, Joseph; Largacha, Mauricio; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2004-05-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve at the elbow can lead to one of 2 clinical entities. Posterior interosseous syndrome is primarily a motor deficiency of the posterior interosseous nerve, and radial tunnel syndrome presents as pain along the radial tunnel and extensor muscle mass. The radial nerve can be compressed at a number of sites around the elbow. In addition, numerous mass lesions reported in the literature can cause compressive neuropathy of the radial nerve at the elbow. Standard surgical management for persistent radial tunnel syndrome that is refractory to nonsurgical treatment is open decompression of the radial nerve. Cysts occurring in other joints are commonly treated arthroscopically. Supraglenoid cysts of the shoulder, meniscal cysts in the knee, and dorsal wrist ganglia are routinely treated with arthroscopic decompression or excision with management of the underlying etiology of the cyst. We present a case of radial tunnel syndrome caused by a ganglion cyst of the proximal radioulnar joint that was treated using arthroscopic excision of the cyst and decompression of the radial nerve. PMID:15122155

  9. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-02-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. PMID:21323277

  10. Multiple myxoid cysts secondary to occupation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, M; de Berker, D A R

    2006-05-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with eight digital myxoid cysts (DMCs) involving the fingers of both hands. They developed within 12 months of the patient starting a job that involved pushing a garment into an embroidery mould, thus exerting a downward force on the fingertips. The pressure exerted from this force could have potentially damaged the joint synovial capsule, leading to rupture and loss of synovial gel, thus inducing myxoid cysts. This case suggests that DMCs may be related to occupation, and to our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of occupationally induced DMCs. PMID:16681589

  11. Splenic cysts in children.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y H; Sheih, C P; Horng, S S; Liao, Y J; Lu, W T; Li, Y W; Kao, S P

    1997-01-01

    Splenic cysts were found, incidentally, in eight children during the past nine years (1987-1995) in Taipei Municipal Women's and Children's Hospital. Five of the children were boys and three were girls. The age at diagnosis ranged from 8 to 15 years. Evidence of possible splenic cyst development was found initially by ultrasonography; six patients received further evaluation with computerized tomography (CT); one patient received radionuclide scanning. The cysts ranged from 2 cm to 14 cm in diameter. Four of the patients received surgical treatment (three partial splenectomy and one total splenectomy) because of huge splenic cysts (diameter > 10 cm). Subsequent pathological examination revealed that all cysts had epithelial cell lining in the cyst wall, meaning they were all congenital in origin. The remaining four cases were followed up at the Out-patient Clinic here. All cases had a benign clinical course. PMID:9066189

  12. Intrathoracic extrapulmonary hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Atoini, Fouad; Ouarssani, Aziz; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed; Aitlhou, Fatima; Rguibi, Mustapha Idrissi; Hommadi, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    Hydatid disease caused by echinococcus granulosus is still a serious problem in both underdeveloped and developing countries. Clinical signs of the disease are not specific. Most patients have a few symptoms when a hydatid cyst is discovered. Symptoms depend on its location, size and complications. Parasite can settle in every organ and tissue in the human body. We report two cases with intrathoracic extrapulmonary hydatid cyst with multiple cysts. Pathophysiology of the mode of dissemination, and surgery are discussed. PMID:23308314

  13. Intravesical hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sallami, Sataa; Nouira, Yassine; Kallel, Yousri; Gargouri, Mourad; Horchani, Ali

    2005-11-01

    A case of intravesical hydatid cyst is reported. The cyst was completely evacuated cystoscopically with intravesical instillation of a scolicidal agent (hydrogen peroxide) to destroy scolices and daughter cysts. The postoperative course was uneventful, and follow-up did not show evidence of recurrence. Because this is the first case, to our knowledge, to be reported, little is known about the nonoperative management of such hydatid localization. A recommendation is made, however, to adopt this minimally invasive procedure. PMID:16286147

  14. Pineal cysts in children.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Boudhrioua, V; Linglart, A; Ancel, P Y; Falip, C; Bougnères, P F; Adamsbaum, C

    2011-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence and characteristics of pineal cysts found on MRI in children. METHODS: This is a retrospective monocentric study of all brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations performed under the same technical conditions for checking the idiopathic nature of short stature (ISS group, n = 116) and for the investigation of central precocious puberty (CPP) over a 3-year period (n = 56). Dimensions, wall and septal thickness, number of locules, signal intensity, and the presence of a solid component were analysed. Ten of 19 cysts were re-evaluated (follow-up interval 4-28 months). The prevalence of the pineal cysts was compared between the two groups using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests, and a significance threshold of p < 0.05. RESULTS: The prevalence of cysts was comparable in the two groups, CPP (10.7%) and ISS (11.2%). Cyst characteristics were similar in the two groups and 74% had thin septations. None of the cysts changed on follow-up. None of the children with pineal cysts exhibited neurological signs. CONCLUSION: Benign pineal cysts are a common finding in young children. High-resolution MRI demonstrates that these cysts are often septated. This pattern is a normal variant and does not require follow-up MR imaging or IV contrast media. PMID:22347985

  15. Pilonidal cyst resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess; Pilonidal dimple; Pilonidal disease; Pilonidal cyst; Pilonidal sinus ... asked to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), vitamin E, clopidogrel (Plavix), warfarin (Coumadin), ...

  16. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our clinical with left buttock pain and paresthesia for 3 years. A large extradural cyst was found at T1-L2 level on MRI and a communication between the cyst and subarachnoid space was illustrated by CT-myelography. We performed cyst fenestration with primary repair of dural defect. Both patients' symptoms gradually subsided and follow up images taken 1-2 months postoperatively showed nearly disappeared cysts. There has been no documented recurrence in these two cases so far. Tailored laminotomy with cyst fenestration can be a safe and effective alternative choice in treating SEACs compared to traditional complete resection of cyst wall with multi-level laminectomy. PMID:24294463

  17. Penile epidermal inclusion cyst.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pradeep; Mansoor, M N; Jalali, Sanjay; Sharma, Abhishek

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst of penis in a five-year-old boy, who had presented to the outpatient department of our hospital. Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign lesions that can develop in any part of the body. However, the finding of an epidermal inclusion cyst in the penis is rare. The child was operated and discharged uneventfully. The objective of reporting this case is to highlight the rare possibility of an inclusion cyst arising from penis as a late complication of circumcision. PMID:20589475

  18. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the intervertebral foramen between 12th thoracal and 1st lumbar vertebrae. The cystic lesions were removed after bilateral exposure of Th12-L1 foramens. The result of hystopathology confirmed the diagnosis as ganglion cyst. The ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. The surgeon should keep this rare entity in their mind for differential diagnosis. PMID:23908708

  19. "Juxtafacet cysts", a misleading name for cystic formations of mobile spine (CYFMOS).

    PubMed

    Christophis, Petros; Asamoto, Shunji; Kuchelmeister, Klaus; Schachenmayr, Walter

    2007-09-01

    To present 58 cystic space-occupying formations of the spinal canal in 53 cases; these formations are called "juxtafacet cysts". Fifty-Three patients (33 women and 20 men, with an average age of 60.8 years) were evaluated retrospectively by neurosurgery. All of the patients had received simple X-P, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgery. The neurological findings were evaluated on admission and in a follow-up review. Surgical intervention was performed on all patients and they underwent gross-total cyst removal. During surgery, the origin of a cyst was well observed. Follow-up data ranged from 6 to 46 months. Patient outcome was graded on a scale of excellent, good, or poor. Histological findings were evaluated. In 53 patients 58 cysts were identified. Four of the patients had multiple cysts. All cysts were associated with mobile spine. Fifty-five cysts were found in the lumbo-sacral region, two cysts were found in the cervico-thoracic region and one cyst in the thoracic region. Forty-two patients presented back pain and 52 patients presented radicular pain. Four patients had a cauda equina syndrome. Sensory disturbance was observed in 24 cases and motor weakness was observed in 21 cases. Claudication was observed in 19 cases. All cases with cervico-thoracic or thoracic cysts presented myelopathy. The duration of these clinical symptoms ranged from 10 days to 10 years. After surgery there was no case of a recurrent cyst during the follow-up period. Thirty-four cases had an excellent outcome, 18 a good outcome, and one a poor outcome. Out of 58 cysts 32 were joint cysts (11 synovial cysts, 21 ganglion cysts). A further 19 were flavum cysts, one was a posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) cyst and six others were unknown pseudo cysts. In 34 of the cysts we found hemosiderin deposits and in eight amyloid deposits. Present investigation and findings in literature show a clear comparison of these cystic formations and the mobile

  20. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation. PMID:24581205

  1. Splenic epidermoid cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, F G; Yellin, A E; Lingua, R W; Craig, J R; Turrill, F L; Mikkelsen, W P

    1978-01-01

    Four patients with splenic masses were operated upon and found to have epidermoid cysts of the spleen, a rare lesion comprising less than 10% of benign, nonparasitic splenic cysts. The patients were young and had vague, non-specific symptoms which were related to the size of the slowly enlarging splenic mass. Three patients had palpable masses. Contrast gastrointestinal studies and intravenous urography will help exclude mass lesions of the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract. Sonar scan may confirm the cystic nature of the lesion and localize it to the spleen. A review of 42,327 autopsy records at the Los Angeles County--University of Southern California Medical Center revealed 32 benign splenic cysts found incidentally at autopsy. Hemorrhage, infection, rupture, and rarely, malignant change are complications of splenic cysts. Splenectomy is recommended to eliminate the symptoms produced by the cyst and prevent the potential complications. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:637577

  2. Treatment of Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B.; Lung, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts are soft tissue swellings occurring most commonly in the hand or wrist. Apart from swelling, most cysts are asymptomatic. Other symptoms include pain, weakness, or paraesthesia. The two main concerns patients have are the cosmetic appearance of the cysts and the fear of future malignant growth. It has been shown that 58% of cysts will resolve spontaneously over time. Treatment can be either conservative or through surgical excision. This review concluded that nonsurgical treatment is largely ineffective in treating ganglion cysts. However, it advised to patients who do not surgical treatment but would like symptomatic relief. Compared to surgery, which has a lower recurrence rate but have a higher complication rate with longer recovery period. It has been shown that surgical interventions do not provide better symptomatic relief compared to conservative treatment. If symptomatic relief is the patient's primary concern, a conservative approach is preferred, whilst surgical intervention will decrease the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:24967120

  3. Surgical treatment of acute type-V acromioclavicular injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Verhaven, E; DeBoeck, H; Haentjens, P; Handelberg, F; Casteleyn, P P; Opdecam, P

    1993-01-01

    In a prospective study, 18 consecutive athletes with an acute type-V acromioclavicular sprain were treated with a coracoclavicular repair using a double velour Dacron graft. All patients were reviewed after a mean follow-up period of 6 years (range: 2-9 years). At follow-up, 12 patients (66.7%) showed a good or excellent result according to the Imatani evaluation system, and six patients (33.3%) demonstrated a fair or poor result according to the same system. Loss of reduction was encountered in eight shoulders (44.4%) despite an initial anatomical reduction. No correlation was seen between the overall scores at follow-up and the degree of residual dislocation, between the overall scores and the presence of coracoclavicular calcifications or ossifications, between the overall scores and the development of post-traumatic arthritic changes, or between the overall scores and the presence of osteolysis of the distal clavicle. PMID:8357696

  4. Oesophageal duplication cyst mimicking hydatid cyst in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Melih; Yildiz, Abdullah; Karadag, Cetin Ali; Sever, Nihat; Dokucu, Ali Ihsan

    2015-01-01

    The cystic appearance of both oesophageal duplications and pulmonary hydatid cysts can cause a misdiagnosis very easily due to rarity of cystic oesophageal duplications beside the higher incidence of hydatid cyst, especially in endemic areas. Here we report a 7-year-old girl with an oesophageal duplication cyst on the left side misdiagnosed as a hydatid cyst. The aim of the study is to report rare oesophageal duplications in the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic cysts. PMID:26702290

  5. Management of adult choledochal cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C S; Sawyers, J L; Reynolds, V H

    1981-01-01

    A review of the English literature reveals a total of 1,337 patients with choledochal cysts. Improved diagnostic techniques to visualize the biliary system are demonstrating an increasing number of unsuspected choledochal cysts in adult patients. Either choledochal cysts remain clinically silent until adulthood or may develop in later life. Experience is reported with adult patients having type I, II, III, and IV choledochal cysts. Type I cysts are preferably managed by excision but cyst anatomy may necessitate choledochoenteric drainage. Type II cysts are treated by excision except for those located within the pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. These are best managed by transduodenal cystoduodenostomy. The type III cyst (choledochocele) should be excised carefully, identifying and preserving the common bile and pancreatic ducts. Type IV cysts include a combination of any one of the first three types of cyst plus the presence of intrahepatic cyst or cysts. Treatment of these cysts is dictated by the type and location of the extrahepatic cyst. Since choledochal cysts are being recognized with increased frequency in adults, surgeons need to be aware of the diagnostic and treatment modalities available for each type of biliary cyst. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:7235770

  6. Surgical treatment of temporomandibular disorder in a 24-year-old male patient with ganglion cyst.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi Wei; Shao, Xia; Yang, Chi; Fang, Yi Ming

    2015-03-01

    Ganglion cysts are common pseudocystic masses, whereas those arising from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare entities. We report a case of ganglion cyst of the right TMJ with symptomatic bilateral TMJ internal derangement in a 24-year-old man. Disk repositioning using bone anchors and excision of the ganglion cyst were performed. A unique characteristic of inflammatory infiltrates was revealed in the specimen, and the relationship between these 2 distinct entities and probable pathogenesis of infectious involvement are discussed. PMID:25643336

  7. Tarlov Cyst and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Methods: Case report and literature review. Results: A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Conclusions: Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients. PMID:19569467

  8. [Intraventricular arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Rico-Cotelo, María; Diaz-Cabanas, Lucía; Allut, Alfredo G; Gelabert-Gonzalez, Miguel

    2013-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. Intracranial arachnoids cysts are considered benign developmental anomalies that occur within the arachnoid membrane and generally contain clear and colourless fluid resembling cerebrospinal fluid. The prevalence of these cysts is higher in the first two decades of life, and the incidence is widely quoted as approximately 1% of all space-occupying intracranial lesions. Arachnoids cysts in the elderly person are a rare occurrence. We report the unusual presentation of a woman with an intraventricular arachnoid cyst treated with endoscopic technique. CASE REPORT. A 75-year-old woman presented with progressive hemiparesis of two years duration. Cranial MR imaging showed a right parieto-occipital intraventricular cyst with local mass effect and moderate dilatation of lateral ventricles. A right-sided burr hole was made and the arachnoids cyst was reached and cysto-ventricle shunting was realized. This was followed by a septum pellucidum fenestration. There were no complications during the surgery and the patient presented no symptoms at time of discharge. CONCLUSIONS. The neuroendoscopic approach to intraventricular arachnoid cysts was effective with few complications. PMID:23799598

  9. Subparaneurial ganglion cysts of the fibular and tibial nerves: A new variant of intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Desy, Nicholas M; Howe, B Matthew; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, the mechanism of formation of intraneural ganglion cysts has been established through a meticulous review of clinical findings and correlation with patterns produced on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pathognomonic imaging patterns distinguish these rare lesions from the more common extraneural variants in almost all cases. In this report, we present a new pattern of cyst occurrence in the subparaneurial compartment of the nerve and provide potential anatomic explanations for its pathogenesis. Using an anatomic framework of connective tissue compartments of the nerve, we reviewed 63 (56 fibular and seven tibial) intraneural ganglion cysts in the knee region evaluated at our institution and all reports with MRI in the world's literature for evidence of cyst occurrence in the subparaneurial compartment. We identified six cases (five in the common fibular nerve and one in the tibial nerve) at our institution that had MR evidence of cyst in the subparaneurial compartment with a new complex lobulated pattern. All cases had articular branch connections to the superior tibiofibular joint, which at operation were resected along with the joints. Follow-up revealed complete recovery in all instances and no clinical or radiological signs of recurrence. Three cases out of 80 in the literature exhibited the new complex lobulated MRI pattern. We present a new pattern of intraneural ganglion cyst occurrence in a potential space that surrounds peripheral nerves- the subparaneurial compartment. We believe that the unifying articular theory applies to the pathogenesis and management of these rare variants. Clin. Anat. 29:530-537, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26599204

  10. Echinoccocal cyst affecting the mandible.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Nitin; Jadhav, Anendd; Borle, Rajiv; Shukla, Samarth

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a parasitic infection also called as hydatid disease or hydatidosis. Hydatidosis is a cyclo-zoonotic infection of the larvae form of Echinococcus granulosus (canine tapeworm). The majority of hydatid cysts are seen in the liver (65%) as most of the embryos are trapped within it. Infratemporal region is an unusual site for hydatidosis and has been sparsely reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth and perhaps the largest case report of hydatidosis involving the mandible in the literature in right infratemporal region involving the ramus condyle unit in a 35-year-old female with chief complaint of pain on right side of temporomandibular joint area on mastication, and opening and closing of mouth. PMID:26389049

  11. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... lobular) Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) Adenosis Fibroadenomas Phyllodes tumors Intraductal papillomas Granular cell tumors Fat necrosis ... caused by fibrosis and/or cysts, which are benign changes in breast tissue that happen in many ...

  12. Testicular epidermoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Çakıroglu, Basri; Sönmez, Nurettin Cem; Sinanoğlu, Orhun; Ateş, Lora; Aksoy, Süleyman Hilmi; Özcan, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cyst of the testis is a benign, non-teratomatous tumour. It is often possible to make the diagnosis pre-operatively, combining typical sonographic features with normal biochemical tumour markers. The accurate pre-operative diagnosis will allow for testis-sparing surgery and prevent unnecessary orchiectomy. An 11-year-old boy with testicular epidermoid cyst who presented with pain in testis was presented in this report. PMID:25659561

  13. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, MIA; Nor Hazla, MH; Suraya, A; Tan, SP

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an extremely rare case of a huge aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the pelvis, occurring in the patient’s 5th decade of life. The patient presented with a history of painless huge pelvic mass for 10 years. Plain radiograph and computed tomography showed huge expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed to profuse bleeding from the tumour. PMID:22279501

  14. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  15. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  16. [Choledochal cysts: surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Gogolja, D; Visnjić, S; Milić, Z; Tomić, K; Car, A; Roić, G; Fattorini, I

    2000-03-01

    The excision of the choledochal cyst with bile drainage through intestinal conduit is a standard operative procedure in the surgical management of choledochal cysts. During the last eight years five patients have been treated with this operation at the University Children's Hospital in Zagreb. All the patients were girls aged from two months to twelve years. The classical triad of pain, jaundice and abdominal mass was observed in only one patient, an eight-year-old girl. The only symptom in infancy was jaundice. Diagnosis was made by abdominal ultrasound, bibliography, CT scan with hepatotropic contrast and in older children by ERCP. Four cysts were type Todani I, and one cyst was Todani type II. The complete excision of the choledochal cyst with the Roux-Y jejunal conduit without antireflux valve was performed. There was neither operative morbidity nor mortality. Three months postoperatively the control ultrasonography and liver laboratory tests were without abnormalities. The routine control which followed did not show episodes of cholangitis, lithiasis, lipid malabsorption, blood clotting abnormalities or growth failure. The complete excision of the cyst with Roux-Y hepaticoenterostomy is an operative treatment with good results in infancy and childhood. PMID:10932533

  17. Supinator Cyst in a Young Female Softball Player Successfully Treated With Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Redler, Lauren H; Makhni, Eric C; Visco, Christopher J; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Ganglion cysts around the elbow joint are rare, with fewer than 25 citations in the English-language literature, most of them case reports. Among the many causes of elbow pain, cysts are primarily a diagnosis that depends on advanced imaging. When an elbow ganglion or perineural cyst is symptomatic, treatment has ranged from nonoperative to surgical intervention. Our case is unique because it is the first documented ultrasound-guided aspiration and cortisone injection that successfully alleviated a patient's symptoms. The procedures and outcomes of minimally invasive ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injections have not been described for cysts around the elbow. PMID:26161770

  18. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  19. Choledochal cysts: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Popova-Jovanovska, R; Genadieva-Dimitrova, M; Trajkovska, M; Serafimoski, V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show the different diagnostic procedures and treatment in patients diagnosed with congenital choledochal cysts. Choledochal cysts are congenital anomalies of the bile ducts and include cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic and intrahepatic biliary ducts or both. The study shows ten patients diagnosed as having choledochal cysts. Diagnosis was established by clinical and radiographic findings including: ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatograpy (MRCP), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and cytological examination of the bile juice. In the study choledochal cysts were classified according to the Todani classification. Most common cysts were type I (six cases); type III (one case), type IVa (one case) and two patients were type V cysts (Caroli disease). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, jaundice and cholangitis. US findings were sensitive for the preliminary diagnosis of choledochal cysts in all the patients. MRCP accurately defined the cyst anatomy and the site of the biliary origin in all the cases with extrahepatic cysts. In three cases ERCP clearly demonstrated the cyst and by PTC smaller cysts were well defined. Cytological examination of the bile juice obtained during the PTC procedure showed malignant cells in one case. Therefore pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and pathological examination showed associated cholangiocarcinoma. Five years after the operation the patient was well and free of the disease. Five patients underwent surgical treatment with a total cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy while the surgical approach in two patients was partial cyst excision and cystojejunostomy. Patients with Caroli disease were conservatively treated and 3 with interventional endoscopic procedures. Despite US evidence suggesting choledochal cyst diagnosis, other supportive radiographic imaging modalities such as MRCP, ERCP and

  20. A Rare Presentation of Ganglion Cyst of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Kapoor, Chirag; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ganglion cysts are benign soft tissue swellings commonly found in the wrist. The presence of these cysts in the elbow is uncommon, and few case reports have been reported for this condition at this location. These lesions can compress on the neighbouring structures or cause restriction of the joint movement. The awareness of this entity is a must, to arrive at an early diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHOD: We report a patient with swelling in the anterolateral aspect of the elbow which had been causing intermittent pain for the last 13 months. The MRI revealed a fluid-filled cystic swelling which was communicating with the radio-capitellar joint. RESULTS: The lesion was excised in toto, using anterolateral approach for the elbow, and sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglion cyst. CONCLUSION: Thus, due to the infrequent presentation, an awareness of this condition is necessary to prevent a delay in diagnosis and its subsequent management. PMID:27493847

  1. Large lateral meniscal ganglion cyst extending into the intercondylar fossa of the knee.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Alwin; Eberhardt, Christian; Hailer, Nils P

    2004-07-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old, otherwise healthy man with a large intra-articular meniscal ganglion cyst (27.7 x 13.5 mm) originating from the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus. Clinically, the patient presented with knee pain in a squatting position. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large intra-articular cyst in the posterior compartment. At arthroscopic surgery, the ganglion cyst was found in the intercondylar space posteriorly to the posterior cruciate ligament. After removal of the ganglion cyst, a horizontal tear in the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus was revealed and treated by partial meniscectomy. To our knowledge, a meniscal ganglion cyst originating from the lateral meniscus and extending into the joint is an extremely rare event, with only two previous reported cases. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis, distribution, and treatment of meniscal ganglion cysts. PMID:15243414

  2. Hypertonic Dextrose Injection for The Treatment of a Baker’s Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Sibel; Balaban, Birol

    2016-01-01

    We present extremely rare and interesting case of a Baker’s cyst treated with hypertonic dextrose injection. A 54-year-old female patient had a Baker’s cyst which was diagnosed by an ultrasonography. After the failure of the two-weekly conservative treatment, we injected hypertonic dextrose (25%) into her right knee joint for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst. Two weeks after the injection, the patient reported improvement in posterior knee pain, and an US showed a resolution of the posterior knee cyst. Certainly hypertonic dextrose injection for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst appears to be a reasonable treatment option. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the efficacy of hypertonic dextrose injection in the treatment of Baker’s cysts. PMID:27042572

  3. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous Topic Granular cell tumors Next Topic Mastitis Fat necrosis and oil cysts Fat necrosis happens when ... lumpy area if it becomes bothersome. How do fat necrosis and oil cysts affect your risk for ...

  4. Thyroglossal cyst: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Subhamay; Saha, A M; Mukherjee, Dhrubyajyoti

    2013-07-01

    To highlight the difference in symptoms, clinical features and management of an intralingual thyroglossal cyst from a classical thyroglossal cyst. We present here the case of a 10 year old boy, who presented to us with the chief complaint of difficulty in speech for 2 years. A marble shaped swelling was seen on the base of the tongue. It was diagnosed as an intralingual thyroglossal cyst. He underwent a Sistrunk operation and the cyst was removed from the base of the tongue. Literature search revealed the rarity of this intralingual thyroglossal cyst, its atypical presentation and difference in way of management. A case report and review of literature regarding this unusual unusual entity is presented. An intralingual thyroglossal cyst is the rarest form of a thyroglossal cyst, and differs from a classical thyroglossal cyst totally in presentation and management. PMID:24427642

  5. Concurrent Lateral Dorsal Cutaneous and Deep Peroneal Intraneural Ganglion Cysts in the Foot.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Amrami, Kimberly K; Jentoft, Mark E; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are non-neoplastic collections of mucinous material within the epineurium of peripheral nerves. We present a rare case of 2 intraneural ganglion cysts in separate nerves of the foot, originating from different joints within the same joint complex. Our findings add to the large body of evidence supporting the unifying articular (synovial) theory. We emphasize the importance of delineating the cyst morphology and origins using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging before surgery and searching for and resecting the articular branch or branches during surgery. PMID:25979292

  6. Coracoclavicular joint, an osteological study with clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakas, Marios-Efstathios; Stoltidou, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The presence of an anomalous coracoclavicular joint was studied in a human male skeleton aged 73 years old from the Osteology Collection of our Department. Case presentation We describe the exact morphology of this variation that is occasionally reported as an anatomical or radiological curiosity in the literature (0.55-21%). Conclusion Although coracoclavicular diarthrosis is of no significance other than academic, it is important to recognize this variation and the clinical symptoms that may occur, as it is a cause of shoulder pain and arthritis in this or the adjacent sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint. Consequently, it is vital to apply the appropriate treatment. PMID:19918399

  7. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone

    PubMed Central

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  9. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone.

    PubMed

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications. PMID:26697314

  10. Colloid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grasu, Beatrice L; Alberico, Anthony M

    2011-01-01

    Colloid cysts are a rare clinical finding with a unique clinical presentation: non-specific paroxysmal headaches. The current recommended treatment is microsurgery, which poses the greatest risk to the patient but allows complete removal of the cyst to prevent recurrence. A 41-year old man presented with a colloid cyst located in the foramen of Monro causing obstructive hydrocephalus. He had paroxysmal headaches and memory and personality changes. Transcortical transventricle microsurgery was performed to remove the entire cyst. A temporary shunt was placed to prevent post-operative hydrocephalus. Normal neurological function returned upon cyst removal. PMID:22034805

  11. Angiomyolipoma With Epithelial Cysts.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michael A; Rao, Priya

    2016-06-01

    Angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the kidney that enters in the differential diagnosis of adult cystic renal neoplasms. These tumors demonstrate a slight female predominance and can present either incidentally or with symptoms, commonly flank pain and hematuria. Unlike conventional angiomyolipoma, this variant is characterized grossly by both solid and cystic areas, and histologically by the presence of single or multiple cysts lined by epithelial cells, a subepithelial "cambium-like" layer of small stromal cells with a prominent capillary vasculature, and a thick exterior wall composed of poorly formed fascicles of smooth muscle and thick-walled dysplastic blood vessels. Tumors show a distinct immunohistochemical profile and are often reactive for melanocytic markers (HMB-45 and Melan-A), as well as estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. These tumors have an indolent clinical course, with no reports of progression or metastasis in reported cases thus far. PMID:27232352

  12. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    PubMed

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings. PMID:25866380

  13. Intrasphenoidal rathke cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Megdiche-Bazarbacha, H; Ben Hammouda, K; Aicha, A B; Sebai, R; Belghith, L; Khaldi, M; Touibi, S

    2006-05-01

    Symptomatic Rathke cleft cysts (RCC) are reported in the sellar and suprasellar regions, but no case of sphenoidal RCC has been reported. We report a case of sphenoidal RCC in a 41-year-old man. The lesion was revealed by headaches and diplopia. Symptoms disappeared transiently after a spontaneous rhinorrhea but relapsed 4 months later. MR imaging showed a cystic sphenoidal lesion, isointense on T1-weighted images (WI) with peripheral gadolinium enhancement and hyperintense on T2 WI. The patient underwent surgery through a transrhinoseptal approach. The wall of the sphenoid sinus was paper-thin. The cyst contained a motor-oil-like fluid and communicated widely with the nasal fossa. Its wall was partially extracted. Symptoms and signs ceased after surgery. MR imaging performed 1 year later showed the disappearance of the sphenoidal cyst. Embryological origin of RCCs is discussed. The hypothesis of a continuum between the different epithelial cystic lesions of the sellar and parasellar region is discussed. Imaging has an important impact on the diagnosis; nevertheless, the specific characterization remains difficult. PMID:16687551

  14. Conjunctival cysts in anophthalmic orbits.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, T J; Koornneef, L; Zonneveld, F W

    1991-01-01

    Five out of 149 patients (3%) who received an intraorbital implant to prevent or treat the disfiguring symptoms associated with the postenucleation socket syndrome developed intraorbital conjunctival cysts. All five patients had received a secondary implant two 14 months previously. After excision of the cysts four patients required additional surgery for lack of conjunctiva and/or recurrent cyst formation. The clinical findings, mechanism of development, and management of this rare but serious complication of socket surgery are described. Images PMID:2043576

  15. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  16. [Perineural cysts causing severe back pain and pathological fracture of the massa lateralis of the sacrum].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, C; Spies, C K G; Maus, U; Mumme, T; Ohnsorge, J A K

    2009-01-01

    We report on the case of an 81-year-old woman who was hospitalised because of severe pain at the sacro-iliacal joint radiating into the left leg without any accompanying neurological defect. X-rays demonstrated a step in the left massa lateralis of the sacrum, thus CT scans and MRI were performed, and multiple perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) were found. The patient underwent microsurgical treatment by fenestration of the cyst wall and evacuation of the fluid content in order to avoid further expansion of the cysts. Under consequent treatment with pain killers, complete mobilisation of the patient could be achieved. Ambulant follow-up by clinical controls and X-rays demonstrated a substantial resolution of the patient's preoperative symptoms. Symptomatic perineural cysts should be included into differential diagnosis of severe low back pain, thus CT or MRI scans should be performed in case of long-lasting or intrackable pain. PMID:19263313

  17. Ganglion cyst of the cervical spine presenting with Brown-Sequard syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Yu; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Wen, Mei-Chin

    2006-12-01

    Ganglion cysts of the spine are uncommon. They occur mostly in the dorsolateral trunk and arise with the greatest frequency in the lumbar spine. However, they are rarely symptomatic. We report a rare case of a patient with a ganglion cyst of the lower cervical spine presenting with acute Brown-Sequard syndrome. The patient had no history of trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a cystic lesion connecting to the synovial joint C6-7 and compressing the posterior aspect of the spinal cord. The patient underwent emergent C6-7 laminectomy with total removal of the cyst. Neurological function recovered completely 4 months after operation. Ganglion cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural mass of the cervical spine. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a rapid and correct diagnosis, and laminectomy with removal of the cyst results in good neurological recovery. PMID:17113987

  18. An Unusual Case of Acl Cyst with Multiple Melon Seed Bodies of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Abhishek; Sancheti, Parag; Vaishya, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The cyst of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a known clinical entity, but its association with knee synovitis and melon or rice bodies is not documented. Case Report: We report a rare case of ganglionic cyst of of the knee in association with diffuse synovitis and multiple melon or rice bodies in a 36 year old male. The case was treated arthroscopically with removal ofthe cyst of ACL and multiple melon seed bodies. Conclusion: Information regarding incidence, treatment, and outcomes for patients with synovial cysts and melon seed bodies is lacking. Arthroscopic examination of joint gives the opportunity to diagnose such rare entity of the joint and also provide minimally invasive effective treatment of such pathology. PMID:27299116

  19. Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts (MLC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... new treatments for the disease. Are there other names for Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with subcortical Cysts (MLC)? Other names for Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with subcortical Cysts (MLC) include: ...

  20. Synovial excrescences and cysts of the spine: clinicopathological features and contributions to spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sze, C I; Kindt, G; Huffer, W B; Chang, M; Wang, M; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    2004-01-01

    Synovial cysts occur throughout the body and are generally benign lesions with limited clinical consequences. Juxtafacet cysts of the spine, in contrast, often press on a nerve root as it exits in the foramen, causing radiculopathy. Synovial tissue that emanates from the facet joint but extends medially, is an additional important cause of spinal stenosis. Over the past 5 years, neurosurgeons at our institution have operated on a large number of patients with back pain, with removal of abnormal synovial tissues. Histological examination of these tissues distinguishes the different types of pathologic processes responsible for producing symptoms. Juxtafacet cysts may be either mucin-filled ganglion cysts devoid of cyst lining or true synovial cysts with watery content and lined by synovial cells. Ganglion cysts arise in degenerated ligament at the facet joint, and occasionally within synovial stroma. Synovial cysts arise within synovium and, unlike synovial cysts in the extremities, have a thick wall containing granulation tissue, numerous histiocytes and giant cells. This hyperplastic, irritated synovium of the spine, which we term "synovial excrescences", is voluminous and this reactive part overshadows the cystic portion of the lesion in most instances. Iron pigment deposition and inflammation are mild to absent, making synovial excrescences different from pigmented villonodular synovitis. Synovial excrescences of the spine are an important cause of spinal stenosis, predominantly in elderly patients. Surgical removal of excrescences protruding into the spinal canal provides prompt and durable relief of symptoms, usually without the need for extensive bony laminectomy or spinal fusion. Several patients in our study had both spinal ganglion cysts and synovial excrescences, suggesting common risk factors for both lesions. PMID:15074582

  1. Recurrent intraneural ganglion cysts: Pathoanatomic patterns and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Desy, Nicholas M; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Tanaka, Shota; Amrami, Kimberly K; Rock, Michael G; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    The etiology of intraneural ganglion cysts has been poorly understood. This has resulted in the development of multiple surgical treatment strategies and a high recurrence rate. We sought to analyze these recurrences in order to provide a pathoanatomic explanation and staging classification for intraneural cyst recurrence. An expanded literature search was performed to identify frequencies and patterns in cases of intraneural ganglion cyst recurrences following primary surgery. Two univariate analyses were completed to identify associations between the type of revision surgery and repeat cyst recurrences. The expanded literature search found an 11% recurrence rate following primary surgery, including 64 recurrences following isolated cyst decompression (Group 1); six after articular branch resection (Group 2); and none following surgical procedures that addressed the joint (Group 3). Eight cases did not specify the type of primary surgery. In group 1, forty-eight of the recurrences (75%) were in the parent nerve, three involved only the articular branch, and one travelled along the articular branch in a different distal direction without involving the main parent nerve. In group 2, only one case (17%) recurred/persisted within the parent nerve, one recurred within a persistent articular branch, and one formed within a persistent articular branch and travelled in a different distal direction. Intraneural recurrences most commonly occur following surgical procedures that only target the main parent nerve. We provide proven or theoretical explanations for all identified cases of intraneural recurrences for an occult or persistent articular branch pathway. PMID:26296291

  2. Neurenteric cysts of the spine.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jesse J; Casey, James N; McNeill, Ian T; Sherman, Jonathan H

    2010-01-01

    Neurenteric cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. These rare lesions result from the inappropriate partitioning of the embryonic notochordal plate and presumptive endoderm during the third week of human development. Heterotopic rests of epithelium reminiscent of gastrointestinal and respiratory tissue lead to eventual formation of compressive cystic lesions of the pediatric and adult spine. Histopathological analysis of neurenteric tissue reveals a highly characteristic structure of columnar or cuboidal epithelium with or without cilia and mucus globules. Patients with symptomatic neurenteric cysts typically present in the second and third decades of life with size-dependent myelopathic and/or radicular signs. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are essential diagnostic tools for the delineation of cyst form and overlying osseous architecture. A variety of approaches have been employed in the treatment of neurenteric cysts each with a goal of total surgical resection. Although long-term outcome analyses are limited, data available indicate that surgical intervention in the case of neurenteric cysts results in a high frequency of resolution of neurological deficit with minimal morbidity. However, recurrence rates as high as 37% have been reported with incomplete resection secondary to factors such as cyst adhesion to surrounding structure and unclear dissection planes. Here we present a systematic review of English language literature from January 1966 to December 2009 utilizing MEDLINE with the following search terminology: neurenteric cyst, enterogenous cyst, spinal cord tumor, spinal dysraphism, intraspinal cyst, intramedullary cyst, and intradural cyst. In addition, the references of publications returned from the MEDLINE search criteria were surveyed in order to examine other pertinent reports. PMID:20890417

  3. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma. PMID:26550597

  4. Large Osteoarthritic Cyst Presenting as Soft Tissue Tumour – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kosuge, DD; Park, DH; Cannon, SR; Briggs, TW; Pollock, RC; Skinner, JA

    2007-01-01

    Large osteoarthritic cysts can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from primary osseous and soft tissue tumours. We present such a case involving a cyst arising from the hip joint and eroding the acetabulum which presented as a soft tissue malignancy referred to a tertiary bone and soft tissue tumour centre. We discuss the diagnostic problems it may pose, and present a literature review of the subject. PMID:17535605

  5. Arachnoid cyst slit valves: the mechanism for arachnoid cyst enlargement.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Safain, Mina G; Heilman, Carl B

    2013-07-01

    Arachnoid cysts are common, accounting for approximately 1% of intracranial mass lesions. Most are congenital, clinically silent, and remain static in size. Occasionally, they increase in size and produce symptoms due to mass effect or obstruction. The mechanism of enlargement of arachnoid cysts is controversial. One-way slit valves are often hypothesized as the mechanism for enlargement. The authors present 4 cases of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts in which a slit valve was identified. The patients presented with hydrocephalus due to enlargement of the cyst. The valve was located in the arachnoid wall of the cyst directly over the basilar artery. The authors believe this slit valve was responsible for the net influx of CSF into the cyst and for its enlargement. They also present 1 case of an arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa that had a small circular opening but lacked a slit valve. This cyst did not enlarge but surgery was required because of rupture and the development of a subdural hygroma. One-way slit valves exist and are a possible mechanism of enlargement of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts. The valve was located directly over the basilar artery in each of these cases. Caudad-to-cephalad CSF flow during the cardiac cycle increased the opening of the valve, whereas cephalad-to-caudad CSF flow during the remainder of the cardiac cycle pushed the slit opening against the basilar artery and decreased the size of the opening. Arachnoid cysts that communicate CSF via circular, nonslit valves are probably more likely to remain stable. PMID:23662935

  6. Bakers Cyst with Synovial Chondromatosis of Knee - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Daivesh P; Diwakar, Manish; Dargar, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare intraarticular benign condition arising from the synovial membrane of the joints, synovial sheaths or bursae around the joints. Primary synovial chondromatosis typically affects the large joints in the third to fifth decade of life, although involvement of smaller joints and presentation in younger age group is also documented. The purpose of this case report is to document this rare extra articular synovial pathology present inside the baker’s cyst which required open synovectomy and debridement to eradicate it. Case Report: A 43 yearold male presented with a two year history of pain, swelling and restriction of right knee joint. After the clinical and radiological assessment, open synovectomy, removal of cyst and thorough joint debridement procedure was performed. Histopathological study confirmed the findings of synovial chondromatosis. Conclusion: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition. Complete synovectomy offers reliable cure rate. PMID:27299117

  7. Cerebral arachnoid cysts in children

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M. J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The case histories of 14 children are described in which hydrocephalus was found on investigation to be associated with a cyst of the posterior fossa or subarachnoid cisterns. The neuroradiological and histological findings are described. The cysts are considered to be developmental in origin. Their recognition and management are discussed. Images PMID:5315217

  8. Epidermal and urethroid penile cyst.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A L; Dutoit, M; Boucheron, S

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe a 74-year-old man who presented with a 2-cm nodule on the ventral face of the penis, showing histologically a cyst lined by both epidermal and urethroid epithelium. The authors discuss the various histological forms of raphe median cysts of the penis. PMID:1676220

  9. Epidermal cyst of median raphe.

    PubMed

    LaNasa, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cysts of the penis are rare and references to them in standard textbooks are sketchy. A case report of a congenital epidermal cyst of the median raphe of the penis is presented; therapy involved excision of the mass. Review of the literature is given. PMID:973298

  10. Cervical Synovial Cyst Causing Cervical Radiculomyelopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corredor, José A; Quan, Gerald

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Synovial cysts in the subaxial cervical spine are rare and are most commonly reported at the cervicothoracic junction. Only six cases of symptomatic C5-C6 synovial cysts have been reported in the literature; the condition is usually treated with decompressive laminectomy. We present a patient with a synovial cyst arising from the C5-C6 facet joint, associated with spondylolisthesis, and causing radiculomyelopathy. The patient was treated with a posterior excision of the cyst, decompressive laminectomy, and fusion. Methods A 67-year-old man had vertebral canal stenosis at C5-C6 secondary to a synovial cyst and spondylolisthesis with symptoms and signs of radiculopathy and myelopathy. Surgical management involved C5-C6 posterior decompressive laminectomy and excision of the cyst and C4-C6 instrumented fusion with lateral mass screws and rods. A literature review of symptomatic cervical synovial cysts is presented. Results The imaging studies identified grade I spondylolisthesis and a 3.3 × 4.3-mm extradural lentiform-like mass associated with focal compression of the spinal cord and exiting the C6 nerve root. After the surgery, the patient had an immediate full recovery and was asymptomatic by the 6-month examination. No operative complications were reported. The histologic report confirmed the presence of a synovial cyst. Conclusions C5-C6 is an unusual localization for symptomatic synovial cysts. Similar cases reported in the literature achieved excellent results after cyst excision and decompressive laminectomy. Because spondylolisthesis plus laminectomy are risk factors for segmental instability in the cervical spine, we report a case of a C5-C6 facet synovial cyst successfully treated with posterior laminectomy and C4-C6 fusion. PMID:26225291

  11. Cervical Synovial Cyst Causing Cervical Radiculomyelopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, José A.; Quan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Synovial cysts in the subaxial cervical spine are rare and are most commonly reported at the cervicothoracic junction. Only six cases of symptomatic C5–C6 synovial cysts have been reported in the literature; the condition is usually treated with decompressive laminectomy. We present a patient with a synovial cyst arising from the C5–C6 facet joint, associated with spondylolisthesis, and causing radiculomyelopathy. The patient was treated with a posterior excision of the cyst, decompressive laminectomy, and fusion. Methods A 67-year-old man had vertebral canal stenosis at C5–C6 secondary to a synovial cyst and spondylolisthesis with symptoms and signs of radiculopathy and myelopathy. Surgical management involved C5–C6 posterior decompressive laminectomy and excision of the cyst and C4–C6 instrumented fusion with lateral mass screws and rods. A literature review of symptomatic cervical synovial cysts is presented. Results The imaging studies identified grade I spondylolisthesis and a 3.3 × 4.3-mm extradural lentiform-like mass associated with focal compression of the spinal cord and exiting the C6 nerve root. After the surgery, the patient had an immediate full recovery and was asymptomatic by the 6-month examination. No operative complications were reported. The histologic report confirmed the presence of a synovial cyst. Conclusions C5–C6 is an unusual localization for symptomatic synovial cysts. Similar cases reported in the literature achieved excellent results after cyst excision and decompressive laminectomy. Because spondylolisthesis plus laminectomy are risk factors for segmental instability in the cervical spine, we report a case of a C5–C6 facet synovial cyst successfully treated with posterior laminectomy and C4–C6 fusion. PMID:26225291

  12. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  13. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Gana, R; Skhissi, M; Maaqili, R; Bellakhdar, F

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual patient with multiple infected cerebral hydatid cysts. A 20-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of headache and progressive left-sided hempiparesis. A cerebral CT scan showed a large and heterogeneous parieto-occipital lesion. During surgery an infected hydatid cyst was discovered with multiple daughter vesicles. Post-operatively the patient was treated with albendazol, cefotaxime and metronidazole. The clinical course was good with total recovery of the hemiparesis. A follow-up CT scan showed persistence of some small deep-seated cysts. Multiple infected cerebral hydatid cyst is uncommon and can be confused with other cystic brain lesions. The aim of surgery is to remove the cyst unruptured and this should be followed by antihelminthic and antibiotic treatment in order to avoid recurrences. PMID:18342511

  14. Hemorrhagic Synovial Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Atlantoaxial Subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jae Jon; Seo, Dong Kwang; Choi, Seung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cyst on prevertebral space of C1-2 joint is rare but may be associated hemorrhagic event. We describe a case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with sudden severe headache in her left occipital area with dyspnea. She had rheumatoid arthritis for 14-years. Large hemorrhagic cystic mass was seen around prevertebral space of the atlantoaxial joint on the left side on cervical MRI (magnetic resonance image) and it obstructed the nasopharyngeal cavity. Aspiration of the cystic lesion was performed via transoral approach, followed by posterior occipito-cervical fusion. The specimen was xanthochromic, suggesting old hemorrhage. The patient was tolerable on her postoperative course and showed good respiration and relieved headache. We suggest that repeated microtrauma due to atalantoaxial subluxation associated with rheumatoid arthritis as a main cause of hemorrhagic event on the cyst. PMID:24757465

  15. Sacral perineural cyst mimicking inflammatory low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, P

    2015-02-01

    This case describes a 46-year-old woman with local pelvic and perineal pain, persisting for 2 years at presentation. The pain worsened during the night and morning and was alleviated during daily activities. Low back pain was associated with morning stiffness lasting longer than 2 h. Sometimes, she felt pain and numbness along her left S1 dermatome, without overt bladder or bowel incontinence. Lasegue's sign was negative. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were elevated (35 mm/h and 9.4, respectively) and Mennel's sign was present on both sides, indicating possible inflammation of the sacroiliac joints. However, radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large spinal meningeal cyst in the sacrum (60 × 37 × 22 mm) consisting of multiple perineural cysts. The cyst eroded the surrounding sacral bone structures, narrowed several sacral foramina, and compressed neighboring nerve fibers. MRI findings on sacroiliac and hip joints were normal. PMID:25315123

  16. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi; Kannan, Narayanasamy Subbaraju

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  17. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  18. When should the external approach be resorted to in the arthroscopic treatment of perimeniscal cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Bombaci, Hasan; Kuyumcu, Mehmet; Coskun, Tamer; Kaya, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Meniscal cysts very often cause meniscal tears and especially when it is peripheral, some of the healthy parts of meniscus might be needlessly sacrificed. In particular conditions, extraarticular approaches might save some menisci. In the present study, we evaluated the conditions which required using the extraarticular approach in addition to the arthroscopic procedure, to maximally preserve the meniscus. Methods: Eight patients with perimeniscal cysts were evaluated retrospectively. One cyst was localized within the medial meniscus and seven in the lateral meniscus. The mean age was 36.13 (range; 19–63) years, mean follow-up time, 27.3 (range; 12–47) months. Patients were evaluated by using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS) to measure pain relief and “Lysholm score” to measure functional improvement. In all patients except one, in which the cystic cavity was connected with the joint at the periphery of the meniscus, the cyst was drained from the intraarticular opening. When the cyst was too large (three cases) and in one case where a large amount of meniscus was preserved for reasons mentioned above, additional extraarticular drainage was carried out. Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS were 6 (range; 2–8) and 1.55 (range; 0–3) (p = 0.00058) and Lysholm scores were 64.75 (range; 48–86) and 93.11 (range; 80–100) (p = 0.0014), respectively. Discussion: In cysts, which have very limited or no connection with the joint on the most peripheral region of the meniscus and/or are larger than the meniscus height, extraarticular drainage of the cyst might produce unnecessary meniscal loss and function. In the extraarticular drainage, scrapping the walls of the cyst, while inspecting with an arthroscope, reduces recurrence of the cyst. PMID:27163108

  19. Artemia cyst production in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Liudmila I.; Litvinenko, Aleksandr I.; Boiko, Elena G.; Kutsanov, Kirill

    2015-11-01

    In Western Siberia (Russia) there are about 100 Artemia lakes with total area over 1 600 km2. Geographically these lakes are located between 51°-56°N and 61°-82°E. In general these lakes are shallow (depth less than 1.5 m), small or medium size (0.1 to 10 km2); they are chloride; their total salinity is from 40 to 250 g/L. The harvesting of cysts per year is only in 20-40 lakes. In Russia 550 tons of dry Artemia cysts (14%-18% of the world production) were harvested annually. This includes about 350 tons in the Altai region and 200 tons in other regions. During our regular 20-year study period the cyst harvest was: 95 tons in Kurgan; 65 tons in Omsk, 20 tons in Novosibirsk, 20 tons in Tyumen. Ways of increasing cyst harvest in Russia are considered in this article. During the last 30 years the harvest of cysts in Russia has increased from 7-20 to 500-600 tons. A significant influence of dryness of the year was found on productivity in selected lakes, but taken for all the lakes together, the relationship was not significant. The optimal salinity for productivity of cysts in the lakes was determined. Analysis of productivity of the lakes and the harvesting results showed that the stocks of cysts are underutilized by approximately 1.7 times.

  20. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of bone cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, F M; Algra, P R; Maas, M; Dijkstra, P F; Falke, T H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the contents of intraosseous cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the signal intensity characteristics on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS--The hand or foot joints of nine patients with the cystic form of RA (where the initial radiological abnormality consisted of intraosseous cysts without erosions) were imaged before and after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. A 0.6 unit, T1 weighted spin echo and T2* weighted gradient echo were used to obtain images in at least two perpendicular planes. RESULTS--Most cysts showed a low signal intensity on the non-enhanced T1 weighted (spin echo) images and a high signal intensity on the T2* weighted (gradient echo) images, consistent with a fluid content. No cyst showed an enhancement of signal intensity on the T1 weighted images after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA, whereas synovium hyperplasia at the site of bony erosions did show an increased signal intensity after Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging detected more cysts (as small as 2 mm) than plain films, and the cysts were located truly intraosseously. In six patients no other joint abnormalities were identified by magnetic resonance imaging; the three other patients also showed, after Gd-DTPA administration, an enhanced synovium at the site of bony erosions. CONCLUSIONS--It is suggested that intraosseous bone cysts in patients with RA do not contain hyperaemic synovial proliferation. The bone cysts in patients with the cystic form of RA may be the only joint abnormality. Images PMID:8257207

  1. Ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C A; Rockwell, W B

    1999-08-01

    Ganglion cysts-the most common hand tumors-usually affect women in their twenties and thirties. The cause of these cysts is unknown, although trauma has been postulated as an inciting factor. Ganglions occur most commonly at the dorsal and palmar wrist. However, ganglions of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint are rare. Four patients with PIP joint ganglions were recently treated at our institution. Three received aspiration and one received operative therapy, all with good results. All four patients were older than 65 years. PMID:10470671

  2. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    PubMed

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  3. [Tarlov cyst and symptomatic bladder disfuction].

    PubMed

    Ruibal Moldes, M; Sánchez Rodríguez-Losada, J; López García, D; Casas Agudo, V; Janeiro País, J M; González Martín, M

    2008-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or perineural cyst are lesions of the nerve roots located at the sacral level and uncertain aetiology. Most of these cysts remain asymptomatic with no clinical relevance. The symptomatic cysts are uncommon and the usual symptoms are pain or radiculopathy. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman witha symptomatic cyst (with a history of frequency and urgency syndrom), that disappears after surgery. PMID:19143297

  4. [Microsurgical treatment of intracraneal arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Saura Rojas, J Enrique; Horcajadas Almansa, Ángel; Ros López, Bienvenido

    2016-01-01

    Craniotomy and fenestration of membranes is one of the main treatment options for symptomatic arachnoid cysts. Open surgery advantages include, direct inspection of the cyst, biopsy sampling, fenestration in multilocular cysts and, in certain locations, cyst communication to basal cisterns. The aim of this paper is to review the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment modality for arachnoid cysts taking into account the different anatomical locations. PMID:25891259

  5. Nasopalatine canal cyst: often missed

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Neeta; Agarwal, Rashmi; Pandey, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Nasopalatine canal cyst may occur within the nasopalatine canal or in the soft tissues of the palate, at the opening of the canal, where it is called the ‘cyst of the palatine papilla’. These are normally asymptomatic, constituting casual radiological findings. We present a case report of a male patient with infected nasopalatine canal cyst seen clinically as swelling over palate. Radiographic interpretation should be thoroughly performed for maxillary anterior region and any occlusal radiograph in routine radiography to screen this entity and must be distinguished from other maxillary anterior radiolucencies by the clinician. PMID:23536642

  6. [Neurosurgical aspects of arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Maier, F; Steube, D; Hamm, K D

    1986-01-01

    After an analysis of the patients treated in the last five years, a report is given on 9 cases of arachnoid cysts as a rare form of intracranial space occupation. The etiology of the arachnoid cysts has not been fully cleared up yet, but the semipermeability of the cyst membrane appears to be an important pathogenetic factor. Today, the diagnosis of the disease is verified by CT techniques. In case of the occurrence of clinical symptoms the treatment should always be carried out in the form of an operation. PMID:3564765

  7. Choroid plexus cysts and aneuploidy.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, D; Yankowitz, J

    1998-01-01

    The association of choroid plexus cysts with fetal aneuploidy, particularly trisomy 18, was first noted in 1986. Through the years there have been numerous reports on this subject, but no consensus has been reached with regard to chromosomal risk. In this review, we attempt to summarise published reports on second trimester choroid plexus cysts, with an emphasis on the strengths and weaknesses of each report. Based on these reports, additional malformations are a significant risk factor for aneuploidy and an indication for determination of fetal karyotype. The management of isolated choroid plexus cysts remains controversial. PMID:9678699

  8. Splenic hydatid cyst attacking retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Bülent; Uçtum, Yalım; Kutanış, Rıza

    2010-01-01

    Hydatid disease most commonly affects the liver and lungs but no organ is immune. Splenic hydatid cyst is a rare clinical entity. Although the patients are usually asymptomatic, the disease may present with secondary infection, adhesion to adjacent organs with fistulisation or rupture into abdominal cavity. We present a 67 year old women with splenic hydatid cyst. Severe adhesions and tumorlike growth were found in the retroperitoneal region. To our knowledge, retroperitoneal invasion with a splenic hydatid cyst is a very rare clinical condition. Total splenectomy was performed without complication. PMID:21391192

  9. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  10. Renal hydatid cyst treatment: retroperitoneoscopic "closed cyst" pericystectomy.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ender; Bostanci, Yakup; Mercimek, Mehmet Necmettin; Yakupoglu, Yarkin Kamil; Yilmaz, Ali Faik; Sarıkaya, Saban

    2011-03-01

    Cystic hydatid disease is an endemic disease caused by the larval form of Echinococcus spp. Isolated renal involvement is extremely rare. The treatment methods for renal hydatid disease require some form of intervention, ranging from traditional open techniques to laparoscopic techniques. Herein, we present a large hydatid cyst in the lower pole of the left kidney in a 43-year-old male patient who was treated by the "closed cyst" method via the retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach to prevent soiling of the peritoneal cavity. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a renal hydatid cyst treated by preserving the renal parenchyma by pericystectomy via the retroperitoneoscopic laparoscopic approach in an adult patient. No complications occurred during the perioperative and postoperative periods. After 9 months of follow up, the patient was asymptomatic with no evidence of clinical recurrence. Retroperitoneoscopic laparoscopic closed cyst pericystectomy can be an alternative minimally invasive treatment technique for the treatment of renal hydatid disease. PMID:21226768

  11. Aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Timothy B; Ward, James P; Alaia, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are rare skeletal tumors that most commonly occur in the first two decades of life. They primarily develop about the knee but may arise in any portion of the axial or appendicular skeleton. Pathogenesis of these tumors remains controversial and may be vascular, traumatic, or genetic. Radiographic features include a dilated, radiolucent lesion typically located within the metaphyseal portion of the bone, with fluid-fluid levels visible on MRI. Histologic features include blood-filled lakes interposed between fibrous stromata. Differential diagnosis includes conditions such as telangiectatic osteosarcoma and giant cell tumor. The mainstay of treatment is curettage and bone graft, with or without adjuvant treatment. Other management options include cryotherapy, sclerotherapy, radionuclide ablation, and en bloc resection. The recurrence rate is low after appropriate treatment; however, more than one procedure may be required to completely eradicate the lesion. PMID:22474093

  12. [Cilia and renal cysts].

    PubMed

    Paces-Fessy, Mélanie

    2014-11-01

    Advances in genomics, bioinformatics and the creation of model organisms have identified many genes associated with polycystic kidney diseases. Historically, these genes were not necessarily associated with ciliopathies, but it appeared that many connections can be made between the cystic kidney disease and function of the primary cilium. Indeed, the proteins encoded by these genes are localized to the cilium itself, to the basal body or are known to regulate the expression and localization of ciliary proteins. The goal of this article is to describe the multiple cellular processes that may lead to the development of renal cysts if they are deregulated. These include changes in proliferation rate, cell polarity or signaling pathways involved in embryonic kidney development. To highlight the role of the primary cilium in cystogenesis, I will discuss several studies investigating the function of ciliary genes and cilia in the kidneys of different model organisms. PMID:25388585

  13. Cervical myelopathy associated with extradural synovial cysts in 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Levitski, R E; Chauvet, A E; Lipsitz, D

    1999-01-01

    Three Mastiffs and 1 Great Dane were presented to the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for cervical myelopathy based on history and neurologic examination. All dogs were males and had progressive ataxia and tetraparesis. Degenerative arthritis of the articular facet joints was noted on survey spinal radiographs. Myelography disclosed lateral axial compression of the cervical spinal cord medial to the articular facets. Extradural compressive cystic structures adjacent to articular facets were identified on magnetic resonance imaging (1 dog). High protein concentration was the most important finding on cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Dorsal laminectomies were performed in all dogs for spinal cord decompression and cyst removal. Findings on cytologic examination of the cystic fluid were consistent with synovial fluid, and histopathologic results supported the diagnosis of synovial cysts. All dogs are ambulatory and 3 are asymptomatic after surgery with a follow-up time ranging from 1 to 8 months. This is the 1st report of extradural synovial cysts in dogs, and synovial cysts should be a differential diagnosis for young giant breed dogs with cervical myelopathy. PMID:10357105

  14. A Ganglion Cyst in the Second Lumbar Intervertebral Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Chul Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tendon sheaths and tissues around the joints. It is usually associated with degenerative arthritic changes in older people. Ganglion cyst in the spine is rare and there is no previous report on case that located in the intervertebral foramen and compressed dorsal root ganglion associated severe radiculopathy. A 29-year-old woman presented with severe left thigh pain and dysesthesia for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell like mass in the intervertebral foramen between second and third lumbar vertebrae on the left side. The lesion was removed after exposure of the L2-L3 intervertebral foramen. The histological examination showed fragmented cystic wall-like structure composed of fibromyxoid tissue but there was no lining epithelium. A ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal root ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. Although it is very rare location, ganglion cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis for intervertebral foraminal mass lesions. PMID:21607185

  15. Pyrophosphate arthropathy in the carpal and metacarpophalangeal joints.

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, M; Vischer, T L; Stasse, P; Docquier, C; Fallet, G H

    1983-01-01

    The hand x-rays of group of patients with generalised osteoarthrosis alone were compared with those patients with generalised osteoarthrosis and chondrocalcinosis (CC). An arthropathy seemingly specific for CC could be identified in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and carpal joints. In the MCP joints it was characterised by subchondral rarefactions, deviation of the joint axis, joint space narrowing, and osteophytosis. Usually only the second and/or third MCP joints are affected. In the carpal joints similar subchondral cysts, sometimes associated with joint space narrowing, were found much more frequently in the group with CC. There was no direct relation with the presence of calcification. Images PMID:6651367

  16. Arthroscopic meniscal repair and needle aspiration for meniscal tear with meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ko-Hsiu

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with meniscal cysts of the meniscus usually requires surgery. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the involved torn meniscus with intra-articular cyst drainage has become the accepted intervention. However, if the meniscal tear is peripheral, a lot of healthy meniscal tissue is needlessly sacrificed with subtotal meniscectomy. Moreover, the meniscal cyst is not a true cyst, so it may be treated more conservatively after the underlying disease has been corrected. We report a case of a meniscal cyst arising from the anterior segment of the lateral torn meniscus that was arthroscopically repaired with an outside-in technique. With the use of a 19-gauge long needle to penetrate the peripheral rim inframeniscally, a nonabsorbable No. 3-0 nylon suture was passed into the joint and brought out suprameniscally to loop the meniscal fragment. The second suture was passed and was used to secure the meniscal rim and fragment by the same means approximately 8 to 10 mm from the first one. Then the cyst was aspirated. A good result was obtained, and no recurrence of the cyst or mechanical problems occurred after a follow-up of 14 months. PMID:17157745

  17. Stifle synovial cyst in a Labrador Retriever with concurrent cranial cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Franklin, A D; Havlicek, M; Krockenberger, M B

    2011-01-01

    A seven-year-old Labrador Retriever dog was presented with the complaint of chronic left hindlimb lameness. A diagnosis of partial rupture of the left cranial cruciate ligament with concurrent cranio-medial synovial cyst formation was made. This cystic structure was assumed to be communicating with the stifle joint. There was no evidence of a meniscal tear, but superficial fibrillation of the axial border was present. Surgical excision of the cyst with concurrent treatment of the cranial cruciate ligament deficiency by tibial tuberosity advancement was performed with a successful outcome. Whilst commonly encountered in humans, synovial cysts are uncommon in dogs. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of synovial cyst formation in the stifle of a dog. PMID:21243179

  18. Management of ovarian cysts in infants

    PubMed Central

    Xue-qiang, Yan; Nan-nan, Zheng; Lei, Yu; Wei, Lu; Hong-qiang, Bian; Jun, Yang; Xu-fei, Duan; Xin-ke, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To discuss the experience of diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cyst in infants. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 20 infants who suffered from ovarian cyst. Results: There were no dysplasia ovarian was found in children which were preoperatively diagnosed simplex cyst. Within thirteen children preoperatively detected mixed cystic-solid lesion, six cases ovarian cysts disappeared and two cases underwent poor blood supply in the following time. Conclusion: Adverse effects for ovarian cyst in infants can be prevented by agressive surgical intervention. Harmful effects of ovarian cyst can be prevented by positive surgical intervention despite the diagnostic difficulties in children with clinical symptoms of this condition. PMID:26958055

  19. Neurenteric cysts of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Ebner, Florian H; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2013-12-01

    Neurenteric cysts in the central nervous system are rare developmental malformations. Usually the cysts are located ventral to the high thoracic or low cervical spinal cord. Only a few cases of intracranial neurenteric cysts have been reported in the literature to date. We report two cases of intracranial neurenteric cysts in the cerebellopontine angle with totally different radiographic, macroscopic, and microscopic appearance. As seen in these cases, the imaging spectrum of neurenteric cysts can be diverse, including malignancy-suspecting partial rim-enhancement or low-grade glioma features. Microsurgical therapy should include endoscopic assistance to ensure complete removal of cyst content. PMID:23397125

  20. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  1. [Calcified inclusions in a popliteal cyst as a rare cause of persistent knee pain and recurrent effusions].

    PubMed

    Küllmer, K; Letsch, R; Bug, R

    1994-11-01

    Popliteal cysts may occur with diseases of the knee and may cause several complications. We report about a patient with a popliteal cyst, that contained calcified concrements after a femur fracture and a complex knee injury and that we found to be a rare cause of persisting knee pain and effusions. The etiology of the concrements will be discussed, that we think are more likely to be posttraumatic loose joint bodies than traumatically induced chondromatosis. PMID:7825471

  2. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Goh, Rachel L Z; Hardy, Thomas G; Williams, Richard A; McNab, Alan A

    2016-10-01

    To describe post-traumatic and congenital respiratory epithelial cysts in the orbit, which are rare lesions with only 5 and 13 published cases, respectively. We reviewed all cases of respiratory epithelial cysts diagnosed at three institutions (two tertiary referral hospitals, one private clinic) between 1995 and 2015. We describe 10 cases of post-traumatic respiratory epithelial cyst (age range 23 - 82), presenting a mean of 17.4 years after their original trauma; and 3 congenital cases (age range 17-34). All but one case underwent surgical excision of the cyst and its lining, along with any surgical implant within the cyst. Two were recurrent after incomplete excision. Three presented with acute infection within the cyst. Respiratory epithelial orbital cysts are probably commoner than the paucity of published reports would suggest. Post-traumatic cysts often present many years after trauma, and may become secondarily infected. Complete surgical removal is recommended to prevent future recurrence. PMID:27468088

  3. A huge presacral Tarlov cyst. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazuhiko; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Asamoto, Shunji; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    Perineural cysts have become a common incidental finding during lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Only some of the symptomatic cysts warrant treatment. The authors describe the successful operative treatment of a patient with, to the best of their knowledge, the largest perineural cyst reported to date. A 29-year-old woman had been suffering from long-standing constipation and low-back pain. During an obstetric investigation for infertility, the clinician discovered a huge presacral cystic mass. Computed tomography myelography showed the lesion to be a huge Tarlov cyst arising from the left S-3 nerve root and compressing the ipsilateral S-2 nerve. The cyst was successfully treated by ligation of the cyst neck together with sectioning of the S-3 nerve root. Postoperative improvement in her symptoms and MR imaging findings were noted. Identification of the nerve root involved by the cyst wall, operative indication, operative procedure, and treatment of multiple cysts are important preoperative considerations. PMID:17688070

  4. Ganglion cysts and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J J; Bertoni, J M; Jaeger, S H

    1988-09-01

    We review 12 cases of ganglion cyst with carpal tunnel syndrome in 11 patients seen at the Hand Rehabilitation Center. Mean age was 42 years (range, 28 to 60 years). One half of the cysts were associated with direct trauma, usually with wrist hyperextension. Symptoms usually developed after the appearance or sudden growth of the cyst. Motor conduction or distal sensory latency was abnormal in seven of eight studied cases. Tinel's sign on tapping the cyst may be pathognomonic for this syndrome. Cyst removal and incision of the flexor retinaculum relieved the symptoms in 11 cases. The other case had total resolution after spontaneous cyst rupture. This syndrome is successfully treated with cyst decompression with release of the carpal canal and has an excellent prognosis. To our knowledge this represents the largest operative series of carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cyst. PMID:3241055

  5. Primary Peritoneal Hydatid Cyst Presenting as Ovarian Cyst Torsion: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gandhiraman, Kavitha; Balakrishnan, Renukadevi; Ramamoorthy, Rathna; Rajeshwari, Raja

    2015-08-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is a zoonotic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus, E.multilocularis or E.Vogli. The most common primary site is liver (75%) followed by lungs (5-15%) and other organs constitute 10-20%. Peritoneal hydatid cysts are very rare especially primary peritoneal hydatid. Secondary peritoneal hydatid cysts are relatively common, which usually occurs due to rupture of primary hepatic hydatid cyst. We present a rare case of large primary peritoneal hydatid cyst misdiagnosed as torsion of ovarian cyst that underwent Laparotomy with cyst excision and postoperative Albendazole therapy. PMID:26436004

  6. Coracoclavicular joint: osteologic study of 1020 human clavicles

    PubMed Central

    Gumina, S; Salvatore, M; De Santis, P; Orsina, L; Postacchini, F

    2002-01-01

    We examined 1020 dry clavicles from cadavers of Italian origin to determine the prevalence of the coracoclavicular joint (ccj), a diarthrotic synovial joint occasionally present between the conoid tubercle of the clavicle and the superior surface of the horizontal part of the coracoid process. Five hundred and nine clavicles from individuals of different ages were submitted to X-ray examination. Using radiography, we measured the entire length and the index of sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve, on which the distance between the conoid tubercle and the coracoid process depends. We also used radiography to record the differences in prevalence of arthritis in two neighbouring joints, the acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joints. Of the 1020 clavicles, eight (0.8%) displayed the articular facet of the ccj. No statistical correlation was found between clavicular length and the index of sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve. The prevalence of arthritis in clavicles with ccj was higher than that revealed in clavicles without ccj. The prevalence of ccj in the studied clavicles is lower than that observed in Asian cohorts. Furthermore, ccj is not conditioned by either length or sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve of the clavicle. Finally, the assumption that ccj is a predisposing factor for degenerative changes of neighbouring joints is statistically justified. PMID:12489763

  7. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  8. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  9. FIRST REPORT OF THE PALE CYST NEMATODE (GLOBODERA PALLIDA) IN THE UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, a cyst nematode was discovered in tare dirt at a potato processing facility in eastern Idaho. The nematode was found during a routine survey conducted jointly by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service through the Cooperative Agricul...

  10. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the lunate: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sá Rodrigues, André; Dopico, Carlos; Matos, Rui; Pinto, Rui; Vidinha, Vitor

    2016-12-01

    The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign osteolytic bone neoplasm. Although most ABC is asymptomatic, in some cases they produce a mass effect, impinging against soft tissues or interfering with joint function. The authors present a rare case report of a lunate ABC successfully treated by curettage and bone grafting, and review the literature of this pathology. PMID:27453641

  11. Giant geode (subchondrial cyst) in calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease on the curist.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, S; Scott, R A

    1981-09-01

    It is important to be aware of the radiographic features of pyrophosphate arthropathy with or without associated chondrocalcinosis. Accordingly, when appropriate structural joint changes are present an extraordinarily large subchondral cyst should not prompt a misdiagnosis of cystic tumor. PMID:7298703

  12. Synovial cyst--an unusual cause of nerve root compression. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hammer, A J

    1988-01-01

    An elderly woman presented with a tense, synovia-lined ganglion, associated with the left L3/L4 apophyseal joint, which protruded posteriorly and caudally through the joint capsule and extended anteriorly and cephally into the neural canal. The intraspinal extension produced a compression radiculopathy of the L3 nerve root. Removal of the cyst produced acute and dramatic alleviation of the symptoms. PMID:3340901

  13. CYSTS OF THE LATERAL MENISCUS

    PubMed Central

    Westrick, Richard B.; Fogarty, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and management of knee pain with or without mechanical symptoms challenges the physical therapist's clinical reasoning skills. Meniscal cysts are one relatively rare disorder of the knee that can cause both pain and mechanical symptoms and are frequently associated with a meniscal tear. In patients with suspected meniscal cysts, systematic differential diagnosis and sound clinical reasoning encourages appropriate integration of the clinical examination with diagnostic imaging. These case reports describe two different presentations of lateral parameniscal cysts where integration of the clinical examination with appropriate imaging allowed the physical therapist to provide a timely and appropriate intervention. In both cases, the diagnostic process is described along with the subsequent interventions that lead to positive outcomes. Level of Evidence: 5 (Case Report) PMID:23772349

  14. [Giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Alberione, F; Caire, F; Fischer-Lokou, D; Gueye, M; Moreau, J J

    2007-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign, uncommon lesions (1% of all intracranial tumors). Their localization is intradiploic in 25% of cases, and exceptionally subtentorial. We report here a rare case of giant intradiploic infratentorial epidermoid cyst. A 74-year old patient presented with recent diplopia and sindrome cerebellar. CT scan and MR imaging revealed a giant osteolytic extradural lesion of the posterior fossa (5.2 cm x 3.8 cm) with a small area of peripheral enhancement after contrast injection. Retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy allowed a satisfactory removal of the tumor, followed by an acrylic cranioplasty. The outcome was good. Neuropathological examination confirmed an epidermoid cyst. We review the literature and discuss our case. PMID:18008017

  15. Asymptomatic vallecular cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Yucel; Uzun, Sennur; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented himself for an intracranial glioblastoma multiforme excision. After being routinely monitored, he was preoxygenated. We induced anesthesia and paralysis with 200 mg propofol, 50 μg fentanyl and 9 mg vecuronium. Direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh 3 blade revealed a 2x2 cm cyst, pedunculated, arising from the right side of the vallecula preventing the endotracheal intubation. While the patient remained anesthetized, we urgently consulted an otolaryngologist and aspirated the cyst with a 22-gauge needle and syringe under direct laryngoscopy. We aspirated 10 cc of liquid content. This was followed by an uneventful tracheal intubation with a 9.0 enforced spiral cuffed tube. An alternative to fiberoptic intubation may be careful cyst aspiration to facilitate the intubation. PMID:24263047

  16. Hydatid cysts of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Widdrington, J D; Echevarria, C; Bone, M; Ellis, R

    2010-01-01

    Cystic hydatid disease is a zoonosis caused by infection with the larval cysts of Echinococcus granulosus. Cysts commonly develop in the liver and lungs. Diagnosis in non-endemic regions is often delayed due to a failure to consider hydatidosis. This results from a non-specific presentation and a failure to record an accurate geographical history. The diagnosis requires integrating an appropriate index of suspicion with correct interpretation of imaging and serological tests. In our case, a 44-year-old woman of Yemeni origin presented to a UK hospital with chest pain, pruritus and weight loss. Following detection of pulmonary nodules, a CT-guided biopsy was carried out to exclude malignancy. Iatrogenic cyst rupture precipitated an acute eosinophilic pleurisy. Cystic hydatid disease was subsequently diagnosed following strongly positive hydatid serological tests. This case illustrates the importance of considering diagnoses appropriate to an individual's geographical history particularly in the context of rising immigration and foreign travel. PMID:22778194

  17. Paradental (mandibular inflammatory buccal) cyst.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Reis, Brenda Mayra Maciel Vasconcelos; Freire-Maia, Belini

    2011-06-01

    The paradental cyst is commonly misinterpreted when associated with atypical clinical and radiographic characteristics, in turn causing diagnostic problems. For this reason, the study of the differential diagnosis of this lesion has become extremely important. In addition, the correlation of clinical, histologic, and radiographic findings are also of great value in obtaining accurate diagnoses. The minor variations in the clinical appearance of paradental cysts make it feasible to consider the two main groups of cysts separately: those associated with 1st and 2nd permanent molars of the mandible and those associated with the 3rd mandibular molar. Moreover, this distinction in localization may well dictate the necessary treatment. Bearing in mind the minor clinical variations, the present article aims to discuss the differential diagnosis of this lesion and its different possible treatments by presenting a case report to illustrate the findings. PMID:21161456

  18. Pigmented median raphe cysts of the penis.

    PubMed

    Urahashi, J; Hara, H; Yamaguchi, Z; Morishima, T

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of median raphe cysts of the penis with melanosis are presented. The presence of melanocytes was observed in the lining of the cysts by light and electron microscopy. The possible mechanism of the embryological development of the cysts is discussed in the context of the published literature. PMID:11028867

  19. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  20. Bilateral giant cyst of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Ferrante, J; Schmidt, R; Eisenbeis, C H

    1987-01-01

    The case of a 61 year old white female with a rapidly progressive rheumatoid arthritis who developed bilateral giant cyst of the shoulder is described here. Arthrographic investigation indicated that these giant cysts were true synovial cysts rather than "pseudocysts". PMID:3427842

  1. Dentigerous cyst of inflammatory origin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Bianca Zimmermann; Beltrame, Ana Paula; Bolan, Michele; Grando, Liliane Janete; Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    There is an association between persistent, prolonged inflammation of a primary tooth and the development of an inflammatory dentigerous cyst involving the succedaneous tooth. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of an inflammatory dentigerous cyst of the permanent maxillary left central incisor in a nine-year-old boy caused by a long-term inflammation/infection of its predecessor. The treatment consisted of conservative decompression, which allowed for rapid healing and the eruption of the permanent tooth. The patient was followed up with periodic clinical and radiographic evaluations for several years. PMID:25198956

  2. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  3. [Echinococcal cysts in the liver and lungs].

    PubMed

    Páral, J; Plodr, M; Ferko, A; Zvák, I

    2003-07-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with relapsing parasitic cyst of the liver and a parasitic cyst of the lungs. The patient was treated by surgery. The cystectomy of the echinococcus cyst in the liver was made in the first stage and subsequently a resection of the lung tissue containing another echinococcus cyst was made. Pharmacological therapy by the anti-helmintic drug albendazol was a part of the treatment. There were no complications during both surgical interventions and the subsequent treatment. In the scolocidal liquid of the liver cyst, echinococcus organisms were diagnosed by microscopy and documented by photography. PMID:14502882

  4. Clinical Experience of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young

    2012-01-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  5. Clinical experience of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young; Lim, Kyung Joon

    2012-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of a paraurethral cyst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clark T; Millard, Sarah E; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Ehsanipoor, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    Paraurethral cysts arising from Skene's gland are a rare cause of urogenital masses in the neonate. We report the case of a pelvic mass noted at the vaginal introitus on prenatal ultrasound that following delivery was found to be a paraurethral cyst. On prenatal ultrasound, there was no evidence of involvement of the urinary, gastrointestinal, or upper genital tract. Serial ultrasounds demonstrated slight enlargement of the cyst without other changes. The patient delivered at 33 weeks and postnatal evaluation demonstrated a paraurethral cyst. The cyst was managed expectantly and drained spontaneously on the second day of life with complete resolution. PMID:23146295

  7. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts. PMID:24450035

  8. Salivary Duct Cyst: Histo-pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are uncommon and represent 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. They are mainly mucoceles or salivary duct cysts. Unlike a mucocele, which is surrounded by granulation tissue, the salivary duct cyst is lined by epithelium. Salivary duct cysts are more common in the oral minor salivary glands and rarely occur in the major salivary glands, show a marked predilection for the superficial lobe of the parotid, and represent 10% of all salivary gland cysts. Neoplastic differentiation of the lining of the salivary duct cyst has been reported. We report a case of a salivary duct cyst of the left parotid gland, with a review of radiographic and histopathologic features. PMID:23878772

  9. Symptomatic Tarlov cyst: report and review.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabud, Pradit; Suwanpratheep, Kitti

    2006-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The cysts are relatively rare and most of them are asymptomatic. Some Tarlov cysts can exert pressure on nerve elements resulting in pain, radiculopathy and even multiple radiculopathy of cauda equina. There is no consensus on the appropriate therapeutic options of Tarlov cysts. The authors present a case of two sacral cysts diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. The initial symptoms were low back pain and sciatica and progressed to cauda equina syndrome. Surgical treatment was performed by sacral laminectomy and wide cyst fenestration. The neurological deficits were recovered and had not recurred after a follow-up period of nine months. The literature was reviewed and discussed. This is the first reported case in Thailand. PMID:16881441

  10. Reinke Edema: Watch For Vocal Fold Cysts.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Yavanoglu, Ahmet; Kurkcuoglu, Melih; Arslan, Necmi

    2015-06-01

    Reinke edema is one of the common cause of dysphonia middle-aged population, and severe thickening of vocal folds require surgical treatment. Smoking plays a major role on etiology. Vocal fold cysts are also benign lesions and vocal trauma blamed for acquired cysts. We would like to present 3 cases with vocal fold cyst related with Reinke edema. First case had a subepidermal epidermoid cyst with Reinke edema, which could be easily observed before surgery during laryngostroboscopy. Second case had a mucous retention cyst into the edematous Reinke tissue, which was detected during surgical intervention, and third case had a epidermoid cyst that occurred 2 months after before microlaryngeal operation regarding Reinke edema reduction. These 3 cases revealed that surgical management of Reinke edema needs a careful dissection and close follow-up after surgery for presence of vocal fold cysts. PMID:26080256

  11. Salivary Duct Cyst: Histo-pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are uncommon and represent 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. They are mainly mucoceles or salivary duct cysts. Unlike a mucocele, which is surrounded by granulation tissue, the salivary duct cyst is lined by epithelium. Salivary duct cysts are more common in the oral minor salivary glands and rarely occur in the major salivary glands, show a marked predilection for the superficial lobe of the parotid, and represent 10% of all salivary gland cysts. Neoplastic differentiation of the lining of the salivary duct cyst has been reported. We report a case of a salivary duct cyst of the left parotid gland, with a review of radiographic and histopathologic features. PMID:23878772

  12. Splenic Hydatid Cysts: 17 Cases.

    PubMed

    Ozogul, Bunyami; Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent; Yıldırgan, Mehmet İlhan; Kantarcı, A Mecit

    2015-12-01

    Hydatid cyst disease, which is endemically observed and an important health problem in our country, involves the spleen at a frequency ranking third following the liver and the lungs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and results of management in splenic hydatid cysts. The demographic data, localization, diagnosis, treatment methods, and the length of postoperative hospital stay of patients with splenic hydatid cysts in a 12-year period were evaluated retrospectively. Seventeen cases were evaluated. Among these, 13 were females and four were males. Seven had solitary splenic involvement, eight had involvement of both the spleen and the liver, and two had multiple organ involvement. Ten had undergone splenectomy, one had undergone distal splenectomy, and the remaining cases had undergone different surgical procedures. The patients had received albendazole treatment in the pre- and postoperative period. One patient had died secondary to hypernatremia on the first postoperative day. The clinical picture in splenic hydatid cysts, which is seen rarely, is usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis is established by ultrasonography and abdominal CT. Although splenectomy is the standard mode of treatment, spleen-preserving methods may be used. PMID:26730005

  13. Eruption cysts in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Hérica Adad; Parisotto, Thaís Manzano; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances of the dental development may result in anomalies, which may be apparent as soon as the child is born. Eruption cysts are rarely observed in neonates considering that at this stage of the child's life teeth eruption is uncommon. Thus, the aim of this report is to describe a case of eruption cysts in a neonate. A male neonate was brought to the emergency service with the chief complaint of an elevated area on the anterior region of the inferior alveolar ridge. The lesion was clinically characterized as a compressive and floating swelling. Through a radiographic exam two mandibular primary incisors could be seen superficially located. Due to the patient's age and the initial diagnosis of eruption cysts the conduct adopted was clinical surveillance. Forty-five days after the first visit the lesions had significantly decreased in size, and completely disappeared after 4 months. At that age, both mandibular central incisors were already in the oral cavity exhibiting small hypoplastic areas in the incisal edges. The clinical and radiographic follow-up of eruption cysts in neonates appears to be an adequate conduct without differing from that recommended for older children. PMID:18524277

  14. Unusually located primary hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Aksakal, Nihat; Kement, Metin; Okkabaz, Nuri; Altuntaş, Yunus Emre; Öncel, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The hydatid disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic parasitic disease affecting several Mediterranean countries. Echinococcal cysts are mostly located in the liver and the lung, but the disease can be detected anywhere in the body. In this study, we present uncommon extrahepatic localizations of primary hydatid disease. Patients who were operated on for hydatid disease or cystic lesions, which were later diagnosed as hydatid disease, between 2004 and 2010 were retrieved retrospectively. Patients with lesions localized outside the liver and the lung were enrolled in the study. Eight patients with extrahepatic primary hydatid disease were treated surgically at our clinic. The cysts were located in the scapular region, spleen, pancreas, lumbosacral region and gluteal muscle. Surgical techniques were partial or total cystectomy with or without tube drainage. Splenectomy was performed for splenic hydatid disease and partial pericystectomy, Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy, cholecystectomy and T-tube drainage for pancreatic hydatid disease. There were no complications or mortality in the postoperative period. Hydatid cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, especially in endemic areas. Surgical technique should be planned according to the location of the cyst. PMID:27436938

  15. Thrombotic cardiac apex hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Madani, Hamid; Dabiri, Samsam; Pormotabed, Alireza; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst (HC) is an endemic infestation in the cattle-breading countries such as in Iran. The involvement of heart by HC is rare; however, nesting of larva in the left ventricular apex with subsequent rupture to the systemic circulation and thrombus formation in the remaining cyst cavity is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. A 45-year-old man referred to our emergency cardiac room with chest pain and a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) that showed a cardiac apex cystic lesion. The differential diagnosis of a cystic tumor, a HC, or aneurysm in the apex of the left ventricular walls was considered and evaluated by TTE and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the thrombotic HC was confirmed at the surgery. The cyst with its thrombotic component was excised surgically by on-pump cardiac surgery. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged to home and treated with a full course of Albendazole therapy for 4 weeks. Six-month follow-up with TTE revealed complete healing of the apex defect without recurrence of the cyst. PMID:26702690

  16. A giant splenic hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Karamjot Singh; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Samita; Jindal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with pain in the left hypochondrium, which had been progressing for 5 months. Examination revealed large splenomegaly, and ultrasonography showed a huge hydatid cyst in the spleen. Preoperative planning and postoperative care lead to successful management of this entity. Radiological investigations also play a major role in diagnosis and decrease morbidity. PMID:26722171

  17. Saccular cyst with atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A; Gheorghe, DC

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory obstruction and stridor in infants and children are not uncommon. A rare cause of these sometimes life-threatening symptoms is the congenital saccular cyst. Objectives: We present the case of a 5-year-old girl with a cervical tumor, which appeared after a laryngeal endoscopic surgery of a saccular cyst with two relapses and a particular local evolution of its recurrence through the cricothyroid membrane. Material and method: The patient data has been reviewed over the entire follow-up period and a thorough an analysis of her investigations and surgery was performed. Results: The unusual evolution of this case was marked by an atypical exteriorization – not found in the published literature. The surgical approach was external, by paramedian thyrotomy, with no further long-term recurrence. Conclusions: An accurate diagnosis of saccular cysts can be made with the help of medical history, by an endoscopic visualization of the lesion and by the CT-scan imaging of the cervical region. Sometimes, saccular cysts can extend beyond laryngeal limits, determining fluid-filled tumors in the cervical region. PMID:27453755

  18. Laparoscopic management of hydatid cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manash Ranjan; Kumar, Saurabh; Panda, Srikanta; Shameel, P. Ahammed

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is a disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Various anatomical location of hydatid cyst has been described in literature. Liver is the most common site of hydatid cyst and lungs are the second most common site. Hydatid cyst of lesser sac is a rare entity. Here we present a rare case report of laparoscopic management of hydatid cyst in lesser sac. PMID:27073313

  19. Complex renal cysts associated with crizotinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Patrick; Bartlett, Cynthia H; Solomon, Benjamin J; Tassell, Vanessa; Shaw, Alice T; de Pas, Tommaso; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Tanaka, Kaoru; Tan, Weiwei; Tang, Yiyun; Wilner, Keith D; Safferman, Allan; Han, Ji-Youn

    2015-01-01

    An apparent causal association between crizotinib treatment and renal cyst development emerged during clinical trials in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Serious adverse event (SAE) reports of renal cysts from a safety database of 1375 patients from four clinical trials were reviewed. A blinded, retrospective, independent radiologic review (IRR) was performed using scans from patients on study for ≥6 months in three clinical trials; risk factors for renal cyst development were assessed. Among 17 patients with renal cysts reported as SAEs, evidence of invasion into adjacent structures was noted in seven patients, with no evidence of malignancy found. These patients generally did not require dose reductions, none required permanent crizotinib discontinuation due to this AE, and most continued treatment with clinical benefit. In the blinded IRR, among 255 crizotinib-treated patients, 22%, 3%, and 2% had preexisting simple cysts, complex cysts, or both, respectively. At the 6-month tumor assessment, 9% of all patients had acquired new cysts, and 2% of patients with preexisting cysts had developed new cysts and enlargements (>50%) of preexisting simple cysts. Asians appeared to have an increased risk of developing new cysts on treatment; Koreans in particular had 5.18 times higher odds of developing cysts than non-Asians (95% confidence interval, 1.51–17.78; P = 0.05). Crizotinib treatment appears to be associated with an increased risk of development and progression of renal cysts in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. While close monitoring is recommended, dosing modification was not generally necessary, allowing patients to remain on crizotinib treatment. PMID:25756473

  20. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis Presenting as a Popliteal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Nikhil; Purohit, Shaligam; Bhosale, Pradeep B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pigmented villonodular synovitis is an uncommon disease characterized by hyperplastic synovium, large effusions and bone erosions. It commonly mimics other conditions. As a result, the diagnosis may remain elusive, as the classic signs of tenderness and effusion are not specific. Occasionally, PVNS presents as a popliteal cyst, which may divert attention from intra-articular pathology. In this article, we describe a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis that presented with a popliteal cyst as the chief problem. Case Report: A twelve year old boy presented to us with a history of a gradually enlarging mass in the left popliteal fossa since eighteen months. He complained of restriction of terminal knee flexion, but he had no pain. After clinical examination and imaging the mass was interpreted as being either a popliteal cyst or chronic hematoma without ruling out the possibility of soft tissue sarcoma. An open excisional biopsy of the lesion was performed which revealed a reddish-brown cystic-nodular mass communicating with the knee joint. The histology was consistent with that of pigmented villonodular synovitis. We performed an arthroscopic synovectomy 3 weeks later. Abnormal synovium found in all compartments of the knee was removed. Histology from the intra-articular lesion was also consistent with a diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Conclusion: A swelling in the popliteal region may be due to various etiologies. The cause should be thoroughly investigated. Along with clinical examination and imaging the tissue must be subjected to histopathological examination. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can rarely present as a popliteal cyst. In such a situation, treatment consists of dealing with intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. PMID:27299073

  1. Imaging in pulmonary hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Mandeep K; Sharma, Madhurima; Gulati, Ajay; Gorsi, Ujjwal; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N; Agarwal, Ritesh; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a zoonosis that can involve almost any organ in the human body. After the liver, the lungs are the most common site for hydatid disease in adults. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of the disease, as clinical features are often nonspecific. Classical radiological signs of pulmonary hydatid cysts have been described in the literature, aiding in the diagnosis of the disease. However, complicated hydatid cysts can prove to be a diagnostic challenge at times due to their atypical imaging features. Radiography is the initial imaging modality. Computed tomography can provide a specific diagnosis in complicated cases. Ultrasound is particularly useful in peripheral lung lesions. The role of magnetic resonance imaging largely remains unexplored. PMID:27358685

  2. Traumatic bone cyst of mandible.

    PubMed

    Surej Kumar, L K; Kurien, Nikhil; Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed

    2015-06-01

    The traumatic bone cyst, an uncommon lesion of the jaws, belongs to the category of 'pseudocyst' owing to its lack of a lining epithelial membrane. It is an asymptomatic lesion, which is often diagnosed accidentally during routine radiological examination commonly present in the posterior mandible as a unilocular radiolucency with scalloping borders. The exact etiopathogenesis of the lesion is still debated, though the role of trauma is often associated. Here we report a rare case of traumatic bone cyst in the anterior mandible, in a 16-year-old female patient with a previous history of trauma to chin; diagnosed and treated successfully in our surgical unit. The case is discussed in relation to its clinical presentation, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, management and prognosis. PMID:26028875

  3. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha A; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  4. Chrysophyte cysts as potential environmental indicators.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, D.P.; Mahood, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Many chrysophyte algae produce morphologically distinctive, siliceous, microscopic cysts during a resting stage of their life cycles; these cysts are often preserved in sediments. Scanning electron microscopy and Nomarski optics permit much more detailed observation of these cysts than was heretofore possible. Many cyst types are found only in specific habitats, such as montane lakes, wet meadows, ephemeral ponds, and Sphagnum bogs. In the samples studied, cysts seem to be most common in fluctuating fresh-water habitats of low to moderate pH and some winter freezing. Chrysophyte cysts have the potential to be a useful tool for modern environmental assessments and paleoecological studies of Cenozoic fresh-water lacustrine deposits. -from Authors

  5. Giant radicular cyst of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Jeevanand; Shrivastava, Ratika; Bharath, Kashetty Panchakshari; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2014-01-01

    Radicular cysts are inflammatory odontogenic cysts of tooth bearing areas of the jaws. Most of these lesions involve the apex of offending tooth and appear as well-defined radiolucencies. Owing to its clinical characteristics similar to other more commonly occurring lesions in the oral cavity, differential diagnosis should include dentigerous cyst, ameloblastoma, odontogenic keratocyst, periapical cementoma and Pindborg tumour. The present case report documents a massive radicular cyst crossing the midline of the palate. Based on clinical, radiographical and histopathological findings, the present case was diagnosed as an infected radicular cyst. The clinical characteristics of this cyst could be considered as an interesting and unusual due to its giant nature. The lesion was surgically enucleated along with the extraction of the associated tooth; preservation of all other teeth and vital structures, without any postoperative complications and satisfactory healing, was achieved. PMID:24792022

  6. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the submandibular gland

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, A. Saneem; Kannan, V. Sadesh; Velaven, K.; Sathyanarayanan, G. R.; Roshni, J.; Elavarasi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts are benign, slowly growing unilocular or multilocular lesions that appear in the head and neck. They are also called Branchial cyst. The head and neck sites are the salivary glands(more commonly parotid and rarely submandibular gland) and the oral cavity (usually the floor of the mouth). there are various methods of investigation available today, of which Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) can be used to provide an immediate diagnosis of a lymphoepithelial cyst. The other investigations include, Ultrasonogram,and Computed tomography. It usually occurs due to the process of lymphocyte-induced cystic ductular dilatation and the confirmatory diagnosis is always made postoperatively by histopathological examination. The mainstay in the treatment of a lymphoepithelial cyst remains the surgical approach, which includes complete enucleation of the cyst along with total excision of the involved salivary gland. This is a report of a lymphoepithelial cyst involving the submandibular salivary gland and its management. PMID:25210369

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha A.; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V.

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  8. Ganglion Cyst of Knee from Hoffa’s Fat Pad Protruding Anterolaterally Through Retinacular Rent: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Utpal; Mukhopadhyay, Anindya S.; Kundu, Srikanta; Mandal, Subhadip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare occurrences. They are usually encountered as incidental findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in arthroscopy. They may originate from both the cruciate ligaments and the menisci, from the popliteus tendon and alar folds, infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa, and subchondral bone cysts. Those arising from the Hoffa’s fat pad, usually present as palpable mass at anterior aspect of the knee joint. We report a case of intraarticular ganglion cyst of knee arising from the infrapatellar fat pad and protruding anterolaterally through retinacular rent into the subcutaneous plane. Case Report: A 19-year-old young man, presented with a painless gradually increasing swelling at the anterior aspect of left knee of 9 months duration. MRI scan revealed a multilobulated, cyst with septations within the anterior aspect of the knee joint, just inferolateral to the patella, with deep extension into the infrapatellar fat pad, and superficial extension into the subcutaneous space across the retinaculum. After diagnostic arthroscopy, we performed an open excision of the cystic mass and confirmed the retinacular rent pre-operatively. Conclusion: Arthroscopic resection and debridement is the gold standard treatment in ganglion cyst of the knee. However, a subcutaneous extension may lead to incomplete arthroscopic resection: Leaving behind the residual tissue which may cause recurrence. Therefore, proper pre-operative evaluation of MR images of these cases is very important. PMID:27299075

  9. Brainstem epidermoid cyst: An update.

    PubMed

    Patibandla, M R; Yerramneni, Vamsi Krishna; Mudumba, Vijaya S; Manisha, Nukavarapu; Addagada, Gokul Chowdary

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of epidermoid tumors is between 1% and 2% of all intracranial tumors. The usual locations of epidermoid tumor are the parasellar region and cerebellopontine angle, and it is less commonly located in sylvian fissure, suprasellar region, cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres, and lateral and fourth ventricles. Epidermoid cysts located in the posterior fossa usually arise in the lateral subarachnoid cisterns, and those located in the brain stem are rare. These epidermoids contain cheesy and flaky white soft putty like contents. Epidermoid cysts are very slow growing tumors having a similar growth pattern of the epidermal cells of the skin and develop from remnants of epidermal elements during closure of the neural groove and disjunction of the surface ectoderm with neural ectoderm between the third and fifth weeks of embryonic life. We are presenting an interesting case of intrinsic brainstem epidermoid cyst containing milky white liquefied material with flakes in a 5-year-old girl. Diffusion-weighted imaging is definitive for the diagnosis. Ideal treatment of choice is removal of cystic components with complete resection of capsule. Although radical resection will prevent recurrence, in view of very thin firmly adherent capsule to brainstem, it is not always possible to do complete resection of capsule without any neurological deficits. PMID:27366244

  10. Brainstem epidermoid cyst: An update

    PubMed Central

    Patibandla, M. R.; Yerramneni, Vamsi Krishna; Mudumba, Vijaya S.; Manisha, Nukavarapu; Addagada, Gokul Chowdary

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of epidermoid tumors is between 1% and 2% of all intracranial tumors. The usual locations of epidermoid tumor are the parasellar region and cerebellopontine angle, and it is less commonly located in sylvian fissure, suprasellar region, cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres, and lateral and fourth ventricles. Epidermoid cysts located in the posterior fossa usually arise in the lateral subarachnoid cisterns, and those located in the brain stem are rare. These epidermoids contain cheesy and flaky white soft putty like contents. Epidermoid cysts are very slow growing tumors having a similar growth pattern of the epidermal cells of the skin and develop from remnants of epidermal elements during closure of the neural groove and disjunction of the surface ectoderm with neural ectoderm between the third and fifth weeks of embryonic life. We are presenting an interesting case of intrinsic brainstem epidermoid cyst containing milky white liquefied material with flakes in a 5-year-old girl. Diffusion-weighted imaging is definitive for the diagnosis. Ideal treatment of choice is removal of cystic components with complete resection of capsule. Although radical resection will prevent recurrence, in view of very thin firmly adherent capsule to brainstem, it is not always possible to do complete resection of capsule without any neurological deficits. PMID:27366244

  11. Diagnosis and evaluation of renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Jack

    2014-12-01

    Renal cysts are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Although most cysts found on routine imaging studies are benign, there must be an index of suspicion to exclude a neoplastic process or the presence of a multicystic disorder. This article focuses on the more common adult cystic diseases, including simple and complex renal cysts, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and acquired cystic kidney disease. PMID:25439536

  12. Surgical treatment of sacral perineural cyst--case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Miki, Takanori; Miyaji, Yuki; Minami, Hiroaki; Masuda, Atsushi; Tominaga, Shogo; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Yamaura, Ikuya; Natsume, Shigeatsu; Yoshida, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented with persistent penis and scrotum pain due to S-2 and S-3 radiculopathy caused by a sacral perineural cyst. The cyst was treated with microsurgical partial cyst removal and cyst wall imbrication, together with closure of the point through which cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed from the subarachnoid space into the cyst cavity. His pain resolved without recurrence of the cyst or complications. Symptomatic perineural cysts are quite rare. Surgical closure of the point through which CSF flows from the subarachnoid space into the cyst cavity is the most important intervention for symptomatic perineural cysts. If the source of CSF leakage cannot be detected, placement of a cyst-subarachnoid shunt should be considered in addition to partial cyst removal and cyst wall imbrication. PMID:22198114

  13. Epithelial Inclusion Cyst in Conjunctival Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Evangelina; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Mastromonaco, Christina; Morales, Melina C; Belfort Neto, Rubens; Burnier, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Conjunctival melanoma is the second most common conjunctival malignancy. Its differential diagnosis with other conjunctival melanocytic neoplasms is inherently difficult. The presence of epithelial cysts is a useful feature in conjunctival tumors and favors a benign lesion. Herein 2 cases of conjunctival melanoma with cysts are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first series of conjunctival melanoma with epithelial inclusion cysts. This series emphasizes the importance of considering several malignant features when reviewing conjunctival melanocytic lesions, as malignancy can exist even in the presence of epithelial inclusion cysts. PMID:27160434

  14. Multiple Organ Involvement with Hydatid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Sabouni, F; Ferdosian, F; Mamishi, S; Nejat, F; Monnajemzadeh, M; Rezaei, N

    2010-01-01

    Hydatid disease is the most common infections worldwide, but it rarely involves multiple organs. Herein, a 12-year-old boy is presented, who was admitted to Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran with symptoms of irritability, sleepless, and weakness of the extremities. Patient's brain computed tomography (CT) scan with contrast media showed large multilocular cystic lesions in right temporal lobe associated with two other smaller similar cystic lesions in centrum semiovale bilaterally. Abdominal sonography revealed intestinal mesenteric and a cardiac cyst. Abdomino-pelvic CT scan showed a cyst medial to the cecum and a cortical cyst in the left kidney as well as a heart cyst. The echocardiography confirmed hydatid cysts at apical and interventricular septum. Serology test was positive for hydatid cyst. Albendazole and praziquantel were started for the patient immediately and right temporal lobe lesions were removed via neurosurgery intervention. After one month, cardiac and mesenteric cysts were operated during two separate surgeries. Pathologic findings of all cysts were compatible with hydatid cyst. Cystic hydatidosis should be suspected in any cystic mass, whilst prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatments are the keys in management of affected patients. PMID:22347246

  15. Videothoracoscopy in the treatment of mediastinal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Brzeziński, Daniel; Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progress in the development of surgical techniques has led to the growing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) techniques in mediastinal cyst treatment. Aim To present our experience of treating mediastinal cysts with the minimally invasive technique. Material and methods Fifty patients with mediastinal cysts were treated from 2001 to 2011. There were 32 women and 18 men. The age of the patients ranged from 17 to 72, the mean age being 42 years. All patients underwent basic preoperative diagnostic tests of the chest: X-ray, computed tomography (CT), bronchoscopy and spirometry; 4 patients underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and 3 fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the described lesions. Results The VATS was performed in each case. Conversion was carried out due to superior mediastinal location in 10 cases and pleural adhesions in 3 cases. The partial resection of a cyst was performed in 3 patients. One patient was treated conservatively due to heart failure. In that patient the transthoracic needle aspiration of a cyst under ultrasound guidance using alcoholisation with 76% ethanol with a good effect was performed twice. Cyst recurrence was observed in 1 case. Conclusions The surgical access depends on the location of a cyst. The VATS resection of a superior mediastinal cyst is not always feasible. Surgery of mediastinal cysts is both diagnostic and curative. PMID:25337163

  16. MRI of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Tsukaguchi, I; Ishida, T; Ootani, M; Yamamoto, T; Tomoda, K; Mitomo, M

    1992-01-01

    Sacral perineural cyst is a relatively rare condition. To our knowledge, reports of MR findings associated with sacral perineural cyst have been limited to only six cases. We present for the first time high field MR findings in a case of sacral perineural cyst. The cyst appeared as a cystic lesion in the sacral spinal canal and had intermediate signal intensity on T1W images and high signal intensity on T2*W images compared with CSF. Slight erosion remodeling of the sacrum was also seen anteriorly. Our case was symptomatic and present with radiculopathy (sciatic pain). Surgical treatment was done to result in dramatic improvement of the sciatic pain. PMID:1337620

  17. Lone, Mobile Left Atrial Hydatid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ugurlu, Mehmet; Baktir, Ahmet Oguz; Tekin, Ali Ihsan; Tok, Ahmet; Yagmur, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcosis is endemic in various regions of Turkey. Cardiac involvement in echinococcosis is rare, and lone cardiac hydatid cysts are even more unusual. Because cardiac hydatid disease can be fatal, even asymptomatic patients are optimally referred for surgical treatment. We present a rare case of a lone, primary, mobile hydatid cyst in the left atrium of a 62-year-old woman. The cyst caused dyspnea from left ventricular inflow obstruction. In addition to reporting the patient's fatal case, we discuss cardiac hydatid cysts in terms of the scant medical literature. PMID:27303247

  18. Hip labral cyst caused by psoas impingement.

    PubMed

    Tey, Marc; Alvarez, Sonia; Ríos, Jose L

    2012-08-01

    Hip labral impingement can cause labral tears and secondary paralabral cyst formation. Femoroacetabular impingement is the main cause of labral impingement, but other conditions such as iliopsoas tendon impingement are described. There is no description of labral cyst resulting from psoas impingement treated arthroscopically in the literature. We present the case of a young sportsman with groin pain caused by psoas impingement with a labral tear and secondary paralabral cyst who was treated arthroscopically by cyst debridement, psoas tenotomy, and labral repair. PMID:22840990

  19. Bronchogenic cysts of the neck in adults.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, Kenneth A; Tassler, Andrew B; Krowiak, Edward J; Deeb, Ziad E

    2004-09-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are congenital sacs that result from maldevelopment of the primitive foregut. Although they occur predominantly in the chest, there are reports of lesions in extrathoracic locations. The majority of reported bronchogenic cysts located in the neck are found in the pediatric population; a review of the literature reveals few reports of bronchogenic cysts of the neck among adults. The diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst relies on the histology and location of the lesion. Here, we review our experience in the diagnosis and management of 2 adult patients with pathologically proven bronchogenic cysts. Both patients presented with solitary neck masses that proved to be bronchogenic cysts on histologic examination. Our purpose is to define the histopathologic and clinical characteristics of bronchogenic cysts and discuss the features that distinguish them from other cervical cysts. In conclusion, congenital bronchogenic cysts can occur in the neck of adults and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic cervical masses in adults, as well as children. PMID:15453524

  20. Hydatid cyst involving the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Anil Z; Oguz, Emrah; Zoghi, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    We report a very rare case of primary mediastinal hydatid cyst which invaded the ascending aorta and the aortic arch which initially presented as a cranial mass. Aortic wall is a very unusual site for the hydatid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of hydatid cyst located within the aortic arch lumen. Patient underwent ascending aortic and hemiarch replacement under hypothermic circulatory arrest and removal of the cyst. Patient had an uneventful recovery and has been on follow-up. Although the literature data are very limited, we believe that the aortic procedure of choice should be graft interpositon rather than patch repair. PMID:17215134

  1. Teratoid cyst of the oral cavity: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Palaskar, Sangeeta J; Garde, Janardan; Bartake, Anirudha; Narang, Bindiya

    2014-01-01

    The teratoid cyst is a rare variant of the dermoid cyst which seldom occurs in the oral cavity. If seen, they generally present as slow growing cysts of the floor of mouth, reported commonly in the 2nd and 3rd decade of life in males. Histopathologically, dermoid cyst is classified as epidermoid cyst, true dermoid cyst and teratoid cyst depending on the presence of adnexal structures and derivatives of all three germ layers. Herewith we report a rare case of teratoid cyst of the floor of the mouth, in a 2-year-old female child, which was present since birth. PMID:25949009

  2. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient. PMID:26261469

  3. Successful Treatment of a Symptomatic Discal Cyst by Percutaneous C-arm Guided Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyun Jeong; Park, Chan Jin

    2016-01-01

    Although discal cysts are a rare cause of low back pain and radiculopathy. Currently, surgical excision is usually the first-line treatment for discal cysts. However, alternative treatment methods have been suggested, as in some cases symptoms have improved with interventional therapies. A 27-year-old man presented with an acute onset of severe pain, and was found to have a discal cyst after an open discectomy. The patient underwent cyst aspiration and steroid injection through the facet joint under C-arm guidance. After the procedure, the patient's pain improved to NRS 0-1. On outpatient physical examination 1 week, and 1 and 3 months later, no abnormal neurological symptoms were present, and pain did not persist; thus, follow-up observation was terminated. When a discal cyst is diagnosed, it is more appropriate to consider interventional management instead of surgery as a first-line treatment, while planning for surgical resection if the symptoms do not improve or accompanying neurologic deficits progress. PMID:27103969

  4. Two cases of symptomatic perineural cysts (tarlov cysts) in one family: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jun; Kim, Il Sup; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-09-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed. PMID:19096672

  5. Two Cases of Symptomatic Perineural Cysts (Tarlov Cysts) in One Family: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed. PMID:19096672

  6. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis in knee joint homeostasis is uncertain. The aim of this study is to describe cross-sectional associations between popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 900 randomly-selected subjects (mean age 63 years, 48% female) were studied. Knee pain, stiffness and dysfunction were assessed by self-administered Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Radiographic knee osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) were recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized to assess popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Results Popliteal cysts were present in 11.7% and subgastrocnemius bursitis in 12.7% of subjects. Subgastrocnemius bursitis was more common in those with popliteal cyst (36.2% versus 9.7%, P <0.01). In multivariable analyses, popliteal cysts were significantly associated with increased osteophytes in both medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartments while subgastrocnemius bursitis was associated with increased osteophytes and JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Both were significantly associated with cartilage defects in all compartments, and with BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Furthermore, both popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis were significantly associated with increased weight-bearing knee pain but these associations became non-significant after adjustment for cartilage defects and BMLs. Conclusions Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with increased symptoms as well as radiographic and MRI-detected joint structural abnormalities. Longitudinal data will help resolve if they are a consequence or a cause of knee joint abnormalities. PMID:24581327

  7. Demonstration of a geode by magnetic resonance imaging: a new light on the cause of juxta-articular bone cysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, E A; Jacoby, R K; Ellis, R E; Fry, M E; Pittard, S; Vennart, W

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a rheumatoid arthritic geode are presented. Development of such a cyst from before x ray diagnosis to its coalescence with the wrist joint is described. The evidence suggests that these juxta-articular cysts are not merely an intrusion of the synovial cavity into the bone marrow but start as isolated structures beneath the subchondral bone. Images PMID:2241269

  8. Demonstration of a geode by magnetic resonance imaging: a new light on the cause of juxta-articular bone cysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moore, E A; Jacoby, R K; Ellis, R E; Fry, M E; Pittard, S; Vennart, W

    1990-10-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a rheumatoid arthritic geode are presented. Development of such a cyst from before x ray diagnosis to its coalescence with the wrist joint is described. The evidence suggests that these juxta-articular cysts are not merely an intrusion of the synovial cavity into the bone marrow but start as isolated structures beneath the subchondral bone. PMID:2241269

  9. Rheumatoid pseudocyst (geode) of the femoral neck without apparent joint involvement.

    PubMed

    Morrey, B F

    1987-05-01

    Typically, rheumatoid cysts are associated with obvious joint involvement and are located in the subchondral portion of the adjacent joint. Giant pseudocysts (geodes) are uncommon and are characteristically associated with extensive joint destruction. The patient described in this report had a giant pseudocyst of the femoral neck but no joint involvement. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first report of such a manifestation of a giant pseudocyst. As such, it posed a somewhat difficult diagnostic problem. PMID:3573827

  10. Bilateral follicular cysts in a water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Khan, F A; Nabi, S U; Pande, Megha; Das, G K; Sarkar, M

    2011-03-01

    The present short communication puts on record a case of bilateral, multiple follicular cysts in a water buffalo along with a detailed description of its ovarian biometry and follicular fluid composition. The ovarian weight and biometrical parameters were much higher than in normal cycling buffaloes. A total of three follicular cysts were observed, two on the right ovary and one on the left ovary, measuring 4.9, 3.0 and 2.6 cm yielding 21, 9 and 5 ml of follicular fluid, respectively. The cystic fluid was deep yellow in colour with a viscous consistency. The follicular fluid concentrations of glucose, total protein, cholesterol, acid phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus and progesterone in all the cysts were within the range reported previously in normal buffalo follicular fluid; however, the alkaline phosphatase concentration in cyst 1 and total bilirubin concentration in cysts 1 and 2 were higher than the values in normal follicular fluid. In contrast, the levels of urea nitrogen in cysts 1 and 3, and oestradiol in cyst 3 were lower than the normal values. All the three follicles had an oestradiol to progesterone ratio less than 1. The results of our study suggest that follicular cysts in buffalo are oestrogenically inactive and have an altered concentration of certain biochemical and hormonal constituents. PMID:21086160

  11. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  12. [Retrobulbar Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Özben; Başak, Tülay; Yakar, Rabia; Doğukan, Fatih Mert; Ergen, Erdem; Kabukçuoğlu, Fevziye

    2015-12-01

    Hydatid cyst is an infectious disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus, transmitted by dogs and encountered mostly in liver and lungs. As the central nervous system involvement is considered, retrobulbar disease is seen pretty rarely. In this subject; a patient complaining from an impaired vision diagnosed as hydatid cyst disease via radiological imagings and histopathological findings. PMID:26809919

  13. Median raphe cyst of the penis.

    PubMed

    Terao, Y; Hamada, T

    1984-11-01

    A case of median raphe cyst of the penis in a 7-year-old boy is reported. Although the lesion is rare, characteristic clinical features makes it easy to diagnose median raphe cyst of the penis, which has been mistakenly reported as apocrine hidrocystoma. Surgical excision must be performed to prevent recurrence. PMID:6499536

  14. Dermoid Cyst Within Concha: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nasirmohtaram, Sevil; Akbari, Maryam

    2016-06-01

    Dermoid cysts are congenital anomalies derived from ectoderm. They are rare in head and neck region and especially in pinna. We presented an 8-year-old girl with a dermoid cyst in the conchal region of auricle which was treated with complete surgical resection. PMID:27306349

  15. [Isolated epidermal cysts of the vulva].

    PubMed

    Kalampalikis, A; Scheungraber, C; Goetze, S; Schliemann, S; Elsner, P

    2016-07-01

    Vulvar cysts are rare und benign entities. They are epidermoid cysts which may develop following trauma or surgery. They can also spontaneously develop. They vary in number and size. They grow slowly and tend to show calcification. The treatment consists of surgical removal. Other methods are pinch-punch excision, heat application, and incision. PMID:26857133

  16. A pericardial hydatid cyst and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Erol, Tansel; Altay, Hakan; Tarim, Ebru

    2011-06-01

    A cardiac hydatid cyst in pregnancy is a very rare condition. Surgical intervention followed by medical therapy is the treatment of choice. A hydatid disease in pregnancy is challenging with a varied presentation and manifestation. A pregnant woman presented with a ruptured pericardial cyst diagnosed by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and serology. Finally, she received medical treatment and no surgical intervention. PMID:21744713

  17. Palatine tonsil cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Degner, D A; Bauer, M S; Ehrhart, E J

    1994-04-01

    A 7-year-old spayed female Doberman Pinscher had a fluctuant red mass that filled the entire crypt of the left palatine tonsil. The mass was surgically excised and was found to be a tonsillar cyst on histologic examination. Because the cyst was lined with pseudostratified epithelium, embryonic origin was the most probable etiopathogenesis. PMID:8045803

  18. [Laparoscopic decapsulation of congenital splenic cyst].

    PubMed

    Visnjić, Stjepan; Zupancić, Bozidar; Car, Andrija; Roić, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Nonparasitic splenic cysts are uncommon and may be congenital or post-traumatic in origin. Complications may include enlargement with pain, rupture, and infection. The laparoscopy is widely accepted method in the treatment of this condition with numerous approaches. A technique of partial decapsulation-fenestration designed to minimize the risk of splenic loss and cyst recurrence is presented. PMID:18018710

  19. Osteolytic lumbar discal cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Marushima, Aiki; Uemura, Kazuya; Sato, Naoaki; Maruno, Toru; Matsumura, Akira

    2008-08-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with left lumboischialgia refractory to medical treatment. Neurological examination revealed L5 and S1 radiculopathy which rapidly worsened over a short period. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated disk bulging with a discal cyst at the L4-5 intervertebral space and disk herniation at the L5-S1 intervertebral space. Computed tomography showed osteolytic change of the L5 vertebral body adjacent to the cyst. Resection of the cyst and removal of the herniated disk were performed following fenestration of the L4-5 and L5-S1 interlaminar spaces. Bloody serous fluid followed by clear serous fluid was recognized during the aspiration and partial resection of the cyst at the L4-5 level. Histological examination demonstrated a cyst wall consisting of fibrous connective tissue without a single-layer lining of cells, and fibrin deposits. The patient's symptoms disappeared immediately after the operation. This osteolytic lumbar discal cyst possibly occurred subsequent to hemorrhage from the epidural venous plexus following intervertebral disk injury, hematoma encapsulation by connective fibrous tissue, and cyst wall formation in reaction to the disk injury and hemorrhage. The cyst may have enlarged due to the inflow of the serous fluid from the water-containing degenerated disk. PMID:18719328

  20. Unusual presentation of a simple renal cyst

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Veena; Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Khan, Roobina; Gaur, Kavita; Harris, S Hasan

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 23-year-old woman who presented with a lump in her right abdomen which was 7 cm in diameter. Ultrasonography showed a unilocular cyst, which was diagnosed as a simple renal cyst. This case is presented for its rare occurrence in young females and unusual clinical presentation as a huge abdominal mass. PMID:22715271

  1. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs. Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference. We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups. We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  2. [Dentigerous cyst in the mixed dentition].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Mariann; Adrienn, Barta; Zsuzsanna, Suba; Szilvia, Mihályi

    2012-12-01

    Dentigerous cyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst, which apparently develops by accumulation of fluid between the reduced enamel epithelium and the tooth crown of an unerupted tooth. Management of dentigerous cyst in primary dentition needs special consideration regarding the preservation of the developing permanent tooth buds. A case of dentigerous cyst is reported in primary dentition of a 7-year-old female patient and its management. By extracting the infected primary teeth, opening the cyst and ensuring continuous drainage, it is possible to achieve spontaneous eruption of the involved permanent teeth into the dental arch even if they are badly dislocated. Simultaneous with the eruption of the permanent teeth, ossification of the bony defect can take place. The reparatory process is completed in one to two years, during this time the patient has been given a space-maintainer. PMID:23387129

  3. Chylous mesenteric cysts: a rare surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Perri, Giampaolo; Freschi, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is defined as a cyst that is located in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract and may extend from the base of the mesentery into the retroperitoneum. It is often asymptomatic and therefore it is usually found as an incidental finding. Preoperative diagnosis may be possible with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the correct diagnosis can only be made with histology. The first-choice therapy is the complete removal of the cyst, which must be accurately planned according to the anatomy of the lesion, its dimensions and its relationships with major abdominal structures. We present two clinical cases: the one of a 30-year-old man with a mesenteric cyst that was removed by laparoscopy and the other of a 61-year-old woman who underwent open excision of a huge retroperitoneal cyst. PMID:24876395

  4. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Józsa, Gergő; Mohay, Gabriella; Pintér, András; Vástyán, Attila

    2015-09-13

    19 children were diagnosed with abdominal cysts of different origin in the Surgical Unit of the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary between 2010 and 2013. The authors discuss the details of representative cases of a parovarial cyst, an intestinal duplication, and an omental cyst with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, diagnostic tools, and surgical interventions. The authors conclude that abdominal cysts often cause mild symptoms only, and they are discovered accidentally by ultrasound imaging performed for other reasons. In some cases, the cyst can cause severe complaints or even acute abdomen requiring emergency surgery. Laporoscopy may be a valuable method both in diagnosis and surgical therapy. Abdominal CT or MRI are not required in the majority of the patients. PMID:26552027

  5. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  6. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  7. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  8. Sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-03-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  9. Voice Change Due to Paratracheal Air Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Youn Ju; Han, Sung Joon; Chong, Yoo Young; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Choong-Sik; Kang, Min-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Paratracheal air cysts are a rare entity in which cystic formation occurs adjacent to the trachea. Most patients with paratracheal air cysts are asymptomatic, and the cysts are detected incidentally on chest radiograph or computed tomography (CT) scan. Most symptomatic patients complain of pulmonary symptoms or repeated respiratory infection. Rarely, the air cysts can lead to paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve as a result of direct compression. We report a case of a 59-year-old male patient who presented with voice change, and the cause was identified as paratracheal air cysts on a chest CT scan. Surgical resection via video-assisted mediastinoscopy was performed, and the voice recovered immediately after the operation. PMID:27525245

  10. Vitelline cyst in the rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Oshikata, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Azusa; Kumabe, Shino; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Katoku, Koshirou; Mitsuishi, Mikio; Kanno, Takeshi; Hamamura, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Congenital vitelline duct anomalies other than Meckel’s diverticulum are rare in animals. A cyst of approximately 8 mm in diameter was observed on the antimesenteric surface of the ileal serosa in a 10-week-old female Crl:CD(SD) rat. Microscopically, the cyst closely resembled the ileum, but it did not communicate with the ileal lumen. We diagnosed this case as a vitelline cyst derived from the vitelline duct based on the location where it developed and its histological behavior. In rats, only Meckel’s diverticulum has been reported with a congenital anomaly of the vitelline duct, and no other spontaneous anomalies including a vitelline cyst have been reported. This case may be the first report concerning a vitelline cyst in the rat ileum. PMID:26538812

  11. Extradural spinal synovial cysts in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, P J; Sturges, B K; Berry, W L; Vernau, K M; Koblik, P D; Lecouteur, R A

    2001-10-01

    Nine dogs presenting for investigation of cervical or thoracolumbar myelopathies were diagnosed with extradural spinal synovial cysts. Degenerative disease affecting the articular facets or intervertebral discs was present on plain spinal radiographs in all cases. Myelography was consistent with dorsolateral, extradural spinal cord compression. Two groups of dogs were identified: (1) young, giant breed dogs with multiple cysts involving one or more levels of the cervical spinal cord; and (2) older, large breed dogs with solitary cysts involving the thoracolumbar spinal cord. The synovial cysts constituted the major compressive lesions in four of the dogs. Analysis of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminocytological dissociation, consistent with chronic compressive myelopathy, in six dogs. All dogs underwent decompressive surgery and the diagnosis of synovial cysts was confirmed histologically. The mean follow-up period was 17 months (range four to 36 months). At the time of follow-up, all dogs were fully ambulatory with improved neurological function compared with that at initial presentation. PMID:11688527

  12. Multiple mediastinal hydatid cysts: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein; Mahmodlou, Rahim

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid cyst (HC) in mediastinum is very rare. To the best of our knowledge, a case with multiple HCs in mediastinum is not reported already. We herein report a case of multiple HCs of the mediastinum and liver in a - 50 year-old woman presented with chest pain, cough and dyspnea for about two years. She had been treated for tuberculosis for 20 years. Chest CT scan showed multiple cysts in posterior mediastinum and one cyst in left lobe of liver. Via right posterolateral thoracotomy, multiple cysts were excised in mediastinum. And then, hepatic left lobe cyst was removed trans-diaphragmatically. Histopathologic examination confirmed HCs. Despite its rarity, primary HCs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal multiple cystic lesions in endemic regions. PMID:20067057

  13. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... too far. In children with hypermobility syndrome, those ligaments are loose or weak. This may lead to: Arthritis, which may develop over time Dislocated joints, which is a separation of two bones where they meet at a joint Sprains and strains Children with hypermobile joints also often have flat ...

  14. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  15. Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pakala, Tina; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y

    2016-03-28

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes (larval stage) of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. E. granulosus are common parasites in certain parts of the world, and are present on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. As a result, a large number of people are affected by CE. The increased emigration of populations from endemic areas where prevalence rates are as high as 5-10% and the relatively quiescent clinical course of CE pose challenges for accurate and timely diagnoses. Upon infection with CE, cyst formation mainly occurs in the liver (70%). Diagnosis involves serum serologic testing for antibodies against hydatid antigens, but preferably with imaging by ultrasound or CT/MRI. Treatment methods include chemotherapy with benzimidazole carbamates and/or surgical approaches, including percutaneous aspiration injection and reaspiration. The success of these methods is influenced by the stage and location of hepatic cysts. However, CE can be clinically silent, and has a high risk for recurrence. It is important to consider the echinococcal parasite in the differential diagnosis of liver cystic lesions, especially in patients of foreign origin, and to perform appropriate long-term follow-ups. The aim of this review is to highlight the epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic methods, and treatment of liver disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:27047771

  16. Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pakala, Tina; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes (larval stage) of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. E. granulosus are common parasites in certain parts of the world, and are present on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. As a result, a large number of people are affected by CE. The increased emigration of populations from endemic areas where prevalence rates are as high as 5–10% and the relatively quiescent clinical course of CE pose challenges for accurate and timely diagnoses. Upon infection with CE, cyst formation mainly occurs in the liver (70%). Diagnosis involves serum serologic testing for antibodies against hydatid antigens, but preferably with imaging by ultrasound or CT/MRI. Treatment methods include chemotherapy with benzimidazole carbamates and/or surgical approaches, including percutaneous aspiration injection and reaspiration. The success of these methods is influenced by the stage and location of hepatic cysts. However, CE can be clinically silent, and has a high risk for recurrence. It is important to consider the echinococcal parasite in the differential diagnosis of liver cystic lesions, especially in patients of foreign origin, and to perform appropriate long-term follow-ups. The aim of this review is to highlight the epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic methods, and treatment of liver disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:27047771

  17. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe. PMID:26636254

  18. Bony window approach for a traumatic bone cyst on the mandibular condyle: a case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) occurs preferentially on the mandibular symphysis and body, but rarely on the mandibular condyle. When TBC occurs in the condylar area, it can usually be related with or misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder. A 15-year-old female patient visited the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic with a 5-year history of pain and noise localized in the left temporomandibular joint. On imaging, a well demarked oval-shaped radiolucent lesion was observed on the left condyle head. The patient underwent cyst enucleation and repositioning of the bony window on the lateral cortex of the affected condyle head under the impression of subchondral cyst or TBC; however, no cystic membrane was found. The bone defect resolved and showed no recurrence on the serial radiographic postoperative follow-up for 43 months after surgery. PMID:27595088

  19. Bony window approach for a traumatic bone cyst on the mandibular condyle: a case report with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Keun; Lim, Jae-Hyung; Jeon, Kug-Jin; Huh, Jong-Ki

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) occurs preferentially on the mandibular symphysis and body, but rarely on the mandibular condyle. When TBC occurs in the condylar area, it can usually be related with or misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder. A 15-year-old female patient visited the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic with a 5-year history of pain and noise localized in the left temporomandibular joint. On imaging, a well demarked oval-shaped radiolucent lesion was observed on the left condyle head. The patient underwent cyst enucleation and repositioning of the bony window on the lateral cortex of the affected condyle head under the impression of subchondral cyst or TBC; however, no cystic membrane was found. The bone defect resolved and showed no recurrence on the serial radiographic postoperative follow-up for 43 months after surgery. PMID:27595088

  20. Bilateral nasolabial cysts - case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Aruna R; Singh, Abhinav Pratap; Nandikoor, Shrivalli; Meganathan, Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Nasolabial cyst is a non-odontogenic, extraosseous, soft tissue cyst, commonly unilateral, located in the nasolabial fold. Bilateral nasolabial cysts are of rare occurrence. This case report describes the multimodality imaging appearance of bilateral nasolabial cysts with a review of literature.

  1. Flap advancement coverage after excision of large mucous cysts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eon K; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2007-06-01

    Mucous cysts are common problems seen by hand surgeons. Surgical excision of symptomatic cysts is the most commonly accepted treatment. Removal of large mucous cysts often requires simultaneous flap coverage or skin grafting for the resulting defect. We present the use of a dorsal advancement flap to permit excellent skin coverage after cyst excision with a tension-free closure. PMID:17549023

  2. Atypical cause of radiculopathy - Intradural spinal arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Krstačić, Antonija; Krstačić, Goran; Butković Soldo, Silva

    2016-08-01

    Intradural spinal arachnoid cysts are a relatively uncommon lesion that may be either intra, or extradural, and intradural spinal arachnoid cysts are even less common. Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms. The objective of this paper is to describe a rare case of radicular pain due to a spinal arachnoid cyst. PMID:27104760

  3. Recurrent synovial chondromatosis of the distal interphalangeal joint: case report.

    PubMed

    Craft, Randall O; Smith, Anthony A; Duncan, Scott F M

    2009-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with recurrent synovial chondromatosis of the distal interphalangeal joint at the site of removal of what was thought to be a ganglion cyst in 2003 and the subsequent excision of a recurrent synovial chondromatosis in 2005. Although synovial chondromatosis is typically described as a benign, self-limiting process, recurrent disease and local erosion of the joint of this patient required wide excision with bone grafting and arthrodesis for definitive treatment. PMID:19181231

  4. [The "globulomaxillary cyst" a specific entity or a myth?].

    PubMed

    Häring, Philipp; Filippi, Andreas; Bornstein, Michael M; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Buser, Daniel; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The following review investigates the term and concept of the globulomaxillary cyst as a correct clinico-pathological diagnosis to describe a so-called fissural cyst said to be caused by epithelial entrapment between the nasal and maxillary process. After analyzing the available literature it has to be concluded that neither from an embryologic nor from a clinical or pathohistological standpoint the term globulomaxillary cyst represents a real entity by itself. Therefore, globulomaxillary cysts have to be diagnosed alternatively after a thorough clinical, radiological and histological examination as other odontogenic cysts like dentigerous cysts or odontogenic keratocysts, odontogenic tumors like ameloblastoma, central giant cell tumors, solitary bone cysts, etc. PMID:16708524

  5. Isolated retroperitoneal hydatid cyst invading splenic hilum.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Safak; Unver, Mutlu; Kibar Ozturk, Burcin; Kebapci, Eyup; Bozbiyik, Osman; Erol, Varlık; Zalluhoglu, Nihat; Olmez, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Hydatid disease (HD) is an infestation that is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The liver is affected in approximately two-thirds of patients, the lungs in 25%, and other organs in a small proportion. Primary retroperitoneal hydatid cyst is extremely rare. The most common complaint is abdominal pain; however, the clinical features of HD may be generally dependent on the location of the cyst. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old female was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain. Her physical examination was normal. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 17 × 11 cm cystic lesion, with a thick and smooth wall that is located among the left liver lobe, diaphragm, spleen, tail of the pancreas, and transverse colon and invading the splenic hilum. Total cystectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathological examination was reported as cyst hydatid. Discussion. Cysts in the peritoneal cavity are mainly the result of the spontaneous or traumatic rupture of concomitant hepatic cysts or surgical inoculation of a hepatic cyst. Serological tests contribute to diagnosis. In symptomatic and large hydatid peritoneal cysts, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. Total cystectomy is the gold standard. Albendazole or praziquantel is indicated for inoperable and disseminated cases. Percutaneous aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR) technique is another nonsurgical option. PMID:24790764

  6. Isolated Retroperitoneal Hydatid Cyst Invading Splenic Hilum

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Safak; Unver, Mutlu; Kibar Ozturk, Burcin; Kebapci, Eyup; Bozbiyik, Osman; Erol, Varlık; Zalluhoglu, Nihat; Olmez, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Hydatid disease (HD) is an infestation that is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The liver is affected in approximately two-thirds of patients, the lungs in 25%, and other organs in a small proportion. Primary retroperitoneal hydatid cyst is extremely rare. The most common complaint is abdominal pain; however, the clinical features of HD may be generally dependent on the location of the cyst. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old female was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain. Her physical examination was normal. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 17 × 11 cm cystic lesion, with a thick and smooth wall that is located among the left liver lobe, diaphragm, spleen, tail of the pancreas, and transverse colon and invading the splenic hilum. Total cystectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathological examination was reported as cyst hydatid. Discussion. Cysts in the peritoneal cavity are mainly the result of the spontaneous or traumatic rupture of concomitant hepatic cysts or surgical inoculation of a hepatic cyst. Serological tests contribute to diagnosis. In symptomatic and large hydatid peritoneal cysts, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. Total cystectomy is the gold standard. Albendazole or praziquantel is indicated for inoperable and disseminated cases. Percutaneous aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR) technique is another nonsurgical option. PMID:24790764

  7. Conservative management of dentigerous cysts in children

    PubMed Central

    Arjona-Amo, Manuel; Serrera-Figallo, María-Angeles; Hernández-Guisado, José-María; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and Introduction Dentigerous cysts are epithelial in origin and are the most commonly found cyst in children. The majority of these lesions are usually a radiological finding and are capable of quite large before being diagnosed. The standard treatment for these cysts is the enucleation and the extraction of the affected tooth. However, if the patient is a child and the affected tooth is not developed, a more conservative attitude should be considered. Material and Methods (Clinical case): A 7-year-old patient is presented with an eruptive backlog of the lower permanent first molars. Radiological examination reveals two radiolucid lesions in relation to them, which are compatible with a dentigerous cyst, and in relation to the inferior aveolar nerve and various germs. A partial enucleation is carried out, maintaining all the dental germs related to the cyst in mouth and monitoring the patient until the case study is over. Results and Discussion Diagnosis and early treatment of these lesions in children is of great importance, especially in cases where the lesions enclose permanent teeth. Conclusions Whenever possible, a conservative attitude should be taken, one that allows for the maintenance of the dentition and treatment of the associated cyst in order to not compromise either the occlusion or the mental state of these patients. Key words:Dentigerous cyst, conservative treatment, dental impaction, child. PMID:26644847

  8. Pancreatic body hydatid cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sorogy, Mohamed El; El-Hemaly, Mohamed; Aboelenen, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation caused by the cystic stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cysts are commonly located in the liver and lung. Pancreatic affection by hydatid cysts is very rare even in endemic areas. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our case is a 34-year-old male patient referred to our centre with a pancreatic body cyst diagnosed by abdominal CT scan. The patient gave 3 months history of epigastric pain. He also gave history of travelling to Saudi Arabia and China. His enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELIZA) test for echinococcal antigens was positive. Surgical exploration revealed a 7 cm cyst in the body of the pancreas separable from the surroundings. Endocystectomy and deroofing of the cyst was done. DISCUSSION Due to its rarity and similarity with more common pancreatic cystic conditions, diagnosis of pancreatic hydatid cyst may be challenging. Abdmonial sonography and CT scan together with enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELIZA) test for echinococcal antigens are helpful diagnostic tools. Therapeutic options include endocystectomy and deroofing, albendazol therapy with percutaneous drainage or laparoscopic excision of the cyst. CONCLUSION Even in non-endemic areas, past history of travelling abroad in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions should raise the suspicion of hydatid disease as a possible diagnosis. PMID:25528027

  9. Management of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianqiang; Sun, Yongdong; Huang, Xin; Luan, Wenzhong

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been no consensus on the optimal treatment of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Most previous reports concerning the management methods were either sporadic case reports or a series of limited cases. This study is to further optimize the management for patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts by analyzing the outcomes of a cohort of patients who were treated with different strategies. Methods and Findings We reviewed the outcomes of 15 patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts who were managed by three different modalities from 1998 through 2010. Six patients underwent microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication. Seven patients underwent a modified surgical procedure, during which the cerebrospinal fluid leak aperture was located and repaired. Two patients were treated with medication and physical therapy. Outcomes of the patients were assessed by following up (13 months to 10 years). All of the six patients treated with microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication experienced complete or substantial relief of their preoperative symptoms. However, the symptoms of one patient reappeared eight months after the operation. Another patient experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six of the seven patients treated with the modified surgical operation experienced complete or substantial resolution of their preoperative symptoms, with only one patient who experienced temporary worsening of his preoperative urine incontinence, which disappeared gradually one month later. No new postoperative neurological deficits, no cerebrospinal fluid leaks and no recurrence were observed in the seven patients. The symptoms of the two patients treated with conservative measures aggravated with time. Conclusions Microsurgical operation should be a treatment consideration in patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Furthermore, the surgical procedure with partial cyst removal and aperture repair

  10. Contralateral Juxtafacet Cyst Development after the Spontaneous Resolution of a Previous Facet Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are implicated in neural compression. Thus far, it is known that surgical removal is the definitive treatment for symptomatic juxtafacet cyst because spontaneous regression is rare, and the failure rate of conservative treatment is high. We have reported a rare case of right-sided juxtafacet cyst development after the spontaneous resolution of contralateral left-sided facet cyst. The left-sided facet cyst resolved spontaneously without surgical treatment, but a juxtacyst developed on the contralateral facet on the right side, as illustrated on 4-year follow-up magnetic resonance images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of newly developed contralateral juxtafacet cyst after spontaneous regression. Herein, we have discussed the natural history and the management of this rare case. PMID:26819695

  11. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S. K.; Sundar, I. Vijay; Sharma, Vinod; Goel, Ravishankar S.

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options. PMID:24082689

  12. Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... be (benign noncancerous), they are sometimes found in parts of the brain that control vital functions. There are four main ... be located in the area where the top part of the brain meets the brain stem. Description Just like a ...

  13. Glabellar dermoid cyst: A case presentation.

    PubMed

    Celik, Tuba

    2016-09-01

    Dermoid cysts are one of the most common non-inflammatory space-occupying orbital lesions in the pediatric population. They are ectodermal cysts which may contain squamous epithelium with dermal contents such as skin, hair follicles, sebaceous glands, or sweat glands. Dermoid cyts are often innocent, however complications such as inflammation of the fistula or preseptal cellulitis are occasionally seen. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with a glabellar dermoid cyst and describe the appropriate investigations and definitive treatment. PMID:26885559

  14. Giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst for 13 years

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Satish Kumar; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    A case of intradiploic arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient presented with a progressively enlarging swelling situated over left frontal region for approximately 13-years following blunt trauma to head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradiploic fluid containing cyst having intensity like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). He underwent craniotomy and successful surgical repair. Intraoperatively CSF cyst was located in the frontal pole with a large defect over inner table and large rent in the dura. It was lined with arachnoid membrane. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:25250069

  15. Mediastinal bronchogenic cyst mimicking congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sumitha; Kumar, Manish; Ross, Benjamin Jeyanth

    2016-01-01

    Bronchogenic cyst (BC) is a rare congenital malformation of the lung. Most patients remain asymptomatic until adulthood while some are symptomatic in the first few years of life. However, symptoms in newborn period are rare. We report a case of a 3-day-old preterm baby with respiratory distress diagnosed as congenital lobar emphysema on chest X-ray. A CT scan revealed a mediastinal cyst causing obstructive lobar emphysema. The cyst was excised and pathological examination was suggestive of BC. PMID:27609589

  16. Cardiac hydatid cyst: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ustünsoy, Haşim; Akdemir, Ilyas; Sivrikoz, M Cumhur; Tahtaci, Nursan; Aksoy, Mehmet; Tunçözgür, Bülent

    2002-01-01

    Cardiac hydatid cyst is life threatening but rare. It is usually asymptomatic and has potentially lethal complications, so early diagnosis with definitive treatment is life-saving. In the present article, we report two cases. The first is a 30-year-old woman with a primary large multivesicular hydatid cyst in the left ventricle. The second is a 17-year-old woman who had multivisceral involvement with a cardiac hydatid cyst, a congenital cardiac anomaly that was an atrial septal defect complicated by pulmonary hypertension. 2-D echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis. Surgical treatment was performed using extracorporeal circulation and adjunctive albendazol therapy. PMID:16352080

  17. Sacral perineural cysts: imaging and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Landers, J; Seex, K

    2002-04-01

    Perineural cysts are an uncommon radiological finding and a rare cause of radicular leg pain. We report the clinical findings, imaging and operative appearances of a patient who presented with radicular leg and perineal pain, which was found to be associated with multiple sacral perineural cysts. The diagnostic and treatment options are explored. In particular, the use of percutaneous fine-needle cyst drainage as a guide to the value of surgery is discussed. Postoperative complications, such as pseudomeningocoele can occur, but may be effectively treated with lumbar drainage. PMID:12046741

  18. Parathyroid cysts: a clinical and radiological challenge.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Jolene; Lewis, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Parathyroid cysts are rare causes of neck swelling accounting for 0.6% of thyroid and parathyroid lesions. They may be functional, resulting in the release of parathyroid hormone, or non-functional. Non-functional cysts may be cosmetically unacceptable or cause dysphagia, dyspnoea or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy as a result of compression. This article presents a young woman who was diagnosed with a thyroid cyst both on examination and imaging. However, the final histology confirmed this to be parathyroid in origin and this should be considered in the differential of such neck swellings. PMID:22504755

  19. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts. PMID:26180389

  20. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts. PMID:26180389

  1. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient.

  2. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Piyush; Bishen, Kundendu A.; Gupta, Nishant; Jamdade, Anshuman; Kumar, Gopa R.

    2012-01-01

    Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC) is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC) as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size. PMID:23293492

  3. Intramedullary cyst formation after removal of multiple intradural spinal arachnoid cysts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Servello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background: A rare cause of spinal cord compression is spinal arachnoid cysts. Symptoms are caused by spinal cord compression, however, asymptomatic patients have been also reported. Treatment options depend upon symptom severity and clinical course. Case Description: We report the case of a 47-year-old patient who developed an intramedullary arachnoid cyst after removal of an intradural extramedullary cyst. Conclusion: Surgery should be considered early in a symptomatic disease course. Longstanding medullary compression may reduce the possibility of neurological recovery as well as secondary complications such as intramedullary cyst formation. PMID:27512608

  4. Spectrum of MRI features of ganglion and synovial cysts.

    PubMed

    Neto, Nelson; Nunnes, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts occur mainly, but not necessarily, in association with osteoarthritis. Presentation varies widely, ranging from small, incidentally detected, asymptomatic lesions to giant ones that might be the source of symptoms, either due to their compressive effect on adjacent structures or due to complications, such as rupture. On magnetic resonance imaging they are typically presented as smooth, well-circumscribed, thin-walled, unilocular, and homogeneously T2-hyperintense lesions. An identifiable thin stalk communicating to the joint space is not infrequent. Nevertheless, depending on their age, anatomic location, and eventual complication, they might have many distinct appearances, including septae and internal debris, which the radiologist must be familiar with in order to accurately differentiate them from worrisome cystic-like lesions. With regard to this diversity, some illustrative cases are presented. PMID:26911967

  5. Right ventricular hydatid cyst ruptured to pericardium

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Vaziri, Siavoosh; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hydatidosis is rare presentation of body hydatidosis. Incidence of cardiac involvements range from 5% to 5% of patients with hydatid disease. Most common site of hydatid cyst in heart is interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. Right ventricular free wall involvement by cyst that ruptured to pericardial cavity is very rare presentation of hydatid cyst. Cardiac involvement may have serious consequences such as rupture to blood steam or pericardial cavity. Both the disease and its surgical treatment carry a high complication rate, including rupture leading to cardiac tamponade, anaphylaxis and also death. In the present report, a 43-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis secondary to a pericardial hydatid cyst is described. PMID:26139761

  6. A Rare Case Report of Conjunctival Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, M. R.; Murthy, Chethan N

    2015-01-01

    A conjunctival cyst is a thin-walled sac or vesicle that contains fluid. This vesicle may develop either on or under the conjunctiva. It develops due to variety of causes such as infection, inflammation, retention cyst and rarely drug induced. The authors aimed to report a case of conjuctival cyst in a 34-year-old male following instillation of anti-allergic topical drugs for over period of one year. Conjuctival cyst developing due to chronic use of anti-allergic topical drugs containing preservatives is one of the complications associated with it. Presence of a preservative in an ocular medication has often been considered in damaging the epithelium. Inclusion of a preservative is equally necessary, especially in multiple-drug therapy in order to protect against dangerous organisms accidentally gaining access during instillation. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK), chlorobutanol, chlorhexidine acetate (CHA) and phenylmercuric nitrate or acetate are some commonly used preservatives in eye drops. PMID:26675748

  7. [Large articular geode cyst in rheumatoid polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Sabri, F; Calmes, D; Muller, M J

    1989-01-01

    A case of a large bone cyst in the tibial condyle of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is reported. The etiology and pathology are discussed, and preventive surgical treatment is recommended. PMID:2801089

  8. Needlescopic decapsulation of a splenic epithelial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Pieter A.; Poulin, Eric C.; Mamazza, Joseph; Schlachta, Christopher M.

    2000-01-01

    As technology advances, the techniques of laparoscopic surgery are being refined and their aplication is expanding to include many disease processes and organs. The new-generation laparoscopic instruments are becoming smaller (less than 5 mm). Expected advantages include improvements in cosmesis and patient satisfaction, and decreased postoperative analgesic requirements. Non-neoplastic cysts of the spleen are rare, and their management has evolved from total open splenectomy to laparoscopic cyst decapsulation. A 22-year-old woman with a symptomatic 10-cm epithelial cyst was treated by splenic decapsulation with needlescopic instruments (3 mm or smaller). Three trocars were used: one 12-mm umbilical and two 3-mm subcostal ports. The cyst was punctured by a Veress needle, and after drainage of straw-coloured fluid, circumferential decapsulation with 5-mm laparoscopic shears through the umbilical port site was done. The patient was discharged within 24 hours, having had a single intramuscular injection of meperidine and an excellent cosmetic result. PMID:10948693

  9. Floating Vitreous Cyst: Two Clinical Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lavric, Alenka; Urbancic, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report two cases of solitary unilateral vitreous cyst. Methods A complete ocular examination, fundus photography, B-scan ultrasound and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography were performed in both patients. Results The first patient (a 39-year-old man) presented with transient blurred vision in the right eye. The second patient (a 78-year-old man) reported transient blurred vision in the right eye when changing head position. He was referred to the Eye Hospital because of vitreomacular traction in the other eye. After examination, a diagnosis of vitreous cyst was made in both cases. Conclusions Vitreous cysts are rare clinical findings. They can occur in normal eyes or in eyes with certain ocular pathologies. When a cyst floats into the visual axis area, it can disturb visual function; therefore, patients usually report transient blurring of vision. A prompt clinical examination is necessary for differentiating this rare condition. PMID:24348410

  10. Epidermoid cysts of the velum interpositum.

    PubMed

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Daniel, Roy T; Chacko, Geeta; Chacko, Ari G

    2008-10-01

    The cistern of the velum interpositum is a space located between the corpus callosum dorsally and the roof of the third ventricle ventrally. Lesions located within the velum interpositum are rare and include meningiomas, pilocytic astrocytomas, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors and arachnoid cysts. Epidermoid cysts in this location have not been reported previously. We report the clinical and radiological features of two patients with epidermoid cysts located in the velum interpositum. The patients presented with gait difficulty and features of raised intracranial pressure and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated large tumors in the velum interpositum with intensities suggestive of epidermoid cysts. There was ventral displacement of the internal cerebral veins and dorsal displacement of the corpus callosum in keeping with a mass in the velum interpositum. Tumors of the third ventricle displace the internal cerebral veins dorsally. A transcallosal approach was used in both patients to effectively excise the tumors. PMID:18710812

  11. Extensive epidermoid cyst of the submental region

    PubMed Central

    Utumi, Estevam Rubens; Araujo, Juliane Pirágine; Pedron, Irineu Gregnanin; Yonezaki, Frederico; Machado, Gustavo Grothe

    2016-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are malformations that are rarely observed in the submental region. Imaging has an important role in surgical planning according to the size and location of the cyst in relation to geniohyoid and mylohyoid muscles. This article reports the case of a 15-year-old female patient complaining of submental swelling. The differential diagnosis included infection, tumor, ranula, and abnormalities during embryonic development. The lesion was surgically excised using an extra-oral approach. The histopathological examination revealed a cyst wall lined with stratified squamous epithelium with the presence of several horny scales consistent with the diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. No recurrences were found after 1 year of follow-up.

  12. Surgical results of sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ikuma, Hisanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical outcomes and to determine indicators of the necessity of surgical intervention. Twelve consecutive patients harboring symptomatic sacral perineural cysts were treated between 1995 and 2003. All patients were assessed for neurological deficits and pain by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance of imaging, computerized tomography, and myelography were performed to detect signs of delayed filling of the cysts. We performed a release of the valve and imbrication of the sacral cysts with laminectomies in 8 cases or recapping laminectomies in 4 cases. After surgery, symptoms improved in 10 (83%) of 12 patients, with an average follow-up of 27 months. Ten patients had sacral perineural cysts with signs of positive filling defect. Two (17%) of 12 patients experienced no significant improvement. In one of these patients, the filling defect was negative. In conclusion, a positive filling defect may become an indicator of good treatment outcomes. PMID:16508691

  13. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  14. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  15. Ruptured, Intracranial Dermoid Cyst - A Visual Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are a very rare entity of intracranial tumours. The traumatic or non-traumatic rupture of the cyst wall is a serious complication that can be treated surgically or conservatively depending on the clinical symptoms. However, more common entities have to be considered as a differential diagnosis. We report on a female patient who was admitted with complaints of significant, prolonged headache and diffuse pain. Analysis of her blood and cerebrospinal fluid indicated no clear pathology. A CT examination of the head revealed a ruptured dermoid cyst adjacent to the left sphenoidal bone. An additional MRI was conducted to confirm the CT findings and rule out an intracranial ischemia or vasospasms. A conservative therapy was scheduled and the patient recovered well. Using current imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to identify a ruptured dermoid cyst by its pathognomonic signal behavior and rule out potentially life threatening complications. PMID:27190918

  16. Functional lutein cyst in a postmenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M L; Plotka, E D

    1977-07-01

    A postmenopausal woman presented with enlarged breasts, increased vaginal mucus, and elevated serum estrogen and normal progesterone levels. A laparotomy was performed and revealed a cystic right ovary. Histologic examination of the ovary demonstrated a cyst lined by stratified lutein cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. The endometrium showed cystic and adenomatous hyperplasia. The diagnosis was functional lutein cyst. Removal of the cystic ovary reduced the estrogen levels, and the clinical picture reverted to that of a normal postmenopausal state. PMID:876536

  17. Median raphe cysts of the penis.

    PubMed

    Asarch, R G; Golitz, L E; Sausker, W F; Kreye, G M

    1979-09-01

    The occurrence of a ventral cystic lesion of the penis should alert the clinician to the diagnosis of a median raphe cyst. The lesions, which are most common near the glans penis, may occur anywhere from the urethral meatus to the anus. Cysts of the median raphe represent defects in the embryologic development of the genitalia and are usually lined by entodermal epithelium. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:485186

  18. Clinicopathological features and histogenesis of penile cysts.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Cecilia; Chaux, Alcides; Velazquez, Elsa F; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2015-05-01

    Cysts arising in the penis are uncommon and can be found anywhere from the urethral meatus to the root of the penis involving glans, foreskin, or shaft. Median raphe cysts account for the majority of penile cystic lesions reported in the literature. As their name suggests, they arise on the ventral midline of the penis that extends from the urethral meatus to the scrotum and perineum. Proposed hypotheses for their origin as well as their diverse morphology are discussed. PMID:25701383

  19. Gastric duplication cyst: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Doepker, Matthew P.; Ahmad, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon finding, especially in the adult population. Presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but can include abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. In this report, we present a 28-year-old female diagnosed with a communicating gastric cyst with both gastric and duodenal mucosa, along with pancreatic tissue and no evidence of dysplasia or malignancy. The clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described and compared to findings in the literature. PMID:27150283

  20. Intracranial Cysts: An Imagery Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Oprişan, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral cysts and cystic appearing intracerebral masses are common findings at routine cerebral imaging examination. We discuss here the most interesting aspects of some intracerebral cysts encountered in medical practice in terms of imaging, clinical and pathological description, and problems of differential diagnosis. On an almost routine basis, the neurologists have to deal with such differentials. Therefore, we aim to mention here some of the frequently encountered diagnosis problems when a patient presents with a cystic cerebral mass. PMID:23737706

  1. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of the Anterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Srinivasa Pathapati; Reddy, Sridhar Padala; Ananthnag, Jakkula

    2015-01-01

    Context: Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare cyst occurring in the middle-age people with mandibular anterior as the common site of occurrence. Case Report: We report a case of massive GOC in a 65-year-old female with an emphasis on its clinical course, histological features, and treatment modalities. Conclusion: The aggressiveness and recurrences of GOC warrants clinicians for the careful examination, treatment, and long-term follow-up. PMID:25789251

  2. Gastric duplication cyst: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Doepker, Matthew P; Ahmad, Syed A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon finding, especially in the adult population. Presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but can include abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. In this report, we present a 28-year-old female diagnosed with a communicating gastric cyst with both gastric and duodenal mucosa, along with pancreatic tissue and no evidence of dysplasia or malignancy. The clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described and compared to findings in the literature. PMID:27150283

  3. Retroperitoneal Cyst: An Uncommon Presentation of Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Senthil; Galodha, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal parasitic cysts are rare. Here we report about a middle aged male patient from rural north India with a recent onset of central abdominal retroperitoneal lump, pain, and fever. After surgical resection due to diagnostic uncertainty, at histopathology, it turned out be a filarial cyst. After receiving a course of diethylcarbamazine, the patient is asymptomatic at 4 months' follow-up. PMID:26664759

  4. Bacteria Associated with Cysts of the Soybean Cyst Nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Sarah M.; Lawrence, John R.; Zhu, Hong; Swerhone, George D. W.; Welsh, Martha; Welacky, Tom W.; Topp, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, causes economically significant damage to soybeans (Glycine max) in many parts of the world. The cysts of this nematode can remain quiescent in soils for many years as a reservoir of infection for future crops. To investigate bacterial communities associated with SCN cysts, cysts were obtained from eight SCN-infested farms in southern Ontario, Canada, and analyzed by culture-dependent and -independent means. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observations of cyst contents revealed a microbial flora located on the cyst exterior, within a polymer plug region and within the cyst. Microscopic counts using 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazine-2-yl)aminofluorescein staining and in situ hybridization (EUB 338) indicated that the cysts contained (2.6 ± 0.5) × 105 bacteria (mean ± standard deviation) with various cellular morphologies. Filamentous fungi were also observed. Live-dead staining indicated that the majority of cyst bacteria were viable. The probe Nile red also bound to the interior polymer, indicating that it is lipid rich in nature. Bacterial community profiles determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis were simple in composition. Bands shared by all eight samples included the actinobacterium genera Actinomadura and Streptomyces. A collection of 290 bacteria were obtained by plating macerated surface-sterilized cysts onto nutrient broth yeast extract agar or on actinomycete medium. These were clustered into groups of siblings by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR fingerprinting, and representative isolates were tentatively identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. Thirty phylotypes were detected, with the collection dominated by Lysobacter and Variovorax spp. This study has revealed the cysts of this important plant pathogen to be rich in a variety of bacteria, some of which could presumably play a role in the ecology of SCN or have potential as biocontrol agents. PMID:12514048

  5. Hyperdense renal masses: a CT manifestation of hemorrhagic renal cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, S.; Cochran, S.T.; Pagani, J.J.; McArdle, C.; Wong, W.; Austin, R.; Curry, N.; Kelly, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven patients with sharply circumscribed round to ovoid renal cysts measuring 70-90 H on CT are reported. The cysts were hyperdense on unenhanced scans, measuring 30-60 H greater than the adjacent parenchyma, and either hypodense, isodense, or hyperdense on enhanced scans. Four patients had polycystic kidney disease; of the other 7 patients, the cysts were cortical in 6 and parapelvic in 1. Eight patients had a solitary cyst and 3 had multiple cysts. Sonography demonstrated internal echoes and/or lack of increased through-transmission in 6 patients. Pathological analysis was available in 6 cases and indicated a benign, hemorrhagic renal cyst. This hyperdense CT appearance is characteristic of some hemorrhagic renal cysts, though differentiation between benign and malignant cysts requires cyst puncture and/or surgery.

  6. Chronic Hydatid Cyst in Malaysia: A Rare Occurence

    PubMed Central

    SURIA HAYATI, Md Pauzi; BOON TECK EUGENE, Chan; JAN JIN, Bong; MOHD ROSE, Isa

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts are not endemic in Malaysia and are rarely seen. We hereby report a case of hydatid cyst of the liver in a 55-year-old Chinese-Australian lady who presented with a calcified liver cyst and negative hydatid serology. A liver segmentectomy was performed and revealed a well-circumscribed, calcified liver cyst containing only creamy whitish material without the typical daughter cyst. A histological examination revealed different layers of the cyst wall and the presence of loose, calcified scolices without a daughter cyst. The case highlights the importance of considering hydatid cyst in the differential diagnosis of liver cyst even in non-endemic areas, as the ease of travelling and migration allows the condition to be seen outside the endemic region. PMID:25892954

  7. Lumbar Intraforaminal Synovial Cyst in Young Adulthood: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kalevski, Svetoslav K.; Haritonov, Dimitar Georgiev; Peev, Nikolay Angelov

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Lumbar juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Most patients with lumbar cysts are in their sixth decade of life and have significant facet joint and disk degeneration. Lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are extremely rare in adolescence and young adulthood, and to our knowledge, only two pediatric cases of LSC have been reported in the literature. We aim to prove the existence of LSC in adolescent patients as a real entity that causes low back and radicular complaints and to discuss the possibility of traumatic injury as a pathogenic cause of LSC formation in adolescence. A case of an 18-year old patient with LSC is presented. We report the clinical presentation, management, outcome, and review of the literature, focusing on issues that remain debatable. Methods The case is presented together with its clinical course, the diagnostic techniques, the surgical findings, histologic results, and the treatment outcome. Results After surgical treatment, the patient's complaints were alleviated and almost no complaints were registered during the next 6 months' follow-up. Conclusions LSCs are extremely rare in adolescence, but they could be considered in the differential diagnosis in adolescent patients with low back pain and radiculopathy. Surgical removal of LSC could be considered as a treatment option to provide immediate and safe symptomatic relief. PMID:25083362

  8. Lumbar intraforaminal synovial cyst in young adulthood: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kalevski, Svetoslav K; Haritonov, Dimitar Georgiev; Peev, Nikolay Angelov

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Lumbar juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Most patients with lumbar cysts are in their sixth decade of life and have significant facet joint and disk degeneration. Lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are extremely rare in adolescence and young adulthood, and to our knowledge, only two pediatric cases of LSC have been reported in the literature. We aim to prove the existence of LSC in adolescent patients as a real entity that causes low back and radicular complaints and to discuss the possibility of traumatic injury as a pathogenic cause of LSC formation in adolescence. A case of an 18-year old patient with LSC is presented. We report the clinical presentation, management, outcome, and review of the literature, focusing on issues that remain debatable. Methods The case is presented together with its clinical course, the diagnostic techniques, the surgical findings, histologic results, and the treatment outcome. Results After surgical treatment, the patient's complaints were alleviated and almost no complaints were registered during the next 6 months' follow-up. Conclusions LSCs are extremely rare in adolescence, but they could be considered in the differential diagnosis in adolescent patients with low back pain and radiculopathy. Surgical removal of LSC could be considered as a treatment option to provide immediate and safe symptomatic relief. PMID:25083362

  9. Primary Intraosseous Hydatid Cyst of Femur

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Hasan Onur; Arican, Mehmet; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Sarp, Umit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Echinococcosis is a parasitic and zoonotic disease of animals and humans. The cause is Echinococcus granulosus and occasionally, Echinococcus multilocularis. Hydatid cysts are mostly seen in the liver and lungs, although almost all organs and systemscan be involvement. Hydatid cysts seen with bone involvement comprise approximately 3% of all hydatid cysts. Even if a long period of survey is possible, it is still difficult to eradicate the disease and effect a cure. Case Presentation: In this study, an evaluation was made of a patient referred at Yozgat State Hospital Orthopedics and Traumatology Polyclinic with complaints of pain in her left thigh close to the knee. After examinations of plain radiographs, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance images, and blood parameters, a diagnosis was made of left femoral intramedullary hydatid cyst from excised intraoperative material. Throughout a 6-month follow-up period, there was no recurrence and functional results were good. Conclusions: Based on this report (of a patient presented with an intramedullary cyst in the long bones), the primary bone hydatid cyst disease should be kept in mind and be investigated in the differential diagnosis. PMID:25838934

  10. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  11. Value of cyst localization to predict cystobiliary communication in patients undergoing conservative surgery with hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Bircan; Kapan, Murat; Teke, Memik; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Arıkanoğlu, Zülfü

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between the segmental localization of liver hydatid cyst by computed tomography (CT) and the presence of cystobiliary communication (CBC) and to identify the risk factors for CBC. Patients and methods One hundred and eleven of 163 patients who underwent liver hydatid surgery between January 2011 and September 2014 were included in this study and analyzed retrospectively. The size, number, stage, and segmental and lobar localization of the cysts were investigated by CT. The presence of CBC and preoperative laboratory findings were recorded from operation notes. Results CBC was more frequent in single large cysts. CBC was most commonly detected in segment 1 (50%), 8 (48.3%), 7 (41.2%), and 4 (40%). CBC was more frequent in the right lobe (40.4%) and Gharbi stage 3 (41.8%) and 4 (55.6%) lesions. There were no differences in CBC according to distance from the hilus. In addition, preoperative total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) elevations were associated with higher CBC frequency (P<0.05). Cyst diameter, number of cysts, and ALP and GGT elevations were independent predictors of CBC presence. Conclusion The evaluation of hydatid cyst diameter, morphological stage, and segmental and lobar localization by abdominal CT and measurement of preoperative cyst diameter, number of cysts, and ALP and GGT values may predict the presence of CBC. PMID:27366078

  12. Cysts of the posterior mediastinum showing müllerian differentiation (Hattori's cysts).

    PubMed

    Thomas-de-Montpréville, Vincent; Dulmet, Elisabeth

    2007-12-01

    Cysts of probable müllerian origin have recently been recognized in the mediastinum by Hattori (Virchows Arch. 2005;446:82-84; Chest. 2005;128:3388-3390). In a retrospective study, we found 9 such cases, accounting for 5.5% of a series of 163 consecutive mediastinal nonneoplastic cysts operated in our institution. These cysts occurred in 9 women aged 40 to 58 years (mean, 50.6 years). These women often had overweight (n=4) or various gynecologic history (n=5). Cysts were paravertebral (n=8) or prevertebral (n=1). They were initially classified as bronchogenic or unspecified benign serous cysts. Their diameter measured 1.3 to 5 cm. Their thin wall contained smooth muscle. They were lined by a simple cylindrical or cuboidal, nonmucinous, and often ciliated epithelium resembling uterine tubal epithelium. This epithelium expressed cytokeratin 7, epithelial membrane antigen and estrogen and progesterone receptors. It was negative for cytokeratin 5/6. In the same series, there were 66 bronchogenic cysts, 6 being paravertebral. In conclusion, cysts with müllerian differentiation account for a small proportion of mediastinal cysts and have a usual but nonspecific paravertebral location. PMID:18022126

  13. Residual Cyst Associated with Calcifications in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, K; Nandan, S. Ratheesh Kumar; Ratnakar, P.; Srikrishna, K.; Vamsi Pavani, B.

    2014-01-01

    A residual cyst, as the name implies, is a radicular, lateral periodotal, dentigerous or any other cyst that has persisted after it’s associated tooth has been lost. Residual cysts show more predilection in males and they commonly affect the maxillary region. Usually, residual cysts are asymptomatic and calcifications occurring in the residual cysts are quite rare. We are reporting a case of symptomatic residual cyst, associated with calcifications involving the anterior region of the body of the mandible in a 60-year-old male patient. The pathogenesis, clinical, radiological features and differential diagnosis have been discussed. PMID:24701547

  14. Molecular Diagnostics in the Evaluation of Pancreatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Brian K; Wald, Abigail I; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-09-01

    Within the past few decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the detection of incidental pancreatic cysts. It is reported a pancreatic cyst is identified in up to 2.6% of abdominal scans. Many of these cysts, including serous cystadenomas and pseudocysts, are benign and can be monitored clinically. In contrast, mucinous cysts, which include intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms, have the potential to progress to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we discuss the current management guidelines for pancreatic cysts, their underlying genetics, and the integration of molecular testing in cyst classification and prognostication. PMID:27523971

  15. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  16. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  17. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  18. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  19. Primary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in the Iliac Bone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chae Geun

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic aneurysmal bone cysts with expansible lesions in the pelvis are rare in children. The management of an aggressive vascular lesion in a female child is challenging. The standard treatment for aneurysmal bone cysts is accompanied by a high risk of local recurrence. A 12-year-old female presented with a history of pelvic pain for 5 months. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed a very large expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. Intralesional curettage, electric cauterization, chemical sclerotherapy and allogeneic bone graft were performed through the window of the iliac crest. At a follow-up consultation 3.5 years post-surgery, the child had painless full-range movement in the hip joint with no recurrence. Although many treatment options are described, our patient was treated successfully using curettage and allogeneic bone graft without recurrence.

  20. An unusual case of vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst.

    PubMed

    Vergis, A; Maletius, W; Messner, K

    1995-10-01

    An unusual case of a vascular abnormality mimicking a lateral meniscal cyst is reported. The patient was a 31-year-old active sportsman who presented with intermittent pain over the lateral aspect of the left knee joint line, occurring only during activities involving twisting motions such as playing soccer. He did not experience local tenderness or swelling, clicking, locking, or giving way. The magnetic resonance imaging, which was done after a diagnostic arthroscopy with normal intra-articular findings, showed a cyst formation of approximately 4-mm diameter adjacent to the lateral meniscus periphery, but no meniscal tissue degeneration. Exactly at the preoperatively marked site of most intensive pain sensation during twisting motions, surgical exposure showed a venous-aneurysm-like tumor, which was removed. The operation resulted in complete relief of symptoms and undisturbed sporting activities including soccer. PMID:8534307

  1. Dinoflagellate cysts in recent marine sediments from Thermaikos Gulf, Greece: Effects of resuspension events on vertical cyst distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakourou, A.; Orlova, T. Y.; Assimakopoulou, G.; Pagou, K.

    2005-12-01

    A qualitative and semi-quantitative study of recent dinoflagellate cysts has been undertaken in the NW part of Aegean Sea, Thermaikos Gulf (Eastern Mediteranean), before (September 2001), during (October 2001) and after 120 days (February 2002) of intensive trawling activities. This is the first survey of recent dinoflagellate cysts from Greek marine coastal environments. Sediment samples were collected with a corer and the vertical distribution of the cysts was studied at five different layers, from 0 to 10 cm. Dinoflagellate cysts were both abundant and diverse. Cysts were found over the whole sampling area and periods, with concentrations ranging between 247-3202 cysts cm -3. Thirty-six cyst types were encountered, of which 32 were identified to species level, representing 12 genera. It seems that significant local resuspension, related to the onset of the trawling period and stirring up of the sediment, contributed to mixing of the upper layers, resulting to more homogenous cyst profiles in the sediment. Viable cysts constituted 16-60% of the total cyst abundance. The abundance peaks of viable cysts within the subsurface sediment layers, observed during the undisturbed period, disappeared during October. In February, the reduction of cyst concentration was associated to a loss of viable cysts, whilst the ratio of viable/empty cysts ranged between 0.30 and 0.67. The abundance of the different dinoflagellate species, in their active form, was monitored in order to detect any relationship between the concentration of cysts in the top 10 cm of sediment and blooms of algae in the water column. Cysts of potentially toxic species, causing Paralitic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP), such as Alexandrium cf. tamarense, A. cf. affine, A. cf. minutum, as well as Gymnodinium catenatum, were detected in the cyst survey.

  2. How simple are 'simple renal cysts'?

    PubMed

    Simms, Roslyn J; Ong, Albert C M

    2014-09-01

    The increasing use of medical imaging as an investigative tool is leading to the incidental and frequent finding of renal cysts in the general population. The presence of a solitary or multiple renal cysts has been generally considered benign in the absence of a family history of renal cystic disease or evidence of chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, a number of recent studies have questioned this consensus by reported associations with the development of hypertension or malignant change. For these reasons, some clinicians consider the presence of renal cysts to be a contraindication to kidney donation. The situation is complicated by the different usage of the term 'simple' by some radiologists (to indicate non-complex lesions) or nephrologists (to indicate age-related non-hereditary lesions). We propose that the term 'simple' be replaced with the morphological description, Stage I renal cyst (Bosniak Classification). The presence of a Stage I renal cyst should not preclude kidney donation. However, occult renal disease should be excluded and appropriate donor assessment performed. PMID:25165175

  3. Tailgut cyst accompanied with bony defect

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Retro-rectal cystic hamartoma (tailgut cyst), is an uncommon congenital developmental lesion, generally located in the retro-rectal space. Its diagnosis and approach is challenging because the retropelvic space is not familiar. We report a 51-year-old woman who presented with paresthesia and pain in perianal area. The magnetic resonance image showed high signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and iso to high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image of the retropelvic space and CT showed sacral bony defect. We chose the posterior approach for removal of the tailgut cyst. Histopathology exam of the retropelvic cyst revealed a multiloculated cyst containing abundant mucoid material lined by both squamous and glandular mucinous epithelium. The patient has recovered nicely with no recurrence. Tailgut cyst needs complete surgical excision for good prognosis. So, a preoperative high-resolution image and co-operation between neurosurgen and general surgeon would help to make safe and feasible diagnosis and surgical access. PMID:27073796

  4. Retrovesical hydatic cyst: About 4 cases

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Ahmed; Bouzouita, Abderrazak; Cherif, Mohamed; Rebai, Mohamed Hedi; Kerkeni, Walid; Ayed, Haroun; Derouiche, Amine; Ben Slama, Riadh; Chebil, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The hydatid cyst is a real public health problem in Tunisia. The retrovesical localization is rare. It is considered an aberrant or ectopic location defined by the development of the parasite in the subvesical and retrovesical fat. Methods: From 2004 to 2013, 4 patients with retrovesical hydatid cyst were hospitalized and operated in the Department of Urology at the Charles Nicolle hospital of Tunis in Tunisia. The average patient age was 40.75 years (range: 23–76). Signs of bladder irritation were the most frequent presenting complaint. No cases of hydaturia were noted. The diagnosis was made on the ultrasound and the computed tomographic urography. Hydatid serology was positive for 3 patients. In 3 cases, a hydatid cyst of the liver was associated. A total cysto-pericystectomy was performed for 1 patient, for others it was partial. Results: The postoperative course was uneventful. No urinary fistula or infection of the residual cavity was observed. One patient had a retroperitoneal cyst recurrence requiring reoperation. Conclusion: Retrovesical location of hydatid cyst is rare and treatment is primarily surgical. PMID:26225181

  5. Melatonin and estrogen in breast cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Burch, James B; Walling, Margie; Rush, Adam; Hennesey, Maxine; Craven, Winfield; Finlayson, Christina; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cosma, Greg; Wells, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Increased breast cancer risks have been reported among women with gross cystic breast disease (GCBD), although the mechanism for this increase remains unexplained. Relationships between GCBD characteristics, breast cancer risk factors, and the biochemical composition and growth properties of 142 breast cyst fluid (BCF) samples were studied among 93 women with GCBD. Concentrations of melatonin, estrogen (17-beta-estradiol), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-B1 and TGF-B2), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) were quantified in BCF samples, and human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were treated with BCF in vitro. Patients were grouped according to BCF Na:K ratios previously linked with increased breast cancer risks (Na:K 3, Type 2) and mixed cyst groups. Women with larger and more frequently occurring cysts had higher BCF estrogen and DHEA-S, and lower TGF-B1 levels. Women with Type 1 cysts had elevated BCF melatonin, estrogen, DHEA-S, and EGF, and lower concentrations of TGF-B2 compared to women with Type 2 cysts. BCF generally inhibited cell growth relative to serum-treated controls, consistent with previous studies. Melatonin and estrogen in BCF independently predicted growth inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Biological monitoring of BCF may help identify women with GCBD at greatest risk for breast cancer development. PMID:17061046

  6. Intraspinal synovial cyst at the craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Eustacchio, S; Trummer, M; Unger, F; Flaschka, G

    2003-01-01

    A cystic lesion adjacent to the dens with compression of the lower portion of the medulla oblongata was found on MRI in a 75-year-old male patient with a 2-month history of occipital pain and gait disturbance. Clinically, the patient showed mild tetraparesis, signs of spinal ataxia and symmetrical hyperreflexia. Following subtotal removal of the cyst via left-sided suboccipital craniotomy and left-sided hemilaminectomy of C1 the lesion was classified as synovial cyst on histopathological examination. Postoperatively, the quadriparesis almost completely subsided and the patient is currently doing well, 33 months after surgery. Synovial or ganglion cysts adjacent to the atlantoaxial articulation with ventral compression of the cervicomedullar cord represent rare surgical or radiological entities. Atlantoaxial synovial cysts have no typical radiographic appearance or specific neurological symptoms so that they are frequently misdiagnosed as intraspinal- or skull base tumour, rheumatoid lesion or ectatic vertebral artery. Since no ensuing complications or recurrences have been encountered in cases of incompletely removed cysts the less invasive operative approaches should be used to avoid destabilisation and subsequent additional surgical procedures. PMID:12838478

  7. Clinical approach to incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Austin L; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The approach to incidentally noted pancreatic cysts is constantly evolving. While surgical resection is indicated for malignant or higher risk cysts, correctly identifying these highest risk pancreatic cystic lesions remains difficult. Using parameters including cyst size, presence of solid components, and pancreatic duct involvement, the 2012 International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) and the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines have sought to identify the higher risk patients who would benefit from further evaluation using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Not only can EUS help further assess the presence of solid component and nodules, but also fine needle aspiration of cyst fluid aids in diagnosis by obtaining cellular, molecular, and genetic data. The impact of new endoscopic innovations with novel methods of direct visualization including confocal endomicroscopy require further validation. This review also highlights the differences between the 2012 IAP and 2015 AGA guidelines, which include the thresholds for sending patients for EUS and surgery and methods, interval, and duration of surveillance for unresected cysts. PMID:26811661

  8. [Testicular epidermoid cyst: orchiectomy or enucleation resection?].

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, A; Zumbé, J; Vorreuther, R; Klotz, T; Vietsch, H; Engelmann, U H

    1996-01-01

    Our experience with 18 patients with simple epidermoid cysts of the testis is reported. In each patient the tumour was enucleated completely and two biopsies of the adjacent parenchyma were obtained for exclusion of associated germ cell cancer, scars or carcinoma in situ. There was no evidence of malignancy in any of the biopsy specimens. Preoperative evaluation included physical examination, testicular sonography, and determination of AFP and hCG serum levels. Although epidermoid cyst can be strongly suspected on sonography the ultrasound appearance is not specific, and inguinal testicular exploration was required in these patients. In 1 patient multiple epidermoid cysts of the right testis were associated with an adult teratoma containing embryonal carcinoma and choriocarcinoma of the left testis; no similar case has been described in the literature. On the basis of our results and experience we consider tumour enucleation and biopsy of the adjacent parenchyma to be adequate treatment for benign epidermoid cyst. The world literature concerning organ-sparing surgery in testicular epidermoid cyst is reviewed. PMID:8851841

  9. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Rathore, Monika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentigerous Cyst/developmental cyst of benign odontogenic origin are ones that surround the crown of impacted, embedded, unerupted or developing teeth. Dentigerous cyst is second most common cyst of the oral cavity after radicular cyst. They are usually solitary in occurrence and mostly associated with the mandibular third molars. Dentigerous cysts involving impacted second premolars are rarely reported in the literatures. We present a rare case of dentigerous cyst in a 12-year-old female patient associated with an impacted mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tripathi AM, Rathore M. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1): 54-57. PMID:25206240

  10. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Prashad, Bhagwat; Jain, Anil K; Dhammi, Ish K

    2007-10-01

    We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts) are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints. PMID:21139800

  11. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Prashad, Bhagwat; Jain, Anil K; Dhammi, Ish K

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts) are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints. PMID:21139800

  12. Optical coherence tomography in a patient with congenital vitreous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dragnev, Daniel; Shanmugalingam, Sinnathamboo

    2014-01-01

    A case of congenital vitreous cyst is presented. An optical coherence tomography scan has been performed, which has shown that the cyst is free floating and is multilobular. Its content was hyper-reflective. PMID:24962488

  13. [Complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst: a case report].

    PubMed

    Qizhang, Xu; Hongliang, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Wang; Zhanji, Wang; Qianqian, Xu; Qiong, Ma

    2014-12-01

    Complex odontoma is a relatively rare dental dysplasia. In particular, a complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst is seldom observed. A case of complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst is reported in this paper. PMID:25665433

  14. Primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst--a short report.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, K; Sundararajan, M; Madeswaran, K; Ambalavanan, S

    2001-06-01

    Primary spinal hydatid cysts are uncommon. Among these, intradural presentation is very rare. A case of primary spinal intradural hydatid cyst presenting as incomplete dorsal cord compression is reported here for its rarity. PMID:11447449

  15. A rare case of carcinoid tumor in a tailgut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Asad; Le, Brian H.; Carter, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Tailgut cysts are rare congenital lesions that arise from the failure of regression of the embryological tailgut. We report a case of neoplastic transformation of tailgut cyst to carcinoid tumor which is exceedingly uncommon. PMID:27406449

  16. Giant epidermoid inclusion cyst of the clitoris mimicking clitoromegaly.

    PubMed

    Al-Ojaimi, Eftekhar Hassan; Abdulla, Maryam Mohd

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rare case of clitoromegaly due to a large clitoral cyst that occurred spontaneously without any declared previous female genital mutilation. The cyst was excised successfully with good cosmetic results. PMID:23222050

  17. Supratentorial endodermal cysts: review of literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Riccardo; Artico, Marco; Colonnese, Claudio; Marrocco, Luigi; Wierzbicki, Venceslao

    2013-11-01

    Supratentorial endodermal cysts are very rare pathological entities. Their pathoembryology is largely unknown and they can represent a diagnostic challenge. A research performed on the PubMed database in December 2010, to screen for supratentorial endodermal cyst studies, demonstrated that since 1960 only 31 supratentorial endodermal cysts have been described in the literature, including our case: a 42-year-old woman with a parasellar endodermal cyst. These lesions are usually benign. As with other types of brain cysts, the signs and symptoms caused by supratentorial endodermal cysts are mainly linked to the compression or irritation of surrounding neural structures. Upon neuroimaging examination, they typically appear as a round or lobulated mass. The signal intensity may vary depending on the protein content of the cyst. The majority of reported supratentorial endodermal cysts were completely excised with good or excellent results. Incomplete excision can result in an increased risk of recurrence, infection, and dissemination. PMID:22700451

  18. Bakers' cyst and tibiofemoral abnormalities are more distinctive MRI features of symptomatic osteoarthritis than patellofemoral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Visser, A W; Mertens, B; Reijnierse, M; Bloem, J L; de Mutsert, R; le Cessie, S; Rosendaal, F R; Kloppenburg, M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which structural MR abnormalities discriminate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), taking co-occurrence of abnormalities in all compartments into account. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45–65 years. In 1285 participants (median age 56 years, 55% women, median body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2), MRI of the right knee were obtained. Structural abnormalities (osteophytes, cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), subchondral cysts, meniscal abnormalities, effusion, Baker's cyst) at 9 patellofemoral and tibiofemoral locations were scored following the knee OA scoring system. Symptomatic OA in the imaged knee was defined following the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Logistic ridge regression analyses were used to investigate which structural abnormalities discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic OA, crude and adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Symptomatic knee OA was present in 177 individuals. Structural MR abnormalities were highly frequent both in individuals with OA and in those without. Baker's cysts showed the highest adjusted regression coefficient (0.293) for presence of symptomatic OA, followed by osteophytes and BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment (0.185–0.279), osteophytes in the medial trochlear facet (0.262) and effusion (0.197). Conclusions Baker's cysts discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic knee OA. Structural MR abnormalities, especially in the medial side of the tibiofemoral joint and effusion, add further in discriminating symptomatic OA. Baker's cysts may present as a target for treatment. PMID:27252896

  19. Traumatic rupture of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, A; Bramhaprasad, V; Purohit, A K

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic. However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression. Presentation as raised intracranial pressure due to cyst rupture into the subdural space is a rare clinical entity. We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure. PMID:22837775

  20. Penile Epidermal Cyst in a Patient With Augmentation Penoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung; Eom, Minseob; Arkoncel, Francis Raymond P.; Sung, Yun Hsien; Kim, Won; Byun, Hyun Keun; Joo, Jung Min; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old male patient who had undergone augmentation penoplasty 20 years previously presented with a slowly growing penoscrotal mass. The penile mass was excised totally and the pathologic diagnosis was an epidermal cyst. Epidermal cysts are benign disorders that can occur in any part of the body. However, an epidermal cyst as a late complication of augmentation penoplasty is extremely rare. We report this case of a penile epidermal cyst that developed after augmentation penoplasty. PMID:23524950

  1. Splenic Epidermoid Cyst in a Five-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bhavna; Sood, Neena; Singh, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    Splenic epidermoid cysts are rare non-parasitic true cysts affecting the spleen. We report a five-year-old child who presented with an abdominal lump associated with pain of 15 days. Ultrasonography of the abdomen showed a huge cystic lesion of obscure origin. At laprotomy a huge unilocular cyst involving upper part of spleen containing pultaceous fluid was seen and its removal necessitated splenectomy. Histopathological findings were consistent with splenic epidermoid cyst. Thus histopathology helped in elucidating the aetiology and diagnosis.

  2. Supratentorial endodermal cysts - Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vithal; Mahore, Amit; Patil, Manoj Kashinath; Shendarkar, Ashwini Dnyandaevrao

    2016-01-01

    We describe two rare cases of frontal cystic lesions presenting with symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure. Both had a preoperative diagnosis of an arachnoid cyst and were subjected to a craniotomy with marsupialization of the cyst. However, the histology confirmed them to be an endodermal cyst (EC) on both occasions. Both the patients have been closely followed with no recurrence of symptoms. ECs of the central nervous system are usually reported in the spinal canal, mid-line posterior fossa, and the suprasellar regions. Supratentorial and non-midline ECs are rare, with only about 22 cases previously reported in literature. We discuss both the cases and review the relevant literature. PMID:27366267

  3. Potentially fatal supramylohyoid sublingual epidermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ujjwal; Mohanty, Sujata; Augustine, Jayaseelan; Gupta, Shalini R

    2015-03-01

    A case of chronic and slow growing massive lateral neck swelling is presented which gradually resulted in dysphagia to an extent that patient reported in emergency room. Clinical findings were indicative of a cystic swelling or a massive lipoma. Temporary decompression of the lesion was achieved by partially aspirating the contents of the cyst. Nature of aspirate and its microscopic and biochemical analysis excluded lipoma, vascular malformation and salivary phenomenon. The diagnosis tapered to developmental lateral neck cysts. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a massive cystic lesion in the left floor of mouth extending to the right lingual aspect of mandible and posteriorly to impinge on the medial wall of pharynx. A combined intraoral and extraoral approach was used to expose and excise the lesion in toto. Final histological diagnosis of the pathology was epidermoid cyst. PMID:25848141

  4. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Adn, M; Hamlat, A; Morandi, X; Guegan, Y

    2006-08-01

    Intraneural ganglion cyst of the tibial nerve is very rare. To date, only 5 cases of this entity in the popliteal fossa have been reported. We report a new case and review the previously reported cases. A 40-year-old man experienced a mild vague pain in the medial half of his right foot for 3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a soft-tissue mass along the right tibial nerve. At surgery, an intraneural ganglion cyst was evacuated. After 12 months, the patient was pain-free with no signs of recurrence. Trauma might be a contributing factor to the development of intraneural ganglion cysts. Application of microsurgical techniques is encouraged. PMID:16775659

  5. Hydatid Cyst of Spleen: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Khalid; Zargar, Showkat Ali; Telwani, Ajaz Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Although splenic involvement alone in hydatid disease is very rare, spleen is the third most common organ involved in hydatid disease. The rarity of splenic hydatid disease poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians, particularly in non-endemic areas. As the hydatid cyst can present as a simple cyst without having the classic serological and imaging features, and later can lead to life-threatening complications like anaphylaxis, hydatid disease of spleen should be considered in differential in every patient in endemic areas with cystic lesion of spleen until proved otherwise. The author used the keyword “splenic hydatid cyst” in PubMed and reviewed the scientific literatures published from January 1965 to June 2012. The present review is to accentuate the incidence, classification, clinical and pathophysiological features, differential diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and treatment choices of hydatid cyst of spleen along with follow-up strategy and newer treatment approaches. PMID:23378949

  6. The Tale of Spring Water Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Schweigert, Michael; Dubecz, Attila; Beron, Martin; Ofner, Dietmar; Stein, Hubert J.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital pericardial diverticula and cysts are extremely uncommon lesions within the anterior mediastinum. Both lesions derive from the pericardial celom and represent different stages of a common embryogenesis. Initial reports date from the 19th century. Surgical pioneers were Otto Pickhardt, who removed a pericardial cyst at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York in 1931, and Richard Sweet, who accomplished the first resection of a pericardial diverticulum at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston in 1943. These lesions were also called spring water cysts because they usually contain watery, crystal-clear fluid. This history outlines the milestones of evolving surgical management, from the first report in 1837 up to the present time. PMID:22719140

  7. Hyperparathyroidism with a functioning parathyroid cyst.

    PubMed

    Ak, Ilknur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat

    2007-09-01

    A rare case of primary hyperparathyroidism with a functioning parathyroid cyst in whom Tc-99m MIBI scintigraphy failed to detect a parathyroid tumor is presented. A 62-year-old woman with primary hyperparathyroidism was referred for Tc-99m MIBI imaging to investigate a parathyroid adenoma. Plasma levels of intact parathyroid hormone were elevated to 2250 pg/mL. Neck ultrasonography revealed a cystic lesion measured 30 x 42 x 35 mm on the right inferior side of the thyroid gland. The cystic lesion was successfully removed at surgery. Pathologic diagnosis revealed a benign parathyroid cyst. The cyst contained clear fluid, and was lined by 1 layer of cuboidal epithelial cells. Her postoperative course was uneventful and plasma levels of intact parathyroid hormone normalized after operation. PMID:17710026

  8. Oesophageal duplication cyst presenting as haemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Noureen; Adil, Syeda Ezz-e-Rukhshan; Mushtaq, Ammara; Rahman, Arshalooz; Amanullah, Muneer

    2013-05-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract include a variety of cysts, diverticula, and tubular malformations, all believed to have embryological origin. The cysts are most commonly found in children, and the diagnosis is made in infancy in the majority of patients. We report a case of a two-and-a-half year old child, presenting with the history of repeated episodes of haematemesis. Upper GI endoscopy was unremarkable and the chest x-ray showed no pathology. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram revealed soft tissue density lesion in the right chest at the level of T6. Right thoracotomy suggested a cystic mass close to the oesophagus which was shown on histopathology to be lined with gastric mucosa consistent with oesophageal duplication cyst. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its kind reported from Pakistan. PMID:23757996

  9. Supratentorial endodermal cysts - Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Vithal; Mahore, Amit; Patil, Manoj Kashinath; Shendarkar, Ashwini Dnyandaevrao

    2016-01-01

    We describe two rare cases of frontal cystic lesions presenting with symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure. Both had a preoperative diagnosis of an arachnoid cyst and were subjected to a craniotomy with marsupialization of the cyst. However, the histology confirmed them to be an endodermal cyst (EC) on both occasions. Both the patients have been closely followed with no recurrence of symptoms. ECs of the central nervous system are usually reported in the spinal canal, mid-line posterior fossa, and the suprasellar regions. Supratentorial and non-midline ECs are rare, with only about 22 cases previously reported in literature. We discuss both the cases and review the relevant literature. PMID:27366267

  10. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Skokic, Fahrija; Hotic, Nesad; Husaric, Edin; Radoja, Gordana; Muratovic, Selma; Dedic, Nermina

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst. PMID:23844300

  11. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  12. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  13. [Sacral perineural cysts. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Thomas, T; Michel, D; Solvet, P; Antoine, J C; Barral, F G

    1992-01-01

    In a 41-year old woman complaining of episodic bilateral sciatic pain, MRI showed large sacral cysts developed in the pelvis. The fact that these cysts communicated with the subarachnoidal spaces was not clearly demonstrated by CT. The mechanism underlying the development of this perineural variety of extradural cysts is discussed. PMID:1439457

  14. Developmental biology of Cystoisospora (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) monozoic tissue cysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue cyst stages are an intriguing aspect of the developmental cycle and transmission of members of the Family Sarcocystidae. Tissue cyst stages of the genera Toxoplasma, Hammondia, Neospora, Besnoitia, and Sarcocystis contain many infectious stages (bradyzoites).The tissue cyst stage of Cystoisos...

  15. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae)...

  16. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae)...

  17. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae)...

  18. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae)...

  19. 9 CFR 311.24 - Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hogs affected with tapeworm cysts. 311.24 Section 311.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... affected with tapeworm cysts. Carcasses of hogs affected with tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus cellulosae)...

  20. [Rare giant retroauricular epidermoid cyst: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Xiaocheng

    2016-03-01

    Epidermnoid cysts are henign, cutaneous cysts which commonly occur on face, neck and trunk. Retroauricular epidermoid cyst is rare reported which should be differentiated from auricle pseudocyst, lipoma, steatocystoma and fibroma. The hitopathological examination is a gold standard of diagnosis. Surgery of complete excision is the first choice of treatment methods. PMID:27382692

  1. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Alugolu, Rajesh; Arradi, Vamshidhar; Sahu, B P

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spine are a rare entity with extradural occurrence being the commonest. Arachnoid cysts in intramedullary location are sparingly reported in elderly. We herein report a case of intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult female who presented with features of compressive myelopathy. PMID:26889288

  2. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Alugolu, Rajesh; Arradi, Vamshidhar; Sahu, B. P.

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spine are a rare entity with extradural occurrence being the commonest. Arachnoid cysts in intramedullary location are sparingly reported in elderly. We herein report a case of intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult female who presented with features of compressive myelopathy. PMID:26889288

  3. Ganglion cyst versus synovial cyst? Ultrasound characteristics through a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Giard, Marie-Claude; Pineda, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonographic characteristics of two common musculoskeletal lesions, ganglion cysts (GCs) and synovial cysts (SCs) are presented through a review of the literature. Although similar in many ways, these two lesions display different morphostructural characteristics justifying, in our view, their descriptions as separate entities. Mainly different from an anatomopathologic point of view, they also differ in their potential therapeutic implications. A symptomatic GC, refractory to conservative therapy, may require surgical excision of the cyst itself. For SC, therapy should primarily be oriented toward identifying and correcting the often coexisting intra-articular disease instead of only targeting merely its consequence, the SC. PMID:25190552

  4. Laparoscopic treatment of unilocular renal hydatid cyst mimicking a simple cyst in a child.

    PubMed

    Onal, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Citgez, Sinharib; Argun, Burak; Oner, Armagan

    2008-12-01

    A 110 x 70 x 60-mm hydatid cyst in the right kidney of a 5-year-old boy was treated using a laparoscopic approach. The renal hydatid cyst was not identified before the operation. There were no complications related to surgery and therapy. The child was under follow-up for 12 months and there was no evidence of recurrence on ultrasonography and computed tomography during this period. To our knowledge, this is the first case of renal hydatid cyst treated by laparoscopic approach in a child. PMID:19013417

  5. Symptomatic glial cysts of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fain, J S; Tomlinson, F H; Scheithauer, B W; Parisi, J E; Fletcher, G P; Kelly, P J; Miller, G M

    1994-03-01

    Small asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland represent a common incidental finding in adults undergoing computerized tomography or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging or at postmortem examination. In contrast, large symptomatic pineal cysts are rare, being limited to individual case reports or small series. The authors have reviewed 24 cases of large pineal cysts. The mean patient age at presentation was 28.7 years (range 15 to 46 years); 18 were female and six male. Presenting features in 20 symptomatic cases included: headache in 19; nausea and/or vomiting in seven; papilledema in five; visual disturbances in five (diplopia in three, "blurred vision" in two, and unilateral partial oculomotor nerve palsy in one); Parinaud's syndrome in two; hemiparesis in one; hemisensory aberration in one; and seizures in one. Four lesions were discovered incidentally. Magnetic resonance imaging typically demonstrated a 0.8- to 3.0-cm diameter mass (mean 1.7 cm) with homogeneous decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and a distinct margin. Hydrocephalus was present in eight cases. The cysts were surgically excised via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach (23 cases) or stereotactically biopsied (one case). Histological examination revealed a cyst wall 0.5 to 2.0 mm thick comprised of three layers: an outer fibrous layer, a middle layer of pineal parenchymal cells with variable calcification, and an inner layer of hypocellular glial tissue often exhibiting Rosenthal fibers and/or granular bodies. Evidence of prior hemorrhage, mild astrocytic degenerative atypia, and disorganization of pineal parenchyma were often present. Postoperative follow-up review in all 24 cases (range 3 months to 10 years) revealed no complications in 21, mild ocular movement deficit in one, gradually resolving Parinaud's syndrome in one, and radiographic evidence of a postoperative venous infarct of the superior cerebellum with ataxia of 1 week

  6. Aggressive dentigerous cyst with ectopic central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Mitra, Malay; Bandlapalli, Anila; Jana, Biswanath

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dentigerous cysts form from accumulation of fluid between reduced enamel epithelium and the crown of an unerupted tooth. They cause several difficulties such as swelling, non-eruption of the involved teeth, and displacement of adjacent teeth, and thus require early detection and prompt treatment. Treatment ranges from marsupialisation to enucleation. Enucleation is rarely used in children compared with marsupialisation. This paper discusses successful use of enucleation for treating a dentigerous cyst and explains the need for such a radical procedure. PMID:24913076

  7. Dermoid cyst of the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Harpreet S; D'Souza, Alwyn R; De, Ranit; Irving, Richard M

    2002-02-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare benign tumours, they represent the simplest form of teratoma. Approximately seven per cent affect the head and neck region, within this region they are frequently encountered in the area of the lateral eyebrow, the orbit and the nose. A case of a 17-year-old girl who developed a rapidly growing facial swelling due to an infratemporal fossa dermoid cyst is presented. A review of the literature using Medline has not revealed any previous reports of similar cases. The lesion was completely excised using a lateral approach to the infratemporal fossa. PMID:11827596

  8. [Renal hydatid cyst: radiologic features and therapy].

    PubMed

    Bentani, N; Basraoui, D; Wakrim, B; Hiroual, M R; Cherif Idrissi Ganouni, N; Dahami, Z; Moudouni, M S; Sarf, I

    2012-12-01

    Hydatid disease is endemic in some Mediterranean countries. Kidney is a relatively rare site, representing 2 to 3 % of all visceral sites. The diagnosis of hydatid cyst of the kidney is suspected in epidemiological, clinical, radiological and biological arguments. It remains clinically silent for a long time and only presents at the stage of complications. Ultrasound can suspect the hydatid nature of the lesion in 50 % of cases. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful in the event of problem of differential diagnosis. The standard treatment for renal hydatid cyst is resection of the prominent dome and nephrectomy is indicated in cases of destroyed kidney. PMID:23178095

  9. Multiple mediastinal hydatic cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Afshin; Khodabakhsh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection that is remains endemic in many countries, particularly the Middle East and Central Asia. Mediastinal hydatidosis is very rare (less than 0.1% of all hydatid disease cases) that have been only anecdotally in the literature. To the best of our knowledge only one case of multiple mediastineal hydatid cysts has been reported previously. We report the second cases of multiple mediastineal hydatid cysts and recommend that it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple cystic mediastineal masses in endemic countries. PMID:21554233

  10. The Toxoplasma gondii cyst wall protein CST1 is critical for cyst wall integrity and promotes bradyzoite persistence.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tadakimi; Bzik, David J; Ma, Yan Fen; Fox, Barbara A; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C; Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects up to one third of the world's population. A key to the success of T. gondii as a parasite is its ability to persist for the life of its host as bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The glycosylated cyst wall is the key structural feature that facilitates persistence and oral transmission of this parasite. Because most of the antibodies and reagents that recognize the cyst wall recognize carbohydrates, identification of the components of the cyst wall has been technically challenging. We have identified CST1 (TGME49_064660) as a 250 kDa SRS (SAG1 related sequence) domain protein with a large mucin-like domain. CST1 is responsible for the Dolichos biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) lectin binding characteristic of T. gondii cysts. Deletion of CST1 results in reduced cyst number and a fragile brain cyst phenotype characterized by a thinning and disruption of the underlying region of the cyst wall. These defects are reversed by complementation of CST1. Additional complementation experiments demonstrate that the CST1-mucin domain is necessary for the formation of a normal cyst wall structure, the ability of the cyst to resist mechanical stress, and binding of DBA to the cyst wall. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis demonstrated dysregulation of bradyzoite genes within the various cst1 mutants. These results indicate that CST1 functions as a key structural component that confers essential sturdiness to the T. gondii tissue cyst critical for persistence of bradyzoite forms. PMID:24385904

  11. The Toxoplasma gondii Cyst Wall Protein CST1 Is Critical for Cyst Wall Integrity and Promotes Bradyzoite Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Tadakimi; Bzik, David J.; Ma, Yan Fen; Fox, Barbara A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects up to one third of the world's population. A key to the success of T. gondii as a parasite is its ability to persist for the life of its host as bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The glycosylated cyst wall is the key structural feature that facilitates persistence and oral transmission of this parasite. Because most of the antibodies and reagents that recognize the cyst wall recognize carbohydrates, identification of the components of the cyst wall has been technically challenging. We have identified CST1 (TGME49_064660) as a 250 kDa SRS (SAG1 related sequence) domain protein with a large mucin-like domain. CST1 is responsible for the Dolichos biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) lectin binding characteristic of T. gondii cysts. Deletion of CST1 results in reduced cyst number and a fragile brain cyst phenotype characterized by a thinning and disruption of the underlying region of the cyst wall. These defects are reversed by complementation of CST1. Additional complementation experiments demonstrate that the CST1-mucin domain is necessary for the formation of a normal cyst wall structure, the ability of the cyst to resist mechanical stress, and binding of DBA to the cyst wall. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis demonstrated dysregulation of bradyzoite genes within the various cst1 mutants. These results indicate that CST1 functions as a key structural component that confers essential sturdiness to the T. gondii tissue cyst critical for persistence of bradyzoite forms. PMID:24385904

  12. Suspended Alexandrium spp. hypnozygote cysts in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirn, Sarah L.; Townsend, David W.; Pettigrew, Neal R.

    2005-09-01

    The life cycle of dinoflagellates of the genus Alexandrium includes sexual reproduction followed by the formation of a dormant hypnozygote cyst, which serves as a resting stage. Negatively buoyant cysts purportedly fall to the benthos where they undergo a mandatory period of quiescence. Previous reports of cysts in the surficial sediments of the Gulf of Maine, where Alexandrium blooms are well documented, show a broad distribution of cysts, with highest concentrations generally in sediments below 100 m depth. We report here an exploration of cysts suspended in the water column, where they would be better positioned to inoculate springtime Alexandrium populations. During cruises in February, April, and June of 2000, water samples were collected at depths just off the bottom (within 5 m), at the top of the bottom nepheloid layer, and near the surface (1 m) and examined for cyst concentrations. Suspended cysts were found throughout the Gulf of Maine and westernmost Bay of Fundy. Planktonic cyst densities were generally greater in near-bottom and top of the bottom nepheloid layer samples than in near-surface water samples; densities were of the order of 10 2 cysts m -3 in surface waters, and 10 2-10 3 cysts m -3 at near-bottom depths. Temporally, they were most abundant in February and least abundant in April. Reports by earlier workers of cysts in the underlying sediments were on the order of 10 3 cysts cm -3. We present calculations that demonstrate the likelihood of cyst resuspension from bottom sediments forced by swell and tidal currents, and propose that such resuspended cysts are important in inoculating the seasonal bloom. We estimate that suspended cysts may contribute significantly to the annual vegetative cell population in the Gulf of Maine.

  13. Atypical Intracranial Epidermoid Cysts: Rare Anomalies with Unique Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Law, Eric K. C.; Lee, Ryan K. L.; Ng, Alex W. H.; Siu, Deyond Y. W.; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing extra-axial tumours that insinuate between brain structures, while their occurrences in intra-axial or intradiploic locations are exceptionally rare. We present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in two patients with atypical epidermoid cysts. CT and MRI findings for the first case revealed an intraparenchymal epidermoid cyst that demonstrated no restricted diffusion. The second case demonstrated an aggressive epidermoid cyst that invaded into the intradiploic spaces, transverse sinus, and the calvarium. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts. PMID:25667778

  14. Gastric Duplication Cyst Presenting as Acute Abdomen: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Afzal

    2010-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are rare variety of gastrointestinal duplications. Sometimes they may present with complications like hemorrhage, infection, perforation, volvulus, intussusception and rarely neoplastic changes in the gastric duplication cyst. We present one and half year old male child who developed sudden abdominal distension with pain and fever for two days. Ultrasound revealed a cystic mass in the hypochondrium and epigastric regions. On exploration an infected and perforated gastric duplication cyst was found. Surgical excision of most part of cyst wall with mucosal stripping of the rest was performed. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of gastric duplication cyst. Early surgical intervention can result in good outcome. PMID:22953249

  15. A symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Hee; Kim, Jin Mo

    2012-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts are formed by the arachnoid membrane of the nerve root at the lumbosacral level. Most of these cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for other causes of chronic lower back pain. This type of cyst requires a differential diagnosis to distinguish it from other causes of radiating pain and neurological symptoms. In the present case, a symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst was found, and pain relief was achieved by non-surgical treatment. A lumbosacral perineural cyst was identified from a differential diagnosis of a lumbar disc disorder that presented as radiating pain and neurological symptoms. PMID:22679550

  16. [Suprasellar arachnoid cyst associated with syringomyelia. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sleiman, M; Assaker, R; Bourgeois, P; Lejeune, J P; Soto-Ares, G

    2000-02-01

    We present a case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst which was revealed by visual impairement and hypopituitarism. Neuroradiological imaging showed the peculiar association of the suprasellar cyst with cerebellar tonsillar herniation and a large asymptomatic cervical syringomyelic cavity. Surgical treatment of the suprasellar cyst allowed the reduction of both the cyst and the syrinx. A common pathophysiological mechanism of these lesions is discussed. We suggest the possibility that an initial obstruction of the basal cisterns caused the suprasellar cyst formation which led to medullar cavity formation. PMID:10790641

  17. A Rare Case of a Pilar Cyst With Ductal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Albert; Binder, Scott W.; Ra, Seong H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Pilar cysts are common squamous-lined cysts that typically occur on the scalp. They are believed to arise from the isthmus of anagen hairs or from the sac surrounding catagen and telogen hairs. The authors describe a rare case of a pilar cyst with prominent ductal differentiation, presumably of eccrine derivation. Sweat duct differentiation has been described in a myriad of cutaneous neoplasms and rarely within epidermoid cysts. The authors could only find one other case in the literature describing a pilar cyst with sebaceous and apocrine differentiation. The clinicopathologic findings are described here. PMID:26588334

  18. A Rare Case of a Pilar Cyst With Ductal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Torous, Vanda F; Su, Albert; Binder, Scott W; Ra, Seong H

    2015-12-01

    Pilar cysts are common squamous-lined cysts that typically occur on the scalp. They are believed to arise from the isthmus of anagen hairs or from the sac surrounding catagen and telogen hairs. The authors describe a rare case of a pilar cyst with prominent ductal differentiation, presumably of eccrine derivation. Sweat duct differentiation has been described in a myriad of cutaneous neoplasms and rarely within epidermoid cysts. The authors could only find one other case in the literature describing a pilar cyst with sebaceous and apocrine differentiation. The clinicopathologic findings are described here. PMID:26588334

  19. Fertility following laparoscopic management of benign adnexal cysts.

    PubMed

    Canis, M; Bassil, S; Wattiez, A; Pouly, J L; Manhes, H; Mage, G; Bruhat, M A

    1992-04-01

    Fertility following laparoscopic treatment of benign adnexal cysts without ovarian suture was studied retrospectively. Patients with endometriomas or who were previously infertile were excluded. Thirty-eight patients treated conservatively were included, 10 after partial resection of functional cysts, 23 after an ovarian cystectomy and six after treatment of a paraovarian cyst. One patient had two cysts. The overall intrauterine pregnancy rate was 92%; one patient had an ectopic pregnancy (2.6%). From these results, we conclude that fertility following laparoscopic treatment of adnexal cysts appears to be normal. Technical guidelines to improve laparoscopic cystectomy are proposed. PMID:1387882

  20. Radicular Cyst associated with Deciduous Incisor: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramanya, P Latha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radicular cysts are considered rare in the primary dentition, comprising only 0.5 to 3.3% of the total number of radicular cysts in both primary and permanent dentitions. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical, radiographic and histological characteristics of radicular cyst associated with primary central incisor. Extraction and enucleation of the cyst was carried out under local anesthesia after elevation of the mucoperiosteal flap, which led to uneventful healing. How to cite this article: Subramanya PL. Radicular Cyst associated with Deciduous Incisor: A Rare Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):217-219. PMID:25206172

  1. Relationship between dorsal ganglion cysts of the wrist and intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Van den Dungen, Sophie; Marchesi, Simona; Ezzedine, Rabih; Bindou, David; Lorea, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Soft tissue ganglion cysts are the most common benign tumours of the wrist; their pathogenesis remains controversial. We prospectively screened the radiographic appearance of the wrists of 51 patients presenting to a single surgeon with dorsal wrist ganglions during a one-year period. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs were systematically performed looking for possible associated intraosseous ganglion cysts. There were 51 dorsal soft tissue ganglion cysts in 51 patients. We detected 29 associated intraosseous ganglia in 24 patients (47%): 16 ganglia in the lunate bone (55%), 5 in the capitate bone, 7 in the scaphoid and 1 in the trapezoid. Mean size of the intraosseous ganglia was 3 mm (range, 2 to 5 mm). This high prevalence of intraosseous ganglia in association with soft tissue ganglia has to our knowledge never been reported previously. A common aetiology for these two types of ganglion cysts may explain this high association rate. PMID:16305077

  2. Proteomic Study of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites, Cysts, and Cyst-Like Structures.

    PubMed

    Luna-Nácar, Milka; Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    The cyst stage of Entamoeba histolytica is a promising therapeutic target against human amoebiasis. Our research team previously reported the production in vitro of Cyst-Like Structures (CLS) sharing structural features with cysts, including rounded shape, size reduction, multinucleation, and the formation of a chitin wall coupled to the overexpression of glucosamine 6-phosphate isomerase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the chitin synthesis pathway. A proteomic study of E. histolytica trophozoites, cysts, and in vitro-produced CLS is reported herein to determine the nature of CLS, widen our knowledge on the cyst stage, and identify possible proteins and pathways involved in the encystment process. Total protein extracts were obtained from E. histolytica trophozoites, CLS, and partially purified cysts recovered from the feces of amoebic human patients; extracts were trypsin-digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, 1029 proteins were identified in trophozoites, 550 in CLS, and 411 in cysts, with 539, 299, and 84 proteins unique to each sample, respectively, and only 74 proteins shared by all three stages. About 70% of CLS proteins were shared with trophozoites, even though differences were observed in the relative protein abundance. While trophozoites showed a greater abundance of proteins associated to a metabolically active cell, CLS showed higher expression of proteins related to proteolysis, redox homeostasis, and stress response. In addition, the expression of genes encoding for the cyst wall proteins Jessie and Jacob was detected by RT-PCR and the Jacob protein identified by Western blotting and immunofluorescence in CLS. However, the proteomic profile of cysts as determined by LC-MS/MS was very dissimilar to that of trophozoites and CLS, with almost 40% of hypothetical proteins. Our global results suggest that CLS are more alike to trophozoites than to cysts, and they could be generated as a rapid survival response of trophozoites to a stressful condition

  3. Proteomic Study of Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites, Cysts, and Cyst-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Nácar, Milka; Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    The cyst stage of Entamoeba histolytica is a promising therapeutic target against human amoebiasis. Our research team previously reported the production in vitro of Cyst-Like Structures (CLS) sharing structural features with cysts, including rounded shape, size reduction, multinucleation, and the formation of a chitin wall coupled to the overexpression of glucosamine 6-phosphate isomerase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the chitin synthesis pathway. A proteomic study of E. histolytica trophozoites, cysts, and in vitro-produced CLS is reported herein to determine the nature of CLS, widen our knowledge on the cyst stage, and identify possible proteins and pathways involved in the encystment process. Total protein extracts were obtained from E. histolytica trophozoites, CLS, and partially purified cysts recovered from the feces of amoebic human patients; extracts were trypsin-digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, 1029 proteins were identified in trophozoites, 550 in CLS, and 411 in cysts, with 539, 299, and 84 proteins unique to each sample, respectively, and only 74 proteins shared by all three stages. About 70% of CLS proteins were shared with trophozoites, even though differences were observed in the relative protein abundance. While trophozoites showed a greater abundance of proteins associated to a metabolically active cell, CLS showed higher expression of proteins related to proteolysis, redox homeostasis, and stress response. In addition, the expression of genes encoding for the cyst wall proteins Jessie and Jacob was detected by RT-PCR and the Jacob protein identified by Western blotting and immunofluorescence in CLS. However, the proteomic profile of cysts as determined by LC-MS/MS was very dissimilar to that of trophozoites and CLS, with almost 40% of hypothetical proteins. Our global results suggest that CLS are more alike to trophozoites than to cysts, and they could be generated as a rapid survival response of trophozoites to a stressful condition

  4. Localization of a Peripheral Residual Cyst: Diagnostic Role of CT Scan

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, Anshuman; Nair, Gopakumar R.; Kapoor, Madhur; Sharma, Neeta; Kundendu, Arya

    2012-01-01

    The term residual cyst is used most often for retained radicular cyst from teeth that has been removed. Residual cysts are among most common cysts of the jaws. The location of all odontogenic cysts is usually intraosseous. The peripheral (extraosseous) presentations are rare. The peripheral presentation of residual cyst has never been reported in the literature. In this article, the role of CT in diagnosing an unusual peripheral presentation of a residual cyst is discussed. PMID:22567458

  5. Radiologic manifestations of colloid cysts: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Algin, Oktay; Ozmen, Evrim; Arslan, Halil

    2013-02-01

    Colloid cysts are among rare benign tumours of the third ventricle. Although the most frequent symptoms are headache and syncope, arrest hydrocephalus or sudden death could appear with colloid cysts. The aim of this pictorial essay was to increase awareness of the clinical presentation, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging spectrum, and treatment options of the colloid cysts. The data of 11 patients with histopathologically and/or clinically proven colloid cyst were analysed, retrospectively; and the neuroradiologic appearances of the cysts were evaluated. The CT and MR appearance of colloid cysts may change, depending on the viscosity or the cholesterol content of the cysts. However, the cystic content is the most important factor that could affect the success of treatment. Cysts that are especially rich in protein and cholesterol tend to be hyperdense on CT, hypointense on T2-weighted sequences and hyperintense on T1-weighted sequences. These cysts are viscous, and the success of aspiration is significantly low. In the diagnosis and evaluation of small-sized cysts that have an ingredient similar to cerebrospinal fluid, 3-dimensional sequences might be useful. The radiologic appearances of colloid cysts could play an important role in directing these patients to alternative surgical modalities, including resection. PMID:22575594

  6. Male median raphe cysts: serial retrospective analysis and histopathological classification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To review the clinical and pathological characteristics of median raphe cysts and to classify the lesions according to pathogenesis and histopathological findings. Methods The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with median raphe cysts between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed to document the clinical presentation and pathological findings of the cysts. Results Most patients were asymptomatic; however, 9 patients had inflammatory or infectious cysts that were tender or painful. Four patients who had cysts on the parameatus and distal prepuce had difficulty voiding. Hematuria and hematospermia were noted in 2 cases. Thirty-one cysts were lined with an urothelium-like epithelium, and a squamous epithelium lining was found in 3 cases. In 2 cases, a well-formed mucinous glandular structure was observed. The other 20 cysts consisted of mixed epithelia. After excision of the cysts under local or general anesthesia, an urethral fistula developed as a complication in only 1 case. Conclusions Median raphe cysts are benign lesions formed due to tissue trapping during the development of urethral folds. The cysts can be defined into 4 types based on pathological findings: urethral, epidermoid, glandular, and mixed. The associated symptoms and signs should be taken into consideration when determining the treatment for the cysts. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http//http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7727074877500751 PMID:22978603

  7. Comparative pathology of pulmonary hydatid cysts in macropods and sheep.

    PubMed

    Barnes, T S; Hinds, L A; Jenkins, D J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Lightowlers, M W; Coleman, G T

    2011-01-01

    The development and appearance of hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus in experimentally infected tammar wallabies (Macropus eugenii) and sheep during the period 9-17 months post-infection (mpi) were studied. Cysts of unknown age were also examined from mature, naturally infected sheep. The cysts grew more rapidly and became fertile within a shorter period in wallabies compared with sheep. Cysts from the wallabies were larger in absolute size and were larger relative to the size of the lungs. Microscopical examination revealed that wallaby hydatid cysts developed in small bronchioles. Hydatid cysts in the wallabies had a thicker germinal membrane, with more nuclei and a thicker laminated layer (LL), than hydatid cysts of similar age found in sheep. In contrast, the adventitial layer was thicker in the ovine cysts, comprising a hyalinized layer of degenerate collagen and necrotic cellular debris surrounded by a layer of granulation tissue that was largely absent from lesions in the wallabies. Multilocular cysts were present in sheep, but not in wallabies. The greater thickness of the germinal membrane in wallaby cysts suggests greater parasite activity, which may explain the more rapid growth rate in this host, whereas the thicker adventitial layer in sheep cysts may be restrictive to growth while simultaneously protecting the hydatid from the host immune response. These differences in the parasite-host relationship between macropods and sheep may reflect the relatively recent introduction of the parasite into Australia. PMID:20846666

  8. Joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    McCutchen, C W

    1983-01-01

    The fine-pored, easily compressed articular cartilage provides animal joints with self-pressurized hydrostatic (weeping) lubrication. The solid skeletons of the cartilages press against each other, but so lightly that their rubbing is lubricated successfully by synovial fluid--a boundary lubricant too weak to lubricate ordinary bearings. PMID:6317095

  9. Laparoscopic excision of mesenteric cyst of sigmoid mesocolon

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarwar, Ajay H; Tayade, Mukund B; Borisa, Ashok D; Kasat, Gaurav V

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumours. They are found in the mesentery of small bowel (66%) and mesentery of large intestine (33%), usually in the right colon. Very few cases have been reported of tumours found in mesentery of descending colon, sigmoid or rectum. Mesenteric cysts do not show classical clinical findings and are detected incidentally during imaging due to absent or non-specific clinical presentation or during management of one of their complications. Ultrasonography (USG)/computed tomography (CT)/ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in diagnosing mesenteric cyst but they cannot determine the origin of cyst. Laparoscopy not only helps in diagnosing the site and origin of the mesenteric cyst but also has a therapeutic role. Laparoscopic treatment of mesenteric cyst is a safe, preferred method of treatment and is a less-invasive surgical technique. Here, we present an unusual case of mesenteric cyst arising from the sigmoid mesocolon treated by laparoscopic excision. PMID:23626420

  10. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  11. Keratin metaplasia in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Ramesh, Venkatapathy; Oza, Nirima; Panda, Abikshyeet; Balamurali, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find the prevalence of keratin metaplasia and its relation with clinico-pathological profile of the odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: Odontogenic cysts were studied histologically with special stains to identify the presence of keratin and compared with various parameters such as underlying connective tissue inflammation, average epithelial thickness, and site of the cyst, type of the cyst, age and the sex of the patient. Results: Of 71 cases of various odontogenic cysts, 26 (36.6%) cases exhibited keratinization in the epithelial lining. In cysts with severe inflammation there is absence of keratinization. Conclusions: This study reveals higher prevalence of keratin metaplasia in the odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, inflammation is found to be one of factor influencing keratin metaplasia. PMID:25210349

  12. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  13. Spontaneous regression of a cervical intraspinal cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kamishina, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Hiroya; Katayama, Masaaki; Yasuda, Jun; Sato, Reeko; Tohyama, Koujiro

    2010-03-01

    We report a cervical intraspinal cyst in a dog that was initially tetraparetic but spontaneously recovered completely. MRI revealed a well-demarcated intraspinal cyst located dorsally to a degenerated intervertebral disc. The location of the cyst and its signal features on MRI resembled those of discal cysts previously reported in humans. It has been reported in dogs that clinical signs of a intraspinal cyst are similar to those of intervertebral disc herniation and both conditions require surgical intervention. Unexpectedly, our case showed rapid spontaneous recovery and the follow-up MRI revealed complete resolution of the intraspinal cyst and spinal cord compression. Spontaneous recovery of degenerative intraspinal cyst may occur in dogs, similar to rare human cases as reported previously. PMID:19952512

  14. Acetabular Paralabral Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Femoral Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kullar, Raj S.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Ihnat, Daniel; Aoki, Stephen K.; Maak, Travis G.

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a known cause of hip pain in the young, active patient. Labral tears can be due to trauma, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, dysplasia, and degenerative pathology. Paralabral cysts are relatively common in association with labral tears of the hip, with cysts seen on magnetic resonance imaging studies in as many as 50% to 70% of patients with labral tears. In some cases the cysts can become sizeable and cause neurovascular compression. Nonoperative interventions for the management of paralabral cysts in the shoulder and knee have shown high recurrence rates. In the shoulder and knee, arthroscopic debridement of paralabral cysts has shown good results with lower recurrence rates and resolution of neurovascular function. In the hip there is limited literature regarding surgical management of paralabral cysts. We present a surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of acetabular paralabral cysts combined with labral repair. PMID:25973371

  15. Multiple soft tissue aneurysmal cysts: An occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of fibula

    PubMed Central

    Karkuzhali, P; Bhattacharyya, Mahuya; Sumitha, P

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of multiple extraosseous aneurysmal cysts occurring in the muscle and subcutaneous plane of postero-lateral aspects of the upper right leg. They appeared about 15 months after resection of aneurysmal bone cyst of the upper end of the fibula. They varied in size from 2 cm to 5 cm. Radiologically they were well-defined lesions with central septate areas surrounded by a rim of calcification. Histologically they showed central cystic spaces separated by septa consisting of fibroblasts, osteoclast type of giant cells and reactive woven bone. Thus they showed histological similarity with aneurysmal bone cysts, but did not show any connection with the bone. Only very few examples of aneurysmal cysts of soft tissue had been described in the past one decade and they were reported in various locations including rare sites such as arterial wall and larynx. Recent cytogenetic analyses have shown abnormalities involving 17p11-13 and/or 16q22 in both osseous and extraosseous aneurysmal cysts indicating its probable neoplastic nature. Our case had unique features like multiplicity and occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of the underlying bone. PMID:21139755

  16. Orbital Epidermoid Cysts: A Diagnosis to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Eltanamly, Rasha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Orbital epidermoids form a rare pathological entity that is separate from dermoid cysts. They have variable clinical and radiological presentations and they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of orbital cystic lesions. This work describes the various clinical and radiological presentations of 17 cases of epidermoid cysts and the surgical outcome. Method. A prospective interventional study was conducted on 17 patients diagnosed with epidermoid cysts. Patients' symptoms and signs were recorded; CT scan was done for all patients. All lesions were removed through anterior orbitotomy and histopathological diagnosis confirmed. Results. Mean age of patients was 16.3 years ±  10.54. Main complaints were lid swelling, masses, ocular dissimilarity, chronic pain, and ocular protrusion. Clinical signs varied from lid swelling and masses in all cases to proptosis, globe displacement, limitation of ocular motility, and scars. Radiological findings ranged from homogenous hypodense masses (58.8%) to homogenous radiolucent (17.6%) and heterogenous masses (23.5%). No recurrences following surgeries were reported throughout the follow-up (mean 18.8 months ±  0.72). Conclusion. Deep orbital epidemoid cysts are a separate entity that can behave like deep orbital epidermoid; however, they usually present at a relatively older age. They can be associated with increased orbital volume but not necessarily related to bony sutures. PMID:25276416

  17. A Case of Laparoscopic Mesenteric Cyst Excision

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikalp; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Geller, Matthew; Selbs, Elena; Romero, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of a young, healthy patient with a symptomatic mesenteric cyst. He had a 5-month history of abdominal pain from this disorder, and the case is presented to illustrate the clinical picture and operative management of this rare disorder. PMID:22988537

  18. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Shabnam; Prendiville, Kevin John; Martinez, Eladio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia. Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam. Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2–3 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months. Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia. PMID:27625966

  19. Inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts with ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Wickramanayake, G B; Rubin, A J; Sproul, O J

    1984-01-01

    Giardia lamblia cysts were inactivated in water with ozone at pH 7.0 and 5 and 25 degrees C. The concentration-time products for 99% inactivation were 0.53 and 0.17 mg-min/liter at 5 and 25 degrees C, respectively. These products were significantly lower than those reported for chlorine. PMID:6497374

  20. Multiple aneurysmal bone cysts in a foal.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, H L; Livesey, M A; Caswell, J L

    1997-01-01

    Multiple aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are previously unreported in horses. An ABC was diagnosed in the left 3rd metacarpal of a Thoroughbred foal, which partially resolved following surgical curettage. A 2nd ABC developed in the left tibia, 7 wk postoperatively, and the foal was euthanized. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9285139

  1. Intralobar pulmonary sequestration and mediastinal bronchogenic cyst.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, R. G.; Yip, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    A patient with a bronchogenic cyst and intralobar pulmonary sequestration is presented. Chest radiography showed a posterior mediastinal mass and a computed tomographic scan of the chest revealed, in addition, an abnormality suggestive of pulmonary sequestration. This was confirmed by an aortogram. It is important to be aware of the coexistence of these anomalies to make a diagnosis preoperatively. Images PMID:8016803

  2. EFFECT OF HALOGENS ON 'GIARDIA' CYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of chlorine and other disinfecting agents on Giardia lamblia cyst viability. The agents studied included free residual chlorine and six different methods recommended for emergency disinfection of small quantities of water...

  3. Proteomic analysis of soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) worldwide causing an estimated $2 billion in losses annually. Proteomic technologies are powerful tools to examine protein expression profiles as well as modification of proteins. W...

  4. Diverse CLE peptides from cyst nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE)-like peptides play diverse roles in plant growth and development including maintenance of the stem cell population in the root meristem. Small secreted peptides sharing similarity to plant CLE signaling peptides have been isolated from several cyst nematode species including...

  5. Conservative management of a large maxillary cyst.

    PubMed

    Rees, J S

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a large maxillary cyst by root canal treatment and decompression using a hollow drain made from surgical suction tubing. The rationale behind the use of this technique is reviewed and its advantages highlighted. PMID:9477796

  6. [Intraperitoneal perforation of hepatic hydatid cyst].

    PubMed

    El Malki, Hadj Omar; El Mejdoubi, Yasser; Mohsine, Raouf; Ifrine, Lahcen; Belkouchi, Abdelkader

    2006-10-01

    The incidence of the rupture of hydatid cyst of the liver is about 15 to 40% of the cases. In 2 to 7% of the cases the cyst can perforate into the peritoneum. The occurrence of a sclerosing peritonitis secondary to the rupture of the hydatid cyst of the liver was described, to our knowledge, only once. We report the observation of a 43 year-old woman in whom the diagnostis of peritoneal rupture of a liver hydatid cyst was made after 3 months. The patient was treated by albendazole (10 mg/kg/d). Two months after the beginning of this treatment, the patient was operated. A sclerosing peritonitis was discovered. The parasitologic studies of the different specimens were negative. The surgical treatment consisted of a good washing with H2O2 of the fibrous hull of the sclerosing peritonitis and drainage without any dissection. The evolution was satisfactory with albendazole treatment for 14 months. Currently, she is in good health without recurrence and without any abnormalities with a 2 years follow-up. We think that albendazole in the treatment of the hydatid disease is very effective in condition to give a continuous treatment for a long time. The occurrence of a sclerosing peritonitis is fortunately an exceptional situation whose surgical management is very delicate. PMID:17075481

  7. Pediatric interhemispheric arachnoid cyst: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Mankotia, Dipanker Singh; Sardana, Hardik; Sinha, Sumit; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar; Suri, Ashish; Borkar, Sachin Anil; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Chandra, P. Sarat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interhemispheric arachnoid cysts (IHACs) are a rare type of congenital arachnoid cyst accounting for <5% of all cases. The optimum surgical management of symptomatic IHAC is still controversial, and there are no clear guidelines. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of six pediatric patients of IHAC operated from 2012 to 2015 at our institute. There was definitive sex predisposition with all patients being males. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy, cystocisternostomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt surgeries were performed in three patients each. Results: The median age at presentation was 13 months. The most common clinical presentations were macrocrania with rapidly increasing head size, seizures, infantile spasms, and developmental delay. The mean duration of follow-up was 24.16 months (range: 3–36 months). Cyst size decreased in all the patients on follow-up imaging. Head size stabilized in all the patients. None of the patients required a second surgical procedure till the last follow-up. Conclusions: Both endoscopic cyst fenestration and shunt surgery are safe and effective in management of IHAC. PMID:27195030

  8. [Laparoscopic treatment of hydatid liver cysts].

    PubMed

    Salinas Sedó, G; Velásquez Hawkins, C; Saavedra Tafur, L

    2001-01-01

    In the treatment of the liver hydatid cyst, many surgical techniques have been used, from aspiration, drainage, marsupialization to the complete excision of the cyst with segmentary liver resection. With the appearance of laparoscopic surgery, new chances for the treatment of liver hydatidoses come to us in this frequent pathology in our country. In this paper we show the laparoscopic technique used in some patients seen by us in the last years. After we made the diagnosis, we gave medical treatment with albendazol 400 mg per day during 90 days, prior to surgery. We also used antibiotic prophylaxis with wide spectrum antibiotics. Surgery was performed with the patient in dorsal decubitus with ports: umbilical; 10 mm for angled optics (30-45 ), epigastric;10 mm, for right subcostal in the mid collar bone position. 5 mm for aspiration and forceps and right subcostal and front axillar line. We performed a diagnostic laparoscopy to visualize the cyst. We introduced soaked gauzes with ClNa 21% surrounding the cyst specially in the more protruded zone. Afterwards we punctured the cyst and took laboratory samples searching for the scolex in the direct exam, then we injected ClNa 21% in the cyst. It stay for 5 minutes and we made rechanges for 4-5 times. We take a piece of the wall cyst and adventicy for pathological examination. We take out the germinative layer and the daughter s hydatides with care to put them in extraction bags to leave out their content in a ClNa 21% recipient. Finally we retrieved the gauzes previously introduced, we suck the remaining fluid and introduce a piece of epiplon inside the residual cavity, fixed with suture points to the border and left a 16F fenestrated probe that is left outside by a lateral port. The postoperative management is the same as the laparoscopic colecystectomy. The oral route begins when the postoperative ileum is over (12 to 24 hours), treatment of the pain, prompt deambulation and discharge in relation of the external

  9. [Sacral perineural cyst--report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Takamura, H; Goto, S; Sasaki, H; Makino, K; Ozaki, N; Hodozuka, A

    1988-06-01

    The presence of cysts within the sacral spinal canal, so-called sacral cysts, is described in literature. These include 'sacral perineural cyst', 'sacral extradural cyst', 'occult intrasacral meningocele' and 'anterior sacral meningocele'. Sacral perineural cyst in these cystic disorders was first described as an incidental autopsy finding by Tarlov in 1938. Since then, several reports have been made describing the sign and symptom, neurological findings, roentgenographic diagnosis and cause and origin of the sacral perineural cysts, although many problems are not yet solved satisfactorily. This cyst occurs on the extradural components of sacral or coccygeal nerve roots. Although most are asymptomatic, these occasionally cause low back pain, sciatic and sacrococcygeal pain, sensory and motor disturbance in the lower extremities, and urinary dysfunction, which symptoms are similar to those brought on by lumbar disc herniation. In 1948, Tarlov reported a case of sciatic pain due to a perineural cyst, the removal of which relieved the symptoms. Symptoms occur because adjacent nerve roots are impinged upon by the thin-walled, fluid-filled cysts, which are formed in a space between the endoneurium and the perineurium. Microscopically, the cyst walls consist of peripheral nerve fibers or ganglionic cells covered with meningeal epithelium. Communication of the cyst with subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid may be poor, but myelogram and CT myelogram demonstrate the cysts filling with contrast media. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), imaging of the sacral perineural cysts has improved. Recently we had the opportunity to evaluate a patient in whom perineural cysts had caused considerable erosion of the sacrum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3221973

  10. Cystic lesion around the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-Ichi

    2015-10-18

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  11. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  12. Reliability of semiquantitative assessment of osteophytes and subchondral cysts on tomosynthesis images by radiologists with different levels of expertise

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daichi; Xu, Li; Gusenburg, Jeffrey; Roemer, Frank W.; Hunter, David J.; Li, Ling; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess reliability of the evaluation of osteophytes and subchondral cysts on tomosynthesis images when read by radiologists with different levels of expertise. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty subjects aged >40 years had both knees evaluated using tomosynthesis. Images were read by an “experienced” reader (musculoskeletal radiologist with prior experience) and an “inexperienced” reader (radiology resident with no prior experience). Readers graded osteophytes from 0 to 3 and noted the presence/absence of subchondral cysts in four locations of the tibiofemoral joint. Twenty knees were randomly selected and re-read. Inter- and intrareader reliabilities were calculated using overall exact percent agreement and weighted κ statistics. Diagnostic performance of the two readers was compared against magnetic resonance imaging readings by an expert reader (professor of musculoskeletal radiology). RESULTS The experienced reader showed substantial intrareader reliability for graded reading of osteophytes (90%, κ=0.93), osteophyte detection (95%, κ=0.86) and cyst detection (95%, κ=0.83). The inexperienced reader showed perfect intrareader reliability for cyst detection (100%, κ=1.00) but intrareader reliability for graded reading (75%, κ=0.79) and detection (80%, κ=0.61) of osteophytes was lower than the experienced reader. Inter-reader reliability was 61% (κ=0.72) for graded osteophyte reading, 91% (κ=0.82) for osteophyte detection, and 88% (κ=0.66) for cyst detection. Diagnostic performance of the experienced reader was higher than the inexperienced reader regarding osteophyte detection (sensitivity range 0.74–0.95 vs. 0.54–0.75 for all locations) but diagnostic performance was similar for subchondral cysts. CONCLUSION Tomosynthesis offers excellent intrareader reliability regardless of the reader experience, but experience is important for detection of osteophytes. PMID:24834489

  13. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  14. Oral mucoceles; extravasation cysts and retention cysts. A study of 298 cases.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Carina; Olsson Bergland, Kamilla; Walhjalt, Hanna; Magnusson, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Oral mucoceles can be divided in two different forms, extravasation and retention cysts. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of each form, sex- and age distribution, location, recurrences, referent and the differences between the two forms. A total of three-hundred-five cases were retrieved from the Department of Oral Pathology at the Institution of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University between 1993 and 2003. Seven referrals were disregarded because there was insufficient information, leaving 298 cases for this study. In relation to other studies, our study investigated a larger number of cases. Extravasation cysts were the most common type (258 cases). There was a slight predominance among women (55%) and the most frequent location was the lower lip (71%). 84% occurred between the ages of 0 and 40 years with peak incidence in the second decade (34%). 62% of the referrals came from specialists, 28% from general practitioners, and 10% from the Department of Oral Medicine. Retention cysts were not found as frequently as extravasation cysts (40 cases) and the occurrence in women was also a bit higher (58%). We found a more even distribution regarding age and location. The most common locations were floor of the mouth (25%), cheek (20%), and lower lip (18%). They occurred more often between the ages of 11 and 30 (31%), and between 50 and 80 (50%). 75% of the referrals came from specialists, 15% from general practitioners,and 10% from the Department of Oral Medicine. Recurrences were unusual for both cyst types. 17 cases of extravasation cysts were reported as recurrences and one case of retention cyst. PMID:19994562

  15. Gross pathology and endocrinology of ovarian cysts in bitches.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Y; Bostedt, H; Failing, K; Knauf, S; Wehrend, A

    2014-06-01

    A total of 73 bitches with ovarian cysts were ovariohysterectomized. Cysts were characterized by gross pathology and endocrine parameters. Therefore, oestradiol-17ß and progesterone concentrations were assessed in cyst-fluid and corresponding blood plasma in each bitch. Our data demonstrated that multiple cysts were often present in a single individual (82%) and that cysts were commonly found on both ovaries (77%). The number of cysts per individual varied from 1 to 35. Most cysts were small in size (range 0.2-4.0 cm in diameter). No cyst was found to produce solely oestradiol-17ß or progesterone. Plasma levels of oestradiol-17ß and progesterone for a given individual were positively correlated with levels of these same hormones in their cyst-fluid (r = 0.334 and p = 0.001 for oestradiol-17ß; r = 0.419 and p < 0.001 for progesterone). Our study is the first to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the gross pathology and endocrinology of ovarian cysts in a larger number of bitches. PMID:24698026

  16. Bilateral Radicular Cyst in Mandible: An Unusual Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bava, Fareed Ahmed; Umar, Dilshad; Bahseer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    A radicular cyst is one of the furthermost everyday odontogenic cysts of the anterior maxilla, not regularly comprehended in youth. They are found mostly at the apices of the tooth (periapical cyst), lateral surface of the roots (lateral radicular cyst) and remains in the jaw after removal of the offending tooth (residual cyst). The radicular cyst has been catalogued as an inflammatory cyst, as an outcome to pulpal necrosis succeeding caries, with a linked periapical inflammatory reaction. They advance sluggishly and asymptomatic lest infected. Because of this they can extent to big dimensions. Many times it is perplexing to segregate radicular cysts from the obligatory pre-existing chronic periapical periodontitis lesions radiographically. Here, we present a rare case with bilateral radicular cyst in relation to first molar of the mandible in a 19-year-old. Orthopantomograph showed a large unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined border in the periapical region of the first molar on the left side extending from the root of the second premolar to the mesial root of the second molar. Correspondingly another well-defined unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined border was seen on the right side of the mandible. Several treatment possibilities are presented for a radicular cyst such as surgical endodontic treatment, extraction of the transgressing tooth, enucleation with primary closure, and marsupialization trailed by enucleation. The patient management comprised surgical enucleation of cystic sac followed by rehabilitation of the same area. PMID:25859111

  17. [Selection of surgical approach for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Hamada, Hideo; Umemura, Kimiko; Kurosaki, Kunikazu; Kurimoto, Masanori; Endo, Shunro

    2005-05-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of 4 cases of quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst were retrospectively reviewed and patterns of extension to surrounding cisterns from the quadrigeminal cistern were examined. Relationship between patterns of extension to surrounding cisterns and selected surgical approach were evaluated. In 2 cases, the cyst extended anteriorly and compressed the quadrigeminal plate. These two cases had hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. The anteroirly extending cyst was treated with endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy via the lateral and third ventricles. In one case, the cyst extended superiorly to the velum interpositum cistern, and was treated with endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy via the lateral ventricle. In one case, the cyst extended laterally to the ambient cistern and compressed the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle. This case had loculated hydrocephalus of the inferior horn. The laterally extending cyst was treated with resection of the wall of the arachnoid cyst via an infratentorial supracerebellar approach assisted by endoscope. All cysts were successfully treated. Injury of the foramen of Monro occurred during a procedure using a flexible endoscope in a case with an anterior extending cyst. Exact analysis of the preoperative imaging and selection of appropriate surgical approach are key factors for successful treatment of a quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst. PMID:15912765

  18. Gross Pathology and Endocrinology of Ovarian Cysts in Bitches

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Y; Bostedt, H; Failing, K; Knauf, S; Wehrend, A

    2014-01-01

    Contents A total of 73 bitches with ovarian cysts were ovariohysterectomized. Cysts were characterized by gross pathology and endocrine parameters. Therefore, oestradiol-17ß and progesterone concentrations were assessed in cyst-fluid and corresponding blood plasma in each bitch. Our data demonstrated that multiple cysts were often present in a single individual (82%) and that cysts were commonly found on both ovaries (77%). The number of cysts per individual varied from 1 to 35. Most cysts were small in size (range 0.2–4.0 cm in diameter). No cyst was found to produce solely oestradiol-17ß or progesterone. Plasma levels of oestradiol-17ß and progesterone for a given individual were positively correlated with levels of these same hormones in their cyst-fluid (r = 0.334 and p = 0.001 for oestradiol-17ß; r = 0.419 and p < 0.001 for progesterone). Our study is the first to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the gross pathology and endocrinology of ovarian cysts in a larger number of bitches. PMID:24698026

  19. Bilateral radicular cyst in mandible: an unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Bava, Fareed Ahmed; Umar, Dilshad; Bahseer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-02-01

    A radicular cyst is one of the furthermost everyday odontogenic cysts of the anterior maxilla, not regularly comprehended in youth. They are found mostly at the apices of the tooth (periapical cyst), lateral surface of the roots (lateral radicular cyst) and remains in the jaw after removal of the offending tooth (residual cyst). The radicular cyst has been catalogued as an inflammatory cyst, as an outcome to pulpal necrosis succeeding caries, with a linked periapical inflammatory reaction. They advance sluggishly and asymptomatic lest infected. Because of this they can extent to big dimensions. Many times it is perplexing to segregate radicular cysts from the obligatory pre-existing chronic periapical periodontitis lesions radiographically. Here, we present a rare case with bilateral radicular cyst in relation to first molar of the mandible in a 19-year-old. Orthopantomograph showed a large unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined border in the periapical region of the first molar on the left side extending from the root of the second premolar to the mesial root of the second molar. Correspondingly another well-defined unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined border was seen on the right side of the mandible. Several treatment possibilities are presented for a radicular cyst such as surgical endodontic treatment, extraction of the transgressing tooth, enucleation with primary closure, and marsupialization trailed by enucleation. The patient management comprised surgical enucleation of cystic sac followed by rehabilitation of the same area. PMID:25859111

  20. Ganglion Cyst Contiguity of the Flexor Hallusis Longus Tendon in a National Swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Çirci, Esra; Özyalvaç, Osman Nuri; Tüzüner, Tolga; Ermutlu, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Tendinopathy of the flexor hallusis longus tendon is common in the athletes. This case is intended to be reported diagnose and treatment ganglion cyst contiguity of the flexor hallucis longus tendon that located atypical region and adversely affect the athlete's training program. Methods: 25-year-old male national swimmer was assessed with a left ankle pain. He had an intensive training program in the pool using pallets at the everyday. Pain in the left ankle was localized posterior and distal of the medial malleolus . Ankle range of motion and muscle strength was full. Neurovascular examination was normal. Radiography with anterior posterior, lateral and oblique analysis was not any unusual finding. In the evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, thickening of the tendon sheath and effusion around the flexor hallucis longus was revealed and tendon integrity was exact. Results: Conservative treatment was planned. It was applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine, modification of the training (without or low weight pallet), platelet rich plasma (two weeks, two times peer weeks). During the six-month follow-up the patient's symptoms improved, but with the increased intensity of training at follow-up complaints started again. Professional athletes who did not respond adequately to conservative treatment surgical exposure were planned. Patient is approached the flexor hallucis longus musculotendinous junction from the posteromedial ankle at the level of the posterior talar tubercles. During the tendon exposure cyst was found at the level of talocalcaneal joint. Excision of the cyst was achieved; its size was 5x5 mm, looking transparent, well defined and soft consistency. Tenolysis is accomplished from superior to inferior to the level of the superior calcaneus. A histopathologic examination result of the cyst consistent with ganglion cyst was detected. Sport-specific training program started at the 6 weeks. There was no recurrence during the 6

  1. Alexandrium minutum resting cyst distribution dynamics in a confined site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglès, Sílvia; Jordi, Antoni; Garcés, Esther; Basterretxea, Gotzon; Palanques, Albert

    2010-02-01

    The life cycle of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum consists of an asexual stage, characterized by motile vegetative cells, and a sexual stage, a resting cyst that once formed remains dormant in the sediment. Insight into the factors that determine the distribution and abundance of resting cysts is essential to understanding the dynamics of the vegetative phase. In investigations carried out between January 2005 and January 2008 in Arenys de Mar harbor (northwestern Mediterranean Sea), the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of A. minutum resting cysts and of the sediments were studied during different bloom stages of the vegetative population. Maximum cyst abundance was recorded mainly in the innermost part of the harbor while the lowest abundance always occurred near the harbor entrance, consistent with the distribution of silt-clay sediment fractions. The tendency of cysts in sediments to increase after bloom periods was clearly associated with new cyst formation, while cyst abundance decreased during non-bloom periods. Exceptions to this trend were observed in stations dominated by the deposition of coarse sediments. High correlation between the presence of cysts and clays during non-bloom periods indicates that cysts behave as passive sediment particles and are influenced by the same hydrodynamic processes as clays. In Arenys de Mar, the main physical forcing affecting sediment resuspension is the seiche, which was studied using in situ measurements and numerical models to interpret the observed distribution patterns. During non-bloom periods, cyst losses were smaller when the seiche was more active and at the station where the seiche-induced current was larger. Thus, seiche-forced resuspension appears to reduce cyst losses by reallocating cysts back to the sediment surface such that their burial in the sediment is avoided. The observed vertical profiles of the cysts were consistent with this process.

  2. Clinicopathological study of jaw cysts in southeast region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Demirkol, Mehmet; Ege, Bilal; Yanik, Saim; Aras, M. Hamdi; Ay, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze clinic and radiologic features and the prevalence of jaw cysts in southeast region of Turkey. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in 149 cysts of the jaw diagnosed among 407 individuals who were taken biopsy in our department from October 2008 to December 2012. All cysts were treated by enucleation, marsupialization, or combination, and all cases were histologically examined. Results: One-hundred-and-forty-eight cases were classified odontogenic, one was non-odontogenic. There were 89 cysts (59.7%) in men, 60 (40.3%) in women. The mean age was 32.72 years. We found 80 cysts (35 F, 45 M) in the maxillary and 69 (28 F, 41 M) in mandible. It is observed that 94 were radicular cysts (63%), 40 were dentigerous cysts (26.9%), 9 were odontogenic keratocysts (OKC) (6.1%), 5 were residual radicular cysts (3.4%), and 1 was nasopalatine cyst (0.6%). In radicular cysts, 56 of them (59.5%) were located in the anterior region of the jaws; 18 dentigerous cysts and 2 OKCs were found in the posterior region of mandible. Clinically, the chief complaint of patients was expansion and pain. Radiographically, scalloping of the lesion between the teeth was found in 1 case, root resorption was seen in 3 cases, and displacement of the teeth and follicles was observed in 16 cases. Conclusions: We found similar prevalence of jaw cysts that reported in the literature, in which most odontogenic cysts (OCs) were inflammatory origin. PMID:24966756

  3. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of the proximal tibiofibular joint should be kept in mind in the evaluation of lateral knee pain. They include osteoarthrosis, rheumatic disease, traumatic subluxation or dislocation, ganglion or synovial cysts, synostosis, synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis and hypomobility of the joint. Peroneal nerve can be at risk with pathologies of the joint either by compressive effect or formation of intra-neural ganglion. A case of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint was reported which presented with lateral knee pain. It was successfully treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. Level of evidence V. PMID:24788187

  4. The Toxoplasma gondii cyst wall protein CST1 is critical for cyst wall integrity and promotes bradyzoite persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Tadakimi; Bzik, David J.; Ma, Yan Fen; Fox, Barbara A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M.

    2013-12-26

    Toxoplasma gondii infects up to one third of the world’s population. A key to the success of T.gondii is its ability to persist for the life of its host as bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The glycosylated cyst wall is the key structural feature that facilitates persistence and oral transmission of this parasite. We have identified CST1 (TGME49_064660) as a 250 kDa SRS (SAG1 related sequence) domain protein with a large mucin-like domain. CST1 is responsible for the Dolichos biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) lectin binding characteristic of T. gondii cysts. Deletion of CST1 results in a fragile brain cyst phenotype revealed by a thinning and disruption of the underlying region of the cyst wall. These defects are reversed by complementation of CST1. Additional complementation experiments demonstrate that the CST1-mucin domain is necessary for the formation of a normal cyst wall structure, the ability of the cyst to resist mechanical stress and binding of DBA to the cyst wall. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis demonstrated dysregulation of bradyzoite genes within the various cst1 mutants. These results indicate that CST1 functions as a key structural component that reinforces the cyst wall structure and confers essential sturdiness to the T. gondii tissue cyst.

  5. [Echinococcal cysts of the lung and spleen].

    PubMed

    Siekierzyńska-Czarnecka, A; Seweryniak, W; Stadnicki, M

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary echinococcosis (hydatid disease) is not rare in endemic regions. In Poland it is rare, seen mainly in subjects returning from endemic areas. The intermediate host includes a variety of mammals-sheep, cows, and also humans. The definite host is the dog and is the main source of ova. A case of a 52 year old male is presented who lived in Argentina for a few years. Radiological examination disclosed two pulmonary cysts. Additionally one was also present in the spleen. The diagnosis was made basing of findings form radiological examinations. CT-scan, and serological studies. It was further confirmed during the surgical removal of the affected lung parenchyma. Leaving the spleen cysts is a risk factor it may be the source for further seeding of ova. Mebendazol therapy was instituted, which will be continued in the future. The patient will remain under observation. PMID:8614666

  6. Retrorectal Dermoid Cyst: a Rare Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, I.; Badulescu, Adriana; Mastalier, B.; Munteanu, Mihaela Luminita; Diaconu, Emilia; Popescu, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The retrorectal space represents the anatomical site at which level we identify the embryologic reminiscents in which it can develop liquid tumors - cysts or solid tumors - neoplasia. These tumors are rare but pose a diagnostic and therapeutic interest. This paper presents the case of a young 18 years-old diagnosed incidentally at a gynecological examination, with a palpable tumor developed, at the retrorectal space. Imaging examinations - transvaginal ultrasound and abdominal - pelvic computer tomographic exam - have supported the presence of a cystic tumor with a maximum diameter of 7.8 cm., in the space retrorectal. The lesion presented surgical indication, so it needed a posterior approach with resection of the coccyx enough for the control and safety of the operation. Histopathological examination revealed a dermoid cyst. Five years after surgery the patient is presented in good general condition, asymptomatic without clinical and imaging signs of local-regional recurrence. PMID:24778859

  7. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  8. Multilocular Disseminated Tarlov Cysts: Importance of Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, P. Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    With technological advancements and wider availability of multimodality imaging, incidental lesions are frequently identified in patients undergoing various imaging studies. We report here a case of multiloculated disseminated perineural or Tarlov cysts (TCs). The primary aim of our study was to (1) provide a comprehensive review of the clinical, imaging and histopathological features of TCs (2) to draw attention to the fact that multiple lumbo-sacral and dorsal TCs can produce nerve injuries and serious movement disturbances (3) to document the usefulness of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scan in noninvasive diagnosis and guiding management in such cases. These cysts are clearly identified by MR and computerized tomography imaging of the lumbosacral spine. However, there are no reports on the scintigraphic findings of TCs in literature. TCs are typically benign, asymptomatic lesions that can simply be monitored. Until date, no consensus exists about the best surgical strategy to be followed for their management. PMID:25191117

  9. Multilocular disseminated tarlov cysts: importance of imaging.

    PubMed

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, P Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    With technological advancements and wider availability of multimodality imaging, incidental lesions are frequently identified in patients undergoing various imaging studies. We report here a case of multiloculated disseminated perineural or Tarlov cysts (TCs). The primary aim of our study was to (1) provide a comprehensive review of the clinical, imaging and histopathological features of TCs (2) to draw attention to the fact that multiple lumbo-sacral and dorsal TCs can produce nerve injuries and serious movement disturbances (3) to document the usefulness of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scan in noninvasive diagnosis and guiding management in such cases. These cysts are clearly identified by MR and computerized tomography imaging of the lumbosacral spine. However, there are no reports on the scintigraphic findings of TCs in literature. TCs are typically benign, asymptomatic lesions that can simply be monitored. Until date, no consensus exists about the best surgical strategy to be followed for their management. PMID:25191117

  10. Dental lamina cysts in a newborn infant

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2012-01-01

    Cystic lesions of transient nature viz. Epstein pearls, Bohn's nodules and dental lamina cysts are frequently found in the oral cavities of newborn infants. These cysts arise from the developing dental tissues or from their remnants. These cystic lesions are not commonly seen by the dental surgeons due to their self-limiting nature and ignorance of the parents to seek the professional opinion. However, when contacted by anxious parents seeking treatment, dental surgeons should be able to explain and reassure the parents about the transient nature of these lesions and need for no treatment but regular follow-up. The present case report was written with the purpose to increase the awareness in dental surgeons about the peculiar clinical presentation and self-limiting nature of these cystic lesions, so that unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided in such young infants. PMID:23048002

  11. Giant Dermoid Cyst Causing Dysphagia and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahan, Leyla; Dere, Yelda; Sahan, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Dermoid cysts are benign lesions seen in young adults. The second most common localization is the floor of the mouth. They are usually asymptomatic over years but can be symptomatic due to secondary changes or the size. Herein, we report a case of 19-year-old woman who applied to emergency service with dyspnea, dysphagia and enlarging of a mass in the submental region. The patient cannot be entubated because of the mass pushing the tongue base backward closing the laryngeal view. Elective tracheostomy was performed for providing airflow during the operation. After the operation a cystic mass fulfilled with keratin lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in addition to the dermal appendages such as sweat glands and follicular structures were seen histopathologically and the case was diagnosed as dermoid cyst of the submental region. In such patients with quick enlarging of mass causing airway obstructions, the tracheostomy can be the preferable method because of the difficulties in entubation. PMID:26999700

  12. Adenocarcinoma associated with tail gut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Susannah; Maloney-Patel, Nell; Rezac, Craig; Poplin, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinomas of the presacral (retrorectal) space are rare. The diagnosis is usually delayed because of non-specific symptoms, and is made after a biopsy or surgery. These carcinomas arise from cystic lesions developing from remnants of the embryological postanal gut containing mucous-secreting epithelium, known as tail gut cysts. The potential for infection, perianal fistulas and most importantly, malignant change warrants an early complete surgical resection. From an oncologist’s perspective, the management of these carcinomas has varied, and has included adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. We describe here a rare case of adenocarcinoma associated with a tail gut cyst that was discovered incidentally and resected by a posterior approach (Kraske procedure). The patient has had clinical and periodic radiologic surveillance without any evidence of cancer recurrence for over a year and a half. PMID:23450681

  13. Mediastinal hydatid cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mediastinal localization of hydatidosis is very rare even in endemic areas. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical and radiological criteria. Case presentation We report a case of a mediastinal location of hydatidosis in a 60-year-old Arab man admitted for chest pain. The chest radiograph showed a rounded and homogeneous opacity. Computed tomography showed a right mediastinal cyst, without other thoracic or abdominal sites. Through a posterolateral thoracotomy, we found a cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum. The patient received a cystectomy with medical treatment based on albendazole. He improved a few weeks later. Conclusion Mediastinal cysts remain rare, even in endemic countries, which makes initial diagnosis difficult. Our observation shows the importance of keeping this diagnosis in mind when a patient presents with signs of mediastinal compression. PMID:24099329

  14. Isolated adenomyotic cyst associated with severe dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Masaki; Taguchi, Shuuhei; Oki, Toshimichi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Ichiro; Yoshinaga, Mitsuhiro; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    A case of a 23-year-old, nulliparous female with a very rare isolated adenomyotic cyst inducing severe dysmenorrhea was seen. Transvaginal ultrasonographic tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 3 x 3-cm cystic mass within the left anterior wall of the uterine corpus. The cystic space was filled with hyperintense fluid on T1-weighted images, which was surrounded by hypointense tissue beside the right uterine corpus on T2-weighted images. The case was preliminarily diagnosed using MRI as having cavitated rudimentary uterine horn. However, hysterosalpingography excluded the possibility of uterine anomaly. A hemorrhagic adenomyotic cyst measuring 3 cm within the left anterior wall of the uterine corpus was surgically removed. There was no evidence of diffuse adenomyosis uteri. Dysmenorrhea completely disappeared postoperatively. PMID:17578374

  15. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence. PMID:24701462

  16. Rupture of Right Hepatic Duct into Hydatid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Pliakos, Ioannis; Kotidis, Eustathios; Kesisoglou, Isaak; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2012-01-01

    Echinococcal disease can develop anywhere in the human body. The liver represents its most frequent location. Hepatic hydatid cysts may rupture into the biliary tract, thorax, peritoneum, viscera, digestive tract or skin. We report a rare case with rupture of the right hepatic duct into a hydatid cyst in a woman with known hydatid disease and choledocholithiasis. The increased intra-luminal pressure in the biliary tree caused the rupture into the adjacent hydatid cyst. The creation of the fistula between the right hepatic duct and the hydatid cyst decompressed the biliary tree, decreased the bilirubin levels and offered a temporary resolution of the obstructive jaundice. Rupture of a hydatid cyst into the biliary tree usually leads to biliary colic, cholangitis and jaundice. However, in case of obstructive jaundice due to choledocholithiasis, it is possible that the cyst may rupture by other way around while offering the patient a temporary relief from his symptoms. PMID:22876065

  17. Primary hydatid cyst of the brain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Nebi; Kiymaz, Nejmi; Etlik, Omer; Yazici, Taner

    2006-08-01

    A 26-year-old woman in the 28th week of pregnancy presented with a primary cerebral hydatid cyst manifesting as deteriorating consciousness and weakness in the left arm and leg. Cranial computed tomography revealed an intracranial hydatid cyst. The cyst was surgically removed and albendazole was administered. The patient had a spontaneous vaginal term delivery and no problem was observed in the mother or child. No primary focus was found in the lungs, liver, and other organs. Hydatid cyst is still an important disease. Intracranial hydatid cyst without primary foci in organs such as the liver and lungs is very rare. Primary cerebral hydatid cyst during pregnancy can be successfully treated by surgical and medical intervention. PMID:16936466

  18. Non-parasitic splenic cysts: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    A, Macheras; EP, Misiakos; T, Liakakos; D, Mpistarakis; C, Fotiadis; G, Karatzas

    2005-01-01

    Primary splenic cyst is a relatively rare disease, and the majority of cases are classified as epithelial cysts. Three cases with nonparasitic splenic cysts are presented: two epithelial and one pseudocyst. All cases had an atypical symptomatology, consisted mainly of fullness in the left upper abdomen and a palpable mass. Preoperative diagnosis was established with ultrasonography and computerized tomography. Two cases with large cysts located in the splenic hilum were treated with open complete splenectomy. The most recent case, a pseudocyst, was managed laparoscopically with partial cystectomy. All cases did not have any problems or recurrence during follow-up. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy is an acceptable procedure for the treatment of splenic cysts, because it cures the disease preserving the splenic tissue. Complete splenectomy is reserved for cases in which cyst excision cannot be done otherwise. PMID:16425403

  19. Melanosis peritonei associated with enteric duplication cyst. A case report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y C; Chen, C J; Tzeng, C C

    1996-02-01

    Melanosis peritonei is extremely rare, and only five cases have been reported in the English literature, four in association with ovarian dermoid cysts, and one with a peritoneal cyst. We describe an additional case occurring in a girl two years of age who also had an enteric cyst. This is the first reported case of melanosis peritonei not associated with an ovarian teratoma, but with an enteric duplication cyst. Melanophages were present focally in the submucosa, superficial muscle layer, and ulcer bases of the cyst and extensively as small nodules on the peritoneal surface and in the omentum. The tendency of perivascular nodular aggregation of melanophages favors a hematogenous (or lymphatic) spread rather than implantation. Although clear evidence of melanocytic aggregation is lacking, are speculate that the melanin originated from the esophageal-like squamous mucosa of the cyst. PMID:8554107

  20. Epidermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mohan; Shenoy, Nandita; Poojary, Dharnappa; Mohan, Ram; Naik, Ramdas

    2014-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are malformations that are rarely seen in the oral cavity. An intraoral dermoid cyst grows slowly, but may enlarge and interfere with deglutition and speech, or can pose a critical risk to the airway and therefore require immediate surgical intervention. Dermoid cysts may develop above or below the mylohyoid muscle, causing a submental or submandibular swelling. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is rare. An intraoral approach for the treatment of large lesions presenting above the mylohyoid muscle provides good cosmetic and functional results. We report a case of a 26-year-old female who developed an epidermoid cyst presenting as a large sublingual swelling causing speech and swallowing difficulties. The lesion was surgically excised using an intraoral approach. Microscopic examination revealed a dermoid cyst of the epidermoid type. This case shows that dermoid cysts may be successfully diagnosed and managed using a series of simple yet effective clinical procedure. PMID:25298725